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Sample records for stable isotopes 15n

  1. Liver function tests using the stable isotope /sup 15/N

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    Faust, H; Jung, K; Hirschberg, K; Krumbiegel, P; Junghans, P; Reinhardt, R; Matkowitz, R; Teichmann, B

    1988-01-01

    Several liver function tests using oral application of a nitrogen compound labelled with /sup 15/N and the subsequent determination of /sup 15/N in a certain fraction of urine or in the total urine by emission spectrometry are described. Because of the key function of the liver in the metabolism of nitrogen compounds, the results of these tests allow conclusions concerning some disturbances of liver functions.

  2. Stable isotope sup 15 N-urea and clinical research in nephrology

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    Sugino, Nobuhiro; Arai, Junko; Akimoto, Mitsuko; Miwa, Toichiro; Takuma, Takehide (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1990-08-01

    Stable isotope {sup 15}N-compound, {sup 15}N-urea, is useful marker to investigate nitrogen metabolism in clinical nephrology, particularly in chronic renal failure or dialysis. {sup 15}N-urea incorporation into plasma albumin in addition to plasma {sup 15}N disappearance was studied in 6 patients with endstage chronic renal failure. As a result, only minor fraction of administered {sup 15}N-urea was incorporated into albumin in this study. In addition, it was also confirmed that high energy diet may promote protein synthesis through {sup 15}N incorporation to plasma amino acids, such as alanine, in these patients with low protein meal. Therefore, administration of {sup 15}N-compound to human subjects may contribute to provide us the important informations on nitrogen metabolism. For instance, urea kinetics are described in the endstage chronic renal failure in this review. However, less expensive {sup 15}N-compounds should be provided and more simple but accurate measurement of {sup 15}N activity should be developed for the further clinical application of the stable isotope. (author).

  3. Stable isotope 15N-urea and clinical research in nephrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Nobuhiro; Arai, Junko; Akimoto, Mitsuko; Miwa, Toichiro; Takuma, Takehide

    1990-01-01

    Stable isotope 15 N-compound, 15 N-urea, is useful marker to investigate nitrogen metabolism in clinical nephrology, particularly in chronic renal failure or dialysis. 15 N-urea incorporation into plasma albumin in addition to plasma 15 N disappearance was studied in 6 patients with endstage chronic renal failure. As a result, only minor fraction of administered 15 N-urea was incorporated into albumin in this study. In addition, it was also confirmed that high energy diet may promote protein synthesis through 15 N incorporation to plasma amino acids, such as alanine, in these patients with low protein meal. Therefore, administration of 15 N-compound to human subjects may contribute to provide us the important informations on nitrogen metabolism. For instance, urea kinetics are described in the endstage chronic renal failure in this review. However, less expensive 15 N-compounds should be provided and more simple but accurate measurement of 15 N activity should be developed for the further clinical application of the stable isotope. (author)

  4. Applications of stable isotopes of 2H, 13C and 15N to clinical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, P.D.; Szczepanik, P.A.; Hachey, D.L.

    1974-01-01

    The function of the Argonne Program is to provide synthetic, analytical instrumental capability in a core facility for the clinical investigator who needs to use 2 H, 13 C, or 15 N labelled compounds for metabolic or clinical research on pregnant women, newborn infants, young children, or for mass screening. To carry out such application development, there were six stages which were recurrent steps in every application. Five fundamental strategies should be adopted to establish the use of stable isotopes in clinical work. The instrument required for measurements was a combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, and its use was schematically illustrated. Some of the successful experiences with compounds labelled by stable isotopes, such as deuterium labelled chenodeoxycholic acid, and respective 13 C and 15 N-labelled glycine were described. Deutrium labelled bile acid enabled easy and safe determination of the size of the bile acid pool and the replacement rate, providing clearer diagnoses for cholestatic liver disease and gallstones. 13 C and 15 N labelled compounds were used in clinical studies, of children with genetic disorders of amino acid metabolism, i.e., non ketotic hyperflycinemia, B 12 -responsive methyl malonic acidemia, and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. 15 N-labelled glycine was also studied in a child with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. (Mukohata, S.)

  5. Diet-tissue stable isotope (Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N) discrimination factors for multiple tissues from terrestrial reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Ronnie; Lemm, Jeffrey M; Pasachnik, Stesha A; Kurle, Carolyn M

    2016-01-15

    Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool for reconstructing trophic interactions to better understand drivers of community ecology. Taxon-specific stable isotope discrimination factors contribute to the best use of this tool. We determined the first Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N values for Rock Iguanas (Cyclura spp.) to better understand isotopic fractionation and estimate wild reptile foraging ecology. The Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N values between diet and skin, blood, and scat were determined from juvenile and adult iguanas held for 1 year on a known diet. We measured relationships between iguana discrimination factors and size/age and quantified effects of lipid extraction and acid treatment on stable isotope values from iguana tissues. Isotopic and elemental compositions were determined by Dumas combustion using an elemental analyzer coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer using standards of known composition. The Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N values ranged from -2.5 to +6.5‰ and +2.2 to +7.5‰, respectively, with some differences among tissues and between juveniles and adults. The Δ(13)C values from blood and skin differed among species, but not the Δ(15)N values. The Δ(13)C values from blood and skin and Δ(15)N values from blood were positively correlated with size/age. The Δ(13)C values from scat were negatively correlated with size (not age). Treatment with HCl (scat) and lipid extraction (skin) did not affect the isotope values. These results should aid in the understanding of processes driving stable carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination factors in reptiles. We provide estimates of Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N values and linear relationships between iguana size/age and discrimination factors for the best interpretation of wild reptile foraging ecology. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Stable isotope tracking of endangered sea turtles: validation with satellite telemetry and δ15N analysis of amino acids.

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    Jeffrey A Seminoff

    Full Text Available Effective conservation strategies for highly migratory species must incorporate information about long-distance movements and locations of high-use foraging areas. However, the inherent challenges of directly monitoring these factors call for creative research approaches and innovative application of existing tools. Highly migratory marine species, such as marine turtles, regularly travel hundreds or thousands of kilometers between breeding and feeding areas, but identification of migratory routes and habitat use patterns remains elusive. Here we use satellite telemetry in combination with compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids to confirm that insights from bulk tissue stable isotope analysis can reveal divergent migratory strategies and within-population segregation of foraging groups of critically endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea across the Pacific Ocean. Among the 78 turtles studied, we found a distinct dichotomy in δ(15N values of bulk skin, with distinct "low δ(15N" and "high δ(15N" groups. δ(15N analysis of amino acids confirmed that this disparity resulted from isotopic differences at the base of the food chain and not from differences in trophic position between the two groups. Satellite tracking of 13 individuals indicated that their bulk skin δ(15N value was linked to the particular foraging region of each turtle. These findings confirm that prevailing marine isoscapes of foraging areas can be reflected in the isotopic compositions of marine turtle body tissues sampled at nesting beaches. We use a Bayesian mixture model to show that between 82 and 100% of the 78 skin-sampled turtles could be assigned with confidence to either the eastern Pacific or western Pacific, with 33 to 66% of all turtles foraging in the eastern Pacific. Our forensic approach validates the use of stable isotopes to depict leatherback turtle movements over broad spatial ranges and is timely for establishing wise conservation

  7. Stable isotope tracking of endangered sea turtles: validation with satellite telemetry and δ15N analysis of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Benson, Scott R; Arthur, Karen E; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H; Tapilatu, Ricardo F; Popp, Brian N

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation strategies for highly migratory species must incorporate information about long-distance movements and locations of high-use foraging areas. However, the inherent challenges of directly monitoring these factors call for creative research approaches and innovative application of existing tools. Highly migratory marine species, such as marine turtles, regularly travel hundreds or thousands of kilometers between breeding and feeding areas, but identification of migratory routes and habitat use patterns remains elusive. Here we use satellite telemetry in combination with compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids to confirm that insights from bulk tissue stable isotope analysis can reveal divergent migratory strategies and within-population segregation of foraging groups of critically endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) across the Pacific Ocean. Among the 78 turtles studied, we found a distinct dichotomy in δ(15)N values of bulk skin, with distinct "low δ(15)N" and "high δ(15)N" groups. δ(15)N analysis of amino acids confirmed that this disparity resulted from isotopic differences at the base of the food chain and not from differences in trophic position between the two groups. Satellite tracking of 13 individuals indicated that their bulk skin δ(15)N value was linked to the particular foraging region of each turtle. These findings confirm that prevailing marine isoscapes of foraging areas can be reflected in the isotopic compositions of marine turtle body tissues sampled at nesting beaches. We use a Bayesian mixture model to show that between 82 and 100% of the 78 skin-sampled turtles could be assigned with confidence to either the eastern Pacific or western Pacific, with 33 to 66% of all turtles foraging in the eastern Pacific. Our forensic approach validates the use of stable isotopes to depict leatherback turtle movements over broad spatial ranges and is timely for establishing wise conservation efforts in

  8. Stable isotope analysis (δ (13)C and δ (15)N) of soil nematodes from four feeding groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody, Carol; Griffiths, Bryan; Dyckmans, Jens; Schmidt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Soil nematode feeding groups are a long-established trophic categorisation largely based on morphology and are used in ecological indices to monitor and analyse the biological state of soils. Stable isotope ratio analysis ((13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N, expressed as δ (13)C and δ (15)N) has provided verification of, and novel insights into, the feeding ecology of soil animals such as earthworms and mites. However, isotopic studies of soil nematodes have been limited to date as conventional stable isotope ratio analysis needs impractically large numbers of nematodes (up to 1,000) to achieve required minimum sample weights (typically >100 µg C and N). Here, micro-sample near-conventional elemental analysis-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (μEA-IRMS) of C and N using microgram samples (typically 20 µg dry weight), was employed to compare the trophic position of selected soil nematode taxa from four feeding groups: predators (Anatonchus and Mononchus), bacterial feeders (Plectus and Rhabditis), omnivores (Aporcelaimidae and Qudsianematidae) and plant feeder (Rotylenchus). Free-living nematodes were collected from conventionally and organically managed arable soils. As few as 15 nematodes, for omnivores and predators, were sufficient to reach the 20 µg dry weight target. There was no significant difference in δ (15)N (p = 0.290) or δ (13)C (p = 0.706) between conventional and organic agronomic treatments but, within treatments, there was a significant difference in N and C stable isotope ratios between the plant feeder, Rotylenchus (δ (15)N = 1.08 to 3.22 mUr‰, δ (13)C = -29.58 to -27.87 mUr) and all other groups. There was an average difference of 9.62 mUr in δ (15)N between the plant feeder and the predator group (δ (15)N = 9.89 to 12.79 mUr, δ (13)C = -27.04 to -25.51 mUr). Isotopic niche widths were calculated as Bayesian derived standard ellipse areas and were smallest for the plant feeder (1.37 mUr(2)) and the predators (1.73 mUr(2)), but largest for

  9. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N of soil nematodes from four feeding groups

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    Carol Melody

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil nematode feeding groups are a long-established trophic categorisation largely based on morphology and are used in ecological indices to monitor and analyse the biological state of soils. Stable isotope ratio analysis (13C/12C and 15N/14N, expressed as δ13C and δ15N has provided verification of, and novel insights into, the feeding ecology of soil animals such as earthworms and mites. However, isotopic studies of soil nematodes have been limited to date as conventional stable isotope ratio analysis needs impractically large numbers of nematodes (up to 1,000 to achieve required minimum sample weights (typically >100 µg C and N. Here, micro-sample near-conventional elemental analysis–isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (μEA–IRMS of C and N using microgram samples (typically 20 µg dry weight, was employed to compare the trophic position of selected soil nematode taxa from four feeding groups: predators (Anatonchus and Mononchus, bacterial feeders (Plectus and Rhabditis, omnivores (Aporcelaimidae and Qudsianematidae and plant feeder (Rotylenchus. Free-living nematodes were collected from conventionally and organically managed arable soils. As few as 15 nematodes, for omnivores and predators, were sufficient to reach the 20 µg dry weight target. There was no significant difference in δ15N (p = 0.290 or δ13C (p = 0.706 between conventional and organic agronomic treatments but, within treatments, there was a significant difference in N and C stable isotope ratios between the plant feeder, Rotylenchus (δ15N = 1.08 to 3.22 mUr‰, δ13C = –29.58 to –27.87 mUr and all other groups. There was an average difference of 9.62 mUr in δ15N between the plant feeder and the predator group (δ15N = 9.89 to 12.79 mUr, δ13C = –27.04 to –25.51 mUr. Isotopic niche widths were calculated as Bayesian derived standard ellipse areas and were smallest for the plant feeder (1.37 mUr2 and the predators (1.73 mUr2, but largest for omnivores (3.83 mUr2

  10. Mercury and stable isotopes15N and δ13C as tracers during the ontogeny of Trichiurus lepturus

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    Ana Paula Madeira Di Beneditto

    Full Text Available This study applies total mercury (THg concentration and stable isotope signature (δ15N and δ13C to evaluate the trophic status and feeding ground of Trichiurus lepturus during its ontogeny in northern Rio de Janeiro, south-eastern Brazil. The trophic position of T. lepturus is detected well by THg and δ15N as the sub-adult planktivorous specimens are distinct from the adult carnivorous specimens. The δ13C signatures suggest a feeding ground associated with marine coastal waters that are shared by fish in different ontogenetic phases. The diet tracers indicated that the fish feeding habits do not vary along seasons of the year, probably reflecting the prey availability in the study area. This fish has economic importance and the concentration of THg was compared to World Health Organization limit, showing that the adult specimens of T. lepturus are very close to the tolerable limit for safe regular ingestion.

  11. Traceability of animal meals in Japanese quail eggs using the technique of 13C e 15N* stable isotopes

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    C Mori

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to trace the inclusion of bovine meat and bone meal (BMBM in the diet of Japanese quails by analyzing eggs and egg fractions (yolk and albumen by the technique of carbon-13 (13C and nitrogen-15 (15N stable isotopes. In the trial, 120 Japanese quails were distributed in six treatments with four replicates of five birds each. The following treatments were applied: feed based on corn and soybean meal, containing graded BMBM inclusions (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5%. After 42 days, 20 eggs per treatment were randomly collected for three consecutive days. Ten eggs were used for yolk and albumen sample collection, and ten for total egg sample collection. It was possible to detect the dietary inclusion of 1% BMBM in the egg and its fractions. Therefore, the technique of isotopes 13C and 15N is able of tracing since 1% inclusion level of BMBM in the diet of Japanese quails in eggs and their fractions.

  12. Nitrogen acquisition, transport and metabolism in intact ectomycorrhizal associations studied by 15N stable isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, H.

    1993-05-01

    The focus of this thesis is on the external mycelium and its role in nitrogen uptake, assimilation and translocation. Tree seedlings in association with ectomycorrhizal fungi were grown in observation chambers. The fungal mycelium were fed with 15-N ammonium or 15-N nitrate or a combination of both. The effects of Collembola on the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis were also studied. The results demonstrates an important role of the external mycelium of Paxillus involutus not only in the uptake but also in the assimilation of ammonium into a variety of different amino acids, primarily glutamine but also glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine, immediately after uptake. The results indicate that ammonium is assimilated by GS and GOGAT or GDH in the mycelium at the uptake site. When nitrate was added to the mycelium as the sole nitrogen source nitrate was reduced in the mycelium and the product assimilated into amino acids. When ammonium nitrate was supplied to the fungal mycelium nitrate was taken up the fungus and transferred to the plant, however, apparently no assimilation of nitrate occurred in the external mycelium. Ammonium or an assimilation product, such as glutamine, probably represses nitrate reductase (NR) but not nitrate uptake and transfer in P. involutus. P. involutus nitrogen uptake and transfer to the associated mycorrhizal pine was up to 76% higher when low numbers of the Collembola Onychiurus armatus were present compared to when they were completely absent. This was probably an indirect effect as P. involutus hyphal growth rate and extramatrical biomass increased at a low Collembola density. At high Collembola densities P. involutus hyphal growth rate was retarded. (74 refs.)

  13. Tracking spatial distribution of human-derived wastewater from Davis Station, East Antarctica, using δ15N and δ13C stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, Patricia A.; King, Catherine K.; Mondon, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Elevated δ15N and δ13C observed in fish tissue up to 4 km from the Davis Station wastewater outfall. • δ15N decreased stepwise with concentrations decreasing with distance from the discharge point. • The trend observed for δ13C almost mirrored δ15N. • Current wastewater treatment practices are insufficient to avoid uptake of contaminants in fish. - Abstract: Stable isotope ratios, δ15N and δ13C were effectively used to determine the geographical dispersion of human derived sewage from Davis Station, East Antarctica, using Antarctic rock cod (Trematomus bernacchii). Fish within 0–4 km downstream of the outfall exhibited higher δ15N and δ13C values relative to reference sites. Nitrogen in particular showed a stepped decrease in δ15N with increasing distance from the discharge point by 1–2‰. Stable isotopes were better able to detect the extent of wastewater contamination than other techniques including faecal coliform and sterol measures. Uptake and assimilation of δ15N and δ13C up to 4 km from the outfall adds to growing evidence indicating the current level of wastewater treatment at Davis Station is not sufficient to avoid impact to the surrounding environment. Isotopic assimilation in T. bernacchii is a viable biomarker for investigation of initial sewage exposure and longer term monitoring in the future

  14. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on gas exchange and stable isotope ratio of δ13C, δ15N of leymus chinensis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Weiqi; Wang Guoan; Li Xiaolin

    2008-01-01

    Leymus chinensis, one of dominant species in Inner Mongolia grassland, was selected to evaluate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on plant gas change parameters and stable isotope ratio in pot culture. The plant was inoculated with two mycorrhizal fungi, Glomus intraradices and Glomus claroidum, and the uninoculated plant was used as the control check. On the 45th , 60th , 75th days after sowing, gas exchange parameters and stable isotope ratio were measured. The results showed that AM infection promoted phosphoms content, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate of Leymus chinensis, reduced host δ 15 N, however, it did not influence host intrinsic water using efficiency and δ 13 C. It was the growth time that significantly affected the gas exchange and stable isotope ratio of δ 13 C and δ 15 N. And the interaction of inoculation and growth time also influenced on the net photosynthetic rate, δ 13 C and δ 15 N of the host. Stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate were always changed the same direction by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi causing no significant difference between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plant. AMF absorbed nitrogen and accumulated δ 15 N, thus, it transformed less 15 N into the host, and as a result, the mycorrhizal plant had lower δ 15 N. Therefore, the results gave a new way and reference to know of the grass balance of carbon gain and water cost and the nitrogen cycle in grassland. (authors)

  15. Correlation between the synthetic origin of methamphetamine samples and their {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C stable isotope ratios

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    Billault, Isabelle [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France)]. E-mail: Isabelle.Billault@univ-nantes.fr; Courant, Frederique [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Pasquereau, Leo [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Derrien, Solene [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Robins, Richard J. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Naulet, Norbert [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France)

    2007-06-12

    The active ingredient of ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methyldioxyphenylisopropylamine (MDMA) can be manufactured by a number of easy routes from simple precursors. We have synthesised 45 samples of MDMA following the five most common routes using N-precursors from 12 different origins and three different precursors for the aromatic moiety. The {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N contents of both the precursors and the MDMA samples derived therefrom were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). We show that within-pathway correlation between the {sup 15}N content of the precursor and that of the derived MDMA can be strong but that no general pattern of correlation can be defined. Rather, it is evident that the {delta} {sup 15}N values of MDMA are strongly influenced by a combination of the {delta} {sup 15}N values of the source of nitrogen used, the route by which the MDMA is synthesised, and the experimental conditions employed. Multivariate analysis (PCA) based on the {delta} {sup 15}N values of the synthetic MDMA and of the {delta} {sup 15}N and {delta} {sup 13}C values of the N-precursors leads to good discrimination between the majority of the reaction conditions tested.

