WorldWideScience

Sample records for stable layer development

  1. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  2. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled:

    Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow

    H.A.M. Sterk

    Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015

    Summary

    The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs

  3. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  4. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  5. Large-eddy simulation of stable atmospheric boundary layers to develop better turbulence closures for climate and weather models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Zeid, Elie; Huang, Jing; Golaz, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-01

    A disconnect remains between our improved physical understanding of boundary layers stabilized by buoyancy and how we parameterize them in coarse atmospheric models. Most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing in such conditions to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. Using Large-eddy simulation, we revisit some of the basic challenges in parameterizing stable atmospheric boundary layers: eddy-viscosity closure is found to be more reliable due to an improved alignment of vertical Reynolds stresses and mean strains under stable conditions, but the dependence of the magnitude of the eddy viscosity on stability is not well represented by several models tested here. Thus, we propose a new closure that reproduces the different stability regimes better. Subsequently, tests of this model in the GFDL's single-column model (SCM) are found to yield good agreement with LES results in idealized steady-stability cases, as well as in cases with gradual and sharp changes of stability with time.

  6. Unconditionally stable perfectly matched layer boundary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2007-01-01

    A brief review is given of a systematic, product-formula based approach to construct unconditionally stable algorithms for solving the time-dependent Maxwell equations. The fundamental difficulties that arise when we want to incorporate uniaxial perfectly matched layer boundary conditions into this

  7. A new first-order turbulence mixing model for the stable atmospheric boundary-layer: development and testing in large-eddy and single column models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Golaz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of the stably-stratified atmospheric boundary-layer is of crucial importance to different aspects of numerical weather prediction at regional scales and climate modeling at global scales, such as land-surface temperature forecasts, fog and frost prediction, and polar climate. It is well-known that most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing of the stable boundary-layer to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component under strong stability, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. In this study we develop and test a general turbulence mixing model of the stable boundary-layer which works under different stabilities and for steady as well as unsteady conditions. A-priori large-eddy simulation (LES) tests are presented to motivate and verify the new parameterization. Subsequently, an assessment of this model using the GFDL single-column model (SCM) is performed. Idealized test cases including continuously varying stability, as well as stability discontinuity, are used to test the new SCM against LES results. A good match of mean and flux profiles is found when the new parameterization is used, while other traditional first-order turbulence models using the concept of stability function perform poorly. SCM spatial resolution is also found to have little impact on the performance of the new turbulence closure, but temporal resolution is important and a numerical stability criterion based on the model time step is presented.

  8. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  9. Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, James C [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

  10. Development of boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layers develop along the blade surfaces on both the pressure and the suction side in a non-stationary flow field. This is due to the fact that there is a strongly fluctuating flow on the downstream blade row, especially as a result of the wakes of the upstream blade row. The author investigates the formation of boundary layers under non-stationary flow conditions and tries to establish a model describing the non-stationary boundary layer. For this purpose, plate boundary layers are measured, at constant flow rates but different interferent frequency and variable pressure gradients. By introducing the sample technique, measurements of the non-stationary boundary layer become possible, and the flow rate fluctuation can be divided in its components, i.e. stochastic turbulence and periodical fluctuation. (GL) [de

  11. Improved Atmospheric Stable Boundary Layer Formulations for Navy Seasonal Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Long-term goals are to develop methods, descriptions and parameterizations that will alleviate long-standing problems in basically all large-scale numerical atmospheric models in dealing with statically stable and/or very stable conditions, and to implement these for Navy extended forecasting

  12. A rational method for developing and testing stable flexible indium- and vacuum-free multilayer tandem polymer solar cells comprising up to twelve roll processed layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Dam, Henrik Friis; Andreasen, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for the preparation of multijunction polymer solar cells without the use of vacuum evaporation methods or indium tin oxide (ITO). The entire layer stack is prepared by printing or coating of each layer. The number of layers typically employed in complete devices exceeds ten...... and were later encapsulated. In this study the same active material comprising poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester ([60]PCBM) was employed using nanoparticle based zinc oxide for electron selectivity and several different PEDOT:PSS formulations for hole selectivity...

  13. Turbulent heat flux measurements in thermally stable boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J.; van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable turbulent boundary layers are prevalent in the polar regions and nocturnal atmospheric surface layer but heat and momentum flux measurements in such flow are often difficult. Here, a new method is employed using a nanoscale cold-wire (T-NSTAP) adjacent to a 2D PIV light sheet to measure these fluxes within rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. This method combines the advantages of fast thermal frequency response with measurement of the spatial variation of the velocity field. Resolution is limited solely by the separation of the probe and the light sheet. The new technique is used to examine the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity over a range of Richardson numbers from weak to strongly stable. In addition, the velocity fields are conditionally averaged subject to strong deviations of temperature above and below the local average in an effort to determine the relationship between the coherent turbulent motions and the fluctuating temperature field. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  14. Improving Wind-Ramp Forecasts in the Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-06-01

    The viability of wind-energy generation is dependent on highly accurate numerical wind forecasts, which are impeded by inaccuracies in model representation of boundary-layer processes. This study revisits the basic theory of the Mellor, Yamada, Nakanishi, and Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer parametrization scheme, focusing on the onset of wind-ramp events related to nocturnal low-level jets. Modifications to the MYNN scheme include: (1) calculation of new closure parameters that determine the relative effects of turbulent energy production, dissipation, and redistribution; (2) enhanced mixing in the stable boundary layer when the mean wind speed exceeds a specified threshold; (3) explicit accounting of turbulent potential energy in the energy budget. A mesoscale model is used to generate short-term (24 h) wind forecasts for a set of 15 cases from both the U.S.A. and Germany. Results show that the new set of closure parameters provides a marked forecast improvement only when used in conjunction with the new mixing length formulation and only for cases that are originally under- or over-forecast (10 of the 15 cases). For these cases, the mean absolute error (MAE) of wind forecasts at turbine-hub height is reduced on average by 17%. A reduction in MAE values on average by 26% is realized for these same cases when accounting for the turbulent potential energy together with the new mixing length. This last method results in an average reduction by at least 13% in MAE values across all 15 cases.

  15. A stable boundary layer perspective on global temperature trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNider, R T; Christy, J R; Biazar, A

    2010-01-01

    temperatures in the stable boundary layer are not very robust measures of the heat content in the deep atmosphere and climate models do not predict minimum temperatures well, minimum temperatures should not be used as a surrogate for measures of deep atmosphere global warming.

  16. Comments on deriving the equilibrium height of the stable boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the equilibrium height of the stable boundary layer received much attention in a series of papers by Zilitinkevich and co-workers. In these studies the stable boundary-layer height is derived in terms of inverse interpolation of different boundary-layer height scales, each representing a

  17. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  18. Estimation of stable boundary-layer height using variance processing of backscatter lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    Stable boundary layer (SBL) is one of the most complex and less understood topics in atmospheric science. The type and height of the SBL is an important parameter for several applications such as understanding the formation of haze fog, and accuracy of chemical and pollutant dispersion models, etc. [1]. This work addresses nocturnal Stable Boundary-Layer Height (SBLH) estimation by using variance processing and attenuated backscatter lidar measurements, its principles and limitations. It is shown that temporal and spatial variance profiles of the attenuated backscatter signal are related to the stratification of aerosols in the SBL. A minimum variance SBLH estimator using local minima in the variance profiles of backscatter lidar signals is introduced. The method is validated using data from HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany [2], under different atmospheric conditions. This work has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, FP7 People, ITN Marie Curie Actions Programme (2012-2016) in the frame of ITaRS project (GA 289923), H2020 programme under ACTRIS-2 project (GA 654109), the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness - European Regional Development Funds under TEC2015-63832-P project, and from the Generalitat de Catalunya (Grup de Recerca Consolidat) 2014-SGR-583. [1] R. B. Stull, An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology, chapter 12, Stable Boundary Layer, pp. 499-543, Springer, Netherlands, 1988. [2] U. Löhnert, J. H. Schween, C. Acquistapace, K. Ebell, M. Maahn, M. Barrera-Verdejo, A. Hirsikko, B. Bohn, A. Knaps, E. O'Connor, C. Simmer, A. Wahner, and S. Crewell, "JOYCE: Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution," Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., vol. 96, no. 7, pp. 1157-1174, 2015.

  19. Stable evaluation of Green's functions in cylindrically stratified regions with uniaxial anisotropic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H., E-mail: haksu.moon@gmail.com [ElectroScience Laboratory, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 (United States); Donderici, B., E-mail: burkay.donderici@halliburton.com [Sensor Physics & Technology, Halliburton Energy Services, Houston, TX 77032 (United States); Teixeira, F.L., E-mail: teixeira@ece.osu.edu [ElectroScience Laboratory, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We present a robust algorithm for the computation of electromagnetic fields radiated by point sources (Hertzian dipoles) in cylindrically stratified media where each layer may exhibit material properties (permittivity, permeability, and conductivity) with uniaxial anisotropy. Analytical expressions are obtained based on the spectral representation of the tensor Green's function based on cylindrical Bessel and Hankel eigenfunctions, and extended for layered uniaxial media. Due to the poor scaling of these eigenfunctions for extreme arguments and/or orders, direct numerical evaluation of such expressions can produce numerical instability, i.e., underflow, overflow, and/or round-off errors under finite precision arithmetic. To circumvent these problems, we develop a numerically stable formulation through suitable rescaling of various expressions involved in the computational chain, to yield a robust algorithm for all parameter ranges. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the robustness of the formulation including cases of practical interest.

  20. Stable evaluation of Green's functions in cylindrically stratified regions with uniaxial anisotropic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, H.; Donderici, B.; Teixeira, F. L.

    2016-11-01

    We present a robust algorithm for the computation of electromagnetic fields radiated by point sources (Hertzian dipoles) in cylindrically stratified media where each layer may exhibit material properties (permittivity, permeability, and conductivity) with uniaxial anisotropy. Analytical expressions are obtained based on the spectral representation of the tensor Green's function based on cylindrical Bessel and Hankel eigenfunctions, and extended for layered uniaxial media. Due to the poor scaling of these eigenfunctions for extreme arguments and/or orders, direct numerical evaluation of such expressions can produce numerical instability, i.e., underflow, overflow, and/or round-off errors under finite precision arithmetic. To circumvent these problems, we develop a numerically stable formulation through suitable rescaling of various expressions involved in the computational chain, to yield a robust algorithm for all parameter ranges. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the robustness of the formulation including cases of practical interest.

  1. Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98) : a report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradelles, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Jorgensem, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable boundary

  2. Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (SABLES 98): A report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable...

  3. Efficient and stable perfectly matched layer for CEM

    KAUST Repository

    Duru, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    An efficient unsplit perfectly matched layer for numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves in unbounded domains is derived via a complex change of variables. In order to surround a Cartesian grid with the PML, the time-dependent PML requires only one (scalar) auxiliary variable in two space dimensions and six (scalar) auxiliary variables in three space dimensions. It is therefore cheap and straightforward to implement. We use Fourier and energy methods to prove the stability of the PML. We extend the stability result to a semi-discrete PML approximated by central finite differences of arbitrary order of accuracy and to a fully discrete problem for the \\'Leap-Frog\\' schemes. This makes precise the usefulness of the derived PML model for longtime simulations. Numerical experiments are presented, illustrating the accuracy and stability of the PML. © 2013 IMACS.

  4. Development of a Safety Management Web Tool for Horse Stables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppälä, Jarkko; Kolstrup, Christina Lunner; Pinzke, Stefan; Rautiainen, Risto; Saastamoinen, Markku; Särkijärvi, Susanna

    2015-11-12

    Managing a horse stable involves risks, which can have serious consequences for the stable, employees, clients, visitors and horses. Existing industrial or farm production risk management tools are not directly applicable to horse stables and they need to be adapted for use by managers of different types of stables. As a part of the InnoEquine project, an innovative web tool, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. A literature review, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were carried out to support the design. The InnoHorse web tool includes a safety section containing a horse stable safety map, stable safety checklists, and examples of good practices in stable safety, horse handling and rescue planning. This new horse stable safety management tool can also help in organizing work processes in horse stables in general.

  5. Necessary Conditions For Establishing Quasi-Stable Double Layers in Earth's Auroral Upward Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, D. S.; Newman, D.; Ergun, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Observations from the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) spacecraft indicate that a strong localized electric field often exists at the boundary between the ionosphere and auroral cavity in the upward current region. The observed electric field structures are found to have widths that are on the order of tens of electron Debye lengths and have components both parallel and perpendicular to Earth’s magnetic field and are therefore said to be an “oblique” electric field. These oblique electric fields have previously been modeled by static BGK double layer solutions. Dynamic Vlasov simulations have shown that a non-oblique double layer models the parallel component of the observed electric field structures well, is quasi-stable and persists long enough to account for the often observed ion phase space holes in the auroral cavity. However, to date, it has not been clear how an oblique double layer can form and remain quasi-stable. Using an open boundary 1D3V particle-in-cell simulation, we present a parameter study of over 20 simulations in which we vary cold electron density and temperature and show the necessary conditions for maintaining both oblique and non-oblique double layers at the lower boundary of the upward current region. The simulation includes an assumed density cavity, hot auroral cavity electrons, cold ionospheric electrons, a hot H+ component and anti-earthward traveling H+ and O+ ion beams. We do not assume that any localized potential drop initially exists. Rather, if a DL forms, it does so self-consistently at the interface of the dense ionosphere and tenuous auroral cavity. Based on the PIC results, we find that the oblique double layer requires a cold (< 5 eV) ionospheric electron population to remain quasi-stable. We also compare the shape of the simulated double layer with observed double layers and show that the observed asymmetric shape can also be explained by the temperature and density of the cold ionospheric electrons. We will also present

  6. Intermittent turbulence and oscillations in the stable boundary layer over land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.

    2002-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates, our main subject of interest is: "Intermittent turbulence and oscillation in the stable boundary layer over land". As such, this theme connects the different chapters. Here, intermittent turbulence is defined as a sequence of events were 'burst' of

  7. Towards a climatology of orographic induced wave drag in the stable boundary layer over real terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.A.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Nappo, C.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) is of particular interest for numerous environmental issues as air quality, aviation, fog forecasting, wind energy engineering, and climate modelling. Unfortunately the current understanding of the SBL is still rather poor, and progress is slow. The relatively poor

  8. Layered bismuth selenide utilized as hole transporting layer for highly stable organic photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Zhongcheng

    2015-11-01

    Abstract Layered bismuth selenide (L-Bi2Se3) nanoplates were implemented as hole transporting layers (HTLs) for inverted organic solar cells. Device based on L-Bi2Se3 showed increasing power conversion efficiency (PCE) during ambient condition storage process. A PCE of 4.37% was finally obtained after 5 days storage, which outperformed the ones with evaporated-MoO3 using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as donor material and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) as acceptor. The improved device efficiency can be attributed to the high conductivity and increasing work function of L-Bi2Se3. The work function of L-Bi2Se3 increased with the storage time in ambient condition due to the oxygen atom doping. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were conducted to verify the increased work function, which originated from the p-type doping process. The device based on L-Bi2Se3 exhibited excellent stability in ambient condition up to 4 months, which was much improved compared to the device based on traditional HTLs. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Young Kim, Woo, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  10. Highly efficient and stable inverted perovskite solar cell employing PEDOT:GO composite layer as a hole transport layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jae Choul; Hong, Ji A; Jung, Eui Dae; Kim, Da Bin; Baek, Soo-Min; Lee, Sukbin; Cho, Shinuk; Park, Sung Soo; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2018-01-18

    The beneficial use of a hole transport layer (HTL) as a substitution for poly(3,4-ethlyenedioxythiophene): polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) is regarded as one of the most important approaches for improving the stability and efficiency of inverted perovskite solar cells. Here, we demonstrate highly efficient and stable inverted perovskite solar cells by applying a GO-doped PEDOT:PSS (PEDOT:GO) film as an HTL. The high performance of this solar cell stems from the excellent optical and electrical properties of the PEDOT:GO film, including a higher electrical conductivity, a higher work function related to the reduced contact barrier between the perovskite layer and the PEDOT:GO layer, enhanced crystallinity of the perovskite crystal, and suppressed leakage current. Moreover, the device with the PEDOT:GO layer showed excellent long-term stability in ambient air conditions. Thus, the enhancement in the efficiency and the excellent stability of inverted perovskite solar cells are promising for the eventual commercialization of perovskite optoelectronic devices.

  11. Dispersion of radionuclides released into a stable planetary boundary layer using a Monte Carlo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, Abdul; Raza, S Shoaib; Irfan, Naseem

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a Monte Carlo model for describing the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides (represented by Lagrangian particles/neutral tracers) continuously released into a stable planetary boundary layer is presented. The effect of variation in release height and wind directional shear on plume dispersion is studied. The resultant plume concentration and dose rate at the ground is also calculated. The turbulent atmospheric parameters, like vertical profiles of fluctuating wind velocity components and eddy lifetime, were calculated using empirical relations for a stable atmosphere. The horizontal and vertical dispersion coefficients calculated by a numerical Lagrangian model are compared with the original and modified Pasquill-Gifford and Briggs empirical σs. The comparison shows that the Monte Carlo model can successfully predict dispersion in a stable atmosphere using the empirical turbulent parameters. The predicted ground concentration and dose rate contours indicate a significant increase in the affected area when wind shear is accounted for in the calculations

  12. Controllable growth of stable germanium dioxide ultra-thin layer by means of capacitively driven radio frequency discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarnas, P., E-mail: svarnas@ece.upatras.gr [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26 504, Patras (Greece); Botzakaki, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, Rion 26 504 (Greece); Skoulatakis, G.; Kennou, S.; Ladas, S. [Surface Science Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26 504 (Greece); Tsamis, C. [NCSR “Demokritos”, Institute of Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology & Microsystems, Aghia Paraskevi 15 310, Athens (Greece); Georga, S.N.; Krontiras, C.A. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, Rion 26 504 (Greece)

    2016-01-29

    It is well recognized that native oxide of germanium is hygroscopic and water soluble, while germanium dioxide is thermally unstable and it is converted to volatile germanium oxide at approximately 400 °C. Different techniques, implementing quite complicated plasma setups, gas mixtures and substrate heating, have been used in order to grow a stable germanium oxide. In the present work a traditional “RF diode” is used for germanium oxidation by cold plasma. Following growth, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that traditional capacitively driven radio frequency discharges, using molecular oxygen as sole feedstock gas, provide the possibility of germanium dioxide layer growth in a fully reproducible and controllable manner. Post treatment ex-situ analyses on day-scale periods disclose the stability of germanium oxide at room ambient conditions, offering thus the ability to grow (ex-situ) ultra-thin high-k dielectrics on top of germanium oxide layers. Atomic force microscopy excludes any morphological modification in respect to the bare germanium surface. These results suggest a simple method for a controllable and stable germanium oxide growth, and contribute to the challenge to switch to high-k dielectrics as gate insulators for high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and to exploit in large scale the superior properties of germanium as an alternative channel material in future technology nodes. - Highlights: • Simple one-frequency reactive ion etcher develops GeO{sub 2} thin layers controllably. • The layers remain chemically stable at ambient conditions over day-scale periods. • The layers are unaffected by the ex-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics onto them. • GeO{sub 2} oxidation and high-k deposition don't affect the Ge morphology significantly. • These conditions contribute to improved Ge-based MOS structure fabrication.

  13. Stable interstitial layer to alleviate fatigue fracture of high nickel cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengkai; Shao, Ruiwen; Mi, Yingying; Shen, Lanyao; Zhao, Binglu; wang, Qian; Wu, Kai; Lui, Wen; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Henghui

    2018-02-01

    High nickel cathodes can deliver higher capacity with lower cost than conventional LiCoO2, however, the irreversible structural and morphology degradation with long-term cycling hinder their further application. In this paper, LiNi0.815Co0.15Al0.035O2 agglomerates are treated by LiNi0.333Co0.333Mn0.333O2 coating to get a stable interstitial layer without capacity loss. The interstitial layer is about 10 nm in thickness and has a layered (R-3m) structure, which can improve the chemical and mechanical stability of cathode materials with capacity retention of 88.5% after 200 cycles. The structural analysis and in-situ compression test proves that the morphology degradation is a fatigue process within long-term electrochemical reaction, and the coated sample has an excellent elastic recovery capacity thus leading to long cycle life.

  14. Numerical study of aircraft wake vortex evolution near ground in stable atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengda LIN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The evolutions of aircraft wake vortices near ground in stable atmospheric boundary layer are studied by Large Eddy Simulation (LES. The sensitivity of vortex evolution to the Monin-Obukhov (M-O scale is studied for the first time. The results indicate that increasing stability leads to longer lifetimes of upwind vortices, while downwind vortices will decay faster due to a stronger crosswind shear under stable conditions. Based on these results, an empirical model of the vortex lifetime as a function of 10-m-high crosswind and the M-O scale is summarized. This model can provide an estimate of the upper boundary of the vortex lifetime according to the real-time crosswind and atmospheric stability. In addition, the lateral translation of vortices is also inspected. The results show that vortices can travel a furthest distance of 722 m in the currently-studied parameter range. This result is meaningful to safety analysis of airports that have parallel runways. Keywords: Aerodynamics, Aircraft, Aircraft wake vortex, Large eddy simulation, Stable atmosphere boundary layer

  15. Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide as Highly Stable Electron Collection Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingyue; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xiaochong; Tai, Meiqian; Li, Jingfeng; Li, Jianbao; Li, Xin; Lin, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although low-temperature, solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) has been widely adopted as the electron collection layer (ECL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because of its simple synthesis and excellent electrical properties such as high charge mobility, the thermal stability of the perovskite films deposited atop ZnO layer remains as a major issue. Herein, we addressed this problem by employing aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as the ECL and obtained extraordinarily thermally stable perovskite layers. The improvement of the thermal stability was ascribed to diminish of the Lewis acid-base chemical reaction between perovskite and ECL. Notably, the outstanding transmittance and conductivity also render AZO layer as an ideal candidate for transparent conductive electrodes, which enables a simplified cell structure featuring glass/AZO/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. Optimization of the perovskite layer leads to an excellent and repeatable photovoltaic performance, with the champion cell exhibiting an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.94 V, a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 20.2 mA cm(-2), a fill factor (FF) of 0.67, and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.6% under standard 1 sun illumination. It was also revealed by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence that the AZO/perovskite interface resulted in less quenching than that between perovskite and hole transport material.

  16. Penetration of steady fluid motions into an outer stable layer excited by MHD thermal convection in rotating spherical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Youhei

    2018-03-01

    Penetration of steady magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) disturbances into an upper strongly stratified stable layer excited by MHD thermal convection in rotating spherical shells is investigated. The theoretical model proposed by Takehiro (2015) is reexamined in the case of steady fluid motion below the bottom boundary. Steady disturbances penetrate into a density stratified MHD fluid existing in the semi-infinite region in the vertical direction. The axis of rotation of the system is tilted with respect to the vertical. The basic magnetic field is uniform and may be tilted with respect to the vertical and the rotation axis. Linear dispersion relation shows that the penetration distance with zero frequency depends on the amplitude of Alfvén wave speed. When Alfvén wave speed is small, viscous diffusion becomes dominant and penetration distance is similar to the horizontal scale of the disturbance at the lower boundary. In contrast, when Alfvén wave speed becomes larger, disturbance can penetrate deeper, and penetration distance becomes proportional to the Alfvén wave speed and inversely proportional to the geometric average of viscous and magnetic diffusion coefficients and to the total horizontal wavenumber. The analytic expression of penetration distance is in good agreement with the extent of penetration of mean zonal flow induced by finite amplitude convection in a rotating spherical shell with an upper stably stratified layer embedded in an axially uniform basic magnetic field. The theory expects that the stable layer suggested in the upper part of the outer core of the earth could be penetrated completely by mean zonal flows excited by thermal/compositional convection developing below the stable layer.

  17. NDAS Hardware Translation Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaretian, Ryan N.; Holladay, Wendy T.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Data Acquisition System (NDAS) project is aimed to replace all DAS software for NASA s Rocket Testing Facilities. There must be a software-hardware translation layer so the software can properly talk to the hardware. Since the hardware from each test stand varies, drivers for each stand have to be made. These drivers will act more like plugins for the software. If the software is being used in E3, then the software should point to the E3 driver package. If the software is being used at B2, then the software should point to the B2 driver package. The driver packages should also be filled with hardware drivers that are universal to the DAS system. For example, since A1, A2, and B2 all use the Preston 8300AU signal conditioners, then the driver for those three stands should be the same and updated collectively.

  18. Thermally Stable Mesoporous Perovskite Solar Cells Incorporating Low-Temperature Processed Graphene/Polymer Electron Transporting Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shi Wun; Balapanuru, Janardhan; Fu, Deyi; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-11-02

    In the short time since its discovery, perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have attained high power conversion efficiency but their lack of thermal stability remains a barrier to commercialization. Among the experimentally accessible parameter spaces for optimizing performance, identifying an electron transport layer (ETL) that forms a thermally stable interface with perovskite and which is solution-processable at low-temperature will certainly be advantageous. Herein, we developed a mesoporous graphene/polymer composite with these advantages when used as ETL in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 PSCs, and a high efficiency of 13.8% under AM 1.5G solar illumination could be obtained. Due to the high heat transmission coefficient and low isoelectric point of mesoporous graphene-based ETL, the PSC device enjoys good chemical and thermal stability. Our work demonstrates that the mesoporous graphene-based scaffold is a promising ETL candidate for high performance and thermally stable PSCs.

  19. Stable Aspects in Robot Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Brugali

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the concept of software “stability” applied to robot systems. We define “stable” a family of systems modelled, designed and implemented so that specific applications of the family may be developed re-using, adapting and specializing knowledge, architecture and existing components. During the last few years, many ideas and technologies of software engineering (e.g. modularity, OO development and design patterns were introduced in the development of robotic systems to improve the “stability” property. All these ideas and technologies are important. Nevertheless, they model robotic systems along a unique direction: the functional decomposition of parts. Unfortunately, there are concerns of robotic systems that relate to the systems as a whole hence crosscutting their modular structure. The Aspect Oriented Software Development is a recently emerged approach for modelling, designing and encapsulating the above-mentioned crosscutting concerns (aspects. We contend that stability must be based on a careful domain analysis and on a multidimensional modelling of different and recurring aspects of robot systems.

  20. Use of SU8 as a stable and biocompatible adhesion layer for gold bioelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarèse, Bruno F E; Feyen, Paul L C; Falco, Aniello; Benfenati, Fabio; Lugli, Paolo; deMello, John C

    2018-04-03

    Gold is the most widely used electrode material for bioelectronic applications due to its high electrical conductivity, good chemical stability and proven biocompatibility. However, it adheres only weakly to widely used substrate materials such as glass and silicon oxide, typically requiring the use of a thin layer of chromium between the substrate and the metal to achieve adequate adhesion. Unfortunately, this approach can reduce biocompatibility relative to pure gold films due to the risk of the underlying layer of chromium becoming exposed. Here we report on an alternative adhesion layer for gold and other metals formed from a thin layer of the negative-tone photoresist SU-8, which we find to be significantly less cytotoxic than chromium, being broadly comparable to bare glass in terms of its biocompatibility. Various treatment protocols for SU-8 were investigated, with a view to attaining high transparency and good mechanical and biochemical stability. Thermal annealing to induce partial cross-linking of the SU-8 film prior to gold deposition, with further annealing after deposition to complete cross-linking, was found to yield the best electrode properties. The optimized glass/SU8-Au electrodes were highly transparent, resilient to delamination, stable in biological culture medium, and exhibited similar biocompatibility to glass.

  1. Testing stable boundary layer parameterizations against the BASE:ALFA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafè, G.; Tampieri, F.; di Giuseppe, F.; Caporaso, L.

    2010-09-01

    The Po valley in the Northern Italy is a large plain in a semi-closed basin surrounded by complex orography; the Alps to the North and Apennines to the South-East, and closed to the east by the Adriatic sea. As a flatland basin shielded by mountains, calm wind is very frequent and strong temperature inversions are often observed near the ground, during the night and in the winter period the occurrence of a extremely stable boundary layer is common. A complete set of surface and atmospheric measurements have been collected during a four month observational program carried out at San Pietro Capofiume meteo station, in the middle of the Po Valley. The long term dataset has been collected in the contest of the project BASE:ALFA with the main aim of creating a data pool of micro-meteorological /soil data to test and validate numerical weather prediction PBL schemes. The measurement periods span summer, winter and spring and allows to analyse a wide range of PBL stability conditions. Different parameterizations of first and second order moments of velocity and temperature are tested against the collected data. A particular focus is given to stable boundary layer and the values of its height obtained from Nieuwstadt 1984 and Zilitinkievich et al 2005 formulas will be provided and compared against radiosounding profile estimates.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Protection: A Path to Stable and Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Andrew G; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    A fundamental challenge in developing photoelectrochemical cells for the renewable production of solar chemicals and fuels is the simultaneous requirement of efficient light absorption and robust stability under corrosive conditions. Schemes for corrosion protection of semiconductor photoelectrodes such as silicon using deposited layers were proposed and attempted for several decades, but increased operational lifetimes were either insufficient or the resulting penalties for device efficiency were prohibitive. In recent years, advances in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin coatings have made novel materials engineering possible, leading to substantial and simultaneous improvements in stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. The self-limiting, layer-by-layer growth of ALD makes thin films with low pinhole densities possible and may also provide a path to defect control that can generalize this protection technology to a large set of materials necessary to fully realize photoelectrochemical cell technology for artificial photosynthesis.

  3. A Study of stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer over highveld South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhunga, P; Djolov, G [University of Pretoria (South Africa); Esau, I, E-mail: george.djolov@up.ac.z

    2010-08-15

    The study is part of the South African - Norwegian Programme for Research and Co-operation Phase II 'Analysis and Possibility for Control of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes to Facilitate Adaptation to Environmental Changes'. The research strategy of the project is based on 4 legged approach. 1) Application and further development of contemporary atmospheric boundary layer theory. 2) Use of modeling based on large eddy simulation techniques. 3) Experimental investigation of turbulent fluxes. 4) Training and developing academics capable of dealing with the present and new challenges. The paper presents some preliminary results on the micrometeorological variability of the basic meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes.

  4. Influence of tall vegetation canopy on turbulence kinetic energy budget in the stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Karmen; Rotach, Mathias W.

    2017-04-01

    While a considerable amount of research has been done on turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget studies in the surface layer over horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surfaces, little research focused on budgets above heterogeneous and rough surfaces. Only few studies have investigated TKE budgets above fetch-limited forest focusing on statically neutral conditions, while studies in the stable boundary layer (SBL) are still scarce in the literature. Therefore, we present turbulence characteristics above tall, deciduous forest in the wintertime SBL and make a comparison with a well-known results of HHF terrain. Turbulence measurements performed at five levels above the canopy height (approximately h = 18 m) allowed the investigation of combined influence of the roughness sublayer (RSL) found above tall vegetation and the internal boundary layer (IBL) on the TKE budget terms. Each term of the TKE budget is investigated within the framework of local similarity theory. Kolomogorov's similarity hypothesis assumes local isotropy within the inertial subrange. Testing the local isotropy hypothesis more thoroughly resulted in a ratio of the horizontal spectral densities (Sv/Su) approaching the 4/3, while the ratio of the vertical to the longitudinal spectral density (Sw/Su) was less than 1 for all levels indicating an anisotropic turbulence above the canopy. As a consequence, estimated values of TKE dissipation rate (ɛ) for the vertical component (ɛw) were smaller (underestimated) compared to the ɛ estimates obtained from the horizontal velocity components. This finding has a direct influence on the applicability of classical Kansas spectral models valid for HHF terrain as well as on the budget of wind variances. Additionally, the dimensionless wind shear function associated with "Kolmogorov turbulence" (existence of a well-defined inertial subrange with -5/3 slopes) was found to depart from linear prediction suggesting that the stability is a stronger determinant of

  5. Stable non-covalent labeling of layered silicate nanoparticles for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Gysell M; Jack, Kevin S; Musumeci, Anthony W; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-04-01

    Layered silicate nanoparticles (LSN) are widely used in industrial applications and consumer products. They also have potential benefits in biomedical applications such as implantable devices and for drug delivery. To study how nanomaterials interact with cells and tissues, techniques to track and quantify their movement through different biological compartments are essential. While radiolabels can be very sensitive, particularly for in vivo studies, fluorescent labeling has been preferred in recent years because of the array of methods available to image and quantify fluorescent nanoparticles. However, labeling can be problematic, especially if it alters the physical properties of the nanomaterial. Herein is described a novel non-covalent labeling technique for LSN using readily available fluorescent dimeric cyanine dyes without the need to use excess amounts of dye to achieve labeling, or the need for removal of unbound dye. The approach utilizes the cationic binding properties of layered silicate clays and the multiple quaternary nitrogens associated with the dyes. Preparation of YOYO-1 labeled LSN with optimal dispersion in aqueous media is presented. The utilization of the labeled particles is then demonstrated in cell binding and uptake studies using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The labeled LSN are highly fluorescent, stable and exhibit identical physical properties with respect to the unlabeled nanoparticles. The general approach described here is applicable to other cyanine dyes and may be utilized more widely for labeling nanoparticles that comprise a crystalline plate structure with a high binding capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stable BC 2N nanostructures: low-temperature production of segregated C/BN layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler-Redlich, Ph.; Terrones, M.; Manteca-Diego, C.; Hsu, W. K.; Terrones, H.; Rühle, M.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1999-09-01

    Stable filaments of nanometer dimensions with overall chemical stoichiometry close to BC 2N were generated by pyrolysis of CH 3CN·BCl 3 over Co at 1000°C and, for the first time, their structures were investigated, at the nanometer level, using high spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Concentration profiles, along and across the filaments, revealed that B, C and N are not homogeneously distributed within the nanostructures but are separated into pure C and BN domains. Interestingly, pure h-BN layers are always sandwiched between graphite-like shells. A two-stage growth process is proposed involving: (a) initial extrusion of a pure carbon filament from the catalytic particle, followed by (b) subsequent thickening of the BN and C layers precipitated from the gas phase. This pyrolytic technique provides an alternative and efficient route to segregated BN/C nanomaterials, which may prove useful as robust nanocomposites and semiconductor nanodevices with enhanced resistance towards oxidation.

  7. Stable isotope evidence for the Bottom Convective Layer homogeneity in the Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, Alexander V; Dubinina, Elena O; Demidova, Tatyana P; Kokryatskaya, Nataliya M; Rimskaya-Korsakova, Maria N; Kosova, Sofia A; Yakushev, Evgeniy V

    2014-01-01

    The Black Sea is the largest euxinic basin on the Earth. The anoxic zone consists of the upper part water mass stratified by density, and the lower water mass homogenized relative to density (depth >1750 m), named the Bottom Convective Layer. To assess homogeneity and possible exchange of matter across the upper and lower boundaries of the Bottom Convective Layer, new data on stable isotope composition of S, O and H were obtained. Samples were collected in August 2008 and March 2009 from two stations located in the eastern central part of the Black Sea. Distribution of δ(18)O and δD values of water for the entire water column did not vary seasonally. Appreciable differences were marked for δD value variation in the picnocline area (water depth 200-400 m) and in the BCL 5 m above the bottom that might be caused by penetration of intrusions with elevated portion of shelf modified Mediterranean Water. Observed linear relationship between δ(18)O (or δD) and salinity indicates that mixing water and salt occurs at the same time, and the deep water of the Black Sea has two end members: the high-salinity Mediterranean seawater and freshwater input. In the Bottom Convective Layer, the average δ(34)S (H2S) was -40.6 ± 0.5‰ and did not vary seasonally. At the bottom (depth > 2000 m), (34)S depletion down to -41.0‰ was observed. Our δ(34)S (SO4) data are by 2-3‰ higher than those measured previously for the Bottom Convective Layer. Sulfate from the aerobic zone with δ(34)S (SO4) = +21‰ corresponds to ocean water sulfate and that has not been subjected to sulfate reduction. Average δ(34)S (SO4) values for depths > 1250 m were found to be +23.0 ± 0.2‰ (1σ). Sulfur isotope composition of sulfate does not change in the Bottom Convective Layer and on its upper and lower boundaries, and does not depend on the season of observation.

  8. A Tri-Layer Proton-Conducting Electrolyte for Chemically Stable Operation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-10-07

    Two BaZr0.7Pr0.1Y0.2O3-δ (BZPY) layers were used to sandwich a BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BCY) layer to produce a tri-layer electrolyte consisting of BZPY/BCY/BZPY. The BZPY layers significantly improved the chemical stability of the BCY electrolyte layer, which was not stable when tested alone, suggesting that the BZPY layer effectively protected the BCY layer from CO2 reaction, which is the major problem of BCY-based materials. A fuel cell with this sandwiched electrolyte supported on a Ni-based composite anode showed a reasonable cell performance, reaching 185 mW cm-2 at 700 oC, in spite of the relatively large electrolyte thickness (about 65 µm).

  9. Development of stable marker-free nuclear transformation strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To avoid the negative effects caused by the marker genes, we tried to develop a stable marker-free nuclear transformation system in Chlorella. For this, linear gene expression cassettes (LGEC) were constructed with functional domains, which are responsible for transformation, of SV40 large T antigen. The LGECs were ...

  10. The meteorology and chemistry of high nitrogen oxide concentrations in the stable boundary layer at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, William; Crawford, Jim; Buhr, Marty; Nicovich, John; Chen, Gao; Davis, Douglas

    2018-03-01

    high accumulation of NO. This may occur via the non-linear HOX-NOx chemistry proposed after the first ISCAT field programs and NOx recycling to the surface where quantum yields may be large under the low-snow-accumulation regime of the Antarctic plateau. During the 2003 field program a sodar made direct measurements of the stable boundary layer depth (BLD), a key factor in explaining the chemistry of the high NO concentrations. Because direct measurements were not available in the other years, we developed an estimator for BLD using direct observations obtained in 2003 and step-wise linear regression with meteorological data from a 22 m tower (that was tested against independent data obtained in 1993). These data were then used with assumptions about the column abundance of NO to estimate surface fluxes of NOx. These results agreed in magnitude with results at Concordia Station and confirmed significant daily, intraseasonal and interannual variability in NO and its flux from the snow surface. Finally, we found that synoptic to mesoscale eddies governed the boundary layer circulation and accumulation pathways for NO at the SP rather than katabatic forcing. It was the small-scale features of the circulation including the transition from cloudy to clear conditions that set the stage for short-term extremes in NO, whereas larger-scale features were associated with more moderate concentrations.

  11. Development of O-18 stable isotope separation technology using membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Woo; Kim, Taek Soo; Choi, Hwa Rim; Park, Sung Hee; Lee, Ki Tae; Chang, Dae Shik

    2006-06-15

    The ultimate goal of this investigation is to develop the separation technology for O-18 oxygen stable isotope used in a cyclotron as a target for production of radioisotope F-18. F-18 is a base material for synthesis of [F-18]FDG radio-pharmaceutical, which is one of the most important tumor diagnostic agent used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography). More specifically, this investigation is focused on three categories as follow, 1) development of the membrane distillation isotope separation process to re-enrich O-18 stable isotope whose isotopic concentration is reduced after used in a cyclotron, 2) development of organic impurity purification technology to remove acetone, methanol, ethanol, and acetonitrile contained in a used cyclotron O-18 enriched target water, and 3) development of a laser absorption spectroscopic system for analyzing oxygen isotopic concentration in water.

  12. Development of Laser Application Technology for Stable Isotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Do Young; Ko, Kwang Hoon; Kwon, Duck Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Tl-203 is used as a source material to produce Tl-201 radioisotope which is produced in a cyclotron by irradiating the enriched Tl-203 target. Tl-201 is a radiopharmaceutical for SPECT (single photon emission computerized tomography) to diagnose heart diseases and tumors. This Project aim to develop laser application technology to product stable isotopes such as Tl-203, Yb-168, and Yb-176. For this, photoion extraction device, atomic beam generator, dye lasers, and high power IR lasers are developed.

  13. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debruin, H.A.R.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, ¿u and ¿T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it

  14. A stable high-order perturbation of surfaces method for numerical simulation of diffraction problems in triply layered media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Youngjoon, E-mail: hongy@uic.edu; Nicholls, David P., E-mail: davidn@uic.edu

    2017-02-01

    The accurate numerical simulation of linear waves interacting with periodic layered media is a crucial capability in engineering applications. In this contribution we study the stable and high-order accurate numerical simulation of the interaction of linear, time-harmonic waves with a periodic, triply layered medium with irregular interfaces. In contrast with volumetric approaches, High-Order Perturbation of Surfaces (HOPS) algorithms are inexpensive interfacial methods which rapidly and recursively estimate scattering returns by perturbation of the interface shape. In comparison with Boundary Integral/Element Methods, the stable HOPS algorithm we describe here does not require specialized quadrature rules, periodization strategies, or the solution of dense non-symmetric positive definite linear systems. In addition, the algorithm is provably stable as opposed to other classical HOPS approaches. With numerical experiments we show the remarkable efficiency, fidelity, and accuracy one can achieve with an implementation of this algorithm.

  15. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  16. Development of stable isotope separation technology for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Cheol Jung; Park, Kyung Bae

    2003-05-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to construct the domestic production system of stable isotopes O-18 and Tl-203 used as target materials in accelerator for the production of medical radioisotopes F-18 and Tl-201, respectively. In order to achieve this goal, diode laser spectroscopic analytical system was constructed and automatic measurement computer software for the direct analysis of H 2 16 O/H 2 18 O ratio were developed. Distillation process, laser process, and membrane diffusion process were analyzed for the evaluation of O-18 production. And electromagnetic process, plasma process, and laser process were analyzed for the evaluation of Tl-203 production. UV laser system, IR laser system, and detailed system Tl-203 production were designed. Finally, current and future worldwide demand/supply of stable isotopes O-18 and Tl-203 were estimated

  17. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  18. Recent developments in low cost stable structures for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, T.C.; Grastataro, C.; Smith, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) is advancing the development of low cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in spacecraft and stable structures. The use of advanced composites is well developed, but the application of an all-composite tracker structure has never been achieved. This paper investigates the application of composite technology to the design and fabrication of an all-composite spacecraft bus for small satellites, using technology directly applicable to central tracking in a high luminosity environment. The satellite program Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) is the second in a series of satellites to be launched into orbit for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper will discuss recent developments in the area of low cost composites, used for either spacecraft or ultra stable applications in high energy physics (HEP) detectors. The use of advanced composites is a relatively new development in the area of HEP. The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) spawned a new generation of Trackers which made extensive use of graphite fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite systems. LANL has designed a structure employing new fabrication technology. This concept will lower the cost of composite structures to a point that they may now compete with conventional materials. This paper will discuss the design, analysis and proposed fabrication of a small satellite structure. Central tracking structures using advanced materials capable of operating in an adverse environment typical of that found in a high luminosity collider could use identical concepts

  19. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alexander H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  20. Optical bi-stable shutter development/improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizon, J. L.; Haddad, N.; Castillo, R.

    2012-09-01

    Two of the VLT instruments (Giraffe and VIMOS) are using the large magnetic E/150 from Prontor (with an aperture diameter of 150 mm). As we were facing an unacceptable number of failures with this component some improvement plan was discussed already in 2004. The final decision for starting this program was conditioned by the decision from the constructor to stop the production. The opportunity was taken to improve the design building a fully bi-stable mechanism in order to reduce the thermal dissipation. The project was developed in collaboration between the two main ESO sites doing the best use of the manpower and of the technical capability available at the two centers. The project took advantage of the laser Mask Manufacturing Unit and the invar sheets used to prepare the VIMOS MOS mask to fabricate the shutter petals. Our paper describes the development including the intensive and long optimization period. To conclude this optimization we proceed with a long life test on two units. These units have demonstrate a very high level of reliability (up to 100 000 cycles without failure which can be estimated to an equivalent 6 years of operation of the instrument) A new bi-stable shutter driver and controller have also been developed. Some of the highlights of this unit are the fully configurable coil driving parameters, usage of braking strategy to dump mechanical vibration and reduce mechanical wearing, configurable usage of OPEN and CLOSE sensors, non volatile storage of parameters, user friendly front panel interface.

  1. Fabrication of stable electrode/diffusion barrier layers for thermoelectric filled skutterudite devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Qing; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed are methods for the manufacture of n-type and p-type filled skutterudite thermoelectric legs of an electrical contact. A first material of CoSi.sub.2 and a dopant are ball-milled to form a first powder which is thermo-mechanically processed with a second powder of n-type skutterudite to form a n-type skutterudite layer disposed between a first layer and a third layer of the doped-CoSi.sub.2. In addition, a plurality of components such as iron, and nickel, and at least one of cobalt or chromium are ball-milled form a first powder that is thermo-mechanically processed with a p-type skutterudite layer to form a p-type skutterudite layer "second layer" disposed between a first and a third layer of the first powder. The specific contact resistance between the first layer and the skutterudite layer for both the n-type and the p-type skutterudites subsequent to hot-pressing is less than about 10.0 .mu..OMEGA.cm.sup.2.

  2. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm−1 in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm−2 using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm−2. To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode. PMID:26648509

  3. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

  4. MoO3–Au composite interfacial layer for high efficiency and air-stable organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Hongbin; Zuo, Lijian; Fu, Weifei

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and stable polymer bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PC61BM) blend active layer have been fabricated with a MoO3–Au co-evaporation composite film as the anode interfacial layer (AIL). The optical...... resistance and thus improving the fill factor and efficiency of the devices. Additionally, the air stability of devices with different AILs (MoO3–Au composite, MoO3 and PEDOT:PSS) were studied and it was found that the MoO3–Au composite layer remarkably improved the stability of the solar cells with shelf...

  5. Characteristics of the turbulence in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J.; Zhang, L.; Yuan, G.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate determination of surface turbulent fluxes in a stable boundary layer is of great practical importance in weather prediction and climate simulations, as well as applications related to air pollution. To gain an insight into the characteristics of turbulence in a stable boundary layer over the complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, we analyzed the data from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). We proposed a method to identify and efficiently isolate nonstationary motions from turbulence series, and examined the characteristics of nonstationary motions (nonstationary motions refer to gusty events on a greater scale than local shear-generated turbulence). The occurrence frequency of nonstationary motions was found to depend on the mean flow, being more frequent in weak wind conditions and vanishing when the wind speed, U, was greater than 3.0 m s-1. When U exceeded the threshold value of 1.0 m s-1 for the gradient Richardson number Ri ≤ 0.3 and 1.5 m s-1 for Ri > 0.3, local shear-generated turbulence depended systematically on U with an average rate of 0.05 U. However, for the weak wind condition, neither the mean wind speed nor the stability was an important factor for local turbulence. Under the weak wind stable condition, affected by topography-induced nonstationary motions, the local turbulence was anisotropic with a strong horizontal fluctuation and a weak vertical fluctuation, resulting in weakened heat mixing in the vertical direction and stronger un-closure of energy. These findings accessed the validity of similarity theory in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain, and revealed one reason for the stronger un-closure of energy in the night.

  6. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  7. Prediction of the first stable compound with flat hexagonal tin layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Junping; Beaufils, Clement; Kolmogorov, Aleksey

    An analysis of stability trends in a large family of metal stannides has directed our attention towards a previously unknown compound featuring a backbone of flat hexagonal tin layers. Ab initio calculations show that this compound is at least metastable under ambient conditions and is furthermore stabilized under pressure. Compounds with such layered frameworks may possess exotic electronic properties and also serve as precursors for the synthesis of 2D derivatives. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-1410514.

  8. Ultra-stable clock laser system development towards space applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świerad, Dariusz; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Venon, Bertrand; Holleville, David; Bize, Sébastien; Kulosa, André; Bode, Sebastian; Singh, Yeshpal; Bongs, Kai; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Lodewyck, Jérôme; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2016-09-26

    The increasing performance of optical lattice clocks has made them attractive for scientific applications in space and thus has pushed the development of their components including the interrogation lasers of the clock transitions towards being suitable for space, which amongst others requires making them more power efficient, radiation hardened, smaller, lighter as well as more mechanically stable. Here we present the development towards a space-compatible interrogation laser system for a strontium lattice clock constructed within the Space Optical Clock (SOC2) project where we have concentrated on mechanical rigidity and size. The laser reaches a fractional frequency instability of 7.9 × 10 -16 at 300 ms averaging time. The laser system uses a single extended cavity diode laser that gives enough power for interrogating the atoms, frequency comparison by a frequency comb and diagnostics. It includes fibre link stabilisation to the atomic package and to the comb. The optics module containing the laser has dimensions 60 × 45 × 8 cm 3 ; and the ultra-stable reference cavity used for frequency stabilisation with its vacuum system takes 30 × 30 × 30 cm 3 . The acceleration sensitivities in three orthogonal directions of the cavity are 3.6 × 10 -10 /g, 5.8 × 10 -10 /g and 3.1 × 10 -10 /g, where g ≈ 9.8 m/s 2 is the standard gravitational acceleration.

  9. Air-stable ink for scalable, high-throughput layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Benjamin D; Connor, Stephen T; Cui, Yi

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing and depositing air-stable, easily decomposable, vulcanized ink on any of a wide range of substrates is disclosed. The ink enables high-volume production of optoelectronic and/or electronic devices using scalable production methods, such as roll-to-roll transfer, fast rolling processes, and the like.

  10. Displaced-beam small aperture scintillometer test: CASES-99 stable boundary layer experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.; DeBruin, H.A.R.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we investigated the performance of a displaced-beam small aperture scintillometer (DBSAS) - operated over a path length of 112 m - under stable conditions using data gathered during the CASES-99 experiment in Kansas, USA. The DBSAS has the advantage over the eddy covariance method that

  11. Study of stable atmospheric boundary layer characterization over highveld region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luhunga, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available : Earth and Environmental Science 13 (2010) 012012 doi:10.1088/1755-1315/13/1/012012 Businger JA, Wyngaard JC, Uzumi Y and EF Bradley, 1971, Flux-profile relationship in the atmospheric surface layer, J Atm Sci, 28, 181-189. Kolmogorov AN, 1941... ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER CHARACTERIZATION OVER HIGHVELD REGION OF SOUTH AFRICA Philbert Luhunga1, 2, 3, George Djolov1, Venkataraman Sivakumar1,4,5 1 University of Pretoria, Department of Geography Geoinformatics and Meterology, Lynnwood road, 0001...

  12. High-Efficiency and Stable Organic Solar Cells Enabled by Dual Cathode Buffer Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Lixin; Sun, Yansheng; Fan, Rui; Huang, Shahua; Zhao, Xiaohui; Li, Xiaowei; Fu, Guangsheng; Yang, Shaopeng

    2018-02-14

    Various cathode interface materials have been used in organic solar cells (OSCs) to realize high performance. However, most cathode interface materials have their respective weaknesses in maximizing the efficiency or stability of OSCs. Herein, three kinds of alcohol-soluble cathode interfacial materials are combined with bathocuproine (BCP) to serve as multifunctional bilayer cathode buffers for the regular OSCs, and thus greatly enhanced power conversion efficiencies over 10.11% and significantly improved device stability have been achieved. By utilizing double interlayers, both light absorption and light distribution in active layer are improved. Furthermore, double interlayers offer favorable energy-level alignment, alcohol treatment, and duplicate protection of active layer, resulting in significantly reduced leakage current, suppressed recombination, and efficient charge collection. The improved device stability is related to the blocking effect of the complex formed between BCP and the metal electrode and the additional protection effect of the underlying alcohol-soluble materials. In view of the universal use of alcohol-soluble organic electrolyte as cathode buffer layers and by courtesy of the superiority of the double cathode layers relative to the monolayer controls, the double interlayer strategy demonstrated here opens a new way to fully exploiting the potential of OSCs and is believed to be extended to a wider application.

  13. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition delivers more active and stable Pt-based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, H.V.; Grillo, F.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Bevaart, Ronald; Nguyên, V.T.; van der Linden, B.; Moulijn, J.A.; Makkee, M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    We tailored the size distribution of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene nanoplatelets at a given metal loading by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition carried out in a fluidized bed reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. The Pt NPs deposited at low temperature (100 °C) after 10 cycles

  14. Enhancing Color Purity and Stable Efficiency of White Organic Light Diodes by Using Hole-Blocking Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Jung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic light-emitting diodes with triple hole-blocking layer (THBL formation sandwich structure which generate white emission were fabricated. The 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnapthacene (Rubrene, (4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazolebiphenyl (CBP, and 4,4′-bis(2,2′diphenylvinil-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi were used as emitting materials in the device. The function of CBP layer is not only an emitting layer but also a hole-blocking layer (HBL, and the Rubrene was doped into the CBP. The optimal configuration structure was indium tin oxide (ITO/Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3 (5 nm/[4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-N-phenylamino]biphenyl (NPB (35 nm/CBP (HBL1 (5 nm/DPVBi (I (10 nm/CBP (HBL2 : Rubrene (4 : 1 (3 nm/DPVBi (II (30 nm/CBP (HBL3 (2 nm/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen (10 nm/Lithium fluoride (LiF/aluminum (Al. The result showed that the device with Rubrene doped in CBP (HBL2 exhibited a stable white emission with the color coordinates of (0.322, 0.368, and the coordinate with the slight shift of ±Δx,y = (0.001, 0.011 for applied voltage of 8–12 V was observed.

  15. Highly Efficient and Stable Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells with Metal Oxides Nanoparticle Charge Extraction Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mehrdad; Di Giacomo, Francesco; Zhang, Dong; Shanmugam, Santhosh; Senes, Alessia; Verhees, Wiljan; Hadipour, Afshin; Galagan, Yulia; Aernouts, Tom; Veenstra, Sjoerd; Andriessen, Ronn

    2018-02-09

    In this study, the fabrication of highly efficient and durable flexible inverted perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is reported. Presynthesized, solution-derived NiO x and ZnO nanoparticles films are employed at room temperature as a hole transport layer (HTL) and electron transport layer (ETL), respectively. The triple cation perovskite films are produced in a single step and for the sake of comparison, ultrasmooth and pinhole-free absorbing layers are also fabricated using MAPbI 3 perovskite. The triple cation perovskite cells exhibit champion power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 18.6% with high stabilized power conversion efficiency of 17.7% on rigid glass/indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates (comparing with 16.6% PCE with 16.1% stabilized output efficiency for the flexible polyethylene naphthalate (PEN)/thin film barrier/ITO substrates). More interestingly, the durability of flexible PSC under simulation of operative condition is proved. Over 85% of the maximum stabilized output efficiency is retained after 1000 h aging employing a thin MAPbI 3 perovskite (over 90% after 500 h with a thick triple cation perovskite). This result is comparable to a similar state of the art rigid PSC and represents a breakthrough in the stability of flexible PSC using ETLs and HTLs compatible with roll to roll production speed, thanks to their room temperature processing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Interfacial engineering of electron transport layer using Caesium Iodide for efficient and stable organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upama, Mushfika Baishakhi; Elumalai, Naveen Kumar; Mahmud, Md Arafat; Wright, Matthew; Wang, Dian; Xu, Cheng; Haque, Faiazul; Chan, Kah Howe; Uddin, Ashraf

    2017-09-01

    Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have gained immense research interest in the recent years predominantly due to low-cost, solution process-ability, and facile device fabrication. However, achieving high stability without compromising the power conversion efficiency (PCE) serves to be an important trade-off for commercialization. In line with this, we demonstrate the significance of incorporating a CsI/ZnO bilayer as electron transport layer (ETL) in the bulk heterojunction PSCs employing low band gap polymer (PTB7) and fullerene (PC71BM) as the photo-active layer. The devices with CsI/ZnO interlayer exhibited substantial enhancement of 800% and 12% in PCE when compared to the devices with pristine CsI and pristine ZnO as ETL, respectively. Furthermore, the UV and UV-ozone induced degradation studies revealed that the devices incorporating CsI/ZnO bilayer possess excellent decomposition stability (∼23% higher) over the devices with pristine ZnO counterparts. The incorporation of CsI between ITO and ZnO was found to favorably modify the energy-level alignment at the interface, contributing to the charge collection efficiency as well as protecting the adjacent light absorbing polymer layers from degradation. The mechanism behind the improvement in PCE and stability is analyzed using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dark I-V characteristics.

  17. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian, E-mail: zlt@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wwei99@jlu.edu.cn; Wang, Wei, E-mail: zlt@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wwei99@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2016-04-25

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (V{sub on}) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔV{sub on}) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of V{sub on} at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔV{sub on} of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  18. Dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during circuit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faits, Michelle C; Zhang, Chunmeng; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria move throughout neuronal dendrites and localize to sites of energy demand. The prevailing view of dendritic mitochondria as highly motile organelles whose distribution is continually adjusted by neuronal activity via Ca2+-dependent arrests is based on observations in cultured neurons exposed to artificial stimuli. Here, we analyze the movements of mitochondria in ganglion cell dendrites in the intact retina. We find that whereas during development 30% of mitochondria are motile at any time, as dendrites mature, mitochondria all but stop moving and localize stably to synapses and branch points. Neither spontaneous nor sensory-evoked activity and Ca2+ transients alter motility of dendritic mitochondria; and pathological hyperactivity in a mouse model of retinal degeneration elevates rather than reduces motility. Thus, our findings indicate that dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during a critical developmental period of high motility, and challenge current views about the role of activity in regulating mitochondrial transport in dendrites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11583.001 PMID:26742087

  19. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include food sources for animals, water sources for plants, pollution sources...