  16. Correlation between the synthetic origin of methamphetamine samples and their 15N and 13C stable isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billault, Isabelle; Courant, Frederique; Pasquereau, Leo; Derrien, Solene; Robins, Richard J.; Naulet, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    The active ingredient of ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methyldioxyphenylisopropylamine (MDMA) can be manufactured by a number of easy routes from simple precursors. We have synthesised 45 samples of MDMA following the five most common routes using N-precursors from 12 different origins and three different precursors for the aromatic moiety. The 13 C and 15 N contents of both the precursors and the MDMA samples derived therefrom were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). We show that within-pathway correlation between the 15 N content of the precursor and that of the derived MDMA can be strong but that no general pattern of correlation can be defined. Rather, it is evident that the δ 15 N values of MDMA are strongly influenced by a combination of the δ 15 N values of the source of nitrogen used, the route by which the MDMA is synthesised, and the experimental conditions employed. Multivariate analysis (PCA) based on the δ 15 N values of the synthetic MDMA and of the δ 15 N and δ 13 C values of the N-precursors leads to good discrimination between the majority of the reaction conditions tested

  17. Improved diffusion technique for 15N:14N analysis of ammonium and nitrate from aqueous samples by stable isotope spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerges, T.; Dittert, K.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) by Dumas combustion and continuous flow mass spectrometry has become a wide-spread tool for the studies of N turnover. The speed and labor efficiency of 15N determinations from aqueous solutions such as soil solutions or soil extracts are often limited by sample preparation. Several procedures for the conversion of dissolved ammonium (NH4+) or nitrate NO3- to gaseous ammonia and its subsequent trapping in acidified traps have been elaborated in the last decades. They are based on the use of acidified filters kept either above the respective solution or in floating PTFE envelopes. In this paper, we present an improved diffusion method with a fixed PTFE trap. The diffusion containers are continuously kept in a vertical rotary shaker. Quantitative diffusion can thus be achieved in only three days. For solutions with NH4+ levels of only 1 mg N kg-1 and NO3- concentrations of 12 mg N kg-1, recovery rates of 98.8-102% were obtained. By addition of 15N labeled and non-labeled NH4+ and NO3- it was shown that no cross-contamination from NH4+ to NO3- or vice versa takes place even when one form is labeled to more than 1 at %15N while the other form has natural 15N content. The method requires no intermediate step of ammonia volatilization before NO3- conversion

  18. A new technique for the evaluation of the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to assimilate foods by using a stable isotope of nitrogen (15N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemiya, Muneyasu; Fujita, Yoshikuni; Yazima, Yoshitada; Okabe, Haruya

    1983-01-01

    A new technique is introduced for the evaluation of the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to assimilate foods by using a stable isotope of nitrogen ( 15 N) as a tracer. Four groups of male Wistar rats were fed 15 N-labeled rice for one day following a basal diet, composed of 87% poudered rice. Then, 15 N-labeled rice was switched to basal diet again for the next seven days. The four groups of rats consisted of: Group A-three pancreatic duct-ligated rats; Group B-four sham operated rats; Group C-five control rats and Group D-seven Streptozotocin-treated (20mg/kg) rats. The 15 N contents were measured in the stool, urine and sera collected before feeding of 15 N-labeled rice and one, three and seven days thereafter. In group A, the rate of 15 N excretion into the stools, i.e., the amount of 15 N in the stools against the total amount of 15 N consumed, was higher as compared to the control group throughout the period of the study. On the contrary, the rate of urinary excretion of 15 N as well as the contents of 15 N in the urine and sera were apparently lower. In group D, the rate of 15 N excretion into the stools as well as the contents of 15 N in the sera and urine showed no difference as compared to the control group. The rate of 15 N excretion into the urine, however, was apparently higher than that of the control group throughout the period of the study. These results indicate that this stable isotope of nitrogen ( 15 N), which clearly reveals the existence of malabsorption of pancreatic origin, is valuable as a tracer for assimilation studies and technically applicable for clinical use. We have found no evidence of malassimilation in rats with Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in spite of the presence of previous reports that assert the existence of pancreatic exocrine dysfunction in these animals. (author)

  19. Applications of stable isotopes of /sup 2/H, /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N to clinical problems. Experience of a collaborative program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P D; Szczepanik, P A; Hachey, D L [Argonne National Lab., Evanston, Ill. (USA)

    1974-08-01

    The function of the Argonne Program is to provide synthetic, analytical instrumental capability in a core facility for the clinical investigator who needs to use /sup 2/H, /sup 13/C, or /sup 15/N labelled compounds for metabolic or clinical research on pregnant women, newborn infants, young children, or for mass screening. To carry out such application development, there were six stages which were recurrent steps in every application. Five fundamental strategies should be adopted to establish the use of stable isotopes in clinical work. The instrument required for measurements was a combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, and its use was schematically illustrated. Some of the successful experiences with compounds labelled by stable isotopes, such as deuterium labelled chenodeoxycholic acid, and respective /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N-labelled glycine were described. Deutrium labelled bile acid enabled easy and safe determination of the size of the bile acid pool and the replacement rate, providing clearer diagnoses for cholestatic liver disease and gallstones. /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N labelled compounds were used in clinical studies, of children with genetic disorders of amino acid metabolism, i.e., non ketotic hyperflycinemia, B/sub 12/-responsive methyl malonic acidemia, and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. /sup 15/N-labelled glycine was also studied in a child with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

  20. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ (13)C and δ (15)N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Christopher D; Nelson, James A; Rozar, Katherine L; Adams, Charles S; Wall, Kara R; Switzer, Theodore S; Winner, Brent L; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus). We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt), against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ (13)C and δ (15)N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ (15)N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ (13)C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes and

  1. Stable Isotope Food Web Analysis of a Large Subtropical Lake: Alternative Explanations for 15N Enrichment of Pelagic vs. Littoral Fisheries

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    Karl E. Havens

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The food webs of littoral, pelagic, and littoral-pelagic ecotone (interface regions of a large subtropical lake were investigated using stable isotope ratio methods, expanding the focus of a previous fish-only study to include other food web components such as primary producers and invertebrates. In these food webs, δ13C increased ~4o/oo and δ15N increased ~10o/oo from primary producers to fish. The δ15N of fish was ~9o/oo in the littoral zone, ~10 o/oo in the ecotone, and ~12o/oo in the pelagic zone. The cross-habitat enrichment in fish 15N corresponded with both an increase in the size of fish and an increase in the δ15N of primary consumers (mollusks. Despite larger body size in the pelagic zone, fish in all three habitats appear to occur at the same average trophic level (TL = 4, assuming an enrichment factor of 3.4o/oo per trophic level, and normalizing to the δ15N of primary consumers.

  2. Clinical-scale investigation of stable isotopes in human blood: delta13C and delta15N from 406 patients at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Rebecca A; Jahren, A Hope; Saudek, Christopher D

    2008-11-01

    Objective chemical biomarkers are needed in clinical studies of diet-related diseases to supplement subjective self-reporting methods. We report on several critical experiments for the development of clinically legitimate dietary stable isotope biomarkers within human blood. Our examination of human blood revealed the following: (1) Within blood clot and serum from anonymous individuals (201 males, 205 females) we observed: mean serum delta13C = -19.1 +/- 0.8 per thousand (standard deviation, SD); clot, -19.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand (SD); range = -15.8 per thousand to -23.4 per thousand. Highly statistically significant differences are observed between clot and serum, males and females for both clot and serum. For 15N (n = 206), mean serum = +8.8 +/- 0.5 per thousand (SD); clot +7.4 +/- 0.4 per thousand (SD); range = +6.3 per thousand to +10.5 per thousand. Blood serum is enriched in 15N relative to blood clot by +1.4 per thousand on average, which may reflect differing protein amino acid content. Serum nitrogen is statistically significantly different for males and females, however, clot shows no statistical difference. (2) Relative to clot, capillary blood is marginally different for 13C, but not 15N. Clot 13C is not significantly different from serum; however, it is depleted in 15N by 1.5 per thousand relative to serum. (3) We assessed the effect of blood additives (sodium fluoride and polymerized acrylamide resin) and laboratory process (autoclaving, freeze drying) commonly used to preserve or prepare venous blood. On average, no alteration in delta13C or delta15N is detected compared with unadulterated blood from the same individual. (4) Storage of blood with and without the additives described above for a period of up to 115 days exhibits statistically significant differences for 13C and 15N for sodium fluoride. However, storage for unadulterated blood and blood preserved with polymerized acrylamide resin does not change the delta13C or delta15N isotopic

  3. Application of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15N and δ(13C to quantify food chain length and trophic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Perkins

    Full Text Available Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15N and carbon (δ(13C are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR using δ(15N, and carbon range (CR using δ(13C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ(15N or δ(13C from source to consumer between trophic levels and among food chains. δ(15N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰, and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ(13C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ(13C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority

  4. Application of Nitrogen and Carbon Stable Isotopes15N and δ13C) to Quantify Food Chain Length and Trophic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Matthew J.; McDonald, Robbie A.; van Veen, F. J. Frank; Kelly, Simon D.; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ15N, and carbon range (CR) using δ13C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ15N or δ13C from source to consumer) between trophic levels and among food chains. δ15N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰), and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ13C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ13C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority of ecological systems

  5. Application of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) to quantify food chain length and trophic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Matthew J; McDonald, Robbie A; van Veen, F J Frank; Kelly, Simon D; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N) and carbon (δ(13)C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ(15)N, and carbon range (CR) using δ(13)C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ(15)N or δ(13)C from source to consumer) between trophic levels and among food chains. δ(15)N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰), and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ(13)C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ(13)C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority of

  6. Application of 13C and 15N stable isotope probing to characterize RDX degrading microbial communities under different electron-accepting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun; Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Condee, Charles W.; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • SIP characterized RDX-degrading communities under different e-accepting conditions. • Dominant RDX degradation pathways differed under different e-accepting conditions. • More complete detoxification of RDX occurred under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions than under manganese(IV) and iron(III)-reducing conditions. - Abstract: This study identified microorganisms capable of using the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or its metabolites as carbon and/or nitrogen sources under different electron-accepting conditions using 13 C and 15 N stable isotope probing (SIP). Mesocosms were constructed using groundwater and aquifer solids from an RDX-contaminated aquifer. The mesocosms received succinate as a carbon source and one of four electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese(IV), iron(III), or sulfate) or no additional electron acceptor (to stimulate methanogenesis). When RDX degradation was observed, subsamples from each mesocosm were removed and amended with 13 C 3 - or ring- 15 N 3 -, nitro- 15 N 3 -, or fully-labeled 15 N 6 -RDX, followed by additional incubation and isolation of labeled nucleic acids. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA sequences, clustering in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, and Actinobacteria, were detected in the 13 C-DNA fractions. A total of twenty seven sequences were derived from different 15 N-DNA fractions, with the sequences clustered in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, and Clostridia. Interestingly, sequences identified as Desulfosporosinus sp. (in the Clostridia) were not only observed to incorporate the labeled 13 C or 15 N from labeled RDX, but also were detected under each of the different electron-accepting conditions. The data suggest that 13 C- and 15 N-SIP can be used to characterize microbial communities involved in RDX biodegradation, and that the dominant pathway of RDX biodegradation may differ under different electron-accepting conditions

  7. Stable isotope (δ"1"3C and δ"1"5N) based interpretation of organic matter source and paleoenvironmental conditions in Al-Azraq basin, Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Khaldoun; Davies, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen from cored lacustrine sediments of the Al-Azraq, an arid lake basin on the Jordan Plateau. Lacustrine sediments contain valuable records of paleoenvironmental conditions, recording local and regional responses to environmental change. Previous paleo-reconstructions on the Jordan Plateau are based on archaeology, pollen, mineralogy, and stratigraphy. The application of organic geochemistry analyses to these lake sediments identifies multiple sources of organic matter, biological production, and contributes to understanding the paleoenvironments of the Al-Azraq basin during the mid-Pleistocene period. Organic carbon concentration (Corg) provides an overview of the organic matter distribution. Carbon isotopic composition (δ13Corg) and nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) are indicators of organic matter sources and paleoproductivity. Magnetic susceptibility (MGSUS) measured the concentration of ferromagnetic minerals and indicated aeolian inputs. Organic geochemistry differentiated five paleoenvironmental zones with specific sources of organic matter, both aquatic and terrestrial. It identified a long period of climate wetter than the present, punctuated by a short intense period of aridity. Diagenesis plays an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and studies indicate this degradation can alter the isotopic signals of organic matter. Analyses of the isotopic signals and statistical analyses demonstrate diagenesis is not a factor in the Al-Azraq sediments in all but Zone 4 of the paleoenvironmental zones. This Zone is defined by less negative carbon isotopic composition and the presence of thick primary gypsum layers, in addition to the influx of high peaks of aeolian sediment as reflected in the magnetic susceptibility data. Stable isotope geochemistry provides detailed information on the paleoenvironments of lake sediments, and is applicable to typically challenging arid basin sediments

  8. Establishing spatial trends in water chemistry and stable isotopes15N and δ13C) in the Elwha River prior to dam removal and salmon recolonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, J.J.; Coe, H.J.; Morley, S.A.; Kloehn, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Two high-head dams on the Elwha River in Washington State (USA) have changed the migratory patterns of resident and anadromous fish, limiting Pacific salmon to the lower 7.9 km of a river that historically supported large Pacific salmon runs. To document the effects of the dams prior to their removal, we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of primary producers, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish, and water chemistry above, between and below the dams. We found that δ15N was significantly higher in fish, stoneflies, black flies, periphyton and macroalgae where salmon still have access. Fish and chloroperlid stoneflies were enriched in δ13C, but the values were more variable than in δ15N. For some taxa, there were also differences between the two river sections that lack salmon, suggesting that factors other than marine-derived nutrients are structuring longitudinal isotopic profiles. Consistent with trophic theory, macroalgae had the lowest δ15N, followed by periphyton, macroinvertebrates and fish, with a range of 6.9, 6.2 and 7.7‰ below, between, and above the dams, respectively. Water chemistry analyses confirmed earlier reports that the river is oligotrophic. Phosphorous levels in the Elwha were lower than those found in other regional rivers, with significant differences among regulated, unregulated and reference sections. The removal of these dams, among the largest of such projects ever attempted, is expected to facilitate the return of salmon and their marine-derived nutrients (MDN) throughout the watershed, possibly altering the food web structure, nutrient levels and stable isotope values that we documented.

  9. Use of stable nitrogen isotope 15N in investigating nitrogen uptake by plants from allylisothiocyanate decomposition products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolejskova, J.; Kovar, J.

    1976-01-01

    The assimilability of nitrogen from allylisothiocyanate or from its nitrogenous decomposition products by plants was investigated using 15 N-labelled allylisothiocyanate. The results show that plant nitrogen assimilation from allylisothiocyanate is the higher, the lower the total nitrogen content of the nutritive medium. (author)

  10. Stable Isotope (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S) Analysis and Satellite Telemetry Depict the Complexity of Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Diets in Southwest Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, A.; Watts, D. E.; Cohn, B. R.; Spencer, P.; Mangipane, B.; Welker, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Throughout Alaska, gray wolves (Canis lupus) are a top predator of large ungulates. While they primarily rely on ungulates such as moose (Alces alces) and caribou (Rangifer tarandus) as food, they are opportunistic and use alternative resources. The variation and supplemental protein sources in wolf diet has not been studied extensively on live animals currently using the landscape. With large seasonal influxes of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus sp.) into Alaska, terrestrial carnivore use of marine species is of particular interest. Using stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S) analysis of wolf guard hair and blood, this study aims to determine the proportion of marine derived nutrients (MDN) in the diet of wolf packs within and surrounding Lake Clark National Park and Preserve and Alaska Peninsula and Becharof National Wildlife Refuges in Southwest Alaska. Satellite telemetry from the animals sampled facilitates quantification of landscape use patterns in correspondence with isotopic traits. Wolf pack territories within and surrounding the Lake Clark region appear to vary in spatial extent and in availability of MDN, such as salmon. Initial analysis shows that two packs with smaller home ranges, centrally located around areas with greater salmon availability, have enriched δ15N values compared to packs that have larger home ranges not centralized around salmon spawning waters. This pattern of isotopic enrichment is found in red blood cells, blood serum and hair, representing diets over different time scales. The enrichment in both blood and hair indicates a sustained use of MDN over the previous six to nine months. In the Lake Clark region, simple mixing model estimates suggest that up to 30% of wolf pack diets may be from marine sources. In contrast, packs with larger home ranges and less access to salmon have stable isotope values representative of a terrestrial diet.

  11. Synthesis of 15N isotope labeled alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Claudineia R. de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Sant'Ana, Carlos Roberto; Tagliassachi, Romulo Barbieri; Maximo, Everaldo; Prestes, Clelber Vieira

    2005-01-01

    The application of light chemical elements and their stable isotopes in biological studies have been increased over the last years. The use of 15 N labeled amino acids is an important tool for elucidation of peptides structures. This paper describe a method for the synthesis of 15 N isotope labeled alanine at lower costs than international ones, as well as the details of the recovery system of the nitrogen residues. In the present work an amination of α-haloacids, with the bromopropionic carboxylic acid and labeled aqua ammonia ( 15 NH 3 aq) was carried out. In order to avoid eventually losses of 15 NH 3 , special cares were adopted, since the production cost is high. Although the acquisition cost of the 13 N (radioactive) labeled compounds is lower, the obtained stable tracer will allow the accomplishment of important studies of the nitrogen cycling in living things, less occupational and environment hazards, and the time limitation problems in field studies. The tests took place in triplicates with NH 3 (aq) being employed. With the establishment of the system for 15 NH 3 recovery, an average of 94 % of the ammonia employed in the synthesis process was recovered. The purity of the amino acid was state determined by TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography) and HPLC (High-Performance Liquid Chromatography) with a fluorescence detector. The Rf and the retention time of the synthesized sample were similar the sigma standard. Finally, regarding the established conditions, it was possible to obtain the alanine with a production cost about 40 % lower than the international price. (author)

  12. Trace elements and stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) in shallow and deep-water organisms from the East China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Agusa, Tetsuro; Mochizuki, Hiroko; Ramu, Karri; Inoue, Suguru; Kubodera, Tsunemi; Takahashi, Shin; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    Trace elements (22) and stable isotope ratios (δ 15 N and δ 13 C) were analyzed in marine organisms from shallow (SW) and deep-water (DW) of the East China Sea to understand biomagnification and prey source of trace elements. In the benthic marine organisms from DW, δ 15 N values were negatively correlated with Ba, Cu, Ag, Mo, Sr, As, and Co concentrations. This may be due to the specific accumulation in lower trophic animals and/or the biodilution through the food web in DW. Relationships between δ 15 N and concentrations of Co, Cr, Bi, and Tl in fish and Ag, Bi, V, Hg, and Tl in crustaceans showed positive correlations, suggesting that trophic position was affecting the concentrations of those elements in phyla, with higher trophic animals retaining higher concentrations than the lower trophic animals. Positive correlations between δ 13 C and Rb were observed in marine organisms. Therefore, Rb may be a possible substitute of δ 13 C as tracer of prey source in the East China Sea although further investigation is required. - This is the first study on trophic transfer and prey source of trace elements in marine organisms from the East China Sea

  13. Efficient Use of Organic Sources by Sorghum Plants Grown on Sand Soil Using "1"5N Stable Isotope Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Hassanin, A.S; Khalifa, A.M; Abdel Aziz, H.A; Galal, Y.G.M; Abdel Salam, M.F

    2015-01-01

    A green house experiment was conducted at Soil and Water Research Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Egypt. Different organic/bio fertilizer and mineral fertilizers were existed for detection and evaluation of sorghum crop response when grown on sand soils. Mineral fertilizer in the form of labeled ammonium sulfate with 2% "1"5N atom excess was applied at two rates of 200 and 400 mg N pot-1 and unfertilized control treatment also included. Different organic fertilizers such as compost, chicken manure and leucaena residues were applied at the same rates per pot according to its content of nitrogen. Sorghum plants treated with organic or mineral fertilizers were inoculated with Azotobacter chrooccocum as a representative of associative nitrogen fixing microorganisms. Un inoculated plants were also included. Completely randomized block design was followed for statistical analysis. Nitrogen use efficiency (%NUE) was estimated using the portion of N derived from mineral fertilizer. Experimental data released from this work could be summarized as following: Dry matter yield of stalks and roots were increased with increasing mineral fertilizer rates where the best increments detected at 100% N rate as compared to the unfertilized control

  14. Assessment of trace elements, POPs, 210Po and stable isotopes (15N and 13C) in a rare filter-feeding shark: The megamouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Jailson Fulgencio de; Merico, Agostino; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela; Silva, Josilene; Seixas, Tércia Guedes; Godoy, José Marcus de Oliveira; Saint’Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pollutants were analyzed in a megamouth shark found stranded in Brazilian coast. • Stable isotopes analyzes revealed a pelagic and filter-feeding habits of the shark. • Low levels of pollutants seem to be linked with the trophic ecology of the species. - Abstract: With less than 60 records being reported worldwide, the megamouth (Megachasma pelagios) is today one of the least known shark species inhabiting our oceans. Therefore, information concerning the biology and ecology of this enigmatic organism is very scarce and limited to feeding behaviour and preferred habitat. The present work reports new data on the concentrations of trace elements, organic mercury, POPs and 210 Po in hepatic and muscular tissues of a specimen found stranded in the southeastern coast of Brazil. Additionally, we provide new evidence based on stable isotope analysis (δ 15 N and δ 13 C) confirming the preference for the pelagic habitat and the zooplanktivorous feeding behaviour of the megamouth. These results are consistent with the low concentrations of organic pollutant compounds and other elements measured in our samples

  15. Heavy metals (As, Hg and V) and stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in fish from Yellow River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Guijian; Yuan, Zijiao; Liu, Houqi; Lam, Paul K S

    2018-02-01

    The Yellow River Estuary is a significant fishery, but at present there are few studies about the concentrations of arsenic (As), mercury (Hg) and vanadium (V) in fish from this area, which might cause potential health risk to fish consumers. The aim of this study was to research on the accumulation and potential sources of heavy metals in the fish of the Yellow River Estuary. Arsenic, Hg, V and stable isotope ratios (δ 15 N and δ 13 C) in 11 species of 129 fish were analyzed. Results showed that the concentrations of As and Hg were all lower than the guideline levels established by international organizations and legal limits by several countries. The mean concentrations of V in samples in this study were significantly higher than the results of previous studies on other regions. Arsenic, Hg and V significantly differed across species (PHg, which could be explained by the positive correlation between Hg concentrations and δ 15 N in fish. Through estimation of daily intake of inorganic As (iAs), Hg and V via fish consumption, the heavy metal contamination level of fish samples fell in an acceptable range, indicating no potentially hazardous for human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) perspective on human diet on Rapa Nui (Easter Island) ca. AD 1400-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commendador, Amy S; Dudgeon, John V; Finney, Bruce P; Fuller, Benjamin T; Esh, Kelley S

    2013-10-01

    Ecological and environmental evidence suggests that Rapa Nui was among the most marginally habitable islands in Eastern Polynesia, with only a fraction of the biotic diversity found on archipelagos to the west, and capable of sustaining many fewer cultigens traditionally transported by Polynesian colonizers. However, archaeological evidence for human dietary adaptations under such restrictions is limited. Little is known about the particulars of the subsistence base and dietary changes on Rapa Nui that may be associated with a hypothesized late prehistoric decline in the quality and diversity of food sources. To better understand prehistoric Rapa Nui diet we examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of human teeth along with archaeological faunal material thought to comprise the Rapa Nui food web. Our results indicate that contrary to previous zooarchaeological studies diet was predominantly terrestrial throughout the entire sequence of occupation, with reliance on rats, chickens and C3 plants. While a few individuals may have had access to higher trophic level marine resources, this is evident only later in time (generally post-AD 1600). A decline in (15)N through time was observed, and may be attributed to declines in available terrestrial proteins; however, presently we cannot rule out the effect of changing soil and plant baseline δ(15)N. Our results also suggest differential access to higher trophic level marine resources among contemporaneous populations, but more research is required to clarify this observation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Trace elements and stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in fish from deep-waters of the Sulu Sea and the Celebes Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Agusa, Tetsuro; Kubota, Reiji; Mochizuki, Hiroko; Ramu, Karri; Nishida, Shuhei; Ohta, Suguru; Yeh, Hsin-ming; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-01-01

    Trace elements (TEs) and stable isotope ratios (δ 15 N and δ 13 C) were analyzed in fish from deep-water of the Sulu Sea, the Celebes Sea and the Philippine Sea. Concentrations of V and Pb in pelagic fish from the Sulu Sea were higher than those from the Celebes Sea, whereas the opposite trend was observed for δ 13 C. High concentrations of Zn, Cu and Ag were found in non-migrant fish in deep-water, while Rb level was high in fish which migrate up to the epipelagic zone, probably resulting from differences in background levels of these TEs in each water environment or function of adaptation to deep-water by migrant and non-migrant species. Arsenic level in the Sulu Sea fish was positively correlated with δ 15 N, indicating biomagnification of arsenic. To our knowledge, this is the first study on relationship between diel vertical migration and TE accumulation in deep-water fish.

  18. A mantle origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Slave Craton: Evidence from 13C-, 15N- and 33,34S-stable isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartigny, Pierre; Farquhar, James; Thomassot, Emilie; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Wing, Bozwell; Masterson, Andy; McKeegan, Kevin; Stachel, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    In order to address diamond formation and origin in the lithospheric mantle underlying the Central Slave Craton, we report N- and C-stable isotopic compositions and N-contents and aggregation states for 85 diamonds of known paragenesis (73 peridotitic, 8 eclogitic and 4 from lower mantle) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Mine, Lac de Gras Area, Canada). For 12 peridotitic and two eclogitic sulfide inclusion-bearing diamonds from this sample set, we also report multiple-sulfur isotope ratios. The 73 peridotitic diamonds have a mean δ13C-value of - 5.2‰ and range from - 6.9 to - 3.0‰, with one extreme value at - 14.1‰. The associated δ15N-values range from - 17.0 to + 8.5‰ with a mean value of - 4.0‰. N-contents range from 0 to 1280 ppm. The 8 eclogitic diamonds have δ13C-values ranging from - 11.2 to - 4.4‰ with one extreme value at - 19.4‰. Their δ15N ranges from - 2.1 to + 7.9‰ and N-contents fall between 0 and 3452 ppm. Four diamonds with an inferred lower mantle origin are all Type II (i.e. nitrogen-free) and have a narrow range of δ13C values, between - 4.5 and - 3.5‰. The δ34S of the 14 analyzed peridotitic and eclogitic sulfide inclusions ranges from - 3.5 to +5.7‰. None of them provide evidence for anomalous δ33S-values; observed variations in δ33S are from +0.19 to - 0.33‰, i.e. within the 2 sigma uncertainties of mantle sulfur ( δ33S = 0‰). At Panda, the N contents and the δ13C of sulfide-bearing peridotitic diamonds show narrower ranges than silicate-bearing peridotitic diamonds. This evidence supports the earlier suggestion established from eclogitic diamonds from the Kaapvaal that sulfide-(±silicate) bearing diamonds sample a more restricted portion of sublithospheric mantle than silicate-(no sulfide) bearing diamonds. Our findings at Panda suggest that sulfide-bearing diamonds should be considered as a specific diamond population on a global-scale. Based on our study of δ34S, Δ 33S, δ15N and δ13C, we find no

  19. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) in marine zooplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerleau, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.pomerleau@umanitoba.ca [Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Kivioq 2, Nuuk 3900, Greenland (Denmark); Stern, Gary A.; Pućko, Monika [Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Foster, Karen L. [Foster Environmental, Peterborough, ON K9J 8L2 (Canada); Macdonald, Robie W. [Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Sidney, BC V8L 4B2 (Canada); Fortier, Louis [Québec-Océan, Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as “keystone” species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ{sup 15}N and lower δ{sup 13}C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. - Highlights: • Assessment of Pan-Arctic variability in zooplankton Hg concentrations • Increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea • Zooplankton plays a central role in the Hg pathway within Arctic marine food webs.

  20. A stable isotope ( δ13C, δ15N) model for the North Water food web: implications for evaluating trophodynamics and the flow of energy and contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Keith A.; Fisk, Aaron; Karnovsky, Nina; Holst, Meike; Gagnon, Jean-Marc; Fortier, Martin

    fundamentally in transferring energy and carbon flux to higher trophic-level seabirds and marine mammals. We measured PCB 153 among selected organisms to investigate the behavior of bioaccumulating contaminants within the food web. Our isotopic model confirmed the trophic magnification of PCB 153 in this high-Arctic food web due to a strong correlation between contaminant concentration and organism δ15N values, demonstrating the utility of combining isotopic and contaminant approaches to food-web studies. Stable-carbon isotope analysis confirmed an enrichment in 13C between POM and ice algae (-22.3 vs. -17.7‰). Benthic organisms were generally enriched in 13C compared to pelagic species. We discuss individual species isotopic data and the general utility of our stable isotope model for defining carbon flux and contaminant flow through the North Water food web.

  1. Stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N combined with conventional dietary approaches reveal plasticity in central-place foraging behaviour of little penguins (Eudyptula minor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre eChiaradia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine top and meso predators like seabirds are limited by the need to breed on land but forage on limited or patchily distributed resources at sea. Constraints imposed by such central-place foraging behaviour change during breeding or even disappear outside the breeding period when there is no immediate pressure to return to a central place. However, central place foraging is usually factored as an unchanging condition in life history studies. Here we used little penguin Eudyptula minor, a resident bird with one of the smallest foraging range among seabirds, to examine the different degree of pressure/constraints of being a central-place forager. We combined data on isotopic composition (δ13C and δ15N, conventional stomach contents and body mass of little penguins breeding at Phillip Island, Australia over nine years (2003-11. We explored relationships between diet and body mass in each stage of the breeding season (pre-laying, incubation, guard, and post-guard in years of high and low reproductive success. Values of δ13C and δ15N as well as isotopic niche width had similar patterns among years, with less variability later in the season when little penguins shorten their foraging range at the expected peak of their central-place foraging limitation. Body mass peaked before laying and hatching in preparation for the energetically demanding periods of egg production and chick provisioning. An increase of anchovy and barracouta in the diet, two major prey for little penguins, occurred at the critical stage of chick rearing. These intra-annual trends could be a response to imposed foraging constraints as reproduction progresses, while inter-annual trends could reflect their ability to match or mismatch the high energy demanding chick rearing period with the peak in availability of high-quality prey such as anchovy. Our findings underline the key advantages of using a stable isotope approach combined with conventional dietary reconstruction to

  2. Benthic macroinvertebrates and the use of stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) in the impact assessment of peatland use on boreal stream ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Mika L.; Daza Secco, Emmanuela; Nykänen, Hannu; Meissner, Kristian

    2013-04-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) can provide insights into carbon flow dynamics and trophic positions of consumers in food webs. SIA is used in this study, where we assess the possible changes in the basal resources of Finnish boreal stream ecosystems and differences in the impact of two forms of peatland use, forestry and peat mining. About 30% of the total land area of Finland is classified as peatland, of which about 55% has been drained for forestry and about 0.6% is in peat production. Unlike forestry, peat production is regionally less scattered and can thus have measurable local impacts although the total area of peat production is small. Three watersheds were used as study areas. Within each watershed, one stream drains a subcatchment affected only by peat mining, whereas the other stream flows through a subcatchment affected by forestry. The two subcatchment streams merge to form a single stream flowing into a lake. Studied watersheds were subject to no other forms of land use. In addition to the impacted sites, we used two pristine natural mire and two natural forest catchments as controls. We analysed the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) from benthic macroinvertebrates, stream bank soil, stream sediment, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in stream water. Samples for stable isotope analyses were collected in the summer of 2011 and samples for invertebrate community analyses in the autumn of 2011. Upon sampling we measured several physical parameters at each sampling site. In addition, stream water samples collected in summer and autumn 2012 were analysed for CH4 and CO2 gas concentrations and autumn gas samples also for their δ13C values. Our initial SIA results of invertebrates suggest some degree of discrimination between different sources of OM and possible effects on feeding habits, presumably due to the quality of the basal resources. We will explore this result further by examining not only taxonomical structure, but also the

  3. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  4. Coupling fallout 210Pb and stables isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) for catchment urbanization reconstruction in southeastern coastal zone of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, Mauricio; Macario, Kita Damasio; Roberto Meigikos dos Anjos; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Lamego, Fernando; Universidade Federal Fluminense

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication history was reconstructed by bulk organic and inorganic proxies (C, N, P) and isotope (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) analysis constrained by geochronological model derived from fallout 210 Pb in Brazilian coastal lagoon. The sedimentary record spanning the last four decades showed impact of urbanization starting from 1970s. These changes were marked by increase of TN, TP, IP fluxes that were significantly correlated with population growth. Significant covariation of C:N, MDP and δ 15 N along age-depth profiles provided linkage with sedimentation rates, serving as an independent time marker for geochronology and validating use of 210 Pb dating model based on constant initial concentration. (author)

  5. Linking Canadian Harvested Juvenile American Black Ducks to Their Natal Areas Using Stable Isotope (δD, δ13C, and δ15N Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ashley

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding source-sink dynamics of game birds is essential to harvest and habitat management but acquiring this information is often logistically and financially challenging using traditional methods of population surveys and banding studies. This is especially true for species such as the American Black Duck (Anas rubripes, which have low breeding densities and extensive breeding ranges that necessitate extensive surveys and banding programs across eastern North America. Despite this effort, the contribution of birds fledged from various landscapes and habitat types within specific breeding ranges to regional harvest is largely unknown but remains an important consideration in adaptive harvest management and targeted habitat conservation strategies. We investigated if stable isotope (δD, δ13C, δ15N could augment our present understanding of connectivity between breeding and harvest areas and so provide information relevant to the two main management strategies for black ducks, harvest and habitat management. We obtained specimens from 200 hatch-year Black Duck wings submitted to the Canadian Wildlife Service Species Composition Survey. Samples were obtained from birds harvested in Western, Central, and Eastern breeding/harvest subregions to provide a sample representative of the range and harvest rate of birds harvested in Canada. We sampled only hatch-year birds to provide an unambiguous and direct link between production and harvest areas. Marine origins were assigned to 12%, 7%, and 5% of birds harvested in the Eastern, Central, and Western subregions, respectively. In contrast, 32%, 9%, and 5% of birds were assigned, respectively, to agricultural origins. All remaining birds were assigned to nonagricultural origins. We portrayed probability of origin using a combination of Bayesian statistical and GIS methods. Placement of most eastern birds was western Nova Scotia, eastern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and southern

  6. Tracing the cycling and fate of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in coastal marine systems with a stable isotopic tracer, 15N-[TNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W.; Vlahos, Penny; Böhlke, John Karl; Ariyarathna, Thivanka; Ballentine, Mark; Cooper, Christopher; Fallis, Stephen; Groshens, Thomas J.; Tobias, Craig

    2015-01-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been used as a military explosive for over a hundred years. Contamination concerns have arisen as a result of manufacturing and use on a large scale; however, despite decades of work addressing TNT contamination in the environment, its fate in marine ecosystems is not fully resolved. Here we examine the cycling and fate of TNT in the coastal marine systems by spiking a marine mesocosm containing seawater, sediments, and macrobiota with isotopically labeled TNT (15N-[TNT]), simultaneously monitoring removal, transformation, mineralization, sorption, and biological uptake over a period of 16 days. TNT degradation was rapid, and we observed accumulation of reduced transformation products dissolved in the water column and in pore waters, sorbed to sediments and suspended particulate matter (SPM), and in the tissues of macrobiota. Bulk δ15N analysis of sediments, SPM, and tissues revealed large quantities of 15N beyond that accounted for in identifiable derivatives. TNT-derived N was also found in the dissolved inorganic N (DIN) pool. Using multivariate statistical analysis and a 15N mass balance approach, we identify the major transformation pathways of TNT, including the deamination of reduced TNT derivatives, potentially promoted by sorption to SPM and oxic surface sediments.

  7. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yohannes

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C, nitrogen (δ15N and sulphur (δ34S in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively. Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues

  8. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  9. Identifying carbon sources and trophic position of coral reef fishes using diet and stable isotope15N and δ13C) analyses in two contrasted bays in Moorea, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneur, Y.; Lison de Loma, T.; Richard, P.; Harmelin-Vivien, M. L.; Cresson, P.; Banaru, D.; Fontaine, M.-F.; Gref, T.; Planes, S.

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios (δ15N and δ13C) and diet of three fish species, Stegastes nigricans, Chaetodon citrinellus and Epinephelus merra, were analyzed on the fringing coral reefs of two bays that are differentially exposed to river runoff on Moorea Island, French Polynesia. S. nigricans and C. citrinellus relied mostly on turf algae and presented similar trophic levels and δ15N values, whereas E. merra fed on large invertebrates (crabs and shrimps) and had higher trophic levels and δ15N values. Discrepancies existed between stomach content and stable isotope analyses for the relative importance of food items. Bayesian mixing models indicated that sedimented organic matter was also an important additional food for S. nigricans and C. citrinellus, and fishes for E. merra. The main sources of organic matter involved in the food webs ending with these species were algal turfs and surface sediments, while water particulate organic matter was barely used. Significant spatial differences in C and N isotopic ratios for sources and fishes were found within and between bays. Lower 13C and higher 15N values were observed for various compartments of the studied trophic network at the end of each bay than at the entrance. Differences were observed between bays, with organic sources and consumers being, on average, slightly more 13C-depleted and 15N-enriched in Cook's Bay than in Opunohu Bay, linked with a higher mean annual flow of the river at Cook's Bay. Our results suggest that rivers bring continental material into these two bays, which is partly incorporated into the food webs of fringing coral reefs at least close to river mouths. Thus, continental inputs can influence the transfer of organic matter within coral reef food webs depending on the diet of organisms.

  10. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  11. Food resources of stream macroinvertebrates determined by natural-abundance stable C and N isotopes and a 15N tracer addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick J. Mulholland; Jennifer L. Tank; Diane M. Sanzone; Wilfrid M. Wollheim; Bruce J. Peterson; Jackson R. Webster; Judy L. Meyer

    2000-01-01

    Trophic relationships were examined using natural-abundance 13C and 15N analyses and a 15N-tracer addition experiment in Walker Branch, a 1st-order forested stream in eastern Tennessee. In the 15N-tracer addition experiment, we added 15NH4...

  12. L'isotope stable 15N et le lysimètre, des outils complémentaires pour l'étude de la lixiviation de l'azote dans les sols agricoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destain JP.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable 15N isotope and lysimeter, complementary tools in order to study the nitrogen leaching in agricultural soils. Stable 15N was used in lysimetric trials conducted with the aim to study nitrate leaching of agricultural soils. At Gembloux, a rate of 200 kg N.ha-1 as 15NH4 15NO3 with an isotopic abundance of 2.161 At%15N was applied in two lysimeters before a spinach crop, followed by beans and winter wheat; in the first lysimeter, total recovery by crops was less than 39.8% while in second lysimeter, recovery was 62.2%. Concentrations of N-NO3 - in leached water were always higher in lysimeter 2 than lysimeter 1, probably due to less microbial immobilization of nitrogen. At Remicourt and Omal, a simulated mineral residue of 150 kg N.ha-1 (rate of 15NH4 15NO3 applied in autumn has completely disappeared from the soil profile (0-90 cm already in July of the following year. At Omal, a winter crop has recovered no more than 9% of nitrogen rate applied in autumn. Measurement of N-NO3 - concentration in leached water has shown clearly higher levels at Remicourt (even more than 70 mg N.l-1 probably caused by an application of high rate of compost rich in nitrogen than is Omal. Stable 15N isotope could not be analyzed in leaching water probably due to a leak of sensitiveness of the analytical equipment.

  13. Synthesis of {sup 15}N isotope labeled alanine; Sintese da alanina enriquecida com {sup 15}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Claudineia R. de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Sant' Ana, Carlos Roberto; Tagliassachi, Romulo Barbieri; Maximo, Everaldo; Prestes, Clelber Vieira [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: crolivei@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    The application of light chemical elements and their stable isotopes in biological studies have been increased over the last years. The use of {sup 15}N labeled amino acids is an important tool for elucidation of peptides structures. This paper describe a method for the synthesis of {sup 15}N isotope labeled alanine at lower costs than international ones, as well as the details of the recovery system of the nitrogen residues. In the present work an amination of {alpha}-haloacids, with the bromopropionic carboxylic acid and labeled aqua ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3} aq) was carried out. In order to avoid eventually losses of {sup 15}NH{sub 3}, special cares were adopted, since the production cost is high. Although the acquisition cost of the {sup 13}N (radioactive) labeled compounds is lower, the obtained stable tracer will allow the accomplishment of important studies of the nitrogen cycling in living things, less occupational and environment hazards, and the time limitation problems in field studies. The tests took place in triplicates with NH{sub 3} (aq) being employed. With the establishment of the system for {sup 15}NH{sub 3} recovery, an average of 94 % of the ammonia employed in the synthesis process was recovered. The purity of the amino acid was state determined by TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography) and HPLC (High-Performance Liquid Chromatography) with a fluorescence detector. The Rf and the retention time of the synthesized sample were similar the sigma standard. Finally, regarding the established conditions, it was possible to obtain the alanine with a production cost about 40 % lower than the international price. (author)

  14. Protein retention assessment of four levels of poultry by-product substitution of fishmeal in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) diets using stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) as natural tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, Daniel; Herzka, Sharon Z; Viana, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This is second part from an experiment where the nitrogen retention of poultry by-product meal (PBM) compared to fishmeal (FM) was evaluated using traditional indices. Here a quantitative method using stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N values) as natural tracers of nitrogen incorporation into fish biomass is assessed. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed for 80 days on isotopically distinct diets in which 0, 33, 66 and 100% of FM as main protein source was replaced by PBM. The diets were isonitrogenous, isolipidic and similar in gross energy content. Fish in all treatments reached isotopic equilibrium by the end of the experiment. Two-source isotope mixing models that incorporated the isotopic composition of FM and PBM as well as that of formulated feeds, empirically derived trophic discrimination factors and the isotopic composition of fish that had reached isotopic equilibrium to the diets were used to obtain a quantitative estimate of the retention of each source of nitrogen. Fish fed the diets with 33 and 66% replacement of FM by PBM retained poultry by-product meal roughly in proportion to its level of inclusion in the diets, whereas no differences were detected in the protein efficiency ratio. Coupled with the similar biomass gain of fishes fed the different diets, our results support the inclusion of PBM as replacement for fishmeal in aquaculture feeds. A re-feeding experiment in which all fish were fed a diet of 100% FM for 28 days indicated isotopic turnover occurred very fast, providing further support for the potential of isotopic ratios as tracers of the retention of specific protein sources into fish tissues. Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool for studies that seek to obtain quantitative estimates of the retention of different protein sources.

  15. Field Trial on Pea ( Pisum Sativum L.) Grown on Sand Soil and Subjected to Water Regimes and Nitrogen Forms with Aid of 15 N Stable Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, A.E.; Abdel Aziz, H.A.; Al-Gindy, A.M.; Arafa, Y.E.

    2016-01-01

    A field experiment on sand soil was conducted to trace the effects of different water regimes on pea growth and nutritional values as fertilized with urea and ammonium sulfate fertilizers. 15 N/ 14 N isotope dilution technique was followed to distinguish between the different N proportions derived to pea plants and in the same time estimating the efficientuse of both two nitrogen forms (%NUE). Irrigation water regimes and fertilization treatments were applied under drip irrigation system. Two water regimes epresented 100% (W1) and 75% (W2) of water requirement in combination with three N fertilizer rates, i.e. N 0 , N 100 and N 75 were applied. Two nitrogen fertilizer forms represent urea and ammonium sulfate were performed. The overall means of seed yield as affected by nitrogen fertilization treatments reflected relative increase accounted for 45.8, and 38.7%; 41.7 and 36.2% over the unfertilized control for NU 100 , and NU 75 ; NAS 100 and NAS 75 , respectively. It seems that 100% water regime (W1) made nitrogen fertilizer, especially with high rate, more available for plant uptake comparing to the low water quantity regime. Pea crop had accumulated more nitrogen from urea comparing to ammonium sulfate fertilizer. Nitrogen uptake, in general, significantly correlated to application N rates. Water regime (W1) in combination with ammonium sulfate fertilizer resulted in the better percentage or absolute values of N derived from fertilizer by pea seeds. It was clear that efficient use of ammonium sulfate, to some extent, was affected by different wa - ter regimes. This holds true either at 100% (N1) or 75% (W2) application rates. On the other hand, urea added at rate of 75% was more efficiently used by seeds than those added at rate of 100% of the recommended N rate

  16. Complete Measurement of Stable Isotopes in N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O) Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in water is a worldwide environmental problem and source apportionment is critical to managing nitrate pollution. Fractionation caused by physical, chemical and biological processes alters the isotope ratios of nitrates (15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O) and biochemical nitrification and denitrification impart different intramolecular site preference (15N14NO vs. 14N15NO). Additionally, atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O compared to other nitrate sources. The anomaly (Δ17O) is conserved during fractionation processes, providing a tracer of atmospheric nitrate. All of these effects can be used to apportion nitrate in soil. Current technology for measuring nitrate isotopes is complicated and costly - it involves conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide (N2O), purification, preconcentration and measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Site specific measurements require a custom IRMS. There is a pressing need to make this measurement simpler and more accessible. Los Gatos Research has developed a next generation mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to quantify all stable isotope ratios of N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O). We present the latest performance data demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the OA-ICOS based measurement. At an N2O concentration of 322 ppb, the analyzer quantifies [N2O], δ15N, δ15Na, δ15Nb, and δ18O with a precision of ±0.05 ppb, ±0.4 ‰, ±0.45 ‰, and ±0.6 ‰, and ±0.8 ‰ respectively (1σ, 100s; 1σ, 1000s for δ18O). Measurements of gas standards demonstrate accuracy better than ±1 ‰ for isotope ratios over a wide dynamic range (200 - 100,000 ppb). The measurement of δ17O requires a higher concentration (1 - 50 ppm), easily obtainable through conversion of nitrates in water. For 10 ppm of N2O, the instrument achieves a δ17O precision of ±0.05 ‰ (1σ, 1000s). This performance is sufficient to quantify atmospheric

  17. Uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    1998-01-01

    The most important fields of stable isotope use with examples are presented. These are: 1. Isotope dilution analysis: trace analysis, measurements of volumes and masses; 2. Stable isotopes as tracers: transport phenomena, environmental studies, agricultural research, authentication of products and objects, archaeometry, studies of reaction mechanisms, structure and function determination of complex biological entities, studies of metabolism, breath test for diagnostic; 3. Isotope equilibrium effects: measurement of equilibrium effects, investigation of equilibrium conditions, mechanism of drug action, study of natural processes, water cycle, temperature measurements; 4. Stable isotope for advanced nuclear reactors: uranium nitride with 15 N as nuclear fuel, 157 Gd for reactor control. In spite of some difficulties of stable isotope use, particularly related to the analytical techniques, which are slow and expensive, the number of papers reporting on this subject is steadily growing as well as the number of scientific meetings organized by International Isotope Section and IAEA, Gordon Conferences, and regional meeting in Germany, France, etc. Stable isotope application development on large scale is determined by improving their production technologies as well as those of labeled compound and the analytical techniques. (author)

  18. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  19. Using nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ15N) of macroalgae to determine the effectiveness of sewage upgrades: changes in the extent of sewage plumes over four years in Moreton Bay, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costanzo, Simon D.; Udy, James; Longstaff, Ben; Jones, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen loading to aquatic ecosystems from sewage is recognised worldwide as a growing problem. The use of nitrogen stable isotopes as a means of discerning sewage nitrogen in the environment has been used annually by the Ecosystem Health Monitoring Program in Moreton Bay (Australia) since 1997 when the technique was first developed. This ('sewage plume mapping') technique, which measures the δ 15 N isotopic signature of the red macroalga Catenella nipae after incubation in situ, has demonstrated a large reduction in the magnitude and spatial extent of sewage nitrogen within Moreton Bay over the past 5 years. This observed reduction coincides with considerable upgrades to the nitrogen removal efficacy at several sewage treatment plants within the region. This paper describes the observed changes and evaluates whether they can be attributed to the treatment upgrades

  20. Using nitrogen stable isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 15}N) of macroalgae to determine the effectiveness of sewage upgrades: changes in the extent of sewage plumes over four years in Moreton Bay, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costanzo, Simon D. [National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, University of Queensland, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plains, QLD 4108 (Australia)]. E-mail: s.costanzo@uq.edu.au; Udy, James [Marine Botany, Centre for Marine Studies, University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia); Longstaff, Ben [Environmental Protection Agency, 80 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, QLD 4058 (Australia); Jones, Adrian [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, P.O. Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613, USA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Nitrogen loading to aquatic ecosystems from sewage is recognised worldwide as a growing problem. The use of nitrogen stable isotopes as a means of discerning sewage nitrogen in the environment has been used annually by the Ecosystem Health Monitoring Program in Moreton Bay (Australia) since 1997 when the technique was first developed. This ('sewage plume mapping') technique, which measures the {delta}{sup 15}N isotopic signature of the red macroalga Catenella nipae after incubation in situ, has demonstrated a large reduction in the magnitude and spatial extent of sewage nitrogen within Moreton Bay over the past 5 years. This observed reduction coincides with considerable upgrades to the nitrogen removal efficacy at several sewage treatment plants within the region. This paper describes the observed changes and evaluates whether they can be attributed to the treatment upgrades.