  20. The effect of air stable n-doping through mild plasma on the mechanical property of WSe2 layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linyan; Qian, Shuangbei; Xie, Yuan; Wu, Enxiu; Hei, Haicheng; Feng, Zhihong; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaodong; Guo, Tong; Zhang, Daihua

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides have been widely applied to electronic and optoelectronic device owing to their remarkable material properties. Many studies present the platform for regulating the contact resistance via various doping schemes. Here, we report the alteration of mechanical properties of few top layers of the WSe2 flake which are processed by air stable n-doping of N2O with a constant gas flow through mild plasma and present better manufacturability and friability. The single-line nanoscratching experiments on the WSe2 flakes with different doping time reveal that the manufacturable depths are positively correlated with the exposure time at a certain range and tend to be stable afterwards. Meanwhile, material characterization by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the alteration of mechanical properties is owing to the creation of Se vacancies and substitution of O atoms, which breaks the primary molecular structure of the WSe2 flakes. The synchronous Kelvin probe force microscopy and topography results of ROI nanoscratching of a stepped WSe2 sample confirmed that the depth of the degenerate doping is five layers, which was consistent with the single-line scratching experiments. Our results reveal the interrelationship of the mechanical property, chemical bonds and work function changes of the doped WSe2 flakes.

  1. A graded catalytic-protective layer for an efficient and stable water-splitting photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jing; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Ferrere, Suzanne; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Yan, Yong; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Young, James L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Achieving solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies above 15% is key for the commercial success of photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices. While tandem cells can reach those efficiencies, increasing the catalytic activity and long-term stability remains a significant challenge. Here we show that annealing a bilayer of amorphous titanium dioxide (TiOx) and molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) deposited onto GaInP2 results in a photocathode with high catalytic activity (current density of 11 mA cm-2 at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode under 1 sun illumination) and stability (retention of 80% of initial photocurrent density over a 20 h durability test) for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Microscopy and spectroscopy reveal that annealing results in a graded MoSx/MoOx/TiO2 layer that retains much of the high catalytic activity of amorphous MoSx but with stability similar to crystalline MoS2. Our findings demonstrate the potential of utilizing a hybridized, heterogeneous surface layer as a cost-effective catalytic and protective interface for solar hydrogen production.

  2. Anti-adhesive layers on stainless steel using thermally stable dipodal perfluoroalkyl silanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynak, Baris; Alpan, Cüneyt; Kratzer, Markus; Ganser, Christian; Teichert, Christian; Kern, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    In this study steel surfaces are modified with dipodal perfluoroalkyl organosilanes and the resulting wetting properties and surface morphologies are analyzed. Dipodal silane monomers with different fluoroalkyl spacer lengths are synthesized via hydrosilylation reaction. The modification of stainless steel surfaces is performed in a two-step procedure comprising a corona activation of the steel surface and the subsequent reaction of surface hydroxyl groups with the dipodal silanes from the liquid phase. Anti-adhesive behavior on the surface is achieved through the modification. The attachment of the dipodal silanes on the stainless steel surface is validated with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wetting properties of the dipodal silane layers are investigated by contact angle measurements and adhesive force measurements. Atomic force microscopy is used to characterize the surface roughness and morphologies. Stainless steel modified with the dipodal perfluoroalkyl silanes exhibits low surface energy and low adhesive force compared to the unmodified steel surface. The thermal stability of coatings based on dipodal silanes is higher when compared to layers based on conventional monopodal organosilanes.

  3. High-Performance Integrated Self-Package Flexible Li-O2Battery Based on Stable Composite Anode and Flexible Gas Diffusion Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Yang; Xu, Ji-Jing; Bao, Di; Chang, Zhi-Wen; Liu, Da-Peng; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xin-Bo

    2017-07-01

    With the rising development of flexible and wearable electronics, corresponding flexible energy storage devices with high energy density are required to provide a sustainable energy supply. Theoretically, rechargeable flexible Li-O 2 batteries can provide high specific energy density; however, there are only a few reports on the construction of flexible Li-O 2 batteries. Conventional flexible Li-O 2 batteries possess a loose battery structure, which prevents flexibility and stability. The low mechanical strength of the gas diffusion layer and anode also lead to a flexible Li-O 2 battery with poor mechanical properties. All these attributes limit their practical applications. Herein, the authors develop an integrated flexible Li-O 2 battery based on a high-fatigue-resistance anode and a novel flexible stretchable gas diffusion layer. Owing to the synergistic effect of the stable electrocatalytic activity and hierarchical 3D interconnected network structure of the free-standing cathode, the obtained flexible Li-O 2 batteries exhibit superior electrochemical performance, including a high specific capacity, an excellent rate capability, and exceptional cycle stability. Furthermore, benefitting from the above advantages, the as-fabricated flexible batteries can realize excellent mechanical and electrochemical stability. Even after a thousand cycles of the bending process, the flexible Li-O 2 battery can still possess a stable open-circuit voltage, a high specific capacity, and a durable cycle performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mesoscopic Oxide Double Layer as Electron Specific Contact for Highly Efficient and UV Stable Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Giordano, Fabrizio; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Grätzel, Michael

    2018-03-15

    The solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has recently reached 22.7%, exceeding that of competing thin film photovoltaics and the market leader polycrystalline silicon. Further augmentation of the PCE toward the Shockley-Queisser limit of 33.5% warrants suppression of radiationless carrier recombination by judicious engineering of the interface between the light harvesting perovskite and the charge carrier extraction layers. Here, we introduce a mesoscopic oxide double layer as electron selective contact consisting of a scaffold of TiO 2 nanoparticles covered by a thin film of SnO 2 , either in amorphous (a-SnO 2 ), crystalline (c-SnO 2 ), or nanocrystalline (quantum dot) form (SnO 2 -NC). We find that the band gap of a-SnO 2 is larger than that of the crystalline (tetragonal) polymorph leading to a corresponding lift in its conduction band edge energy which aligns it perfectly with the conduction band edge of both the triple cation perovskite and the TiO 2 scaffold. This enables very fast electron extraction from the light perovskite, suppressing the notorious hysteresis in the current-voltage ( J-V) curves and retarding nonradiative charge carrier recombination. As a result, we gain a remarkable 170 mV in open circuit photovoltage ( V oc ) by replacing the crystalline SnO 2 by an amorphous phase. Because of the quantum size effect, the band gap of our SnO 2 -NC particles is larger than that of bulk SnO 2 causing their conduction band edge to shift also to a higher energy thereby increasing the V oc . However, for SnO 2 -NC there remains a barrier for electron injection into the TiO 2 scaffold decreasing the fill factor of the device and lowering the PCE. Introducing the a-SnO 2 coated mp-TiO 2 scaffold as electron extraction layer not only increases the V oc and PEC of the solar cells but also render them resistant to UV light which forebodes well for outdoor deployment of these new PSC architectures.

  5. Highly stable and luminescent layered hybrid materials for sensitive detection of TNT explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang-Nan; Wang, Kang; Wang, Feng-Bin; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-04-21

    Self-assembly is an effective way to fabricate optical molecular materials. However, this strategy usually changes the nanoenvironment surrounding fluorescence molecules, yielding low luminescence efficiency. Herein, we report the intercalation of a ruthenium polypyridine (Ru) complex into the interlayer galleries of layered double hydroxides (LDHs), forming a Ru/LDH hybrid. The Ru complex exists as an ordered monolayer state, and the hybrid exhibits high thermal and photo stability. Its luminescence efficiency and lifetime are increased by ∼1.7 and ∼1 times, respectively, compared to those of free molecules. We constructed a Ru/LDH sensing platform based on a fluorescence quenching effect for highly sensitive detection of TNT with a detection limit of 4.4 μM.

  6. Highly Stable Aqueous Zinc-ion Storage Using Layered Calcium Vanadium Oxide Bronze Cathode

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2018-02-12

    Cost-effective aqueous rechargeable batteries are attractive alternatives to non-aqueous cells for stationary grid energy storage. Among different aqueous cells, zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs), based on Zn2+ intercalation chemistry, stand out as they can employ high-capacity Zn metal as anode material. Herein, we report a layered calcium vanadium oxide bronze as cathode material for aqueous Zn batteries. For the storage of Zn2+ ions in aqueous electrolyte, we demonstrate that calcium based bronze structure can deliver a high capacity of 340 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C, good rate capability and very long cycling life (96% retention after 3000 cycles at 80 C). Further, we investigate the Zn2+ storage mechanism, and the corresponding electrochemical kinetics in this bronze cathode. Finally, we show that our Zn cell delivers an energy density of 267 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 53.4 W kg-1.

  7. The traceability of animal meals in layer diets as detected by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JC Denadai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to trace the inclusion of animal meals in layer diets by analyzing eggs and their fractions (yolk and albumen using the technique of carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Two-hundred and eighty-eight (288 73-week-old Shaver White layers, never fed animal ingredients, were randomly distributed in six treatments with six replicates each. The treatments were: control - corn and soybean meal based diet and five other experimental diets including bovine meat and bone meal (MBM; poultry offal meal (POM; feather meal (FM; feather meal and poultry offal meal (OFM, and poultry offal meal, feather meal, and meat and bone meal (MBOFM. The isotopic results were submitted to multivariate analysis of variance. Ellipses were determined through an error matrix (95% confidence to identify differences between treatments and the control group. In the albumen and yolk of all experimental treatments were significantly different from the control diet (p < 0.05. In summary, the stable isotope technique is able to trace the animal meals included in layer feeds in the final product under these experimental conditions.

  8. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model

  9. Toward Isolation of Salient Features in Stable Boundary Layer Wind Fields that Influence Loads on Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkyoo Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutral boundary layer (NBL flow fields, commonly used in turbine load studies and design, are generated using spectral procedures in stochastic simulation. For large utility-scale turbines, stable boundary layer (SBL flow fields are of great interest because they are often accompanied by enhanced wind shear, wind veer, and even low-level jets (LLJs. The generation of SBL flow fields, in contrast to simpler stochastic simulation for NBL, requires computational fluid dynamics (CFD procedures to capture the physics and noted characteristics—such as shear and veer—that are distinct from those seen in NBL flows. At present, large-eddy simulation (LES is the most efficient CFD procedure for SBL flow field generation and related wind turbine loads studies. Design standards, such as from the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC, provide guidance albeit with simplifying assumptions (one such deals with assuming constant variance of turbulence over the rotor and recommend standard target turbulence power spectra and coherence functions to allow NBL flow field simulation. In contrast, a systematic SBL flow field simulation procedure has not been offered for design or for site assessment. It is instructive to compare LES-generated SBL flow fields with stochastic NBL flow fields and associated loads which we evaluate for a 5-MW turbine; in doing so, we seek to isolate distinguishing characteristics of wind shear, wind veer, and turbulence variation over the rotor plane in the alternative flow fields and in the turbine loads. Because of known differences in NBL-stochastic and SBL-LES wind fields but an industry preference for simpler stochastic simulation in design practice, this study investigates if one can reproduce stable atmospheric conditions using stochastic approaches with appropriate corrections for shear, veer, turbulence, etc. We find that such simple tuning cannot consistently match turbine target SBL load statistics, even though

  10. Development of redox stable, multifunctional substrates for anode supported SOFCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Ramos, Tania

    2017-01-01

    upon redox cycling, while other properties such as catalytic activity for methane reforming and/or water gas shift, thermal conductivity in addition to electronic conductivity for current pickup are highly wanted for SOFC applications. In order to combine the advantages of a redox stable anode...

  11. Thermally Stable Solution Processed Vanadium Oxide as a Hole Extraction Layer in Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulami, Abdullah; Griffin, Jonathan; Alqurashi, Rania; Yi, Hunan; Iraqi, Ahmed; Lidzey, David; Buckley, Alastair

    2016-03-25

    Low-temperature solution-processable vanadium oxide (V₂O x ) thin films have been employed as hole extraction layers (HELs) in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells. V₂O x films were fabricated in air by spin-coating vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide (s-V₂O x ) at room temperature without the need for further thermal annealing. The deposited vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide film undergoes hydrolysis in air, converting to V₂O x with optical and electronic properties comparable to vacuum-deposited V₂O₅. When s-V₂O x thin films were annealed in air at temperatures of 100 °C and 200 °C, OPV devices showed similar results with good thermal stability and better light transparency. Annealing at 300 °C and 400 °C resulted in a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5% with a decrement approximately 15% lower than that of unannealed films; this is due to the relative decrease in the shunt resistance (R sh ) and an increase in the series resistance (R s ) related to changes in the oxidation state of vanadium.

  12. Color-tunable and stable-efficiency white organic light-emitting diode fabricated with fluorescent-phosphorescent emission layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Su-Hua, E-mail: shya@cc.kuas.edu.tw; Shih, Po-Jen; Wu, Wen-Jie; Huang, Yi-Hua

    2013-10-15

    White organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated for color-tunable lighting applications. Fluorescent and phosphorescent hybrid emission layers (EMLs) were used to enhance the luminance and stability of the devices, which have blue-EML/CBP interlayer/green-EML/phosphorescent-sensitized-EML/red-EML structures. The influence of the composition and structure of the EMLs on the electroluminescence properties of the devices were investigated from the viewpoint of their emission spectra. The possible exciton harvesting, diffusion, transport, and annihilation processes occurring in the EMLs were also evaluated. A maximum luminance intensity of 7400 cd/m{sup 2} and a highly stable current efficiency of 3.2 cd/A were obtained. Good color tunability was achieved for the white OLEDs; the chromatic coordinates linearly shifted from pure white (0.300, 0.398) to cold white (0.261, 0.367) when the applied voltage was varied from 10 to 14 V. -- Highlights: • Exciton harvesting, diffusion, transport, and annihilation processes were evaluated. • The electroluminescence properties were investigated from the viewpoint of the emission spectra. • Good color tunability and stable-efficiency were achieved for the white OLEDs.

  13. Homogeneous fluorescent thin films as long-term stable microscopy reference layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Dietrich, Klaus; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-05-01

    Calibration and validation of fluorescence microscopy devices and components require a high level of stability and repeatability in their fluorescent properties, both spatially and temporally. In order to establish a dependable reference point, from which all variations within the microscope and peripheral devices can be tested, an exceedingly homogeneous fluorescence response must be provided through a calibration tool. We present material system optimization and microfabrication process development, as well as long-term stability considerations for such a calibration tool. Stringent specifications for film thickness (spatial resolutions demands use of high quality lenses that typically show low field curvatures and good chromatic corrections. Therefore, the focal plane is flat and well defined in the z-plane. Fluorescent, ligand capped core-shell quantum dots (SMQDs) were embedded in diluted PMMA at low concentrations. The formulations were spin-coated on silicon and glass wafers to obtain films with thicknesses under 1 μm and low variations on a 100 mm wafer. Fluorescence properties of the SMQD were preserved in the matrix material, and agglomerations were not detectable in the fluorescence response nor in SEM images. Gradual degradation of the fluorescence response due to film aging was managed through robust packaging solutions.

  14. Stable MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors Using TiO2 Interfacial Layer at Metal/MoS2 Contact

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Woojin

    2017-09-07

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is an emerging 2-dimensional (2D) semiconductor for electronic devices. However, unstable and low performance of MoS2 FETs is an important concern. In this study, inserting an atomic layer deposition (ALD) titanium dioxide (TiO2) interfacial layer between contact metal and MoS2 channel is suggested to achieve more stable performances. The reduced threshold voltage (VTH) shift and reduced series resistance (RSD) were simultaneously achieved.

  15. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Layer Specific Development of Neocortical Pyramidal to Fast Spiking Cells Synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eVoinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All cortical neurons are engaged in inhibitory feedback loops which ensure excitation-inhibition balance and are key elements for the development of coherent network activity. The resulting network patterns are strongly dependent on the strength and dynamic properties of these excitatory-inhibitory loops which show pronounced regional and developmental diversity. We therefore compared the properties and postnatal maturation of two different synapses between rat neocortical pyramidal cells (layer 2/3 and layer 5, respectively and fast spiking (FS interneurons in the corresponding layer. At P14, both synapses showed synaptic depression upon repetitive activation. Synaptic release properties between layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and FS cells were stable from P14 to P28. In contrast, layer 5 pyramidal to FS cell connections showed a significant increase in paired pulse ratio by P28. Presynaptic calcium dynamics did also change at these synapses, including the sensitivity to exogenously loaded calcium buffers and expression of presynaptic calcium channels subtypes. These results underline the large variety of properties at different, yet similar, synapses in the neocortex. They also suggest that postnatal maturation of the brain goes along with increasing differences between synaptically driven network activity in layer 5 and layer 2/3.

  17. First observations of elevated ducts associated with intermittent turbulence in the stable boundary layer over Bosten Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Ning, Hui; Song, Shihui; Yan, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    Nocturnal radiative cooling is a main driver for atmospheric duct formation. Within this atmospheric process, the impacts of intermittent turbulence on ducting have seldom been studied. In this paper, we reported two confusing ducting events observed in the early morning in August 2014 over Bosten Lake, China, when a stable boundary layer (SBL) still survived, by using tethered high-resolution GPS radiosondes. Elevated ducts with strong humidity inversions were observed during the balloon ascents but were absent during observations made upon the balloon descents several minutes later. This phenomenon was initially hypothesized to be attributable to turbulence motions in the SBL, and the connection between the turbulence event and the radar duct was examined by the statistical Thorpe method. Turbulence patches were detected from the ascent profiles but not from the descent profiles. The possible reasons for the duct formation and elimination were discussed in detail. The turbulent transport of moisture in the SBL and the advection due to airflows coming from the lake are the most probable reasons for duct formation. In one case, the downward transport of moisture by turbulence mixing within a Kelvin-Helmholtz billow at the top of the low-level jet resulted in duct elimination. In another case, the passage of density currents originating from the lake may have caused the elimination of the duct. Few studies have attempted to associate intermittent turbulence with radar ducts; thus, this work represents a pioneering study into the connection between turbulent events and atmospheric ducts in a SBL.

  18. The Impact of Wind Speed Changes on the Surface Stress in the Weak-wind Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field based upon field observations. Extensive sonic anemometer measurements from horizontal networks and vertical towers ranging from 12 to 20 m height were collected from three field programs in moderately sloped terrain with a varying degree of surface heterogeneity, namely the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) and the Flow Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) II experiments in Colorado (USA), and the Advanced Canopy Resolution Experiment (ARCFLO) in Oregon (USA). The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions is studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso-scale motions. Consequently, the roles of the wind speed and stratification are not adequately accommodated by a single non-dimensional combination, such as the bulk Richardson number. Howver, cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The latter may be significant in explaining the small-scale weak turbulence during stable stratification and deviations from conventional flux-profile relationships.

  19. Erosion of melt layers developed during a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1995-01-01

    Material erosion of plasma-facing components during a tokamak disruption is a serious problem that limits reactor operation and economical reactor lifetime. In particular, metallic low-Z components such as Be will be subjected to severe melting during disruptions and edge localized modes (ELMs). Loss of the developed melt layer will critically shorten the lifetime of these components, severely contaminate the plasma, and seriously inhibit successful and reliable operation of the reactor. In this study mechanisms responsible for melt-layer loss during a disruption are modeled and evaluated. Implications of melt-layer loss on the performance of metallic facing components in the reactor environment are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Sustainable Energy Development: The Key to a Stable Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalu Uduma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of sustainable energy systems based on solar and biomass technologies to provide solutions to utility challenges in Nigeria and acute water shortage both in rural and urban areas of that country. The paper highlights the paradoxes of oil-rich Nigeria and the stark reality of social infrastructure deprivations in that country. Perennial power outages over many years have translated to the absence of or poorly-developed basic social infrastructures in Nigeria. The consequences of this lack have been an increase in abject poverty in rural and urban communities as well as the erosion of social order and threats to citizen and their property. This paper proposes the adaptation of two emerging technologies for building sustainable energy systems and the development of decentralized and sustainable energy sources as catalyst for much-needed social infrastructure development through the creation of Renewable Energy Business Incubators, creative lending strategies, NGO partnerships and shifting energy-distribution responsibilities. These changes will stimulate grassroots economies in the country, develop large quantities of much needed clean water, maintain acceptable standards of sanitation and improve the health and wellbeing of Nigerian communities. The proposed strategies are specific to the Nigerian context; however, the authors suggest that the same or similar strategies may provide energy and social infrastructure development solutions to other developing countries as well.

  1. Development of Barrier Layers for the Protection of Candidate Alloys in the VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, Carlos G. [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jones, J. Wayne [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pollock, Tresa M. [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Was, Gary S. [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-22

    The objective of this project was to develop concepts for barrier layers that enable leading candi- date Ni alloys to meet the longer term operating temperature and durability requirements of the VHTR. The concepts were based on alpha alumina as a primary surface barrier, underlay by one or more chemically distinct alloy layers that would promote and sustain the formation of the pro- tective scale. The surface layers must possess stable microstructures that provide resistance to oxidation, de-carburization and/or carburization, as well as durability against relevant forms of thermo-mechanical cycling. The system must also have a self-healing ability to allow endurance for long exposure times at temperatures up to 1000°C.

  2. Development of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for the Measurement of Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M. Witte

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the components and usage of an unmanned aerial vehicle developed for measuring turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. A method of computing the time-dependent wind speed from a moving velocity sensor data is provided. The physical system built to implement this method using a five-hole probe velocity sensor is described along with the approach used to combine data from the different on-board sensors to allow for extraction of the wind speed as a function of time and position. The approach is demonstrated using data from three flights of two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs measuring the lower atmospheric boundary layer during transition from a stable to convective state. Several quantities are presented and show the potential for extracting a range of atmospheric boundary layer statistics.

  3. Soil development on stable landforms and implications for landscape studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Soil development parameters include a wide variety of morphological, chemical, and mineralogical parameters, but some of the best indicators of time and surface stability are derived from field morphology. Over long time-spans, the most common time function for soil development is exponential or logarithmic, in which rates decrease with increasing age. Over shorter time-spans in semi-arid and moister climates, Holocene and Pleistocene soil development functions appear as linear segments, with Holocene rates about 10 to 50 times those of Pleistocene rates. In contrast to significant temporal variation in rates, geographical variation in rates within (a) the southern Great Basin and (b) the east Central Valley of California is on the order of 2 or 3 times. When comparing soil development indices of the semi-arid Great Basin to those of moister central California, Holocene rates are similar, but Pleistocene rates are more than 10 times slower in the Great Basin. In a range of climatic settings, the reasons for declining rates over time are several and are complexly related to erosional history, fluxes in water and dust related to climatic changes, rates of primary mineral dissolution, and intrinsic soil processes. ?? 1990.

  4. Effects of Boundary Layer Height on the Model of Ground-Level PM2.5 Concentrations from AOD: Comparison of Stable and Convective Boundary Layer Heights from Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Zang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical depth (AOD from satellites or ground-based sun photometer spectral observations has been widely used to estimate ground-level PM2.5 concentrations by regression methods. The boundary layer height (BLH is a popular factor in the regression model of AOD and PM2.5, but its effect is often uncertain. This may result from the structures between the stable and convective BLHs and from the calculation methods of the BLH. In this study, the boundary layer is divided into two types of stable and convective boundary layer, and the BLH is calculated using different methods from radiosonde data and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data for the station in Beijing, China during 2014–2015. The BLH values from these methods show significant differences for both the stable and convective boundary layer. Then, these BLHs were introduced into the regression model of AOD-PM2.5 to seek the respective optimal BLH for the two types of boundary layer. It was found that the optimal BLH for the stable boundary layer is determined using the method of surface-based inversion, and the optimal BLH for the convective layer is determined using the method of elevated inversion. Finally, the optimal BLH and other meteorological parameters were combined to predict the PM2.5 concentrations using the stepwise regression method. The results indicate that for the stable boundary layer, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of surface relative humidity, BLH, and surface temperature. These three factors can significantly enhance the prediction accuracy of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations, with an increase of determination coefficient from 0.50 to 0.68. For the convective boundary layer, however, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of BLH and surface wind speed. These two factors improve the determination coefficient, with a relatively low increase from 0.65 to 0.70. It is found that the

  5. Abstraction Layer For Development And Deployment Of Cloud Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Minh Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present an abstraction layer for cloud computing, which intends to simplify the manipulation with virtual machines in clouds for easy and controlled development and deployment of cloud services. It also ensures interoperability between different cloud infrastructures and allows developers to create cloud appliances easily via inheritance mechanisms.

  6. The impact of non-stationary flows on the surface stress in the weak-wind stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field based upon field observations. Extensive sonic anemometer measurements from horizontal networks and vertical towers ranging from 12 to 20 m height and innovative fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing observations were collected from three field programs in moderately sloped terrain with a varying degree of surface heterogeneity, namely the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) and the Flow Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) II experiments in Colorado (USA), and the Advanced Canopy Resolution Experiment (ARCFLO) in Oregon (USA). The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions is studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso-scale motions. Consequently, the roles of the wind speed and stratification are not adequately accommodated by a single non-dimensional combination, such as the bulk Richardson number. However, cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The latter may be significant in explaining the small-scale weak turbulence during stable stratification and deviations from conventional flux-profile relationships. Contrary to expectations, the vertical coherence was strongest for weakest winds and declined fast with increasing velocities, which suggests that submeso-scale motions are much deeper than previously thought.

  7. Advances in Nanotechnology for Efficacious and Stable Formulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putcha, Lakshimi

    2012-01-01

    Current operational medical kits aboard the International Space Station (ISS) include an array of medications intended for the treatment of minor ambulatory care symptoms, first aid, and basic life support. All medications contained in the flight kits are commercially available off-the-shelf formulations used for treatment of illnesses on Earth. However, transport and stowage of supplies including medications for space missions are exposed to adverse environmental conditions and extended shelf-life demands. Proposed missions to Mars and near-Earth objects such as asteroid 1999 AO10 will present crew health risk that is different both quantitatively and qualitatively from those encountered on ISS missions. Few drug options are available at the present time for mitigation of crew health risk of planned space exploration missions. Alternatives to standard oral formulations that include sustained and targeted delivery technologies for preventive healthcare in space will be a welcome addition to the space formulary and may include controlled release topical, sub-cutaneous, intranasal and inhalation dosage forms. An example of such a technology development endeavor can be nanotechnology-based multi-stage drug cocktail and vaccine delivery systems. Nanostructures also have the ability to protect drugs encapsulated within them from physiologic degradation, target their delivery with sustained release and are suitable for per oral routes of administration. The use of nanostructures such as polymeric nanoparticles offers a non-invasive approach for penetrating the blood brain barrier. Finally, nanotechnology offers great potential for the development of safe and efficacious drug delivery systems for preventive health care in space and on Earth.

  8. Establishing Accurate and Sustainable Geospatial Reference Layers in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, V. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate geospatial reference layers (settlement names & locations, administrative boundaries, and population) are not readily available for most developing countries. This critical information gap makes it challenging for governments to efficiently plan, allocate resources, and provide basic services. It also hampers international agencies' response to natural disasters, humanitarian crises, and other emergencies. The current work involves a recent successful effort, led by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Government of Nigeria, to obtain such data. The data collection began in 2013, with local teams collecting names, coordinates, and administrative attributes for over 100,000 settlements using ODK-enabled smartphones. A settlement feature layer extracted from satellite imagery was used to ensure all settlements were included. Administrative boundaries (Ward, LGA) were created using the settlement attributes. These "new" boundary layers were much more accurate than existing shapefiles used by the government and international organizations. The resulting data sets helped Nigeria eradicate polio from all areas except in the extreme northeast, where security issues limited access and vaccination activities. In addition to the settlement and boundary layers, a GIS-based population model was developed, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratories and Flowminder), that used the extracted settlement areas and characteristics, along with targeted microcensus data. This model provides population and demographics estimates independent of census or other administrative data, at a resolution of 90 meters. These robust geospatial data layers found many other uses, including establishing catchment area settlements and populations for health facilities, validating denominators for population-based surveys, and applications across a variety of government sectors. Based on the success of the Nigeria effort, a partnership between DfID and the Bill & Melinda Gates

  9. Development of inverted organic solar cells with TiO₂ interface layer by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenhua; Jiang, Changyun; Zhu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Jie

    2013-02-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) with inverted structure have attracted much attention in recent years because of their improved device air stability due to the use of stable materials for electrodes and interface layers. In this work, TiO(2) films, fabricated using low temperature (e.g., 130-170 °C) atomic layer deposition (ALD) on ITO substrates, are used as electron selective interface layers to investigate inverted OSCs. It is found that though the as-deposited TiO(2) films are high resistive due to the presence of oxygen defects, the defects can be significantly reduced by light soaking. PV cells with 15-nm-thick amorphous-TiO(2) layers fabricated at low temperature show better performance than those with poly crystal TiO(2) with same thickness deposited at 250 °C. The low temperature ALD-grown TiO(2) films are dense, stable and robust with capability of conformal coating on nanostructural surfaces, showing a promising interface layer for achieving air-stable plastic OSCs with roll-to-roll mass production potential.

  10. Sintering, camber development of layer composites and a new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Zinc–magnesium titanate dielectrics/nickel–zinc–copper ferrite layer composites were prepared by tape- casting technique combined with a uniaxial pressure shaping technique. The sintering and camber development of the composites were investigated. The results show that the difference of shrinkage in the ...

  11. Latest developments at GANIL for stable and radioactive ion beam production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, P.; Barue, C.; Bajeat, O.; Canet, C.; Clement, E.; Cornell, J. C.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Flambard, J. L.; Fraanberg, H.; Frigot, R.; Leboucher, C.; Lecesne, N.; Lecomte, P.; Leherissier, P.; Lemagnen, F.; Leroy, R.; Maunoury, L.; Mery, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the frame of the SPIRAL II (Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Acceleres en Ligne Partie II) project, several developments of stable and radioactive ion production systems have been started up. In parallel, GANIL has the ambition to preserve the existing stable and radioactive beams and also to increase its range by offering new ones. In order to identify the best directions for this development, a new group called GANISOL has been formed. Its preliminary conclusions and the latest developments at GANIL are presented.

  12. Stable self-compliance resistive switching in AlOδ/Ta2O5−x/TaOy triple layer devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Huaqiang; Li, Xinyi; Huang, Feiyang; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He; Chen, An

    2015-01-01

    Stable self-compliance property was observed in the AlO δ /Ta 2 O 5−x /TaO y triple-layer resistive random access memory structure. The impact of AlO δ barrier layer was studied with different thicknesses. Endurance of more than 10 10 cycles and data retention for more than 3 h at 125 °C were demonstrated. All the measurements were carried out without external current compliance and no hard breakdown was observed. Systematic analysis reveals the self-compliance property is due to the built-in series resistance of the thin AlO δ barrier layer. A model is proposed to explain this self-compliance property. (paper)

  13. Combined effect of boundary layer recirculation factor and stable energy on local air quality in pearl river delta over southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haowen; Wang, Baomin; Fang, Xingqin; Zhu, Wei; Fan, Qi; Liao, Zhiheng; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Asi; Fan, Shaojia

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) has a significant impact on the spatial and temporal distribution of air pollutants. In order to gain a better understanding of how ABL affects the variation of air pollutants, atmospheric boundary layer observations were performed at Sanshui in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region over Southern China during the winter of 2013. Two types of typical ABL status which could lead to air pollution were analyzed comparatively: weak vertical diffusion ability type (WVDAT) and weak horizontal transportation ability type (WHTAT). Results show: 1) WVDAT was featured with moderate wind speed, consistent wind direction, and thick inversion layer at 600 ~ 1000m above ground level (AGL), and air pollutants were restricted in the low altitude due to the stable atmospheric structure; 2) WHTAT was characterized with calm wind, varied wind direction and shallow intense ground inversion layer, and air pollutants accumulated in the local because of strong recirculation in the low ABL; 3) Recirculation Factor (RF) and Stable Energy (SE) were proved to be good indicators for horizontal transportation ability and vertical diffusion ability of the atmosphere, respectively. Combined utilization of RF and SE can be very helpful in the evaluation of air pollution potential of the ABL. Implications Air quality data from ground and meteorological data collected from radio sounding in Sanshui in Pearl River Delta show that local air quality was poor when wind reversal was pronounced or temperature stratification state is stable. It should take the combination of horizontal and vertical transportation ability of local atmosphere into consideration when evaluating local environmental bearing capacity for air pollution.

  14. How Do Polyethylene Glycol and Poly(sulfobetaine) Hydrogel Layers on Ultrafiltration Membranes Minimize Fouling and Stay Stable in Cleaning Chemicals?

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu

    2017-05-18

    We compare the efficiency of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer on poly(ether imide) (PEI) hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane surfaces in terms of filtration performance, fouling minimization and stability in cleaning solutions. Two previously established different methods toward the two different chemistries (and both had already proven to be suited to reduce fouling significantly) are applied to the same PEI membranes. The hydrophilicity of PEI membranes is improved by the modification, as indicated by the change of contact angle value from 89° to 68° for both methods, due to the hydration layer formed in the hydrogel layers. Their pure water flux declines because of the additional permeation barrier from the hydrogel layers. However, these barriers increase protein rejection. In the exposure at a static condition, grafting PEG or poly(sulfobetaine) reduces protein adsorption to 23% or 11%, respectively. In the dynamic filtration, the hydrogel layers minimizes the flux reduction and increases the reversibility of fouling. Compared to the pristine PEI membrane that can recover its flux to 42% after hydraulic cleaning, the PEG and poly(sulfobetaine) grafted membranes can recover their flux up to 63% and 94%, respectively. Stability tests show that the poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer is stable in acid, base and chlorine solutions, whereas the PEG hydrogel layer suffers alkaline hydrolysis in base and oxidation in chlorine conditions. With its chemical stability and pronounced capability of minimizing fouling, especially irreversible fouling, protective poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layers have great potential for various membrane-based applications.

  15. Efficient, Hysteresis-Free, and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells with ZnO as Electron-Transport Layer: Effect of Surface Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Wu, Binghui; Chen, Ruihao; Wu, Youyunqi; Hui, Yong; Mao, Bing-Wei; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2018-01-19

    The power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has ascended from 3.8% to 22.1% in recent years. ZnO has been well-documented as an excellent electron-transport material. However, the poor chemical compatibility between ZnO and organo-metal halide perovskite makes it highly challenging to obtain highly efficient and stable PSCs using ZnO as the electron-transport layer. It is demonstrated in this work that the surface passivation of ZnO by a thin layer of MgO and protonated ethanolamine (EA) readily makes ZnO as a very promising electron-transporting material for creating hysteresis-free, efficient, and stable PSCs. Systematic studies in this work reveal several important roles of the modification: (i) MgO inhibits the interfacial charge recombination, and thus enhances cell performance and stability; (ii) the protonated EA promotes the effective electron transport from perovskite to ZnO, further fully eliminating PSCs hysteresis; (iii) the modification makes ZnO compatible with perovskite, nicely resolving the instability of ZnO/perovskite interface. With all these findings, PSCs with the best efficiency up to 21.1% and no hysteresis are successfully fabricated. PSCs stable in air for more than 300 h are achieved when graphene is used to further encapsulate the cells. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Layered oxygen-deficient double perovskite as an efficient and stable anode for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengodan, Sivaprakash; Choi, Sihyuk; Jun, Areum; Shin, Tae Ho; Ju, Young-Wan; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Jeeyoung; Irvine, John T S; Kim, Guntae

    2015-02-01

    Different layered perovskite-related oxides are known to exhibit important electronic, magnetic and electrochemical properties. Owing to their excellent mixed-ionic and electronic conductivity and fast oxygen kinetics, cation layered double perovskite oxides such as PrBaCo2O5 in particular have exhibited excellent properties as solid oxide fuel cell oxygen electrodes. Here, we show for the first time that related layered materials can be used as high-performance fuel electrodes. Good redox stability with tolerance to coking and sulphur contamination from hydrocarbon fuels is demonstrated for the layered perovskite anode PrBaMn2O5+δ (PBMO). The PBMO anode is fabricated by in situ annealing of Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-δ in fuel conditions and actual fuel cell operation is demonstrated. At 800 °C, layered PBMO shows high electrical conductivity of 8.16 S cm(-1) in 5% H2 and demonstrates peak power densities of 1.7 and 1.3 W cm(-2) at 850 °C using humidified hydrogen and propane fuels, respectively.

  17. Development of Retinal Layers in Prenatal Human Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Anita

    2016-01-01

    To determine the developmental sequence of retinal layers to provide information on where in utero pathologic events might affect retinal development. Qualitative and quantitative descriptive research. A histology collection of human eyes from fetal week (Fwk) 8 to postnatal (P) 10 weeks was analyzed. The length of the nasal and temporal retina was measured along the horizontal meridian in 20 eyes. The location of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and outer plexiform layer (OPL) was identified at each age, and its length measured. The human eye retinal length increased from 5.19 mm at Fwk 8 to 20.92 mm at midgestation to 32.88 mm just after birth. The IPL appeared in the presumptive fovea at Fwk 8, reached the eccentricity of the optic nerve by Fwk 12, and was present to both nasal and temporal peripheral edges by Fwk 18-21. By contrast, the OPL developed slowly. A short OPL was first present in the Fwk 11 fovea and did not reach the eccentricity of the optic nerve until midgestation. The OPL reached the retinal edges by Fwk 30. Laminar development of both IPL and OPL occurred before vascular formation. In human fetal retina, the IPL reached the far peripheral edge of the retina by midgestation and the OPL by late gestation. Only very early in utero events could affect IPL lamination in the central retina, but events occurring after Fwk 20 in the peripheral retina would overlap OPL laminar development in outer retina. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of required hydrophilic-lipophilic balance of citronella oil and development of stable cream formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Jaya Gopal; Yadav, Narayan Prasad; Sahu, Jagat Jyoti; Sinha, Priyam

    2013-10-01

    Citronella oil is reported to have excellent mosquito-repellent activity. To develop a stable cream formulation (emulsion), its hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) value is important. To determine required hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (rHLB) value of citronella oil and to develop stable cream formulation. Emulsions of citronella oil were prepared by phase inversion temperature technique using water, Tween 80 and Span 80. A first series of 11 emulsions with HLB values ranging from 5.0 to 15.0 and a second series of eight emulsions with smaller interval in HLB values from 11.0 to 13.8 were prepared. Emulsions were evaluated for creaming index, droplet size and turbidity to determine rHLB. Utilizing determined rHLB, citronella oil cream was formulated and evaluated for different texture parameters. rHLB of light liquid paraffin was also determined for validation of methodology. rHLB of light liquid paraffin and citronella oil was determined to be 11.80 and 12.60, respectively. Stable citronella oil cream was developed with 10% emulsifier blend. Texture parameters were found to be consistent over the entire storage period. Creaming index, droplet diameter, percent increase in droplet diameter and turbidity are the established parameters to determine rHLB and to develop stable emulsion. Emulsions with optimum emulsifier concentration resulted in less percentage creaming index, smallest droplet, less percentage increase in droplet diameter and highest turbidity. Texture properties evaluation ensures the stability of the developed cream. rHLB value of citronella oil was found 12.6 and a stable cream was formulated utilizing determined rHLB.

  19. Effects of pyriproxyfen and buprofezin on immature development and reproduction in the stable fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S S; Li, A Y; Lohmeyer, K H; Pérez De León, A A

    2012-12-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most significant biting flies that affect cattle. The use of traditional insecticides for stable fly control has only a limited success owing to the insect's unique feeding behaviours and immature development sites. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of two insect growth regulator (IGR) products, pyriproxyfen and buprofezin, on the development of the immature stages of the stable fly and the effects of pyriproxyfen on oviposition and egg hatch. Both pyriproxyfen and buprofezin had significant inhibitory effects on immature development. The LC(50) s of pyriproxyfen and buprofezin were 0.002 and 18.92 p.p.m., respectively. Topical treatment of adult females with different doses of pyriproxyfen had significant negative effects on both female oviposition and egg hatching when 1- and 3-day-old females were treated, and the effects were dose dependent. A significant reduction in the mean number of eggs laid was observed only at the highest pyriproxyfen dose (8 µg/fly) and egg hatch was unaffected by pyriproxyfen treatment when 5-day-old females were treated. Results from the present study indicate that pyriproxyfen has the potential to be used as part of an integrated stable fly management programme. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Zinc tin oxide as high-temperature stable recombination layer for mesoscopic perovskite/silicon monolithic tandem solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Jérémie

    2016-12-05

    Perovskite/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells have the potential to reach efficiencies beyond those of silicon single-junction record devices. However, the high-temperature process of 500 °C needed for state-of-the-art mesoscopic perovskite cells has, so far, been limiting their implementation in monolithic tandem devices. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of zinc tin oxide as a recombination layer and show its electrical and optical stability at temperatures up to 500 °C. To prove the concept, we fabricate monolithic tandem cells with mesoscopic top cell with up to 16% efficiency. We then investigate the effect of zinc tin oxide layer thickness variation, showing a strong influence on the optical interference pattern within the tandem device. Finally, we discuss the perspective of mesoscopic perovskite cells for high-efficiency monolithic tandem solar cells. © 2016 Author(s)

  1. Assessment of Gradient-Based Similarity Functions in the Stable Boundary Layer Derived from a Large-Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2017-06-01

    Gradient-based similarity functions, evaluated based on data generated by a large-eddy simulation model of the stably stratified boundary layer, are compared with analogous similarity functions, derived from field observations in the surface layer during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment in the Arctic. The comparison is performed in terms of explicit and implicit local scaling systems, for the temperature and momentum fluxes, standard deviations of the vertical velocity and of temperature, as well as dissipation rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and for the temperature variance. The comparison shows the best agreement of the SHEBA-based similarity functions with analogous functions evaluated using the large-eddy simulation data in the range of the Richardson number 0.01<{ Ri}< 0.1.

  2. Development of efficient GPU parallelization of WRF Yonsei University planetary boundary layer scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer (PBL is the lowest part of the atmosphere and where its character is directly affected by its contact with the underlying planetary surface. The PBL is responsible for vertical sub-grid-scale fluxes due to eddy transport in the whole atmospheric column. It determines the flux profiles within the well-mixed boundary layer and the more stable layer above. It thus provides an evolutionary model of atmospheric temperature, moisture (including clouds, and horizontal momentum in the entire atmospheric column. For such purposes, several PBL models have been proposed and employed in the weather research and forecasting (WRF model of which the Yonsei University (YSU scheme is one. To expedite weather research and prediction, we have put tremendous effort into developing an accelerated implementation of the entire WRF model using graphics processing unit (GPU massive parallel computing architecture whilst maintaining its accuracy as compared to its central processing unit (CPU-based implementation. This paper presents our efficient GPU-based design on a WRF YSU PBL scheme. Using one NVIDIA Tesla K40 GPU, the GPU-based YSU PBL scheme achieves a speedup of 193× with respect to its CPU counterpart running on one CPU core, whereas the speedup for one CPU socket (4 cores with respect to 1 CPU core is only 3.5×. We can even boost the speedup to 360× with respect to 1 CPU core as two K40 GPUs are applied.

  3. Holistic sustainable development: Floor-layers and micro-enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortie, Monique; Nadeau, Sylvie; Vezeau, Steve

    2016-11-01

    Attracting and retaining workers is important to ensuring the sustainability of floor laying businesses, which are for the most part micro-enterprises (MiE). The aim of this paper is to shed light on the challenges MiE face in OHS implementation in the context of sustainable development. Participative ergonomics and user-centred design approaches were used. The material collected was reviewed to better understand the floor layers' viewpoints on sustainability. The solutions that were retained and the challenges encountered to make material handling and physical work easier and to develop training and a website are presented. The importance of OHS as a sustainability factor, its structuring effect, what distinguishes MiE from small businesses and possible strategies for workings with them are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Very thin thermally stable TiO2 blocking layers with enhanced electron transfer for solar cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kment, Š.; Krýsová, Hana; Hubička, Zdeněk; Kmentová, H.; Kavan, Ladislav; Zbořil, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, DEC 2017 (2017), s. 122-129 ISSN 2352-9407 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073; GA ČR GA13-07724S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1305 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Cyclic voltammetry * Impedance spectroscopy * Photochemistry * Solar cell * TiO blocking layer 2 Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cell s, batteries, fuel cell s, corrosion metals, electrolysis); Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) (FZU-D)

  5. Very thin thermally stable TiO2 blocking layers with enhanced electron transfer for solar cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kment, Š.; Krýsová, Hana; Hubička, Zdeněk; Kmentová, H.; Kavan, Ladislav; Zbořil, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, DEC 2017 (2017), s. 122-129 ISSN 2352-9407 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073; GA ČR GA13-07724S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1305 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Cyclic voltammetry * Impedance spectroscopy * Photochemistry * Solar cell * TiO blocking layer 2 Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis); Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) (FZU-D)

  6. Development of a stable cation modified graphene oxide membrane for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenzheng; (Yet Yu, Tong; Graham, Nigel

    2017-12-01

    Membranes prepared from layers of graphene oxide (GO) offer substantial advantages over conventional materials for water treatment (e.g. greater flux), but the stability of GO membranes in water has not been achieved until now. In this study the behavior of GO membranes prepared with different quantities and species of cations has been investigated to establish the feasibility of their application in water treatment. A range of cation-modified GO membranes were prepared and exposed to aqueous solutions containing specific chemical constituents. In pure water, unmodified and Na-modified GO membranes were highly unstable, while GO membranes modified with multivalent cations were stable provided there were sufficient quantities of cations present; their relative capability to achieve GO stability was as follows: Al3+  >  Ca2+  >  Mg2+  >  Na+. It is believed that the mechanism of cross-linking, and membrane stability, is via metal-carboxylate chelates and cation-graphite surface interactions (cation-π interaction), and that the latter appears to increase with increasing cation valency. The instability of cation (Ca or Al)-modified GO membranes by NaCl solutions during permeation occurred as Na+ exchanged with the incorporated multivalent cations, but a high content of Al3+ in the GO membrane impeded Al3+/Na+ exchange and thus retained membrane stability. In solutions containing biopolymers representative of surface waters or seawater (protein and polysaccharide solutions), Ca-GO membranes (even with high Ca2+ content) were not stable, while Al-GO membranes were stable if the Al3+ content was sufficiently high; Al-formed membranes also had a greater flux than Ca-GO membranes.

  7. Development of shelf stable, processed, low acid food products using heat-irradiation combination treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnaar, A.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of ionizing irradiation needed to sterilize low acid vegetable and starch products (with and without sauces) commercially impairs their sensorial and nutritive qualities, and use of thermal processes for the same purpose may also have an adverse effect on the product quality. A systematic approach to the establishment of optimized combination parameters was developed for heat-irradiation processing to produce high quality, shelf stable, low acid food products. The effects of selected heat, heat-irradiation combination and irradiation treatments on the quality of shelf stable mushrooms in brine and rice, stored at ambient temperature, were studied. From a quality viewpoint, use of heat-irradiation combination treatments favouring low irradiation dose levels offered a feasible alternative to thermally processed or radappertized mushrooms in brine. However, shelf stable rice produced by heat-irradiation combination treatments offered a feasible alternative only to radappertized rice from the standpoint of quality. The technical requirements for the heat and irradiation processing of a long grain rice cultivar from the United States of America oppose each other directly, thereby reducing the feasibility of using heat-irradiation combination processing to produce shelf stable rice. The stability of starch thickened white sauces was found to be affected severely during high dose irradiation and subsequent storage at ambient temperature. However, use of pea protein isolate as a thickener in white sauces was found to have the potential to maintain the viscosity of sauces for irradiated meat and sauce products throughout processing and storage. (author)

  8. Development of a stable liquid formulation of live attenuated influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jessica A; Estrada, Marcus; Flood, E Alexander; Mahmood, Kutub; Dhere, Rajeev; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-07-12

    Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing influenza. However, the cost of producing annual seasonal influenza vaccines puts them out of reach for most developing countries. While live attenuated influenza vaccines are among the most efficacious and can be manufactured at low cost, they may require lyophilization to be stable enough for developing-country use, which adds a significant cost burden. The development of a liquid live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine that is stable for around a year-the duration of an annual influenza season-would significantly improve not only the production output but also the use and accessibility of influenza vaccines in low-resource settings. In this study, potential stabilizing excipients were screened and optimized using the least stable influenza vaccine strain presently known, H1N1 (A/California/07/2009), as a model. The stability-conferring properties of the lead formulations were also tested with a Type B strain of influenza virus (B/Brisbane/60/2008). Stability was also evaluated with higher titers of influenza virus and exposure to agitation and freeze-thaw stresses to further confirm the stability of the lead formulations. Through this process, we identified a liquid formulation consisting of sucrose phosphate glutamate buffer with 1% arginine and 0.5% recombinant human serum albumin that provided storage stability of one year at 2-8°C for the influenza A and B strains tested. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Observations and modeling of the effects of waves and rotors on submeso and turbulence variability within the stable boundary layer over central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez Mullins, Astrid

    Terrain-induced gravity waves and rotor circulations have been hypothesized to enhance the generation of submeso motions (i.e., nonstationary shear events with spatial and temporal scales greater than the turbulence scale and smaller than the meso-gamma scale) and to modulate low-level intermittency in the stable boundary layer (SBL). Intermittent turbulence, generated by submeso motions and/or the waves, can affect the atmospheric transport and dispersion of pollutants and hazardous materials. Thus, the study of these motions and the mechanisms through which they impact the weakly to very stable SBL is crucial for improving air quality modeling and hazard predictions. In this thesis, the effects of waves and rotor circulations on submeso and turbulence variability within the SBL is investigated over the moderate terrain of central Pennsylvania using special observations from a network deployed at Rock Springs, PA and high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model forecasts. The investigation of waves and rotors over central PA is important because 1) the moderate topography of this region is common to most of the eastern US and thus the knowledge acquired from this study can be of significance to a large population, 2) there have been little evidence of complex wave structures and rotors reported for this region, and 3) little is known about the waves and rotors generated by smaller and more moderate topographies. Six case studies exhibiting an array of wave and rotor structures are analyzed. Observational evidence of the presence of complex wave structures, resembling nonstationary trapped gravity waves and downslope windstorms, and complex rotor circulations, resembling trapped and jump-type rotors, is presented. These motions and the mechanisms through which they modulate the SBL are further investigated using high-resolution WRF forecasts. First, the efficacy of the 0.444-km horizontal grid spacing WRF model to reproduce submeso and meso

  10. Stable isotopes in the atmospheric marine boundary layer water vapour over the Atlantic Ocean, 2012–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Marion; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Reverdin, Gilles; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný Erla; Aloisi, Giovanni; Berkelhammer, Max B.; Bourlès, Bernard; Bourras, Denis; de Coetlogon, Gaëlle; Cosgrove, Ann; Faber, Anne-Katrine; Grelet, Jacques; Hansen, Steffen Bo; Johnson, Rod; Legoff, Hervé; Martin, Nicolas; Peters, Andrew J.; Popp, Trevor James; Reynaud, Thierry; Winther, Malte

    2017-01-01

    The water vapour isotopic composition (1H216O, H218O and 1H2H16O) of the Atlantic marine boundary layer has been measured from 5 research vessels between 2012 and 2015. Using laser spectroscopy analysers, measurements have been carried out continuously on samples collected 10–20 meter above sea level. All the datasets have been carefully calibrated against the international VSMOW-SLAP scale following the same protocol to build a homogeneous dataset covering the Atlantic Ocean between 4°S to 63°N. In addition, standard meteorological variables have been measured continuously, including sea surface temperatures using calibrated Thermo-Salinograph for most cruises. All calibrated observations are provided with 15-minute resolution. We also provide 6-hourly data to allow easier comparisons with simulations from the isotope-enabled Global Circulation Models. In addition, backwards trajectories from the HYSPLIT model are supplied every 6-hours for the position of our measurements. PMID:28094798

  11. Calculating the azimuth of mountain waves, using the effect of tilted fine-scale stable layers on VHF radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple method is described, based on standard VHF wind-profiler data, where imbalances of echo power between four off-vertical radar beams, caused by mountain waves, can be used to calculate the orientation of the wave pattern. It is shown that the mountain wave azimuth (direction of the horizontal component of the wavevector, is given by the vector [ W (PE - P W ,W (PN - P S ]; PN, PS, PE, PW are radar echo powers, measured in dB, in beams pointed away from vertical by the same angle towards north, south, east and west respectively, and W is the vertical wind velocity. The method is applied to Aberystwyth MST radar data, and the calculated wave vector usually, but not always, points into the low-level wind direction. The mean vertical wind at Aberystwyth, which may also be affected by tilted aspect-sensitive layers, is investigated briefly using the entire radar output 1990-1997. The mean vertical-wind profile is inconsistent with existing theories, but a new mountain-wave interpretation is proposed.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques.

  12. Graphene oxide/PEDOT:PSS composite hole transport layer for efficient and stable planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da-Young; Na, Seok-In; Kim, Seok-Soon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a graphene oxide (GO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) composite as a promising candidate for the practical application of a 2-D carbonaceous hole transport layer (HTL) to planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells (PeSCs) consisting of a transparent electrode/HTL/perovskite/fullerene/metal electrode. Both the insulating properties of GO and the non-uniform coating of the transparent electrode with GO cause the poor morphology of perovskite induced low power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.4%. On the other hand, PeSCs with a GO/PEDOT:PSS composite HTL, exhibited a higher PCE of 9.7% than that of a device fabricated with conventional PEDOT:PSS showing a PCE of 8.2%. The higher performance is attributed to the decreased series resistance (RS) and increased shunt resistance (RSh). The well-matched work-function between GO (4.9 eV) and PEDOT:PSS (5.1 eV) probably results in more efficient charge transport and an overall decrease in RS. The existence of GO with a large bandgap of ~3.6 eV might induce the effective blocking of electrons, leading to an increase of RSh. Moreover, improvement in the long-term stability under atmospheric conditions was observed.

  13. Calculating the azimuth of mountain waves, using the effect of tilted fine-scale stable layers on VHF radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    Full Text Available A simple method is described, based on standard VHF wind-profiler data, where imbalances of echo power between four off-vertical radar beams, caused by mountain waves, can be used to calculate the orientation of the wave pattern. It is shown that the mountain wave azimuth (direction of the horizontal component of the wavevector, is given by the vector [ W (PE - P W ,W (PN - P S ]; PN, PS, PE, PW are radar echo powers, measured in dB, in beams pointed away from vertical by the same angle towards north, south, east and west respectively, and W is the vertical wind velocity. The method is applied to Aberystwyth MST radar data, and the calculated wave vector usually, but not always, points into the low-level wind direction. The mean vertical wind at Aberystwyth, which may also be affected by tilted aspect-sensitive layers, is investigated briefly using the entire radar output 1990-1997. The mean vertical-wind profile is inconsistent with existing theories, but a new mountain-wave interpretation is proposed.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques.

  14. Development of Enhanced Window layers for CIGS Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. Nicholas

    One of the most promising thin film devices right now is the Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) solar cell with maximum reported power conversion efficiency of 22.3%. The Transparent Conducting Oxide (TCO) which is the top layer of the CIGS device also known as the window layer, is responsible for collecting the electrons generated in the CIGS device and conducting them to the circuit. Development of a very low resistivity film with a high optical transmission is crucial for optimal performance of devices as well as the ability to be deployed without changes to their properties for several decades. Current TCOs such as indium tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) are met with limitations with either using large amounts of expensive materials such as indium, often requiring and anneal step to obtain good conductivity, or have shown poor long term reliability. This thesis is focused on development of InZnO and zirconium doped InZnO as a potential replacement TCO to obtain high conductivity and high transmission like the leading TCOs without needing heated depositions, post deposition annealing, and maintain a good film reliability. Zirconium doping was employed to farther enhance both the optical and electrical properties through enhancement of the films high frequency permittivity of InZnO while providing improved reliability to the film. The films were grown through a mix of DC and RF co-sputtering. InZnO films were deposited at varying indium concentration ( 10-30%) and samples were able to achieve low resistivity ( 7x10-4 O-cm), high mobility (>30 cm2/v.s), high carrier concentration (>10 20 cm-3), while maintaining high transmission (> 80%) in the visible and near-infrared region. After zirconium was incorporated into the InZnO films by replacement of the ZnO target with a ZrO2/ZnO (5:95) target, films of Zr:InZnO were deposit through the same method to achieve films that maintained very similar electrical and optical properties. The little

  15. Rhesus iPSC Safe Harbor Gene-Editing Platform for Stable Expression of Transgenes in Differentiated Cells of All Germ Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, So Gun; Yada, Ravi Chandra; Choi, Kyujoo; Carpentier, Arnaud; Liang, T Jake; Merling, Randall K; Sweeney, Colin L; Malech, Harry L; Jung, Moonjung; Corat, Marcus A F; AlJanahi, Aisha A; Lin, Yongshun; Liu, Huimin; Tunc, Ilker; Wang, Xujing; Palisoc, Maryknoll; Pittaluga, Stefania; Boehm, Manfred; Winkler, Thomas; Zou, Jizhong; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2017-01-04

    Nonhuman primate (NHP) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer the opportunity to investigate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of proposed iPSC-derived cellular delivery in clinically relevant in vivo models. However, there is need for stable, robust, and safe labeling methods for NHP iPSCs and their differentiated lineages to study survival, proliferation, tissue integration, and biodistribution following transplantation. Here we investigate the utility of the adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) as a safe harbor for the addition of transgenes in our rhesus macaque iPSC (RhiPSC) model. A clinically relevant marker gene, human truncated CD19 (hΔCD19), or GFP was inserted into the AAVS1 site in RhiPSCs using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Genetically modified RhiPSCs maintained normal karyotype and pluripotency, and these clones were able to further differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to transgene delivery using randomly integrating viral vectors, AAVS1 targeting allowed stable transgene expression following differentiation. Off-target mutations were observed in some edited clones, highlighting the importance of careful characterization of these cells prior to downstream applications. Genetically marked RhiPSCs will be useful to further advance clinically relevant models for iPSC-based cell therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Development of safe and shelf-stable Intermediate Moisture (IM) convenience meat products through radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh Chander; Kanatt, S.R.; Chawla, S.P.; Bongirwar, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Ready-to-use shelf stable mutton and chicken sheek kababs, and chicken chilly were developed by reducing the water activity either by grilling or by hot air drying, vacuum packing and irradiation. Microbiological analysis revealed a dose dependent reduction in total viable count and in Staphylococcus species on irradiation treatment ( 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy). The products subjected to irradiation at 10 kGy showed absence of viable micro-organisms and also had high sensory acceptability up to 9 months at ambient temperature. (author)

  17. Development of Efficient and Stable Inverted Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) Solar Cells Using Different Metal Oxide Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzov, Ivan; Brabec, Christoph J

    2013-12-10

    Solution-processed inverted bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells have gained much more attention during the last decade, because of their significantly better environmental stability compared to the normal architecture BHJ solar cells. Transparent metal oxides (MeO x ) play an important role as the dominant class for solution-processed interface materials in this development, due to their excellent optical transparency, their relatively high electrical conductivity and their tunable work function. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the most common synthesis methods used for the wet chemical preparation of the most relevant n -type- and p -type-like MeO x interface materials consisting of binary compounds A x B y . Their performance for applications as electron transport/extraction layers (ETL/EEL) and as hole transport/extraction layers (HTL/HEL) in inverted BHJ solar cells will be reviewed and discussed.