  1. 13C- and 15N-labelled non-biogenic compounds used as stable isotope drugs for human liver function tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1989-01-01

    As a result of liver diseases, the elimination of certain drugs is retarded. After labelling a suitable drug with 13 C, the 13 CO 2 elimination rate serves as a liver function parameter. Current contributions to the 13 CO 2 breath test method are reviewed and related to the 14 CO 2 breath test proposals. In spite of several advantages of 13 C-labelled agents, some dissatisfaction has remained with the tests, especially at using them with infants. It is the necessity of face masks and the uncertainty to consider endogeneous CO 2 contributions diluting the exhaled 13 CO 2 . The problems are avoided if the other molecule site of the drug is labelled which is known to be eliminated via urine. With 15 N as a tracer, a suitable urine test using [ 15 N]-methacetin as agent has been proposed and put into practice. (author)

  2. Stable carbon (12/13C) and nitrogen (14/15N) isotopes as a tool for identifying the sources of cyanide in wastes and contaminated soils-A method development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihmann, Jenny; Mansfeldt, Tim; Schulte, Ulrike

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of iron-cyanide complexes in the environment is of concern, since they are potentially hazardous. In order to determine the source of iron-cyanide complexes in contaminated soils and wastes, we developed a method based on the stable isotope ratios 13 C/ 12 C and 15 N/ 14 N of the complexed cyanide-ion (CN - ). The method was tested on three pure chemicals and two industrials wastes: blast-furnace sludge (BFS) and gas-purifier waste (GPW). The iron-cyanide complexes were converted into the solid cupric ferrocyanide, Cu 2 [Fe(China) 6 ].7H 2 O, followed by combustion and determination of the isotope-ratios by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Cupric ferrocyanide was obtained from the materials by (i) an alkaline extraction with 1 M NaOH and (ii) a distillate digestion. The [Fe(China) 6 ] 4- of the alkaline extraction was precipitated after adding Cu 2+ . The CN - of the distillate digestion was at first complexed with Fe 2+ under inert conditions and then precipitated after adding Cu 2+ . The δ 13 C-values obtained by the two methods differed slightly up to 1-3 per mille for standards and BFS. The difference was larger for alkaline-extracted GPW (4-7 per mille ), since non-cyanide C was co-extracted and co-precipitated. Therefore the distillate digestion technique is recommended when determining the C isotope ratios in samples rich in organic carbon. Since the δ 13 C-values of BFS are in the range of -30 to -24 per mille and of -17 to -5 per mille for GPW, carbon seems to be a suitable tracer for identifying the source of cyanide in both wastes. However, the δ 15 N-values overlapped for BFS and GPW, making nitrogen unsuitable as a tracer

  3. Isotopic enrichment of 15N by ionic exchange cromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.; Matsui, E.; Salati, E.

    1979-01-01

    The ionic exchange chromatographic method in columns of resin which is employed in the study of isotopic enrichment of 15 N is presented. Determinations are made of the isotopic separation constant for the exchange of isotopes 15 N and 14 N in the equilibrium involving ammonium hidroxide in the solution phase and ions NH 4 + adsorbed in cationic resins: Dowex 50W-X8 and X12, 100-200 mesh. Experiments are also conducted for determination of height of theoretical plates for situations of equilibrium of the NH 4 + band in two systems of resin's columns aimed at estimating the experimental conditions used. The isotopic analyses of nitrogen are carried out by mass spectrometry [pt

  4. Defining fish community structure in Lake Winnipeg using stable isotopes (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 34}S): Implications for monitoring ecological responses and trophodynamics of mercury and other trace elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofukany, Amy F.A. [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B3 (Canada); Wassenaar, Leonard I. [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada); Bond, Alexander L., E-mail: alex.bond@rspb.org.uk [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada); Hobson, Keith A. [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    The ecological integrity of freshwater lakes is influenced by atmospheric and riverine deposition of contaminants, shoreline development, eutrophication, and the introduction of non-native species. Changes to the trophic structure of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, and consequently, the concentrations of contaminants and trace elements measured in tissues of native fishes, are likely attributed to agricultural runoff from the 977,800 km{sup 2} watershed and the arrival of non-native zooplankters and fishes. We measured δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N, and δ{sup 34}S along with concentrations of 15 trace elements in 17 native fishes from the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg in 2009 and 2010. After adjusting for differences in isotopic baseline values between the two basins, fishes in the south basin had consistently higher δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 34}S, and lower δ{sup 15}N. We found little evidence of biomagnification of trace elements at the community level, but walleye (Sander vitreus) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) had higher mercury and selenium concentrations with increased trophic position, coincident with increased piscivory. There was evidence of growth dilution of cobalt, copper, manganese, molybdenum, thallium, and vanadium, and bioaccumulation of mercury, which could be explained by increases in algal (and consequently, lake and fish) productivity. We conclude that the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg represent very different communities with different trophic structures and trace element concentrations. - Highlights: • Anthropogenic eutrophication and non-native species affect Lake Winnipeg’s ecosystem. • We measured stable isotopes and trace elements in 15 native fish species. • There was more evidence for growth dilution than biomagnification for most elements. • The trophic structures of the north and south basins were different. • These results will help determine the effects of recent arrival of zebra mussels.

  5. Defining fish community structure in Lake Winnipeg using stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S): Implications for monitoring ecological responses and trophodynamics of mercury and other trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofukany, Amy F.A.; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Bond, Alexander L.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The ecological integrity of freshwater lakes is influenced by atmospheric and riverine deposition of contaminants, shoreline development, eutrophication, and the introduction of non-native species. Changes to the trophic structure of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, and consequently, the concentrations of contaminants and trace elements measured in tissues of native fishes, are likely attributed to agricultural runoff from the 977,800 km 2 watershed and the arrival of non-native zooplankters and fishes. We measured δ 13 C, δ 15 N, and δ 34 S along with concentrations of 15 trace elements in 17 native fishes from the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg in 2009 and 2010. After adjusting for differences in isotopic baseline values between the two basins, fishes in the south basin had consistently higher δ 13 C and δ 34 S, and lower δ 15 N. We found little evidence of biomagnification of trace elements at the community level, but walleye (Sander vitreus) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) had higher mercury and selenium concentrations with increased trophic position, coincident with increased piscivory. There was evidence of growth dilution of cobalt, copper, manganese, molybdenum, thallium, and vanadium, and bioaccumulation of mercury, which could be explained by increases in algal (and consequently, lake and fish) productivity. We conclude that the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg represent very different communities with different trophic structures and trace element concentrations. - Highlights: • Anthropogenic eutrophication and non-native species affect Lake Winnipeg’s ecosystem. • We measured stable isotopes and trace elements in 15 native fish species. • There was more evidence for growth dilution than biomagnification for most elements. • The trophic structures of the north and south basins were different. • These results will help determine the effects of recent arrival of zebra mussels

  6. Stable carbon ({sup 12/13}C) and nitrogen ({sup 14/15}N) isotopes as a tool for identifying the sources of cyanide in wastes and contaminated soils-A method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weihmann, Jenny [Arbeitsgruppe Bodengeographie/Bodenkunde, Geographisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50923 Cologne (Germany); Mansfeldt, Tim [Arbeitsgruppe Bodengeographie/Bodenkunde, Geographisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50923 Cologne (Germany)]. E-mail: tim.mansfeldt@uni-koeln.de; Schulte, Ulrike [Lehrstuhl fuer Sediment- und Isotopengeologie, Institut fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2007-01-23

    The occurrence of iron-cyanide complexes in the environment is of concern, since they are potentially hazardous. In order to determine the source of iron-cyanide complexes in contaminated soils and wastes, we developed a method based on the stable isotope ratios {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C and {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N of the complexed cyanide-ion (CN{sup -}). The method was tested on three pure chemicals and two industrials wastes: blast-furnace sludge (BFS) and gas-purifier waste (GPW). The iron-cyanide complexes were converted into the solid cupric ferrocyanide, Cu{sub 2}[Fe(China){sub 6}].7H{sub 2}O, followed by combustion and determination of the isotope-ratios by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Cupric ferrocyanide was obtained from the materials by (i) an alkaline extraction with 1 M NaOH and (ii) a distillate digestion. The [Fe(China){sub 6}]{sup 4-} of the alkaline extraction was precipitated after adding Cu{sup 2+}. The CN{sup -} of the distillate digestion was at first complexed with Fe{sup 2+} under inert conditions and then precipitated after adding Cu{sup 2+}. The {delta} {sup 13}C-values obtained by the two methods differed slightly up to 1-3 per mille for standards and BFS. The difference was larger for alkaline-extracted GPW (4-7 per mille ), since non-cyanide C was co-extracted and co-precipitated. Therefore the distillate digestion technique is recommended when determining the C isotope ratios in samples rich in organic carbon. Since the {delta} {sup 13}C-values of BFS are in the range of -30 to -24 per mille and of -17 to -5 per mille for GPW, carbon seems to be a suitable tracer for identifying the source of cyanide in both wastes. However, the {delta} {sup 15}N-values overlapped for BFS and GPW, making nitrogen unsuitable as a tracer.

  7. Isotopic enrichment of 15N by ionic exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper presents some studies on production of 15 N-enriched ammonium sulphate with 5% atoms by ionic exchange chromatography method. Two systems are described of columns of resin, where experiments were conducted by eluition of NH 4 + bands with sodium hydroxide solution. Analyses were made of the cost of production of 15 N-enriched ammonium sulphate 5% atoms and, based on the experiments developed, a cost was obtained which was compatible with the international price of the product. The isotopic analyses of nitrogen were made by mass spectrometry. (Author) [pt

  8. Enrichment of {sup 15}N and {sup 10}B isotopes by chemical exchange process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D` Souza, A B; Sonwalkar, A S; Subrahmanyam, B V; Valladares, B A [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Many processes are available for separation of stable isotopes like distillation, chemical exchange, thermal diffusion, gaseous diffusion, centrifuge etc. Chemical exchange process is eminently suitable for separation of isotopes of light elements. Work done on separation and enrichment of two of the stable isotopes viz. {sup 15}N and {sup 10}B in Chemical Engineering Division is presented. {sup 15}N is widely used as a tracer in agricultural research and {sup 10}B is used in nuclear industry as control rod material, soluble reactor poison, neutron detector etc. The work on {sup 15}N isotope resulted in a pilot plant, which was the only source of this material in the country for many years and later it was translated into a production plant as M/s. RCF Ltd. The work done on the ion-exchange process for enrichment of {sup 10}B isotope which is basically a chemical exchange process, is now being updated into a pilot plant to produce enriched {sup 10}B to be used as soluble reactor poison. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Enrichment of 15N and 10B isotopes by chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, A.B.; Sonwalkar, A.S.; Subrahmanyam, B.V.; Valladares, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    Many processes are available for separation of stable isotopes like distillation, chemical exchange, thermal diffusion, gaseous diffusion, centrifuge etc. Chemical exchange process is eminently suitable for separation of isotopes of light elements. Work done on separation and enrichment of two of the stable isotopes viz. 15 N and 10 B in Chemical Engineering Division is presented. 15 N is widely used as a tracer in agricultural research and 10 B is used in nuclear industry as control rod material, soluble reactor poison, neutron detector etc. The work on 15 N isotope resulted in a pilot plant, which was the only source of this material in the country for many years and later it was translated into a production plant as M/s. RCF Ltd. The work done on the ion-exchange process for enrichment of 10 B isotope which is basically a chemical exchange process, is now being updated into a pilot plant to produce enriched 10 B to be used as soluble reactor poison. (author)

  10. Stable isotopes - separation and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockhart, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, methods used for the separation of stable isotopes ( 12 C, 13 C, 14 N, 15 N, 16 O, 17 O, 18 O, 34 S) will be described. The synthesis of labelled compounds, techniques for detection and assay, and areas of application will also be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to the isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen; to date, sulphur isotopes have only assumed a minor role. The field of deuterium chemistry is too extensive for adequate treatment; it will therefore be essentially excluded. (author)

  11. Organic synthesis with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daub, G.H.; Kerr, V.N.; Williams, D.L.; Whaley, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Some general considerations concerning organic synthesis with stable isotopes are presented. Illustrative examples are described and discussed. The examples include DL-2-amino-3-methyl- 13 C-butanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-valine- 13 C 3 ); methyl oleate-1- 13 C; thymine-2,6- 13 C 2 ; 2-aminoethanesulfonic- 13 C acid (taurine- 13 C); D-glucose-6- 13 C; DL-2-amino-3-methylpentanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-isoleucine- 13 C 2 ); benzidine- 15 N 2 ; and 4-ethylsulfonyl-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide- 15 N

  12. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  13. Liver function tests using the stable istope 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Jung, K.; Hirschberg, K.; Krumbiegel, P.; Junghans, P.; Reinhardt, R.; Teichmann, B.

    1988-01-01

    Several liver function tests using oral application of a nitrogen compound labelled with 15 N and the subsequent determination of 15 N in a certain fraction of urine or in the total urine by emission spectrometry are described. Because of the key function of the liver in the metabolism of nitrogen compounds, the results of these tests allow conclusions concerning some disturbances of liver functions. (author)

  14. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  15. Methods of clinical chemistry and isotopic technique for investigation of the nitrogen metabolism in man using 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Bornhak, H.; Hirschberg, K.; Jung, K.; Junghans, P.; Krumbiegel, P.; Reinhardt, R.

    1981-03-01

    The present manual is a catalogue of methods representing theoretical and practical aspects of application of the stable isotope 15 N in medicine as well as a reference book for users of 15 N techniques in life sciences. Special emphasis is given to the planning of 15 N tracer experiments and their interpretation, sources of error and standard values of nitrogen compounds, information on sampling of medical materials, methods of separation and determination of proteins and non-protein nitrogen compounds in serum and urine, and details of the isotopic analysis of nitrogen by emission and mass spectrometry. (author)

  16. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  17. Nature and sources of suspended particulate organic matter in a tropical estuary during the monsoon and pre-monsoon: Insights from stable isotopes (delta 13C POC, delta 15 N TPN) and carbohydrate signature compounds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B.; Bhosle, N.B.

    zooplankton, and then known aliquots (0.25 to 1.5 L) were filtered through pre-combusted (450 °C, 4h) 47 mm GF/F filter papers (0.7 µm, Whatman) for the measurements of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), δ13CPOC, δ15NTPN... analysis. 2.3. Determination of bulk parameters and stable isotopes GF/F (0.7 µm, 47 mm) filter containing particulate matter was washed with UV-Milli-Q- water to remove salt and the filter was dried at 40 °C for 24 h. Filter was cooled and weighed...

  18. Stable-isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Structures of bacteriochlorophyll b and the Krasnovskii photoreduction products of chlorophyll a are given. All 55 13 C and 4 15 N NMR transitions in chlorophyl a and its magnesium-free derivative pheophytin a were assigned. ESR of triplet states of chlorophylls a, b, c/sub z/, and c 2 and bacteriochlorophyll a are reported. Experiments in the cultivation of 13 C-enriched morning glory plants indicated that the isotope enrichment can produce observable morphological changes. (U.S.)

  19. From hilltop to kettle hole: what trends across the terrestrial-aquatic transition zone are revealed by organic matter stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) composition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Nitzsche, K. N.; Gessler, A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Hoffmann, C.; Premke, K.; Ellerbrock, R.

    2016-12-01

    Steep environmental gradients develop across the interface between terrestrial and aquatic domains that influence organic matter (OM) retention. In NE Germany, kettle holes are small water bodies found in high density across managed landscapes. Kettle hole water budgets are generally fed through precipitation and overland flow and are temporarily connected to groundwater resulting in distinct hydroperiods. We took advantage of the range of environmental conditions created by the fluctuating shoreline to investigate patterns of OM stability along transects spanning from hilltops to sediments within a single kettle hole. We physically and chemically separated OM fractions that are expected to be loosely bound, such as particulate organic matter, to those that are tightly bound, such as OM associated with mineral or metal surfaces. The study design allowed us to investigate stabilization processes at the aggregate, transect, and kettle hole catchment scale. At the aggregate scale, we analyzed soil characteristics (texture, pH, extractable Al, Fe, Ca) to contribute to our understanding of OM stabilization. At the transect scale, we compared isotopic trends in the different fractions against a simple Rayleigh distillation model to infer disruption of the transfer of material, for example erosion, by land management such as tillage or the addition of OM through fertilization. At the kettle hole catchment scale, we correlated our findings with plant productivity, landform properties, and soil wetness proxies. Aggregate scale patterns of OM 13C and 15N were fraction dependent; however, we observed a convergence in isotopic patterns with soil properties from OM of more stabilized fractions. At the transect scale, loosely bound fractions did not conform to the simple model, suggesting these fractions are more dynamic and influenced by land management. The stabilized fractions did follow the Rayleigh model, which implies that transfer processes play a larger role in these

  20. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  1. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree; Heuser, Alexander; Wombacher, Frank; Dietzel, Martin; Tipper, Edward; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  2. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-11-02

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  3. [Accumulation responses of seeds and seedlings to 15N isotope for two typical broadleaved trees in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang Chen; Song, Yuan; Yan, Qiao Ling; Zhang, Jin Xin

    2016-08-01

    Two typical broadleaved trees (i.e., Fraxinus rhynchophylla and Acer mono) with wind-dispersed seeds in Northeast China were selected in this study. A method of 15 N isotope labeling was used to explore the accumulation responses of seeds and seedlings to 15 N-urea soaking concentration (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 g·L -1 ), soaking time (4, 8 and 12 days) and leaf stage (2, 4, 6, and 8 leaves). The results showed that 15 N-urea soaking concentration and soaking time had significantly positive effects on δ 15 N values of seeds, i.e., higher 15 N-urea concentration and longer period of soaking (0.2 g·L -1 +12 d) were contributed to more 15 N accumulation of seeds. The maximum multiples of 15 N accumulation in F. rhynchophylla seeds and A. mono seeds were observed in 0.1 g·L -1 + (4 d, 8 d) and 0.05 g·L -1 + (4 d, 8 d), respectively. The loss rate of δ 15 N values decreased markedly from 2 leaves to 6 leaves and then kept relatively stable with the increasing seedling height, and the total δ 15 N values of seedlings started to decline at the stage of 8 leaves. These results suggested that seedlings with 6 leaves were more suitable for tracking seedling source. The δ 15 N values in leaves of seedlings were significantly positively correlated with 15 N-urea concentration level, soaking time and δ 15 N values of seeds. Overall, the accumulation of 15 N-urea could be found in seeds and seedlings of F. rhynchophylla and A. mono. The combination of 15 N-urea concentration (0.1 g·L -1 ), soaking time (8 d) and leaf stage (6 leaves) was the most suitable for tracking the seeds and seedlings of these two broadleaved trees.