  18. Development of Efficient and Stable Inverted Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ Solar Cells Using Different Metal Oxide Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Litzov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed inverted bulk heterojunction (BHJ solar cells have gained much more attention during the last decade, because of their significantly better environmental stability compared to the normal architecture BHJ solar cells. Transparent metal oxides (MeOx play an important role as the dominant class for solution-processed interface materials in this development, due to their excellent optical transparency, their relatively high electrical conductivity and their tunable work function. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the most common synthesis methods used for the wet chemical preparation of the most relevant n-type- and p-type-like MeOx interface materials consisting of binary compounds AxBy. Their performance for applications as electron transport/extraction layers (ETL/EEL and as hole transport/extraction layers (HTL/HEL in inverted BHJ solar cells will be reviewed and discussed.

  19. Development of Strained-Layer Superlattice (SLS) IR Detector Camera

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) detectors are a new class of detectors which may be the next generation of band-gap engineered, large format infrared detector...

  20. Development of Novel Two-dimensional Layers, Alloys and Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    The one-atom-think graphene has fantastic properties and attracted tremendous interests in these years, which opens a window towards various two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers. However, making large-size and high-quality 2D layers is still a great challenge. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, we have successfully synthesized a wide varieties of highly crystalline and large scale 2D atomic layers, including h-BN, metal dichalcogenides e.g. MoS2, WS2, CdS, GaSe and MoSe2 which belong to the family of binary 2D materials. Ternary 2D alloys including BCN and MoS2xSe2 (1 - x) are also prepared and characterized. In addition, synthesis of 2D heterostructures such as vertical and lateral graphene/h-BN, vertical and lateral TMDs are also demonstrated. Complementary to CVD grown 2D layers, 2D single-crystal (bulk) such as Phosphorene (P), WTe2, SnSe2, PtS2, PtSe2, PdSe2, WSe2xTe2 (1 - x), Ta2NiS5andTa2NiSe5 are also prepared by solid reactions. There work provide a better understanding of the atomic layered materials in terms of the synthesis, atomic structure, alloying and their physical properties. Potential applications of these 2D layers e.g. optoelectronic devices, energy device and smart coating have been explored.

  1. Effect of surface texture and structure on the development of stable fluvial armors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Stephane; Friedrich, Heide

    2018-04-01

    Stable fluvial armors are found in river systems under conditions of partial sediment transport and limited sediment supply, a common occurrence in nature. Stable armoring is also readily recreated in experimental flumes. Initially, this bed stabilizing phenomenon was examined for different flow discharges and solely related to surface coarsening and bedload transport reduction. The models developed suggest a specific armor composition (i.e., texture) dependent on the parent bed material and formative discharge. Following developments in topographic remote sensing, recent research suggests that armor structure is an important control on bed stability and roughness. In this paper, replicated flume runs during which digital elevation models (DEMs) were collected from both exposed and flooded gravel beds are used to interpret armoring manifestations and to assess their replicability. A range of methodologies was used for the analysis, providing information on (i) surface grain size and orientation, (ii) bed-elevation distributions, (iii) the spatial coherence of the elevations at the grain-scale, (iv) surface slope and aspect, (v) grain imbrication and (vi) the spatial variability in DEM properties. The bed-surface topography was found to be more responsive than bed-material size to changes in flow strength. Our experimental results also provide convincing evidence that gravel-beds' response to water-work during parallel degradation is unique (i.e., replicable) given the formative parameters. Based on this finding, relationships between the armors' properties and formative parameters are proposed, and are supported by adding extensive data from previous research.

  2. Development of "all natural" layer-by-layer redispersible solid lipid nanoparticles by nano spray drying technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taoran; Hu, Qiaobin; Zhou, Mingyong; Xia, Yan; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have gained tremendous attraction as carriers for controlled drug delivery. Despite numerous advances in the field, one long-standing historical challenge for their practical applications remains unmet: redispersibility after drying. In this work, a novel design of SLNs using a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was developed and the formulations were optimized by surface response methodology (Box-Behnken design). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the fabrication of SLNs from all natural ingredients in the absence of any synthetic surfactants or coatings. The SLNs were prepared by a combined solvent-diffusion and hot homogenization method, with soy lecithin as natural emulsifier (first layer), followed by the subsequent coating with sodium caseinate (second layer) and pectin (third layer), both of which are natural food biopolymers. The adsorption of pectin coating onto caseinate was reinforced by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions induced by a pH-driven process along with thermal treatment. The innovative nano spray drying technology was further explored to obtain ultra-fine powders of SLNs. Compared to uncoated or single-layer coated SLNs powders, which showed severe aggregation after spray drying, the well-separated particles with spherical shape and smooth surface were obtained for layer-by-layer (LbL) SLNs, which were redispersible into water without variation of dimension, shape and morphology. The SLNs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and high-performance differential scanning calorimetry for their physical properties. The LbL-coated SLNs based on all natural ingredients have promising features for future applications as drug delivery systems, overcoming the major obstacles in conventional spray drying and redispersing SLNs-based formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a Numerical Model for Evaluating the Effect of Litter Layer on Evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Taek, Park; Shigeaki, Hattori; Takafumi, Tanaka; School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University; School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University; School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University

    1998-01-01

    A numerical model (LITEM) to evaluate the effect of the litter layer on evaporation was developed and used to estimate evaporation, soil temperature and soil water content. This model includes a sub-model to estimate the resistance of the litter layer to evaporation with its thickness and volumetric water content. The resistance of the litter layer to evaporation increases as volumetric water content of the litter layer decreases and as its thickness increases. Evaporation data in a deciduous...

  4. Cures for the shock instability: Development of a shock-stable Roe scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S S; Rho, O H; Kyu-Hong, S

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of an improved Roe scheme that is free from the shock instability and still preserves the accuracy and efficiency of the original Roe's Flux Difference Splitting (FDS). Roe's FDS is known to possess good accuracy but to suffer from the shock instability, such as the carbuncle phenomenon. As the first step towards a shock-stable scheme, Roe's FDS is compared with the HLLE scheme to identify the source of the shock instability. Through a linear perturbation analysis on the odd-even decoupling problem, damping characteristic is examined and Mach number-based functions f and g are introduced to balance damping and feeding rates, which leads to a shock-stable Roe scheme. In order to satisfy the conservation of total enthalpy, which is crucial in predicting surface heat transfer rate in high-speed steady flows, an analysis of dissipation mechanism in the energy equation is carried out to find out the error source and to make the proposed scheme preserve total enthalpy. By modif...

  5. Design of ultra-stable insulin analogues for the developing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Weiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of insulin analogues illustrates the application of structure-based protein design to clinical medicine. Such design has traditionally been based on structures of wild-type insulin hexamers in an effort to optimize the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic properties of the hormone. Rapid-acting insulin analogues (in chronological order of their clinical introduction, Humalog ® [Eli Lilly & Co.], Novolog ® [Novo-Nordisk], and Apidra ® [Sanofi-Aventis] exploit the targeted destabilization of subunit interfaces to facilitate capillary absorption. Conversely, long-acting insulin analogues exploit the stability of the insulin hexamer and its higher-order self-assembly within the subcutaneous depot to enhance basal glycemic control. Current products either operate through isoelectric precipitation (insulin glargine, the active component of Lantus ® ; Sanofi-Aventis or employ an albumin-binding acyl tether (insulin detemir, the active component of Levemir ® ; Novo-Nordisk. Such molecular engineering has often encountered a trade-off between PK goals and product stability. Given the global dimensions of the diabetes pandemic and complexity of an associated cold chain of insulin distribution, we envisage that concurrent engineering of ultra-stable protein analogue formulations would benefit the developing world, especially for patients exposed to high temperatures with inconsistent access to refrigeration. We review the principal mechanisms of insulin degradation above room temperature and novel molecular approaches toward the design of ultra-stable rapid-acting and basal formulations.

  6. A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid Metal Structures and Electronic Equilibrium - 154041

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0027 A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal Structures and...to 16 Dec 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal...Air Force Research Laboratory for accurately predicting compositions of new amorphous alloys specifically based on aluminium with properties superior

  7. Development of High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The quality of antiretroviral medicines (ARVs) is vital in the management of HIV infection. Nevertheless ... and validation, a high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) system with WinCATS software was used. Freshly prepared ..... into Vocational Excellence in East Africa (THRiVE)”, grant number ...

  8. Development of a Layered Conditional Random Field Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2014-12-01

    Dec 1, 2014 ... and intelligent layered conditional random field based network intrusion detection system. (LCRFNIDS) for ... of this study will help to proactively address potential security vulnerabilities by detecting attacks and security ...... International Conference of Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence,. Networking ...

  9. Sintering, camber development of layer composites and a new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NiZnCu hexagonal ferrite (abbreviated as ZT/NZC) composite samples were prepared successfully by using restricted shrinkage sintering process (RSS) (Liu et al 2009a, b). But the electromagnetic performance degra- dation of co-sintered layer ...

  10. Is going into stable symptomatic remission associated with a more positive development of life satisfaction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardsjord, Erlend Strand; Romm, Kristin Lie; Røssberg, Jan Ivar

    2017-01-01

    by the Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group. One-way ANOVA, mixed model analysis, bivariate correlations and multiple regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Patients going into stable symptomatic remission showed a more positive S-QoL-development over the follow-up period and reported higher life...... satisfaction at 10-year follow-up compared to non-remission. At 10-year follow-up, depressive symptoms and alcohol abuse or dependence explained a significant amount of variance in S-QoL among patients in remission. Among patients in non-remission, PANSS excitative component explained a significant amount...... implications. While patients in remission might need treatment for depressive symptoms to increase S-QoL, in non-remission measures aiming to decrease hostility and uncooperativeness should be part of the treatment approach. Alcohol problems should be treated regardless of remission status....

  11. Stable intergenerational associations of childhood overweight during the development of the obesity epidemic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Teresa A; Ängquist, Lars; Silventoinen, Karri

    2015-01-01

    of children born to parents with and without childhood overweight. METHODS: The study population was from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, which includes age- and sex-specific body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2) ) of children. This study used BMI values from 7-year-old children born 1952-1989 and from....... RESULTS: Stable levels in parent-child overweight associations were observed across child BMI groups born to parents with and without childhood overweight. A slight upward odds ratio trend was observed across time in children born to two overweight parents at age 13, but not at age 7 years. CONCLUSIONS......: Parent-child resemblance in childhood overweight showed small changes during the development of the obesity epidemic, suggesting that the obesogenic environment inducing the epidemic in Denmark influenced children irrespective of their familial predisposition....

  12. Development of stable low-electroosmotic mobility coatings. [for use in electrophoresis systems in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    Long-time rinsings of the Z6040-methlycellulose coating used successfully on the ASTP MA=011 experiment indicate the permanency of this coating is inadequate for continuous flowing systems. Two approaches are described for developing coatings which are stable under continuous fluid movement and which exhibit finite and predictable electroosmotic mobility values while being effective on different types of surfaces, such as glass, plastics, and ceramic alumina, such as is currently used as the electrophoresis channel in the GE-SPAR-CPE apparatus. The surface charge modification of polystyrene latex, especially by protein absorption, to be used as model materials for ground-based electrophoresis experiments, and the preliminary work directed towards the seeded polymerization of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  13. Development of DC active filter for high magnetic field stable power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lei; Liu Xiaoning

    2008-01-01

    The DC active filter (DAF), with very low current ripple, of the stable power supply system of high magnetic field device is developed by using the PWM and parallel active power filter technique. Due to the PWM control technique, the required DAF current can be obtained and the current ripple can be compensated by means of monitoring the load voltage, and the current ripple becomes very low by adjusting the load voltage. The simulation and analysis show that this system can respond to the reference quickly and is effective in suppressing the harmonics, especially the low-order harmonics. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is proved on the equipment built in the laboratory. (authors)

  14. Synergetic effects of solution-processable fluorinated graphene and PEDOT as a hole-transporting layer for highly efficient and stable normal-structure perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jae-Hun; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Joh, Han-Ik; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Na, Seok-In

    2017-11-16

    We demonstrate that a bi-interlayer consisting of water-free poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and fluorinated reduced graphene oxide (FrGO) noticeably enhances the efficiency and the stability of the normal-structure perovskite solar cells (PeSCs). With simple and low temperature solution-processing, the PeSC employing the PEDOT + FrGO interlayer exhibits a significantly improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.9%. Comprehensive investigations indicate that the enhanced PCE is mostly attributed to the retarded recombination in the devices. The minimized recombination phenomena are related to the interfacial dipoles at the PEDOT/FrGO interface, which facilitates the electron-blocking and the higher built-in potential in the devices. Furthermore, the PEDOT + FrGO device shows a better stability by maintaining 70% of the initial PCE over the 30 days exposure to ambient conditions. This is because the more hydrophobic graphitic sheets of the FrGO on the PEDOT further protect the perovskite films from oxygen/water penetration. Consequently, the introduction of composite interfacial layers including graphene derivatives can be an effective and versatile strategy for high-performing, stable, and cost-effective PeSCs.

  15. The Development of Love Wave-Based Humidity Sensors Incorporating Multiple Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A Love wave humidity sensor is developed by using a multilayer structure consisting of PVA/SiO2 layers on an ST-90°X quartz substrate. The theoretical result shows that the sensor with such a two-layer structure can achieve a higher sensitivity and a smaller loss than the structures with a single polymer layer. Comparative experiments are performed for the sensor incorporating PVA/SiO2 layers and the sensor incorporating a PVA layer. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predication.

  16. The development of love wave-based humidity sensors incorporating multiple layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Jiansheng; He, Shitang

    2015-04-14

    A Love wave humidity sensor is developed by using a multilayer structure consisting of PVA/SiO2 layers on an ST-90°X quartz substrate. The theoretical result shows that the sensor with such a two-layer structure can achieve a higher sensitivity and a smaller loss than the structures with a single polymer layer. Comparative experiments are performed for the sensor incorporating PVA/SiO2 layers and the sensor incorporating a PVA layer. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predication.

  17. Recent developments in stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis with special regard to Alternaria toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asam, Stefan; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) are becoming ever commoner in mycotoxin analysis, and the number of synthesized or commercially available isotopically labelled compounds has greatly increased in the 7 years since our last review dealing with this topic. Thus, this review is conceived as an update for new applications or improvements of SIDAs for compounds discussed earlier, but the main focus is on newly introduced labelled substances and the development of SIDAs for, for example, fusarin C, moniliformin or the enniatins. Mycotoxin research has concentrated on the emerging group of Alternaria toxins in recent years, and a series of SIDAs have been developed, including ones for tenuazonic acid, alternariol, altertoxins and tentoxin that are discussed in detail in this review. Information about synthetic routes, isotopic purity and mass-spectrometric characterization of labelled compounds is given, as well as about the development and validation of SIDAs and their application to foods, feeds or biological samples. As the number of commercially available labelled standards is increasing continuously, a general tendency for the use of analytical methods based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry capable of identifying a series of mycotoxins simultaneously ("multimethods") and using one or more labelled internal standards can be observed. An overview of these applications is given, thus demonstrating that SIDAs are increasingly being used in routine analysis.

  18. Stable intergenerational associations of childhood overweight during the development of the obesity epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajslev, Teresa A; Ängquist, Lars; Silventoinen, Karri; Baker, Jennifer L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2015-06-01

    The obesity epidemic may have developed as a response to the obesogenic environment among the genetically predisposed. This investigation examined whether the intergenerational resemblances in childhood overweight changed across the development of the obesity epidemic in groups of children born to parents with and without childhood overweight. The study population was from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, which includes age- and sex-specific body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2) ) of children. This study used BMI values from 7-year-old children born 1952-1989 and from their parents at ages 7 and 13 years. The available number of parent-child pairs ranged from 17,926 through 42,184. The odds ratios of childhood overweight (BMI z-score >90th percentile) were calculated using logistic regression by parental BMI groups (BMI > or ≤90th percentile) and child birth year intervals. Stable levels in parent-child overweight associations were observed across child BMI groups born to parents with and without childhood overweight. A slight upward odds ratio trend was observed across time in children born to two overweight parents at age 13, but not at age 7 years. Parent-child resemblance in childhood overweight showed small changes during the development of the obesity epidemic, suggesting that the obesogenic environment inducing the epidemic in Denmark influenced children irrespective of their familial predisposition. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  19. Development of 4-methoxy-7-nitroindolinyl (MNI)-caged auxins which are extremely stable in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Kusaka, Naoyuki; Yamasaki, Soma; Zhao, Yunde; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-15

    Phytohormone auxin is a master regulator in plant growth and development. Regulation of cellular auxin level plays a central role in plant development. Auxin polar transport system modulates an auxin gradient that determines plant developmental process in response to environmental conditions and developmental programs. Photolabile caged auxins allow optical control of artificial auxin gradients at cellular resolution. Especially, two-photon uncaging system achieves high spatiotemporal control of photolysis reaction at two-photon cross-section. However, the development of caged versions of auxin has been limited by the instability of the caged auxins to higher plant metabolic activities. Here, we describe the synthesis and application of highly stable caged auxins, 4-methoxy-7-nitroindolinyl (MNI)-caged auxins. Natural auxin, indole 3-acetic acid, and two synthetic auxins, 1-NAA and 2,4-D were caged by MNI caging group. MNI-caged auxins showed a high stability in planta and a rapid release the original auxin when photolyzed. We demonstrated that optical control of auxin-responsive gene expression and auxin-related physiological responses by using MNI-caged auxins. We anticipate that MNI-caged auxins will be an effective tool for high-resolution control of endogenous auxin level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of new technology for the use of stable isotopic tracers in the study of human health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacyey, D.L.; Klein, P.D.; Szczepanik, P.A.; Niu, W.; Stellaard, F.; Tserng, K.Y.

    1977-01-01

    This program has five major aspects: first, the development of analytical instrumentation of requisite sensitivity, stability, and simplicity to conduct stable isotope measurements in a routine manner; second, the development of appropriately labeled compounds for metabolic investigations, initially through custom syntheses but eventually through commercial sources; third, development of analytical methodology to isolate, purify, and determine the isotopic content of specific organic compounds reflecting metabolic processes or disease states; fourth, collaborative development of clinical applications and testing on a routine basis, through a network of clinical centers around the country; and finally, the collection and dissemination of stable isotope information on an international scale through survey publications and conferences

  1. Mechanical resistance by an ectorganic soil layer on roo development of seedling Pinus sylvestris.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, den J.; Vogels, D.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated early root development of Pinus sylvestris seedlings in relation to bulk density and natural particle layering in an ectorganic soil layer from a bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) stand. Responses in root development to two levels of bulk density (0.07 and 0.15 g/cm3) in mixed bracken

  2. Printed biotin-functionalised polythiophene films as biorecognition layers in the development of paper-based biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihalainen, Petri, E-mail: petri.ihalainen@abo.fi [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Center for Functional Materials, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Pesonen, Markus [Physics, Center for Functional Materials, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Sund, Pernilla [Laboratory of Polymer Technology, Center for Functional Materials, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Viitala, Tapani [Centre for Drug Research, Division of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Määttänen, Anni; Sarfraz, Jawad [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Center for Functional Materials, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Wilén, Carl-Erik [Laboratory of Polymer Technology, Center for Functional Materials, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Österbacka, Ronald [Physics, Center for Functional Materials, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Peltonen, Jouko [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Center for Functional Materials, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland)

    2016-02-28

    Highlights: • Inkjet-printed polythiophene films show good adhesion on ultrathin gold films. • Biotin-functionalisation of polythiophene enables specificity towards streptavidin. • Supramolecular biorecognition architectures can be prepared by printing. • The addition of each printed layer can be followed by a change in capacitance. - Abstract: The integration of flexible electronic sensors in clinical diagnostics is visioned to significantly reduce the cost of many diagnostic tests and ultimately make healthcare more accessible. This study concentrates on the characterisation of inkjet-printed bio-functionalised polythiophene films on paper-based ultrathin gold film (UTGF) electrodes and their possible application as biorecognition layers. Physicochemical surface properties (topography, chemistry, and wetting) and electrochemical characteristics of water-soluble regioirregular tetraethylene-glycol polythiophene (TEGPT) and biotin-functionalised TEGPT (b-TEGPT) films were examined and compared. In addition, their specificity towards streptavidin protein was tested. The results show that stable supramolecular biorecognition layers of insulating b-TEGPT and streptavidin were successfully fabricated on a paper-based UTGF by inkjet-printing. Good adhesion of thiophene to UTGF can be attributed to covalent linkage between sulphur and gold, whereas the stability of the streptavidin layer is due to the high affinity between biotin and streptavidin. The device introduced can be utilised in the development of biosensors for clinically relevant analytes e.g. for detecting complementary DNA oligomers or antibody–antigen complexes.

  3. (Invited) Towards the Development of Active, Stable and Abundant Catalysts for Oxygen Evolution in Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan; Paoli, Elisa Antares; Frydendal, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    to the TW level. State-of the art PEM electrolysers employ IrOx, which is both expensive and scarce, to catalyse oxygen evolution.(1) Around a decade’s worth of Ir production would be required to scale up PEM electrolysis to the TW scale: this is clearly untenable.(2) It turns out that RuOx has a higher...... and also most prone to dissolution, could be stabilised by TiOx. We test this notion by performing oxygen evolution on Mn-TiOx thin films. We probe the composition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and dissolution with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. We confirm that Ti......Ox does indeed engender MnOx with modest stability. Further development of this strategy opens up the possibility of developing active, stable and abundant non-precious metal oxides for oxygen evolution in acid. References 1. M. K. Debe, S. M. Hendricks, G. D. Vernstrom, M. Meyers, M. Brostrom, M...

  4. Ion source developments for stable and radioactive ion beams at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, R; Lecesne, N; Jardin, P; Gaubert, G; Huguet, Y; Pacquet, J Y; Villari, A C C; Lecler, D; Been, T

    1999-01-01

    Since now many years, the Ganil ion source team has in charge to develop ion sources with three main purposes. The first one concerns the radioactive ion production that implies high efficiency ion sources as the amount of created exotic atoms is very low (between 10 to 108 particle per second). The second one deals with high intensities of stable metallic ion beams for the injectors of the accelerator while the last one tries to increase the intensities of very high charge state ion beams for atomic physic. Concerning radioactive ion production, the recent results obtained, in collaboration with the ISN Grenoble group, with the 1+/n+ method drove us to develop a new concept of ecr ion source for monocharged ion production. The results of the first tests of this source will be given. This new idea for the construction of ecr ion source can be applied to multicharged ion production. Concerning the high charge state ion beam production, a new source called SUPERSHYPIE has been built that allow to increase by a ...

  5. Observations of the Morning Development of the Urban Boundary Layer Over London, UK, Taken During the ACTUAL Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halios, Christos H.; Barlow, Janet F.

    2018-03-01

    The study of the boundary layer can be most difficult when it is in transition and forced by a complex surface, such as an urban area. Here, a novel combination of ground-based remote sensing and in situ instrumentation in central London, UK, is deployed, aiming to capture the full evolution of the urban boundary layer (UBL) from night-time until the fully-developed convective phase. In contrast with the night-time stable boundary layer observed over rural areas, the night-time UBL is weakly convective. Therefore, a new approach for the detection of the morning-transition and rapid-growth phases is introduced, based on the sharp, quasi-linear increase of the mixing height. The urban morning-transition phase varied in duration between 0.5 and 4 h and the growth rate of the mixing layer during the rapid-growth phase had a strong positive relationship with the convective velocity scale, and a weaker, negative relationship with wind speed. Wind shear was found to be higher during the night-time and morning-transition phases than the rapid-growth phase and the shear production of turbulent kinetic energy near the mixing-layer top was around six times larger than surface shear production in summer, and around 1.5 times larger in winter. In summer under low winds, low-level jets dominated the UBL, and shear production was greater than buoyant production during the night-time and the morning-transition phase near the mixing-layer top. Within the rapid-growth phase, buoyant production dominated at the surface, but shear production dominated in the upper half of the UBL. These results imply that regional flows such as low-level jets play an important role alongside surface forcing in determining UBL structure and growth.

  6. Development of polymer nanocomposites based on layered double hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sipusic, J.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanocomposites are commonly considered as systems composed of a polymeric matrix and - usually inorganic - filler. The types of nanofillers are indicated in Fig. 1. Beside wellknown layered silicate fillers, recent attention is attracted to layered double hydroxide fillers (LDH, mainly of synthetic origin. The structure of LDH is based on brucite, or magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH2 and is illustrated in Fig. 2. The modification of LDHs is commonly done by organic anions, to increase the original interlayer distance and to improve the organophilicity of the filler, keeping in mind their final application as fillers for, usually hydrophobic, polymer matrices. We have used the modified rehydration procedure for preparing organically modified LDH. The stoichiometric quantities of Ca33Al2O6, CaO and benzoic (B (or undecenoic (U acid were mixed with water and some acetone. After long and vigorous shaking, the precipitated fillers were washed, dried and characterized. X-ray diffraction method (XRD has shown the increase of the original interlayer distance for unmodified LDH (OH–-saturated of 0.76 nm to the 1.6 nm in LDH-B or LDH-U fillers (Fig. 3. Infrared spectroscopy method (FTIR has confirmed the incorporation of benzoic anion within the filler layers (Fig. 4. For the preparation of LDH-B and LDH-U composites with polystyrene (PS, poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and copolymer (SMMA matrices, a two-step in situ bulk radical polymerization was selected (Table 1 for recipes, azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator, using conventional stirred tank reactor in the first step, and heated mold with the movable wall (Fig. 6 in the second step of polymerization. All the prepared composites with LDH-U fillers were macroscopically phase-separated, as was the PMMA/LDH-B composite.PS/LDH-B and SMMA/LDH-B samples were found to be transparent and were further examined for deduction of their structure (Fig. 5 and thermal properties. FTIR measurements showed that

  7. Development of a Stable TiO2 Nanocomposite Self-Cleaning Coating for Outdoor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Madidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A convenient and low-cost approach for the elaboration of a stable superhydrophobic coating is reported, involving the use of TiO2 nanoparticles via the spray coating method. This method can be used for preparing self-cleaning superhydrophobic coatings on large areas for different kinds of substrates. The synergistic effect of the micro/nanobinary scale roughness was produced by a multilayer RTV SR/TiO2 composite. The influence of the nanofiller concentration in a specific frequency range (40 Hz to 2 MHz on the dielectric behavior was analyzed as well. It was found that the real relative permittivity (εr′ increases as the nanofiller concentration increases. Superhydrophobic behavior is analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and profilometer. The stability of the developed coating also has been evaluated in terms of immersion in various aqueous solutions, heating, adhesion, and exposure to UV irradiation, and the results showed good stability against these factors. The coating retained its superhydrophobicity after several days of immersion in solutions of different pH levels (2, 4, 6, and 12 and different conductivities. In addition, they also exhibited exceptional stability against UV radiation and heating, as well as good mechanical stability.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF MODEL FOR QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF DYNAMICALLY STABLE FORMS OF RIVER CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Zenkin

    2017-01-01

    systems. The determination of regularities of development of bed forms and quantitative relations between their parameters are based on modeling the “right” forms of riverbed.The research has resulted in establishing and testing methodology of simulation modeling, which allows one to identify dynamically stable form of riverbed. 

  9. Application of a mixture of soils to create a stable layer of support on the slope in ponds waterproofed with geo membranes. Application to a specific case in the reservoir Conseller Jose Ramon Garcia Anton in Elche (Alicante)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferran Gozalvez, F. J.; Ferrer Gisbert, C.; Redon Santafe, M.; Perez Sanchez, M.; Torregrosa Solar, J. S.; Zapata Raboso, F. J.; Sanchez Romero, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    This text present the experience developed in a reservoir in Elche (Alicante). This communication explains the importance of the layer of support to prevent the punching. This phenomenon can occur in a reservoir that has a deficient layer of support. Also, the paper describes the requirements to be met by the support layer to perform its function. (Author)

  10. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (BRAZIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  11. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (URUGUAY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  12. Development and analysis of multi-layer scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papenburg, B.J.; Liu, J.; Higuera Sierra, Gustavo; Barradas, A.M.C.; de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    The development of 3D scaffolds consisting of stacked multi-layered porous sheets featuring microchannels is proposed and investigated in this work. In this concept, the inner-porosity of the sheets allows diffusion of nutrients and signalling products between the layers whereas the microchannels

  13. Development of compound layer of iron (carbo)nitrides during nitriding of steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratajski, J.; Tacikowski, J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and phase constitution of a compound layer developing during gaseous nitriding was investigated at 853 K for three commercial steels (AISI 120, 4340 and 1090) and Armco iron. The compound layers were characterised by light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe...

  14. Differences in egg nutrient availability, development, and nutrient metabolism of broiler and layer embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangsuay, A.; Molenaar, R.; Meijerhof, R.; Anker, van den I.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2015-01-01

    Selection for production traits of broilers and layers leads to physiological differences, which may already be present during incubation. This study aimed to investigate the influence of strain (broiler vs layer) on egg nutrient availability, embryonic development and nutrient metabolism. A total

  15. Development of compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburising; current status and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of the compound layer during gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburising of Fe based material is described. The first nucleation of the compound layer at the surface depends on the competition between the dissociation of ammonia and the removal of nitrogen from the surface by solid sta...

  16. Variation of stable silicon isotopes. Analytical developments and applications in Precambrian geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis predominantly deals with bulk-rock measurements of silicon stable isotopes on a Multi Collector-ICP-MS. Analyses were performed in cooperation with the Royal Museum for Central Africa, Belgium. The first section describes how the first analysis of δ 30 Si on a conventional Nu PlasmaTM Multi-Collector ICP-MS instrument can be enabled by the elimination of 14N16O interference overlying the 30Si peak. The determination of δ 30 Si was rendered possible owing to new instrumental upgrades that facilitate the application of a higher mass resolution. The careful characterisation of appropriate reference materials is indispensable for the assessment of the accuracy of a measurement. The determination of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reference materials represents the second objective of this section. The analysis of two Hawaiian standards (BHVO-1 and BHVO-2) demonstrates precise and accurate δ 30 Si determinations and provides cross-calibration data as a quality control for other laboratories. The second section focuses on coupled silicon-oxygen isotopic evidences for the origin of silicification in mafic volcanic rocks of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. In contrast to the modern Earth, silicification of near-surface layers, including chert formation, were widespread processes on the Precambrian ocean floor, and demonstrate the ubiquity of extreme silica mobilization in the early Earth. This section outlines the investigation of silicon and oxygen isotopes on three different stratigraphic sections of variably silicified basalts and overlying bedded cherts from the 3.54 Ga, 3.45 Ga and 3.33 Ga Theespruit, Kromberg and Hooggenoeg Formations, respectively. Silicon isotopes, oxygen isotopes and the variable SiO 2 -contents demonstrate a positive correlation with silicification intensity in all three sections, with varying gradients of δ 30 Si vs. δ 18 O arrays for different sections. Seawater has been regarded as the most

  17. Development of stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of Amadori compounds in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitinger, Michael; Hartmann, Sandra; Schieberle, Peter

    2014-06-04

    During thermal processing of foods, reducing carbohydrates and amino acids may form 1-amino-1-desoxyketoses named Amadori rearrangement products after the Italian chemist Mario Amadori. Although these compounds are transient intermediates of the Maillard reaction, they are often used as suitable markers to measure the extent of a thermal food processing, such as for spray-dried milk or dried fruits. Several methods are already available in the literature for their quantitation, but measurements are often done with external calibration without addressing losses during the workup procedure. To cope with this challenge, stable isotope dilution assays in combination with LC-MS/MS were developed for the glucose-derived Amadori products of the seven amino acids valine, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine, and histidine using the respective synthesized [(13)C6]-labeled isotopologues as internal standards. The quantitation of the analytes added to a model matrix showed a very good sensitivity with the lowest limits of detection for the Amadori compound of phenylalanine of 0.1 μg/kg starch and 0.2 μg/kg oil, respectively. Also, the standard deviation measured in, for example, wheat beer was only ±2% for this analyte. Application of the method to several foods showed the highest concentrations of the Amadori product of valine in unroasted cocoa (342 mg/kg) as well as in dried bell pepper (3460 mg/kg). In agreement with literature data, drying of foods led to the formation of Amadori products, whereas they were degraded during roasting of, for example, coffee or cocoa. The study presents for the first time results on concentrations of the Amadori compounds of tyrosine and histidine in foods.

  18. WCF multi-layer services development with Entity framework

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Mike

    2014-01-01

    If you are a C#, VB.NET, or C++ developer and want to get started with WCF and Entity Framework, then this book is for you. Competence in Entity Framework will be needed to follow the examples in the book, but experience in creating WCF services using Entity Framework is not necessary. Developers and architects evaluating SOA implementation technologies for their company will find this book useful.

  19. Electrochemical Double Layered Capacitor Development and Implementation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Gavin P.

    Electrochemical Double Layered Capacitors (EDLC's) are becoming a more popular topic of research for hybrid power systems, especially vehicles. They are known for their high power density, high cycle life, low internal resistance, and wider operating temperature compared to batteries. They are rarely used as a standalone power source; however, because of their lack of energy density compared to batteries and fuel cells. Researchers are now discovering the benefits of using them in hybrid systems. The increased complexity of a hybrid power source presents many challenges. A major drawback of this complexity is the lack of design tools to assist a designer in translating a simulation all the way to a full scale implementation. A full spectrum of tools was designed to assist designers at all stages of implementation including: single cell testing, a multi-cell management system, and a full scale vehicle data acquisition system to monitor performance. First, the full scale vehicle data acquisition is described. The system is isolated from the electric shuttle bus it was tested on to allow the system to be ported to other vehicles and applications. This was done to modularize the system to characterize a wide variety of full scale applications. Next, a single cell test system was designed that allows the designer to characterize cell specifications, as well as, test control and safety systems in a controlled environment. The goal is to ensure safety systems can be thoroughly tested to ensure robustness as the bank is scaled up. This system also includes simulation models that provide examples of using the simulation to predict the behavior of a cell and the test system to validate the results of the simulation. This information is then used by the designer to more effectively design sensor ranges for the bank. Finally, a multi-cell EDLC management system was designed to implement a bank. It incorporates 12 series EDLC cells per control module, and the modular design

  20. Stable isotopic analysis of fossil chironomids as an approach to environmental reconstruction: state of development and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Heiri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Remains of chironomid larvae, especially their strongly sclerotized head capsules, can be found abundantly and well preserved in most lake sediment records. These remains mainly consist of chitin and proteins and, since their chemical composition does not seem to be strongly affected by decompositional processes, they can be used to develop palaeoenvironmental reconstructions based on their stable isotopic composition. Here we review available stable isotope studies based on fossil chironomids and indicate future research necessary to further develop this still relatively new research approach. Efforts to produce stable isotope records based on fossil chironomids have mainly examined the elements H, N, C, and O. They have focussed on (1 developing the methodology for preparing samples for isotopic analysis, (2 laboratory studies cultivating chironomid larvae under controlled conditions to determine the factors affecting their stable isotopic composition, (3 ecosystem-scale studies relating stable isotopic measurements of fossil chironomid assemblages to environmental conditions, and (4 developing first down-core records describing past changes in the stable isotopic composition of chironomid assemblages. These studies have shown that chemical sample pretreatment may affect the isotopic composition for some elements. Laboratory runs suggest that the diet of the larvae influences their stable isotopic composition for H, N, C and O, whereas stable isotopes in the ambient water also strongly influence their oxygen and to a lesser extent hydrogen isotopic composition. These experiments also indicate only minor offsets between the nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of chironomid soft tissue and the fossilizing head capsules, whereas for hydrogen and oxygen this offset remains to be explored. Though few datasets have been published, the available ecosystem studies and developed down-core sediment records indicate that stable isotopes in

  1. Measurement of the Flow Over Two Parallel Mountain Ridges in the Nighttime Stable Boundary Layer With Scanning Lidar Systems at the Perdigão 2017 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildmann, N.; Kigle, S.; Gerz, T.; Bell, T.; Klein, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    For onshore wind energy production, the highest wind potential is often found on exposed spots like hilltops, mountain ridges or escarpments with heterogeneous land cover. The understanding of the flow field in such complex terrain in the relevant heights where wind power is generated is an ongoing field of research. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) contributed to the NEWA (New European Wind Atlas) experiment in the province of Perdigão (Portugal) with three long-range Doppler wind lidar of type Leosphere Windcube-200S from May to June 2017. In the experiment, a single wind energy converter (WEC) of type Enercon E82 is situated on a forested mountain ridge. In main wind direction, which is from South-West and almost perpendicular to the ridge, a valley and then a second mountain ridge in a distance of approximately 1.4 km follow. Two of the DLR lidar instruments are placed downstream and in line with the main wind direction and the WEC. One of these instruments is placed in the valley, and the other one on the distant mountain ridge. This line-up allows coplanar scanning of the flow in the valley and over the ridge tops and thus the determination of horizontal and vertical wind components. The third DLR system, placed on the WEC ridge, and an additional scanning lidar from the University of Oklahoma, placed in the valley, are used to determine the cross-wind component of the flow. Regular flow features that were observed with this lidar setup in the six weeks of the intensive operation period are jet-like layers of high wind speeds that occur during the night from a North-Easterly direction. These jets are found to have wind speeds up to 13 m s-1 and are very variable with regards to their maximum speed, height and broadness. Depending on the Froude number of the flow, waves are forming over the two mountain ridges with either a stable wavelength that equals the mountain ridge distance, or more dynamic higher frequency oscillations. All of these flow features are

  2. Printed biotin-functionalised polythiophene films as biorecognition layers in the development of paper-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Pesonen, Markus; Sund, Pernilla; Viitala, Tapani; Määttänen, Anni; Sarfraz, Jawad; Wilén, Carl-Erik; Österbacka, Ronald; Peltonen, Jouko

    2016-02-01

    The integration of flexible electronic sensors in clinical diagnostics is visioned to significantly reduce the cost of many diagnostic tests and ultimately make healthcare more accessible. This study concentrates on the characterisation of inkjet-printed bio-functionalised polythiophene films on paper-based ultrathin gold film (UTGF) electrodes and their possible application as biorecognition layers. Physicochemical surface properties (topography, chemistry, and wetting) and electrochemical characteristics of water-soluble regioirregular tetraethylene-glycol polythiophene (TEGPT) and biotin-functionalised TEGPT (b-TEGPT) films were examined and compared. In addition, their specificity towards streptavidin protein was tested. The results show that stable supramolecular biorecognition layers of insulating b-TEGPT and streptavidin were successfully fabricated on a paper-based UTGF by inkjet-printing. Good adhesion of thiophene to UTGF can be attributed to covalent linkage between sulphur and gold, whereas the stability of the streptavidin layer is due to the high affinity between biotin and streptavidin. The device introduced can be utilised in the development of biosensors for clinically relevant analytes e.g. for detecting complementary DNA oligomers or antibody-antigen complexes.

  3. Development of Buffer Layer Technologies for LWIR and VLWIR HgCdTe Integration on Si

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golding, Terry D

    2005-01-01

    This program proposed to develop manufacturable, cost-effective buffer layer technologies that would allow either hybrid or monolithic integration of LWIR and VLWIR HgCdTe infrared focal plane arrays...

  4. Development of a stable positive control to be used for quality assurance of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, Inge; Mens, Petra F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a simple, cheap, and stable positive control for the quality control and quality assurance (QA) of rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) for the diagnosis of malaria. Plasmodium falciparum in vitro culture of known parasite concentrations was dried on a

  5. Development and oviposition preference of house flies and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) in six substrates from Florida equine facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    House flies, Musca domestica L., and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), (Diptera: Muscidae), common pests on equine facilities, were studied in the laboratory to determine their oviposition preferences and larval development on six substrates commonly found on equine facilities. The substrates...

  6. Development of Silicon Drift Detectors using Boron layer technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golshani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a large variety of fields such as medicine, security, defense, geophysics, industry and physics. They have been developed to detect the energy or position of radiation or charge particles. In Chapter 1 several X-ray detectors were introduced briefly. In gas filled

  7. Efficacy and longevity of the newly developed catnip oil microcapsules against stable fly oviposition larval growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most important pests of cattle and costs U.S. cattle producers billions of dollars in losses annually. In this study, the efficacy of catnip oil encapsulated in gelatin in oviposition deterrence and larval growth inhibition in st...

  8. Efficacy and longevity of newly developed catnip oil microcapsules against stable fly oviposition and larval growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J J; Wienhold, B J; Wehrle, J; Davis, D; Chen, H; Taylor, D; Friesen, K; Zurek, L

    2014-06-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most important pests of cattle and costs U.S. cattle producers billions of dollars in losses annually. In this study, the efficacy of catnip oil encapsulated in gelatin in oviposition deterrence and larval growth inhibition in stable flies was examined under laboratory conditions. More than 98% inhibition of stable fly larval growth and female oviposition was observed in larval and oviposition media treated with encapsulated catnip oil (0.5 g). Further, dose-response tests showed that as little as 0.1 g of encapsulated catnip oil provided > 85% oviposition deterrence. The release of nepetalactones from the capsules was more rapid when the capsules were placed on a moist substrate rather than a dry substrate. Encapsulated catnip oil also exhibited antibacterial activity, supporting the hypothesis that its inhibition of larval growth may be based on its killing of the bacteria on which larvae feed. The use of encapsulated catnip oil can provide an alternative control strategy for stable fly management. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Environmental parameters associated with stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) development at hay feeding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substrates composed of hay residues, dung, and urine accumulate around winter hay feeding sites in cattle pastures, providing developmental habitats for stable flies. The objective of this study was to relate physiochemical and microbial properties of these substrates to the presence or absence of s...

  10. Environmental parameters associated with stable fly development at hay feeding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substrates composed of hay residues, dung, and urine accumulate around winter hay feeding sites in cattle pastures providing developmental habitat for stable flies. The objective of this study was to relate physiochemical and microbial properties of this substrate to the presence or absence of devel...

  11. Recent developments in application of stable isotope analysis on agro-product authenticity and traceability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Gang; Chen, Ailiang; Yang, Shuming; Ye, Zhihua

    2014-02-15

    With the globalisation of agro-product markets and convenient transportation of food across countries and continents, the potential for distribution of mis-labelled products increases accordingly, highlighting the need for measures to identify the origin of food. High quality food with identified geographic origin is a concern not only for consumers, but also for agriculture farmers, retailers and administrative authorities. Currently, stable isotope ratio analysis in combination with other chemical methods gradually becomes a promising approach for agro-product authenticity and traceability. In the last five years, a growing number of research papers have been published on tracing agro-products by stable isotope ratio analysis and techniques combining with other instruments. In these reports, the global variety of stable isotope compositions has been investigated, including light elements such as C, N, H, O and S, and heavy isotopes variation such as Sr and B. Several factors also have been considered, including the latitude, altitude, evaporation and climate conditions. In the present paper, an overview is provided on the authenticity and traceability of the agro-products from both animal and plant sources by stable isotope ratio analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of seasonal heat storage based on stable supercooling of a sodium acetate water mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua; Andersen, Elsa

    2012-01-01

    A number of heat storage modules for seasonal heat storages based on stable supercooling of a sodium acetate water mixture have been tested by means of experiments in a heat storage test facility. The modules had different volumes and designs. Further, different methods were used to transfer heat...

  13. Environmental Parameters Associated With Stable Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Development at Hay Feeding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Kristina; Berkebile, Dennis; Wienhold, Brian; Durso, Lisa; Zhu, Jerry; Taylor, David B

    2016-03-25

    Substrates composed of hay residues, dung, and urine accumulate around winter hay feeding sites in cattle pastures, providing developmental habitats for stable flies. The objective of this study was to relate physiochemical and microbial properties of these substrates to the presence or absence of stable fly larvae. Properties included pH, temperature, moisture, ammonium concentration, electrical conductivity, and numbers of coliform, fecal coliform,Escherichia coli, andEnterococcusbacteria. Each physiochemical sample was classified as a function of belonging to one of the three 2-m concentric zones radiating from the feeder as well as presence or absence of larvae. In total, 538 samples were collected from 13 sites during 2005-2011. Stable fly larvae were most likely to be found in moist, slightly alkaline substrates with high levels of ammonium and low temperature. The probability of larvae being present in a sample was the highest when the moisture content was 347% relative to dry weight and the average pH was 8.4. Larvae were recovered within all zones, with a nonsignificant, but slightly higher, percentage of samples containing larvae taken 2-4 m from the center. All methods used to enumerate bacteria, except total coliform, indicated decreasing concentrations in hay bale residue throughout the summer. In addition to the environmental parameters, cumulative degree day 10°C had a significant effect on the probability of observing stable fly larvae in a sample, indicating that unidentified seasonal effects also influenced immature stable fly populations. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  14. Efficient and Air-Stable Planar Perovskite Solar Cells Formed on Graphene-Oxide-Modified PEDOT:PSS Hole Transport Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Lin, Xuanhuai; Hou, Xian; Pan, Likun; Huang, Sumei; Chen, Xiaohong

    2017-10-01

    As a hole transport layer, PEDOT:PSS usually limits the stability and efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) due to its hygroscopic nature and inability to block electrons. Here, a graphene-oxide (GO)-modified PEDOT:PSS hole transport layer was fabricated by spin-coating a GO solution onto the PEDOT:PSS surface. PSCs fabricated on a GO-modified PEDOT:PSS layer exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.34%, which is higher than 11.90% of PSCs with the PEDOT:PSS layer. Furthermore, the stability of the PSCs was significantly improved, with the PCE remaining at 83.5% of the initial PCE values after aging for 39 days in air. The hygroscopic PSS material at the PEDOT:PSS surface was partly removed during spin-coating with the GO solution, which improves the moisture resistance and decreases the contact barrier between the hole transport layer and perovskite layer. The scattered distribution of the GO at the PEDOT:PSS surface exhibits superior wettability, which helps to form a high-quality perovskite layer with better crystallinity and fewer pin holes. Furthermore, the hole extraction selectivity of the GO further inhibits the carrier recombination at the interface between the perovskite and PEDOT:PSS layers. Therefore, the cooperative interactions of these factors greatly improve the light absorption of the perovskite layer, the carrier transport and collection abilities of the PSCs, and especially the stability of the cells.

  15. Associations between and development of welfare indicators in organic layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, Lena Karina; Riber, Anja Brinch; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    , keel bone damages, back feathering, body feathering, foot damages, comb colour and wounds on the body. An observational study with 12 organic egg farms was conducted in 2012 and 2013 with a total of 214 hens assessed individually at the peak and the end of lay. Insufficient data were obtained......The retail market share of organic eggs in Denmark is high, and the consumers expect high animal welfare standards in the organic production. Documentation of animal welfare is important, however, knowledge about the associations between animal-based welfare indicators is limited. The aims...... of the study were to investigate the associations between selected welfare indicators at two ages (peak and end of lay), and to examine the development with age of the chosen welfare indicators. The chosen welfare indicators were Ascaridia galli (roundworm) infection, Heterakis sp. (caecal worm) infection...

  16. Evaluation and improvement of the WRF mesoscale model for the stable boundary layer and the representation of the low level jet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.A.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Correct forecasting of the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is of key importance for many applications like for wind energy, weather forecasting and climate, agriculture and air quality. Previous research has shown models are very sensitive to the selected boundary-layer

  17. Exploring the role of wave drag in the stable stratified oceanic and atmospheric bottom boundary layer in the cnrs-toulouse (cnrm-game) large stratified water flume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Paci, A.; Calmer, R.; Belleudy, A.; Canonici, J.C.; Murguet, F.; Valette, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a laboratory experiment in the CNRM-GAME (Toulouse) stratified water flume of a stably stratified boundary layer, in order to quantify the momentum transfer due to orographically induced gravity waves by gently undulating hills in a boundary layer flow. In a stratified fluid, a

  18. "Being In" and "Feeling Seen" in Professional Development as New Teachers: The Ontological Layer(ing) of Professional Development Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Andrew M.; Giles, David; Rogers, Bev

    2016-01-01

    Dominant discourses on professional development for teachers internationally are increasingly geared to the priority of ensuring individual teachers are meeting prescribed standards-based performance benchmarks which we call "performativities" in this paper. While this intent is invariably played out in individualised performance…

  19. Stable isotope usage in developing countries: Safe tracer tools to measure human nutritional status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, P.D.; Klein, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    How many calories are used when a nursing mother feeds her infant? How much milk does an infant receive in one week? What is the impact of the environment on the energy needs of children? How adequately does dietary protein sustain the synthesis of body constituents? What types of foods best nourish a child recovering from intestinal diseases such as diarrhoea? Quantitative answers to questions such as these can be obtained from the use of stable, non-radioactive isotopic tracers. Answers to these questions are important in assessing the nutritional status of infants, children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, as well as that of individuals who subsist on marginal food supplies. Because stable isotopic tracers are completely safe and without hazard, they can be used freely in health, nutrition, and agriculture studies in all populations

  20. Use of stable isotopes of selenium in human metabolic studies: development of analytical methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janghorbani, M.; Ting, B.T.; Young, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    Use of stable isotopes of selenium in relation to enrichment of diets for studies of selenium absorption and metabolism in human subjects is discussed. A method based on radiochemical neutron activation analysis is described which allows accurate measurement of stable isotopes 74Se, 76Se, and 80Se in matrices (feces, plasma, red blood cells, and urine) of interest in metabolic studies. We show that these isotopes can routinely be measured with analytical precision and accuracy of 10% in samples of available size. This precision and accuracy is satisfactory for conduct of many nutritional experiments concerned with gastrointestinal absorption, plasma and red cell selenium turnover, and urinary excretion of the element, using an oral dose of 74Se. Original, experimental data are presented to illustrate the degree of enrichment of 74Se in feces, plasma, and urine after a single oral ingestion of 50 micrograms of the isotope with a breakfast meal in healthy young men

  1. The development of mechanically formed stable nanobubbles intended for sonoporation-mediated gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalkader, Rodi; Kawakami, Shigeru; Unga, Johan; Higuchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2017-11-01

    In this study, stable nano-sized bubbles (nanobubbles [NBs]) were produced using the mechanical agitation method in the presence of perfluorocarbon gases. NBs made with perfluoropropane had a smaller size (around 400 nm) compared to that of those made with perfluorobutane or nitrogen gas. The lipid concentration in NBs affected both their initial size and post-formulation stability. NBs formed with a final lipid concentration of 0.5 mg/ml tended to be more stable, having a uniform size distribution for 24 h at room temperature and 50 h at 4 °C. In vitro gene expression revealed that NBs/pDNA in combination with ultrasound (US) irradiation had significantly higher transfection efficacy in colon C26 cells. Moreover, for in vivo gene transfection in mice left limb muscles, there was notable local transfection activity by NBs/pDNA when combined with US irradiation. In addition, the aged NBs kept at room temperature or 4 °C were still functional at enhancing gene transfection in mice. We succeeded in preparing stable NBs for efficient in vivo gene transfection, using the mechanical agitation method.

  2. Evaluation of different insecticides and fabric types for development of treated targets for stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogsette, Jerome A; Nalli, Alyce; Foil, Lane D

    2008-06-01

    Stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), once only a pest of pastured cattle, has become a serious pest of range cattle in the United States. Because of the difficulties associated with stable fly management under range conditions, a pesticide-impregnated cloth target is being developed as a management tool. We conducted studies to determine the influence of weather, time, fabric type, insecticide type, and insecticide concentration on the mortality of stable flies from a susceptible laboratory colony exposed for 30 s to treated cloth targets. We found that 100% of the flies exposed to trigger (Trigger-Royal Box, 65% polyester and 35% cotton) fabric targets that were treated with 0.1% h-cyhalothrin or 0.1% zeta-cypermethrin and weathered outdoors in Gainesville, FL., for up to 3 mo, were dead within 20 min after a 30-s exposure. The results of this study support the concept that treated targets can be developed for integration into stable fly control programs.

  3. Spontaneous development of concentric layering in a solidified siliceous dike, East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBirney, Alexander R.; White, Craig M.; Boudreau, A. E.

    1990-10-01

    A meter-wide rhyolitic dike near the eastern margin of the Skaergaard Intrusion developed fine concentric layering in a small section where a fault appears to have fractured the dike and enhanced its interaction with meteoric water. Layers two or three millimeters thick consist of quartz alternating with low-temperature albite and potassium feldspar around a core of radiating clots of the same minerals. The layering seems to have resulted from late-stage crystallization and "self-organization" during devitrification in a warm hydrous environment. The development of fine-scale layering can be modeled quantitatively using the model for competitive particle growth (CPG) of Ortoleva and co-workers. Owing to the small differences of surface energy of grains of differing sizes, large crystals tend to grow at the expense of smaller ones, and a repetitive pattern of layering develops from a small initial perturbation of grain size. The spacing of layers predicted by a numerical model using reasonable estimates for the physical parameters, such as diffusivity and the rate of cooling, is in good agreement with the observed geometry and dimensions.

  4. Variations in stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in atmospheric water vapor in the marine boundary layer across a wide latitude range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingfeng; Xiao, Cunde; Ding, Minghu; Ren, Jiawen

    2014-11-01

    The newly-developed cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy analyzer with special calibration protocols has enabled the direct measurement of atmospheric vapor isotopes at high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper presents real-time hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope data for atmospheric water vapor above the sea surface, over a wide range of latitudes spanning from 38°N to 69°S. Our results showed relatively higher values of δ(18)O and δ(2)H in the subtropical regions than those in the tropical and high latitude regions, and also a notable decreasing trend in the Antarctic coastal region. By combining the hydrogen and oxygen isotope data with meteoric water line and backward trajectory model analysis, we explored the kinetic fractionation caused by subsiding air masses and related saturated vapor pressure in the subtropics, and the evaporation-driven kinetic fractionation in the Antarctic region. Simultaneous observations of meteorological and marine variables were used to interpret the isotopic composition characteristics and influential factors, indicating that d-excess is negatively correlated with humidity across a wide range of latitudes and weather conditions worldwide. Coincident with previous studies, d-excess is also positively correlated with sea surface temperature and air temperature (Tair), with greater sensitivity to Tair. Thus, atmospheric vapor isotopes measured with high accuracy and good spatial-temporal resolution could act as informative tracers for exploring the water cycle at different regional scales. Such monitoring efforts should be undertaken over a longer time period and in different regions of the world. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Development of volume-stable adipose tissue constructs using polycaprolactone-based polyurethane scaffolds and fibrin hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Katharina; Storck, Katharina; Muhr, Christian; Mayer, Helena; Regn, Sybille; Staudenmaier, Rainer; Wiese, Hinrich; Maier, Gerhard; Bauer-Kreisel, Petra; Blunk, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    Adipose tissue engineering aims at the restoration of soft tissue defects and the correction of contour deformities. It is therefore crucial to provide functional adipose tissue implants with appropriate volume stability. Here, we investigate two different fibrin formulations, alone or in combination with biodegradable polyurethane (PU) scaffolds as additional support structures, with regard to their suitability to generate volume-stable adipose tissue constructs. Human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were incorporated in a commercially available fibrin sealant as well as a stable fibrin hydrogel previously developed by our group. The composite constructs made from the commercially available fibrin and porous poly(ε-caprolactone)-based polyurethane scaffolds exhibited increased volume stability as compared to fibrin gels alone; however, only constructs using the stable fibrin gels completely maintained their size and weight for 21 days. Adipogenesis of ASCs was not impaired by the additional PU scaffold. After induction with a common hormonal cocktail, for constructs with either fibrin formulation, strong adipogenic differentiation of ASCs was observed after 21 days in vitro. Furthermore, upregulation of adipogenic marker genes was demonstrated at mRNA (PPARγ, C/EBPα, GLUT4 and aP2; qRT-PCR) and protein (leptin; ELISA) levels. Stable fibrin/PU constructs were further evaluated in a pilot in vivo study, resulting in areas of well-vascularized adipose tissue within the implants after only 5 weeks. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Tuning the Structure and Ionic Interactions in a Thermochemically Stable Hybrid Layered Titanate-Based Nanocomposite for High Temperature Solid Lubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.; Lubbers, Roy; Veldhuis, Sjoerd; Narygina, Olga; Lette, Walter; Schipper, Dirk J.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2017-01-01

    Solid inorganic lubricants are thermally stable but they are often limited by their lack of deformability, while organic lubricants have limitations in terms of thermal stability. In this study, a novel solid organic–inorganic nanocomposite lubricant that synergistically combines the

  7. Development of stable current collectors for large area dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Isabel; Martins, Jorge; Tavares, Carlos José; Andrade, Luísa; Mendes, Adélio

    2017-11-01

    The substrate sheet resistance effect in a large area dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) device is still the main factor responsible for low energy conversion efficiencies. In this work, current collectors made of metal lines were applied by magnetron sputtering on a transparent conducting glass substrate. The introduction of these metal lines enabled a decrease in the sheet resistance from 7.26 Ω·□-1 to 2.52 Ω·□-1, by depositing an optimized 1.0 μm tungsten thick layer on the top of 1.5 μm thick molybdenum lines. These Mo/W lines withstanded long-term stability when in contact with iodide/triiodide redox couple. Large area dye-sensitized solar cells with 36 cm2 of active area were assembled and the power conversion efficiency increased from 0.54% to 1.62% when ten metal lines were applied in both electrodes. As a final design, Mo/W lines were only applied onto the counter-electrode and protected with an indium-tin oxide layer; the resulting device showed a power conversion efficiency of 3.43%, compared with the reference efficiency of 2.38%.