  4. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, C.T.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical applications include the galactose breath test which consists of oral administration of 13 C-labeled galactose and measurement of the 13 C content of respired CO 2 as a function of time in patients with cirrhotic livers for diagnosis of liver dysfunction. Another application was the breath test to study glucose metabolism in children. Respired 13 CO 2 from ingested glucose- 13 C was measured for normal and diabetic children. Studies on mice in which 60 percent of the body carbon was replaced with 13 C failed to show significant effects of the isotope. Studies on biochemical applications include nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 13 C-labeled amino acids from Chlorella pyrenoidosa; studies on 15 N nmr spectra of arginine-guanidino- 13 C-2,3-- 15 N 2 as a function of pH; and isolation of fatty acids from algae

  5. Metabolic studies in man using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Jung, K.; Krumbiegel, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this project, stable isotope compounds and stable isotope pharmaceuticals were used (with emphasis on the application of 15 N) to study several aspects of nitrogen metabolism in man. Of the many methods available, the 15 N stable isotope tracer technique holds a special position because the methodology for application and nitrogen isotope analysis is proven and reliable. Valid routine methods using 15 N analysis by emission spectrometry have been demonstrated. Several methods for the preparation of biological material were developed during our participation in the Coordinated Research Programme. In these studies, direct procedures (i.e. use of diluted urine as a samples without chemical preparation) or rapid isolation methods were favoured. Within the scope of the Analytical Quality Control Service (AQCS) enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies were prepared and are now available through the International Atomic Energy Agency. The materials are of special importance as the increasing application of stable isotopes as tracers in medical, biological and agricultural studies has focused interest on reliable measurements of biological material of different origin. 24 refs

  6. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15)N and (13)C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Valentin H; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15)N and δ(13)C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15)N (δ(15)N plant - δ(15)N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13)C in hay and δ(15)N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13)C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15)N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13)C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently

  7. Organic vs. Conventional Grassland Management: Do 15N and 13C Isotopic Signatures of Hay and Soil Samples Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Valentin H.; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ15N and δ13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ15N15N plant - δ15N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ13C in hay and δ15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently used in practice

  8. Influence of 15N enrichment on the net isotopic fractionation factor during the reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, O.; Levegue, J.; Henault, C.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is mainly emitted from soils during the denitrification process. Nitrogen stable-isotope investigations can help to characterise the N(2)O source and N(2)O production mechanisms. The stable-isotope approach is increasingly used with (15)N natural abundance...

  9. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  10. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  11. Stable isotopes: essential tools in biological and medical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P. D.; Hachey, D. L.; Kreek, M. J.; Schoeller, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of the stable isotopes, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O, as tracers in research studies in the fields of biology, medicine, pharmacology, and agriculture are briefly reviewed. (CH)

  12. Solvent-dependent deuterium isotope effects in the 15N NMR spectra of an ammonium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielogorska, E.; Jackowski, K.

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 15 N NMR chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants have been investigated for the 15 N enriched ammonium chloride (conc. 15 NH 4 + ion has been observed in water, methanol, ethanol and dimethylsulfoxide, while the 15 ND 4 + has been monitored in the analogous deuterated liquids. It is shown that the isotope effect in nitrogen chemical shifts ( 1 Δ 15 N( 2/1 H)), significantly different in various solvents, changes from -1.392 ppm in dimethylsulfoxide to -0.071 ppm in ethanol. The 1 J(N,H) and 1 J(N,D) coupling constants have been measured for acidic solutions under conditions of slow proton (or deuterium) exchange. The reduced coupling constants have been estimated to present isotope effects in the spin-spin coupling constants. The latter isotope effects are fairly small. (author)

  13. Trophic position of coexisting krill species: a stable isotope approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Bode, Antonio; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2014-01-01

    Four krill species with overlapping functional biology coexist in Greenland waters. Here, we used stable isotopes to investigate and discuss their trophic role and mode of coexistence. Bulk carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope analyses of Thysanoessa longicaudata, T. inermis, T. raschii...

  14. Application of stable isotopes (δ{sup 34}S-SO{sub 4}, δ{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4,} δ{sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}, δ{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}) to determine natural background and contamination sources in the Guadalhorce River Basin (southern Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urresti-Estala, Begoña, E-mail: b.urresti@uma.es [Universidad de Málaga, Facultad de Ciencias, Grupo de Geodinámica Externa, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Vadillo-Pérez, Iñaki; Jiménez-Gavilán, Pablo [Universidad de Málaga, Facultad de Ciencias, Grupo de Geodinámica Externa, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Soler, Albert [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Fac. Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Sánchez-García, Damián; Carrasco-Cantos, Francisco [Universidad de Málaga, Facultad de Ciencias, Grupo de Geodinámica Externa, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    The integrated use of isotopes (δ{sup 34}S-SO{sub 4}, δ{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4,} δ{sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}, δ{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}), taking into account existing hydrogeological knowledge of the study area (mainly hydrochemical), was applied in the Guadalhorce River Basin (southern Spain) to characterise SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and NO{sub 3}{sup −} sources, and to quantify natural background levels (NBLs) in groundwater bodies. According to Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC and, more recently, Groundwater Directive 2006/118/EC, it is important to determine NBLs, as their correct assessment is the first, essential step to characterising groundwater bodies, establishing threshold values, assessing chemical status and identifying trends in pollutant concentrations. In many cases, NBLs are high for some parameters and types of groundwater, making it difficult to distinguish clearly between factors of natural or human origin. The main advantages of using stable isotopes in a complex area like the Guadalhorce River Basin that exhibits widely varying hydrogeological and hydrochemical conditions and longstanding anthropogenic influences (mainly agriculture, but also many others) is accurate determination of pollution sources and precise quantification of NBLs. Since chemical analyses only provides the concentration of pollutants in water and not the source, three isotopic sampling campaigns for sulphates (δ{sup 34}S-SO{sub 4}, δ{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4}) were carried out, in 2006, 2007 and 2012, and another one was conducted for nitrates (δ{sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}, δ{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}), in 2009, in groundwater bodies in order to trace the origins of each pollutant. The present study identified different pollution sources of dissolved NO{sub 3}{sup −} in groundwater using an isotopic composition and quantified the percentage of natural (lithology, chemical and biological processes) and anthropogenic (fertilisers, manure and sewage) SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and matched a concentration

  15. Progress in 15N and 13C separation by isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of 15 N separation by isotopic exchange in NO, NO 2 - HNO 3 system under pressure is presented. The pressure increase in 15 N separation plant improved the isotopic transport between the two phases circulated in counter-current in the packed column according to a better kinetics of isotopic exchange at higher pressures. The operation of 15 N separation plant at a pressure of 1.8 atm (absolute) will permit doubling of 10 M nitric acid flow rate and of 15 N production of a given column. The improved performance at a higher pressure is significant for large scale 15 N production, which would be utilized for uranium nitride fuels for FBRs. Enrichment of 13 C by chemical exchange between CO 2 and amine carbamate in nonaqueous solvent has been modelled. For process optimization the steady state separation and the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) have been determined for different experimental conditions and simulated for higher pressures than atmospheric one. At lower temperature (5 deg C) as the pressure increases the quantity of CO 2 dissolved in amine solution increases. For process analysis at higher pressures and lower temperatures, the two steps model has been considered. At 0.9 MPa pressure and 5 deg C the reaction rate is higher than at 25 deg C and atmospheric pressure, the value of HETP being lower with more than 100% than at 25 deg C. (author)

  16. Separation of 15N by isotopic exchange in NO, NO2-HNO3 system under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.; Baldea, A.; Teaca, C.; Horga, R.; Abrudean, M.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most used method for production of 15 N with 99% at. concentration is the isotopic exchange between gaseous nitrogen oxides and HNO 3 solution 10M: ( 15 NO, 15 NO 2 ) g + H 14 NO 3,l = ( 14 NO, 14 NO 2 ) g + H 15 NO 3,l . The isotopic exchange is characterized by an elemental separation factor α=1.055 at 25 deg. C and atmospheric pressure. Recently, kinetics data pointed to the linear dependence of the exchange rate 15 N/ 14 N(R) on the nitrogen oxide pressure with a rate law R = k[HNO 3 ] 2 · [N 2 O 3 ]. In this work, the influence of the nitrogen oxide pressure on the 15 N separation efficiency was determined by the use of a laboratory equipment with a separation column pack of Helipack type, with dimensions 1.8 mm x 1.8 mm x 0.2 mm. The increase of nitrogen oxide pressure led to a better isotopic transfer between the two counter-flow phases in the column pack. The HETP (Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate) determined for a 3.14 ml ·cm -2 · min -1 load is equal to that obtained at atmospheric pressure for a two times lower load. The operation of the equipment for isotopic separation of 15 N at 1.8 atm instead of atmospheric pressure allows doubling the HNO 3 10 M load of the column and consequently, doubling the production rate. A better performance of the separation process at higher pressure is essential for the industrial production of 15 N isotope which is used for the production of uranium nitride in FBR type reactors. (authors)

  17. Development of Stable Isotope Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Cheol Jung; Han, Jae Min

    2009-03-01

    KAERI has obtained an advanced technology with singular originality for laser stable isotope separation. Objectives for this project are to get production technology of Tl-203 stable isotope used for medical application and are to establish the foundation of the pilot system, while we are taking aim at 'Laser Isotope Separation Technology to make resistance to the nuclear proliferation'. And we will contribute to ensuring a nuclear transparency in the world society by taking part in a practical group of NSG and being collaboration with various international groups related to stable isotope separation technology

  18. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available for distribution within the United States for non-destructive research use from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Materials Research Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or in reprocessing

  19. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  20. French days on stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These first French days on stable isotopes took place in parallel with the 1. French days of environmental chemistry. Both conferences had common plenary sessions. The conference covers all aspects of the use of stable isotopes in the following domains: medicine, biology, environment, tracer techniques, agronomy, food industry, geology, petroleum geochemistry, cosmo-geochemistry, archaeology, bio-geochemistry, hydrology, climatology, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, isotope separations etc.. Abstracts available on CD-Rom only. (J.S.)

  1. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available for distribution within the United States for nondestructive research use from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Material Research Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  2. The CN/C15N isotopic ratio towards dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hily-Blant, P.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Faure, A.; Le Gal, R.; Padovani, M.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the origin of the composition of solar system cosmomaterials is a central question, not only in the cosmochemistry and astrochemistry fields, and requires various approaches to be combined. Measurements of isotopic ratios in cometary materials provide strong constraints on the content of the protosolar nebula. Their relation with the composition of the parental dark clouds is, however, still very elusive. In this paper, we bring new constraints based on the isotopic composition of nitrogen in dark clouds, with the aim of understanding the chemical processes that are responsible for the observed isotopic ratios. We have observed and detected the fundamental rotational transition of C15N towards two starless dark clouds, L1544 and L1498. We were able to derive the column density ratio of C15N over 13CN towards the same clouds and obtain the CN/C15N isotopic ratios, which were found to be 500 ± 75 for both L1544 and L1498. These values are therefore marginally consistent with the protosolar value of 441. Moreover, this ratio is larger than the isotopic ratio of nitrogen measured in HCN. In addition, we present model calculations of the chemical fractionation of nitrogen in dark clouds, which make it possible to understand how CN can be deprived of 15N and HCN can simultaneously be enriched in heavy nitrogen. The non-fractionation of N2H+, however, remains an open issue, and we propose some chemical way of alleviating the discrepancy between model predictions and the observed ratios. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectra (in FITS format) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/557/A65

  3. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  4. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with 2H, 13C and 15N in insect cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D.

    2015-01-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80 % can be achieved for 15 N and 13 C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For 2 H, 15 N and 2 H, 13 C, 15 N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73 %, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins

  5. Isotopic ratios D/H and 15N/14N in giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marboeuf, Ulysse; Thiabaud, Amaury; Alibert, Yann; Benz, Willy

    2018-04-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios in planets is important since it allows us to investigate the origins and initial composition of materials. The present work aims to determine the possible range of values for isotopic ratios D/H and 15N/14N in giant planets. The main objective is to provide valuable theoretical assumptions on the isotopic composition of giant planets, their internal structure, and the main reservoirs of species. We use models of ice formation and planet formation that compute the composition of ices and gas accreted in the core and the envelope of planets. Assuming a single initial value for isotopic ratios in volatile species, and disruption of planetesimals in the envelope of gaseous planets, we obtain a wide variety of D/H and 15N/14N ratios in low-mass planets (≤100 Mearth) due to the migration pathway of planets, the accretion time of gas species whose relative abundance evolves with time, and isotope exchanges among species. If giant planets with mass greater than 100 Mearth have solar isotopic ratios such as Jupiter and Saturn due to their higher envelope mass, Neptune-type planets present values ranging between one and three times the solar value. It seems therefore difficult to use isotopic ratios in the envelope of these planets to get information about their formation in the disc. For giant planets, the ratios allow us to constrain the mass fraction of volatile species in the envelope needed to reproduce the observational data by assuming initial values for isotopic ratios in volatile species.

  6. Use of stable isotopes in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, F. K.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research is considered to be one of the most important steps to achieve sustainable agriculture development. This paper is focused on the role of stable isotopes and their applications in agriculture for plant and animal production, and to study the relationship between soil, plant, air, water, nutrients and agricultural pests. Symbiotic N 2 fixation and efficient use of chemical and organic N fertilizers using 15 N were reported. Factors affecting 13 C values and application of carbon isotope discrimination to physiological and eco-physiological studies and selection of genotypes with improved water-use efficiency and drought tolerance and the recent progress in this field are reviewed. Moreover, the use of carbon isotope compositions in monitoring environmental changes and its various applications in food technology, animal production and entomology are discussed. (author)

  7. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah B Vander Zanden; David X Soto; Gabriel J Bowen; Keith A Hobson; Keith A Hobson

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicat...

  8. Expanding the Isotopic Toolbox: Applications of Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratios to Food Web Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Zanden, Hannah B.; Soto, David X.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicatio...

  9. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  10. Determination of δ13C, δ15N, or δ34S by isotope-ratio-monitoring mass spectrometry using an elemental analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Stricker, Craig A.; Gulbransen, Cayce A.; Emmons, Matthew P.

    2018-02-14

    This report describes procedures used in the Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, Colorado, to determine the stable-isotope ratios 13C/12C, 15N/14N, and 34S/32S in solid materials. The procedures use elemental analyzers connected directly to gas-source isotope-ratio mass spectrometers. A different elemental–analyzer–mass-spectrometer system is used for 13C/12C and 15N/14N than is used for 34S/32S to accommodate differences in reagents, catalysts, and instrument settings.

  11. {sup 37}Cl, {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C isotopic analysis of common agro-chemicals for identifying non-point source agricultural contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annable, W.K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: wkannabl@uwaterloo.ca; Frape, S.K. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Shouakar-Stash, O. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Shanoff, T. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Drimmie, R.J. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Harvey, F.E. [School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0517 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The isotopic compositions of commercially available herbicides were analyzed to determine their respective {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl signatures for the purposes of developing a discrete tool for tracing and identifying non-point source contaminants in agricultural watersheds. Findings demonstrate that of the agrochemicals evaluated, chlorine stable isotopes signatures range between {delta}{sup 37}Cl = -4.55 per mille and +3.40 per mille , whereas most naturally occurring chlorine stable isotopes signatures, including those of road salt, sewage sludge and fertilizers, vary in a narrow range about the Standard Mean Ocean Chloride (SMOC) between -2.00 per mille and +1.00 per mille . Nitrogen stable isotope values varied widely from {delta}{sup 15}N = -10.86 per mille to +1.44 per mille and carbon stable isotope analysis gave an observed range between {delta}{sup 13}C = -37.13 per mille and -21.35 per mille for the entire suite of agro-chemicals analyzed. When nitrogen, carbon and chlorine stable isotope analyses were compared in a cross-correlation analysis, statistically independent isotopic signatures exist suggesting a new potential tracer tool for identifying herbicides in the environment.

  12. Stable Isotope Identification of Nitrogen Sources for United ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used natural abundance stable isotope data to evaluate nitrogen sources to U.S. west coast estuaries. We collected δ15N of macroalgae data and supplemented this with available data from the literature for estuaries from Mexico to Alaska. Stable isotope ratios of green macroalgae were compared to δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen of oceanic and watershed end members. There was a latitudinal gradient in δ15N of macroalgae with southern estuaries being 7 per mil heavier than northern estuaries. Gradients in isotope data were compared to nitrogen sources estimated by the USGS using the SPARROW model. In California estuaries, the elevation of isotope data appeared to be related to anthropogenic nitrogen sources. In Oregon systems, the nitrogen levels of streams flowing into the estuaries are related to forest cover, rather than to developed land classes. In addition, the δ15N of macroalgae suggested that the ocean and nitrogen-fixing trees in the watersheds were the dominant nitrogen sources. There was also a strong gradient in δ15N of macroalgae with heavier sites located near the estuary mouth. In some Oregon estuaries, there was an elevation an elevation of δ15N above marine end members in the vicinity of wastewater treatment facility discharge locations, suggesting isotopes may be useful for distinguishing inputs along an estuarine gradient. Nutrients are the leading cause of water quality impairments in the United States, and as a result too

  13. Coral skeletal δ15N reveals isotopic traces of an agricultural revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Guy S.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Mucciarone, David A.; Kremer, James N.; Lansing, J. Stephen; Arthawiguna, Alit

    2005-01-01

    This study introduces a new method of tracing the history of nutrient loading in coastal oceans via δ 15 N analysis of organic nitrogen preserved in the skeleton of the massive Porites coral. Four coral cores were collected in Bali, Indonesia, from reefs exposed to high levels of fertilizers in agricultural run-off, from lagoonal corals impacted by sewage, and from a reef located 30 km offshore. Skeletal δ 15 N in the agriculturally exposed coral declined from 10.7 ± 0.4 per mille in 1970-1971, when synthetic fertilizers (-0.8 per mille ± 0.2 per mille ) were introduced to Bali, to a depleted 'anthropogenic' baseline of 3.5 per mille ± 0.4% in the mid-1990s. δ 15 N values were negatively correlated with rainfall, suggesting that marine δ 15 N lowers during flood-born influxes of waste fertilizers. Reef cores exposed to untreated sewage in terrestrial discharge were enriched (7.8 and 7.3 ± 0.4 per mille ), while the offshore core reflected background oceanic signals (6.2 ± 0.4 per mille). δ 15 N, N concentration, and C:N systematics indicate that the N isotopic composition of skeletal organic matter was generally well preserved over 30 years. We suggest that skeletal organic δ 15 N can serve as a recorder of past nitrogen sources. In Bali, this tracer suggests that the intensification of Western style agricultural practices since 1970 are contributing to the degradation of coastal coral reefs

  14. Coral skeletal {delta}{sup 15}N reveals isotopic traces of an agricultural revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Guy S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)]. E-mail: g.marion@uq.edu.au; Dunbar, Robert B. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Mucciarone, David A. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kremer, James N. [Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut at Avery Point, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Lansing, J. Stephen [Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Arthawiguna, Alit [Installation for Agricultural Research (IP 2TP), Kotak Pos 3480, Denpasar, Bali (Indonesia)

    2005-09-01

    This study introduces a new method of tracing the history of nutrient loading in coastal oceans via {delta}{sup 15}N analysis of organic nitrogen preserved in the skeleton of the massive Porites coral. Four coral cores were collected in Bali, Indonesia, from reefs exposed to high levels of fertilizers in agricultural run-off, from lagoonal corals impacted by sewage, and from a reef located 30 km offshore. Skeletal {delta}{sup 15}N in the agriculturally exposed coral declined from 10.7 {+-} 0.4 per mille in 1970-1971, when synthetic fertilizers (-0.8 per mille {+-} 0.2 per mille ) were introduced to Bali, to a depleted 'anthropogenic' baseline of 3.5 per mille {+-} 0.4% in the mid-1990s. {delta}{sup 15}N values were negatively correlated with rainfall, suggesting that marine {delta}{sup 15}N lowers during flood-born influxes of waste fertilizers. Reef cores exposed to untreated sewage in terrestrial discharge were enriched (7.8 and 7.3 {+-} 0.4 per mille ), while the offshore core reflected background oceanic signals (6.2 {+-} 0.4 per mille). {delta}{sup 15}N, N concentration, and C:N systematics indicate that the N isotopic composition of skeletal organic matter was generally well preserved over 30 years. We suggest that skeletal organic {delta}{sup 15}N can serve as a recorder of past nitrogen sources. In Bali, this tracer suggests that the intensification of Western style agricultural practices since 1970 are contributing to the degradation of coastal coral reefs.

  15. Evaluation for dinitrogen fixation of induced wheat nodules by 15N isotope dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yunyin; Zhen Ming; Chang Xizhong

    1993-11-01

    The results in pot experiments showed that the treating of 2,4-D and Azorhizobium caulinodans (2,4-D+A) could induce para-nodule formation on wheat roots. Plants treated grew normally. The plant height and dry weight are significantly higher than reference plants which are treated with 2,4-D+azorhizobium sterilized (2,4-D+AS). The nitrogenase activity is detected by ARA method. The N yield of most treated plants, especially in root systems, is higher than reference group that is measured by Kjeldahl method. The atom % 15 N excess in leaf and stem of treated plants measured by 15 N isotope dilution method is lower than that of reference group. Through four years experiments, it shows that para-nodules of wheat treated with 2,4-D+A could fix N 2 from air, but the ability of nitrogen fixation is lower and unstable. Although the nodulation efficiency could reach 100%, not each para-nodule induced can present activity of dinitrogen fixation. The amount of N fixed is 0.05∼18.1 mg/pot (0.01∼3.87 mg/plant). The net %Ndfa is 2.32%∼18.07%. The free-living N 2 fixing activity of azorhizobium is detected by 15 N isotope dilution method. The calculation of %Ndfa of nodulated wheat accurately is also discussed

  16. Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana; Rapčanová, Anna; Michalko, Juraj; Čech, Peter; Veis, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for δ 13 C and δ 15 N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in 13 C and 15 N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both δ 13 C and δ 15 N values. These data were compared to previously published δ 13 C and δ 15 N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking. - Highlights: • This study deals with stable isotope analyses of fingernails from Slovak volunteers. • δ 13 C and δ 15 N values of vegetarian and omnivore fingernails were compared. • Influence of sex, diet and smoking was studied

  17. Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.grolmusova@geology.sk [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Rapčanová, Anna [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Michalko, Juraj; Čech, Peter [State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Veis, Pavel [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-10-15

    Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values. These data were compared to previously published δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking. - Highlights: • This study deals with stable isotope analyses of fingernails from Slovak volunteers. • δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values of vegetarian and omnivore fingernails were compared. • Influence of sex, diet and smoking was studied.

  18. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs.

  19. Studies of the utilization of phosphorus and nitrogen fertilizers by 32P and 15N isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombovari, Janos; Kiss, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of phosphorus and nitrogen fertilizers in crop enhancement was studied with different plants and soils, using 15 N nad 32 P labelling. 15 N was determined by mass spectrometry, 32 P by radiometry. For nitrogen fertilizers better results were achieved by sequential small doses than by single higher doses. The utilization of phosphorus fertilizer strongly depends, in addition to the plant species, on the quality of the soil, especially on its Ca and N contents. Low and high soil liming increased and decreased the utilization of phosphorus, respectively, while nitrogen fertilizers increased it in each case. Measurement of the isotopically exchangable phosphorus content of soils represents a new technique for the determination of the phosphorus uptake. (A.L.)

  20. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  1. Stable Isotope Group 1982 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1983-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences during 1982, in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation, is described

  2. Stable Isotope Group 1983 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1984-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and related fields, and mass spectrometer instrumentation, during 1983, is described

  3. Stable-isotope paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuser, W.G.

    1978-01-01

    Seasonal variations of temperature and salinity in the surface waters of large parts of the oceans are well established. Available data on seasonal distributions of planktonic foraminifera show that the abundances of different species groups peak at different times of the year with an apparent succession of abundance peaks through most of the year. This evidence suggests that a measure of seasonal contrast is recorded in the isotope ratios of oxygen, and perhaps carbon, in the tests of different foraminiferal species. The evaluation of this potential paleoclimatologic tool awaits planned experiments with recent foraminifera in well-known settings, but a variety of available data is consistent with the idea that interspecies differences in 18 O content contain a seasonal component.(auth.)

  4. Mangrove isotopic15N and δ13C) fractionation across a nitrogen vs. phosphorus limitation gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, Karen L.; Feller, Ilka C.; Popp, Marianne; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by a unique switching from nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) limitation to tree growth from shoreline to interior. Fertilization has previously shown that Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) fringe trees (5–6 m tall) growing along the shoreline are N limited; dwarf trees (!1.5 m tall) in the forestinterior are P limited; and transition trees (2–4 m tall) are co-limited by both N and P.  Growth patterns paralleled a landward decrease in soil flushing by tides and an increase in bioavailable N, but P availability remained consistently low across the gradient. Stable isotopic composition was measured in R. mangle leaves to aid in explaining this nutrient switching pattern and growth variation. Along control transects, leaf !15N decreased from "0.10‰ (fringe) to #5.38‰ (dwarf). The !15N of N-fertilized trees also varied spatially, but the values were consistently more negative (by $3‰) compared to control trees. Spatial variation in !15N values disappeared when the trees were fertilized with P, and values averaged "0.12‰, similar to that in control fringe trees. Neither variation in source inputs nor microbial fractionation could fully account for the observed patterns in !15N. The results instead suggest that the lower !15N values in transition and dwarf control trees were due to plant fractionation as a consequence of slower growth and lower N demand. P fertilization increased N demand and decreased fractionation. Although leaf !13C was unaffected by fertilization, values increased from fringe (#28.6‰) to transition (#27.9‰) to dwarf (#26.4‰) zones, indicating spatial variation in environmental stresses affecting stomatal conductance or carboxylation. The results thus suggest an interaction of external supply, internal demand, and plant ability to acquire nutrients under different hydro-edaphic conditions that vary across this tree-height gradient. The findings not only aid in understanding

  5. Unusually negative nitrogen isotopic compositions (δ15N) of mangroves and lichens in an oligotrophic, microbially-influenced ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, M. L.; Wooller, M. J.; Cheeseman, J.; Smallwood, B. J.; Roberts, Q.; Romero, I.; Meyers, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Extremes in δ15N values in mangrove tissues and lichens (range =+4 to -22‰) were measured from a mangrove forest ecosystem located on Twin Cays, offshore islands in Belize, Central America. The N isotopic compositions and concentrations of NH4+/NH3 in porewater, rainwater, and atmospheric ammonia, and the δ15N of lichens, mangrove leaves, roots, stems, and wood were examined to study the biogeochemical processes important for establishing these unusual N isotopic ratios. Dwarfed Rhizophora mangle trees had the most negative δ15N, whereas fringing Rhizophora trees, the most positive δ15N values. Porewater ammonium concentrations had little relationship to N isotopic fractionation in mangrove tissues. In dwarfed mangroves, the δ15N of fine and coarse roots were 6-9‰ more positive than leaf tissue from the same tree, indicating different sources of N for root and leaf tissues. When P was added to dwarfed mangrove trees without added N, δ15N increased within one year from -12‰ to -2‰, approaching the δ15N of porewater ammonium (δ15N=+4‰). Isotopically depleted ammonia in the atmosphere (δ15N=-19‰) and in rainwater (δ15N=-10‰) were found on Twin Cays. We propose that foliar uptake of these atmospheric sources by P-stressed, dwarfed mangrove trees and lichens can explain their very negative δ15N values. In environments where P is limiting for growth, uptake of atmospheric N by Rhizophora mangle may be an important adaptive strategy.

  6. Unusually negative nitrogen isotopic compositions (δ15N of mangroves and lichens in an oligotrophic, microbially-influenced ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Romero

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Extremes in δ15N values in mangrove tissues and lichens (range =+4 to −22‰ were measured from a mangrove forest ecosystem located on Twin Cays, offshore islands in Belize, Central America. The N isotopic compositions and concentrations of NH4+/NH3 in porewater, rainwater, and atmospheric ammonia, and the δ15N of lichens, mangrove leaves, roots, stems, and wood were examined to study the biogeochemical processes important for establishing these unusual N isotopic ratios. Dwarfed Rhizophora mangle trees had the most negative δ15N, whereas fringing Rhizophora trees, the most positive δ15N values. Porewater ammonium concentrations had little relationship to N isotopic fractionation in mangrove tissues. In dwarfed mangroves, the δ15N of fine and coarse roots were 6–9‰ more positive than leaf tissue from the same tree, indicating different sources of N for root and leaf tissues. When P was added to dwarfed mangrove trees without added N, δ15N increased within one year from −12‰ to −2‰, approaching the δ15N of porewater ammonium (δ15N=+4‰. Isotopically depleted ammonia in the atmosphere (δ15N=−19‰ and in rainwater (δ15N=−10‰ were found on Twin Cays. We propose that foliar uptake of these atmospheric sources by P-stressed, dwarfed mangrove trees and lichens can explain their very negative δ15N values. In environments where P is limiting for growth, uptake of atmospheric N by Rhizophora mangle may be an important adaptive strategy.

  7. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high-abundance, naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56. All requests for the loan of samples should be submitted with a summary of the purpose of the loan to: Iotope Distribution Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Requests from non-DOE contractors and from foreign institutions require DOE approval

  8. Stable isotopes and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krouse, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Whereas traditionally, stable isotope research has been directed towards resource exploration and development, it is finding more frequent applications in helping to assess the impacts of resource utilization upon ecosystems. Among the many pursuits, two themes are evident: tracing the transport and conversions of pollutants in the environment and better understanding of the interplay among environmental receptors, e.g. food web studies. Stable isotope data are used primarily to identify the presence of pollutants in the environment and with a few exceptions, the consequence of their presence must be assessed by other techniques. Increasing attention has been given to the isotopic composition of humans with many potential applications in areas such as paleodiets, medicine, and criminology. In this brief overview examples are used from the Pacific Rim to illustrate the above concepts. 26 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  9. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd, E-mail: a-nazrul@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahim, Sahibin Abd, E-mail: haiyan@ukm.edu.my [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  10. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using 15N isotopic tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct 15 N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the 15 N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. 15 N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. 15 N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained

  11. Protein-based stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehmlich, Nico; Schmidt, Frank; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; Bastida, Felipe; von Bergen, Martin; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2010-12-01

    We describe a stable isotope probing (SIP) technique that was developed to link microbe-specific metabolic function to phylogenetic information. Carbon ((13)C)- or nitrogen ((15)N)-labeled substrates (typically with >98% heavy label) were used in cultivation experiments and the heavy isotope incorporation into proteins (protein-SIP) on growth was determined. The amount of incorporation provides a measure for assimilation of a substrate, and the sequence information from peptide analysis obtained by mass spectrometry delivers phylogenetic information about the microorganisms responsible for the metabolism of the particular substrate. In this article, we provide guidelines for incubating microbial cultures with labeled substrates and a protocol for protein-SIP. The protocol guides readers through the proteomics pipeline, including protein extraction, gel-free and gel-based protein separation, the subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and the calculation of the incorporation of stable isotopes into peptides. Extraction of proteins and the mass fingerprint measurements of unlabeled and labeled fractions can be performed in 2-3 d.

  12. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: Geographic and anthropogenic variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Inés G.; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes15 N). In this study δ 15 N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ 15 N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ 15 N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ 15 N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ 15 N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15 × 10 3 inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ 15 N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. - Highlights: ► Anthropogenic versus upwelling nitrogen effect on macroalgal δ 15 N was studied. ► The influence of populations and upwelling has not been made before on macroalgal δ 15 N. ► Natural variability has not been taken into account in most biomonitoring studies. ► Upwelling explains most of the variability in δ 15 N in macroalgae

  13. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: Geographic and anthropogenic variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Inés G., E-mail: ines.gonzalez@co.ieo.es; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-15

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ{sup 15}N). In this study δ{sup 15}N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ{sup 15}N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ{sup 15}N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ{sup 15}N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ{sup 15}N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15 × 10{sup 3} inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ{sup 15}N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. - Highlights: ► Anthropogenic versus upwelling nitrogen effect on macroalgal δ{sup 15}N was studied. ► The influence of populations and upwelling has not been made before on macroalgal δ{sup 15}N. ► Natural variability has not been taken into account in most biomonitoring studies. ► Upwelling explains most of the variability in δ{sup 15}N in macroalgae.

  14. Nitrogen Dynamic Study on Rice Mutant Lines Using 15N Isotope Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nazrul Abd Wahid; Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2015-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency in collaboration with UPM and MARDI has produced two types of rice mutant lines of MR219, viz. MR219-4 and MR219-9 developed under rice radiation mutagenenesis programme for adaptability to aerobic conditions. Aerobic cultivating is rice cultivation system on well drained soil and using minimal water input. At Malaysian Nuclear Agency, a nitrogen fertilization study in aerobic condition for the rice mutant lines was carried out in the shade house and field. The study is intended to examine and assess the dynamics of nitrogen by rice mutant lines through the different soil water management and nitrogen levels. Direct 15 N isotopic tracer method was used in this study, whereby the 15 N labeled urea fertilizer was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake by the test crops. This paper is intended to highlight the progress that has been made in the study of the nitrogen dynamics on MR219-4 and MR219-9 rice mutant lines. (author)

  15. Biological nitrogen fixation in Crotalaria species estimated using the 15N isotope dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samba, R.T.; Neyra, M.; Gueye, M.; Sylla, S.N.; Ndoye, I.; Dreyfus, B.

    2002-01-01

    Growing in Senegal by using 15 N direct isotope dilution technique. Two non-fixing plants, Senna obtusifolia and Senna occidentalis served as reference plants. The amount of nitrogen fixed two months after planting was obtained using the average of the two reference plants. The atom % 15 N excess in the Crotalaria species was significantly lower than that of the reference plants, indicating that significant nitrogen fixation occurred in the three plants. Significant differences were observed between the Crotalaria species; C. ochroleuca yielded more dry matter weight and total nitrogen than did C. perrottetti and C. retusa. The % nitrogen derived from atmosphere (%Ndfa) in leaves and stems was also higher in C. ochroleuca. There was no significant difference in %Ndfa in the whole plant between the three Crotalaria species (47% to 53%). In contrast, interspecific variability was observed based on the %Ndfa. C. ochroleuca significantly exhibited the higher amount of total nitrogen fixed, equivalent to 83 kg of nitrogen fixed per hectare. Based on these data, it was concluded that C. ochroleuca could be used in multiple cropping systems in Senegal for making more nitrogen available to other plants. (author)

  16. 15N isotopic techniques to study nitrogen cycle in soil-plant-atmosphere system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Chandrakala, J.U.; Sachdev, M.S.; Sachdev, P.

    2009-01-01

    Intensification of agriculture to meet the increasing food demand has caused severe disruption in natural balance of global as well as regional nitrogen cycle, potentially threatening the future sustainability of agriculture and environment of the total fertilizer nitrogen used in agriculture globally, only less than half is recovered by crop plants, rest is lost to the environment, resulting in several environmental problems such as ground water pollution and global warming, besides huge economic loss of this costly input in agriculture. Improving fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency and minimising N loss to the environment is the key to regain the lost control of nitrogen cycle in agriculture. Fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency depends largely on N requirement of crops, N supply from soil and fertilizer through N transformations in soil, and N losses from the soil-water-plant system. 15 N isotopic techniques have the potential to provide accurate measurement quantification of different processes involved in N cycle such as fixation of atmospheric N 2 , transformations- mineralization and immobilization- of soil and fertilizer N which governs N supply to plants, and N losses to the environment through ammonia volatilization, denitrification and nitrate leaching. 15 N tracers can also give precise identification of ways and sources of N loss from agriculture. These information can be used to develop strategies for increasing fertilizer N use efficiency and minimizing the loss of this costly input from agriculture to environment, which in turn will help to achieve the tripartite goal of food security, agricultural profitability and environmental quality. (author)

  17. Applications of stable isotopes in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koren'kov, D.A.; Faust, Kh.

    1977-01-01

    The stable isotope 15 N has become widely used in agricultural studies. With it one can determine the true uptake of fertilizer and soil nitrogen by different crops as a function of their particular biological characteristics. Under field conditions, the extent of fertilizer nitrogen uptake by plants does not as a rule exceed 50%, being less for winter cereals and significantly more for perennial grasses. Applied fertilizer nitrogen, by intensifying the mobilization processes, increases the mobility of soil nitrogen. As a result, the accessibility of soil nitrogen to plants increases, and there is a greater chance of its being lost through washing-out. A considerable fraction of fertilizer nitrogen (on average 20-30%) becomes fixed in the soil in compounds which are not easily hydrolized and hence not readily available to plants. Nitrogen fixed in fulvic acids and non-specific compounds is the most mobile and can be used by plants. Fertilizer nitrogen in the soil undergoes various changes, as a result of which some is lost in the form of gaseous compounds. A certain amount of fertilizer nitrogen may become lost through washing-out. On the basis of 15 N investigations, it is possible to find ways of increasing the effectiveness of nitrogenous fertilizers and reducing nitrogen losses - for example, fertilizer application closer to the beginning of the period of active utilization of nutrients by plants, selection of more efficient fertilizer forms and the use of nitrification inhibitors. The wider employment of 15 N in agricultural studies should become possible through the use of cheaper compounds depleted or slightly enriched in 15 N. (author)

  18. The Influence of Seed-borne N in 15N Isotope Dilution Studies with Legumes The Influence of Seed-borne N in 15N Isotope Dilution Studies with Legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen; Andersen, A. J.; Thomsen, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The distriution of seed-borne N in shoot and root of pea and field bean was studied using three methods: 1) determination of the N content in shoot and root of plants grown in sand culture without other N sources. 2) 15N isotope dilution in plants grown in Rhizobium-free medium supplied with 15N-...... of corrections for seed-borne N in studies of nitrogen fixation in legumes is discussed....

  19. Variation in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in flight feathers of a moulting White-bellied Sunbird Cinnyris talatala

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Symes, CT

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors measured d13C and d15N isotope signatures in flight feathers of a White-bellied Sunbird to assess the value of using stable isotopes of feathers in avian dietary studies. Significant variation in d13C and d15N isotope values of flight...

  20. Human baby hair amino acid natural abundance 15N-isotope values are not related to the 15N-isotope values of amino acids in mother's breast milk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Julien, Maxime; Frasquet-Darrieux, Marine; Tea, Illa; Antheaume, Ingrid; Hankard, Régis; Robins, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Since exclusively breast-suckled infants obtain their nutrient only from their mother's milk, it might be anticipated that a correlation will exist between the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of amino acids of protein of young infants and those supplied by their mother. The work presented here aimed to determine whether amino nitrogen transfer from human milk to infant hair protein synthesized within the first month of life conserves the maternal isotopic signature or whether post-ingestion fractionation dominates the nitrogen isotope spectrum. The study was conducted at 1 month post-birth on 100 mother-infant pairs. Isotope ratios (15)N/(14)N and (13)C/(12)C were measured using isotope ratio measurement by Mass Spectrometry (irm-MS) for whole maternal milk, and infant hair and (15)N/(14)N ratios were also measured by GC-irm-MS for the N-pivaloyl-O-isopropyl esters of amino acids obtained from the hydrolysis of milk and hair proteins. The δ(15)N and δ(13)C (‰) were found to be significantly higher in infant hair than in breast milk (δ(15)N, P amino acids in infant hair was also significantly higher than that in maternal milk (P < 0.001). By calculation, the observed shift in isotope ratio was shown not to be accounted for by the amino acid composition of hair and milk proteins, indicating that it is not simply due to differences in the composition in the proteins present. Rather, it would appear that each pool-mother and infant-turns over independently, and that fractionation in infant N-metabolism even in the first month of life dominates over the nutrient N-content.

  1. Estudio de flujos verticales de carbono y nitrógeno en ambientes acuáticos controlados en la bahía de Knebel, Dinamarca utilizando isótopos estables de nitrógeno y carbono (15N y 13C A study of the vertical flow of carbon and nitrogen in controlled aquatic environments at the Knebel Bay, Denmark, with the use of the stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon (15N y 13C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANNI DANERI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se utilizaron isótopos estables como trazadores para caracterizar y cuantificar el flujo vertical de carbono y nitrógeno. Los experimentos se llevaron a cabo en la bahía de Knebel, Dinamarca (56 08' N, 10 11' E, en dos ambientes acuáticos controlados tipo mesocosmos. La adición de nutrientes inorgánicos estimuló el afloramiento del flagelado no-tóxico Prorocentrum minimum, determinando un comportamiento similar en las mediciones de clorofila a (Clo-a, nitrógeno orgánico particulado (NOP y carbono orgánico particulado (COP en ambos mesocosmos. Bajo condiciones no limitantes de nutrientes inorgánicos existió una baja discriminación isotópica resultando en bajos valores de delta13C en el COP en suspensión y sedimentado. El desfase entre los máximos de NOP, Clo-a y COP así como la rápida asimilación del nitrato adicionado en menos de tres días y una razón C/N variable indican que P. minimum posee una gran habilidad para asimilar nitrógeno inorgánico. La razón C/N alcanzó un mínimo al inicio del experimento, para luego aumentar una vez agotado el nitrato de la columna de agua. El nitrógeno nuevo sedimentado alcanzó un 10 a 11 % del total originalmente adicionado a la columna de agua en la forma de nitrato, sin que se observara una sedimentación masiva de P. minimum durante los días de duración de este experimentoStable isotopes were used as tracers to characterize and quantify the downward flux of carbon and nitrogen. The experiments were conducted in Knebel bay, Denmark (56 08' N, 10 11' E, in two controlled aquatic environments (mesocosm type. The addition of inorganic nutrients to the mesocosms stimulated a bloom of the non-toxic flagellate Prorocentrum minimum. A similar pattern in the concentration of chlorophyll a (Chl-a, particulate organic nitrogen (PON and particulate organic carbon (POC was observed in both mesocosms. The elevated nutrient conditions resulted in low isotopic discrimination

  2. Recent applications of stable isotopes in environmental medicine in germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.; Herbarth, O.

    2000-01-01

    In the last few years, a new quality in the application of stable isotopes became manifest. It is the establishment of stable isotopes as a tool in medical routine diagnosis - a novel field of nuclear medicine - and in environmental-medical epidemiological surveys. Owing to missing suitable radioactive isotopes of the bio elements carbon and nitrogen and because of ethical problems in the human use of some radionuclides, the stable isotopes 13 C and 1% N play a key role in this new field. A review is given about four new stable isotope-aided methods for in vivo organ function test. Three of them were developed in Leipzig, germany, and one in houston/Texas. We have validated the tests and then introduced into medical and environmental routine diagnostic use: ( 15 N Methacetin and ( 13 C) methacetin liver function tests to characterize the detoxification capacity of the human liver; ( 15 N) Urea and ( 13 C) urea tests to detect the colonization of the human stomach by the bacterium helicobacter pylori. This bacterium is, as known, responsible for gastritis and ulcer of the gastrointestinal tract. The transmission ways of H. Pylori are under investigation world-wide

  3. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  4. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: geographic and anthropogenic variability

    OpenAIRE

    González-Viana, I. (Inés); Bode, A. (Antonio)

    2013-01-01

    Proyectos ANILE (CTM2009-08396 and CTM2010-08804-E) del Plan Nacional de I+D+i y RADIALES del Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO). I.G.V. recibió un contrato FPI del Ministerio de Economía y Competividad Growing human population add to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. As the excess nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass anthropogenic and natural nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of stable nitrogen isotopes15N). In this study δ15N was dete...

  5. Attempt at estimating the rate of symbiotic fixation of nitrogen in the Lupine by natural isotopic tracing (/sup 15/N)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarger, Noelle [INRA Centre de Recherches de Dijon, 21 (France). Lab. de Microbiologie des Sols; Mariotti, Andre; Mariotti, Francoise [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France)

    1977-06-06

    The rate of nitrogen fixation by a Rhizobium-Leguminous plant pair has been determined by natural isotopic tracing (/sup 15/N). After determining the isotopic fractionation coefficients between atmospheric nitrogen and plant nitrogen on the one hand (epsilon=-0.9) and nitrogen of the substrate and plant nitrogen on the other hand (epsilon=-1.1), the rate of nitrogen fixation by way of mixed nutrition cultures was calculated. The method is more accurate than standard methods.