  8. Transparent thin-film transistor exploratory development via sequential layer deposition and thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, David; Chiang, Hai Q.; Presley, Rick E.; Dehuff, Nicole L.; Bender, Jeffrey P.; Park, Cheol-Hee; Wager, John F.; Keszler, Douglas A.

    2006-01-01

    A novel deposition methodology is employed for exploratory development of a class of high-performance transparent thin-film transistor (TTFT) channel materials involving oxides composed of heavy-metal cations with (n - 1)d 10 ns 0 (n ≥ 4) electronic configurations. The method involves sequential radio-frequency sputter deposition of thin, single cation oxide layers and subsequent post-deposition annealing in order to obtain a multi-component oxide thin film. The viability of this rapid materials development methodology is demonstrated through the realization of high-performance TTFTs with channel layers composed of zinc oxide/tin oxide, and tin oxide/indium oxide

  9. Silicon dioxide with a silicon interfacial layer as an insulating gate for highly stable indium phosphide metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, V. J.; Shokrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    A novel gate insulator consisting of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with a thin silicon (Si) interfacial layer has been investigated for high-power microwave indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors (MISFETs). The role of the silicon interfacial layer on the chemical nature of the SiO2/Si/InP interface was studied by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the silicon interfacial layer reacted with the native oxide at the InP surface, thus producing silicon dioxide, while reducing the native oxide which has been shown to be responsible for the instabilities in InP MISFETs. While a 1.2-V hysteresis was present in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MIS capacitors with silicon dioxide, less than 0.1 V hysteresis was observed in the C-V curve of the capacitors with the silicon interfacial layer incorporated in the insulator. InP MISFETs fabricated with the silicon dioxide in combination with the silicon interfacial layer exhibited excellent stability with drain current drift of less than 3 percent in 10,000 sec, as compared to 15-18 percent drift in 10,000 sec for devices without the silicon interfacial layer. High-power microwave InP MISFETs with Si/SiO2 gate insulators resulted in an output power density of 1.75 W/mm gate width at 9.7 GHz, with an associated power gain of 2.5 dB and 24 percent power added efficiency.

  10. Biology and trapping of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in pineapple residues (Ananas comosus) in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano, José-Arturo; Gilles, Jeremie; Bravo, Oscar; Vargas, Cristina; Gomez-Bonilla, Yannery; Bingham, Georgina V; Taylor, David B

    2015-01-01

    Pineapple production in Costa Rica increased nearly 300-fold during the last 30 yr, and >40,000 hectares of land are currently dedicated to this crop. At the end of the pineapple cropping cycle, plants are chopped and residues incorporated into the soil in preparation for replanting. Associated with increased pineapple production has been a large increase in stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), populations. Stable flies are attracted to, and oviposit in, the decomposing, chopped pineapple residues. In conjunction with chemical control of developing larvae, adult trapping is an important control strategy. In this study, four blue-black fabric traps, Nzi, Vavoua, Model H, and Ngu, were compared with a white sticky trap currently used for stable fly control in Costa Rica. Overall, the white sticky trap caught the highest number of stable flies, followed by the Nzi, Vavoua, Model H, and Ngu. Collections on the white sticky trap increased 16 d after residues were chopped; coinciding with the expected emergence of flies developing in the pineapple residues. During this same time period, collections in the blue-black fabric traps decreased. Sex ratio decreased from >7:1 (females:males) 3-7 d after chopping to 1:1 at 24-28 d. White sticky, Nzi and Vavoua traps collected similar numbers of colonizing flies 3-7 d after residues were chopped. However, white sticky traps collected more flies once emergence from the pineapple residues began. Although white sticky traps collected more flies than fabric traps, they remain labor intensive and environmentally unsound because of their disposable and nonbiodegradable nature. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Significance of the double-layer capacitor effect in polar rubbery dielectrics and exceptionally stable low-voltage high transconductance organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lee, Wen-Ya; Kong, Desheng; Pfattner, Raphael; Schweicher, Guillaume; Nakajima, Reina; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Wu, Hung-Chin; Lopez, Jeffery; Diao, Ying; Gu, Xiaodan; Himmelberger, Scott; Niu, Weijun; Matthews, James R.; He, Mingqian; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Both high gain and transconductance at low operating voltages are essential for practical applications of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we describe the significance of the double-layer capacitance effect in polar rubbery dielectrics, even when present in a very low ion concentration and conductivity. We observed that this effect can greatly enhance the OFET transconductance when driven at low voltages. Specifically, when the polar elastomer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (e-PVDF-HFP) was used as the dielectric layer, despite a thickness of several micrometers, we obtained a transconductance per channel width 30 times higher than that measured for the same organic semiconductors fabricated on a semicrystalline PVDF-HFP with a similar thickness. After a series of detailed experimental investigations, we attribute the above observation to the double-layer capacitance effect, even though the ionic conductivity is as low as 10-10 S/cm. Different from previously reported OFETs with double-layer capacitance effects, our devices showed unprecedented high bias-stress stability in air and even in water.

  12. Characteristics and development report for the MC4169 double-layer capacitor assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, N.H.; Baca, W.E.

    1993-09-01

    The MC4169 Double-Layer Capacitor Assembly was developed in response to a request from the B61 Systems organization to provide interim power for the B61 Common JTA Development. The project has been successfully completed, and Lot 1 has been built by MMSC/GEND. Development testing showed that this assembly met all design requirements. This report describes the design configuration, environmental testing, and aging, reliability, and safety studies done to ensure that the design requirements were met.

  13. Numerical investigation of a spatially developing turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Keisuke; Hattori, Yasuo; Suto, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A large-eddy simulation of a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer is conducted. • First- and second-order moments of the heat and momentum showed a reasonable agreement with past experiments. • Coherent structure of turbulent vortex inherent in this boundary layer is discussed. - Abstract: Large-eddy simulation (LES) on a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate was conducted. The heat transfer rate, friction velocity, mean velocity and temperature, and second-order turbulent properties both in the wall-normal and the stream-wise direction showed reasonable agreement with the findings of past experiments. The spectrum of velocity and temperature fluctuation showed a -2/3-power decay slope and -2-power decay slope respectively. Quadrant analysis revealed the inclination on Q1 and Q3 in the Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, changing their contribution along the distance from the plate surface. Following the convention, we defined the threshold region where the stream-wise mean velocity takes local maximum, the inner layer which is closer to the plate than the threshold region, the outer layer which is farther to the plate than the threshold region. The space correlation of stream-wise velocity tilted the head toward the wall in the propagating direction in the outer layer; on the other hand, the correlated motion had little inclination in the threshold region. The time history of the second invariant of gradient tensor Q revealed that the vortex strength oscillates both in the inner and the outer layers in between the laminar and the transition region. In the turbulent region, the vortex was often dominant in the outer layer. Instantaneous three-dimensional visualization of Q revealed the existence of high-speed fluid parcels associated with arch-shape vortices. These results were considered as an intrinsic structure in the outer layer, which is symmetrical to the structure of

  14. Differences in egg nutrient availability, development, and nutrient metabolism of broiler and layer embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangsuay, A; Molenaar, R; Meijerhof, R; van den Anker, I; Heetkamp, M J W; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2015-03-01

    Selection for production traits of broilers and layers leads to physiological differences, which may already be present during incubation. This study aimed to investigate the influence of strain (broiler vs layer) on egg nutrient availability, embryonic development and nutrient metabolism. A total of 480 eggs with an egg weight range of 62.0 to 64.0 g from Lohmann Brown Lite and Ross 308 breeder flocks of 41 or 42 weeks of age were selected in two batches of 120 eggs per batch per strain. For each batch, 30 eggs per strain were used to determine egg composition, including nutrient and energy content, and 90 eggs per strain were separately incubated in one of two climate respiration chambers at an eggshell temperature of 37.8°C. The results showed that broiler eggs had a higher ratio of yolk: albumen with 2.41 g more yolk and 1.48 g less albumen than layers. The yolk energy content of broiler eggs was 46.32 kJ higher than that of layer eggs, whereas total energy content of broiler eggs was 47.85 kJ higher compared to layer eggs. Yolk-free body mass at incubation day 16 and chick weight and length at hatch were higher in broilers compared to layers. Respiration quotient of broiler embryos was higher than layer embryos during incubation day 8 to incubation day 10. A 0.24 g lower residual yolk at the hatch of broiler embryos than for the layer embryos indicated that broiler embryos used more yolk and had a higher energy utilization and energy deposition in yolk-free body mass. Heat production of broiler embryos was higher than that of layer embryos from incubation day 12 to incubation day 18, but efficiency of converting egg energy used by embryos to form yolk-free body mass was similar. In conclusion, broiler and layer embryos have different embryonic development patterns, which affect energy utilization and embryonic heat production. However, the embryos are equal in efficiency of converting the energy used to yolk-free body mass. © 2015 Poultry Science

  15. The different influence of the residual layer on the development of the summer convective boundary layer in two deserts in northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao; Bo, Han; Shihua, Lv; Lijuan, Wen; Xianhong, Meng; Zhaoguo, Li

    2018-02-01

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer is closely connected with the exchange of momentum, heat, and mass near the Earth's surface, especially for a convective boundary layer (CBL). Besides being modulated by the buoyancy flux near the Earth's surface, some studies point out that a neutrally stratified residual layer is also crucial for the appearance of a deep CBL. To verify the importance of the residual layer, the CBLs over two deserts in northwest China (Badan Jaran and Taklimakan) were investigated. The summer CBL mean depth over the Taklimakan Desert is shallower than that over the Badan Jaran Desert, even when the sensible heat flux of the former is stronger. Meanwhile, the climatological mean residual layer in the Badan Jaran Desert is much deeper and neutrally stratified in summer. Moreover, we found a significant and negative correlation between the lapse rate of the residual layer and the CBL depth over the Badan Jaran Desert. The different lapse rates of the residual layer in the two regions are partly connected with the advection heating from large-scale atmospheric circulation. The advection heating tends to reduce the temperature difference in the 700 to 500-hPa layer over the Badan Jaran Desert, and it increases the stability in the same atmospheric layer over the Taklimakan Desert. The advection due to climatological mean atmospheric circulation is more effective at modulating the lapse rate of the residual layer than from varied circulation. Also, the interannual variation of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height over two deserts was found to covary with the wave train.

  16. Development of a setup to enable stable and accurate flow conditions for membrane biofouling studies

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2015-07-10

    Systematic laboratory studies on membrane biofouling require experimental conditions that are well defined and representative for practice. Hydrodynamics and flow rate variations affect biofilm formation, morphology, and detachment and impacts on membrane performance parameters such as feed channel pressure drop. There is a suite of available monitors to study biofouling, but systems to operate monitors have not been well designed to achieve an accurate, constant water flow required for a reliable determination of biomass accumulation and feed channel pressure drop increase. Studies were done with membrane fouling simulators operated in parallel with manual and automated flow control, with and without dosage of a biodegradable substrate to the feedwater to enhance biofouling rate. High flow rate variations were observed for the manual water flow system (up to ≈9%) compared to the automatic flow control system (<1%). The flow rate variation in the manual system was strongly increased by biofilm accumulation, while the automatic system maintained an accurate and constant water flow in the monitor. The flow rate influences the biofilm accumulation and the impact of accumulated biofilm on membrane performance. The effect of the same amount of accumulated biomass on the pressure drop increase was related to the linear flow velocity. Stable and accurate feedwater flow rates are essential for biofouling studies in well-defined conditions in membrane systems. © 2015 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  17. The layered sensing operations center: a modeling and simulation approach to developing complex ISR networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Christopher; Lenzo, Matthew; McClure, Matthew; Preiss, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    In order to anticipate the constantly changing landscape of global warfare, the United States Air Force must acquire new capabilities in the field of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR). To meet this challenge, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing a unifying construct of "Layered Sensing" which will provide military decision-makers at all levels with the timely, actionable, and trusted information necessary for complete battlespace awareness. Layered Sensing is characterized by the appropriate combination of sensors and platforms (including those for persistent sensing), infrastructure, and exploitation capabilities to enable this synergistic awareness. To achieve the Layered Sensing vision, AFRL is pursuing a Modeling & Simulation (M&S) strategy through the Layered Sensing Operations Center (LSOC). An experimental ISR system-of-systems test-bed, the LSOC integrates DoD standard simulation tools with commercial, off-the-shelf video game technology for rapid scenario development and visualization. These tools will help facilitate sensor management performance characterization, system development, and operator behavioral analysis. Flexible and cost-effective, the LSOC will implement a non-proprietary, open-architecture framework with well-defined interfaces. This framework will incentivize the transition of current ISR performance models to service-oriented software design for maximum re-use and consistency. This paper will present the LSOC's development and implementation thus far as well as a summary of lessons learned and future plans for the LSOC.

  18. Development of a Novel Ceramic Support Layer for Planar Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Boccaccini, Dino; Brodersen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    properties to the conventional Ni/YSZ support were seen, and sufficient and fairly stable conductivity of LSC infiltrated 3YSZ was observed. The conductivity of 8–15 S cm–1 at 850 °C seen for over 600 h, corresponds to a serial resistance of less than 3.5 m Ω cm2 of a 300 μm thick support layer.......The conventional solid oxide cell is based on a Ni–YSZ support layer, placed on the fuel side of the cell, also known as the anode supported SOFC. An alternative design, based on a support of porous 3YSZ (3 mol.% Y2O3–doped ZrO2), placed on the oxygen electrode side of the cell, is proposed....... Electronic conductivity in the 3YSZ support is obtained post sintering by infiltrating LSC (La0.6Sr0.4Co1.05O3). The potential advantages of the proposed design is a strong cell, due to the base of a strong ceramic material (3YSZ is a partially stabilized zirconia), and that the LSC infiltration...

  19. Development of stable Grid service at the next generation system of KEKCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Iwai, G.; Matsunaga, H.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Suzuki, S.; Takase, W.

    2017-10-01

    A lot of experiments in the field of accelerator based science are actively running at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) by using SuperKEKB and J-PARC accelerator in Japan. In these days at KEK, the computing demand from the various experiments for the data processing, analysis, and MC simulation is monotonically increasing. It is not only for the case with high-energy experiments, the computing requirement from the hadron and neutrino experiments and some projects of astro-particle physics is also rapidly increasing due to the very high precision measurement. Under this situation, several projects, Belle II, T2K, ILC and KAGRA experiments supported by KEK are going to utilize Grid computing infrastructure as the main computing resource. The Grid system and services in KEK, which is already in production, are upgraded for the further stable operation at the same time of whole scale hardware replacement of KEK Central Computer System (KEKCC). The next generation system of KEKCC starts the operation from the beginning of September 2016. The basic Grid services e.g. BDII, VOMS, LFC, CREAM computing element and StoRM storage element are made by the more robust hardware configuration. Since the raw data transfer is one of the most important tasks for the KEKCC, two redundant GridFTP servers are adapted to the StoRM service instances with 40 Gbps network bandwidth on the LHCONE routing. These are dedicated to the Belle II raw data transfer to the other sites apart from the servers for the data transfer usage of the other VOs. Additionally, we prepare the redundant configuration for the database oriented services like LFC and AMGA by using LifeKeeper. The LFC servers are made by two read/write servers and two read-only servers for the Belle II experiment, and all of them have an individual database for the purpose of load balancing. The FTS3 service is newly deployed as a service for the Belle II data distribution. The service of CVMFS stratum-0 is

  20. House and Stable Fly Seasonal Abundance, Larval Development Substrates, and Natural Parasitism on Small Equine Farms in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtinger, E T; Leppla, N C; Hogsette, J A

    2016-08-01

    House flies, Musca domestica Linnaeus, and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), are common pests on horse farms. The successful use of pupal parasitoids for management of these pests requires knowledge of seasonal fluctuations and biology of the flies as well as natural parasitism levels. However, these dynamics have not been investigated on small equine farms. A 1-year field study began in July 2010, in north central Florida, to determine adult fly population levels and breeding areas on four small equine farms. Weekly surveillance showed that pest flies were present year-round, though there were differences in adult population levels among farms and seasons. Fly development was not confirmed on two of the four small farms, suggesting that subtle differences in husbandry may adversely affect the development of immature flies. In six substrates previously identified as the most common among the farms, stable fly puparia were found overwhelmingly in hay mixed with equine manure and house fly puparia were found in fresh pine shavings mixed with equine manure. Natural parasitism was minimal as expected, but greatest numbers of natural parasitoids collected were of the genus Spalangia. Differences in adult and immature fly numbers recovered emphasizes the need for farm owners to confirm on-site fly development prior to purchase and release of biological control agents. Additionally, due to the low natural parasitism levels and domination of parasitism by Spalangia cameroni, augmentative releases using this species may be the most effective.

  1. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  2. Development of 4-methoxy-7-nitroindolinyl (MNI)-caged auxins which are extremely stable in planta

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kusaka, Naoyuki; Yamasaki, Soma; Zhao, Yunde; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone auxin is a master regulator in plant growth and development. Regulation of cellular auxin level plays a central role in plant development. Auxin polar transport system modulates an auxin gradient that determines plant developmental process in response to environmental conditions and developmental programs. Photolabile caged auxins allow optical control of artificial auxin gradients at cellular resolution. Especially, two-photon uncaging system achieves high spatiotemporal control...

  3. Development of lightweight, fire-retardant, low smoke, high strength, thermally stable aircraft floor paneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. A.; Karch, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Boeing's participation in a NASA funded program (FIREMEN) to develop materials for use as floor panels possessing flammability, smoke and toxicity characteristics superior to current materials is outlined. The objectives of the program are to develop an aircraft floor paneling suitable for high traffic areas, e.g., aisle or galley and to install and certify the panel in a commercial aircraft for service evaluation.

  4. Development of optimized mobile phases for protein separation by high performance thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Julia; Morschheuser, Lena; Riedner, Maria; Rohn, Sascha

    2015-10-09

    In recent years, protein chemistry tends inexorably toward the analysis of more complex proteins, proteoforms, and posttranslational protein modifications. Although mass spectrometry developed quite fast correspondingly, sample preparation and separation of these analytes is still a major issue and quite challenging. For many years, electrophoresis seemed to be the method of choice; nonetheless its variance is limited to parameters such as size and charge. When taking a look at traditional (thin-layer) chromatography, further parameters such as polarity and different mobile and stationary phases can be utilized. Further, possibilities of detection are manifold compared to electrophoresis. Similarly, two-dimensional separation can be also performed with thin-layer chromatography (TLC). As the revival of TLC developed enormously in the last decade, it seems to be also an alternative to use high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) for the separation of proteins. The aim of this study was to establish an HPTLC separation system that allows a separation of protein mixtures over a broad polarity range, or if necessary allowing to modify the separation with only few steps to improve the separation for a specific scope. Several layers and solvent systems have been evaluated to reach a fully utilized and optimized separation system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The development of patterns of stable, transient, and school-age onset aggressive behavior in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, L; Prior, M

    1995-03-01

    To examine the development of patterns of aggressive behavior in children from the age of 2 to 8 years. Children with early histories of aggressive behavior were selected from a community sample of 2,400 infants participating in a longitudinal study. The sample was divided into four groups: children with stable aggressive behavior, those with transient aggression, those with aggression only after age 5 years (late onset), and a comparison group of nonaggressive children. Children with stable aggressive behavior were characterized by a difficult temperament, hostile sibling interactions, maternal perception of the child as difficult, and harsher child-rearing practices. Children whose early aggression decreased over time and those who became aggressive only after entering school could not be reliably classified with the selected family variables. Teacher ratings of temperament factors of task orientation and reactivity and ability ratings correctly classified 74% of children whose aggression began at school-age. Children with persistent aggressive behavior differed from those who improved, predominantly in terms of symptom severity. Problems with aggression can be identified early in development, and a significant proportion of aggressive children are at risk for continuing social and scholastic difficulties. Knowledge of associated factors may play an important role in prevention.

  6. Development of a stable cell line with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis for screening environmental chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Christina T.; Beames, Burton; Alex Merrick, B.; Martin, Negin; Romeo, Charles; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a stable cell line with intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis. • The ERRα repressor, XCT790, down regulates this pathway. • Phytoestrogen, genisten stimulates this pathway. - Abstract: The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) play critical roles in the control of several physiological functions, including the regulation of genes involved in energy homeostasis. However, little is known about the ability of environmental chemicals to disrupt or modulate this important bioenergetics pathway in humans. The goal of this study was to develop a cell-based assay system with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis that could be used as a screening assay for detecting such chemicals. To this end, we successfully generated several stable cell lines expressing PGC-1α and showed that the reporter driven by the native ERRα hormone response unit (AAB-Luc) is active in these cell lines and that the activation is PGC-1α-dependent. Furthermore, we show that this activation can be blocked by the ERRα selective inverse agonist, XCT790. In addition, we find that genistein and bisphenol A further stimulate the reporter activity, while kaempferol has minimal effect. These cell lines will be useful for identifying environmental chemicals that modulate this important pathway

  7. Development of a stable cell line with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis for screening environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Christina T., E-mail: teng1@niehs.nih.gov [DNTP, BioMolecular Screening Branch, Division, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Beames, Burton; Alex Merrick, B. [DNTP, BioMolecular Screening Branch, Division, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Martin, Negin; Romeo, Charles [DIR, Viral Core Lab, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Jetten, Anton M. [DIR Laboratory of Respiratory Biology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • We developed a stable cell line with intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis. • The ERRα repressor, XCT790, down regulates this pathway. • Phytoestrogen, genisten stimulates this pathway. - Abstract: The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) play critical roles in the control of several physiological functions, including the regulation of genes involved in energy homeostasis. However, little is known about the ability of environmental chemicals to disrupt or modulate this important bioenergetics pathway in humans. The goal of this study was to develop a cell-based assay system with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis that could be used as a screening assay for detecting such chemicals. To this end, we successfully generated several stable cell lines expressing PGC-1α and showed that the reporter driven by the native ERRα hormone response unit (AAB-Luc) is active in these cell lines and that the activation is PGC-1α-dependent. Furthermore, we show that this activation can be blocked by the ERRα selective inverse agonist, XCT790. In addition, we find that genistein and bisphenol A further stimulate the reporter activity, while kaempferol has minimal effect. These cell lines will be useful for identifying environmental chemicals that modulate this important pathway.

  8. Development of temperature stable charge based piezoelectric composite quasi-static pressure sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Groen, W.A.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this work piezoelectric composite charge based sensors are developed, aimed at quasi-static pressure sensor or switch type applications. The use of piezoelectric composite materials allows for manufacturing robust devices which can easily be integrated with conventional polymer processing.

  9. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2012-03-21

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  10. Graphene Oxide by UV-Ozone Treatment as an Efficient Hole Extraction Layer for Highly Efficient and Stable Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yingdong; Pan, Yufeng; Zhang, Haijuan; Qiu, Jian; Zheng, Yiting; Chen, Yonghua; Huang, Wei

    2017-08-09

    The hole extraction layer has a significant impact on the achievement of high-efficiency polymer solar cells (PSCs). Here, we report an efficient approach to direct UV-ozone treatment by larger device performance enhancement employing graphene oxide (GO). The dramatic performance enhancement of PSCs with the P3HT:PCBM blend as an active layer was demonstrated by the UV-ozone treatment of GO for 30 min: best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.18%, fill factor of 0.63, J sc of 10.94 mA cm -2 , and V oc of 0.61 V, which are significantly higher than those of the untreated GO (1.82%) and highly comparable PEDOT:PSS-based PSCs (3.73%). In addition, PSCs with UV-ozone-treated GO showed a longer stability than PSCs with PEDOT:PSS. The significant enhancement of PCEs of PSCs can be attributed to the fact that ozone molecules can oxidize GO into CO 2 and leave highly conductive graphene particles. We suggest that this simple UV-ozone treatment can provide an efficient method for highly efficient GO hole extraction in high-performance PSCs.

  11. Recent developments and future directions for stable isotope applications in nutrition research. Report of a consultants meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at its Headquarters in Vienna convened a consultants meeting to provide the Agency with an overview of the current status of isotopic techniques in nutritional science with respect to both methodology and applications. The main objectives were: To assess the practice of stable isotope methodologies in human nutrition research; To explore high quality stable isotope spikes for use in humans; To standardise the mathematical approaches to evaluate mass spectrometric data when using stable isotope labels within metabolic studies; To identify new strategies for improving sensitivity of nutrition monitoring techniques for use in projects in nutrition. This exercise was conducted to also identify strengths and weaknesses of methodologies currently used in IAEA funded research (CRPs and Technical Cooperation Projects) and to see how they can be improved for the general user, and to provide a basis for the assessment of outcomes delivered by collaborating laboratories in IAEA funded studies. The consultants reviewed the methods relating to the measurement of energy expenditure and noted that the analytical methodologies had changed substantially and that there was further refinement to data fitting and the calculation of uncertainties. They also felt that a repeat of a comparison of laboratory performances with a dilution series similar to the one carried out earlier should be performed for quality control. Other methods using labelled isotopes 13 C and 2 H were also discussed. The meeting noted that it was IAEA's intention to support the development of compound specific reference materials for 2 H, 13 C, 15 N and 18 O. Contrary to light isotope techniques where attempts have been made in the past towards standardization, in particular by IAEA and Stable Isotopes in Gastroenterology and Nutrition (SIGN) harmonization of techniques between laboratories is unsatisfactory for the minerals and trace elements. It was decided that

  12. Integration as the basis of stable and dynamic development of enterprises in agroindustrial complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ivanovich Ogorodnikov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of market relations in Russian economy generates an objective need to address a number of problems in the relationship between agroundustrial complex organizations in connection with privatization, liberalization of prices and imbalances in the existing inter-industry production and economic relations that negatively affect the results of their economic activities. Because of the flagrant violations of the replenishment process, a diverse range of connections and relationships between producers and processors was broken. The major direction of lifting agricultural economy in this situation is the development of cooperatives and agroindustrial integration. In addition, the formation of large integrated complexes demonstrates high efficiency and rapid development, which is the basis of agroindustrial sector in many developed countries. The increase of competition forces business entities to combine capabilities and mutually beneficial cooperation in the struggle for the strengthening of market positions. Thus, increasing the degree of integration in the agricultural sector helps to get out of the protracted crisis and move more quickly to the innovations.

  13. Develop high activity, low cost non-PGM fuel cell electrocatalyst and stable supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Gaillard, J. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL

    2016-09-28

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFC. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into Metallic Organic Framework (MOF) catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of FePhen@MOF catalysts have been synthesized with varying [Fe] to investigate the effect on electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties. The magnitude of the FeII/III redox couple and the electrochemical surface area are analyzed to determine if there is a correlation between [Fe] and the ORR onset potential and/or the relative number of active sites.

  14. Development of high resolution Michelson interferometer for stable phase-locked ultrashort pulse pair generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takumi; Komori, Kazuhiro; Goshima, Keishiro; Yamauchi, Shohgo; Morohashi, Isao; Sugaya, Takeyoshi; Ogura, Mutsuo; Tsurumachi, Noriaki

    2008-10-01

    We developed a high resolution Michelson interferometer with a two-frequency He-Ne laser positioning system in order to stabilize the relative phase of a pulse pair. The control resolution corresponded to a 12 as time resolution or a phase of 1.5 degrees at 900 nm. This high resolution Michelson interferometer can generate a phase-locked pulse pair either with a specific relative phase such as 0 or pi radians or with an arbitrary phase. Coherent control of an InAs self-assembled quantum dot was demonstrated using the high resolution Michelson interferometer with a microspectroscopy system.

  15. Development and quality assessment of heat-stable fruit fillings containing dietary fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna CROPOTOVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the development and quality assessment of fruit fillings prepared with dietary fibers (inulin and pectin. The fillings were prepared in laboratory conditions starting from apple puree (45% w/w in a wide range of soluble solids (30-70 °Brix. A 2k regression modeling was applied to assess the common and individual effects of total soluble solids and dietary fiber content on heat-stability and quality characteristics of prepared fillings. The use of multiple response optimization tool revealed that fillings prepared with 40-50°Brix and addition of 3.5-5% inulin and 0.9-1.1% pectin possess the highest heat stability and sensory properties.

  16. Passing Corrupt Data Across Network Layers: An Overview of Recent Developments and Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welzl

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent Internet developments seem to make a point for passing corrupt data from the link to the network layer and above instead of ensuring data integrity with a checksum and ARQ. We give an overview of these efforts (the UDP Lite and DCCP protocols and explain which circumstances would justify delivery of erroneous data; clearly, the missing piece in the puzzle is efficient and meaningful interlayer communication.

  17. Development of stable reporter system cloning luxCDABE genes into chromosome of Salmonella enterica serotypes using Tn7 transposon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Mark L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis may be a food safety problem when raw food products are mishandled and not fully cooked. In previous work, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella enterica serotypes using a plasmid-based reporting system that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products in short term studies. In this study, we report the use of a Tn7-based transposon system for subcloning of luxCDABE genes into the chromosome of eleven Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from the broiler production continuum. Results We found that the lux operon is constitutively expressed from the chromosome post-transposition and the lux cassette is stable without external pressure, i.e. antibiotic selection, for all Salmonella enterica serotypes used. Bioluminescence expression is based on an active electron transport chain and is directly related with metabolic activity. This relationship was quantified by measuring bioluminescence against a temperature gradient in aqueous solution using a luminometer. In addition, bioluminescent monitoring of two serotypes confirmed that our chicken skin model has the potential to be used to evaluate pathogen mitigation strategies. Conclusions This study demonstrated that our new stable reporting system eliminates bioluminescence variation due to plasmid instability and provides a reliable real-time experimental system to study application of preventive measures for Salmonella on food products in real-time for both short and long term studies.

  18. Evolution of a Western Arctic Ice Ocean Boundary Layer and Mixed Layer Across a Developing Thermodynamically Forced Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    on measurements made by the turbulence package on AOFB 33. For shortwave radiative input (QH), we set the fractional solar radiation terms in Eqn...2.6. Air-Ocean Shortwave Radiation Overview at MIZ C2 .............................77 Figure 2.7. Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes Overview at MIZ C2...2005 (Perovich et al. 2007a). Identifying the processes that drive SIZ expansion requires an understanding of how this incoming solar radiation is

  19. Development of radiation stable plastic scintillator. Final technical report, July 1991--July 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Detector Development Group at the University of Florida has identified the only known optically radiation hard polymer, scintillator and wavelength shifter materials. The authors summarize their findings here. They conducted an extensive study of siloxane polymers using monomers of dimethyl, diphenyl and methylphenyl siloxanes. An important finding of that study was that polymethylphenylsiloxane is a candidate polymer for use at the SSC. However, the most important result of that work was the demonstration of the existence of optical polymers with extreme resistance to radiation damage. It held out the promise that other possibly more convenient polymers with similar properties could be identified. The first high viscosity, transparent, radiation hard siloxane with high fluor solubility was processed into prototype plates. The authors propose a mechanism to account for radiation induced annealable color center formation in commercial scintillator polymers such as PS and PMMA. The authors produced analogues of these polymers with T g g g ∼ 50 C (i.e., high enough for structural stability) and with high color center annealing rate such as polyisobutylmethacrylate. These polymers were both radiation hard and had minimal dye migration. The University of Florida has a patent on these materials. These materials were extruded and tested for stability and found adequate for operation up to 10 Mrad at the SSC

  20. Development of an Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation method for the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Mano

    Full Text Available The sensitive plant Mimosa pudica has long attracted the interest of researchers due to its spectacular leaf movements in response to touch or other external stimuli. Although various aspects of this seismonastic movement have been elucidated by histological, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral approaches, the lack of reverse genetic tools has hampered the investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. To overcome this obstacle, we developed an efficient genetic transformation method for M. pudica mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agrobacterium. We found that the cotyledonary node explant is suitable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation because of its high frequency of shoot formation, which was most efficiently induced on medium containing 0.5 µg/ml of a synthetic cytokinin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP. Transformation efficiency of cotyledonary node cells was improved from almost 0 to 30.8 positive signals arising from the intron-sGFP reporter gene by using Agrobacterium carrying a super-binary vector pSB111 and stabilizing the pH of the co-cultivation medium with 2-(N-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid (MES buffer. Furthermore, treatment of the explants with the detergent Silwet L-77 prior to co-cultivation led to a two-fold increase in the number of transformed shoot buds. Rooting of the regenerated shoots was efficiently induced by cultivation on irrigated vermiculite. The entire procedure for generating transgenic plants achieved a transformation frequency of 18.8%, which is comparable to frequencies obtained for other recalcitrant legumes, such as soybean (Glycine max and pea (Pisum sativum. The transgene was stably integrated into the host genome and was inherited across generations, without affecting the seismonastic or nyctinastic movements of the plants. This transformation method thus provides an effective genetic tool for studying genes involved in M. pudica movements.

  1. Development of an Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation method for the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Hiroaki; Fujii, Tomomi; Sumikawa, Naomi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-01-01

    The sensitive plant Mimosa pudica has long attracted the interest of researchers due to its spectacular leaf movements in response to touch or other external stimuli. Although various aspects of this seismonastic movement have been elucidated by histological, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral approaches, the lack of reverse genetic tools has hampered the investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. To overcome this obstacle, we developed an efficient genetic transformation method for M. pudica mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agrobacterium). We found that the cotyledonary node explant is suitable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation because of its high frequency of shoot formation, which was most efficiently induced on medium containing 0.5 µg/ml of a synthetic cytokinin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Transformation efficiency of cotyledonary node cells was improved from almost 0 to 30.8 positive signals arising from the intron-sGFP reporter gene by using Agrobacterium carrying a super-binary vector pSB111 and stabilizing the pH of the co-cultivation medium with 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer. Furthermore, treatment of the explants with the detergent Silwet L-77 prior to co-cultivation led to a two-fold increase in the number of transformed shoot buds. Rooting of the regenerated shoots was efficiently induced by cultivation on irrigated vermiculite. The entire procedure for generating transgenic plants achieved a transformation frequency of 18.8%, which is comparable to frequencies obtained for other recalcitrant legumes, such as soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum). The transgene was stably integrated into the host genome and was inherited across generations, without affecting the seismonastic or nyctinastic movements of the plants. This transformation method thus provides an effective genetic tool for studying genes involved in M. pudica movements.

  2. Development of an Agrobacterium-Mediated Stable Transformation Method for the Sensitive Plant Mimosa pudica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Hiroaki; Fujii, Tomomi; Sumikawa, Naomi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-01-01

    The sensitive plant Mimosa pudica has long attracted the interest of researchers due to its spectacular leaf movements in response to touch or other external stimuli. Although various aspects of this seismonastic movement have been elucidated by histological, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral approaches, the lack of reverse genetic tools has hampered the investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. To overcome this obstacle, we developed an efficient genetic transformation method for M. pudica mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agrobacterium). We found that the cotyledonary node explant is suitable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation because of its high frequency of shoot formation, which was most efficiently induced on medium containing 0.5 µg/ml of a synthetic cytokinin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Transformation efficiency of cotyledonary node cells was improved from almost 0 to 30.8 positive signals arising from the intron-sGFP reporter gene by using Agrobacterium carrying a super-binary vector pSB111 and stabilizing the pH of the co-cultivation medium with 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer. Furthermore, treatment of the explants with the detergent Silwet L-77 prior to co-cultivation led to a two-fold increase in the number of transformed shoot buds. Rooting of the regenerated shoots was efficiently induced by cultivation on irrigated vermiculite. The entire procedure for generating transgenic plants achieved a transformation frequency of 18.8%, which is comparable to frequencies obtained for other recalcitrant legumes, such as soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum). The transgene was stably integrated into the host genome and was inherited across generations, without affecting the seismonastic or nyctinastic movements of the plants. This transformation method thus provides an effective genetic tool for studying genes involved in M. pudica movements. PMID:24533121

  3. Development of a low-color, color stable, dual cure dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, James D; Mishriky, Maged; Barghi, Nasser; Rawls, H Ralph; Cardenas, H Lee; Aguirre, Rene; Whang, Kyumin

    2013-04-01

    Dual-cure (DC) resins are mainly used as cements due to high initial color (generally yellow) and large color shift (ΔE*) after polymerization as compared to light-cured resins. However, even as cements, this color shift is clinically unacceptable, especially when used to cement thin veneers. To develop a novel DC initiator system with both lower initial color (less yellow, i.e., whiter) and smaller ΔE*. The effect of using an allyl thiourea (T)/cumene hydroperoxide (CH) self-cure (SC) initiator system in combination with a photo-co-initiator, p-octyloxy-phenyl-phenyl iodonium hexafluoroantimonate (OPPI), in a commercial DC resin cement (PermaFlo DC, Ultradent Products, Inc.) was investigated. Initial color and ΔE* were assessed for 6 weeks in vitro under accelerated aging conditions (75°C water bath). Rockwell15T hardness was used to assess degree of cure (DoC) and the three-point bending test was used to assess mechanical properties. PermaFlo DC (control) was significantly harder than all experimental groups without OPPI but had up to three times higher initial color and four times greater color shift (ΔE*=27 vs. 8). With OPPI, hardness in the experimental groups increased significantly and several were comparable to the controls. Initial color and ΔE* increased slightly (ΔE*=9), but was still 3 times less than that of PermaFlo DC. DC samples containing OPPI had comparable modulus and ultimate transverse strengths to those of the controls. DC resins that use the T/CH initiator system are weaker but have extremely low color and ΔE*. The addition of OPPI increases DoC and mechanical properties to clinically acceptable levels and maintains extremely low color and ΔE*. With this novel initiator system, DC resins potentially can now have comparable color and color stability to light-cure resins and be used in broader esthetic dental applications to improve color stability and reduce shrinkage stress in restorative composites. Copyright © 2013 Academy of

  4. Development of stable solidification methods for toxic lead oxide in radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitoshi Mimura; Shingo Ikeda; Yuichi Niibori

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop the advanced solidification methods for the toxic lead oxide contained in radioactive wastes and to examine their chemical durability in terms of leachability and surface alteration; the solidification characteristics and leachability for the following three kinds of solidified products immobilizing lead were examined, and the experimental results were summarized as follows. (a) Mineral solidified products: A-zeolite or fly ash (FA) was used as a binder, and NaAlO 2 and Na 2 SiO 3 were mixed as additives. The leachability of lead ions in pure water was considerably lowered by the heat treatment at higher temperature (1,000 degree C), and the concentration of lead ions leached was under criterion value of 0.3 mg/l. The products prepared by mixing A-zeolite and fly ash also had low leachability under 0.3 mg/l even in the saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. (b) Melted solidified products: A-zeolite or fly ash was used as a binder and glass-forming reagents of B 2 O 3 and NaH 2 PO 4 were used as additives. The XRD peaks assigned PbO were not observed in all products. The products for the mixtures of FA:NaH 2 PO 4 :PbO (2:2:1 and 3:1:1) had low leachability under criterion value in both leachants of deionized water and saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution. (c) Phosphate ceramics products: the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics were produced by using MgKPO 4 , MgHPO 4 , Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 , potassium iron phosphate and sodium iron phosphate, and FA was used as additives. In particular, by using MgHPO 4 , the leachability of the products was lowered less than 0.3 mg/l in both leachants. The phosphate ceramics products and melted solidified products are favorable as the waste solid forms immobilizing lead. In particular, novel ceramics products have advantages in the simple solidification procedure similarly to the cement products. As for mineral solidification, natural zeolites and FA as binder also useful from the viewpoint of cost efficiency

  5. Development of a low activation concrete shielding wall by multi-layered structure for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Maegawa, Toshio; Yoshimatsu, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Nonaka, Akira; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    A multi-layered concrete structure has been developed to reduce induced activity in the shielding for neutron generating facilities such as a fusion reactor. The multi-layered concrete structure is composed of: (1) an inner low activation concrete, (2) a boron-doped low activation concrete as the second layer, and (3) ordinary concrete as the outer layer of the neutron shield. With the multi-layered concrete structure the volume of boron is drastically decreased compared to a monolithic boron-doped concrete. A 14 MeV neutron shielding experiment with multi-layered concrete structure mockups was performed at FNS and several reaction rates and induced activity in the mockups were measured. This demonstrated that the multi-layered concrete effectively reduced low energy neutrons and induced activity.

  6. Stable anatase TiO2 coating on quartz fibers by atomic layer deposition for photoactive light-scattering in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Han; Koo, Hyung-Jun; Jur, Jesse S.; Woodroof, Mariah; Kalanyan, Berç; Lee, Kyoungmi; Devine, Christina K.; Parsons, Gregory N.

    2012-07-01

    Quartz fibers provide a unique high surface-area substrate suitable for conformal coating using atomic layer deposition (ALD), and are compatible with high temperature annealing. This paper shows that the quartz fiber composition stabilizes ALD TiO2 in the anatase phase through TiO2-SiO2 interface formation, even after annealing at 1050 °C. When integrated into a dye-sensitized solar cell, the TiO2-coated quartz fiber mat improves light scattering performance. Results also confirm that annealing at high temperature is necessary for better photoactivity of ALD TiO2, which highlights the significance of quartz fibers as a substrate. The ALD TiO2 coating on quartz fibers also boosts dye adsorption and photocurrent response, pushing the overall efficiency of the dye-cells from 6.5 to 7.4%. The mechanisms for improved cell performance are confirmed using wavelength-dependent incident photon to current efficiency and diffuse light scattering results. The combination of ALD and thermal processing on quartz fibers may enable other device structures for energy conversion and catalytic reaction applications.

  7. Stable anatase TiO₂ coating on quartz fibers by atomic layer deposition for photoactive light-scattering in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Han; Koo, Hyung-Jun; Jur, Jesse S; Woodroof, Mariah; Kalanyan, Berç; Lee, Kyoungmi; Devine, Christina K; Parsons, Gregory N

    2012-08-07

    Quartz fibers provide a unique high surface-area substrate suitable for conformal coating using atomic layer deposition (ALD), and are compatible with high temperature annealing. This paper shows that the quartz fiber composition stabilizes ALD TiO(2) in the anatase phase through TiO(2)-SiO(2) interface formation, even after annealing at 1050 °C. When integrated into a dye-sensitized solar cell, the TiO(2)-coated quartz fiber mat improves light scattering performance. Results also confirm that annealing at high temperature is necessary for better photoactivity of ALD TiO(2), which highlights the significance of quartz fibers as a substrate. The ALD TiO(2) coating on quartz fibers also boosts dye adsorption and photocurrent response, pushing the overall efficiency of the dye-cells from 6.5 to 7.4%. The mechanisms for improved cell performance are confirmed using wavelength-dependent incident photon to current efficiency and diffuse light scattering results. The combination of ALD and thermal processing on quartz fibers may enable other device structures for energy conversion and catalytic reaction applications.

  8. Developments in the Aerosol Layer Height Retrieval Algorithm for the Copernicus Sentinel-4/UVN Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Swadhin; Sanders, Abram; Veefkind, Pepijn

    2016-04-01

    The Sentinel-4 mission is a part of the European Commission's Copernicus programme, the goal of which is to provide geo-information to manage environmental assets, and to observe, understand and mitigate the effects of the changing climate. The Sentinel-4/UVN instrument design is motivated by the need to monitor trace gas concentrations and aerosols in the atmosphere from a geostationary orbit. The on-board instrument is a high resolution UV-VIS-NIR (UVN) spectrometer system that provides hourly radiance measurements over Europe and northern Africa with a spatial sampling of 8 km. The main application area of Sentinel-4/UVN is air quality. One of the data products that is being developed for Sentinel-4/UVN is the Aerosol Layer Height (ALH). The goal is to determine the height of aerosol plumes with a resolution of better than 0.5 - 1 km. The ALH product thus targets aerosol layers in the free troposphere, such as desert dust, volcanic ash and biomass during plumes. KNMI is assigned with the development of the Aerosol Layer Height (ALH) algorithm. Its heritage is the ALH algorithm developed by Sanders and De Haan (ATBD, 2016) for the TROPOMI instrument on board the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission that is to be launched in June or July 2016 (tentative date). The retrieval algorithm designed so far for the aerosol height product is based on the absorption characteristics of the oxygen-A band (759-770 nm). The algorithm has heritage to the ALH algorithm developed for TROPOMI on the Sentinel 5 precursor satellite. New aspects for Sentinel-4/UVN include the higher resolution (0.116 nm compared to 0.4 for TROPOMI) and hourly observation from the geostationary orbit. The algorithm uses optimal estimation to obtain a spectral fit of the reflectance across absorption band, while assuming a single uniform layer with fixed width to represent the aerosol vertical distribution. The state vector includes amongst other elements the height of this layer and its aerosol optical

  9. Development of computer code for determining prediction parameters of radionuclide migration in soil layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hiromichi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    1986-07-01

    A computer code (MIGSTEM-FIT) has been developed to determine the prediction parameters, retardation factor, water flow velocity, dispersion coefficient, etc., of radionuclide migration in soil layer from the concentration distribution of radionuclide in soil layer or in effluent. In this code, the solution of the predicting equation for radionuclide migration is compared with the concentration distribution measured, and the most adequate values of parameter can be determined by the flexible tolerance method. The validity of finite differential method, which was one of the method to solve the predicting equation, was confirmed by comparison with the analytical solution, and also the validity of fitting method was confirmed by the fitting of the concentration distribution calculated from known parameters. From the examination about the error, it was found that the error of the parameter obtained by using this code was smaller than that of the concentration distribution measured. (author)

  10. Development of a Rotating Rake Array for Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Fan-Stage Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, John D.; Arend, David J.; Hirt, Stefanie M.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2017-01-01

    The recent Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet/Distortion Tolerant Fan wind tunnel experiment at NASA Glenn Research Center's 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) examined the performance of a novel inlet and fan stage that was designed to ingest the vehicle boundary layer in order to take advantage of a predicted overall propulsive efficiency benefit. A key piece of the experiment's instrumentation was a pair of rotating rake arrays located upstream and downstream of the fan stage. This paper examines the development of these rake arrays. Pre-test numerical solutions were sampled to determine placement and spacing for rake pressure and temperature probes. The effects of probe spacing and survey density on the repeatability of survey measurements was examined. These data were then used to estimate measurement uncertainty for the adiabatic efficiency.

  11. Alternative buffer layer development in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Peipei

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based thin film solar cells are considered to be one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar devices have the potential advantage of low-cost, fast fabrication by using semiconductor layers of only a few micrometers thick and high efficiency photovoltaics have been reported at both the cell and the module levels. CdS via chemical bath deposition (CBD) has been the most widely used buffer option to form the critical junction in CIGS-based thin film photovoltaic devices. However, the disadvantages of CdS can’t be ignored - regulations on cadmium usage are getting stricter primarily due to its toxicity and environmental impacts, and the proper handling of the large amount of toxic chemical bath waste is a massive and expensive task. This dissertation is devoted to the development of Cd-free alternative buffer layers in CIGS-based thin film solar cells. Based on the considerations of buffer layer selection criteria and extensive literature review, Zn-compound buffer materials are chosen as the primary investigation candidates. Radio frequency magnetron sputtering is the preferred buffer deposition approach since it’s a clean and more controllable technique compared to CBD, and is readily scaled to large area manufacturing. First, a comprehensive study of the ZnSe1-xOx compound prepared by reactive sputtering was completed. As the oxygen content in the reactive sputtering gas increased, ZnSe1-xOx crystallinity and bandgap decreased. It’s observed that oxygen miscibility in ZnSe was low and a secondary phase formed when the O2 / (O2 + Ar) ratio in the sputtering gas exceeded 2%. Two approaches were proposed to optimize the band alignment between the CIGS and buffer layer. One method focused on the bandgap engineering of the absorber, the other focused on the band structure modification of the buffer. As a result, improved current of the solar cell was achieved although a carrier transport barrier at the junction

  12. A Layered Past: the Transformation and Development of Legacy Sediments as Alluvial Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A.; Richter, D. D., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Legacy sediments are a widespread consequence of post-colonial upland erosion in the United States. Although these deposits are ubiquitous in valley bottoms of the southeastern Piedmont, mature hardwood forests and collapsed stream banks mask their occurrence. While these deposits have been studied for their fluvial dynamics and water quality impacts, they have received less attention in regards to soil structure and formation. In this study, we characterized legacy sediment mineraology, composition and structure to understand how pedogenic processes are overprinting sediment layering in a 40-hectare Piedmont floodplain. To constrain the timing of deposition, we used Pb-210 and C-14 dating on buried charcoal and tree stumps. Our results show that in 100 years of forest regeneration, vegetation and oscillating floodplain conditions have driven these eroded sediment deposits to evolve as soil profiles both in structure and composition. These textural and nutrient gradients have ramifications for the subsurface flow of nutrients through the floodplain. Given the estimated millennia it will take to erode legacy sediment from Piedmont floodplains, it is important to think of these deposits as new stable environments on their own trajectory of soil evolution.

  13. LRP5 is required for vascular development in deeper layers of the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-hong Xia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5 plays an important role in the development of retinal vasculature. LRP5 loss-of-function mutations cause incomplete development of retinal vessel network in humans as well as in mice. To understand the underlying mechanism for how LRP5 mutations lead to retinal vascular abnormalities, we have determined the retinal cell types that express LRP5 and investigated specific molecular and cellular functions that may be regulated by LRP5 signaling in the retina.We characterized the development of retinal vasculature in LRP5 mutant mice using specific retinal cell makers and a GFP transgene expressed in retinal endothelial cells. Our data revealed that retinal vascular endothelial cells predominantly formed cell clusters in the inner-plexiform layer of LRP5 mutant retina rather than sprouting out or migrating into deeper layers to form normal vascular network in the retina. The IRES-beta-galactosidase (LacZ report gene under the control of the endogenous LRP5 promoter was highly expressed in Müller cells and was also weakly detected in endothelial cells of the retinal surface vasculature. Moreover, the LRP5 mutant mice had a reduction of a Müller cell-specific glutamine transporter, Slc38a5, and showed a decrease in b-wave amplitude of electroretinogram.LRP5 is not only essential for vascular endothelial cells to sprout, migrate and/or anastomose in the deeper plexus during retinal vasculature development but is also important for the functions of Müller cells and retinal interneurons. Müller cells may utilize LRP5-mediated signaling pathway to regulate vascular development in deeper layers and to maintain the function of retinal interneurons.

  14. The Role of Priming in the Development of Stable and Radioactive Carbon Isotope Profiles of Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serach, L.; Breecker, D.

    2017-12-01

    The stability of soil carbon (C) is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global C cycle models and is central to identifying potential feedbacks to a warming climate. The role that more stable soil organic matter (SOM) pools could have in these feedbacks is highly uncertain. Stable C isotope (δ13C) and radiocarbon (14C) SOM profiles are used to understand the processes involved in soil C stabilization. In this study, we use a 1-dimensional, 3 pool soil C model to simulate the development of SOM δ13C and 14C profiles in a well-drained forest soil. Under the simplest model scenario where decomposition rate constants for each SOM pool remain fixed, model runs exhibit a buildup of slowly degrading C in the shallow subsurface (0-5cm) where fresh, labile C typically dominates in natural soils. Additionally, magnitudes of trends in SOM δ13C and 14C profiles were inconsistent with those observed in natural profiles, suggesting a deficiency in this version of the model. We hypothesize that the observed disparity between modeled and natural profiles is due to the absence of priming in the model. Priming effects presume a change in decomposition rate constants for recalcitrant C pools upon the addition of labile C to the soil. As such, priming effects were simulated in the model by making decomposition rate constants a function of labile C input (e.g., root C and leaf litter). The incorporation of priming into the model yields larger, more realistic shifts in SOM δ13C profiles and trends in 14C profiles that vary based on the sensitivity of recalcitrant pools to labile C addition. So far, the results from this study support the hypothesis that SOM δ13C and 14C profiles cannot be explained without priming. These results highlight the importance of priming to our understanding of the persistence of stable C in the soil and our ability to use SOM δ13C and 14C trends as a means to quantify C stability.

  15. Progress and Challenges in Developing Reference Data Layers for Human Population Distribution and Built Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. S.; Yetman, G.; de Sherbinin, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between environmental and human systems, and in particular supporting the applications of Earth science data and knowledge in place-based decision making, requires systematic assessment of the distribution and dynamics of human population and the built human infrastructure in conjunction with environmental variability and change. The NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) operated by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University has had a long track record in developing reference data layers for human population and settlements and is expanding its efforts on topics such as intercity roads, reservoirs and dams, and energy infrastructure. SEDAC has set as a strategic priority the acquisition, development, and dissemination of data resources derived from remote sensing and socioeconomic data on urban land use change, including temporally and spatially disaggregated data on urban change and rates of change, the built infrastructure, and critical facilities. We report here on a range of past and ongoing activities, including the Global Human Settlements Layer effort led by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), the Global Exposure Database for the Global Earthquake Model (GED4GEM) project, the Global Roads Open Access Data Working Group (gROADS) of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA), and recent work with ImageCat, Inc. to improve estimates of the exposure and fragility of buildings, road and rail infrastructure, and other facilities with respect to selected natural hazards. New efforts such as the proposed Global Human Settlement indicators initiative of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) could help fill critical gaps and link potential reference data layers with user needs. We highlight key sectors and themes that require further attention, and the many significant challenges that remain in developing comprehensive, high quality

  16. Contribution of the cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) for development of layer-by-layer films with potential application in nanobiomedical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, I.M.S. [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, CCN, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Teresina, PI, 64049-550 (Brazil); Nucleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Parnaiba, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64202-020 (Brazil); Zampa, M.F. [Nucleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Parnaiba, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64202-020 (Brazil); Campus Parnaiba, Instituto Federal de Educacao Ciencia e Tecnologia do Piaui, IFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64210-260 (Brazil); Moura, J.B.; Santos, J.R. dos [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, CCN, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Teresina, PI, 64049-550 (Brazil); Eaton, P. [REQUIMTE, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, Porto, 4169-007 (Portugal); Zucolotto, V. [Grupo de Biofisica Molecular Sergio Mascarenhas, Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, IFSC, USP, Sao Carlos, SP, 13566-590 (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-01

    The search for bioactive molecules to be employed as recognition elements in biosensors has stimulated researchers to pore over the rich Brazilian biodiversity. In this sense, we introduce the use of natural cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) as an active biomaterial to be used in the form of layer-by-layer films, in conjunction with phthalocyanines, which were tested as electrochemical sensors for dopamine detection. We investigated the effects of chemical composition of cashew gum from two different regions of Brazil (Piaui and Ceara states) on the physico-chemical characteristics of these nanostructures. The morphology of the nanostructures containing cashew gum was studied by atomic force microscopy which indicates that smooth films punctuated by globular features were formed that showed low roughness values. The results indicate that, independent of the origin, cashew gum stands out as an excellent film forming material with potential application in nanobiomedical devices as electrochemical sensors. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study focused on the use of cashew gum for the formation of LbL films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LbL films containing cashew gums were investigated by AFM and cyclic voltammetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cashew gum contributed to obtain stable films with well-defined redox processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cashew gum films detected dopamine in low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These LbL films presented potential application in nanobiomedical devices.

  17. Low Temperature Double-layer Capacitors with Improved Energy Density: An Overview of Recent Development Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Yushin, Gleb; Korenblit, Yair; Kajdos, Adam; Kvit, Alexander; Jagiello, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors are finding increased use in a wide range of energy storage applications, particularly where high pulse power capabilities are required. Double-layer capacitors store charge at a liquid/solid interface, making them ideal for low temperature power applications, due to the facile kinetic processes associated with the rearrangement of the electrochemical double-layer at these temperatures. Potential low temperature applications include hybrid and electric vehicles, operations in polar regions, high altitude aircraft and aerospace avionics, and distributed environmental and structural health monitoring. State-of-the-art capacitors can typically operate to -40 C, with a subsequent degradation in power performance below room temperature. However, recent efforts focused on advanced electrolyte and electrode systems can enable operation to temperatures as low as -70 C, with capacities similar to room temperature values accompanied by reasonably low equivalent series resistances. This presentation will provide an overview of recent development efforts to extend and improve the wide temperature performance of these devices.

  18. Development of Moving Particle Simulation Method for Multiliquid-Layer Sloshing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Sung Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed oil and gas including water and sand are extracted from well to offshore structure. This mixed fluid must be separated for subsequent processes by using wash tanks or separators. To design such a system, a proper numerical-prediction tool for multiphase fluids is required. In this regard, a new moving particle simulation (MPS method is developed to simulate multiliquid-layer sloshing problems. The new MPS method for multifluid system includes extra search methods for interface particles, boundary conditions for interfaces, buoyancy-correction model, and surface-tension model for interface particles. The new particle interaction models are verified through comparisons with published numerical and experimental data. In particular, the multiliquid MPS method is verified against Molin et al’s (2012 experiment with three liquid layers. In case of excitation frequency close to one of the internal-layer resonances, the internal interface motions can be much greater than top free-surface motions. The verified multiliquid MPS program is subsequently used for more nonlinear cases including multichromatic multimodal motions with larger amplitudes, from which various nonlinear features, such as internal breaking and more particle detachment, can be observed. For the nonlinear case, the differences between with and without buoyancy-correction and surface-tension models are also demonstrated.

  19. Development of Modal Analysis for the Study of Global Modes in High Speed Boundary Layer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Joseph Michael

    Boundary layer transition for compressible flows remains a challenging and unsolved problem. In the context of high-speed compressible flow, transitional and turbulent boundary-layers produce significantly higher surface heating caused by an increase in skin-friction. The higher heating associated with transitional and turbulent boundary layers drives thermal protection systems (TPS) and mission trajectory bounds. Proper understanding of the mechanisms that drive transition is crucial to the successful design and operation of the next generation spacecraft. Currently, prediction of boundary-layer transition is based on experimental efforts and computational stability analysis. Computational analysis, anchored by experimental correlations, offers an avenue to assess/predict stability at a reduced cost. Classical methods of Linearized Stability Theory (LST) and Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) have proven to be very useful for simple geometries/base flows. Under certain conditions the assumptions that are inherent to classical methods become invalid and the use of LST/PSE is inaccurate. In these situations, a global approach must be considered. A TriGlobal stability analysis code, Global Mode Analysis in US3D (GMAUS3D), has been developed and implemented into the unstructured solver US3D. A discussion of the methodology and implementation will be presented. Two flow configurations are presented in an effort to validate/verify the approach. First, stability analysis for a subsonic cylinder wake is performed and results compared to literature. Second, a supersonic blunt cone is considered to directly compare LST/PSE analysis and results generated by GMAUS3D.

  20. Mapping plant species ranges in the Hawaiian Islands: developing a methodology and associated GIS layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jonathan P.; Jacobi, James D.; Gon, Samuel M.; Matsuwaki, Dwight; Mehrhoff, Loyal; Wagner, Warren; Lucas, Matthew; Rowe, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This report documents a methodology for projecting the geographic ranges of plant species in the Hawaiian Islands. The methodology consists primarily of the creation of several geographic information system (GIS) data layers depicting attributes related to the geographic ranges of plant species. The most important spatial-data layer generated here is an objectively defined classification of climate as it pertains to the distribution of plant species. By examining previous zonal-vegetation classifications in light of spatially detailed climate data, broad zones of climate relevant to contemporary concepts of vegetation in the Hawaiian Islands can be explicitly defined. Other spatial-data layers presented here include the following: substrate age, as large areas of the island of Hawai'i, in particular, are covered by very young lava flows inimical to the growth of many plant species; biogeographic regions of the larger islands that are composites of multiple volcanoes, as many of their species are restricted to a given topographically isolated mountain or a specified group of them; and human impact, which can reduce the range of many species relative to where they formerly were found. Other factors influencing the geographic ranges of species that are discussed here but not developed further, owing to limitations in rendering them spatially, include topography, soils, and disturbance. A method is described for analyzing these layers in a GIS, in conjunction with a database of species distributions, to project the ranges of plant species, which include both the potential range prior to human disturbance and the projected present range. Examples of range maps for several species are given as case studies that demonstrate different spatial characteristics of range. Several potential applications of species-range maps are discussed, including facilitating field surveys, informing restoration efforts, studying range size and rarity, studying biodiversity, managing

  1. Development of input data layers for the FARSITE fire growth model for the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Complex, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Janice L. Garner; Kirsten M. Schmidt; Donald G. Long; James P. Menakis; Mark A. Finney

    1998-01-01

    Fuel and vegetation spatial data layers required by the spatially explicit fire growth model FARSITE were developed for all lands in and around the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area in Idaho and Montana. Satellite imagery and terrain modeling were used to create the three base vegetation spatial data layers of potential vegetation, cover type, and structural stage....

  2. Development of scour in non-cohesive sediments under a poorly erodible top layer

    OpenAIRE

    Van Zuylen, J.A.; Sloff, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the development of deep scour holes in the river bed of the Dutch Rhine delta in the Netherlands. Assessment of multi-beam surveys, laboratory-flume experiments, and 3D numerical modelling, shows how fast this type of scour holes grows in depth and width. These typical scour holes are found in the tidal deltaic rivers that experience a general incision. This erosion decreases the thickness of the erosion resistant clay/peat layer that is covering and protecting the under...

  3. Development and Breakdown of Goertler Vortices in High Speed Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Wu, Minwei; Greene, Ptrick T.

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear development of G rtler instability over a concave surface gives rise to a highly distorted stationary flow in the boundary layer that has strong velocity gradients in both spanwise and wall-normal directions. This distorted flow is susceptible to strong, high frequency secondary instability that leads to the onset of transition. For high Mach number flows, the boundary layer is also subject to the second mode instability. The nonlinear development of G rtler vortices and the ensuing growth and breakdown of secondary instability, the G rtler vortex interactions with second mode instabilities as well as oblique second mode interactions are examined in the context of both internal and external hypersonic configurations using nonlinear parabolized stability equations, 2-D eigenvalue analysis and direct numerical simulation. For G rtler vortex development inside the Purdue Mach 6 Ludwieg tube wind tunnel, multiple families of unstable secondary eigenmodes are identified and their linear and nonlinear evolution is examined. The computation of secondary instability is continued past the onset of transition to elucidate the physical mechanisms underlying the laminar breakdown process. Nonlinear breakdown scenarios associated with transition over a Mach 6 compression cone configuration are also explored.

  4. Velocity-vorticity correlation structures (VVCS) in spatially developing compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Yao; She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Jun

    2017-11-01

    A velocity-vorticity correlation structure (VVCS) analysis is applied to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) at Mach numbers, Ma = 2.25 , 4.50 and 6.0 . It is shown that the VVCS analysis captures the geometry variation in the streamwise direction during the transition and in the wall-normal direction in the fully developed regime. Specifically, before transition, the VVCS captures the instability wave number, while in the transition region it displays a distinct scaling change of the dimensions. The fully developed turbulence regime is characterized by a nearly constant spatial extension of the VVCS. Particularly, after turbulence is well developed, a multi-layer structure in the wall normal direction is observed in the maximum correlation coefficient and in the length scales of the VVCS, as expected from a recent symmetry-based theory, the ensemble structure dynamics (SED). The most interesting outcome is an observed linear dependence of the length scale of the VVCS from y+ 50 to 200, which is a direct support to Townsend's attached-eddy theory. In conclusion, the VVCS analysis quantifies the geometrical characteristics of the coherent structures in turbulent compressible shear flows throughout the whole domain. Supported by NSFC (11172006, 11221062, 11452002) and by MOST (China) 973 project (2009CB724100).

  5. Hydrography, Washburn Countys Hydro Layer was developed in 1997 utilizing 1996 Orthophotos. This layer includes Lake, Rivers, Streams and Ponds within Washburn County., Published in 1997, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Washburn County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Hydrography dataset current as of 1997. Washburn Countys Hydro Layer was developed in 1997 utilizing 1996 Orthophotos. This layer includes Lake, Rivers, Streams and...

  6. Climate change and atmospheric chemistry: how will the stratospheric ozone layer develop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameris, Martin

    2010-10-25

    The discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1985 was a surprise for science. For a few years the reasons of the ozone hole was speculated about. Soon it was obvious that predominant meteorological conditions led to a specific situation developing in this part of the atmosphere: Very low temperatures initiate chemical processes that at the end cause extreme ozone depletion at altitudes of between about 15 and 30 km. So-called polar stratospheric clouds play a key role. Such clouds develop at temperatures below about 195 K. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on cloud particles initiate the destruction of ozone molecules. The future evolution of the ozone layer will not only depend on the further development of concentrations of ozone-depleting substances, but also significantly on climate change.

  7. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations: 1. Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; Li, Zhijin; Xie, Shaocheng; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Zhang, Minghua; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2015-06-01

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60 h case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in situ measurements from the Routine AAF (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility) CLOWD (Clouds with Low Optical Water Depth) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign and remote sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, are derived from observations to be 0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing data sets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, and a multiscale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in "trial" large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.

  8. Steady state, erosional continuity, and the topography of landscapes developed in layered rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perne, Matija; Covington, Matthew D.; Thaler, Evan A.; Myre, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of topographic steady state has substantially informed our understanding of the relationships between landscapes, tectonics, climate, and lithology. In topographic steady state, erosion rates are equal everywhere, and steepness adjusts to enable equal erosion rates in rocks of different strengths. This conceptual model makes an implicit assumption of vertical contacts between different rock types. Here we hypothesize that landscapes in layered rocks will be driven toward a state of erosional continuity, where retreat rates on either side of a contact are equal in a direction parallel to the contact rather than in the vertical direction. For vertical contacts, erosional continuity is the same as topographic steady state, whereas for horizontal contacts it is equivalent to equal rates of horizontal retreat on either side of a rock contact. Using analytical solutions and numerical simulations, we show that erosional continuity predicts the form of flux steady-state landscapes that develop in simulations with horizontally layered rocks. For stream power erosion, the nature of continuity steady state depends on the exponent, n, in the erosion model. For n = 1, the landscape cannot maintain continuity. For cases where n ≠ 1, continuity is maintained, and steepness is a function of erodibility that is predicted by the theory. The landscape in continuity steady state can be quite different from that predicted by topographic steady state. For n stream power erosion model, continuity steady state provides a general mathematical tool that may also be useful to understand landscapes that develop by other erosion processes.

  9. Application of stable isotopic techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases like obesity and NIDDM in developing societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.; Iyengar, V.; Sawaya, A.

    2002-01-01

    Economic development in developing societies characterized by industrialization, urbanization and globalization has seen the emergence of an epidemic of diet and life-style related chronic degenerative diseases. A research project has been initiated under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria, under its Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) to promote the use of stable isotopic techniques to document the extent of the problem and to understand the determinants of this epidemic. The principal objectives of this CRP involving countries both in the North and the South are to define the magnitude of the problem of obesity and non-insulin Dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in developing countries, to identify the vulnerable groups at increased risk and to attempt to describe the metabolic and physiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. These comparative international studies of obesity and NIDDM are looking at the effects of childhood malnutrition (Brazil and socio-economic differentials (Mexico) on adult risk factors; the composition of the daily diet on obesity (Chile); levels of patterns of physical activity of older adults (China) as well as their influence on weight gain and obesity (Cuba, Nigeria); the impact of body composition and energy expenditure on the evolution frank diabetes from impaired glucose tolerance (Jamaica), and of body compositional changes and the role of inflammatory cytokines on impaired glucose tolerance (India). The last study conducted in New Zealand was aimed at comparing the energy expenditures of Maori (Pacific Island) with New Zealanders of European descent. The findings of the CRP of the MEA in this area carried out in several countries are presented in this article. (author)

  10. Using different experimental designs in drug-excipient compatibility studies during the preformulation development of a stable solid dosage formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanec, Simona; Peterka, Tanja Rozman; Blažič, Petra; Jurečič, Rok; Grmaš, Jernej; Krivec, Aleksandra; Zakrajšek, Jure

    2010-12-01

    Different types of factorial experimental designs can be used in compatibility studies of drug development, where many different factors and their interactions should be evaluated to predict their effects on the degradation of the drug substance under study. All possible main and interaction effects of different potential excipients that can constitute the drug product should be evaluated in order to select the best combination of excipients that give the lowest possible degradation, i.e., the most stable drug product. Statistical experimental designs enable the user to obtain the maximum amount of information, i.e., the degradation effects of excipients and their interactions on the stability of the drug substance, on the basis of the smallest possible number of experiments. The use of full and two different fractional factorial designs is described using a real example where the excipients that stabilize the drug substance or cause as little degradation as possible are selected for a solid dosage formulation. It was shown that the type and the sequence of design used during the studies are also important to get reliable and valuable results. A thorough explanation of the statistical evaluation of data and different presentations of final solutions are given.

  11. Development of multi-layer ionization chamber for heavy-ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Kaori; Kusano, Yohsuke; Shimojyu, Takuya; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2007-01-01

    In heavy-ion radiotherapy, depth dose distributions measured in water phantom are applied to estimate the dose distributions in a patient body. In order to obtain depth dose distributions in water phantom easily and rapidly, Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber (MLIC) was developed and had been adapted as a field dosimeter at NIRS since 2002. Production cross section of fragments in high Z material of the MLIC, however, is very different from those in water material. Then, empirical correction should be required. In order to obtain depth dose distributions with high accuracy, we have to use low Z material as a phantom, which are thought to produce similar fragments with water phantom. From this point of view, we have developed a new MLIC made up of low Z materials, PMMA and graphite film. (author)

  12. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  13. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio-degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser-print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running-in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  14. Development of dental composites with reactive fillers that promote precipitation of antibacterial-hydroxyapatite layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabo, Anas; Abou Neel, Ensanya A; Knowles, Jonathan C; Young, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    The study aim was to develop light-curable, high strength dental composites that would release calcium phosphate and chlorhexidine (CHX) but additionally promote surface hydroxyapatite/CHX co-precipitation in simulated body fluid (SBF). 80 wt.% urethane dimethacrylate based liquid was mixed with glass fillers containing 10 wt.% CHX and 0, 10, 20 or 40 wt.% reactive mono- and tricalcium phosphate (CaP). Surface hydroxyapatite layer thickness/coverage from SEM images, Ca/Si ratio from EDX and hydroxyapatite Raman peak intensities were all proportional to both time in SBF and CaP wt.% in the filler. Hydroxyapatite was, however, difficult to detect by XRD until 4 weeks. XRD peak width and SEM images suggested this was due to the very small size (~10 nm) of the hydroxyapatite crystallites. Precipitate mass at 12 weeks was 22 wt.% of the sample CaP total mass irrespective of CaP wt.% and up to 7 wt.% of the specimen. Early diffusion controlled CHX release, assessed by UV spectrometry, was proportional to CaP and twice as fast in water compared with SBF. After 1 week, CHX continued to diffuse into water but in SBF, became entrapped within the precipitating hydroxyapatite layer. At 12 weeks CHX formed 5 to 15% of the HA layer with 10 to 40 wt.% CaP respectively. Despite linear decline of strength and modulus in 4 weeks from 160 to 101 MPa and 4 to 2.4 GPa, respectively, upon raising CaP content, all values were still within the range expected for commercial composites. The high strength, hydroxyapatite precipitation and surface antibacterial accumulation should reduce tooth restoration failure due to fracture, aid demineralised dentine repair and prevent subsurface carious disease respectively. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  16. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  17. Applied model for the growth of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1991-01-01

    A slab model is proposed for developing the height of the mixed layer capped by stable air aloft. The model equations are closed by relating the consumption of energy (potential and kinetic) at the top of the mixed layer to the production of convective and mechanical turbulent kinetic energy with...

  18. Development of Strained-Layer Superlattice (SLS) IR Detector Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) detectors are a new class of detectors.   In our FY12 IRAD “Strained Layer Superlattice Infrared Detector Array...

  19. Towards development of stable formulations of a live attenuated bacterial vaccine: a preformulation study facilitated by a biophysical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuhong; Fan, Haihong; Chiueh, Gary; Pham, Binh; Martin, Russ; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Truong, Vu L; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2009-05-01

    Development of optimal formulation conditions stabilizing live attenuated bacterial vaccines is impeded by traditional methods used for viability measurement. To facilitate preformulation studies of such vaccines, spectroscopic techniques capable of providing real-time and high throughput information have been employed to obtain a global stability profile for a live attenuated Ty21a bacterial typhoid vaccine over a wide range of pH (4 to 8) and temperature (10 to 85 degrees C). Using the data obtained from fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques, an empirical phase diagram (EPD) has been subsequently constructed, which suggests that Ty21a cells exist in at least four apparent physical phases related to different viability states, with the most stable phase at pH 6 and 7 at temperatures below 30 degrees C. A slightly basic pH (pH 8) appears to decrease the fluidity of the cell membrane, whereas acidic pH conditions are detrimental to membrane integrity over the entire temperature range. Based on the above stability profile, a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay has been developed to test the stabilizing effects of various compounds at different concentrations. Amongst other promising stabilizers, 10% sucrose and 0.15 M glutamic acid display the greatest protective effects, with an increase of about 10 degrees C in the transition temperature of Ty21a cells. Preliminary studies have also been performed on foam dried formulations as an alternative approach to further stabilize Ty21a cells. The data show that 10% sucrose and trehalose both increase the in-process and storage stabilities of the cells.

  20. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  1. Development of migration prediction system (MIGSTEM) for cationic species of radionuclides through soil layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takebe, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi

    1989-01-01

    The migration prediction system (MIGSTEM) has been developed for estimating the migration of cationic species of radionuclides through soil layers systematically. The MIGSTEM consists of the migration experiments, the one-dimensional fitting code (inverse analysis code) for determining retardation factor and dispersivity (migration factors) and the three-dimensional differential code (prediction code) for estimating the migration of the radionuclides. The migration experiments are carried out for obtaining the concentration profiles of the radionuclides in unsaturated and saturated soil layers. Using the inverse analysis code, the migration factors are obtained at one time by fitting the concentration profiles calculated to those observed. The prediction code can give the contours of concentration and the one-dimensional concentration profiles at selected time, as well as the changing in the concentration at a selected position with time. The validity of the MIGSTEM was obtained by the benchmark test on the prediction and inverse analysis codes. The MIGSTEM was applied to estimate the migration of Sr 2+ through the sandy soil. (author)

  2. Stable ozone layer in Norway and USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, K.; Svenoe, T.; Terez, E. I.; Terez, G. A.; Roldugin, V.; Larsen, S. H. H.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term column ozone density measurements have been carried out in Norway and USSR. Data from Tromso and two meridional chains in USSR are analyzed, and most of the stations show that no significant decreasing trend in ozone has occurred during the last two decades.

  3. Aerosol model development for environmental monitoring in the coastal atmosphere surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, Gennady A.; Matvienko, Gennady G.

    2007-06-01

    Extinction of radiation in the marine boundary layer is dominated by scattering and absorption due to atmospheric aerosol. It is known, that the extinction of optical radiation visible and near IR spectra in the marine surface layer is determined mainly by scattering and absorption atmospheric aerosol. It influences on a dependence of spectral transmission and extinction both natural, and artificial light that is of interest for a wide range of problems, in particular for radiating problems at studying laws of climate formation, and for lines of the applications connected to the forecast of a signal power in coastal conditions at an estimation of EO systems characteristics. This is important to optical retrievals from satellite, remote sensing at environmental monitoring, backscatter of light to space (including climate forcing), cloud properties etc. In unpolluted regions the greatest effects on near shore scattering extinction will be a result of sea-salt from breaking waves and variations in relative humidity. The role of breaking waves appears to be modulated by wind, tide, swell, wave spectra and coastal conditions. These influences will be superimposed upon aerosol generated by open ocean sea-salt aerosol that varies with wind speed. The focus of our study is the extinction and optical effects due to aerosol in a specific coastal region. This involves linking coastal physical properties to oceanic and meteorological parameters in order to develop predictive algorithms that describe 3-D aerosol structure and variability. The aerosol microphysical model of the marine and coastal atmosphere surface layer is considered. The model distinctive feature is parameterization of amplitude and width of the modes as functions of fetch and wind speed. In the paper the dN/dr behavior depending at change meteorological parameters, heights above sea level, fetch, wind speed and RH is show. On the basis of the developed model with usage of Mie theory for spheres the

  4. Effect of nanoparticles of silver and gold on metabolic rate and development of broiler and layer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineda, L; Sawosz, E; Hotowy, A

    2012-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the effects of nanoparticles of silver (AgNano) and gold (AuNano) on metabolic rate (O(2) consumption, CO(2) production and heat production-HP) and the development of embryos from different breeds of broiler and layer chicken. Gaseous exchange was measured in an open...... was not affected by either of the treatments, but it was significantly higher compared to the layer embryos. Neither of the nanoparticles promoted nor depressed growth and development of the embryos, irrespective of breed. Although the metabolic rate of AgNano-injected layer embryos was significantly increased......-air-circuit respiration unit, and HP was calculated for 10, 13, 16 and 19-day-old embryos. Relative chick and muscle weights were used as a measure of growth rate and development. AgNano but not AuNano increased the rates of O(2) consumption and HP of the layer embryos. The metabolic rate of broiler embryos...

  5. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  6. A nonlinear scenario for development of vortex layer instability in gravity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    A Hamiltonian version of contour dynamics is formulated for models of constant-vorticity plane flows with interfaces. The proposed approach is used as a framework for a nonlinear scenario for instability development. Localized vortex blobs are analyzed as structural elements of a strongly perturbed wall layer of a vorticity-carrying fluid with free boundary in gravity field. Gravity and vorticity effects on the geometry and velocity of vortex structures are examined. It is shown that compactly supported nonlinear solutions (compactons) are candidates for the role of particle-like vortex structures in models of flow breakdown. An analysis of the instability mechanism demonstrates the possibility of a self-similar collapse. It is found that the vortex shape stabilizes at the final stage of the collapse, while the vortex sheet strength on its boundary increases as (t 0 - t) -1 , where t 0 is the collapse time

  7. Feedbacks between tall shrubland development and active layer temperatures in northwest Siberian arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, H. E.; Frost, G. V.; Walker, D. A.; Matyshak, G.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils are a globally significant carbon store, but changes in permafrost thermal regime observed in recent decades across much of the Arctic suggest that permafrost carbon balance is likely to change with continued climate warming. Critical to changes in permafrost carbon balance in a warmer world, however, are feedbacks between changes in the composition and density of surface vegetation, and the thermal state of permafrost. Shrub expansion has been widely observed in the northwest Siberian Low Arctic, but the magnitude and direction of shrub-induced impacts to permafrost temperature and stability remain poorly understood. Here we evaluate changes to active layer properties and thermal regime that occur during tall shrubland development (shrubs > 1.5 m height) within a northwest Siberian landscape dominated by well-developed, small-scale patterned ground features (e.g., non-sorted circles). We measured the annual time-series of soil temperature at 5 cm and 20 cm depth, and the structural attributes of vegetation at patterned-ground microsites across four stages of tall shrubland development: low-growing tundra lacking erect shrubs, newly-developed shrublands, mature shrublands, and paludified shrublands. Mean summer soil temperatures declined with increasing shrub cover and moss thickness, but winter soil temperatures increased with shrub development. Shrubland development strongly attenuated cryoturbation, promoting the establishment of complete vegetation cover and the development of a continuous organic mat. Increased vegetation cover, in turn, led to further reduced cryoturbation and an aggrading permafrost table. These observations indicate that tall shrub expansion that is now occurring in patterned-ground landscapes of the northwest Siberian Arctic may buffer permafrost from atmospheric warming, and increase carbon storage in these systems at least in the short term.

  8. Highly-stable and low-state-density Al2O3/GaN interfaces using epitaxial n-GaN layers grown on free-standing GaN substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneki, Shota; Ohira, Joji; Toiya, Shota; Yatabe, Zenji; Asubar, Joel T.; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    Interface characterization was carried out on Al2O3/GaN structures using epitaxial n-GaN layers grown on free-standing GaN substrates with relatively low dislocation density (capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves at reverse bias, showing high-density interface states in the range of 1012 cm-1 eV-1. On the other hand, excellent C-V characteristics with negligible frequency dispersion were observed from the MOS sample after annealing under a reverse bias at 300 °C in air for 3 h. The reverse-bias-annealed sample showed state densities less than 1 × 1011 cm-1 eV-1 and small shifts of flat-band voltage. In addition, the C-V curve measured at 200 °C remained essentially similar compared with the room-temperature C-V curves. These results indicate that the present process realizes a stable Al2O3/GaN interface with low interface state densities.

  9. Thermally stable dielectric responses in uniaxially (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 nanofilms grown on a Ca2Nb3O10- nanosheet seed layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Junichi; Takuwa, Itaru; Matsushima, Masaaki; Shimizu, Takao; Uchida, Hiroshi; Kiguchi, Takanori; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Shibata, Tatsuo; Osada, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    To realize a high-temperature capacitor, uniaxially (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 films with various film thicknesses were prepared on (100)cSrRuO3/Ca2Nb3O10- nanosheet/glass substrates. As the film thickness decreases to 50 nm, the out-of-plane lattice parameters decrease while the in-plane lattice ones increase due to the in-plane tensile strain. However, the relative dielectric constant (ɛr) at room temperature exhibits a negligible degradation as the film thickness decreases to 50 nm, suggesting that ɛr of (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 is less sensitive to the residual strain. The capacitance density increases monotonously with decreasing film thickness, reaching a value of 4.5 μF/cm2 for a 50-nm-thick nanofilm, and is stable against temperature changes from room temperature to 400 °C irrespective of film thickness. This behaviour differs from that of the widely investigated perovskite-structured dielectrics. These results show that (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 films derived using Ca2Nb3O10- nanosheets as seed layers can be made candidates for high-temperature capacitor applications by a small change in the dielectric properties against film thickness and temperature variations.

  10. Development of Nitride Coating Using Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sumit

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power and can withstand high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. The design of the research reactor fuels is done for efficient heat emission, and consists of assemblies of thin-plates cladding made from aluminum alloy. The low-enriched fuels (LEU) were developed for replacing high-enriched fuels (HEU) for these reactors necessitates a significantly increased uranium density in the fuel to counterbalance the decrease in enrichment. One of the most promising new fuel candidate is U-Mo alloy, in a U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel form, due to its high uranium loading as well as excellent irradiation resistance performance, is being developed extensively to convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel for high-performance research reactors. However, the formation of an interaction layer (IL) between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, and the associated pore formation, under high heat flux and high burnup conditions, degrade the irradiation performance of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. From the recent tests results accumulated from the surface engineering of low enriched uranium fuel (SELENIUM) and MIR reactor displayed that a surface barrier coating like physical vapor deposited (PVD) zirconium nitride (ZrN) can significantly reduce the interaction layer. The barrier coating performed well at low burn up but above a fluence rate of 5x 1021 ions/cm2 the swelling reappeared due to formation interaction layer. With this result in mind the objective of this research was to develop an ultrathin ZrN coating over particulate uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel using a modified savannah 200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. This is done in support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) effort to slow down the interaction at fluence rate and reach higher burn up for high power research reactor. The low-pressure Savannah 200 ALD system is modified to be designed as a batch powder coating system using the

  11. Development of analytical theory of the physical libration for a two-layer Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Natalia; Barkin, Yurii; Gusev, Alexander; Ivanova, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    -project. Prognosis recommendations are made for the future experiment. The model of free rotation of the two-layer Moon is constructed, the periods of the free modes and of the librational motion of a pole are received, effects of influence of a lunar core on behavior of LPhL-harmonics caused by the solid-state rotation of the Moon are deduced. Computer simulating has revealed the sensitivity of the free libration periods to core's ellipticity and to core-mantle boundary dissipation parameters. Geometrical interpretation of the pole motion owing to the free libration is given. For the first time the theoretical model of tidal potential of the Moon is developed, on the basis of the model the analytical formulae for variations of the Stockes coefficients of the 2-nd order and of the speed of the Lunar rotation is received in dependence on time. For a two-layer structure of the Moon and the Mercury Cassini's law were stated at the first time: 1. a two-layer Moon keeps its own stationary rotation; 2. there is a splitting of Cassini nodes and angular momentums of Lunar mantle and core; 3. the same phenomenon will be observed for any two-layer planet (Mercury); 4. the differential rotation of a core and mantle is inherent to a planet as result of a generalized Cassini's Laws. Theoretical and practical methods of construction of the theory of rotation of the Earth have been successfully applied in the development of the theory of rotation of the Moon, in

  12. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  13. Influence of electrical parameters on morphology of nanostructured TiO2 layers developed by electrochemical anodization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strnad Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti6Al4V alloy micro rough surfaces with TiO2 self-organized nanostructured layers were synthesized using electrochemical anodization in phosphate/fluoride electrolyte, at different end potentials (5V, 10V, 15V, and 20 V. The current – time characteristics were recorded, and the link between current evolution and the morphology of developing oxide layers was investigated. On flat surfaces of Ti6Al4V alloy we developed TiO2 layers with different morphologies (random pores, nanopores of 25…50 nm, and highly organized nanotubes of 50…100 nm in diameter depending on electrical parameters of anodization process. In our anodization cell, in optimized conditions, we are able to superimpose nanostructured oxide layers (nanotubular or nanoporous over micro structured surfaces of titanium based materials used for biomedical implants.

  14. Unsteady boundary layer development on a wind turbine blade: an experimental study of a surrogate problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadel, Daniel R.; Zhang, Di; Lowe, K. Todd; Paterson, Eric G.

    2018-04-01

    Wind turbines with thick blade profiles experience turbulent, periodic approach flow, leading to unsteady blade loading and large torque fluctuations on the turbine drive shaft. Presented here is an experimental study of a surrogate problem representing some key aspects of the wind turbine unsteady fluid mechanics. This experiment has been designed through joint consideration by experiment and computation, with the ultimate goal of numerical model development for aerodynamics in unsteady and turbulent flows. A cylinder at diameter Reynolds number of 65,000 and Strouhal number of 0.184 is placed 10.67 diameters upstream of a NACA 63215b airfoil with chord Reynolds number of 170,000 and chord-reduced frequency of k=2π fc/2/V=1.5. Extensive flow field measurements using particle image velocimetry provide a number of insights about this flow, as well as data for model validation and development. Velocity contours on the airfoil suction side in the presence of the upstream cylinder indicate a redistribution of turbulent normal stresses from transverse to streamwise, consistent with rapid distortion theory predictions. A study of the boundary layer over the suction side of the airfoil reveals very low Reynolds number turbulent mean streamwise velocity profiles. The dominance of the high amplitude large eddy passages results in a phase lag in streamwise velocity as a function of distance from the wall. The results and accompanying description provide a new test case incorporating moderate-reduced frequency inflow for computational model validation and development.

  15. Development and evaluation of a dynamic model of calcium and phosphorus flows in layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebreab, E; France, J; Kwakkel, R P; Leeson, S; Kuhi, H Darmani; Dijkstra, J

    2009-03-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient involved in most metabolic processes. Most of the interest in Ca metabolism relates to eggshell formation. Although the eggshell is composed of Ca carbonate, metabolism of both Ca and P is closely related such that a deficiency in one can interfere with proper utilization of the other. To understand Ca and P metabolism properly, modeling can be of paramount importance. A new dynamic and mechanistic model of P and Ca metabolism in layers has been developed to simulate diurnal changes in Ca and P and the hourly requirement of the layer for those minerals. The model consists of 8 state variables representing Ca and P pools in the crop, stomachs, plasma, and bone. The flow equations are described by Michaelis-Menten or mass action forms. An experiment that measured Ca and P uptake in layers fed different Ca concentrations during shell-forming days was used for model evaluation. The experiment showed that Ca retained in body and egg decreased from 62.5 to 50.5% of Ca intake when the Ca in diet was increased from 25 to 45 mg/g of feed. The model simulations were in agreement with the trend. Predictions of Ca retention in bone and egg were 63.2, 56.1, and 55.3% for low, medium, and high dietary Ca concentrations. The experimental results showed that P retention in body and egg increased significantly from 11.5% of absorbable P intake at the lowest Ca inclusion concentration to 24.1% at the highest. The model also predicted an increase in P retention in bone and egg from 8.4 to 25.4% of absorbable P intake at the lowest and highest concentration of Ca inclusion, respectively. The advantage of the model is that absorption and utilization can be monitored on an hourly basis and that adjustments can be made accordingly. The model successfully showed how the availability of one mineral affects the utilization of the other and is a useful tool to evaluate feeding strategies aimed at reducing P excretion to the environment in poultry manure.

  16. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  17. Temporal changes in the bacterial community of animal feces and their correlation with stable fly oviposition, larval development, and adult fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Thais A; Zurek, Ludek

    2014-01-01

    Stable flies are blood-feeding insects with a great negative impact on animals world wide. Larvae develop primarily in animal manure and bacteria are essential for larval development; however, the principle of this dependence is not understood. We hypothesized that as the microbial community of animal manure changes over time, it plays an important role in stable fly fitness. Two-choice bioassays were conducted using 2 week old horse manure (control) and aging horse manure (fresh to 5 week old) to evaluate the effect of manure age on stable fly oviposition. Our data showed that fresh feces did not stimulate oviposition and that the attractiveness increased as manure aged but started to decline after 3 weeks. Bioassays assessing the effect of manure age at the time of oviposition on larval development demonstrated that 1-3 week old manure supported larval development significantly better than fresh, 4, and 5 week old manure. In addition, adult fitness (body size) was significantly higher in flies from 1 and 2 week old manure comparing to that of all other treatments. Analysis of the bacterial community of aging horse manure by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA revealed a great reduction in bacterial diversity and richness from fresh to 1-5 week old manure and a major shift from strict anaerobes in fresh manure to facultative anaerobes and strict aerobes in aged manure. Overall, the microbial community of 2 and 3 week old horse manure with its dominant bacterial taxa Rhizobium, Devosia, and Brevundimonas stimulated stable fly oviposition the most and provided a suitable habitat for larval development. These bacteria represent the candidates for studies focused on better understanding of stable fly - microbial interactions.

  18. Temporal changes in the bacterial community of animal feces and their correlation with stable fly oviposition, larval development, and adult fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais eAlbuquerque

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stable flies are blood-feeding insects with a great negative impact on animals worldwide. Larvae develop primarily in animal manure and bacteria are essential for larval development; however, the principle of this dependence is not understood. We hypothesized that as the microbial community of animal manure changes over time, it plays an important role in stable fly fitness. Two-choice bioassays were conducted using two week old horse manure (control and aging horse manure (fresh to 5 week old to evaluate the effect of manure age on stable fly oviposition. Our data showed that fresh feces did not stimulate oviposition and that the attractiveness increased as manure aged but started to decline after 3 weeks. Bioassays assessing the effect of manure age at the time of oviposition on larval development demonstrated that 1 to 3 week old manure supported larval development significantly better than fresh, 4, and 5 week old manure. In addition, adult fitness (body size was significantly higher in flies from 1 and 2 week old manure comparing to that of all other treatments. Analysis of the bacterial community of aging horse manure by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA revealed a great reduction in bacterial diversity and richness from fresh to 1-5 week old manure and a major shift from strict anaerobes in fresh manure to facultative anaerobes and strict aerobes in aged manure. Overall, the microbial community of 2 and 3 week old horse manure with its dominant bacterial taxa Rhizobium, Devosia, and Brevudiomonas stimulated stable fly oviposition the most and provided a suitable habitat for larval development. These bacteria represent the candidates for studies focused on better understanding of stable fly - microbial interactions.

  19. Development of off-line layer chromatographic and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods for arsenic speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihucz, Victor G. [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Moricz, Agnes M. [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Chemical Technology and Environmental Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Kroepfl, Krisztina [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Szikora, Szilvia [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Tatar, Eniko [Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Parra, Lue Meru Marco [Universidad Centro-occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Decanato de Agronomia, Departamento de Quimica y Suelos Unidad de Analisis Instrumental, Apartado Postal 4076, Cabudare 3023 (Venezuela); Zaray, Gyula [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary) and Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary) and L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: zaray@ludens.elte.hu

    2006-11-15

    Rapid and low cost off-line thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods have been developed for separation of 25 ng of each As(III), As(V), monomethyl arsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid applying a PEI cellulose stationary phase on plastic sheets and a mixture of acetone/acetic acid/water = 2:1:1 (v/v/v) as eluent system. The type of eluent systems, the amounts (25-1000 ng) of As species applied to PEI cellulose plates, injection volume, development distance, and flow rate (in case of overpressured thin layer chromatography) were taken into consideration for the development of the chromatographic separation. Moreover, a microdigestion method employing nitric acid for the As spots containing PEI cellulose scratched from the developed plates divided into segments was developed for the subsequent total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry analysis. The method was applied for analysis of root extracts of cucumber plants grown in As(III) containing modified Hoagland nutrient solution. Both As(III) and As(V) were detected by applying the proposed thin layer chromatography/overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods.

  20. Development of off-line layer chromatographic and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods for arsenic speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihucz, Victor G.; Móricz, Ágnes M.; Kröpfl, Krisztina; Szikora, Szilvia; Tatár, Enikő; Parra, Lué Merú Marcó; Záray, Gyula

    2006-11-01

    Rapid and low cost off-line thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods have been developed for separation of 25 ng of each As(III), As(V), monomethyl arsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid applying a PEI cellulose stationary phase on plastic sheets and a mixture of acetone/acetic acid/water = 2:1:1 (v/v/v) as eluent system. The type of eluent systems, the amounts (25-1000 ng) of As species applied to PEI cellulose plates, injection volume, development distance, and flow rate (in case of overpressured thin layer chromatography) were taken into consideration for the development of the chromatographic separation. Moreover, a microdigestion method employing nitric acid for the As spots containing PEI cellulose scratched from the developed plates divided into segments was developed for the subsequent total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry analysis. The method was applied for analysis of root extracts of cucumber plants grown in As(III) containing modified Hoagland nutrient solution. Both As(III) and As(V) were detected by applying the proposed thin layer chromatography/overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods.

  1. Development of new S-band RF window for stable high-power operation in linear accelerator RF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Youngdo; Lee, Byung-Joon; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Kong, Hyung-Sup; Hwang, Woonha; Roh, Sungjoo; Ryu, Jiwan

    2017-09-01

    For stable high-power operation, a new RF window is developed in the S-band linear accelerator (Linac) RF systems of the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) and the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free-Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL). The new RF window is designed to mitigate the strength of the electric field at the ceramic disk and also at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the conventional RF window. By replacing the pill-box type cavity in the conventional RF window with an overmoded cavity, the electric field component perpendicular to the ceramic disk that caused most of the multipacting breakdowns in the ceramic disk was reduced by an order of magnitude. The reduced electric field at the ceramic disk eliminated the Ti-N coating process on the ceramic surface in the fabrication procedure of the new RF window, preventing the incomplete coating from spoiling the RF transmission and lowering the fabrication cost. The overmoded cavity was coupled with input and output waveguides through dual side-wall coupling irises to reduce the electric field strength at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure and the possibility of mode competitions in the overmoded cavity. A prototype of the new RF window was fabricated and fully tested with the Klystron peak input power, pulse duration and pulse repetition rate of 75 MW, 4.5 μs and 10 Hz, respectively, at the high-power test stand. The first mass-produced new RF window installed in the PLS-II Linac is running in normal operation mode. No fault is reported to date. Plans are being made to install the new RF window to all S-band accelerator RF modules of the PLS-II and PAL-XFEL Linacs. This new RF window may be applied to the output windows of S-band power sources like Klystron as wells as the waveguide windows of accelerator facilities which operate in S-band.

  2. Development of acid stable, hyper-crosslinked, silica-based reversed-phase liquid chromatography supports for the separation of organic bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lianjia; Luo, Hao; Dai, Jun; Carr, Peter W

    2006-05-05

    A new generation of extremely acid stable "hyper-crosslinked" (HC) phases have been developed with good plate counts for basic drug separations. In our previous work, we successfully developed an approach for synthesizing HC stationary phases on silica substrates using aluminum trichloride catalyzed Friedel-Crafts (F-C) chemistry to improve the stability of silica-based RPLC stationary phases at low pH. However, the performance of basic analytes on these HC phases under acidic conditions was unusually poor compared to that of conventional silica-based C18 phases. The effects of the specific F-C catalysts used and the specific silica substrate on the chromatographic properties of HC phases have been studied. Modified synthetic strategies that give both good observed plate counts for basic analytes under acidic conditions and very good low pH stability without compromising other chromatographic properties of the hyper-crosslinked phases have been developed. Replacement of aluminum trichloride with tin tetrachloride as the catalyst for the F-C chemistry and use of a very high purity silica result in significantly improved plate counts for basic analytes. In formic acid buffered mobile phases, which are highly compatible with electrospray ionization LC-MS, basic analytes showed much better performance on the tin tetrachloride catalyzed HC phases than on any conventional commercial phase tested. The tin tetrachloride catalyzed HC phase is as stable as the original aluminum trichloride catalyzed HC phases, and much more stable than the bench mark acid stable commercial phase.

  3. Development and validation of a thin-layer chromatography method for stability studies of naproxen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Hernandez, Yaslenis; Suarez Perez, Yania; Garcia Pulpeiro, Oscar; Rodriguez Borges, Tania

    2011-01-01

    The validation of an analytical method was carried out to be applied to the stability studies of the future formulations of naproxen suppositories for infant and adult use. The factors which mostly influenced in the naproxen stability were determined, the major degradation occurred in oxidizing acid medium and by action of light. The possible formation of esters between the free carboxyl group present in naproxen and the glyceryl monoestereate present in the base was identified as one of the degradation paths in the new formulation. The results were satisfactory. A thin-layer chromatography-based method was developed as well as the best chromatographic conditions were selected. GF 254 silica gel plates and ultraviolet developer at 254 nm were employed. Three solvent systems were evaluated of which A made up of glacial acetic: tetrahydrofurane:toluene (3:9:90 v/v/v)allowed adequate resolution between the analyte and the possible degradation products, with detection limit of 1 μg. The use of the suggested method was restricted to the identification of possible degradation products just for qualitative purposes and not as final test. The method proved to be sensitive and selective enough to be applied for the stated objective, according to the validation results

  4. Recent Development of Advanced Electrode Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition for Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Wang, John

    2016-10-01

    Electrode materials play a decisive role in almost all electrochemical energy storage devices, determining their overall performance. Proper selection, design and fabrication of electrode materials have thus been regarded as one of the most critical steps in achieving high electrochemical energy storage performance. As an advanced nanotechnology for thin films and surfaces with conformal interfacial features and well controllable deposition thickness, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been successfully developed for deposition and surface modification of electrode materials, where there are considerable issues of interfacial and surface chemistry at atomic and nanometer scale. In addition, ALD has shown great potential in construction of novel nanostructured active materials that otherwise can be hardly obtained by other processing techniques, such as those solution-based processing and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. This review focuses on the recent development of ALD for the design and delivery of advanced electrode materials in electrochemical energy storage devices, where typical examples will be highlighted and analyzed, and the merits and challenges of ALD for applications in energy storage will also be discussed.

  5. Effect of nanoparticles of silver and gold on metabolic rate and development of broiler and layer embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, L; Sawosz, E; Hotowy, A; Elnif, J; Sawosz, F; Ali, A; Chwalibog, A

    2012-03-01

    This investigation evaluated the effects of nanoparticles of silver (AgNano) and gold (AuNano) on metabolic rate (O(2) consumption, CO(2) production and heat production-HP) and the development of embryos from different breeds of broiler and layer chicken. Gaseous exchange was measured in an open-air-circuit respiration unit, and HP was calculated for 10, 13, 16 and 19-day-old embryos. Relative chick and muscle weights were used as a measure of growth rate and development. AgNano but not AuNano increased the rates of O(2) consumption and HP of the layer embryos. The metabolic rate of broiler embryos was not affected by either of the treatments, but it was significantly higher compared to the layer embryos. Neither of the nanoparticles promoted nor depressed growth and development of the embryos, irrespective of breed. Although the metabolic rate of AgNano-injected layer embryos was significantly increased, their BW and muscle weights at hatching were similar to those of the control group, which suggests that the concentration of AgNano used was adequate for increasing the metabolic rate but not enough to affect growth and development. The results show that AgNano could be a potential metabolic modifier for layer embryos; however, the exact mechanism of action should be elucidated in future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A One-Dimensional Atmospheric Boundary Layer Model: Intermittent Wind Shears and Thermal Stability at Night

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turnick, Arnold

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent computer model of the atmospheric boundary layer was developed to simulate intermittent turbulence and the near-ground microclimate under nighttime stable conditions...

  7. Design and Development of Layered Security: Future Enhancements and Directions in Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Aamir; Lee, Malrey; Kim, Suntae; Kim, Kangmin; Choi, Jae-Young; Cho, Younghwa; Lee, Keun-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Today, security is a prominent issue when any type of communication is being undertaken. Like traditional networks, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems suffer from a number of vulnerabilities. Numerous end-to-end security mechanisms have been proposed for the resolution of SCADA-system security issues, but due to insecure real-time protocol use and the reliance upon open protocols during Internet-based communication, these SCADA systems can still be compromised by security challenges. This study reviews the security challenges and issues that are commonly raised during SCADA/protocol transmissions and proposes a secure distributed-network protocol version 3 (DNP3) design, and the implementation of the security solution using a cryptography mechanism. Due to the insecurities found within SCADA protocols, the new development consists of a DNP3 protocol that has been designed as a part of the SCADA system, and the cryptographically derived security is deployed within the application layer as a part of the DNP3 stack. PMID:26751443

  8. Computed and experimental interactions between eddy structure and dispersed particles in developing free shear layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Keller, J.O.; Ellzey, J.; Hubbard, G.; Daily, J.W.

    1982-05-20

    We are investigating the interactive process between turbulent flow and dispersed phase particles. We are focusing on the mechanisms that appear to result in a reduction of local turbulent intensity and a corresponding reduction in wall heat transfer and subsequent wall erosion in turbulent solid propellant combustion flow. We apply computational simulations and physical experiments specialized to a developing free shear layer over a rearward facing step and over a parallel splitter plate. The flow configuration evolves in a two-dimensional, steady, combustion and non-combustion turbulent free shear mixing region, with and without particle additives. The computational simulations combine three basic components: gas phase Navier-Stokes solutions, Lagrange particle field solutions and a Monte Carlo technique for the random encounters, forces and accelerations between the two fields. We concentrate here on relatively large sized additive particles (of the order of tens of microns to 100 microns mean diameter). We examine their apparent influence in breaking up the larger, energy bearing eddy structures into smaller structures which are more readily dissipated.

  9. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2014-06-02

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other free shear flows available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number (Sc). In the present study, such a strong jump is observed for a scalar with Sc ≈ 1. Conditional statistics of kinetic energy and scalar dissipation are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterised by a strong peak very close to the interface. Finally, it is shown that the geometric features of the interfaces correlate with relatively large scale structures as visualised by low-pressure isosurfaces. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  10. Development of counting system for wear measurements using Thin Layer Activation and the Wearing Apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Michel de A.; Suita, Julio C.; Salgado, César M., E-mail: mchldante@gmail.com, E-mail: suita@ien.gov.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This paper focus on developing a counting system for the Wearing Apparatus, which is a device previously built to generate measurable wear on a given surface (Main Source) and to carry the fillings from it to a filter (second source). The Thin Layer Activation is a technique used to produce activity on one of the Wearing Apparatus' piece, this activity is proportional to the amount of material worn, or scrapped, from the piece's surface. Thus, by measuring the activity on those two points it is possible to measure the produced wear. The methodology used in this work is based on simulations through MCNP-X Code to nd the best specifications for shielding, solid angles, detectors dimensions and collimation for the Counting System. By simulating several scenarios, each one different from the other, and analyzing the results in the form of Counts Per Second, the ideal counting system's specifications and geometry to measure the activity in the Main Source and the Filter (second source) is chosen. After that, a set of previously activated stainless steel foils were used to reproduce the real experiments' conditions, this real experiment consists of using TLA and the Wearing Apparatus, the results demonstrate that the counting system and methodology are adequate for such experiments. (author)

  11. Development of Three-Layer Simulation Model for Freezing Process of Food Solution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminishi, Koji; Araki, Tetsuya; Shirakashi, Ryo; Ueno, Shigeaki; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    A numerical model has been developed for simulating freezing phenomena of food solution systems. The cell model was simplified to apply to food solution systems, incorporating with the existence of 3 parts such as unfrozen, frozen and moving boundary layers. Moreover, the moving rate of freezing front model was also introduced and calculated by using the variable space network method proposed by Murray and Landis (1957). To demonstrate the validity of the model, it was applied to the freezing processes of coffee solutions. Since the model required the phase diagram of the material to be frozen, the initial freezing temperatures of 1-55 % coffee solutions were measured by the DSC method. The effective thermal conductivity for coffee solutions was determined as a function of temperature and solute concentration by using the Maxwell - Eucken model. One-dimensional freezing process of 10 % coffee solution was simulated based on its phase diagram and thermo-physical properties. The results were good agreement with the experimental data and then showed that the model could accurately describe the change in the location of the freezing front and the distributions of temperature as well as ice fraction during a freezing process.

  12. Design and Development of Layered Security: Future Enhancements and Directions in Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Aamir; Lee, Malrey; Kim, Suntae; Kim, Kangmin; Choi, Jae-Young; Cho, Younghwa; Lee, Keun-Kwang

    2016-01-06

    Today, security is a prominent issue when any type of communication is being undertaken. Like traditional networks, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems suffer from a number of vulnerabilities. Numerous end-to-end security mechanisms have been proposed for the resolution of SCADA-system security issues, but due to insecure real-time protocol use and the reliance upon open protocols during Internet-based communication, these SCADA systems can still be compromised by security challenges. This study reviews the security challenges and issues that are commonly raised during SCADA/protocol transmissions and proposes a secure distributed-network protocol version 3 (DNP3) design, and the implementation of the security solution using a cryptography mechanism. Due to the insecurities found within SCADA protocols, the new development consists of a DNP3 protocol that has been designed as a part of the SCADA system, and the cryptographically derived security is deployed within the application layer as a part of the DNP3 stack.

  13. Design and Development of Layered Security: Future Enhancements and Directions in Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, security is a prominent issue when any type of communication is being undertaken. Like traditional networks, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA systems suffer from a number of vulnerabilities. Numerous end-to-end security mechanisms have been proposed for the resolution of SCADA-system security issues, but due to insecure real-time protocol use and the reliance upon open protocols during Internet-based communication, these SCADA systems can still be compromised by security challenges. This study reviews the security challenges and issues that are commonly raised during SCADA/protocol transmissions and proposes a secure distributed-network protocol version 3 (DNP3 design, and the implementation of the security solution using a cryptography mechanism. Due to the insecurities found within SCADA protocols, the new development consists of a DNP3 protocol that has been designed as a part of the SCADA system, and the cryptographically derived security is deployed within the application layer as a part of the DNP3 stack.

  14. Polymerisation shrinkage versus layer thickness of a dentine bonding resin: Method development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarzadeh T

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Dentine bonding systems are usually unfilled, and so their shrinkage may be significant. High"nshrinkage may cause internal stress at the interface between resin-composite restoration and the dentine"nsubstrate. Failure of the adhesive interface may be observed due to the interna! stress. The aims of this"nstudy were:"nA To obtain a suitable method for measuring the kinetics of polymerisation shrinkage in unfilled resm at different thicknesses, particularly for thin films."nB Consideraing the effect of thickness on shrinkage."nScotchbond Multipurpose (3M adhesive bond resin was used. To overcome the particular challenges presented by thin films, a filled-ring measurement procedure was used. Also, a non-contact laser analogue displacement sensor system was developed and applied to measure polymerisation shrinkage. Regression analysis was performed on a complete data set. Non-linear regression analysis established a logarithmic relationship between polymerisation shrinkage and layer thickness. The method applied in this study was found to be sensitive and accurate procedure for determining photo-polymerisation shrinkage of thin films. Polymerisation shrinkage increased with logarithmic of the adhesive thickness.

  15. Folder: A numerical tool to simulate the development of structures in layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2016-03-01

    We present Folder, a numerical toolbox for modelling deformation in layered media subject to layer parallel shortening or extension in two dimensions. The toolbox includes a range of features that ensure maximum flexibility to configure model geometry, define material parameters, specify numerical parameters, and choose the plotting options. Folder builds on an efficient finite element method model and implements state of the art iterative and time integration schemes. We describe the basic Folder features and present several case studies of single and multilayer stacks subject to layer parallel shortening and extension. Folder additionally comprises an application that illustrates various analytical solutions of growth rates calculated for the cases of layer parallel shortening and extension of a single layer with interfaces perturbed with a single sinusoidal waveform. We further derive two novel analytical expressions for the growth rate in the cases of layer parallel shortening and extension of a linear viscous layer embedded in a linear viscous medium of a finite thickness. These solutions help understand mechanical instabilities in layered rocks and provide a unique opportunity for benchmarking of numerical codes. We demonstrate how Folder can be used for benchmarking of numerical codes. We test the accuracy of single-layer folding simulations using various 1) spatial and temporal resolutions, 2) iterative algorithms for non-linear materials, and 3) time integration schemes. The accuracy of the numerical results is quantified by: 1) comparing them to analytical solutions, if available, or 2) running convergence tests. As a result, we provide a map of the most optimal choice of grid size, time step, and number of iterations to keep the results of the numerical simulations below a given error for a given time integration scheme. Folder is an open source MATLAB application and comes with a user-friendly graphical interface. Folder is suitable for both educational

  16. Development of Strained-Layer Superlattice (SLS) IR Detector Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) detectors are a new class of detectors which may be the next generation of band-gap engineered, large format infrared detector...

  17. Self-Supporting High Performance Multi-Layer Insulation Technology Development (SSMLI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of MLI—Integrated Multi-Layer Insulation (IMLI)—uses rigid, low-conductivity polymer spacers instead of netting to keep the radiation barriers separated....

  18. Development of evaluation method of high temperature mechanical properties of TRISO SiC coating layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Kyung; Lee, Hyeon Keun; Kim, Dong Seok; Lee, Ji Seok; Park, Kwi Il

    2010-05-01

    SiC coating layer has been introduced as protective layer in TRISO nuclear fuel particle of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) due to excellent mechanical stability at high temperature. It is important to study for high temperature stability in SiC coating layers, because TRISO fuel particles were operating at high temperature around 1000 .deg. C. In this study, the nanoindentation test and micro tensile test were conducted in order to measure the mechanical properties of SiC coating layers at elevated temperature. SiC coating film was fabricated on the carbon substrate using chemical vapor deposition process with different microstructures and thicknesses. Nanoindentation test was performed for the analysis of the hardness, modulus and creep properties up to 500 .deg. C. Impression creep method applied to nanoindentation and creep properties of SiC coating layers were characterized by nanoindentation creep test. The fracture strength of SiC coating layers was measured by the micro tensile method at room temperature and 500 .deg. C. From the results, we can conclude that the hardness and fracture strength are decreased with temperature and no significant change in the modulus is observed with increase in temperature. The deformation mechanism for indentation creep and creep rate changes as the testing temperature increased

  19. Effect of biomolecules adsorption on oxide layers developed on metallic materials used in cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Bautista, Blanca-Estela

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was carried out in the frame of the BIOCOR ITN European project, in collaboration with the industrial partner RSE S.p.A. (Italy). Metallic materials commonly used in cooling systems of power plants may be affected by bio-corrosion induced by biofilm formation. The objective of this work was to study the influence of biomolecules adsorption, which is the initial stage of biofilm formation, on the electrochemical behaviour and the surface chemical composition of three metallic materials (70Cu-30Ni alloy, 304L stainless steel and titanium) in seawater environments. In a first step, the interactions between a model protein, the bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the surface of these materials were investigated. Secondly, tightly bound (TB) and loosely bound (LB) extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), that play a fundamental role in the different stages of biofilm formation, maturation and maintenance, were extracted from Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 marine strain, and their effects on oxide layers were also evaluated. For that purpose, electrochemical measurements (corrosion potential E(corr) vs time, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) performed during the very first steps of oxide layers formation (1 h immersion time) were combined to surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ions mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Compared to 70Cu-30Ni alloy in static artificial seawater (ASW) without biomolecules, for which a thick duplex oxide layer (outer redeposited Cu 2 O layer and inner oxidized nickel layer) is shown, the presence of BSA, TB EPS and LB EPS leads to a mixed oxide layer (oxidized copper and nickel) with a lower thickness. In the biomolecules-containing solutions, this oxide layer is covered by an adsorbed organic layer, mainly composed of proteins. A model is proposed to analyse impedance data obtained at E(corr). The results show a slow-down of the anodic reaction in the presence

  20. Repeat cranial tomography in patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination a perspective from a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Sadaf

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To determine the frequency of altered findings on repeat cranial tomography (CT in patients with mild head injury along with stable neurological examination at tertiary care hospital. Methods: Cross-sectional study was done in the Department of Radiology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi from January 2008 to September 2010. All patients with mild head injury in terms of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS who underwent repeat scan without clinical or neurological deterioration in the emergency department of a tertiary care centre were included. The collected data were accordingly entered and analyzed by the principal investigator using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 16.0. Results: In all 275 patients, only 17 (6% of the patients were found worseing on repeat CT, 120 (43.63% scans improved, 138 (50.18% unchanged and 17 (6.18% worsened. None of these patients showed signs of clinical deterioration. ?Conclusion: Our results suggest that for patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination, only 6% of them show deterioration on repeat CT, especially when patients?GCS is below 13.?Key words: Brain injuries; Neurologic examination; Glasgow coma scale; Tomography

  1. Supportive properties of basement membrane layer of human amniotic membrane enable development of tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour, Sonia; Mahdavi-Shahri, Nasser; Miri, Raheleh; Hasanzadeh, Halimeh; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Zahabi, Ehsan; Matin, Maryam M

    2018-01-08

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) has been widely used as a natural scaffold in tissue engineering due to many of its unique biological properties such as providing growth factors, cytokines and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. This study aimed at finding the most suitable and supportive layer of HAM as a delivery system for autologous or allogeneic cell transplantation. Three different layers of HAM were examined including basement membrane, epithelial and stromal layers. In order to prepare the basement membrane, de-epithelialization was performed using 0.5 M NaOH and its efficiency was investigated by histological stainings, DNA quantification, biomechanical testing and electron microscopy. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) and a human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) were seeded on the three different layers of HAM and cultured for 3 weeks. The potential of the three different layers of HAM to support the attachment and viability of cells were then monitored by histology, electron microscopy and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Moreover, mechanical strengths of the basement membrane were assessed before and after cell culture. The results indicated that the integrity of extra cellular matrix (ECM) components was preserved after de-epithelialization and resulted in producing an intact basement amniotic membrane (BAM). Moreover, all three layers of HAM could support the attachment and proliferation of cells with no visible cytotoxic effects. However, the growth and viability of both cell types on the BAM were significantly higher than the other two layers. We conclude that growth stimulating effectors of BAM and its increased mechanical strength after culturing of ASCs, besides lack of immunogenicity make it an ideal model for delivering allogeneic cells and tissue engineering applications.