  6. Stable isotopes and biomarkers in microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of biomarkers in combination with stable isotope analysis is a new approach in microbial ecology and a number of papers on a variety of subjects have appeared. We will first discuss the techniques for analysing stable isotopes in biomarkers, primarily gas chromatography-combustion-isotope

  7. 15N/14N isotopic ratio and statistical analysis: an efficient way of linking seized Ecstasy tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palhol, Fabien; Lamoureux, Catherine; Chabrillat, Martine; Naulet, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the 15 N/ 14 N isotopic ratios of 106 samples of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) extracted from Ecstasy tablets are presented. These ratios, measured using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS), show a large discrimination between samples with a range of δ 15 N values between -17 and +19%o, depending on the precursors and the method used in clandestine laboratories. Thus, δ 15 N values can be used in a statistical analysis carried out in order to link Ecstasy tablets prepared with the same precursors and synthetic pathway. The similarity index obtained after principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis appears to be an efficient way to group tablets seized in different places

  8. {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic ratio and statistical analysis: an efficient way of linking seized Ecstasy tablets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palhol, Fabien; Lamoureux, Catherine; Chabrillat, Martine; Naulet, Norbert

    2004-05-10

    In this study, the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic ratios of 106 samples of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) extracted from Ecstasy tablets are presented. These ratios, measured using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS), show a large discrimination between samples with a range of {delta}{sup 15}N values between -17 and +19%o, depending on the precursors and the method used in clandestine laboratories. Thus, {delta}{sup 15}N values can be used in a statistical analysis carried out in order to link Ecstasy tablets prepared with the same precursors and synthetic pathway. The similarity index obtained after principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis appears to be an efficient way to group tablets seized in different places.

  9. Simultaneous determination of 14N and 15N isotopes in opium by proton induced γ-ray emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritty Rao; Reddy, G.L.N.; Vikram Kumar, S.; Ramana, J.V.; Raju, V.S.; Sanjiv Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the simultaneous determination of 14 N and 15 N isotopes in opium by proton induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) technique. The isotopic ratio of 14 N and 15 N is a useful parameter for assigning provenance of (seized) illicit drugs. The measurement, non-destructive in nature, is performed on pellets made up of opium powders and is based on the prompt detection of 2.313 and 4.4 MeV γ-rays emanating from 14 N(p,p'γ) 14 N and 15 N(p,αγ) 12 C nuclear reactions respectively, induced simultaneously by 3.6-3.8 MeV proton beam. Positive as well as negative deviations from the natural isotopic abundance (99.63:0.37) were observed in the samples. The precision of the measurements is about 4%. The methodology provides an easy and rapid approach to determine the isotopic ratio of 14 N and 15 N and has been used for the first time in the analysis of opium. (author)

  10. Natural isotopes abundance of 15N and 13C in leaves of some N2-fixing and non N2-fixing trees and shrubs in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Shamma'a, M.

    2007-12-01

    Variability in the natural abundance isotopes of 15 N and 13 C in leaves of several legume and non-legume plant species grown at different sites of two areas in semi-arid regions of Syria was determined. In the first area (non-saline soil), the 15 N values of a number of fixing and non-fixing reference plants ranged from -2.09 to +9.46, depending on plant species and studied site. 15 N in a number of legume species including Acacia cyanopylla (-1.73), Acacia farnesiana (-0.55), Prosopis juliflora (-1.64) and Medicago arborea (+1.6) were close to the atmospheric value pointing to a major contribution of N 2 fixing in these species; whereas, those of reference plants were highly positive (between +3.6 and +9.46%). In the actinorhizal tree, Elaeagnus angustifolia, the 15 N abundance was far lower (-0.46 to -2.1%) strongly suggesting that the plant obtained large proportional contribution from BNF. In contrast, δ 15 N values in some other legumes and actinorhizal plants were relatively similar to those of reference plants, suggesting that the contribution of fixed N 2 is negligible. On the other hand, δ 13 C% values in leaves of C3 plants were affected by plant species, ranging from a minimum of -28.67% to a maximum of -23%. However, they were the same within each plant species although they were grown at different sites. Moreover, dual stable isotope analysis in leaves of Prosopis juliflora and other non- legumes grown on a salt affected soil (second area) was also conducted. Results showed that salinity did not affect C assimilation in this woody legume since a higher carbon discrimination was obtained indicating that this plant is a salt tolerant species; whereas, N2-fixation was drastically affected (δ 15 N= +7.03). (Author)

  11. Stable isotope enrichment: Current and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates the Isotope Enrichment Facility for the purpose of providing enriched stable isotopes, selected radioactive isotopes (including the actinides), and isotope-related materials and services for use in various research applications. ORNL is responsible for isotope enrichment and the distribution of approximately 225 nongaseous stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. Many enriched isotope products are of prime importance in the fabrication of nuclear targets and the subsequent production of special radionuclides. State-of-the-art techniques to achieve special isotopic, chemical, and physical requirements are performed at ORNL This report describes the status and capabilities of the Isotope Enrichment Facility and the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory as well as emphasizing potential advancements in enrichment capabilities

  12. Stable isotope enrichment - current and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates the Isotope Enrichment Facility for the purpose of providing enriched stable isotopes, selected radioactive isotopes (including the actinides), and isotope-related materials and services for use in various research applications. ORNL is responsible for isotope enrichment and the distribution of approximately 225 nongaseous stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. Many enriched isotope products are of prime importance in the fabrication of nuclear targets and the subsequent production of special radionuclides. State-of-the-art techniques to achieve special isotopic, chemical, and physical requirements are performed at ORNL. This report describes the status and capabilities of the Isotope Enrichment Facility and the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory as well as emphasizing potential advancements in enrichment capabilities. (orig.)

  13. Influence of forest disturbance on stable nitrogen isotope ratios in soil and vegetation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer D. Knoepp; Scott R. Taylor; Lindsay R. Boring; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2015-01-01

    Soil and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratios (15 N) are influenced by atmospheric nitrogen (N) inputs and processes that regulate organic matter (OM) transformation and N cycling. The resulting 15N patterns may be useful for discerning ecosystem differences in N cycling. We studied two ecosystems; longleaf pine wiregrass (...

  14. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: geographic and anthropogenic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Inés G; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-15

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ(15)N). In this study δ(15)N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ(15)N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ(15)N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ(15)N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ(15)N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15×10(3) inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ(15)N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Periodicity of the stable isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, J C A

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all stable (non-radioactive) isotopes are formally interrelated as the products of systematically adding alpha particles to four elementary units. The region of stability against radioactive decay is shown to obey a general trend based on number theory and contains the periodic law of the elements as a special case. This general law restricts the number of what may be considered as natural elements to 100 and is based on a proton:neutron ratio that matches the golden ratio, characteristic of biological and crystal growth structures. Different forms of the periodic table inferred at other proton:neutron ratios indicate that the electronic configuration of atoms is variable and may be a function of environmental pressure. Cosmic consequences of this postulate are examined. (author)

  16. External Quality Assurance: Annual Proficiency Test on {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C isotopic abundance in plant materials [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, Martina [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Division for Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Eight out of twelve laboratories (67%) participating in the nitrogen analysis reported {sup 15}N-data within the control limits for the enriched plant sample and eight out of nine (89%) participating laboratories for carbon analysis reported {sup 13}C isotopic abundance results within the control limits for this test sample. The reported analytical data and WEPAL evaluation of the {sup 15}N enriched plant material produced by SWMCNL is shown. All participants received a certificate of participation. Worldwide comparison of stable {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C isotope measurements will provide confidence in the laboratory's analytical performance and is hence an invaluable tool for external quality control. It is hoped that in the future more stable isotope laboratories will make use of this unique opportunity to assess their analytical performance and provide evidence of the high quality of their analytical data.

  17. External Quality Assurance: Annual Proficiency Test on 15N and 13C isotopic abundance in plant materials [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Eight out of twelve laboratories (67%) participating in the nitrogen analysis reported 15 N-data within the control limits for the enriched plant sample and eight out of nine (89%) participating laboratories for carbon analysis reported 13 C isotopic abundance results within the control limits for this test sample. The reported analytical data and WEPAL evaluation of the 15 N enriched plant material produced by SWMCNL is shown. All participants received a certificate of participation. Worldwide comparison of stable 15 N and 13 C isotope measurements will provide confidence in the laboratory's analytical performance and is hence an invaluable tool for external quality control. It is hoped that in the future more stable isotope laboratories will make use of this unique opportunity to assess their analytical performance and provide evidence of the high quality of their analytical data

  18. Isotope (δ13C, δ15N, δ2H) diet-tissue discrimination in African grey parrot Psittacus erithacus: implications for forensic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Craig; Skhosana, Felix; Butler, Mike; Gardner, Brett; Woodborne, Stephan

    2017-12-01

    Diet-tissue isotopic relationships established under controlled conditions are informative for determining the dietary sources and geographic provenance of organisms. We analysed δ 13 C, δ 15 N, and non-exchangeable δ 2 H values of captive African grey parrot Psittacus erithacus feathers grown on a fixed mixed-diet and borehole water. Diet-feather Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N discrimination values were +3.8 ± 0.3 ‰ and +6.3 ± 0.7 ‰ respectively; significantly greater than expected. Non-exchangeable δ 2 H feather values (-62.4 ± 6.4 ‰) were more negative than water (-26.1 ± 2.5 ‰) offered during feather growth. There was no positive relationship between the δ 13 C and δ 15 N values of the samples along each feather with the associated samples of food offered, or the feather non-exchangeable hydrogen isotope values with δ 2 H values of water, emphasising the complex processes involved in carbohydrate, protein, and income water routing to feather growth. Understanding the isotopic relationship between diet and feathers may provide greater clarity in the use of stable isotopes in feathers as a tool in determining origins of captive and wild-caught African grey parrots, a species that is widespread in aviculture and faces significant threats to wild populations. We suggest that these isotopic results, determined even in controlled laboratory conditions, be used with caution.

  19. Within-wing isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N variation of monarch butterflies: implications for studies of migratory origins and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hobson Keith A.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, stable isotope measurements are being used to assign individuals to broad geographic origins based on established relationships between animal tissues and tissue-specific isoscapes. In particular, the eastern North American population of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus has been the subject of several studies using established δ2H and δ13C wingtissue isoscapes to infer natal origins of migrating and overwintering individuals. However, there has been no study investigating potential variance that can derive from subsampling different regions of the wings, especially those regions differing in pigmentation (orange versus black. Within-wing isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N variance of 40 monarch butterflies collected from natural overwinter mortality on Mexican roost sites were split evenly into two groups: unwashed samples and those washed in a 2:1 chloroform:methanol solvent. Isotopic variance in δ2H and δ13C was related to pigment (within-wing range 5‰ and 0.5‰, respectively, but not region of subsampling. This variance was reduced 3 to 4 fold through solvent washing that removed pigmented surface scales and any adhered oils. Wing δ15N was similarly influenced by pigment (range 0.3‰, but this effect was not reduced through washing. We recommend future isotopic studies of monarchs and other butterflies for migration research to use the same region for subsampling consistently and to wash samples with solvent to reduce isotopic variance related to uncontrolled variance in discrimination (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N and/or adsorbed water vapor (δ2H. These data also need to be included in description of methods.

  20. Refining Soil Test Calibration and Nitrogen Recommendation in Corn through 15N Isotope Tracer Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rallos, Roland V.

    2015-01-01

    Soil test serve as a baseline to efficiently manage the fertilizer inputs and determine excess nutrients that may cause adverse impact to human health and the environment. The ever increasing fertilizer prices and application inefficiency raised concerns to re-evaluate and redesigned the current crop cultural management to increase its efficiency and productivity. Additionally, with the intensification of farming methods, corn varietal improvement, soil degradations, climate change among many others, the earlier fertilizer recommendations may not be sufficient enough to match with the crop’s fertilizer requirements. The use of 15N isotope tracer techniques in nutrient management research implies important benefits than any existing conventional methodologies. This technology provides enormous advantages because it permits a direct quantitative measurement of the crop nutrient utilization under the influence of varied factors of the environment. Hence, this technique was used to understand N dynamics and fertilizer N-use efficiency (FNUE) in corn grown under different soil fertility levels during wet and dry season productions. This allows us to follow the fate and accurately quantify the contribution of different N pools to the crops N nutrition. Results showed that the fertilizer rates for optimum corn yield under low soil N was observed at 180 kg N ha-1 during dry season while 90 kg N ha-1 during wet season production. While for medium and high N soil, the optimum production yield was noted in 45 kg N ha-1 both in dry and wet season productions. Economic optimum nitrogen recommendations (EONR) were also calculated following the quadratic crop response model. In all cases, EONR for dry season productions are much higher compared to wet season production. Generally, high chlorophyll content was observed at higher fertilizer levels. In addition, more than half of the plant N was taken directly from the added fertilizer during the early stage (30-60 days after

  1. Barley Benefits from Organic Nitrogen in Plant Residues Applied to Soil using 15N Isotope Dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadalla, A.M.; Galal, Y.G.M.; Abdel Aziz, H.A.; El-Degwy, S.M.A.; Abd El-Haleem, M.

    2008-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in pots (sandy soil cultivated with Barley plant) under greenhouse conditions, at Inshas, Egypt. The aim was to evaluate the transformation of nitrogen applied either as mineral form ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , or as organic-material-N (plant residues) .Basal recommended doses of P and K were applied. Labeled 15 N as( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 (5 % a.e) or plant residues (ground leuceana forage, compost, and mixture of them) were applied at a rate of 20 kg N/ ha). 15 N technique was used to evaluate N-uptake and fertilizer use efficiency. The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized block design under greenhouse conditions. The obtained results showed that the dry weight of barley shoots was positively affected by reinforcement of mineral- N with organic-N. On the other hand, the highest dry weight was estimated with leuceana either applied alone or reinforced with mineral N. Similar trend was noticed with N uptake but only with organic N, while with treatment received 50% organic-N. plus 50% mineral- N. the best value of N uptake was recorded with mixture of leuceana and compost. The amount of Ndff was lowest where fertilizer 15 N was applied alone. Comparing Ndff for the three organic treatments which received a combination of fertilizer- 15 N+organic-material-N, results showed that the highest Ndff was occurred with mixture of leuceana and compost, whereas the lowest was induced with individual leuceana treatment. 15 N recovery in shoots of barley ranged between 22.14 % to 82.16 %. The lowest occurred with application of mineral 15 N alone and; the highest occurred where mineral 15 N was mixed with compost or leucaena-compost mixture

  2. Development of stable isotope manufacturing in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokidychev, A.; Pokidycheva, M.

    1999-01-01

    For the past 25 years, Russia has relied heavily on the electromagnetic separation process for the production of middle and heavy mass stable isotopes. The separation of most light isotopes had been centered in Georgia which, after the collapse of the USSR, left Russia without this capability. In the mid-1970s, development of centrifuge technology for the separation of stable isotopes was begun. Alternative techniques such as laser separation, physical-chemical methods, and ion cyclotron resonance have also been investigated. Economic considerations have played a major role in the development and current status of the stable isotope enrichment capabilities of Russia

  3. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the

  4. Gas phase thermal diffusion of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of stable isotopes at Mound Facility is reviewed from a historical perspective. The historical development of thermal diffusion from a laboratory process to a separation facility that handles all the noble gases is described. In addition, elementary thermal diffusion theory and elementary cascade theory are presented along with a brief review of the uses of stable isotopes

  5. Isotopic evaluations of dynamic and plant uptake of N in soil amended with 15N-labelled sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kchaou, R.; Khelil, M. N.; Rejeb, S.; Gharbi, F.; Henchi, B.; Hernandez, T.; Destain, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a novel 15N isotope technique for comparing the dynamics of N derived from sewage sludge applied to sorghum to the dynamics of N derived from the commercial fertilizer, urea. The treatments included a control, sludge applied at three rates (3, 6 and 9 t/ha, or 113, 226 and 338 kg N/ha) and N-urea applied at three rates (150, 250 and 350 kg N/ha). Recovery of 15N -labelled sludge was similar for the different nitrogen rates applied , with a mean value of 27%. However, the recovery of 15N -urea decreased as the rate of N application increased (from 38% to 27%). Approximately 22% and 19% of the 15N from sludge and urea, respectively, remained in the 0-60 cm layer of soil, most of which was present in the 0-20 cm layer. Furthermore, losses of 15N -labelled fertilizer were not affected by the N fertilization source, and the greatest losses, which were measured in response to the highest N application rate, were 59%. (authors)

  6. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N in insect cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80 % can be achieved for {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For {sup 2}H,{sup 15}N and {sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73 %, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  7. Rare stable isotopes in meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) using accelerators has been applied with success to cosmic ray exposure ages and terrestrial residence times of meteorites by measuring cosmogenic nuclides of Be, Cl, and I. It is proposed to complement this work with experiments on rare stable isotopes, in the hope of setting constraints on the processes of solar nebula/meteoritic formation. The relevant species can be classified as: a) daughter products of extinct nuclides (halflife less than or equal to 2 x 10 8 y) -chronology of the early solar system; b) products of high temperature astrophysical processes - different components incorporated into the solar nebula; and c) products of relatively low temperature processes, stellar winds and cosmic ray reactions - early solar system radiation history. The use of micron-scale primary ion beams will allow detailed sampling of phases within meteorites. Strategies of charge-state selection, molecular disintegration and detection should bring a new set of targets within analytical range. The developing accelerator field is compared to existing (keV energy) ion microprobes

  8. 15N-tomatine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliger, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    A method for preparative isolation of 15 N-tomatine from foliage of tomato plants grown hydroponically with 15 N-containing nutrient salts is described. Extractive workup of plant material gave a crude product which was chromatographed on Sephadex LH-20 to yield pure tomatine. Assay of 15 N content by mass spectrometry showed that isotopic purity was ca. 95%. (author)

  9. Impact of seaweed beachings on dynamics of δ15N isotopic signatures in marine macroalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemesle, Stéphanie; Mussio, Isabelle; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Menet-Nédélec, Florence; Claquin, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two coastal sites (COU, GM) in the Bay of Seine affected by summer seaweed beachings. • The same temporal dynamics of the algal δ 15 N at the two sites. • N and P concentrations in seawater of the two sites dominated by riverine sources. • A coupling between seaweed beachings and N sources of intertidal macroalgae. - Abstract: A fine-scale survey of δ 15 N, δ 13 C, tissue-N in seaweeds was conducted using samples from 17 sampling points at two sites (Grandcamp-Maisy (GM), Courseulles/Mer (COU)) along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013. Partial triadic analysis was performed on the parameter data sets and revealed the functioning of three areas: one estuary (EstA) and two rocky areas (GM ∗ , COU ∗ ). In contrast to oceanic and anthropogenic reference points similar temporal dynamics characterized δ 15 N signatures and N contents at GM ∗ and COU ∗ . Nutrient dynamics were similar: the N-concentrations in seawater originated from the River Seine and local coastal rivers while P-concentrations mainly from these local rivers. δ 15 N at GM ∗ were linked to turbidity suggesting inputs of autochthonous organic matter from large-scale summer seaweed beachings made up of a mixture of Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta species. This study highlights the coupling between seaweed beachings and nitrogen sources of intertidal macroalgae

  10. "Fingerprinting" Vehicle Derived Ammonia Utilizing Nitrogen Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, W.; Hastings, M. G.; Colombi, N. K.

    2017-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the primary alkaline molecule in the atmosphere and plays a key role in numerous atmospheric processes that have important implications for human health and climate control. While agriculture activities dominate the global NH3 budget, there are large uncertainties in the urban NH3 emission inventories. The analysis of the nitrogen stable isotope composition of NH3 (δ15N-NH3) might be a useful tool for partitioning NH3 emission sources, as different emission sources tend to emit NH3 with distinctive δ15N signatures or "fingerprints". This novel tool may help improve upon urban emission inventories, which could help to improve modeling of important atmospheric processes involving NH3. However, there is a current lack of δ15N-NH3 measurements of potentially important urban NH3 emission sources, and many of the reported NH3 collection methods have not been verified for its ability to accurately characterize δ15N-NH3. Here we present a laboratory tested method to accurately measure δ15N-NH3 using honeycomb denuders coated with a 2% citric acid solution. Based on laboratory tests, the NH3 collection device has been optimized under a variety of conditions. Near quantitative NH3 collection is found at a sampling rate of 10 SLPM for NH3 concentrations less than 2 ppmv, and δ15N-NH3 precision is found to be approximately 1.0‰. This newly developed NH3 collection device for isotopic characterization has been applied to improve our understanding of the δ15N-NH3 signatures from vehicles. Preliminary results of NH3 collected near a road-side indicate an average δ15N-NH3 of -2.1 ± 1.9‰. This work is ongoing, and plans are in place to collect NH3 directly from tailpipes and from on-road air. Our preliminary results indicate that vehicle derived NH3 has a distinctive δ15N signature compared to agricultural and waste emissions; thus, δ15N(NH3) has the potential to be used to understand urban NH3 emission sources.