  2. Developing Cost-Effective Dense Continuous SDC Barrier Layers for SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Hoang Viet P.; Hardy, John S.; Coyle, Christopher A.; LU, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2017-12-04

    Significantly improved performance during electrochemical testing of a cell with a dense continuous pulsed laser deposited (PLD) samarium doped ceria (SDC) layer spurred investigations into the fabrication of dense continuous SDC barrier layers by means of cost-effective deposition using screen printing which is amenable to industrial production of SOFCs. Many approaches to improve the SDC density have been explored including the use of powder with reduced particle sizes, inks with increased solids loading, and doping with sintering aids (1). In terms of sintering aids, dopants like Mo or binary systems of Mo+Cu or Fe+Co greatly enhance SDC sinterability. In fact, adding dopants to a screen printed, prefired, porous SDC layer made it possible to achieve a dense continuous barrier layer atop the YSZ electrolyte without sintering above 1200°C. Although the objective of fabricating a dense continuous layer was achieved, additional studies have been initiated to improve the cell performance. Underlying issues with constrained sintering and dopant-enhanced ceria-zirconia solid solubility are also addressed in this paper.

  3. Development of membrane filters with nanostructured porous layer by coating of metal nanoparticles sintered onto a micro-filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok Joo; Park, Young Ok; Lee, Dong Geun; Ryu, Jeong In

    2008-01-01

    The membrane filter adhered with nanostructured porous layer was made by heat treatment after deposition of nanoparticle-agglomerates sintered in aerosol phase onto a conventional micron-fibrous metal filter as a substrate filter. The Sintered-Nanoparticle-Agglomerates-coated NanoStructured porous layer Membrane Filter (SNA-NSMF), whose the filtration performance was improved compared with the conventional metal membrane filters, was developed by adhesion of nanoparticle-agglomerates of dendrite structure sintered onto the micron-fibrous metal filter. The size of nanoparticle-agglomerates of dendrite structure decreased with increasing the sintering temperature because nanoparticle-agglomerates shrank. When shrinking nanoparticle-agglomerates were deposited and treated with heat onto the conventional micron-fibrous metal filter, pore size of nanostructured porous layer decreased. Therefore, pressure drops of SNA-NSMFs increased from 0.3 to 0.516 KPa and filtration efficiencies remarkably increased from 95.612 to 99.9993%

  4. Development and evaluation of airborne microwave refractometer for studies on atmospheric tropical boundary layer radiorefractive index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. S. S. Sarma

    Full Text Available Observations of high-resolution data on radio refractivity were obtained by the airborne microwave refractometer over the Indian sub-continent (a tropical country from 1971 to 1988. Detailed vertical and horizontal distributions of radio refractivity on a near-real-time basis in the atmospheric boundary layer were determined . Radiosonde observations cannot detect the thin refractivity gradients which characterize the propagation environment in this low-altitude region. This knowledge is required to design reliable and efficient communication systems for strategic, tactical and operational needs. However, the results demonstrate the layer structures and the variability of the boundary layer in time and space. The radio refractive effects on electromagnetic propagation and the future direction of radio refractivity fine-structure measurements are discussed.

  5. Development of form stable Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coated thermal phase change material for solar water heater applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munusamy, Y.; Shanmugam, S.; Shi-Ying, Kee

    2018-04-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is one of the most popular and widely used thermal energy storage material in solar water heater because it able to absorb and release a large amount of latent heat during a phase change process over a narrow temperature range. However the practical application of PCM is limited by two major issues; 1) leakage which leads to material loss and corrosion of tank and 2) large volume change during phase change process which cause pressure build up in the tank. In this work, form-stable PCM was prepared by coating myristic acid with Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to prevent leakage of PCM. PMMA was mixed with different weight percentage (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 wt%) of dicumyl peroxide (DCP). The purpose of adding DCP to PMMA is to crosslink the polymer and to increase the mechanical strength of PMMA to hold the myristic acid content inside the coating during the phase change process. Leakage test results showed that PMMA mixed with 0.1% DCP exhibit 0% leakage. This result is further supported by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) images and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis results, where a compact and uniform coating without cracks were formed for PCM coated with PMMA with 0.1% DCP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results shows that the melting point of form-stable PCM is 55°C, freezing point is 50°C, the latent heat of melting and freezing is 67.59 J/g.

  6. Development of controlled drug release formulation based on pamoate-zinc-aluminium-layered double hydroxide nano composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaemah Jubri

    2008-01-01

    Controlled drug release formulation of pamoate was developed by the intercalation of pamoate anion into Zn-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH). The resulting layered organic-inorganic hybrid nano composite material was formed using pamoate as guest anion intercalated into the Zn-Al layered double hydroxide inorganic host by direct co-precipitation method. As a result of successful intercalation of pamoate ion into the interlayer structure of Zn-Al-LDH, an expansion of the interlayer spacing, from 8.9 Angstrom in the layered double hydroxide to 18.1 Angstrom in the nano composite (ZAP) could be observed in the powder X-ray diffractogram. The reverse process, for example the de intercalation or release of the guest, pamoate was found to be rapid initially, followed by a more sustained release thereafter and this behavior was dependent on the pH of the release medium, the aqueous solution. The mechanism of release has been interpreted on the basis of the ion-exchange process between the pamoate anion intercalated in the lamella host and nitrate, or hydroxyl anions in the aqueous solution. This study suggest that layered double hydroxide can be used as a carrier for drugs that allow safe and controlled delivery of various bio agents into target with high efficiency. (author)

  7. Pressure retarded osmosis dual-layer hollow fiber membranes developed by co-casting method and ammonium persulfate (APS) treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Fengjiang

    2014-11-01

    Delamination and low water permeability are two issues limiting the applications of dual-layer hollow fiber membranes in the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) process. In this work, we first developed a universal co-casting method that is able to co-cast highly viscous dope solutions to form homogeneous dual-layer flat sheet membranes. By employing this method prior to the tedious dual-layer hollow fiber spinning process, both time and material consumptions are significantly saved. The addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is found to eliminate delamination at the sacrifice of water flux. A new post-treatment method that involves flowing ammonium persulfate (APS) solution and DI water counter-currently is potentially to remove the PVP molecules entrapped in the substrate while keeps the integrity of the interface. As the APS concentration increases, the water flux in the PRO process is increased while the salt leakage is slightly decreased. With the optimized APS concentration of 5wt%, the post-treated membrane shows a maximum power density of 5.10W/m2 at a hydraulic pressure of 15.0bar when 1M NaCl and 10mM NaCl were used as the draw and feed solutions, respectively. To the extent of our knowledge, this is the best phase inversion dual-layer hollow fiber membrane with an outer selective layer for osmotic power generation. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Development of gold induced surface plasmon enhanced CIGS absorption layer on polyimide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Un; Sharma, Rahul; Sim, Jae-Kwan; Baek, Byung Joon; Ahn, Haeng-Kwun; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-09-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with metal nanoparticles is the promising phenomenon to increase light absorption by trapping light in thin film solar cells. In this study we demonstrate a successful LSPR effect with gold (Au) nanoparticles onto the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) absorption layer. First, the CIGS absorber layers is fabricated onto the Mo coated polyimide (PI) substrate by using two stage process as DC sputtering of CIG thin film followed by the selenization at 400 °C. Finally, the Au nanoparticles are deposited onto the CIGS layer with increasing particles size from 4-15 nm by using sputter coater for 10-120 s. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirm the formation of CIGS/Au nanocomposite structure with prominent peak shift of CIGS reflections and increasing intensity for Au phase. The CIGS/Au nanocomposite morphologies with Au particle size distribution uniformity and surface coverage is examined under ultra-high resolution field effect scanning electron microscope (UHR-FESEM). A peak at 176 cm-1 in Raman spectra, associated with the “A1” mode of lattice vibration for the attributed to the pure chalcopyrite structure. The secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) showed ∼200 nm depth converge of Au nanoparticles into the CIGS absorption layer. The optical properties as transmittance, reflectance and absorbance of CIGS/Au layers were found to expand in the infrared region and the LSPR effect is the most prominent for Au particles (5-7 nm) deposited for 60 s. The absorption coefficient and band gap measurement also confirms that the LSPR effect for 5-7 nm Au particles with band gap improvement from 1.31 to 1.52 eV for CIGS/Au layer as the defect density decreases due to the deposition of Au nanoparticles onto the CIGS layer. Such LSPR effect in CIGS/Au nanocomposite absorption layer will be a key parameter to further improve performance of the solar cell.

  9. Development of gold induced surface plasmon enhanced CIGS absorption layer on polyimide substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong-Un; Sharma, Rahul; Sim, Jae-Kwan; Baek, Byung Joon; Ahn, Haeng-Kwun; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with metal nanoparticles is the promising phenomenon to increase light absorption by trapping light in thin film solar cells. In this study we demonstrate a successful LSPR effect with gold (Au) nanoparticles onto the Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) absorption layer. First, the CIGS absorber layers is fabricated onto the Mo coated polyimide (PI) substrate by using two stage process as DC sputtering of CIG thin film followed by the selenization at 400 °C. Finally, the Au nanoparticles are deposited onto the CIGS layer with increasing particles size from 4–15 nm by using sputter coater for 10–120 s. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirm the formation of CIGS/Au nanocomposite structure with prominent peak shift of CIGS reflections and increasing intensity for Au phase. The CIGS/Au nanocomposite morphologies with Au particle size distribution uniformity and surface coverage is examined under ultra-high resolution field effect scanning electron microscope (UHR-FESEM). A peak at 176 cm −1 in Raman spectra, associated with the “A1” mode of lattice vibration for the attributed to the pure chalcopyrite structure. The secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) showed ∼200 nm depth converge of Au nanoparticles into the CIGS absorption layer. The optical properties as transmittance, reflectance and absorbance of CIGS/Au layers were found to expand in the infrared region and the LSPR effect is the most prominent for Au particles (5–7 nm) deposited for 60 s. The absorption coefficient and band gap measurement also confirms that the LSPR effect for 5–7 nm Au particles with band gap improvement from 1.31 to 1.52 eV for CIGS/Au layer as the defect density decreases due to the deposition of Au nanoparticles onto the CIGS layer. Such LSPR effect in CIGS/Au nanocomposite absorption layer will be a key parameter to further improve performance of the solar cell.

  10. Development of Drug Delivery Systems Based on Layered Hydroxides for Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Barahuie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Layered hydroxides (LHs have recently fascinated researchers due to their wide application in various fields. These inorganic nanoparticles, with excellent features as nanocarriers in drug delivery systems, have the potential to play an important role in healthcare. Owing to their outstanding ion-exchange capacity, many organic pharmaceutical drugs have been intercalated into the interlayer galleries of LHs and, consequently, novel nanodrugs or smart drugs may revolutionize in the treatment of diseases. Layered hydroxides, as green nanoreservoirs with sustained drug release and cell targeting properties hold great promise of improving health and prolonging life.

  11. Development of uniformly stable isotope labeling system in higher plants for hetero-nuclear NMR experiments in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Novel methods for measurement of living systems are making new breakthroughs in life science. In the era of the metabolome (analysis of all measurable metabolites), a MS-based approach is considered to be the major technology, whereas a NMR-based method is recognized as minor technology due to its low sensitivity. Therefore, my laboratory is currently focusing to develop novel methodologies for an NMR-based metabolomics. This will be achieved by uniform stable isotope labeling of higher plants allowing application of multi-dimensional NMR experiments used in protein structure determination. Using these novel methods, I will analyze the dynamic molecular networks inside tissues. Especially, use of stable isotope labeling methods has enormous advantage for discrimination of incorporated or de novo synthesized compounds. Furthermore, potentiality of in vivo-NMR metabolomics will be discussed in the conference. (author)

  12. Thin plasma-polymerized layers of hexamethyldisiloxane for humidity sensor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermat, N.; Bellel, A.; Sahli, S.; Segui, Y.; Raynaud, P.

    2009-01-01

    The response of resistive-type sensors based on thin hexamethyldisiloxane layers to relative humidity (RH) was evaluated. Humidity sensitive layers were plasma polymerized at low frequency glow discharge using a capacitively coupled parallel plate reactor. The sensor design comprises the absorbing layer deposited on clean glass substrate with comb-shape aluminum electrodes (interdigitated structure). The change in electrical impedance of the sensing film was monitored as the device was exposed to humidity. The variation of the plasma-polymerization parameters resulted in different humidity sensing properties which could be correlated to the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The deposited films exhibited a detectable response to RH ranging from 30 to 95% with low hysteresis, good reproducibility and stability in long-term use. Films with a greater thickness showed a significant decrease in the humidity sensing capability. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of SiH bonding groups, which are frequently linked to the film density. The increase in the plasma discharge power induced also a significant decrease in the diffusion process of water vapor inside the sensitive layer bulk.

  13. Development of a multi-layered psychosocial care system for children in areas of political violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordans, M.J.D.; Tol, W.A.; Komproe, I.H.; Susanty, D.; Vallipuram, A.; Ntamatumba, P.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Few psychosocial and mental health care systems have been reported for children affected by political violence in low- and middle income settings and there is a paucity of research-supported recommendations. This paper describes a field tested multi-layered psychosocial care system for children

  14. Modelling internal boundary-layer development in a region with a complex coastline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Cai, X.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test the ability of two quite different models to simulate the combined spatial and temporal variability of the internal boundary layer in an area of complex terrain and coastline during one day. The simple applied slab model of Gryning and Batchvarova, and the Col...

  15. Nonapical symmetric divisions underlie horizontal cell layer formation in the developing retina in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godinho, Leanne; Williams, Philip R.; Claassen, Yvonne; Provost, Elayne; Leach, Steven D.; Kamermans, Maarten; Wong, Rachel O. L.

    2007-01-01

    Symmetric cell divisions have been proposed to rapidly increase neuronal number late in neurogenesis, but how critical this mode of division is to establishing a specific neuronal layer is unknown. Using in vivo time-lapse imaging methods, we discovered that in the laminated zebrafish retina, the

  16. Thin plasma-polymerized layers of hexamethyldisiloxane for humidity sensor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermat, N.; Bellel, A. [Universite Mentouri de Constantine, Laboratoire des Etudes de Materiaux d' Electronique pour Applications Medicales (LEMEAMED), Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Constantine 25000 (Algeria); Sahli, S., E-mail: sahli50@hotmail.co [Universite Mentouri de Constantine, Laboratoire de Microsystemes et Instrumentation (LMI), Faculte des Science de l' Ingenieur, Constantine 25000 (Algeria); Segui, Y.; Raynaud, P. [Universites de Toulouse, Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie (LAPLACE), CNRS, INPT, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2009-06-01

    The response of resistive-type sensors based on thin hexamethyldisiloxane layers to relative humidity (RH) was evaluated. Humidity sensitive layers were plasma polymerized at low frequency glow discharge using a capacitively coupled parallel plate reactor. The sensor design comprises the absorbing layer deposited on clean glass substrate with comb-shape aluminum electrodes (interdigitated structure). The change in electrical impedance of the sensing film was monitored as the device was exposed to humidity. The variation of the plasma-polymerization parameters resulted in different humidity sensing properties which could be correlated to the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The deposited films exhibited a detectable response to RH ranging from 30 to 95% with low hysteresis, good reproducibility and stability in long-term use. Films with a greater thickness showed a significant decrease in the humidity sensing capability. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of SiH bonding groups, which are frequently linked to the film density. The increase in the plasma discharge power induced also a significant decrease in the diffusion process of water vapor inside the sensitive layer bulk.

  17. Development of flat panel X-ray detector utilizing a CdZnTe film as conversion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Satoshi; Kishihara, Hiroyuki; Kaino, Masatomo; Sato, Toshiyuki

    2006-01-01

    A polycrystalline CdZnTe film formed by the CSS (closed-spaced sublimation) method is one of the most promising materials as a conversion layer of next-generation highly efficient flat-panel X-ray detectors. Therefore, we have developed a prototype of a new flat-panel X-ray detector (a sensing region of 3 inches by 3 inches) with the film and evaluated its commercial feasibility. This paper describes evaluation of the physical and imaging properties of the prototype and explains the features of the CdZnTe film and the construction, specifications, and fabrication procedures of the prototype. Also included in this paper are formation of a semiconductor thin film barrier layer by the CBD (chemical bath deposition) method and conjunction of a sensor substrate and a TFT array substrate with the bump electrodes formed by screen printing, both of which we have developed during the course of the development of the prototype. (author)

  18. Nb and Pd co-doped La0.57Sr0.38Co0.19Fe0.665Nb0.095Pd0.05O3-δ as a stable, high performance electrode for barrier-layer-free Y2O3-ZrO2 electrolyte of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kongfa; He, Shuai; Li, Na; Cheng, Yi; Ai, Na; Chen, Minle; Rickard, William D. A.; Zhang, Teng; Jiang, San Ping

    2018-02-01

    La0.6Sr0.2Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) is the most intensively investigated high performance cathode for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs), but strontium segregation and migration at the electrode/electrolyte interface is a critical issue limiting the electrocatalytic activity and stability of LSCF based cathodes. Herein, we report a Nb and Pd co-doped LSCF (La0.57Sr0.38Co0.19Fe0.665Nb0.095Pd0.05O3-δ, LSCFNPd) perovskite as stable and active cathode on a barrier-layer-free anode-supported yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte cell using direct assembly method without pre-sintering at high temperatures. The cell exhibits a peak power density of 1.3 W cm-2 at 750 °C and excellent stability with no degradation during polarization at 500 mA cm-2 and 750 °C for 175 h. Microscopic and spectroscopic analysis show that the electrochemical polarization promotes the formation of electrode/electrolyte interface in operando and exsolution of Pd/PdO nanoparticles. The Nb doping in the B-site of LSCF significantly reduces the Sr surface segregation, enhancing the stability of the cathode, while the exsoluted Pd/PdO nanoparticles increases the electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. The present study opens up a new route for the development of cobaltite-based perovskite cathodes with high activity and stability for barrier-layer-free YSZ electrolyte based IT-SOFCs.

  19. Development of laser-fired contacts for amorphous silicon layers obtained by Hot-Wire CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Blanque, S. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Ibarz, D.; Bertomeu, J. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    In this work we study aluminium laser-fired contacts for intrinsic amorphous silicon layers deposited by Hot-Wire CVD. This structure could be used as an alternative low temperature back contact for rear passivated heterojunction solar cells. An infrared Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) has been used to locally fire the aluminium through the thin amorphous silicon layers. Under optimized laser firing parameters, very low specific contact resistances ({rho}{sub c} {approx} 10 m{omega} cm{sup 2}) have been obtained on 2.8 {omega} cm p-type c-Si wafers. This investigation focuses on maintaining the passivation quality of the interface without an excessive increase in the series resistance of the device.

  20. Development of laser-fired contacts for amorphous silicon layers obtained by Hot-Wire CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, D.; Voz, C.; Blanque, S.; Ibarz, D.; Bertomeu, J.; Alcubilla, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we study aluminium laser-fired contacts for intrinsic amorphous silicon layers deposited by Hot-Wire CVD. This structure could be used as an alternative low temperature back contact for rear passivated heterojunction solar cells. An infrared Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) has been used to locally fire the aluminium through the thin amorphous silicon layers. Under optimized laser firing parameters, very low specific contact resistances (ρ c ∼ 10 mΩ cm 2 ) have been obtained on 2.8 Ω cm p-type c-Si wafers. This investigation focuses on maintaining the passivation quality of the interface without an excessive increase in the series resistance of the device.

  1. FOLDER: A numerical tool to simulate the development of structures in layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2015-04-01

    FOLDER is a numerical toolbox for modelling deformation in layered media during layer parallel shortening or extension in two dimensions. FOLDER builds on MILAMIN [1], a finite element method based mechanical solver, with a range of utilities included from the MUTILS package [2]. Numerical mesh is generated using the Triangle software [3]. The toolbox includes features that allow for: 1) designing complex structures such as multi-layer stacks, 2) accurately simulating large-strain deformation of linear and non-linear viscous materials, 3) post-processing of various physical fields such as velocity (total and perturbing), rate of deformation, finite strain, stress, deviatoric stress, pressure, apparent viscosity. FOLDER is designed to ensure maximum flexibility to configure model geometry, define material parameters, specify range of numerical parameters in simulations and choose the plotting options. FOLDER is an open source MATLAB application and comes with a user friendly graphical interface. The toolbox additionally comprises an educational application that illustrates various analytical solutions of growth rates calculated for the cases of folding and necking of a single layer with interfaces perturbed with a single sinusoidal waveform. We further derive two novel analytical expressions for the growth rate in the cases of folding and necking of a linear viscous layer embedded in a linear viscous medium of a finite thickness. We use FOLDER to test the accuracy of single-layer folding simulations using various 1) spatial and temporal resolutions, 2) time integration schemes, and 3) iterative algorithms for non-linear materials. The accuracy of the numerical results is quantified by: 1) comparing them to analytical solution, if available, or 2) running convergence tests. As a result, we provide a map of the most optimal choice of grid size, time step, and number of iterations to keep the results of the numerical simulations below a given error for a given time

  2. Development of a Fiber-Optics Microspatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy Sensor for Probing Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Conti, Claudia; Rousaki, Anastasia; Moens, Luc; Realini, Marco; Matousek, Pavel

    2017-09-05

    Microspatially offset Raman spectroscopy (micro-SORS) has been proposed as a valuable approach to sample molecular information from layers that are covered by a turbid (nontransparent) layer. However, when large magnifications are involved, the approach is not straightforward, as spatial constraints exist to position the laser beam and the objective lens with the external beam delivery or, with internal beam delivery, the maximum spatial offset achievable is restricted. To overcome these limitations, we propose here a prototype of a new micro-SORS sensor, which uses bare glass fibers to transfer the laser radiation to the sample and to collect the Raman signal from a spatially offset zone to the Raman spectrometer. The concept also renders itself amenable to remote delivery and to the miniaturization of the probe head which could be beneficial for special applications, e.g., where access to sample areas is restricted. The basic applicability of this approach was demonstrated by studying several layered structure systems. Apart from proving the feasibility of the technique, also, practical aspects of the use of the prototype sensor are discussed.

  3. Development and Characterization of Non-Conventional Micro-Porous Layers for PEM Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Balzarotti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas diffusion medium (GDM is a crucial component in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. Being composed of a gas diffusion layer (GDL with a micro-porous layer (MPL coated onto it, it ensures a proper water management due to the highly hydrophobic materials employed in cell assembly. In current commercial applications, the desired water repellent behaviour is usually obtained by using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. In this work, Fluorolink® P56 (Solvay Specialty Polymers, Milan, Italy, a commercially available, anionic, segmented high molecular weight polyfluorourethane with perfluoropolyether groups was extensively evaluated as an alternative to PTFE for micro-porous layer hydrophobization. A change in polymer used is desirable in order to simplify the production process, both in terms of ink formulation and thermal treatment, as well as to get a higher hydrophobicity and, consequently, more efficient water management. Innovative prepared samples were compared to a PTFE-based GDM, in order to assess differences both from morphological and from an electrochemical point of view.

  4. Development of a Multi-layer Anti-reflective Coating for Gallium Arsenide/Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells by Kimberley A Olver Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...Development of a Multi-layer Anti-reflective Coating for Gallium Arsenide / Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells by Kimberley A Olver... Aluminum Gallium Arsenide (AlGaAs) Solar Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kimberley A Olver

  5. Characterization of stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) larval developmental habitat at round hay bale feeding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Justin; Broce, Alberto; Zurek, Ludek

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we examined the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), larval developmental habitat within the round hay bale feeding sites on cattle pastures, and we identified three zones with distinct characteristics around two types of hay feeders (ring and cone). The parameters monitored in each zone included stable fly emergence, substrate temperature, moisture, pH, thickness of hay-manure layer, and concentration of fecal coliform bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca) as indicators of fecal material. All measurements were conducted during the period of high stable fly prevalence (HSF) in May-June and low stable fly prevalence (LSF) in July-August to better understand the environmental factors influencing stable fly seasonality. Substrate temperature and fecal coliform concentration were the only two significantly different factors between HSF and LSF. Temperatures ranged from 21 to 25 degrees C during HSF versus 25-30 degrees C in LSF but all were within the range for successful stable fly development. Fecal coliform concentrations ranged from 4.2 x 10(3) to 4.1 x 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g of the substrate during HSF and from undetectable (stable fly development (egg to adult). Temperature was significantly higher and stable fly developmental time significantly shorter in all substrates containing hay when compared with that of manure alone, but no significant differences were detected in stable fly emergence among the substrates. These results strongly indicate that the fecal microbial community plays an important role in stable fly larval development in hay feeding sites and that it is the main factor behind stable fly developmental seasonality on pastures. Our results also demonstrate that animal manure mixed with hay provides conditions for faster stable fly development than manure alone; however, hay does not significantly affect overall stable fly emergence.

  6. Development of ultraviolet LED devices containing europium (III) complexes in fluorescence layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Hiroki; Amano, Akio; Aiga, Fumihiko; Harada, Kohichi; Oguchi, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Relations between molecular structures of europium complexes and their luminescent properties were investigated. Europium complex with β-diketones and two different phosphine oxides 8 was highly soluble in fluorinated medium, and realized largest fluorescence intensities. The luminous intensity of ultraviolet light emitting diodes devices (LEDs) whose fluorescence layer consists of fluorinated polymer and 8 was over 200 mcd (20 mA). Fluorescence compounds of this type are promising for application in next-generation white LEDs. Moreover, we proposed a novel molecular design of europium complex with asymmetric diphosphine dioxide

  7. Investigation of the Development of Laminar Boundary-Layer Instabilities along a Blunted Cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    taps, having approximate diameters of 0.064 in., were connected by tubing either to one-psid Druck ® or 2.5-psid ESP transducers of the Tunnel B...surveys of the model boundary layer using a 15-psid Druck transducer calibrated for 10- psid fu l l scale. The small size of the pi tot probe (Section...of freedom greater than 3D . Estimates of the measured data uncertainties for this test, including the basic hot-wire anemometer measurements

  8. Prediction Model for Object Oriented Software Development Effort Estimation Using One Hidden Layer Feed Forward Neural Network with Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Shekhar Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The budget computation for software development is affected by the prediction of software development effort and schedule. Software development effort and schedule can be predicted precisely on the basis of past software project data sets. In this paper, a model for object-oriented software development effort estimation using one hidden layer feed forward neural network (OHFNN has been developed. The model has been further optimized with the help of genetic algorithm by taking weight vector obtained from OHFNN as initial population for the genetic algorithm. Convergence has been obtained by minimizing the sum of squared errors of each input vector and optimal weight vector has been determined to predict the software development effort. The model has been empirically validated on the PROMISE software engineering repository dataset. Performance of the model is more accurate than the well-established constructive cost model (COCOMO.

  9. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  10. Readout Driver Firmware Development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shaw-Pin; Hsu, Shih-Chieh

    During the Large Hadron Collider shutdown from 2013 to 2014 a fourth silicon layer, called the Insertable-B Layer (IBL), was inserted inside the existing ATLAS Pixel Detector. The IBL uses the state-of-the-art FE-I4 front-end readout ASICs for enhanced detector readout efficiency during upcoming LHC runs at higher energy and luminosity. The control and data acquisition (DAQ) of the IBL requires the commissioning of new off-detector readout electronics, mainly consisting of Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based Readout Driver (ROD) and Back-of-Crate (BOC) Cards. This thesis focuses on the architecture, implementation, simulation, and hardware test results of the new IBL ROD datapath firmware. Characterization of the IBL detector front-end and an overview of ATLAS Trigger DAQ (TDAQ) system are provided in the first chapters of the thesis. IBL ROD datapath firmware was designed and simulated in a ModelSim testbench with a realistic HDL FE-I4 model as source of data. The hardware tests using both real and em...

  11. Efficacy of novaluron as a feed-through for control of immature horn flies, house flies, and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in cow manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeyer, K H; Pound, J M; Yeater, K M; May, M A

    2014-07-01

    Two rates (0.4 mg/kg body weight/d and 0.6 mg/kg body weight/d) of a daily feed-through formulation of novaluron (Novaluron 0.67% active ingredient Cattle Mix), a newer benzoylphenyl urea insecticide, were evaluated for efficacy in controlling the larval stage of horn flies, Haematobia irritans (L.), house flies, Musca domestica L., and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), developing in cow manure. Both rates of feed-through novaluron, delivered consecutively for 10 d, reduced adult emergence of all three species when compared with the untreated control. The presence of deformed puparia indicated that novaluron had an insect growth regulator effect on the developing fly larvae. Both of the feed-through rates evaluated resulted in 100% reduction of adult stable fly emergence after the second day of feed-through treatment. The level of control efficacy observed against these three fly species make this feed-through formulation a candidate for use in an integrated livestock pest management program, particularly in confined cattle production situations where a feed-through product could be easily administered.

  12. Development of a system for integrative and stable transformation of the zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae by Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielse, C.B.; Salim, K.; Ragas, P.; Ram, A.F.J.; Kudla, B.; Jarry, B.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2004-01-01

    Two transformation systems, based on the use of CaCl2/PEG and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, respectively, were developed for the zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae. Irrespective of the selection marker used, a pyr4 marker derived from R. niveus or a dominant amdS+ marker from Aspergillus nidulans, and

  13. Development of advanced technology for stable support of Korean style space foods by the collaboration with an industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Woon; Byun, Myung Woo; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Suk; Choi, Jong Il; Park, Jin Kyu; Park, Jae Nam

    2007-06-01

    Keeping pace with the space era of 21 century, Korea gets an opportunity to participate in a project in which the manned spaceship and the international space station will be developed. The Korean astronaut program is so the first step to open a new field of space development project that needs many researches and experiments to implement the mission successfully. Because food is an important part of life, it is imperative that the space food system is the best it can be. The supply of food must be nourishing and tasty so astronauts maintain their health during their important stays in space. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop space foods maintaining microbial safety and sensory characteristics, and the objective is to produce basic information about the processing technology of space foods. The results showed that combination treatment of radiation technology might be helpful for extending the space foods such as space Kimchi. And the development of a new herbal preparation (HemoHIM) for immune and hematopoiesis modulation as well as oxidative damage inhibition in space environment might be helpful for improving the astronaut's health

  14. House and stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) seasonal abundance, larval development substrates, and natural parasitism on small equine farms in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 1-year study was designed to determine adult fly population levels and development substrates on four small equine farms. Results showed that pest flies were present year-round, but differences existed in population levels among farms and seasons. Fly larvae were not found on two of the farms, ...

  15. Development of advanced technology for stable support of Korean style space foods by the collaboration with an industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Woon; Byun, Myung Woo; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Suk; Choi, Jong Il; Park, Jin Kyu; Park, Jae Nam

    2007-06-15

    Keeping pace with the space era of 21 century, Korea gets an opportunity to participate in a project in which the manned spaceship and the international space station will be developed. The Korean astronaut program is so the first step to open a new field of space development project that needs many researches and experiments to implement the mission successfully. Because food is an important part of life, it is imperative that the space food system is the best it can be. The supply of food must be nourishing and tasty so astronauts maintain their health during their important stays in space. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop space foods maintaining microbial safety and sensory characteristics, and the objective is to produce basic information about the processing technology of space foods. The results showed that combination treatment of radiation technology might be helpful for extending the space foods such as space Kimchi. And the development of a new herbal preparation (HemoHIM) for immune and hematopoiesis modulation as well as oxidative damage inhibition in space environment might be helpful for improving the astronaut's health.

  16. Turbulent kinetic energy budget in the boundary layer developing over an urban-like rough wall using PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Karin; Perret, Laurent; Calmet, Isabelle; Rivet, Cédric

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, a boundary layer developing over a rough-wall consisting of staggered cubes with a plan area packing density λp = 25% is studied within the wind tunnel using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to investigate the Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) budget. To access the full TKE budget, an estimation of the dissipation (ɛ) using both the transport equation of the resolved-scale kinetic energy and Large-Eddy (LE) PIV models based on the use of a subgrid-scale model following the methodology used in large-eddy simulations is employed. A low-pass filter, larger than the Taylor microscale, is applied to the data prior to the computation of the velocity gradients ensuring a clear cutoff in the inertial range where the models are valid. The presence of the cube roughness elements has a significant influence on the TKE budget due to the region of strong shear that develops over the cubes. The shear layer is shown to produce and dissipate energy, as well as transport energy through advection, turbulent transport, and pressure transport. The recirculation region that forms through the interaction of the shear layer and the canopy layer, which is the region below the height of the cube roughness, creates rapid longitudinal evolution of the mean flow thereby inducing weak production. Finally, through stochastic estimation of the conditional average, it is shown that localized regions of backscatter (energy transfer from unresolved to resolved scales) and forward scatter (energy transfer from resolved to unresolved scales) occur as a result of coherent vortical structures.

  17. Cited2 Regulates Neocortical Layer II/III Generation and Somatosensory Callosal Projection Neuron Development and Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fame, Ryann M; MacDonald, Jessica L; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Takahashi, Emi; Macklis, Jeffrey D

    2016-06-15

    The neocortex contains hundreds to thousands of distinct subtypes of precisely connected neurons, allowing it to perform remarkably complex tasks of high-level cognition. Callosal projection neurons (CPN) connect the cerebral hemispheres via the corpus callosum, integrating cortical information and playing key roles in associative cognition. CPN are a strikingly diverse set of neuronal subpopulations, and development of this diversity requires precise control by a complex, interactive set of molecular effectors. We have found that the transcriptional coregulator Cited2 regulates and refines two stages of CPN development. Cited2 is expressed broadly by progenitors in the embryonic day 15.5 subventricular zone, during the peak of superficial layer CPN birth, with a progressive postmitotic refinement in expression, becoming restricted to CPN of the somatosensory cortex postnatally. We generated progenitor-stage and postmitotic forebrain-specific Cited2 conditional knock-out mice, using the Emx1-Cre and NEX-Cre mouse lines, respectively. We demonstrate that Cited2 functions in progenitors, but is not necessary postmitotically, to regulate both (1) broad generation of layer II/III CPN and (2) acquisition of precise area-specific molecular identity and axonal/dendritic connectivity of somatosensory CPN. This novel CPN subtype-specific and area-specific control from progenitor action of Cited2 adds yet another layer of complexity to the multistage developmental regulation of neocortical development. This study identifies Cited2 as a novel subtype-specific and area-specific control over development of distinct subpopulations within the broad population of callosal projection neurons (CPN), whose axons connect the two cerebral hemispheres via the corpus callosum (CC). Currently, how the remarkable diversity of CPN subtypes is specified, and how they differentiate to form highly precise and specific circuits, are largely unknown. We found that Cited2 functions within

  18. Development and validation of quantitative methods for the analysis of clinical biomarkers of iron metabolism applying stable isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Konz, Tobías

    2016-01-01

    The continuous discovery of new biomarkers is reflected not only in the scientific literature but also in its application in current clinical practice. The urgent need to determine the values of appropriate clinical parameters (biomarkers) in biological fluids is driving the development of new analytical methodologies capable of providing quantitative, precise, accurate and validated information on the concentration of those biomarkers, both in control individuals as well as in patients affec...

  19. Development of stable walking robot for accident condition monitoring on uneven floors in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seog; Jang, You Hyun [Central Research Institute of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Even though the potential for an accident in nuclear power plants is very low, multiple emergency plans are necessary because the impact of such an accident to the public is enormous. One of these emergency plans involves a robotic system for investigating accidents under conditions of high radiation and contaminated air. To develop a robot suitable for operation in a nuclear power plant, we focused on eliminating the three major obstacles that challenge robots in such conditions: the disconnection of radio communication, falling on uneven floors, and loss of localization. To solve the radio problem, a Wi-Fi extender was used in radio shadow areas. To reinforce the walking, we developed two- and four-leg convertible walking, a floor adaptive foot, a roly-poly defensive falling design, and automatic standing recovery after falling methods were developed. To allow the robot to determine its location in the containment building, a bar code landmark reading method was chosen. When a severe accident occurs, this robot will be useful for accident condition monitoring. We also anticipate the robot can serve as a workman aid in a high radiation area during normal operations.

  20. Development of stable walking robot for accident condition monitoring on uneven floors in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Seog; Jang, You Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Even though the potential for an accident in nuclear power plants is very low, multiple emergency plans are necessary because the impact of such an accident to the public is enormous. One of these emergency plans involves a robotic system for investigating accidents under conditions of high radiation and contaminated air. To develop a robot suitable for operation in a nuclear power plant, we focused on eliminating the three major obstacles that challenge robots in such conditions: the disconnection of radio communication, falling on uneven floors, and loss of localization. To solve the radio problem, a Wi-Fi extender was used in radio shadow areas. To reinforce the walking, we developed two- and four-leg convertible walking, a floor adaptive foot, a roly-poly defensive falling design, and automatic standing recovery after falling methods were developed. To allow the robot to determine its location in the containment building, a bar code landmark reading method was chosen. When a severe accident occurs, this robot will be useful for accident condition monitoring. We also anticipate the robot can serve as a workman aid in a high radiation area during normal operations

  1. Stable nitrogen isotopes in the turtle grass Thalassia testudinum from the Mexican Caribbean: Implications of anthropogenic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Alberto; Ortiz-Hernández, Ma. Concepción; Talavera-Sáenz, Ana; Aguíñiga-García, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun) and decreased toward Bahia Akumal and Tulum. The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were relatively enriched compared to Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore, Puerto Morelos and Mahahual may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring where tourist activities are growing and can lead to environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  2. Development of Stable Walking Robot for Accident Condition Monitoring on Uneven Floors in a Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Seog Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Even though the potential for an accident in nuclear power plants is very low, multiple emergency plans are necessary because the impact of such an accident to the public is enormous. One of these emergency plans involves a robotic system for investigating accidents under conditions of high radiation and contaminated air. To develop a robot suitable for operation in a nuclear power plant, we focused on eliminating the three major obstacles that challenge robots in such conditions: the disconnection of radio communication, falling on uneven floors, and loss of localization. To solve the radio problem, a Wi-Fi extender was used in radio shadow areas. To reinforce the walking, we developed two- and four-leg convertible walking, a floor adaptive foot, a roly-poly defensive falling design, and automatic standing recovery after falling methods were developed. To allow the robot to determine its location in the containment building, a bar code landmark reading method was chosen. When a severe accident occurs, this robot will be useful for accident condition monitoring. We also anticipate the robot can serve as a workman aid in a high radiation area during normal operations.

  3. Modeling the Response of Climate and Precipitation Oxygen Stable Isotopes to the Tectonic Development of the Indian Collision Zone during the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsyun, S.; Sepulchre, P.; Donnadieu, Y.; Risi, C.; Licht, A.; Caves, J. K.

    2016-12-01

    Tectonics-climate interaction as well as the impact of greenhouse forcing on climate has become a major focus of paleoclimate studies since the quarter of the century. The Himalayas and the Tibetan plateau owes its current height to the Cenozoic collision between Indian and Asian plates, since 55 Ma. However, the timing and rate of surface elevations remain controversial and its impact on Asian climate and the onset of monsoon systems is highly debated. Stable oxygen paleoaltimetry is considered to be a very efficient and widely applied technique, but has limitations from two sides: 1) the link between stable oxygen composition of precipitation and climate is not well established, 2) Cenozoic climate over Asia is poorly reconstructed. With a purpose of filling the gap in our knowledge of climate variability over Asia during the Cenozoic climate we use the atmospheric general circulation model LMDZ. Paleocene, Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene boundary conditions have been applied together with various scenarios of TP growth. The results of our numerical modeling show a significant influence of paleogeography on the Asian climate. Moreover, we use isotope-equipped atmospheric model LMDZ-iso for understanding the controlling factors of δ18O in precipitation. Experiments with reduced height over the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalayas have been designed. We develop a theoretical expression for the precipitation composition. In addition, realist Cenozoic boundary conditions together with isotope-equipped atmospheric model allowed reconstructing δ18O in paleoprecipitation for several periods during the Cenozoic, while comparison of simulated δ18O patterns with data from carbonate archives allowed revealing possible limitations of paleoelevation techniques based on stable oxygen isotopes.

  4. Synaptic and Cellular Organization of Layer 1 of the Developing Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti eMuralidhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a systematic and quantitative study of the neuronal and synaptic organisation of neocortical layer 1 in the somatosensory cortex in juvenile rats (P13 – P16 using multi-neuron patch-clamp and 3D morphology reconstructions. We used both subjective expert based and objective classification to establish distinct morphological groups. According to expert based subjective classification, the neurons were classified into six morphological types: (1 the dense axon neurogliaform cell (NGC-DA and (2 a sparse axon neurogliaform cell (NGC-SA, (3 the horizontal axon cell (HAC and (4 those with descending axonal colaterals (DAC, (5 the large axon cell (LAC and (6 the small axon cell (SAC. We also used objective supervised and unsupervised analyses that confirmed 4 out of the 6 expert proposed groups, namely, DAC, HAC, LAC and a combined NGC. The cells were also classified into 5 electrophysiological types based on the Petilla convention; classical non-adapting (cNAC, burst non-adapting (bNAC, classical adapting (cAC, classical stuttering (cSTUT and classical irregular spiking (cIR. The most common electrophysiological type was the cNAC type (40% and the most commonly encountered morpho-electrical type of neuron was the NGC-DA - cNAC. Layer 1 cells are connected by GABAergic inhibitory synaptic connections with a 7.9% connection probability, as well gap junctions with 5.2% connection probability. Most synaptic connections were mediated by both GABAA and GABAB receptors (62.6%, as observed from the response characteristics to single pulse and train stimulations. A smaller fraction of synaptic connections were mediated exclusively by GABAA (15.4% or GABAB (21.8% receptors. Based on the morphological reconstructions, we found multi-synapse connections with an average of 9 putative synapses per connection. These putative touches were widely distributed with 39% on somata and 61% on dendrites.

  5. Developing Daily Quantitative Damage Estimates From Geospatial Layers To Support Post Event Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, B. K.; Wei, L. H.; Connor, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    With the growth of natural hazard data available in near real-time it is increasingly feasible to deliver damage estimates caused by natural disasters. These estimates can be used in disaster management setting or by commercial entities to optimize the deployment of resources and/or routing of goods and materials. This work outlines an end-to-end, modular process to generate estimates of damage caused by severe weather. The processing stream consists of five generic components: 1) Hazard modules that provide quantitate data layers for each peril. 2) Standardized methods to map the hazard data to an exposure layer based on atomic geospatial blocks. 3) Peril-specific damage functions that compute damage metrics at the atomic geospatial block level. 4) Standardized data aggregators, which map damage to user-specific geometries. 5) Data dissemination modules, which provide resulting damage estimates in a variety of output forms. This presentation provides a description of this generic tool set, and an illustrated example using HWRF-based hazard data for Hurricane Arthur (2014). In this example, the Python-based real-time processing ingests GRIB2 output from the HWRF numerical model, dynamically downscales it in conjunctions with a land cover database using a multiprocessing pool, and a just-in-time compiler (JIT). The resulting wind fields are contoured, and ingested into a PostGIS database using OGR. Finally, the damage estimates are calculated at the atomic block level and aggregated to user-defined regions using PostgreSQL queries to construct application specific tabular and graphics output.

  6. THE FORMATION OF ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC COMPETENCES IN THE CONTEXT OF THE STABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CARPATHIAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Khymynets

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the peculiarities of the formation of ecological and economic competences at modern school. The paper shows that ecological and economic education is continuous and uninterrupted psychological process which is directed towards the formation of knowledge, culture and consciousness of a person. Attention is paid to the problems of environmental and economic situation in the Carpathian region of Ukraine. Ecological and economic model of education can develop effectively only on the basis of humanistic orientation and innovation potential of the educational institution. The humanization provides increased attention to the individual as a whole, the promotion of its abilities, physical and moral qualities. Modern education aims to form environmentally and economically responsible person, that is ready for the conscious activity on the basis of the gained knowledge and formes behavioral norms and rules concerning the environment. Humanity has the ability to choose either the path of environmental and economic education, or the path of the global catastrophe and self-destruction. Civilized, cultured people are called to protect and multiply the good, by laws and authority to establish the highest spiritual values of the life in the society and public opinion. Only intelligence and environmental and economic culture, that is continuous educational training and educational activity, may generate culture of society, relevant to the permanent development, and transfer its relationships with the environment on the way of intelligent coexistence.

  7. Development and quality characteristics of shelf-stable soy-agushie: a residual by-product of soymilk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nti, Christina A; Plahar, Wisdom A; Annan, Nana T

    2016-03-01

    A process was developed for the production of a high-protein food ingredient, soy-agushie, from the residual by-product of soymilk production. The product, with a moisture content of about 6%, was evaluated for its quality characteristics and performance in traditional dishes. The protein content was about 26% with similar amino acids content as that of the whole soybean. Lysine remained high in the dehydrated product (6.57 g/16 g N). While over 60% of the original B vitamins content in the beans was extracted with the milk, high proportions of the minerals were found to be retained in the residual by-product. The process adequately reduced the trypsin inhibitor levels in the beans from 25 to 1.5 mg/g. High sensory scores were obtained for recipes developed with soy-agushie in traditional dishes. The scope of utilization of the soy-agushie could be widened to include several traditional foods and bakery products for maximum nutritional benefits.

  8. A stem cell proliferation burst forms new layers of P63 expressing suprabasal cells during zebrafish postembryonic epidermal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Guzman

    2013-09-01

    Organ growth during development is a highly regulated process with both temporal and spatial constraints. Epidermal stratification is essential for skin growth and development. Although the zebrafish has been well studied, it is not known when and how epidermal stratification occurs. This is because beyond the first five days of development our knowledge is currently limited. We found that epidermal stratification in zebrafish begins when the larvae reach a standard length (SL of 6 mm at approximately 25 days of age. Over the next four days (from a SL of 6 to 9 mm, epidermis thickness increases almost four-fold. This represents a sudden increase in organ size, since for the previous 20 days of development, the epidermis has been only two layers thick. This pattern is different from that observed in mammals that undergo continuous stratification from E14.5–E18.5. To study how stem cell proliferation gives rise to the new epidermal layers, we used a combination of markers: one for cell proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear-antigen PCNA and one for epidermal stem cells (P63 transcription factor. We identified, throughout the stratification process, two different waves of cell division. Initially, the most basal epidermal cells divided and generated a subset of suprabasal cells (possibly transient-amplifying cells; within the next several days, the basal cells stopped dividing, and the suprabasal cells began proliferation, giving rise to most of the cell types in the new layers. This part of the process is similar to what has been recently found during epidermal stratification in mammals.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of novaluron as a development site treatment for controlling larval horn flies, house flies, and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeyer, K H; Pound, J M

    2012-05-01

    A granular formulation of novaluron (Novaluron 0.2G, 0.2% [AI]), a newer benzoylphenyl urea insecticide, was evaluated for its efficacy in controlling the larval stage of horn flies, Haematobia irritans (L.); house flies, Musca domestica L.; and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), in cow manure. Various rates and insecticide placement locations (top, middle, and bottom of manure) were evaluated in this study and all combinations of these variables reduced adult emergence of all three species when compared with the untreated controls. The presence of deformed pupae indicated that novaluron had an insect growth regulator effect on the developing fly larvae. Top, middle, or bottom application rates of 0.125, 0.195, 0.25, and 0.375 g novaluron onto manure samples, reduced adult horn fly emergence by > 90%. Middle and bottom application rates of 0.195, 0.25, and 0.375 g novaluron reduced adult house fly emergence >93%. All rates and placement combinations resulted in >98% reduction of adult stable fly emergence. The level of control efficacy observed against these three fly species along with the ease of use of a granular formulation, make this product an ideal candidate for use in an integrated livestock pest management program.

  10. Developing a Stable Aqueous Enteric Coating Formulation with Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-MF) and Colloidal Silicon Dioxide as Anti-tacking Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Tanvi M; Quadir, Anisul; Obara, Sakae; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Hoag, Stephen W

    2018-02-16

    The purpose of this study was to use statistical design of experiments to develop a stable aqueous enteric coating formulation containing stabilizing excipients, such as polyethylene glycol that can minimize hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate aggregation and minimize spray-nozzle clogging at elevated processing temperatures. The mechanisms of stabilization (i.e. charge stabilization and molecular interactions) were studied by performing zeta potential and FTIR studies. Electrostatic stabilization by sodium lauryl sulfate and hydrogen bonding by polyethylene glycol provided dispersion stability and yielded a stable aqueous coating formulation that prevented spray-nozzle clogging. An enteric coated tablet with better gastric resistance was obtained by incorporating fumed silica (Aerosil ® R972) as the anti-tacking agent instead of talc. Dissolution testing on the riboflavin enteric coated tablets showed a good enteric release profile without releasing riboflavin in 0.1 N HCl, and completely disintegrating within 10 min in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Analysis of the passive layer developed on stainless steels implanted with chromium; Analisis de las peliculas pasivas generadas en aceros inoxidables implantados con cromo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, C. M.; Cristobal, M. J.; Novoa, X. R.; Pena, G.; Perez, M. C.

    2004-07-01

    This work studies the effect of chromium implantation on the development of passive layers generated electrochemically in alkaline medium over two stainless steels. The XPS analyses show that the layers generated on the implanted steels present less thickness together with similar composition compared to the unimplanted steels layers. However, SEM micrographs show that the layers grown on implanted steels present more defects and less adherence that the films on unimplanted steels. These changes together with the results obtained by Cyclic Voltammetry suggest an oxide structure modification, lattice structure or crystallinity state. (Author) 6 refs.

  12. International cooperation for the development of consistent and stable transportation regulations to promote and enhance safety and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.

    2004-01-01

    International commerce of radioactive materials crosses national boundaries, linking separate regulatory institutions with a common purpose and making it necessary for these institutions to work together in order to achieve common safety goals in a manner that does not place an undue burden on industry and commerce. Widespread and increasing use of radioactive materials across the world has led to increases in the transport of radioactive materials. The demand for consistency in the oversight of international transport has also increased to prevent unnecessary delays and costs associated with incongruent or redundant regulatory requirements by the various countries through which radioactive material is transported. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the authority for international regulation of transportation of radioactive materials responsible for promulgation of regulations and guidance for the establishment of acceptable methods of transportation for the international community. As such, the IAEA is seen as the focal point for consensus building between its Member States to develop consistency in transportation regulations and reviews and to ensure the safe and secure transport of radioactive material. International cooperation is also needed to ensure stability in our regulatory processes. Changes to transportation regulations should be based on an anticipated safety benefit supported by risk information and insights gained from continuing experience, evaluation, and research studies. If we keep safety as the principle basis for regulatory changes, regulatory stability will be enhanced. Finally, as we endeavour to maintain consistency and stability in our international regulations, we must be mindful of the new security challenges that lay before the international community as a result of a changing terrorist environment. Terrorism is a problem of global concern that also requires international cooperation and support, as we look for ways to

  13. Fundamental understanding of oxygen reduction and reaction behavior and developing high performance and stable hetero-structured cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-11-14

    New unique hetero-structured cathode has been developed in this project. La2NiO4+δ (LNO) as a surface catalyst with interstitial oxygen defects was introduced onto the state-of-the-art (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode to enhance the surface-limited ORR kinetics on SOFC cathode. Furthermore, the hetero-structured cathode surface maintains high activity under electrode polarization with much less negative effects from surface cation segregation of Sr, which is known to cause degradation issues for conventional LSCF and LSC cathodes, thus improving the cathode long-term stability. The interface chemistry distribution and oxygen transport properties have been studied to prove the enhancement of power out and stability of LNO-infiltrated LSCF cathode. The further investigation demonstrates that CeO2 & La2-xNiO4+δ (x=0-0.2) co-infiltration is a simple and cost-effective method to improve both performance and stability of LSCF cathode by limiting nano-particles growth/delamination and further improve the surface stability. For the first time, a physical model is proposed to illustrate how unique interstitial species on hetero-structured cathode surface work to regulate the exchange rate of the incorporation reaction. Meanwhile, fundamental investigation of the surface oxygen exchange and bulk oxygen transport properties under over-potential conditions across cathode materials have been carried out in this project, which were discussed and compared to the Nernst equation that is generally applied to treat any oxide electrodes under equilibrium.

  14. Development of effective power supply using electric double layer capacitor for static magnetic field coils in fusion plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomoto, M; Abe, K; Yamada, T; Kuwahata, A; Kamio, S; Cao, Q H; Sakumura, M; Suzuki, N; Watanabe, T; Ono, Y

    2011-02-01

    A cost-effective power supply for static magnetic field coils used in fusion plasma experiments has been developed by application of an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). A prototype EDLC power supply system was constructed in the form of a series LCR circuit. Coil current of 100 A with flat-top longer than 1 s was successfully supplied to an equilibrium field coil of a fusion plasma experimental apparatus by a single EDLC module with capacitance of 30 F. The present EDLC power supply has revealed sufficient performance for plasma confinement experiments whose discharge duration times are an order of several seconds.

  15. Realization of EEC OON strategy for education in the interest of stable development on the regional level (on the example of elaboration of the system of ecological education at non-core educational institution of higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Melnikova, O.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the historical prerequisites of forming EEC OON strategy for education in the interest of stable development. Ecological education in the light of the conception of stable development as an integrating factor of education in general is described. The example of the realization of the strategy on the regional level is given. The topicality of making the system of ecological education at non-core educational institution of higher education is shown.

  16. Application of Displacement Height and Surface Roughness Length to Determination Boundary Layer Development Length over Stepped Spillway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangju Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most uncertain parameters in stepped spillway design is the length (from the crest of boundary layer development. The normal velocity profiles responding to the steps as bed roughness are investigated in the developing non-aerated flow region. A detailed analysis of the logarithmic vertical velocity profiles on stepped spillways is conducted through experimental data to verify the computational code and numerical experiments to expand the data available. To determine development length, the hydraulic roughness and displacement thickness, along with the shear velocity, are needed. This includes determining displacement height d and surface roughness length z0 and the relationship of d and z0 to the step geometry. The results show that the hydraulic roughness height ks is the primary factor on which d and z0 depend. In different step height, step width, discharge and intake Froude number, the relations d/ks = 0.22–0.27, z0/ks = 0.06–0.1 and d/z0 = 2.2–4 result in a good estimate. Using the computational code and numerical experiments, air inception will occur over stepped spillway flow as long as the Bauer-defined boundary layer thickness is between 0.72 and 0.79.

  17. Design and Development of Basic Physical Layer WiMAX Network Simulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Wide Web . The third software version was developed during the period of 22 August to 4 November, 2008. The software version developed during the...researched on the Web . The mathematics of some fundamental concepts such as Fourier transforms, convolutional coding techniques were also reviewed...Mathworks Matlab users’ website. A simulation model was found, entitled Estudio y Simulacion de la capa Jisica de la norma 802.16 ( Sistema WiMAX) developed

  18. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  19. Development of the mesospheric Na layer at 69° N during the Geminids meteor shower 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dunker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ECOMA sounding rocket campaign in 2010 was performed to investigate the charge state and number density of meteoric smoke particles during the Geminids meteor shower in December 2010. The ALOMAR Na lidar contributed to the campaign with measurements of sodium number density, temperature and line-of-sight wind between 80 and 110 km altitude over Andøya in northern Norway. This paper investigates a possible connection between the Geminids meteor shower and the mesospheric sodium layer. We compare with data from a meteor radar and from a rocket-borne in situ particle instrument on three days. Our main result is that the sodium column density is smaller during the Geminids meteor shower than the winter average at the same latitude. Moreover, during two of the three years considered, the sodium column density decreased steadily during these three weeks of the year. Both the observed decrease of Na column density by 30% and of meteoric smoke particle column density correlate well with a corresponding decrease of sporadic meteor echoes. We found no correlation between Geminids meteor flux rates and sodium column density, nor between sporadic meteors and Na column density (R = 0.25. In general, we found the Na column density to be at very low values for winter, between 1.8 and 2.6 × 1013 m−2. We detected two meteor trails containing sodium, on 13 December 2010 at 87.1 km and on 19 December 2010 at 84 km. From these meteor trails, we estimate a global meteoric Na flux of 121 kg d−1 and a global total meteoric influx of 20.2 t d−1.

  20. Dataset on the absorption of PCDTBT:PC70BM layers and the electro-optical characteristics of air-stable, large-area PCDTBT:PC70BM-based polymer solar cell modules, deposited with a custom built slot-die coater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar I. Kutsarov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article is related to the research article entitled “Fabrication of air-stable, large-area, PCDTBT:PC70BM polymer solar cell modules using a custom built slot-die coater” (D.I. Kutsarov, E. New, F. Bausi, A. Zoladek-Lemanczyk, F.A. Castro, S.R.P. Silva, 2016 [1]. The repository name and reference number for the raw data from the abovementioned publication can be found under: https://doi.org/10.15126/surreydata.00813106. In this data in brief article, additional information about the absorption properties of PCDTBT:PC70BM layers deposited from a 12.5 mg/ml and 15 mg/ml photoactive layer dispersion are shown. Additionally, the best and average J-V curves of single cells, fabricated from the 10 and 15 mg/ml dispersions, are presented.

  1. Headspace volume and percentage of carbon monoxide affects carboxymyoglobin layer development of modified atmosphere packaged beef steaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Christopher R; Hunt, Melvin C

    2010-01-01

    Carboxymyoglobin (COMb) development of beef Longissimus lumborum as related to molecular CO availability and package headspace volume was evaluated. Steaks from six pairs of USDA Select strip loins were packaged in modified atmosphere packages with 0.2%, 0.4%, or 0.8% CO and 30% CO(2) and balanced with N(2) to obtain meat-to-gas ratios of 0.4, 0.7, and 1.1, and CO molar concentrations of 0.07, 0.10, and 0.20 mMol. Steak redness (CIE a*), COMb layer thickness, percentage of CO in the headspace, visual display color, and bloom intensity scores were evaluated 4 and 7 d after packaging. Greater concentration of CO in a smaller headspace resulted in a thicker COMb layer compared with lesser concentration of CO in a larger headspace, regardless of moles CO available. The combined effects of concentration of CO and headspace volume had a greater impact on COMb development than millimoles of CO in the package headspace. Package headspace can be reduced and the concentration of CO can be increased without detriment to fresh beef color or consumer safety.

  2. Numerical simulation of the subsolar magnetopause current layer in the sun-earth meridian plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, H.

    1993-01-01

    The formation and stability of the magnetopause current layer near the subsolar point in the sun-earth meridian plane are examined using a 2D electromagnetic particle simulation. For the case of zero IMF, the simulation results show that the current layer remains stable and is essentially the same as in the 1D simulation. The width of the current layer is given by the electron-ion hybrid gyroradius which is much smaller than the ion gyroradius. The current layer is found to remain stable for the northward IMF as well. As in the 1D simulation, the jump of the magnetic field at the current layer for the northward IMF remains small. For the southward IMF, collisionless magnetic reconnection is found to develop, leading to the formation of magnetic islands and density peaking within the current layer.

  3. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  4. Determination of Elastic Parameters of Near-Surface Layers Over Subsidence Trough Development During Longwall Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendecki, Maciej J.; Jochymczyk, Krzysztof; Zuberek, Wacław M.; Tomaszewska, Radosława

    2017-12-01

    Seismic and geodetic studies were carried out before, during, and after underground exploitation of a coal bed in Katowice - Kleofas Coal Mine, located in the Upper Silesia Coal Basin, Poland. Development of a subsidence trough was completed approximately 3 months after passage of a longwall exploitation in the coal seam. This was the time required for the subsidence trough to appear on the surface, which was confirmed by levelling measurements. Sharp changes in the elastic parameters were observed on each profile during subsidence trough development. This observation can result from changing tension and compression forces caused by increase and/or decrease of the elastic parameters of the rock mass. After completion of subsidence trough development, the rock mass appeared to return to its isotropic state and the observed changes ceased. Some minor fluctuations were noted, but they probably resulted from changes in groundwater levels, which might have affected the measured parameters.

  5. New development of large-area direct conversion detector for digital radiography using amorphous selenium with a C60-doped polymer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariyuki, F.; Imai, S.; Watano, H.; Nabeta, T.; Hosoi, Y.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a novel direct conversion detector for digital radiography by using a fullerene (C60)-doped polymer layer added on a thick amorphous selenium (a-Se) layer coupled to an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (a-Si TFT) array. This detector exhibits considerable improvement in the lag characteristics and durability in high ambient temperatures. The C60-doped polymer layer, which is directly and uniformly solution cast on the a-Se layer and followed by an inorganic electron-transporting layer, smoothly changes the electronic junction between the a-Se layer and the inorganic layer. It lubricates the emission of photocurrents from the a-Se photo-conversion layer and leads to the improved lag characteristics. Another merit of using a C60-doped polymer is that it is stabile in high-temperature ambient conditions and is not degraded by humidity or a large amount of X-ray exposure. The polymer layer prevents the crystallization of a-Se, which otherwise occurs on exposure of a-Se to high temperature not only during the deposition of the inorganic layer or the metal electrode layer in the manufacturing process but also in actual use. A prototype detector, with a size of 17 in × 17 in and a pixel pitch of 150 μm, exhibited a good resolution; its DQE is approximately 48% at 1 cy/mm in 258 μC/kg (RQA5). This new development can simplify cooling apparatus and detector modules and also make a wide range of operational environments available. In addition, the improved lag characteristics make it possible to reduce the exposure intervals for static imaging, tomosynthesis, and other various exposure techniques.

  6. Recent Progresses and Development of Advanced Atomic Layer Deposition towards High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrode materials and electrolytes play a vital role in device-level performance of rechargeable Li-ion batteries (LIBs. However, electrode structure/component degeneration and electrode-electrolyte sur-/interface evolution are identified as the most crucial obstacles in practical applications. Thanks to its congenital advantages, atomic layer deposition (ALD methodology has attracted enormous attention in advanced LIBs. This review mainly focuses upon the up-to-date progress and development of the ALD in high-performance LIBs. The significant roles of the ALD in rational design and fabrication of multi-dimensional nanostructured electrode materials, and finely tailoring electrode-electrolyte sur-/interfaces are comprehensively highlighted. Furthermore, we clearly envision that this contribution will motivate more extensive and insightful studies in the ALD to considerably improve Li-storage behaviors. Future trends and prospects to further develop advanced ALD nanotechnology in next-generation LIBs were also presented.

  7. The salinity effect in a mixed layer ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A model of the thermally mixed layer in the upper ocean as developed by Kraus and Turner and extended by Denman is further extended to investigate the effects of salinity. In the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean rapid increases in salinity occur at the bottom of a uniformly mixed surface layer. The most significant effects produced by the inclusion of salinity are the reduction of the deepening rate and the corresponding change in the heating characteristics of the mixed layer. If the net surface heating is positive, but small, salinity effects must be included to determine whether the mixed layer temperature will increase or decrease. Precipitation over tropical oceans leads to the development of a shallow stable layer accompanied by a decrease in the temperature and salinity at the sea surface.

  8. High-precision mass measurements of neutron-deficient Tl isotopes at ISOLTRAP and the development of an ultra-stable voltage source for the PENTATRAP experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Christine

    2015-01-14

    Atomic masses and hence binding energies of nuclides are of great importance for studies of nuclear structure since they reflect all effective interactions in a nucleus. Within this thesis the masses of seven nuclides, namely {sup 194}Au, {sup 194}Hg, {sup 190,193,198}Tl and {sup 202,208}Pb, were determined at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. The thallium region in the chart of isotopes is of special interest due to the occurrence of nuclear structure effects like low-lying isomers, level inversion, shape coexistence and deformations. These effects are investigated by applying finite-difference mass formulas, such as the two-neutron separation energies or the so-called empirical pairing gaps. The second topic addressed within the present thesis is an ultra-stable voltage source, called StaReP (Stable Reference for Penning Trap Experiments), which was developed at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik. It is one of the key components of the high-precision mass spectrometer PENTATRAP, containing a tower of five Penning traps. A 25-channel voltage source with a relative stability of few 10{sup -8} over a period of 10 minutes in the range of 0 to -100V is mandatory for PENTATRAP aiming for mass measurements with relative mass uncertainties of ≤ 10{sup -11}. Mass values with such a high precision allow for stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics in strong electric fields, testing Einstein's mass-energy relation E = mc{sup 2} as well as measurements of decay energies (Q-values) with applications in neutrino physics.

  9. Development of scour in non-cohesive sediments under a poorly erodible top layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zuylen, J.A.; Sloff, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the development of deep scour holes in the river bed of the Dutch Rhine delta in the Netherlands. Assessment of multi-beam surveys, laboratory-flume experiments, and 3D numerical modelling, shows how fast this type of scour holes grows in depth and width. These typical scour

  10. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of four species of Curcuma rhizomes using twice development thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J S; Guan, J; Yang, F Q; Liu, H G; Cheng, X J; Li, S P

    2008-11-04

    The rhizomes of Curcuma phaeocaulis, Curcuma kwangsiensis, Curcuma wenyujin and Curcuma longa are used as Ezhu or Jianghuang in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Due to their similar morphological characters, it is difficult to distinguish their origins of raw materials used in clinic. In this study, a simple, rapid and reliable twice development TLC method was developed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the four species of Curcuma rhizomes. The chromatography was performed on silica gel 60F(254) plate with chloroform-methanol-formic acid (80:4:0.8, v/v/v) and petroleum ether-ethyl acetate (90:10, v/v) as mobile phase for twice development. The TLC markers were colorized with 1% vanillin-H(2)SO(4) solution. The four species of Curcuma were easily discriminated based on their characteristic TLC profiles, and simultaneous quantification of eight compounds, including bisdemethoxycurcumin, demethoxycurcumin, curcumine, curcumenol, curcumol, curdione, furanodienone and curzerene, in Curcuma were also performed densitometrically at lambda(scan)=518nm and lambda(reference)=800 nm. The investigated compounds had good linearity (r(2)>0.9905) within test ranges. Therefore, the developed TLC method can be used for quality control of Curcuma rhizomes.

  11. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  12. Development of novel CO{sub 2}-stable oxygen permeable dual phase membranes for CO{sub 2} capture in an oxy-fuel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Huixia

    2012-07-19

    The combustion of fossil fuels in power stations with pure oxygen following the oxy-fuel process allows the Sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The pure oxygen needed can be separated from air by oxygen transporting ceramics like single phase perovskites. However, most of the so far developed single phase perovskites have stability problems in a CO{sub 2} containing atmosphere. Dual phase membranes are micro-scale mixtures of an electron conducting phase and an oxygen ion conducting phase and their compositions can be tailored according to practical requirements, which are considered to be promising substitutes for the single phase perovskite materials. In my thesis the issues of phase stability for perovskite-type material with the common composition Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF) as weil as the development of a series of novel CO{sub 2}-stable dual phase membranes were studied. In Chapter 2, the phase stability and permeation behavior of a dead-end BSCF tube membrane in high-purity oxygen at temperatures below 750 C, were elucidated using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). lt was found that parts of the cubic perovskite BSCF transformed into a hexagonal perovskite Ba{sub 0.5{+-}x}Sr{sub 0.5{+-}x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (x {approx} 0.1) and a trigonal mixed oxide Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CO{sub 2-y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 5{+-}{delta}} (x {approx} 0.15, y {approx} 0.25) in high-purity oxygen at 750 C. On the other hand, it was found that the partial degradation of cubic BSCF perovskite at 750 C was more pronounced under the strongly oxidizing conditions on the oxygen supply (feed) side than on the oxygen release (permeate) side of the membrane. The structural instability of BSCF is attributed to an oxidation of cobalt from Co{sup 2+} to Co{sup 3+} and Co{sup 4+}, which exhibits an ionic radius that is too small to be tolerated by

  13. Thin and Broadband Two-Layer Microwave Absorber in 4-12 GHz with Developed Flaky Cobalt Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Neeraj; Singh, Jaydeep; Puthucheri, Smitha; Singh, Dharmendra

    2018-03-01

    Microwave absorbing materials (MAMs) in the frequency range of 2.0-18.0 GHz are essential for the stealth and communication applications. Researchers came up with effective MAMs for the higher frequency regions, i.e., 8.0-18.0 GHz, while absorbers with comparable properties in the lower frequency band are still not in the limelight. Designing a MAM for the lower frequency range is a critical task. It is known that the factors governing the absorption in this frequency predominantly depend on the permeability and conductivity of the material, whereas the shape anisotropy of the particles can initiate different absorption mechanisms like multiple internal reflections, phase cancellations, surface charge polarization and enhanced conductivity that can promote the microwave absorption towards lower frequencies. But the material alone may not serve the purpose of getting broad absorption bandwidth. With the effective use of advanced electromagnetic technique like multi-layering this problem may be solved. Therefore, in this paper, a material with shape anisotropy (cobalt flakes with high shape anisotropy) has been prepared and a two-layer structure is developed which gives the absorption bandwidth in 4.17-12.05 GHz at a coating thickness of 2.66 mm.

  14. A development of simulation and analytical program for through-diffusion experiments for a single layer of diffusion media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Haruo

    2001-01-01

    A program (TDROCK1. FOR) for simulation and analysis of through-diffusion experiments for a single layer of diffusion media was developed. This program was made by Pro-Fortran language, which was suitable for scientific and technical calculations, and relatively easy explicit difference method was adopted for an analysis. In the analysis, solute concentration in the tracer cell as a function of time that we could not treat to date can be input and the decrease in the solute concentration as a function of time by diffusion from the tracer cell to the measurement cell, the solute concentration distribution in the porewater of diffusion media and the solute concentration in the measurement cell as a function of time can be calculated. In addition, solution volume in both cells and diameter and thickness of the diffusion media are also variable as an input condition. This simulation program could well explain measured result by simulating solute concentration in the measurement cell as a function of time for case which apparent and effective diffusion coefficients were already known. Based on this, the availability and applicability of this program to actual analysis and simulation were confirmed. This report describes the theoretical treatment for the through-diffusion experiments for a single layer of diffusion media, analytical model, an example of source program and the manual. (author)

  15. Development of SiPM-based scintillator tile detectors for a multi-layer fast neutron tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubek J.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We are developing thin tile scintillator detectors with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM readout for use in a multi-layer fast-neutron tracker. The tracker is based on interleaved Timepix and plastic scintillator layers. The thin 15 × 15 × 2 mm plastic scintillators require suitable optical readout in order to detect and measure the energy lost by energetic protons that have been recoiled by fast neutrons. Our first prototype used dual SiPMs, coupled to opposite edges of the scintillator tile using light-guides. An alternative readout geometry was designed in an effort to increase the fraction of scintillation light detected by the SiPMs. The new prototype uses a larger SiPM array to cover the entire top face of the tile. This paper details the comparative performance of the two prototype designs. A deuterium-tritium (DT fast-neutron source was used to compare the relative light collection efficiency of the two designs. A collimated UV light source was scanned across the detector face to map the uniformity. The new prototype was found to have 9.5 times better light collection efficiency over the original design. Both prototypes exhibit spatial non-uniformity in their response. Methods of correcting this non-uniformity are discussed.

  16. Development of the online data reduction system and feasibility studies of 6-layer tracking for the Belle II pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchow, David

    2015-04-24

    The Belle II experiment, the upgrade of the Belle experiment, at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) in Tsukuba, Japan, will be built to answer fundamental questions that are not covered by the Standard Model of particle physics. For this reason, decays should be observed with high precision. To be able to measure all decay products with a very accurate vertex resolution, it was decided to add a Pixel Detector (PXD) with an inner radius of only 14 mm in short distance around the beam (outer radius 12.5 mm). This increases the vertex resolution and it is possible to improve the reconstruction efficiency and accuracy. Because of the short distance to the interaction point, we expect to have a background induced occupancy of up to 3% on the pixel detector. This generates an expected data rate of about 20 GB/s and exceeds the bandwidth limitations of the data storage. Based on hits in the outer detectors, back projections of particle tracks are performed and Region of Interests (ROI) on the PXD sensors are calculated. Based on those ROIs the data are reduced. In this thesis I present my development of the ROI based data reduction algorithm as well as my feasibility studies about a future 6-layer tracking. Online Data Reduction for Belle II A first test with the whole DAQ integration and prototype sensors of PXD and SVD had been performed at DESY. For the verification of the ROI selection logic a full recording of in- and output data was included. With this setup I recorded 1.2.10{sup 6} events containing in total 4.8.10{sup 8} hits. The occupancy of originally ∼ 0.80% was reduced with my ROI selection logic by a factor of 6.9 to ∼ 0.12% by rejecting all hits outside any ROI. In addition I investigated the ROI positioning and got a result of a distance between ROI center and hit of 17.624±0.029 with a main offset direction of (π)/(2) and (3π)/(2). With a more accurate position of the ROIs their size could be reduced which would optimize the

  17. Monolithic pixel development in TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS for the outer pixel layers in the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdalovic, I.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Cardella, R.; Egidos Plaja, N.; Hemperek, T.; Hiti, B.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Kugathasan, T.; Mandic, I.; Maneuski, D.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Moustakas, K.; Musa, L.; Pernegger, H.; Riedler, P.; Riegel, C.; Schaefer, D.; Schioppa, E. J.; Sharma, A.; Snoeys, W.; Solans Sanchez, C.; Wang, T.; Wermes, N.

    2018-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS tracking detector (ITk) for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires the development of novel radiation hard silicon sensor technologies. Latest developments in CMOS sensor processing offer the possibility of combining high-resistivity substrates with on-chip high-voltage biasing to achieve a large depleted active sensor volume. We have characterised depleted monolithic active pixel sensors (DMAPS), which were produced in a novel modified imaging process implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process in the framework of the monolithic sensor development for the ALICE experiment. Sensors fabricated in this modified process feature full depletion of the sensitive layer, a sensor capacitance of only a few fF and radiation tolerance up to 1015 neq/cm2. This paper summarises the measurements of charge collection properties in beam tests and in the laboratory using radioactive sources and edge TCT. The results of these measurements show significantly improved radiation hardness obtained for sensors manufactured using the modified process. This has opened the way to the design of two large scale demonstrators for the ATLAS ITk. To achieve a design compatible with the requirements of the outer pixel layers of the tracker, a charge sensitive front-end taking 500 nA from a 1.8 V supply is combined with a fast digital readout architecture. The low-power front-end with a 25 ns time resolution exploits the low sensor capacitance to reduce noise and analogue power, while the implemented readout architectures minimise power by reducing the digital activity.

  18. Monolithic pixel development in 180 nm CMOS for the outer pixel layers in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kugathasan, Thanushan; Buttar, Craig; Berdalovic, Ivan; Blochet, Bastien; Cardella, Roberto Calogero; Dalla, Marco; Egidos Plaja, Nuria; Hemperek, Tomasz; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Maneuski, Dima; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Moustakas, Konstantinos; Mugnier, Herve; Musa, Luciano; Pernegger, Heinz; Riedler, Petra; Riegel, Christian; Rousset, Jerome; Sbarra, Carla; Schaefer, Douglas Michael; Schioppa, Enrico Junior; Sharma, Abhishek; Snoeys, Walter; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Wang, Tianyang; Wermes, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN plans to upgrade its Inner Tracking System for the High-Luminosity LHC in 2026. After the ALPIDE monolithic sensor for the ALICE ITS was successfully implemented in a 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor technology, the process was modified to combine full sensor depletion with a low sensor capacitance (≈ 2.5fF), for increased radiation tolerance and low analog power consumption. Efficiency and charge collection time were measured with comparisons before and after irradiation. This paper summarises the measurements and the ATLAS-specific development towards full-reticle size CMOS sensors and modules in this modified technology.

  19. Contribution of the cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) for development of layer-by-layer films with potential application in nanobiomedical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, I M S; Zampa, M F; Moura, J B; dos Santos, J R; Eaton, P; Zucolotto, V; Veras, L M C; de Paula, R C M; Feitosa, J P A; Leite, J R S A; Eiras, C

    2012-08-01

    The search for bioactive molecules to be employed as recognition elements in biosensors has stimulated researchers to pore over the rich Brazilian biodiversity. In this sense, we introduce the use of natural cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) as an active biomaterial to be used in the form of layer-by-layer films, in conjunction with phthalocyanines, which were tested as electrochemical sensors for dopamine detection. We investigated the effects of chemical composition of cashew gum from two different regions of Brazil (Piauí and Ceará states) on the physico-chemical characteristics of these nanostructures. The morphology of the nanostructures containing cashew gum was studied by atomic force microscopy which indicates that smooth films punctuated by globular features were formed that showed low roughness values. The results indicate that, independent of the origin, cashew gum stands out as an excellent film forming material with potential application in nanobiomedical devices as electrochemical sensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A surface-mediated siRNA delivery system developed with chitosan/hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer films through layer-by-layer self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijuan; Wu, Changlin; Liu, Guangwan; Liao, Nannan; Zhao, Fang; Yang, Xuxia; Qu, Hongyuan; Peng, Bo; Chen, Li; Yang, Guang

    2016-12-01

    siRNA delivery remains highly challenging because of its hydrophilic and anionic nature and its sensitivity to nuclease degradation. Effective siRNA loading and improved transfection efficiency into cells represents a key problem. In our study, we prepared Chitosan/Hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer films through layer-by-layer self-assembly, in which siRNAs can be effectively loaded and protected. The construction process was characterized by FTIR, 13C NMR (CP/MAS), UV-vis spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented the controlled-release performance of the films during incubation in 1 M NaCl solution for several days through UV-vis spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Additionally, we verified the stability and integrity of the siRNA loaded on multilayer films. Finally, the biological efficacy of the siRNA delivery system was evaluated via cells adhesion and gene silencing analyses in eGFP-HEK 293T cells. This new type of surface-mediated non-viral multilayer films may have considerable potential in the localized and controlled-release delivery of siRNA in mucosal tissues, and tissue engineering application.

  1. Development of dual-layer GSO depth-of-interaction block detector using angled optical fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Satoshi, E-mail: okumura.satoshi@c.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University (Japan); Kato, Natsuki; Hamamura, Huka [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    A PET system for small animals requires a small detector ring to obtain high-spatial resolution images. However, when we use a relatively large size of photodetector such as a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT), the detector ring is arranged in a hexagonal- or octagonal-shape, and the PET system has large gaps between the block detectors. The large gaps produce image distortion, and the reconstruction algorithm is difficult. To solve these problems, we proposed to arrange two scintillator blocks on one PSPMT using two angled optical fiber-based image guides. We could set two scintillator blocks angled at 22.5° on a PSPMT so that these scintillator blocks are arranged in a nearly circular (hexadecagonal) shape with eight developed block detectors. We used Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillators with Ce concentrations of 1.5 mol% (decay time: 39 ns) and 0.4 mol% (decay time: 63 ns). Sizes of these GSO cells were 1.6×2.4×7.0 mm{sup 3} and 1.6×2.4×8.0 mm{sup 3} for 1.5 mol% Ce and 0.4 mol% Ce, respectively. These two types of GSO were arranged in an 11×15 matrix and optically coupled in the depth direction to form a depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector. Two GSO blocks and two optical fiber-based image guides were optically coupled to a 2-in. PSPMT (Hamamatsu Photonics H8500: 8×8 anodes). We measured the performances of the block detector with Cs-137 gamma photons (662-keV). We could resolve almost all pixels clearly in a two-dimensional position histogram. The average peak-to-valley ratios (P/Vs) of the two-dimensional position histogram along profiles were 2.6 and 4.8 in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. The energy resolution was 28.4% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The pulse shape spectra showed good separation with a P/V of 5.2. The developed block detector performed well and shows promise for the development of high-sensitivity and high-spatial resolution PET systems.

  2. Development of dual-layer GSO depth-of-interaction block detector using angled optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kato, Natsuki; Hamamura, Huka

    2015-05-01

    A PET system for small animals requires a small detector ring to obtain high-spatial resolution images. However, when we use a relatively large size of photodetector such as a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT), the detector ring is arranged in a hexagonal- or octagonal-shape, and the PET system has large gaps between the block detectors. The large gaps produce image distortion, and the reconstruction algorithm is difficult. To solve these problems, we proposed to arrange two scintillator blocks on one PSPMT using two angled optical fiber-based image guides. We could set two scintillator blocks angled at 22.5° on a PSPMT so that these scintillator blocks are arranged in a nearly circular (hexadecagonal) shape with eight developed block detectors. We used Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillators with Ce concentrations of 1.5 mol% (decay time: 39 ns) and 0.4 mol% (decay time: 63 ns). Sizes of these GSO cells were 1.6×2.4×7.0 mm3 and 1.6×2.4×8.0 mm3 for 1.5 mol% Ce and 0.4 mol% Ce, respectively. These two types of GSO were arranged in an 11×15 matrix and optically coupled in the depth direction to form a depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector. Two GSO blocks and two optical fiber-based image guides were optically coupled to a 2-in. PSPMT (Hamamatsu Photonics H8500: 8×8 anodes). We measured the performances of the block detector with Cs-137 gamma photons (662-keV). We could resolve almost all pixels clearly in a two-dimensional position histogram. The average peak-to-valley ratios (P/Vs) of the two-dimensional position histogram along profiles were 2.6 and 4.8 in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. The energy resolution was 28.4% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The pulse shape spectra showed good separation with a P/V of 5.2. The developed block detector performed well and shows promise for the development of high-sensitivity and high-spatial resolution PET systems.

  3. Development of a single-layer Nb3Sn common coil dipole model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Novitski et al.

    2002-12-13

    A high-field dipole magnet based on the common coil design was developed at Fermilab for a future Very Large Hadron Collider. A short model of this magnet with a design field of 11 T in two 40-mm apertures is being fabricated using the react-and-wind technique. In order to study and optimize the magnet design two 165-mm long mechanical models were assembled and tested. A technological model consisting of magnet straight section and ends was also fabricated in order to check the tooling and the winding and assembly procedures. This paper describes the design and technology of the common coil dipole magnet and summarizes the status of short model fabrication.The results of the mechanical model tests and comparison with FE mechanical analysis are also presented.

  4. Development of a Fault Analysis Algorithm for HTS Power Cable Using RTDS Considering Both Conducting and Shield Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. H.; Park, C. H.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.

    High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) power cable consists of a conducting layer and a shield layer for carrying the required current. Geometrically, the conducting and shield layers each have self inductance; and the mutual inductance exists between the conducting and shield layers. Therefore, the direction of the current of shield the layer is opposite that of the conducting layer current. The value of the shield layer current is over 95% of the conducting layer current at the steady state. However, if a fault current passes through an HTS power cable, the quench occurs in both the conducting and shield layers. After the quench, resistance appears, and the even self inductance values are not changed a great deal, but the mutual inductance value is directly affected. According to the above mentioned processes, the current distribution of the conducting and shield layers changes due to the fault current. In this paper, the authors describe the transient state analysis of a real manufactured HTS power model cable, considering both the conducting and the shield layers. The manufactured system is coupled with RTDS, in which a utility grid is composed and simulated. These results provide important data for the design of an HTS power cable.

  5. Application of a mixture of soils to create a stable layer of support on the slope in ponds waterproofed with geo membranes. Application to a specific case in the reservoir Conseller Jose Ramon Garcia Anton in Elche (Alicante); Aplicacion de una mezcla de suelos para el desarrollo de la capa de apoyo estable a lo largo del tiempo en los taludes para la geomembrana de la balsa Conseller Jose Ramon Garcia Anton en Elche. Alicante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferran Gozalvez, F. J.; Ferrer Gisbert, C.; Redon Santafe, M.; Perez Sanchez, M.; Torregrosa Solar, J. S.; Zapata Raboso, F. J.; Sanchez Romero, F. J.

    2014-02-01

    This text present the experience developed in a reservoir in Elche (Alicante). This communication explains the importance of the layer of support to prevent the punching. This phenomenon can occur in a reservoir that has a deficient layer of support. Also, the paper describes the requirements to be met by the support layer to perform its function. (Author)

  6. Lectin staining shows no evidence of involvement of glycocalyx/mucous layer carbohydrate structures in development of celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Nielsen, Christian; Biagini, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The presence of unique carbohydrate structures in the glycocalyx/mucous layer of the intestine may be involved in a susceptibility to celiac disease (CD) by serving as attachment sites for bacteria. This host-microbiota interaction may influence the development of CD and possibly other diseases...... with autoimmune components. We examined duodenal biopsies from a total of 30 children, of which 10 had both celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D); 10 had CD alone; and 10 were suspected of having gastrointestinal disease, but had normal duodenal histology (non-CD controls). Patients with both CD and T1D...... showed no significant differences. Based on our material, we found no indication that the presence of Gal-β(1,3)-GalNAc or Fucα1-2Gal-R is involved in the susceptibility to CD, or that the disease process affects the expression of these carbohydrates....

  7. Development of Streamwise Counter-Rotating Vortices in Flat Plate Boundary Layer Pre-set by Leading Edge Patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S.M.

    2017-04-03

    Development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices induced by leading edge patterns with different pattern shape is investigated using hot-wire anemometry in the boundary layer of a flat plate. A triangular, sinusoidal and notched patterns with the same pattern wavelength λ of 15mm and the same pattern amplitude A of 7.5mm were examined for free-stream velocity of 3m/s. The results show a good agreement with earlier studies. The inflection point on the velocity profile downstream of the trough of the patterns at the beginning of the vortex formation indicates that the vortices non-linearly propagate downstream. An additional vortex structure was also observed between the troughs of the notched pattern.

  8. [Responses of rice growth and development to elevated near-surface layer ozone (O3) concentration: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yu-long; Shi, Guang-yao; Wang, Yun-xia; Zhu, Jian-guo

    2008-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is recognized as one of the most important air pollutants. At present, the worldwide average tropospheric O3 concentration has been increased from an estimated pre-industrial level of 38 nl L(-1) (25-45 nl L(-1), 8-h summer seasonal average) to approximately 50 nl L(-1) in 2000, and to 80 nl L(-1) by 2100 based on most pessimistic projections. Oryza sativa L. (rice) is the most important grain crop in the world, and thus, to correctly evaluate how the elevated near-surface layer O3 concentration will affect the growth and development of rice is of great significance. This paper reviewed the chamber (including closed and open top chamber)-based studies about the effects of atmospheric ozone enrichment on the rice visible injury symptoms, photosynthesis, water relationship, phenology, dry matter production and allocation, leaf membrane protective system, and grain yield and its components. Further research directions in this field were discussed.

  9. The role of atmospheric boundary layer-surface interactions on the development of coastal fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Malda

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Frictional convergence and thermal difference between land and sea surface are the two surface conditions that govern the intensity and evolution of a coastal front. By means of the mesoscale model MM5, we investigate the influence of these two processes on wind patterns, temperature and precipitation amounts, associated with a coastal front, observed on the west coast of The Netherlands in the night between 12 and 13 August 2004. The mesoscale model MM5 is further compared with available observations and the results of two operational models (ECMWF and HIRLAM. HIRLAM is not capable to reproduce the coastal front, whereas ECMWF and MM5 both calculate precipitation for the coastal region. The precipitation pattern, calculated by MM5, agrees satisfactorily with the accumulated radar image. The failure of HIRLAM is mainly due to a different stream pattern at the surface and consequently, a different behaviour of the frictional convergence at the coastline.

    The sensitivity analysis of frictional convergence is carried out with the MM5 model, by varying land surface roughness length (z0. For the sensitivity analysis of thermal difference between sea and land surface, we changed the sea surface temperature (SST. Increasing surface roughness implies stronger convergence near the surface and consequently stronger upward motions and intensification of the development of the coastal front. Setting land surface roughness equal to the sea surface roughness means an elimination of frictional convergence and results in a diminishing coastal front structure of the precipitation pattern. The simulation with a high SST produces much precipitation above the sea, but less precipitation in the coastal area above land. A small increment of the SST results in larger precipitation amounts above the sea; above land increments are calculated for areas near the coast. A decrease of the SST shifts the precipitation maxima inland, although the

  10. The role of atmospheric boundary layer-surface interactions on the development of coastal fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Malda

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Frictional convergence and thermal difference between land and sea surface are the two surface conditions that govern the intensity and evolution of a coastal front. By means of the mesoscale model MM5, we investigate the influence of these two processes on wind patterns, temperature and precipitation amounts, associated with a coastal front, observed on the west coast of The Netherlands in the night between 12 and 13 August 2004. The mesoscale model MM5 is further compared with available observations and the results of two operational models (ECMWF and HIRLAM. HIRLAM is not capable to reproduce the coastal front, whereas ECMWF and MM5 both calculate precipitation for the coastal region. The precipitation pattern, calculated by MM5, agrees satisfactorily with the accumulated radar image. The failure of HIRLAM is mainly due to a different stream pattern at the surface and consequently, a different behaviour of the frictional convergence at the coastline. The sensitivity analysis of frictional convergence is carried out with the MM5 model, by varying land surface roughness length (z0. For the sensitivity analysis of thermal difference between sea and land surface, we changed the sea surface temperature (SST. Increasing surface roughness implies stronger convergence near the surface and consequently stronger upward motions and intensification of the development of the coastal front. Setting land surface roughness equal to the sea surface roughness means an elimination of frictional convergence and results in a diminishing coastal front structure of the precipitation pattern. The simulation with a high SST produces much precipitation above the sea, but less precipitation in the coastal area above land. A small increment of the SST results in larger precipitation amounts above the sea; above land increments are calculated for areas near the coast. A decrease of the SST shifts the precipitation maxima inland, although the precipitation amounts

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Spatially Developing Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers with the One-Dimensional Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas Frank

    Large eddy simulation (LES) combined with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to simulate spatially developing turbulent reacting shear layers with high heat release and high Reynolds numbers. The LES-ODT results are compared to results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), for model development and validation purposes. The LES-ODT approach is based on LES solutions for momentum and pressure on a coarse grid and solutions for momentum and reactive scalars on a fine, one-dimensional, but three-dimensionally coupled ODT subgrid, which is embedded into the LES computational domain. Although one-dimensional, all three velocity components are transported along the ODT domain. The low-dimensional spatial and temporal resolution of the subgrid scales describe a new modeling paradigm, referred to as autonomous microstructure evolution (AME) models, which resolve the multiscale nature of turbulence down to the Kolmogorv scales. While this new concept aims to mimic the turbulent cascade and to reduce the number of input parameters, AME enables also regime-independent combustion modeling, capable to simulate multiphysics problems simultaneously. The LES as well as the one-dimensional transport equations are solved using an incompressible, low Mach number approximation, however the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density computed by the ideal gas equation of state, based on temperature variations. The computations are carried out on a three-dimensional structured mesh, which is stretched in the transverse direction. While the LES momentum equation is integrated with a third-order Runge-Kutta time-integration, the time integration at the ODT level is accomplished with an explicit Forward-Euler method. Spatial finite-difference schemes of third (LES) and first (ODT) order are utilized and a fully consistent fractional-step method at the LES level is used. Turbulence closure at the LES level is achieved by utilizing the Smagorinsky

  12. Development of a simplified densitometer for the determination of aflatoxins by thin-layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroka, J; Anklam, E

    2000-12-29

    A simple, miniaturised and low power consuming (battery, fully semiconductor based) detector cell (SeBaDeC) was developed for the densitometric measurement of aflatoxins on TLC plates. A UV-light emitting diode (UV-LED) with a peak emission wavelength of 370 nm was used for fluorescence excitation, while a photo diode with a peak sensitivity of 440 nm in combination with a 418 nm cut-off filter was applied for detecting the fluorescence intensity. The resulting signal was further amplified by means of a commonly used operational amplifier integrated circuit (OA) and directly converted into a digital signal with a simple analogue-digital-converter (ADC). This signal was recorded at the serial (RS232) port of a portable PC and processed with a spreadsheet program. The software used for data recording is freeware and available in its source code, and the long lifetime of the UV-LED (up to 10 000 h) permits a maintenance free application of this device. This simplified device has shown to be able to detect concentrations of aflatoxins of 1 ng, thus offering a cheap and sensitive alternative to currently available TCL scanners.

  13. Interaction of Natural Organic Matter with Layered Minerals: Recent Developments in Computational Methods at the Nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A. Greathouse

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of mineral surfaces in the adsorption, transport, formation, and degradation of natural organic matter (NOM in the biosphere remains an active research area owing to the difficulties in identifying proper working models of both NOM and mineral phases present in the environment. The variety of aqueous chemistries encountered in the subsurface (e.g., oxic vs. anoxic, variable pH further complicate this field of study. Recently, the advent of nanoscale probes such as X-ray adsorption spectroscopy and surface vibrational spectroscopy applied to study such complicated interfacial systems have enabled new insight into NOM-mineral interfaces. Additionally, due to increasing capabilities in computational chemistry, it is now possible to simulate molecular processes of NOM at multiple scales, from quantum methods for electron transfer to classical methods for folding and adsorption of macroparticles. In this review, we present recent developments in interfacial properties of NOM adsorbed on mineral surfaces from a computational point of view that is informed by recent experiments.

  14. Primary cell culture of Echinococcus granulosus developed from the cystic germinal layer: biological and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Clara M; Elissondo, María Celina; Cumino, Andrea C; Chisari, Andrea; Denegri, Guillermo M

    2010-09-01

    Cell cultures of parasitic helminths are an invaluable tool for investigations of basic biological processes, as well as for development of improved chemotherapeutic agents and molecular interactions between host and parasite. We carried out a simple and efficient methodology to isolate Echinococcus granulosus germinal cells which were maintained for at least 4 months while cultivated in the presence of reducing agents and hormones. Microscopic analysis of the primary cell culture revealed the presence of cells with similar Echinococcus germinal cell morphology and behaviour. Population doubling time was estimated at 48 h, showing a rapid division rate. To discard possible host contamination, the specificity of the primary culture was tested by nested PCR, analyzing mdh gene expression and obtaining only one product with the expected size. We also studied the expression of specific E. granulosus proteins in primary cell culture. The novel and systematized method described here constitutes a powerful tool for investigations in cystic echinococcosis on biochemical and biological aspects related to the life cycle of the parasite and mechanisms of host-parasite interactions. This method also constitutes a powerful tool for the design of more efficient therapeutic alternatives. Copyright (c) 2010 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discovering and measuring a layered Earth: A foundational laboratory for developing students' understanding of Earth's interior structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Braile, L. W.; Olds, S. E.; Taber, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysics research is continuously revealing new insights about Earth’s interior structure. Before students can grasp theses new complexities, they first must internalize the 1st order layered structure of Earth and comprehend how seismology contributes to the development of such models. Earth structure is of course covered in most introductory geoscience courses, though all too often instruction of this content is limited to didactic methods that make little effort to inspire or engage the minds of students. In the process, students are expected to blindly accept our understanding of the unseen and abstract. Thus, it is not surprising then that many students can draw a layered Earth diagram, yet not know that knowledge of Earth’s interior is based on information from earthquakes. Cognitive learning theory would suggest that what has been missing from instruction of Earth structure is a feasible method to present students with seismic evidence in a manner that allows students to become minds-on with the content; discovering or dispelling the presence of a layered Earth for themselves. Recent advances in serving seismic data to a non-seismologist audience have made the development of such laboratory investigations possible. In this exercise students use an inquiry approach to examine seismic evidence and determine that the Earth cannot have a homogeneous composition. Further they use the data to estimate the dimensions of Earth’s outer core. To reach these conclusions, students are divided into two teams, theoreticians and seismologists, to test the simplest hypothesis for Earth's internal structure; a homogeneous Earth. The theoreticians create a scale model of a homogeneous Earth and predict when seismic waves should arrive at various points on the model. Simultaneously, seismologists interpret a seismic record section from a recent earthquake noting when seismic waves arrive at various points around Earth. The two groups of students then compare the

  16. Development of hard X-ray photoelectron SPLEED-based spectrometer applicable for probing of buried magnetic layer valence states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, Xeniya, E-mail: kozina@uni-mainz.de [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ikenaga, Eiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Viol Barbosa, Carlos Eduardo; Ouardi, Siham; Karel, Julie [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Yamamoto, Masafumi [Division of Electronics for Informatics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan); Kobayashi, Keisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Elmers, Hans Joachim; Schönhense, Gerd [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg – Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Felser, Claudia [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A high-voltage compatible spin-HAXPES detector based on SPLEED from W(001) has been developed. • Magnetic properties of a TMR device were studied by core-level photoemission on the Fe 2p{sub 3/2} states. • The developed instrument enabled probing of buried layers in the region of the valence states. - Abstract: A novel design of high-voltage compatible polarimeter for spin-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Spin-HAXPES) went into operation at beamline BL09XU of SPring-8 in Hyogo, Japan. The detector is based on the well-established principle of electron diffraction from a W(001) single-crystal at a scattering energy of 103.5 eV. It's special feature is that it can be operated at a high negative bias potential up to 10 kV, necessary to access the HAXPES range. The polarimeter is operated behind a large hemispherical analyzer (Scienta R-4000). It was optimized for high transmission of the transfer optics. A delay-line detector (20 mm dia.) is positioned at the exit plane of the analyzer enabling conventional multichannel intensity spectroscopy simultaneously with single-channel spin analysis. The performance of the combined setup is demonstrated by the spin-resolved data for the valence-region of a FeCo functional layer of a tunneling device, buried beneath 3 nm of oxidic material. The well-structured spin polarization spectrum validates Spin-HAXPES in the valence energy range as powerful method for bulk electronic structure analysis. The spin polarization spectrum exhibits a rich structure, originating from clearly discernible transitions in the majority and minority partial spin spectra.

  17. Developing of a VS30 map for addressing site effects for Portugal: evaluation of the effectiveness of using VS30-proxies for stable continental regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Susana; Narciso, Joao; Carvalho, Joao; Pinto, Carlos; Lopes, Isabel; Nemser, Eliza; Borges, Jose; Oliveira, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    - Sand deposits and clays, terrace deposits of Pleistocene age; and S6 - Alluvium, mud, sands, clay, silt and sand dune of Holocene age. The time-average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30m (Vs30) from the database sites range from 123m/s to 1870m/s. The variance of the distribution of Vs30 values varies significantly with the generalized geological unit, being larger S1 and S2 units. The use of proxies based either on the geological-geographical units developed for California by Wills and Clahan (2006) or on correlations with the topographic slope for stable continental regions (Wald and Allen, 2007) shows relatively unbiased total residual distributions of the logarithm of Vs30, although with a large variance. However, the performance of both methods varies significantly with the generalized geological unit analyzed. Both methods are highly biased towards lower values of Vs30 for unit S1 (hard rock). The topographic-slope method shows inconsistent bias for each generalized unit. These results are not in agreement with those of Lemoine et al. (2012) who concluded that, for stable continental regions, the topographic-slope method performance was best for rock sites (A/B NERPH class). This discrepancy points to the limitations of the database on near-surface site-conditions used in project SHARE in what concerns stable continental regions.

  18. A surface-mediated siRNA delivery system developed with chitosan/hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer films through layer-by-layer self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lijuan [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Wu, Changlin, E-mail: Ph.Dclwu1314@sina.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Liu, Guangwan [Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Liao, Nannan [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Zhao, Fang; Yang, Xuxia; Qu, Hongyuan [Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Peng, Bo [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Chen, Li [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Suzhou Novovita Bio-products Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215300 (China); Yang, Guang [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We prepared Chitosan/Hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer as carrier to effectively load and protect siRNAs. • The stability and integrity of the siRNA was verified in the siRNA-loaded films. • The siRNA-loaded films showed good cells adhesion and gene silencing effect in eGFP-HEK 293T cells. • This is a new type of surface-mediated non-viral multilayer films. - Abstract: siRNA delivery remains highly challenging because of its hydrophilic and anionic nature and its sensitivity to nuclease degradation. Effective siRNA loading and improved transfection efficiency into cells represents a key problem. In our study, we prepared Chitosan/Hyaluronic acid-siRNA multilayer films through layer-by-layer self-assembly, in which siRNAs can be effectively loaded and protected. The construction process was characterized by FTIR, {sup 13}C NMR (CP/MAS), UV–vis spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented the controlled-release performance of the films during incubation in 1 M NaCl solution for several days through UV–vis spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Additionally, we verified the stability and integrity of the siRNA loaded on multilayer films. Finally, the biological efficacy of the siRNA delivery system was evaluated via cells adhesion and gene silencing analyses in eGFP-HEK 293T cells. This new type of surface-mediated non-viral multilayer films may have considerable potential in the localized and controlled-release delivery of siRNA in mucosal tissues, and tissue engineering application.

  19. Development and construction of a novel MOCVD facility for the growth of ferroelectric thin layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, P.R.

    2002-02-01

    This thesis deals with the production of ferroelectric thin films using the MOCVD technology. The main focus is put on the design and construction of a complete MOCVD research system that is equipped with a novel non-contact vaporizer system. The precursors are nebulized in an ultrasonic atomizer and injected into a hot gas stream, so they can vaporize without getting into contact with a hot surface. Hence, one of the biggest disadvantages of conventional vaporizer concepts, the contamination of the vaporizing element with decomposing chemicals, could be avoided completely, resulting in a nearly maintenance-free system. In a direct comparison with the well-established Direct Liquid Injection Subsystem DLI-25C from MKS Instruments, the advantages of non-contact evaporation were clearly demonstrated. Additionally, the scope of this work included the development of standard deposition processes for the ternary oxides SrTiO 3 , BaTiO 3 und PbTiO 3 and growth studies were performed. Electrical measurements performed on MIM structures with Pt electrodes and SrTiO 3 as dielectric indicate a high film quality comparable with results presented in the literature. Furthermore, for the first time the solid solution (Pb x Ba 1-x )TiO 3 has been deposited by MOCVD. This material system is widely unknown in thin film form and it is well suited as a model system to investigate the influence of mechanical stresses on the film properties, because it represents a transition between the (as a thin film) superparaelectric barium titanate and the ferroelectric lead titanate. Through variation of the lead/barium ratio the tetragonal distortion of the lattice cell could be adjusted in a wide range. (orig.)

  20. Development of a stable source of atomic oxygen with a pulsed high-voltage discharge and its application to crossed-beam reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I-Chung; Huang, Wen-Jian; Chaudhuri, Chanchal; Chen, Wei-Kan; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2007-08-01

    To investigate the reactions of oxygen atoms with ethene and silane in a crossed-beam condition, we developed a stable, highly intense, and short-pulsed source of atomic oxygen with a transient high-voltage discharge. Mixtures of O(2) and He served as discharge media. Utilizing a crossed molecular-beam apparatus and direct vacuum-ultraviolet ionization, we measured the temporal profiles of oxygen atoms and the time-of-flight spectra of reaction products. With O(2) 3% seeded in He as a discharge medium, oxygen atoms might have a full width as small as 13.5 micros at half maximum at a location 193 mm downstream from the discharge region. Most population of oxygen atoms is in the ground state (3)P but some in the first excited state (1)D, depending on the concentration of precursor O(2). This discharge device analogously generates carbon, nitrogen, and fluorine atoms from precursors CO, N(2), and F(2), respectively.

  1. Development of a routine analysis of 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one in wine by stable isotope dilution assay and mass tandem spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagan, Laurent; Reillon, Florence; Roland, Aurélie; Schneider, Rémi, E-mail: remi@nyseos.fr

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a routine method to analyze the 4-methyl-4-mercaptopentan-2-one in wine. • We developed the first method with sensitivity below the 4MMP perception threshold. • We obtained an accurate method by using the stable isotope dilution assay approach. Abstract: The 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP) is a key aroma compound in wines, especially in Sauvignon Blanc ones. Its accurate quantification is quite difficult due to its traces levels and its reactivity in wine conferred by the thiol function. In this paper, we proposed a new method for its quantification in wine without any sample preparation, based on automated derivatization procedure by methoximation and SIDA–SPME–GC–MS/MS analysis. The derivatization procedure was adapted from a previously published method in order to decrease the amount of reagents and the volume of wine (only 3 mL are required). The use of SPME and the detection conditions have also been optimized to reach the best sensitivity as possible. The method was then validated according to the International Organization of Vine and Wine recommendations and exhibited excellent performances. Indeed, this method allowed us to quantify the 4MMP in wine at traces levels (LOD = 0.19 ng L₅⁻¹) with reproducible results (RSD < 15%) and a very good accuracy (recovery = 102%)

  2. Development of a routine analysis of 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one in wine by stable isotope dilution assay and mass tandem spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, Laurent; Reillon, Florence; Roland, Aurélie; Schneider, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a routine method to analyze the 4-methyl-4-mercaptopentan-2-one in wine. • We developed the first method with sensitivity below the 4MMP perception threshold. • We obtained an accurate method by using the stable isotope dilution assay approach. - Abstract: The 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP) is a key aroma compound in wines, especially in Sauvignon Blanc ones. Its accurate quantification is quite difficult due to its traces levels and its reactivity in wine conferred by the thiol function. In this paper, we proposed a new method for its quantification in wine without any sample preparation, based on automated derivatization procedure by methoximation and SIDA–SPME–GC–MS/MS analysis. The derivatization procedure was adapted from a previously published method in order to decrease the amount of reagents and the volume of wine (only 3 mL are required). The use of SPME and the detection conditions have also been optimized to reach the best sensitivity as possible. The method was then validated according to the International Organization of Vine and Wine recommendations and exhibited excellent performances. Indeed, this method allowed us to quantify the 4MMP in wine at traces levels (LOD = 0.19 ng L −1 ) with reproducible results (RSD < 15%) and a very good accuracy (recovery = 102%)

  3. Development of Production PVD-AIN Buffer Layer System and Processes to Reduce Epitaxy Costs and Increase LED Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerio, Frank

    2013-09-14

    The DOE has set aggressive goals for solid state lighting (SSL) adoption, which require manufacturing and quality improvements for virtually all process steps leading to an LED luminaire product. The goals pertinent to this proposed project are to reduce the cost and improve the quality of the epitaxial growth processes used to build LED structures. The objectives outlined in this proposal focus on achieving cost reduction and performance improvements over state-of-the-art, using technologies that are low in cost and amenable to high efficiency manufacturing. The objectives of the outlined proposal focus on cost reductions in epitaxial growth by reducing epitaxy layer thickness and hetero-epitaxial strain, and by enabling the use of larger, less expensive silicon substrates and would be accomplished through the introduction of a high productivity reactive sputtering system and an effective sputtered aluminum-nitride (AlN) buffer/nucleation layer process. Success of the proposed project could enable efficient adoption of GaN on-silicon (GaN/Si) epitaxial technology on 150mm silicon substrates. The reduction in epitaxy cost per cm{sup 2} using 150mm GaN-on-Si technology derives from (1) a reduction in cost of ownership and increase in throughput for the buffer deposition process via the elimination of MOCVD buffer layers and other throughput and CoO enhancements, (2) improvement in brightness through reductions in defect density, (3) reduction in substrate cost through the replacement of sapphire with silicon, and (4) reduction in non-ESD yield loss through reductions in wafer bow and temperature variation. The adoption of 150mm GaN/Si processing will also facilitate significant cost reductions in subsequent wafer fabrication manufacturing costs. There were three phases to this project. These three phases overlap in order to aggressively facilitate a commercially available production GaN/Si capability. In Phase I of the project, the repeatability of the performance

  4. The peculiar effect of forest dislocations on single twin layer development in zinc and beryllium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrentev, F.F.; Bosin, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    This is an investigation of the effect of different types of forest dislocation on the rate of twin layer broadening, Vsub(n), in zinc and beryllium crystals, and on the velocity of the twinning dislocation movement, Vsub(t), in zinc crystals under the action of a constant external shear stress. Increasing the forest basal dislocation density, rhosub(b), was found to result in increasing Vsub(n) and reducing Vsub(t), while increasing the forest pyramidal dislocation density, rhosub(p), causes Vsub(n) to decrease. An analysis in terms of crystal geometry shows that the dualism of the influence of the basal dislocations stems from the fact that they behave as twinning dislocation sources whose density, increasing with rhosub(b) leads to higher Vsub(n). The decrease in the effective stress, tausup(*), with increasing rhosub(b) is estimated. An analysis of the experimental data yielded the relation Vsub(t)(tausup(*)) and an estimate of the activation volume, which amounted to 6 x 10 -21 cm 3 . The close coincidence of the activation volumes as obtained from Vsub(t)(tausup(*)) and Vsub(n)(tau) suggests that the rate-controlling mechanism of the twin layer development in zinc crystals with large forest basal dislocation density is the twinning dislocation inhibition. In Be crystals, the increasing Vsub(n) effect is observed during untwinning. In Be twinned crystals, electron microscopy revealed twinning dislocations with a density of about 10 5 cm -1 at the twin boundaries and a large forest basal dislocation density inside the twin (ca. 10 8 cm -2 ). (Auth.)

  5. Development and comparative investigation of Ag-sensitive layer based SAW and QCM sensors for mercury sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, K M Mohibul; Sabri, Ylias M; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Ippolito, Samuel J; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2016-04-21

    Piezoelectric acoustic wave devices integrated with noble metal surfaces provide exciting prospects for the direct measurement of toxic gas species such as mercury (Hg) in the atmosphere. Even though gold (Au) based acoustic wave sensors have been utilized extensively for detecting Hg, the potential of using other metal surfaces such as silver (Ag) is yet to be thoroughly studied. Here, we developed Ag sensitive layer-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors and focused on their comparative analysis for Hg sensing applications with parameters such as the sensor sensitivity, selectivity, adsorption/desorption isotherm and Hg diffusion into the surface thoroughly studied. The SAW sensor was fabricated with nickel (Ni) interdigitated transducer (IDT) electrodes and a Ag thin film on the delay line of the device. In the case of the QCM sensor, the electrodes were constructed of Ag thin film and simultaneously employed as a sensitive layer. Mercury sensing experiments were conducted for a range of concentrations between 24-365 ppbv without/with the presence of some common industrial interfering gas species (i.e. ammonia, acetaldehyde, ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl disulphide, methyl ethyl ketone and humidity) at various operating temperatures in the range of 35-95 °C. The SAW sensor was found to possess up to 70 times higher response magnitudes than its QCM counterpart at 35 °C while up to 30 and 23 times higher response magnitudes were observed for the SAW sensor at elevated temperatures of 75 and 95 °C, respectively. Furthermore, the SAW sensor showed good selectivity (>89%) toward Hg(0) vapor in the presence of all the interferents tested at an operating temperature of 75 °C while the QCM sensor exhibited significant cross-sensitivity when ethyl mercaptan was introduced along with Hg(0) vapor. Overall, it is indicative that Ag-based acoustic wave sensors do have great potential for Hg sensing applications, given that right

  6. Design methodology and development history of an ISO OSI layered architecture for the Canadian Broadcast Telidon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablatash, M.; Fitzgerald, R.

    1981-08-01

    To enable the Telidon System to be compatible with many other data communications devices, systems and networks, a layered protocol logically and conceptually consistent with the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO's) Reference Model for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) was designed. The features and functions of the proposed design example are described. The protocol control information for each of the seven layers is described by giving specifications for services and functions provided in each layer, and additional descriptions and definitions as required. A general methodology for the design of ISO OSI layered information systems is briefly described.

  7. Fabrication of highly stable glyco-gold nanoparticles and development of a glyco-gold nanoparticle-based oriented immobilized antibody microarray for lectin (GOAL) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-De; Adak, Avijit K; Yu, Ching-Ching; Hsiao, Wei-Chen; Lin, Hong-Jyune; Chen, Mu-Lin; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2015-03-02

    The design of high-affinity lectin ligands is critical for enhancing the inherently weak binding affinities of monomeric carbohydrates to their binding proteins. Glyco-gold nanoparticles (glyco-AuNPs) are promising multivalent glycan displays that can confer significantly improved functional affinity of glyco-AuNPs to proteins. Here, AuNPs are functionalized with several different carbohydrates to profile lectin affinities. We demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with mixed thiolated ligands comprising glycan (70 mol %) and an amphiphilic linker (30 mol %) provide long-term stability in solutions containing high concentrations of salts and proteins, with no evidence of nonspecific protein adsorption. These highly stable glyco-AuNPs enable the detection of model plant lectins such as Concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, and Ricinus communis Agglutinin 120, at subnanomolar and low picomolar levels through UV/Vis spectrophotometry and dynamic light scattering, respectively. Moreover, we develop in situ glyco-AuNPs-based agglutination on an oriented immobilized antibody microarray, which permits highly sensitive lectin sensing with the naked eye. In addition, this microarray is capable of detecting lectins presented individually, in other environmental settings, or in a mixture of samples. These results indicate that glyconanoparticles represent a versatile and highly sensitive method for detecting and probing the binding of glycan to proteins, with significant implications for the construction of a variety of platforms for the development of glyconanoparticle-based biosensors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A development of the direct Lyapunov method for the analysis of transient stability of a system of synchronous generators based on the determination of non- stable equilibria on a multidimensional sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A development of the direct Lyapunov method for the analysis of transient stability of a system of synchronous generators based on the determination of non- stable equilibria on a multidimensional sphere.We consider the problem of transient stability analysis for a system of synchronous generators under the action of strong perturbations. The aim of our work is to develop methods to analyze a transient stability of the system of synchronous generators, which allow getting trustworthy results on reserve transient stability under different perturbations. For the analysis of transient stability, we use the direct Lyapunov method.One of the problems for this method application is to find the Lypunov function that well reflects the properties of a parallel system of synchronous generators. The most reliable results were obtained when the analysis of transient stability was performed with a Lyapunov function of energy type. Another problem for application of the direct Lyapunov method is to determine the critical value of the Lyapunov function, which requires finding the non-stable equilibria of the system. Determination of the non-stable equilibria requires studying the Lyapunov function in a multidimensional space in a neighborhood of a stable equilibrium for the post-breakdown system; this is a complicated non-linear problem.In the paper, we propose a method for determination of the non-stable equilibria on a multidimensional sphere. The method is based on a search of a minimum of the Lyapunov function on a multidimensional sphere the center of which is a stable equilibrium. Our method allows, comparing with the other, e.g., gradient methods, reliable finding a non-stable equilibrium and calculating the critical value. The reliability of our method is proved by numerical experiments. The developed methods and a program realized in a MATLAB package can be recommended for design of a post-breakdown control system of synchronous generators or as a

  9. Development of inhibitory synaptic inputs on layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the rat medial prefrontal cortex

    KAUST Repository

    Virtanen, Mari A.

    2018-01-10

    Inhibitory control of pyramidal neurons plays a major role in governing the excitability in the brain. While spatial mapping of inhibitory inputs onto pyramidal neurons would provide important structural data on neuronal signaling, studying their distribution at the single cell level is difficult due to the lack of easily identifiable anatomical proxies. Here, we describe an approach where in utero electroporation of a plasmid encoding for fluorescently tagged gephyrin into the precursors of pyramidal cells along with ionotophoretic injection of Lucifer Yellow can reliably and specifically detect GABAergic synapses on the dendritic arbour of single pyramidal neurons. Using this technique and focusing on the basal dendritic arbour of layer 2/3 pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, we demonstrate an intense development of GABAergic inputs onto these cells between postnatal days 10 and 20. While the spatial distribution of gephyrin clusters was not affected by the distance from the cell body at postnatal day 10, we found that distal dendritic segments appeared to have a higher gephyrin density at later developmental stages. We also show a transient increase around postnatal day 20 in the percentage of spines that are carrying a gephyrin cluster, indicative of innervation by a GABAergic terminal. Since the precise spatial arrangement of synaptic inputs is an important determinant of neuronal responses, we believe that the method described in this work may allow a better understanding of how inhibition settles together with excitation, and serve as basics for further modelling studies focusing on the geometry of dendritic inhibition during development.

  10. Insertable B-Layer integration in the ATLAS experiment and development of future 3D silicon pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00371528; Røhne, Ole

    This work has two distinct objectives: the development of software for the integration of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) in the ATLAS offline software framework and the study of the performance of 3D silicon sensors produced by SINTEF for future silicon pixel detectors. The former task consists in the implementation of the IBL byte stream converter. This offline tool performs the decoding of the binary-formatted data coming from the detector into information (e.g. hit position and Time over Threshold) that is stored in a format used in the reconstruction data flow. It also encodes the information extracted from simulations into a simulated IBL byte stream. The tool has been successfully used since the beginning of the LHC Run II data taking. The experimental work on SINTEF 3D sensors was performed in the framework of the development of pixel sensors for the next generation of tracking detectors. Preliminary tests on SINTEF 3D sensors showed that the majority of these devices suffers from high leakage currents, ...

  11. On Possible Similarity Solutions for Three-Dimensional Incompressible Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows Over Developable Surfaces and with Proportional Mainstream Velocity Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Arthur G.

    1958-01-01

    Analysis is presented on the possible similarity solutions of the three-dimensional, laminar, incompressible, boundary-layer equations referred to orthogonal, curvilinear coordinate systems. Requirements of the existence of similarity solutions are obtained for the following: flow over developable surface and flow over non-developable surfaces with proportional mainstream velocity components.

  12. Development of the α-IGZO/Ag/α-IGZO Triple-Layer Structure Films for the Application of Transparent Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun-Neng; Yang, Cheng-Fu; Wu, Chia-Ching; Chen, Yu-Hsin

    2017-02-24

    We investigated the structural, optical, and electrical properties of amorphous IGZO/silver/amorphous IGZO (α-IGZO/Ag/α-IGZO) triple-layer structures that were deposited at room temperature on Eagle XG glass and flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrates through the sputtering method. Thin Ag layers with different thicknesses were inserted between two IGZO layers to form a triple-layer structure. Ag was used because of its lower absorption and resistivity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy measurements of the triple-layer structures revealed that the thicknesses of the Ag layers ranged from 13 to 41 nm. The thickness of the Ag layer had a large effect on the electrical and optical properties of the electrodes. The optimum thickness of the Ag metal thin film could be evaluated according to the optical transmittance, electrical conductivity, and figure of merit of the electrode. This study demonstrates that the α-IGZO/Ag/α-IGZO triple-layer transparent electrode can be fabricated with low sheet resistance (4.2 Ω/□) and high optical transmittance (88.1%) at room temperature without postannealing processing on the deposited thin films.

  13. Effect of eggshell temperature and a hole in the air cell on the perinatal development and physiology of layer hatchlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, R.; Vries, de S.; Anker, van den I.; Meijerhof, R.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of incubation conditions on layer hatchlings, an experiment was performed in which layer eggs were incubated at a normal (37.8°C) or high (38.9°C) eggshell temperature (EST) and a hole was punctured in the air cell of half of the eggs in both EST treatments from d 14 of

  14. Development and design of double-layer co-injection moulded soy protein based drug delivery devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz, C.M.; Doeveren, van P.F.N.M.; Reis, R.L.; Cunha, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Novel double-layer delivery devices based on soy protein derived materials were designed and produced using an innovative two material co-injection moulding technique. It was demonstrated that the viscosity ratio between core and skin layer materials played an important role in the formation of the

  15. Development of the α-IGZO/Ag/α-IGZO Triple-Layer Structure Films for the Application of Transparent Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Neng Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the structural, optical, and electrical properties of amorphous IGZO/silver/amorphous IGZO (α-IGZO/Ag/α-IGZO triple-layer structures that were deposited at room temperature on Eagle XG glass and flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrates through the sputtering method. Thin Ag layers with different thicknesses were inserted between two IGZO layers to form a triple-layer structure. Ag was used because of its lower absorption and resistivity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy measurements of the triple-layer structures revealed that the thicknesses of the Ag layers ranged from 13 to 41 nm. The thickness of the Ag layer had a large effect on the electrical and optical properties of the electrodes. The optimum thickness of the Ag metal thin film could be evaluated according to the optical transmittance, electrical conductivity, and figure of merit of the electrode. This study demonstrates that the α-IGZO/Ag/α-IGZO triple-layer transparent electrode can be fabricated with low sheet resistance (4.2 Ω/□ and high optical transmittance (88.1% at room temperature without postannealing processing on the deposited thin films.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF DRYING AMARANTH SEEDS IN THE MACHINE WITH A BALANCED TWISTED – LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zhuravlev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Intensification of drying is a major improvement of the drying equipment and technology. Development and implementation in the industry of high-intensity devices with active hydrodynamic regimes, provides in many cases, higher technical and economic indicators. The use of devices with twisted coolant flow to intensify the process of drying of dispersed materials is both theoretical interest and practical value. The processes of heat and mass transfer in drying machines are largely determined by the hydrodynamic conditions in its internal volume. Given the complexity of the geometry and structure of the velocity field in the balanced twisted-layer, which in general is essentially three-dimensional, it is necessary to decompose the hydrodynamic problem into two parts superposition. From the analysis of the physical picture implies that the path of the current lines of his close family helical curves. Based on the theoretical analysis of heat and mass transfer process of drying seeds of amaranth in the office with a balanced twisted-layer authors developed a mathematical model of it. The structure of the flow of the drying process in the cross-sections of the device. The model is based on the fundamental equations A.V. Lykov, describes a heat moisture transfer in capillary-porous environments in a linear thermodynamic approach, given the method of convective heat supply and the small size of dried seeds of amaranth. These equations describe the dynamic change in the fields of temperature and moisture content in a conjugated heat and mass transfer at the interface solid phase - coolant. Found macrokinetic natural process. The results will be useful for a wide range of professionals involved in drying seeds of amaranth, as well as for calculation and design of modern dryers. On the basis of experimental data and their statistical treatment has been received a mathematical model that adequately describes the process of drying seeds of

  17. Heat-stable proteins and abscisic acid action in barley aleurone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, J.V.; Shaw, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    [ 35 S]Methionine labeling experiments showed that abscisic acid (ABA) induced the synthesis of at least 25 polypeptides in mature barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The polypeptides were not secreted. Whereas most of the proteins extracted from aleurone cells were coagulated by heating to 100 degree C for 10 minutes, most of the ABA-induced polypeptides remained in solution (heat-stable). ABA had little effect on the spectrum of polypeptides that were synthesized and secreted by aleurone cells, and most of these secreted polypeptides were also heat-stable. Coomassie blue staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels indicated that ABA-induced polypeptides already occurred in high amounts in mature aleurone layers having accumulated during grain development. About 60% of the total protein extracted from mature aleurone was heat stable. Amino acid analyses of total preparations of heat-stable and heat-labile proteins showed that, compared to heat-labile proteins, heat-stable intracellular proteins were characterized by higher glutamic acid/glutamine (Glx) and glycine levels and lower levels of neutral amino acids. Secreted heat-stable proteins were rich in Glx and proline. The possibilities that the accumulation of the heat-stable polypeptides during grain development is controlled by ABA and that the function of these polypeptides is related to their abundance and extraordinary heat stability are considered

  18. Stable T-bet+GATA-3+ Th1/Th2 Hybrid Cells Arise In Vivo, Can Develop Directly from Naive Precursors, and Limit Immunopathologic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peine, Michael; Fröhlich, Anja; Hegazy, Ahmed N.; Kühl, Anja A.; Grevelding, Christoph G.; Höfer, Thomas; Hartmann, Susanne; Löhning, Max

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated T helper (Th) cell lineages are thought to emerge from alternative cell fate decisions. However, recent studies indicated that differentiated Th cells can adopt mixed phenotypes during secondary immunological challenges. Here we show that natural primary immune responses against parasites generate bifunctional Th1 and Th2 hybrid cells that co-express the lineage-specifying transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 and co-produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The integration of Th1-promoting interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-12 signals together with Th2-favoring IL-4 signals commits naive Th cells directly and homogeneously to the hybrid Th1/2 phenotype. Specifically, IFN-γ signals are essential for T-bet+GATA-3+ cells to develop in vitro and in vivo by breaking the dominance of IL-4 over IL-12 signals. The hybrid Th1/2 phenotype is stably maintained in memory cells in vivo for months. It resists reprogramming into classic Th1 or Th2 cells by Th1- or Th2-promoting stimuli, which rather induce quantitative modulations of the combined Th1 and Th2 programs without abolishing either. The hybrid phenotype is associated with intermediate manifestations of both Th1 and Th2 cell properties. Consistently, hybrid Th1/2 cells support inflammatory type-1 and type-2 immune responses but cause less immunopathology than Th1 and Th2 cells, respectively. Thus, we propose the self-limitation of effector T cells based on the stable cell-intrinsic balance of two opposing differentiation programs as a novel concept of how the immune system can prevent excessive inflammation. PMID:23976880

  19. Stable T-bet(+GATA-3(+ Th1/Th2 hybrid cells arise in vivo, can develop directly from naive precursors, and limit immunopathologic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Peine

    Full Text Available Differentiated T helper (Th cell lineages are thought to emerge from alternative cell fate decisions. However, recent studies indicated that differentiated Th cells can adopt mixed phenotypes during secondary immunological challenges. Here we show that natural primary immune responses against parasites generate bifunctional Th1 and Th2 hybrid cells that co-express the lineage-specifying transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 and co-produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The integration of Th1-promoting interferon (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-12 signals together with Th2-favoring IL-4 signals commits naive Th cells directly and homogeneously to the hybrid Th1/2 phenotype. Specifically, IFN-γ signals are essential for T-bet(+GATA-3(+ cells to develop in vitro and in vivo by breaking the dominance of IL-4 over IL-12 signals. The hybrid Th1/2 phenotype is stably maintained in memory cells in vivo for months. It resists reprogramming into classic Th1 or Th2 cells by Th1- or Th2-promoting stimuli, which rather induce quantitative modulations of the combined Th1 and Th2 programs without abolishing either. The hybrid phenotype is associated with intermediate manifestations of both Th1 and Th2 cell properties. Consistently, hybrid Th1/2 cells support inflammatory type-1 and type-2 immune responses but cause less immunopathology than Th1 and Th2 cells, respectively. Thus, we propose the self-limitation of effector T cells based on the stable cell-intrinsic balance of two opposing differentiation programs as a novel concept of how the immune system can prevent excessive inflammation.

  20. Development of high-performance thin-layer chromatography method for herbals identification in extemporaneous oral solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Khokhlova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of extemporal medicines in store includes carrying out intrapharmacy quality control and stability studies. Since there is no single analytical method that ideally suited for all drugs, for each formulation depend on its composition and analytical goal, appropriate quality control methods should be developed. The object of analysis was pediatric oral solution with sedative action that contains Valerian tincture, Motherwort tincture, and sodium bromide. The purpose of research was the development of simple, specific and reproducible methods of active herbal ingredients identification formulated into oral solution. Materials and methods. The high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC was used as the method for analysis. It was performed on 200 × 100 mm silica gel 60 F 254 HPTLC glass plates (Merck, Germany. Standard solutions and samples were applied onto the plate as bands 8.0 mm wide using spray-on technique with Automatic TLC sampler ATS 4; the development was made in saturated Automatic developing chamber ADC 2, temperature and the relative humidity were 23 °C and 33 % respectively; the derivatization was performed using Chromatogram Immersion Device; the documentation was conducted using Visualizer with visionCATS software (CAMAG, Switzerland. As a result two HPTLC identification methods have been developed for valerenic acids that are specific for Valerian tincture and flavonoids that are specific for Motherwort tincture. Thus, the sample preparation has been developed, the optimal chromatographic conditions have been chosen, the acceptance criteria have been proposed, and the reference chromatograms have been shown. Valerenic acids of oral solution were determined in mobile phase: cyclohexane, ethyl acetate, acetic acid (60:38:2; the derivatization of plates was performed through dipping with Anisaldehyde-sulfuric acid reagent and heated to 100 °C for 3 min; documentation was performed after derivatization under

  1. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  2. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  3. Development of a chitosan based double layer-coated tablet as a platform for colon-specific drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim MS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Min Soo Kim,1,* Dong Woo Yeom,1,* Sung Rae Kim,1 Ho Yub Yoon,1 Chang Hyun Kim,1 Ho Yong Son,1 Jin Han Kim,1 Sangkil Lee,2 Young Wook Choi1 1College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 2College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A double layer-coated colon-specific drug delivery system (DL-CDDS was developed, which consisted of chitosan (CTN based polymeric subcoating of the core tablet containing citric acid for microclimate acidification, followed by an enteric coating. The polymeric composition ratio of Eudragit E100 and ethyl cellulose and amount of subcoating were optimized using a two-level factorial design method. Drug-release characteristics in terms of dissolution efficiency and controlled-release duration were evaluated in various dissolution media, such as simulated colonic fluid in the presence or absence of CTNase. Microflora activation and a stepwise mechanism for drug release were postulated. Consequently, the optimized DL-CDDS showed drug release in a controlled manner by inhibiting drug release in the stomach and intestine, but releasing the drug gradually in the colon (approximately 40% at 10 hours and 92% at 24 hours in CTNase-supplemented simulated colonic fluid, indicating its feasibility as a novel platform for CDD. Keywords: chitosan, colon-specific delivery, acidification, microflora, factorial design, controlled release

  4. The measuring technique developed to evaluate the thermal diffusivity of the multi-layered thin film specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tse-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the thermal diffusivities of the Al, Si and ITO films deposited on the SUS304 steel substrate are evaluated via the present technique. Before applying this technique, the temperature for the thin film of the multi-layered specimen is developed theoretically for the one- dimensional steady heat conduction in response to amplitude and frequency of the periodically oscillating temperature imposed by a peltier placed beneath the specimen's substrate. By the thermal-electrical data processing system excluding the lock-in amplifier, the temperature frequency a3 has been proved first to be independent of the electrical voltage applied to the peltier and the contact position of the thermocouples. The experimental data of phase difference for three kinds of specimen are regressed well by a straight line with a slope. Then, the thermal diffusivity of the thin film is thus determined if the slope value and the film- thickness are available. In the present arrangements for the thermocouples, two thermal diffusivity values are quite close each other and valid for every kind of specimen. This technique can provide an efficient, low-cost method for the thermal diffusivity measurements of thin films.

  5. Development of a stable and sensitive semiconductor detector by using a mixture of lead(II) iodide and lead monoxide for NDT radiation dose detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Y. J.; Kim, K. T.; Han, M. J.; Moon, C. W.; Kim, J. E.; Park, J. K.; Park, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, high-energy radiation has been widely used in various industrial fields, including the medical industry, and increasing research efforts have been devoted to the development of radiation detectors to be used with high-energy radiation. In particular, nondestructive industrial applications use high-energy radiation for ships and multilayered objects for accurate inspection. Therefore, it is crucial to verify the accuracy of radiation dose measurements and evaluate the precision and reproducibility of the radiation output dose. Representative detectors currently used for detecting the dose in high-energy regions include Si diodes, diamond diodes, and ionization chambers. However, the process of preparing these detectors is complex in addition to the processes of conducting dosimetric measurements, analysis, and evaluation. Furthermore, the minimum size that can be prepared for a detector is limited. In the present study, the disadvantages of original detectors are compensated by the development of a detector made of a mixture of polycrystalline PbI2 and PbO powder, which are both excellent semiconducting materials suitable for detecting high-energy gamma rays and X-rays. The proposed detector shows characteristics of excellent reproducibility and stable signal detection in response to the changes in energy, and was analyzed for its applicability. Moreover, the detector was prepared through a simple process of particle-in-binder to gain control over the thickness and meet the specific value designated by the user. A mixture mass ratio with the highest reproducibility was determined through reproducibility testing with respect to changes in the photon energy. The proposed detector was evaluated for its detection response characteristics with respect to high-energy photon beam, in terms of dose-rate dependence, sensitivity, and linearity evaluation. In the reproducibility assessment, the detector made with 15 wt% PbO powder showed the best characteristics of 0

  6. Building unique surface structure on aramid fibers through a green layer-by-layer self-assembly technique to develop new high performance fibers with greatly improved surface activity, thermal resistance, mechanical properties and UV resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lifang; Yuan, Li; Guan, Qingbao; Gu, Aijuan, E-mail: ajgu@suda.edu.cn; Liang, Guozheng, E-mail: lgzheng@suda.edu.cn

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • A green technology is setup to build unique surface structure on aramid fiber (AF). • The method is layer-by-layer self-assembling SiO{sub 2} and layered double hydroxide. • The surface of AF is adjustable by controlling the self-assembly cycle number. • New AF has excellent surface activity, anti-UV, thermal and mechanical properties. • The origin behind attractive performances of new AFs was intensively studied. - Abstract: Combining green preparation and high performance is becoming the direction of sustainable development of materials. How to simultaneously overcome the two bottlenecks (poor surface activity and UV resistance) of aramid fibers (AFs) while improving thermal and mechanical properties through a green process is still an interesting issue with big challenge. Herein, new AFs (BL-AFs) were prepared by alternately self-assembling SiO{sub 2} and MgAlFe layered double hydroxide (LDH) on surfaces of AFs, successively, through a green layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique without using high temperature and organic solvent. The structures and properties of BL-AFs were systematically studied, which are controllable by adjusting the number of self-assembly cycle. The new fibers with three or more self-assembly cycles have remarkably improved surface activity, thermal resistance, mechanical properties and UV resistance compared with AFs. Typically, with three self-assembly cycles, the initial degradation temperature and char yield of the new fiber (3BL-AF) are as high as 552.9 °C and 81.2%, about 92 °C and 25.2% higher than those of AF, respectively; after 168 h-UV irradiation, the retention of tensile performances of 3BL-AF fiber is as high as 91–95%, about 29–14% higher than that of AF, showing the best overall performances among all modified AFs prepared using a green technique reported so far. The origin behind the attractive performances of BL-AFs is revealed through correlating with structures of original and

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF DRYING AMARANTH SEEDS IN THE MACHINE WITH A BALANCED TWISTED – LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zhuravlev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One way to create a new drying technology is the development and adoption by the industry of high-intensity machines with active hydrodynamic regimes, providing in many cases, higher technical and economic indicators. This principle is very successfully implemented in devices with swirling flow and particulate material. Therefore, the use of devices with twisted coolant flow to intensify the process of drying particulate materials is both theoretical interest and practical value. Amaranth seeds contain an average of 17 % protein, 8 % of oil and 4-5% fiber. Because of the significant amino acid content of lysine in the protein which amaranth twice larger than that of wheat, and three times more than corn and sorghum, and compares the number with cow's milk and soy , amaranth protein quality is considered very high . Amaranth seeds are the raw material for the production of oil containing up to 8 % of squalene. On the basis of theoretical analysis of heat and mass transfer process of drying amaranth seeds in the machine with a balanced twisted layer authors developed a mathematical model of it . The structure of the flow of the drying process in the cross sections of the machine. The model is based on the fundamental equations AV Lykov , describes a heat moisture transfer in capillaryporous environments in the linear thermodynamic approximation , given the way the convective heat supply and small size of dried amaranth seeds . The resulting equations describe the dynamic change of temperature fields and the moisture content in a conjugated heat and mass transfer at the boundary of the solid phase coolant. Found macrokinetic regularities of the process. The results of the work will be useful to a wide range of professionals involved in drying amaranth seeds, as well as for the calculation and design of modern dryers.

  8. Characterization of dielectric materials in thin layers for the development of S.O.I. (Silicon on Insulator) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, Olivier

    1999-01-01

    This thesis deals with the characterization of oxide layer placed inside S.O.I. substrates and submitted to irradiation. This type of material is used for the development of hardened electronic components, that is to say components able to be used in a radiative environment. The irradiation induces charges (electrons or holes) in the recovered oxide. A part of these charges is trapped which leads to changes of the characteristics of the electronic components made on these substrates. The main topic of this study is the characterization of trapping properties of recovered oxides and more particularly of 'Unibond' material carried out with a new fabrication process: the 'smart-cut' process. This work is divided into three parts: - study with one carrier: this case is limited to low radiation doses where is only observed holes trapping. The evolution of the physical and chemical properties of the 'Unibond' material recovered oxide has been revealed, this evolution being due to the fabrication process. - Study with two carriers: in this case, there is trapping of holes and electrons. This type of trapping is observed in the case of strong radiation doses. A new type of electrons traps has been identified with the 'Unibond' material oxide. The transport and the trapping of holes and electrons have been studied in the case of transient phenomena created by short radiative pulses. This study has been carried out using a new measurement method. - Study with three carriers: here are added to holes and electrons the protons introduced in the recovered oxide by the annealing under hydrogen. These protons are movable when they are submitted to the effect of an electric field and they induce a memory effect according to their position in the oxide. These different works show that the 'Unibond' material is a very good solution for the future development of S.O.I. (author) [fr

  9. Preliminary Development of Spectrochemical Analysis of Superalloys with the Liquid-Layer Solid-Sample Spark Technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnes, Ramon

    1969-01-01

    A comparison study is made, for the spectrochemical analysis of cobalt-base superalloys, between the liquid-layer solid-sample spark technique and the conventional point-to-plane spark analysis in air...

  10. A novel high-temperature combustion based system for stable isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in aqueous samples. : I development and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Federherr, E.; Cerli, C.; Kirkels, F. M. S. A.; Kalbitz, K.; Kupka, H. J.; Dunsbach, R.; Lange, L.; Schmidt, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Traditionally, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) stable isotope analysis (SIA) is performed using either offline sample preparation followed by elemental analyzer/isotope ratiomass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) or a wet chemical oxidation (WCO)-based device coupled to an isotope ratio mass

  11. Ozone depletion, developing countries, and human rights: Seeking better ground on which to fight for protection of the ozone layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, V.

    1995-12-31

    I urge you not to take a complacent view of the situation. The state of depletion of the ozone layer continues to be alarming... In February, 1993, the ozone levels over North America and most of Europe were 20 percent below normal... Even now, millions of tons of CFC [chlorofluorocarbon] products are en route to their fatal stratospheric rendezvous... This exponential increase calls for increased reflection on the state of the ozone layer and calls for bold decisions.

  12. Mechanical loading regulates human MSC differentiation in a multi-layer hydrogel for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Neven J; Aisenbrey, Elizabeth A; Westbrook, Kristofer K; Qi, H Jerry; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    A bioinspired multi-layer hydrogel was developed for the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. The spatial presentation of biochemical cues, via incorporation of extracellular matrix analogs, and mechanical cues, via both hydrogel crosslink density and externally applied mechanical loads, were characterized in each layer. A simple sequential photopolymerization method was employed to form stable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a soft cartilage-like layer of chondroitin sulfate and low RGD concentrations, a stiff bone-like layer with high RGD concentrations, and an intermediate interfacial layer. Under a compressive load, the variation in hydrogel stiffness within each layer produced high strains in the soft cartilage-like layer, low strains in the stiff bone-like layer, and moderate strains in the interfacial layer. When hMSC-laden hydrogels were cultured statically in osteochondral differentiation media, the local biochemical and matrix stiffness cues were not sufficient to spatially guide hMSC differentiation after 21 days. However dynamic mechanical stimulation led to differentially high expression of collagens with collagen II in the cartilage-like layer, collagen X in the interfacial layer and collagen I in the bone-like layer and mineral deposits localized to the bone layer. Overall, these findings point to external mechanical stimulation as a potent regulator of hMSC differentiation toward osteochondral cellular phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High serotonin levels during brain development alter the structural input-output connectivity of neural networks in the rat somatosensory layer IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie eMiceli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic regulation of serotonin (5-HT concentration is critical for normal topographical organization and development of thalamocortical (TC afferent circuits. Down-regulation of the serotonin transporter (SERT and the consequent impaired reuptake of 5-HT at the synapse, results in a reduced terminal branching of developing TC afferents within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1. Despite the presence of multiple genetic models, the effect of high extracellular 5-HT levels on the structure and function of developing intracortical neural networks is far from being understood. Here, using juvenile SERT knockout (SERT-/- rats we investigated, in vitro, the effect of increased 5-HT levels on the structural organization of (i the thalamocortical projections of the ventroposteromedial thalamic nucleus towards S1, (ii the general barrel-field pattern and (iii the electrophysiological and morphological properties of the excitatory cell population in layer IV of S1 (spiny stellate and pyramidal cells. Our results confirmed previous findings that high levels of 5-HT during development lead to a reduction of the topographical precision of TCA projections towards the barrel cortex. Also, the barrel pattern was altered but not abolished in SERT-/- rats. In layer IV, both excitatory spiny stellate and pyramidal cells showed a significantly reduced intracolumnar organization of their axonal projections. In addition, the layer IV spiny stellate cells gave rise to a prominent projection towards the infragranular layer Vb. Our findings point to a structural and functional reorganization, of TCAs, as well as early stage intracortical microcircuitry, following the disruption of 5-HT reuptake during critical developmental periods. The increased projection pattern of the layer IV neurons suggests that the intracortical network changes are not limited to the main entry layer IV but may also affect the subsequent stages of the canonical circuits of the barrel

  14. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  15. Fitted-Stable Finite Difference Method for Singularly Perturbed Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fitted-stable central difference method is presented for solving singularly perturbed two point boundary value problems with the boundary layer at one end (left or right) of the interval. A fitting factor is introduced in second order stable central difference scheme (SCD Method) and its value is obtained using the theory of ...

  16. Development of efficient electrocatalysts via molecular hybridization of NiMn layered double hydroxide nanosheets and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Ma, Renzhi; Wu, Jinghua; Sun, Pengzhan; Liu, Xiaohe; Zhou, Kechao; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2016-05-01

    Ni2+Mn3+ layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets have been hydrothermally synthesized in a homogeneous precipitation of mixed Ni2+/Mn2+ salts at a molar ratio of 2 : 1 via the hydrolysis of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and in situ oxidation with H2O2. After anion-exchange, NiMn LDH was exfoliated into unilamellar nanosheets. Subsequent flocculation of NiMn LDH nanosheets with (reduced) graphene oxide (GO/rGO) into superlattice composites was achieved and further tested as electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The face-to-face heteroassembly of NiMn LDH nanosheets with conductive rGO at an alternating sequence resulted in a small overpotential of 0.26 V and a Tafel slope of 46 mV per decade, which is much superior to as-exfoliated nanosheets. The analyses of electrochemical activity surface area (ECSA) and impedance spectra clearly indicated that the superlattice structure was ideal in facilitating the migration/transfer of the charge and reactants, revealing the electrochemical energetics and mechanism behind the synergistic effect arising from molecular hybridization. The proof of concept toward total water splitting using the newly developed hybrid electrocatalyst was demonstrated by an electrolysis cell powered by a single AA battery.Ni2+Mn3+ layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets have been hydrothermally synthesized in a homogeneous precipitation of mixed Ni2+/Mn2+ salts at a molar ratio of 2 : 1 via the hydrolysis of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and in situ oxidation with H2O2. After anion-exchange, NiMn LDH was exfoliated into unilamellar nanosheets. Subsequent flocculation of NiMn LDH nanosheets with (reduced) graphene oxide (GO/rGO) into superlattice composites was achieved and further tested as electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The face-to-face heteroassembly of NiMn LDH nanosheets with conductive rGO at an alternating sequence resulted in a small overpotential of 0.26 V and a Tafel slope of 46 mV per decade

  17. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  18. Transient gas flow through layered porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, F.A. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Low Reynolds number isothermal flow of an ideal gas through layered porous material was investigated analytically. Relations governing the transient flow in one dimension are obtained. An implicit, iterative, unconditionally stable finite difference scheme is developed for calculation of such flows. A computer code, SIROCCO, employing this technique has been written and implemented on the LLL computer system. A listing of the code is included. This code may be effectively applied to the evaluation of stemming plans for underground nuclear experiments. (U.S.)

  19. Puff pastry with low saturated fat contents: The role of fat and dough physical interactions in the development of a layered structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renzetti, S.; Harder, R. de; Jurgens, A.

    2015-01-01

    In puff pastry, fat and dough rheological behavior during sheeting control pastry dough development by formation of the layered structure which is essential for product quality. The aim of this work was to unravel the influence of fat and dough physical interactions during sheeting, as affected by

  20. Development of non-lethal monitoring of stable isotopes in asp (Leuciscus aspius): a comparison of muscle, fin and scale tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašek, Mojmír; Vejřík, Lukáš; Vejříková, Ivana; Šmejkal, Marek; Baran, Roman; Muška, Milan; Kubečka, Jan; Peterka, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 785, č. 1 (2017), s. 327-335 ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01625S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : fish fins * fish scales * fractionation * non-lethal sampling * stable isotopes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.056, year: 2016

  1. Population Games, Stable Games, and Passivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Fox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The class of “stable games”, introduced by Hofbauer and Sandholm in 2009, has the attractive property of admitting global convergence to equilibria under many evolutionary dynamics. We show that stable games can be identified as a special case of the feedback-system-theoretic notion of a “passive” dynamical system. Motivated by this observation, we develop a notion of passivity for evolutionary dynamics that complements the definition of the class of stable games. Since interconnections of passive dynamical systems exhibit stable behavior, we can make conclusions about passive evolutionary dynamics coupled with stable games. We show how established evolutionary dynamics qualify as passive dynamical systems. Moreover, we exploit the flexibility of the definition of passive dynamical systems to analyze generalizations of stable games and evolutionary dynamics that include forecasting heuristics as well as certain games with memory.

  2. Design and development of a highly stable hydrogen peroxide biosensor on screen printed carbon electrode based on horseradish peroxidase bound with gold nanoparticles in the matrix of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkuaram, Tanin; Ponchio, Chatchai; Kangkasomboon, Thippayawadee; Katikawong, Panadda; Veerasai, Waret

    2007-04-15

    The design and development of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) on a polyvinyl chloride substrate as a disposable sensor is described. Six configurations were designed on silk screen frames. The SPCEs were printed with four inks: silver ink as the conducting track, carbon ink as the working and counter electrodes, silver/silver chloride ink as the reference electrode and insulating ink as the insulator layer. Selection of the best configuration was done by comparing slopes from the calibration plots generated by the cyclic voltammograms at 10, 20 and 30 mM K(3)Fe(CN)(6) for each configuration. The electrodes with similar configurations gave similar slopes. The 5th configuration was the best electrode that gave the highest slope. Modifying the best SPCE configuration for use as a biosensor, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was selected as a biomaterial bound with gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the matrix of chitosan (HRP/AuNP/CHIT). Biosensors of HRP/SPCE, HRP/CHIT/SPCE and HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE were used in the amperometric detection of H(2)O(2) in a solution of 0.1M citrate buffer, pH 6.5, by applying a potential of -0.4V at the working electrode. All the biosensors showed an immediate response to H(2)O(2). The effect of HRP/AuNP incorporated with CHIT (HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE) yielded the highest performance. The amperometric response of HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE retained over 95% of the initial current of the 1st day up to 30 days of storage at 4 degrees C. The biosensor showed a linear range of 0.01-11.3mM H(2)O(2), with a detection limit of 0.65 microM H(2)O(2) (S/N=3). The low detection limit, long storage life and wide linear range of this biosensor make it advantageous in many applications, including bioreactors and biosensors.

  3. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll and Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea - A basin-scale habitat comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Bagøien, Espen

    2012-09-01

    Seasonal patterns for mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll, and Calanus finmarchicus in different water masses between 62 and 70°N of the Norwegian Sea were compared using spatiotemporally aggregated basin-scale data. Norwegian Coastal Water was stratified throughout the year due to a low-salinity upper layer. The winter mixed layer depth was typically about 50-60m, and the spring phytoplankton bloom peaked in late April. In Atlantic and Arctic Waters the winter mixed layer depths were much greater, typically about 175-250m. Due to the requirement for thermal stratification, the phytoplankton build-ups there were slower and the peaks were delayed until late May. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrient consumption and chlorophyll was similar for the Atlantic and Arctic areas. Young Calanus copepodites of the first new generation in Coastal Water peaked in early May, preceding the peak in Atlantic Water by about 2weeks, and that in Arctic Water by about 6weeks. While the young G 1 cohorts in Coastal and Atlantic waters coincided rather well in time with the phytoplankton blooms, the timing of the cohort in Arctic Water was delayed compared to the phytoplankton. Two or more Calanus generations in Coastal Water, and two generations in Atlantic Water were observed. Only one generation was found in Arctic Water, where scarce autumn data precludes evaluation of a possible second generation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Gas phase thermal diffusion of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of stable isotopes at Mound Facility is reviewed from a historical perspective. The historical development of thermal diffusion from a laboratory process to a separation facility that handles all the noble gases is described. In addition, elementary thermal diffusion theory and elementary cascade theory are presented along with a brief review of the uses of stable isotopes

  5. Building unique surface structure on aramid fibers through a green layer-by-layer self-assembly technique to develop new high performance fibers with greatly improved surface activity, thermal resistance, mechanical properties and UV resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lifang; Yuan, Li; Guan, Qingbao; Gu, Aijuan; Liang, Guozheng

    2017-07-01

    Combining green preparation and high performance is becoming the direction of sustainable development of materials. How to simultaneously overcome the two bottlenecks (poor surface activity and UV resistance) of aramid fibers (AFs) while improving thermal and mechanical properties through a green process is still an interesting issue with big challenge. Herein, new AFs (BL-AFs) were prepared by alternately self-assembling SiO2 and MgAlFe layered double hydroxide (LDH) on surfaces of AFs, successively, through a green layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique without using high temperature and organic solvent. The structures and properties of BL-AFs were systematically studied, which are controllable by adjusting the number of self-assembly cycle. The new fibers with three or more self-assembly cycles have remarkably improved surface activity, thermal resistance, mechanical properties and UV resistance compared with AFs. Typically, with three self-assembly cycles, the initial degradation temperature and char yield of the new fiber (3BL-AF) are as high as 552.9 °C and 81.2%, about 92 °C and 25.2% higher than those of AF, respectively; after 168 h-UV irradiation, the retention of tensile performances of 3BL-AF fiber is as high as 91-95%, about 29-14% higher than that of AF, showing the best overall performances among all modified AFs prepared using a green technique reported so far. The origin behind the attractive performances of BL-AFs is revealed through correlating with structures of original and modified fibers. The excellent comprehensive properties of BL-AFs demonstrate that the green method provided in this study is facile and effective to completely solve the bottlenecks of aramid fibers, and developing higher performance organic fibers.

  6. Development of advanced catalytic layer based on vertically aligned conductive polymer arrays for thin-film fuel cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shangfeng; Yi, Baolian; Cao, Longsheng; Song, Wei; Zhao, Qing; Yu, Hongmei; Shao, Zhigang

    2016-10-01

    The degradation of carbon supports significantly influences the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), particularly in the cathode, which must be overcome for the wide application of fuel cells. In this study, advanced catalytic layer with electronic conductive polymer-polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire as ordered catalyst supports for PEMFCs is prepared. A platinum-palladium (PtPd) catalyst thin layer with whiskerette shapes forms along the long axis of the PPy nanowires. The resulting arrays are hot-pressed on both sides of a Nafion® membrane to construct a membrane electrode assembly (without additional ionomer). The ordered thin catalyst layer (approximately 1.1 μm) is applied in a single cell as the anode and the cathode without additional Nafion® ionomer. The single cell yields a maximum performance of 762.1 mW cm-2 with a low Pt loading (0.241 mg Pt cm-2, anode + cathode). The advanced catalyst layer indicates better mass transfer in high current density than that of commercial Pt/C-based electrode. The mass activity is 1.08-fold greater than that of DOE 2017 target. Thus, the as-prepared electrodes have the potential for application in fuel cells.

  7. Influence of the gut microbiota on transcriptional regulation of genes involved in early life development of the intestinal mucus layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between the gut microbiota and the intestinal mucus layer is important both in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier as part of the innate immune defense, and in the conservation of gut homeostasis. Little is known about how the microbiota regulates mucin proteins, which protect...

  8. Influence of the gut microbiota on transcriptional regulation of genes involved in early life development of the intestinal mucus layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng

    The interplay between the gut microbiota and the intestinal mucus layer is important both in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier as part of the innate immune defense, and in the conservation of gut homeostasis. Little is known about how the microbiota regulates mucin proteins, which protect...

  9. Drug intercalation in layered double hydroxide clay: Application in the development of a nanocomposite film for guided tissue regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborti, M.; Jackson, J.K.; Plackett, David

    2011-01-01

    of release by intercalation of alendronate anions in magnesium/aluminum layered double hydroxide (LDH) clay nanoparticles and dispersed in the PLGA film matrix. Tetracycline, loaded as free drug into the film together with alendronate–LDH clay complex released more rapidly than alendronate, but showed...

  10. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  11. Stable and high order accurate difference methods for the elastic wave equation in discontinuous media

    KAUST Repository

    Duru, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Inc. In this paper, we develop a stable and systematic procedure for numerical treatment of elastic waves in discontinuous and layered media. We consider both planar and curved interfaces where media parameters are allowed to be discontinuous. The key feature is the highly accurate and provably stable treatment of interfaces where media discontinuities arise. We discretize in space using high order accurate finite difference schemes that satisfy the summation by parts rule. Conditions at layer interfaces are imposed weakly using penalties. By deriving lower bounds of the penalty strength and constructing discrete energy estimates we prove time stability. We present numerical experiments in two space dimensions to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method for simulations involving typical interface phenomena in elastic materials. The numerical experiments verify high order accuracy and time stability.

  12. Stable catalyst layers for hydrogen permeable composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, J. Douglas; Wolden, Colin A

    2014-01-07

    The present invention provides a hydrogen separation membrane based on nanoporous, composite metal carbide or metal sulfide coated membranes capable of high flux and permselectivity for hydrogen without platinum group metals. The present invention is capable of being operated over a broad temperature range, including at elevated temperatures, while maintaining hydrogen selectivity.

  13. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte structure showed good chemical stability in both CO2 and H2O atmosphere, indicating that the BZPY layers effectively protect the inner BCY electrolyte, while the BCY electrolyte alone decomposed completely under the same conditions. Fuel cell prototypes fabricated with the sandwiched electrolyte achieved a relatively high performance of 185 mW cm- 2 at 700 C, with a high electrolyte film conductivity of 4 × 10- 3 S cm- 1 at 600 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  15. Development of the mouse dermal adipose layer occurs independently of subcutaneous adipose tissue and is marked by restricted early expression of FABP4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Wojciechowicz

    Full Text Available The laboratory mouse is a key animal model for studies of adipose biology, metabolism and disease, yet the developmental changes that occur in tissues and cells that become the adipose layer in mouse skin have received little attention. Moreover, the terminology around this adipose body is often confusing, as frequently no distinction is made between adipose tissue within the skin, and so called subcutaneous fat. Here adipocyte development in mouse dorsal skin was investigated from before birth to the end of the first hair follicle growth cycle. Using Oil Red O staining, immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and TUNEL staining we confirmed previous observations of a close spatio-temporal link between hair follicle development and the process of adipogenesis. However, unlike previous studies, we observed that the skin adipose layer was created from cells within the lower dermis. By day 16 of embryonic development (e16 the lower dermis was demarcated from the upper dermal layer, and commitment to adipogenesis in the lower dermis was signalled by expression of FABP4, a marker of adipocyte differentiation. In mature mice the skin adipose layer is separated from underlying subcutaneous adipose tissue by the panniculus carnosus. We observed that the skin adipose tissue did not combine or intermix with subcutaneous adipose tissue at any developmental time point. By transplanting skin isolated from e14.5 mice (prior to the start of adipogenesis, under the kidney capsule of adult mice, we showed that skin adipose tissue develops independently and without influence from subcutaneous depots. This study has reinforced the developmental link between hair follicles and skin adipocyte biology. We argue that because skin adipocytes develop from cells within the dermis and independently from subcutaneous adipose tissue, that it is accurately termed dermal adipose tissue and that, in laboratory mice at least, it represents a separate adipose depot.

  16. Development of mid-frequency AC reactive magnetron sputtering for fast deposition of Y2O3 buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jie; Xia, Yudong; Xue, Yan; Zhang, Fei; Guo, Pei; Zhao, Xiaohui; Tao, Bowan

    2014-02-01

    A reel-to-reel magnetron sputtering system with mid-frequency alternating current (AC) power supply was used to deposit double-sided Y2O3 seed layer on biaxially textured Ni-5 at.%W tape for YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors. A reactive sputtering process was carried out using two opposite symmetrical sputtering guns with metallic yttrium targets and water vapor for oxidizing the sputtered metallic atoms. The voltage control mode of the power supply was used and the influence of the cathode voltage and ArH2 pressure were systematically investigated. Subsequently yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) barrier and CeO2 cap layers were deposited on the Y2O3 buffered substrates in sequence, indicating high quality and uniform double-sided structure and surface morphology of such the architecture.

  17. Developing arithmetic deformation model of complex reiforced concrete plate with polymer concrete layer under the impact of corrosive medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treshchev Aleksandr Anatol'evich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The arithmetic model of reinforced concrete slab distortion with a polymer-concrete layer exposed to aggressive influences is introduced. The relevance of this object choice as a matter of actual practice. The least contradictory model for specification of the strain-stress state of reinforced concrete constructions is sampled. The most efficient way of solving such tasks is the finite elements method, which lacks the drawbacks of the finite differences method. In this article, the arithmetic model of hybrid finite element qualification for the armored reinforced concrete slabs design is considered. The problem of reinforced concrete slab with a polymer-concrete layer bending is dealt with in the presence of dynamic deformation and simple loading, which gives the opportunity to introduce concrete as a nonlinear material with its elastic-plastic properties, which stay within the strain potential limits. The deformation of creep is not taken into account. The incremental equations connecting stress and deformation increments are provided.

  18. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  19. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  20. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  1. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  2. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  3. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  4. Influence of high-intensity turbulence on laminar boundary layer development on a cylindrical leading edge: Enhancement to eddy diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Juli K.

    The growing demand for increased efficiency in turbine engine designs has sparked a growing interest for research of air flow around curved surfaces. The turbine's operating conditions result in material property constraints, especially in the first stage turbine vanes and blades. These turbine vane components experience extreme loading conditions of both high temperature and high turbulence intensities exiting the combustor. The surface of the turbine blades has cylindrical leading edges that promote stabilizing flow accelerations. These convex surfaces can cause a reduced eddy diffusivity across the boundary layer. This thesis reviews measurements of velocity and turbulence intensities taken just shy of the thirty degrees offset from the stagnation line of a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge under a wide range of turbulence and flow conditions flow conditions. Flow conditions and velocity measurements were gathered with respect to the distance to the surface. The length of the measurements extended from the surface to beyond the boundary layer's edge. The instrumentation used to collect data was a single wire driven by a constant temperature anemometer bridge. The hot wire is specially modified to measure data near the cylindrical leading edges curved surface. The traversing system allowed the acquisition of high-resolution boundary layer data. The traversing system was installed internally to the cylindrical leading edge to reduce probe blockage.

  5. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of buffer layer structure for epitaxial growth of (100)/(001)Pb(Zr,Ti)O3-based thin film on (111)Si wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, Takeshi; Yoshida, Shinya; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports on the development of a novel buffer layer structure, (100)SrRuO3/(100)LaNiO3/(111)Pt/(111)CeO2, for the epitaxial growth of a (100)/(001)-oriented Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)-based thin film on a (111)Si wafer. (111)Pt and (111)CeO2 were epitaxially grown on (111)Si straightforwardly. Then, the crystal orientation was forcibly changed from (111) to (100) at the LaNiO3 layer owing to its strong (100)-self-orientation property, which enabled the cube-on-cube epitaxial growth of the subsequent (100)SrRuO3 layer and preferentially (100)/(001)-oriented PZT-based thin film. The PZT-based epitaxial thin films were comprehensively characterized in terms of the crystallinity, in-plane epitaxial relationships, piezoelectricity, and so forth. This buffer layer structure for the epitaxial growth of PZT can be applied to piezoelectric micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) vibrating ring gyroscopes.

  7. Development of ZnO:Al-based transparent contacts deposited at low-temperature by RF-sputtering on InN layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, S. [Departamento de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Naranjo, F.B.; Valdueza-Felip, S. [Grupo de Ingenieria Fotonica, Departamento de Electronica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Alcala Campus Universitario, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Abril, O. de [ISOM and Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros de Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politenica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Nitride semiconductors (Al,Ga,In)N attain material properties that make them suitable for photovoltaic and optoelectronics devices to be used in hard environments. These properties include an energy gap continuously tuneable within the energy range of the solar spectrum, a high radiation resistance and thermal stability. The developing of efficient devices requires contacts with low resistivity and high transmittance in visible region. ZnO:Al (AZO) emerges as a feasible candidate for transparent contact to nitride semiconductors, taking advantage of its low resistivity, high transparency in visible wavelengths and a very low lattice mismatch with respect to nitride semiconductors. This work presents a study of the applications of AZO films deposited at low-temperature by RF magnetron sputtering as transparent contact for InN layers. The optimization of AZO conditions deposition lead to the obtaining of contacts which shows an ohmic behaviour for the as-deposited layer, regardless the thickness of the ZnO:Al contact layer. Specific contact resistances of 1.6 {omega}.cm{sup 2} were achieved for the contact with 90 nm thick ZnO:Al layer without any post-deposition treatment (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Development of symmetric composition-gradient materials including hard particles in its surface layer; Hyosobu ni koshitsu ryushi wo fukumu taishogata sosei keisha zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Development of new materials with both thermal resistance and thermal shock resistance was studied on the basis of symmetric ceramics/metal/ceramics gradient composition. Al2O3/TiC/Ni/TiC/Al2O3 was used as material model of basic composition, and the system was selected where WC-Co system alloy hard particles were dispersed into the Al2O3 ceramic surface layer. The layered material was sintered in N2 gas atmosphere by SHS/HIP method using exothermic caused by nitriding reaction. Since cracks were generated in some specimens of 5-layer structure, improved specimens of 7-layer structure were prepared. To examine the effect of a particle size on toughness, WC-Co system alloy specimens with different particle sizes were also prepared. As a result, no cracks were found, and residual stress and fracture toughness were affected by particle size. In addition, the following were studied: technique of mass production, observation of fine structures, analysis of thermal stress, thermal shock resistance, and friction and abrasion characteristics. 13 refs., 65 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Layered microporous polymers by solvent knitting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaolei; Zhang, Chengxin; Shu, Yu; Jiang, Shulan; Xia, Qi; Chen, Linjiang; Jin, Shangbin; Hussain, Irshad; Cooper, Andrew I; Tan, Bien

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, especially 2D organic nanomaterials with unprecedentedly diverse and controlled structure, have attracted decent scientific interest. Among the preparation strategies, the top-down approach is one of the considered low-cost and scalable strategies to obtain 2D organic nanomaterials. However, some factors of their layered counterparts limited the development and potential applications of 2D organic nanomaterials, such as type, stability, and strict synthetic conditions of layered counterparts. We report a class of layered solvent knitting hyper-cross-linked microporous polymers (SHCPs) prepared by improving Friedel-Crafts reaction and using dichloroalkane as an economical solvent, stable electrophilic reagent, and external cross-linker at low temperature, which could be used as layered counterparts to obtain previously unknown 2D SHCP nanosheets by method of ultrasonic-assisted solvent exfoliation. This efficient and low-cost strategy can produce previously unreported microporous organic polymers with layered structure and high surface area and gas storage capacity. The pore structure and surface area of these polymers can be controlled by tuning the chain length of the solvent, the molar ratio of AlCl 3 , and the size of monomers. Furthermore, we successfully obtain an unprecedentedly high-surface area HCP material (3002 m 2 g -1 ), which shows decent gas storage capacity (4.82 mmol g -1 at 273 K and 1.00 bar for CO 2 ; 12.40 mmol g -1 at 77.3 K and 1.13 bar for H 2 ). This finding provides an opportunity for breaking the constraint of former knitting methods and opening up avenues for the design and synthesis of previously unknown layered HCP materials.

  10. Development of a Highly Efficient Hybrid White Organic-Light-Emitting Diode with a Single Emission Layer by Solution Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Yi; Chen, Show-An

    2018-02-07

    We use a mixed host, 2,6-bis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]pyridine blended with 20 wt % tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine, to lower the hole-injection barrier, along with the bipolar and high-photoluminescence-quantum-yield (Φ p = 84%), blue thermally activated delay fluorescence (TADF) material of 9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine-2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine (DMAC-TRZ) as a blue dopant to compose the emission layer for the fabrication of a TADF blue organic-light-emitting diode (BOLED). The device is highly efficient with the following performance parameters: maximum brightness (B max ) = 57586 cd/m 2 , maximum current efficiency (CE max ) = 35.3 cd/A, maximum power efficiency (PE max ) = 21.4 lm/W, maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE max ) = 14.1%, and CIE coordinates (0.18, 0.42). This device has the best performance recorded among the reported solution-processed TADF BOLEDs and has a low efficiency roll-off: at brightness values of 1000 and 5000 cd/m 2 , its CEs are close, being 35.1 and 30.1 cd/A, respectively. Upon further doping of the red phosphor Ir(dpm)PQ 2 (emission peak λ max = 595 nm) into the blue emission layer, we obtained a TADF-phosphor hybrid white organic-light-emitting diode (T-P hybrid WOLED) with high performance: B max = 43594 cd/m 2 , CE max = 28.8 cd/A, PE max = 18.1 lm/W, and CIE coordinates (0.38, 0.44). This B max = 43594 cd/m 2 is better than that of the vacuum-deposited WOLED with a blue TADF emitter, 10000 cd/m 2 . This is also the first report on a T-P hybrid WOLED with a solution-processed emitting layer.

  11. On the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tool for the effective machining of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Rao, Balkrishna C.

    2017-01-01

    This work is focused on the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tungsten carbide tool for machining titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. A hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to synthesize diamond films on tungsten carbide tools. A boron-doped diamond interlayer was added to a microcrystalline diamond layer in an attempt to improve the interface adhesion strength. The dual-layered diamond-coated tool was employed in machining at cutting speeds in the range of 70 to 150 m min-1 with a lower feed and a lower depth of cut of 0.5 mm rev-1 and 0.5 mm, respectively, to operate in the transition from adhesion- to diffusion-tool-wear and thereby arrive at suitable conditions for enhancing tool life. The proposed tool was then compared, on the basis of performance under real-time cutting conditions, with commercially available microcrystalline diamond, nanocrystalline diamond, titanium nitride and uncoated tungsten carbide tools. The life and surface finish of the proposed dual-layered tool and uncoated tungsten carbide were also investigated in interrupted cutting such as milling. The results of this study show a significant improvement in tool life and finish of Ti-6Al-4V parts machined with the dual-layered diamond-coated tool when compared with its uncoated counterpart. These results pave the way for the use of a low-cost tool, with respect to, polycrystalline diamond for enhancing both tool life and machining productivity in critical sectors fabricating parts out of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The application of this coating technology can also be extended to the machining of non-ferrous alloys owing to its better adhesion strength.

  12. On the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tool for the effective machining of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Rao, Balkrishna C; Ramachandra Rao, M S

    2017-01-01

    This work is focused on the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tungsten carbide tool for machining titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. A hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to synthesize diamond films on tungsten carbide tools. A boron-doped diamond interlayer was added to a microcrystalline diamond layer in an attempt to improve the interface adhesion strength. The dual-layered diamond-coated tool was employed in machining at cutting speeds in the range of 70 to 150 m min −1 with a lower feed and a lower depth of cut of 0.5 mm rev −1 and 0.5 mm, respectively, to operate in the transition from adhesion- to diffusion-tool-wear and thereby arrive at suitable conditions for enhancing tool life. The proposed tool was then compared, on the basis of performance under real-time cutting conditions, with commercially available microcrystalline diamond, nanocrystalline diamond, titanium nitride and uncoated tungsten carbide tools. The life and surface finish of the proposed dual-layered tool and uncoated tungsten carbide were also investigated in interrupted cutting such as milling. The results of this study show a significant improvement in tool life and finish of Ti-6Al-4V parts machined with the dual-layered diamond-coated tool when compared with its uncoated counterpart. These results pave the way for the use of a low-cost tool, with respect to, polycrystalline diamond for enhancing both tool life and machining productivity in critical sectors fabricating parts out of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The application of this coating technology can also be extended to the machining of non-ferrous alloys owing to its better adhesion strength. (paper)

  13. Contributions of Early Versus Later-Generated Cortical Layers to the Development of Laminar Patterns in Ferret Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-17

    Sheng, J.G., Mrak, R.E., and Griffin, W.S.T. S100 protein expression in Alzheimer Disease: Potential role in the pathogenesis of neuritic plaques. J...Variance Observations Hypothesized Mean Difference eft tStat P(T<=t) one-tail t Critical one-tail P(T<=t) two-tail t Critical two-tail Layer 4 t-Test: Two...0.869353949 3.182449291 181 Mean Variance Observations Hypothesized Mean Difference eft tStat P(T<=t) one-tail t Critical one-tail P(T<=t) two-tail t

  14. Potentialities of the sol-gel route to develop cathode and electrolyte thick layers Application to SOFC systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lenormand, Pascal; Rieu, Mathilde; Cienfuegos, René Fabian; Julbe, Anne; Castillo, Simone; Ansart, Florence

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report the potential of sol–gel process to prepare cathode and electrolyte thin and thick layers on anodic NiO-YSZ supports which were also made from powders prepared by sol–gel route. YSZ and La2 − xNiO4 + δ, La4Ni3O10 were synthesized as electrolyte and cathode materials for SOFC applications. For electrolyte shaping, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y2O3) thick films were cast onto porous NiO-YSZ composite substrates by a dip-coating process using a new suspension formu...

  15. PathfinderTURB: an automatic boundary layer algorithm. Development, validation and application to study the impact on in situ measurements at the Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Poltera

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the PathfinderTURB algorithm for the analysis of ceilometer backscatter data and the real-time detection of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer. Two aerosol layer heights are retrieved by PathfinderTURB: the convective boundary layer (CBL and the continuous aerosol layer (CAL. PathfinderTURB combines the strengths of gradient- and variance-based methods and addresses the layer attribution problem by adopting a geodesic approach. The algorithm has been applied to 1 year of data measured by two ceilometers of type CHM15k, one operated at the Aerological Observatory of Payerne (491 m a.s.l. on the Swiss plateau and one at the Kleine Scheidegg (2061 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps. The retrieval of the CBL has been validated at Payerne using two reference methods: (1 manual detections of the CBL height performed by human experts using the ceilometer backscatter data; (2 values of CBL heights calculated using the Richardson's method from co-located radio sounding data. We found average biases as small as 27 m (53 m with respect to reference method 1 (method 2. Based on the excellent agreement between the two reference methods, PathfinderTURB has been applied to the ceilometer data at the mountainous site of the Kleine Scheidegg for the period September 2014 to November 2015. At this site, the CHM15k is operated in a tilted configuration at 71° zenith angle to probe the atmosphere next to the Sphinx Observatory (3580 m a.s.l. on the Jungfraujoch (JFJ. The analysis of the retrieved layers led to the following results: the CAL reaches the JFJ 41 % of the time in summer and 21 % of the time in winter for a total of 97 days during the two seasons. The season-averaged daily cycles show that the CBL height reaches the JFJ only during short periods (4 % of the time, but on 20 individual days in summer and never during winter. During summer in particular, the CBL and the CAL modify the

  16. molecules in a functionalized layered double hydroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    included within the functionalized Mg–Al layered double hydroxide solid are similar to that of dilute so- lutions of the PAH in non-polar ... thermally stable over a wide temperature range with their emission properties practically unaltered. Keywords. Layered double ..... deformation, C–C skeletal stretch. 1020. 1024. 1024. –.

  17. Thermally stable antireflective coatings based on nanoporous organosilicate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhan; Cho, Jinhan; Char, Kookheon

    2007-06-05

    Thermally stable nanoporous organosilicate thin films were realized by the microphase separation of pore-generating polymers mixed with an organosilicate matrix to be antireflective coatings (ARCs), for which a thin film with a refractive index (n) of 1.23 for zero reflection is required. The refractive index of such nanoporous organosilicate films can be tuned from 1.39 down to 1.23 by incorporating nanopores within the films. With a nanoporous single layer with n approximately 1.23, the light transmittance of the glass above 99.8% was achieved in the visible range (lambda approximately 550 nm). To overcome the limitation on the narrow wavelength for high transmittance imposed by a single antireflective nanoporous thin film, bilayer thin films with different refractive indices were prepared by placing a high refractive index layer with a refractive index of 1.45 below the nanoporous thin film. UV-vis transmittance of a glass coated with the bilayer films was compared with nanoporous single-layer films and it is demonstrated that the novel broadband antireflection coatings in a wide range of visible wavelength can be easily obtained by the organosilicate bilayer thin films described in this study. Also, ARCs developed in this study demonstrate excellent AR durability owing to the hydrophobic nature of the organosilicate matrix.

  18. Air Stable Photovoltaic Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A method of forming a conducting polymer based photovoltaic device comprising the steps of : (a) providing a transparent first electrode; (b) providing the transparent first electrode with a layer of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein the metal oxide is selected from the group consisting of : TiO...

  19. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  20. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torreão Dassen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    We develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. We present algorithms to compute both Gram-Schmidt and reduced bases in this generalized setting. A layered lattice can be seen as lattices where certain directions have infinite weight. It can also be