  11. Biogeochemical Indicators in High- and Low-Arctic Marine and Terrestrial Avian Community Changes: Comparative Isotopic (13C, 15N, and 34S) Studies in Alaska and Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, D.; Bargmann, N. A.; Burnham, K. K.; Burnham, J. L.; Padula, V. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Welker, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the complex dynamics of environmental change in northern latitudes is of paramount importance today, given documented rapid shifts in sea ice, plant phenology, temperatures, deglaciation, and habitat fidelity. This knowledge is particularly critical for Arctic avian communities, which are integral components by which biological teleconnections are maintained between the mid and northern latitudes. Furthermore, Arctic birds are fundamental to Native subsistence lifestyles and a focus for conservation activities. Avian communities of marine and terrestrial Arctic environments represent a broad spectrum of trophic levels, from herbivores (eg., geese Chen spp.), planktivores (eg., auklets Aethia spp.), and insectivores (eg., passerines: Wheatears Oenanthe spp., Longspurs Calcarius spp.), to predators of marine invertebrates (eg., eiders Somateria spp.), nearshore and offshore fish (eg., cormorants Phalacrocorax spp, puffins Fratercula spp.), even other bird species (eg., gulls Larus spp., falcons Peregrinus spp.). This diversity of trophic interconnections is an integral factor in the dynamics of Arctic ecosystem ecology, and they are key indicators for the strength and trajectories of change. We are especially interested in their feeding ecology, using stable isotope-diet relations to examine historical diets and to predict future feeding ecology by this range of species. Since 2009, we have been studying the foodweb ecology using stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S) of contemporaneous coastal and marine bird communities in High Arctic (Northwest Greenland) and Low Arctic (western Aleutian Islands, AK). We are quantifying the isotopic values of blood, organ tissues, and feathers, and have carried out comparisons between native and lipid-extracted samples. Although geographically distant, these communities comprise similar taxonomic and ecological congeners, including several species common to both (eg., Common Eider, Black-legged Kittiwake, Northern

  12. Expeditious syntheses of stable and radioactive isotope-labeled anticonvulsant agent, JNJ-26990990, and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ronghui; Weaner, Larry E; Hoerr, David C; Salter, Rhys; Gong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Syntheses of stable and radioactive isotope-labeled anticonvulsant agent, JNJ-26990990, that is, N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide and its metabolites are described. [(13)C(15)N]Benzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile was first prepared by coupling of 3-bromo-benzo[b]thiophene with [(13)C(15)N]-copper cyanide. The resultant [(13)C(15)N]benzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile was reduced with lithium aluminum deuteride to give [(13)CD2(15)N]benzo[b]thiophen-3-yl-methylamine; which was then coupled with sulfamide to afford [(13)CD2(15)N]-N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide, the stable isotope-labeled compound with four stable isotope atoms. Direct oxidation of [(13)CD2(15)N]-N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide with hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid gave the stable isotope-labeled sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites. On the other hand, radioactive (14)C-labeled N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide was prepared conveniently by sequential coupling of 3-bromo-benzo[b]thiophene with [(14)C]-copper cyanide, reduction of the carbonitrile to carboxaldehyde, and reductive amination with sulfamide. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Ultra-violet absorption cross sections of isotopically substituted nitrous oxide species: 14N14NO, 15N14NO, 14N15NO and 15N15NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. von Hessberg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The isotopically substituted nitrous oxide species 14N14NO, 15N14NO, 14N15NO and 15N15NO were investigated by ultra-violet (UV absorption spectroscopy. High precision cross sections were obtained for the wavelength range 181 to 218nm at temperatures of 233 and 283K. These data are used to calculate photolytic isotopic fractionation constants as a function of wavelength. The fractionation constants were used in a three-dimensional chemical transport model in order to simulate the actual fractionation of N2O in the stratosphere, and the results were found to be in good agreement with field studies.

  14. Determination of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by labelling the soil atmosphere with sup(15)N sub(2) at low isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.

    1982-01-01

    A direct method to determine the total symbiotic nitrogen fixation during the leguminous plants cycles has been, developed, by labelling the soil atmosphere with sup(15)N sub(2) at low isotope enrichment, of about 1 atom % excess. The soil explored by the root system of leguminous plants was confined by means of a chamber in the field and by sealed pots in greenhouse experiments in order to maintain the soil air labelled with sup(15)N sub(2). The average sup(15)N concentration in the soil atmosphere, necessary to calculate dinitrogen fixation, was obtained by integration of the exponential functions of isotope dilution. Those functions were obtained by periodic sampling and analysis of the N sub(2) in the soil atmosphere. The field experiment with labelled atmosphere was carried out from the 22 sup(nd) to the 31 sup(st) day of the bean crop cycle and 5.5 mg N/plant (24% of total plant N) was derived from fixation. In pot experiments, under greenhouse conditions, integrated determination of fixation was made in Phaseolus beans (from the 19 sup(th) to the 67 sup(th) day from planting) and in soybeans (from the 24 sup(th) to the 70 sup(th) day from planting). The soil atmosphere was labelled with sup(15)N sub(2) in both cases. Average fixation obtained for Phaseolus beans was 80 mg N/plant (65% of total plant N) and for soybeans 265 mg N/plant (71% of total plant N). Evaluation of the basic concept of the isotope dilution method to determine nitrogen fixation in pots experiments, as proposed by Fried and Middelboe (1977) has also been made in the present paper. Simultaneous determinations of fixation in soybeans, using the isotope dilution method of Fried and Middelboe, natural variation of the sup(15)N/ sup(14)N ratios, and total-N differences, indicated the same results for pot experiments, harvested at the end of the plant cycle. (author)

  15. The excretion of isotope in urea and ammonia for estimating protein turnover in man with [15N]glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, E.B.; Garlick, P.J.; McNurlan, M.A.; Waterlow, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Four normal adults were given [ 15 N]-glycine in a single dose either orally or intravenously. Rates of whole-body protein turnover were estimated from the excretion of 15 N in ammonia and in urea during the following 9 h. The rate derived from urea took account of the [ 15 N]urea retained in body water. In postabsorptive subjects the rates of protein synthesis given by ammonia were equal to those from urea, when the isotope was given orally, but lower when an intravenous dose was given. In subjects receiving equal portions of food every 2 h rates of synthesis calculated from ammonia were much lower than those from urea whether an oral or intravenous isotope was given. Comparison of rates obtained during the postabsorptive and absorptive periods indicated regulation by food intake primarily of synthesis when measurements were made on urea, but regulation primarily of breakdown when measurements were made on ammonia. These inconsistencies suggest that changes in protein metabolism might be assessed better by correlating results given by different end-products, and it is suggested that the mean value given by urea and ammonia will be useful for this purpose. (author)

  16. Excretion of isotope in urea and ammonia for estimating protein turnover in man with (/sup 15/N)glycine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fern, E B; Garlick, P J; McNurlan, M A; Waterlow, J C [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK)

    1981-01-01

    Four normal adults were given (/sup 15/N)-glycine in a single dose either orally or intravenously. Rates of whole-body protein turnover were estimated from the excretion of /sup 15/N in ammonia and in urea during the following 9 h. The rate derived from urea took account of the (/sup 15/N)urea retained in body water. In postabsorptive subjects the rates of protein synthesis given by ammonia were equal to those from urea, when the isotope was given orally, but lower when an intravenous dose was given. In subjects receiving equal portions of food every 2 h rates of synthesis calculated from ammonia were much lower than those from urea whether an oral or intravenous isotope was given. Comparison of rates obtained during the postabsorptive and absorptive periods indicated regulation by food intake primarily of synthesis when measurements were made on urea, but regulation primarily of breakdown when measurements were made on ammonia. These inconsistencies suggest that changes in protein metabolism might be assessed better by correlating results given by different end-products, and it is suggested that the mean value given by urea and ammonia will be useful for this purpose.

  17. Auto-inducing media for uniform isotope labeling of proteins with 15N, 13C and 2H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthertz, Nicolas; Klopp, Julia; Winterhalter, Aurélie; Fernández, César; Gossert, Alvar D.

    2015-01-01

    Auto-inducing media for protein expression offer many advantages like robust reproducibility, high yields of soluble protein and much reduced workload. Here, an auto-inducing medium for uniform isotope labelling of proteins with 15 N, 13 C and/or 2 H in E. coli is presented. So far, auto-inducing media have not found widespread application in the NMR field, because of the prohibitively high cost of labeled lactose, which is an essential ingredient of such media. Here, we propose using lactose that is only selectively labeled on the glucose moiety. It can be synthesized from inexpensive and readily available substrates: labeled glucose and unlabeled activated galactose. With this approach, uniformly isotope labeled proteins were expressed in unattended auto-inducing cultures with incorporation of 13 C, 15 N of 96.6 % and 2 H, 15 N of 98.8 %. With the present protocol, the NMR community could profit from the many advantages that auto-inducing media offer

  18. Impact of seaweed beachings on dynamics of δ(15)N isotopic signatures in marine macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle, Stéphanie; Mussio, Isabelle; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Menet-Nédélec, Florence; Claquin, Pascal

    2015-08-15

    A fine-scale survey of δ(15)N, δ(13)C, tissue-N in seaweeds was conducted using samples from 17 sampling points at two sites (Grandcamp-Maisy (GM), Courseulles/Mer (COU)) along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013. Partial triadic analysis was performed on the parameter data sets and revealed the functioning of three areas: one estuary (EstA) and two rocky areas (GM(∗), COU(∗)). In contrast to oceanic and anthropogenic reference points similar temporal dynamics characterized δ(15)N signatures and N contents at GM(∗) and COU(∗). Nutrient dynamics were similar: the N-concentrations in seawater originated from the River Seine and local coastal rivers while P-concentrations mainly from these local rivers. δ(15)N at GM(∗) were linked to turbidity suggesting inputs of autochthonous organic matter from large-scale summer seaweed beachings made up of a mixture of Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta species. This study highlights the coupling between seaweed beachings and nitrogen sources of intertidal macroalgae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. δ15N values of atmospheric N species simultaneously collected using sector-based samplers distant from sources - Isotopic inheritance and fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Martine M.; Cole, Amanda; Smirnoff, Anna; Vet, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of atmospheric N species are commonly suggested as indicators of N emission sources. Therefore, numerous research studies have developed analytical methodologies and characterized primary (gases) and secondary emission products (mostly precipitation and aerosols) from various emitters. These previous studies have generally collected either reduced or oxidized N forms, and sampled them separately prior to determining their δ15N values. Distinctive isotopic signals have been reported for emissions from various sources, and seasonality of the δ15N values has been frequently attributed to shifts in relative contributions from sources with different isotopic signals. However, theoretical concepts suggest that temperature effects on isotopic fractionation may also affect the δ15N values of atmospheric reaction products. Here we use a sector-based multi-stage filter system to simultaneously collect seven reduced and oxidized N species downwind from five different source types in Alberta, Canada. We report δ15N values obtained with a state-of-the-art gold-furnace pre-concentrator online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) to provide representative results even for oxidized-N forms. We find that equilibrium isotope effects and their temperature dependence play significant roles in determining the δ15N values of the secondary emission products. In the end, seasonal δ15N changes here are mainly caused by temperature effects on fractionation, and the δ15N values of only two N species from one source type can be retained as potential fingerprints of emissions.

  20. Changes of stable isotopes carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 in different tissues of cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Fengmei; Yu Hongxia; Wu Wei; Yang Shuming

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a potential tool for tracing food origin. The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition in different tissues of two varieties of cattle under the same culture condition were investigated. δ 13 C and δ 15 N values of different defatted muscle and crude fat, cattle tail hair, blood, liver and feed were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry, and statistical analysis was carried out. The results showed that stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen composition was not affected by cattle variety; the δ 13 C values between different defatted muscle, blood, liver and cattle hair were not significantly different, but δ 15 N value in the liver was much higher than other muscle and the δ 13 C values didn't show difference among all the crude fat samples. So these results indicated that isotope fractionation in the various tissue was discrepant. (authors)

  1. Stable isotope genealogy of meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillinger, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    One of the oldest problems in meteoritics is that of taxonomically grouping samples. In recent years the use of isotopes, particularly oxygen isotopes has proved very successful in this respect. Other light-element systematics potentially can perform the same function. For example, nitrogen in iron meteorites, and nitrogen and carbon in ureilites and SNC meteorites. These measurements will serve to extend and augment existing classification schemes and provide clues to the nature of meteorite parent bodies. They can also aid in the recognition of the isotopic signatures relating to inaccessible regions of the Earth. (author)

  2. Soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics determined by stable isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M. H.

    1998-09-01

    Being aware of limitations and possible bias the 13 C natural abundance technique using the different 13 C enrichments in plants with differing photosynthetic pathways in a powerful tool to quantify turnover processes, both in long-term field studies and short-term laboratory experiments. Special care is needed in choosing reference plots and the proper number of replicate samples. The combination of 13 C and 14 C measurements has a high potential for a further improvement of isotope techniques in SOM studies. Natural abundance of 15 N is less powerful with respect to quantification of SOM processes than the isotope dilution technique. However its usefulness could be distinctly improved by introducing other stable isotopes into the studies.(author)

  3. The study on effect of zeolite on nitrogen use efficiency of corn by 15N-isotope dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Changhong; Li Huaxing; Zhang Xinming; Liu Yuanjin

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study the effect of natural zeolite on nitrogen use efficiency of corn by using 15 N-isotope dilution method. The results showed that application of zeolite could improve the corn growth and enhance the biomass of the corn seedling. By using zeolite, nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of corn was increased by 23.2%-33.1% as compared with no-zeolite treatment; and the residual nitrogen has no significant difference between zeolite treatment and no-zeolite treatment

  4. On the nitrogen isotope dilution analysis by means of the automated NA-5A type 15N-analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Mueller, G.; Stoerl, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The analytical conditions are investigated under which quantitative nitrogen determination through isotope dilution analysis is possible using the NA-5A type 15 N-analyzer. Calculation of the nitrogen quantity, estimation of the maximum error and the evaluation technique are considered in detail. Test analyses performed on ammonia, urea, and amino acid nitrogen model solutions labelled in different ways yielded good correspondence with preset values. This technique was applied to determine the nitrogen content of biomedical materials. A working scheme for direct quantitative determination of ammonia-N, urea-N, and total-N in urine is presented. (author)

  5. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  6. Investigating differences in light stable isotopes between Thai jasmine rice and Sungyod rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukusamude, C.; Kongsri, S.

    2017-10-01

    We report the differences in light stable isotopes between two kinds of Thai rice (Thai jasmine and Sungyod rice). Thai jasmine rice and Sungyod rice were cultivated in the northeast and the south of Thailand. Light isotopes including 13C, 15N and 18O of Thai jasmine rice and Sungyod rice samples were carried out using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Thai jasmine rice (Khao Dawk Mali 105) was cultivated from Thung Kula Rong Hai area, whereas Sungyod rice was cultivated from Phathalung province. Hypothesis testing of difference of each isotope between Thai jasmine rice and Sungyod rice was also studied. The study was the feasibility test whether the light stable isotopes can be the variables to identify Thai jasmine rice and Sungyod rice. The result shows that there was difference in the isotope patterns of Thai jasmine rice and Sungyod rice. Our results may provide the useful information in term of stable isotope profiles of Thai rice.

  7. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    The application of stable Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes, as a tracer for fluxes between different compartments of the water cycle was subject of the present PhD-thesis. During a three year period, temporal data from a wide range of water cycle constituents was collected from...... the Skjern River catchment, Denmark. The presented applications focused on studying the isotopic 'input signal' to the hydrosphere in the form of precipitation, the isotopic 'output signal' with its related dynamic processes at a coastal saltwater-freshwater interface (groundwater isotopes) and the temporal...... development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence...

  8. Rapid Stable Isotope Turnover of Larval Fish in a Lake Superior Coastal Wetland: Implications for Diet and Life History Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trophic linkages of larval fish in Lake Superior coastal wetlands, rivers and embayments can be identified using naturally occurring differences in the stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (15N:14N, ?15N) and carbon (13C:12C, ?13C). We sampled pelagic fish larvae weekly during sprin...

  9. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of bioarcheological material of ancient human populations allows us to understand the subsistence behavior associated with various adaptations to the environment. Feeding habits are essential to the survival and growth of ancient populations. Stable isotope analysis is accepted tool in paleodiet (Schutkowski et al, 1999) and paleoenvironmental (Zernitskaya et al, 2014) studies. However, stable isotopes can be useful not only in investigating human feeding habits but also in describing social and cultural structure of the past populations (Le Huray and Schutkowski, 2005). Only few stable isotope investigations have been performed before in Lithuanian region suggesting a quite uniform diet between males and females and protein intake from freshwater fish and animal protein. Previously, stable isotope analysis has only been used to study a Stone Age population however, more recently studies have been conducted on Iron Age and Late medieval samples (Jacobs et al, 2009). Anyway, there was a need for more precise examination. Stable isotope analysis were performed on human bone collagen and apatite samples in this study. Data represented various ages (from 5-7th cent. to 18th cent.). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on medieval populations indicated that individuals in studied sites in Lithuania were almost exclusively consuming C3 plants, C3 fed terrestrial animals, and some freshwater resources. Current investigation demonstrated social differences between elites and country people and is promising in paleodietary and daily life reconstruction. Acknowledgement I thank prof. dr. G. Grupe, Director of the Anthropological and Palaeoanatomical State Collection in Munich for providing the opportunity to work in her laboratory. The part of this work was funded by DAAD. Antanaitis-Jacobs, Indre, et al. "Diet in early Lithuanian prehistory and the new stable isotope evidence." Archaeologia Baltica 12 (2009): 12-30. Le Huray, Jonathan D., and Holger

  10. Stable Isotope Mapping of Alaskan Grasses and Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, A. L.; Wooller, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    The spatial variation of isotope signatures in organic material is a useful forensic tool, particularly when applied to the task of tracking the production and distribution of plant-derived illicit drugs. In order to identify the likely grow-locations of drugs such as marijuana from unknown locations (i.e., confiscated during trafficking), base isotope maps are needed that include measurements of plants from known grow-locations. This task is logistically challenging in remote, large regions such as Alaska. We are therefore investigating the potential of supplementing our base (marijuana) isotope maps with data derived from other plants from known locations and with greater spatial coverage in Alaska. These currently include >150 samples of modern C3 grasses (Poaceae) as well as marijuana samples (n = 18) from known grow-locations across the state. We conducted oxygen, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses of marijuana and grasses (Poaceae). Poaceae samples were obtained from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Museum of the North herbarium collection, originally collected by field botanists from around Alaska. Results indicate that the oxygen isotopic composition of these grasses range from 10‰ to 30‰, and broadly mirror the spatial pattern of water isotopes in Alaska. Our marijuana samples were confiscated around the state of Alaska and supplied to us by the UAF Police Department. δ13C, δ15N and δ18O values exhibit geographic patterns similar to the modern grasses, but carbon and nitrogen isotopes of some marijuana plants appear to be influenced by additional factors related to indoor growing conditions (supplementary CO2 sources and the application of organic fertilizer). As well as providing a potential forensic resource, our Poaceae isotope maps could serve additional value by providing resources for studying ecosystem nutrient cycling, for tracing natural ecological processes (i.e., animal migration and food web dynamics) and providing

  11. Patterns in Stable Isotope Values of Nitrogen and Carbon in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotope measurements of nitrogen and carbon (15N, 13ddC) are often used to characterize estuarine, nearshore, and open ocean ecosystems. Reliable information about the spatial distribution of base-level stable isotope values, often represented by primary producers, is critical to interpreting values in these ecosystems. While base-level isotope data are generally readily available for estuaries, nearshore coastal waters, and the open ocean, the continental shelf is less studied. To address this, and as a first step toward developing a surrogate for base-level isotopic signature in this region, we collected surface and deep water samples from the United States’ eastern continental shelf in the Western Atlantic Ocean, from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, periodically between 2000 and 2013. During the study, particulate matter 15dN values ranged from 0.8 to 17.4‰, and 13dC values from −26.4 to −15.6‰over the region. We used spatial autocorrelation analysis and random forest modeling to examine the spatial trends and potential environmental drivers of the stable isotope values. We observed general trends toward lower values for both nitrogen and carbon isotopes at the seaward edge of the shelf. Conversely, higher 15dN and 13dC values were observed on the landward edge of the shelf, in particular in the southern portion of the sampling area. Across all sites, the magnitude of the difference between the 15dN of subsurface and surface particulate m

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values for Plants and Mammals in a Semi-Desert Region of Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Davie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Little information exists on the isotopic signatures of plants and animals in Mongolia, limiting the application of stable isotope analysis to wildlife biology studies. Here we present plant and mammal carbon (δ 13 C and nitrogen (δ 15 N isotope values from a desert-steppe region of southeastern Mongolia. We analyzed 11 samples from 11 plant species and 93 samples from 24 mammal species across Ikh Nart Nature Reserve, and compared these numbers to isotope values reported from other areas of Mongolia. Our plant and mammal 13 C and 15 N values were similar to those from a similar arid steppe region and more enriched than those from less arid habitats. Habitat variation within and between study sites has an important infl uence on δ 13 C and δ 15 N variation. Our results supplement current knowledge of isotopic variation in Mongolia and provide a reference for future stable isotope research in Mongolia and similar Asian steppe ecosystems.

  13. Stable Isotope Group 1984 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    The work of the group in 1984 is described and includes studies in isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation. Geothermal studies have decreased compared to other years, but major data summaries were made for Wairakei and Ngawha. The hydrology of Whakarewarewa and Rotorua is being elucidated using water isotopes. Models of the subsurface flows at Kawerau and Ngawha are being made to relate fluid to mineral isotope compositions. A study of the δ 13 C and δ 34 S compositions of New Zealand oils has been started. Groups of oils of related origin are being defined, and compositions will be compared with those of potential source rocks. A method was developed for isotope analysis of sulphur in rocks. The isotopic composition of water is being used to identify and characterise groundwater aquifers in the Wairarapa and at Poverty Bay. Stable carbon isotopes have been used to identify food sources for invertebrates, and to show biochemical pathways in lactation by cows. The geochronology group is involved in major studies in Antarctica, using U-Pb, Rb-Sr and K-Ar methods. Rocks from North Victoria Land, Marie Byrd Land and the USARP mountains are being compared with possible correlatives in New Zealand and Argentina. Strontium isotope data is being applied to the origin of magmas in several regions of New Zealand. The K-Ar data is being stored on computer files. Fission track measurements are being applied to unravel uplift histories in Westland and Taranaki

  14. Characterization of Nitrogen Uptake Pattern in Malaysian Rice MR219 at Different Growth Stages Using 15N Isotope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mu’az Hashim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N use efficiency is usually less than 50%, and it remains a major problem in rice cultivation. Controlled release fertilizer (CRF technology is one of the well-known efforts to overcome this problem. The efficiency of CRF, however, is very much dependent on the timing of nutrient release. This study was conducted to determine the precise time of N uptake by rice as a guideline to develop efficient CRF. Fertilizer N uptake by rice at different growth stages was investigated by using 15N isotopic technique. Rice was planted in pots, with 15N urea as N source at the rate of 120 kg/hm2. Potassium and phosphorus were applied at the same rate of 50 kg/hm2. Standard agronomic practices were employed throughout the growing periods. Rice plants were harvested every two weeks until maturation at the 14th week and analyzed for total N and 15N content. Nitrogen derived from fertilizer was calculated. Total N uptake in plants consistently increased until the 11th week. After that, it started to plateau and finally declined. Moreover, N utilization by rice plants peaked at 50%, which occurred during the 11th week after transplanting. N derived from fertilizer in rice plants were in the range of 18.7% to 40.0% in all plant tissues. The remaining N was derived from soil. Based on this study, N release from CRF should complete by the 11th week after planting to ensure the maximum fertilizer N uptake by rice plants. Efficient CRF should contribute to higher N derived from fertilizer which also resultedin a higher total N uptake by rice plants, increasing the potential of rice to produce higher yield while at the same time of reducing loss.

  15. Diet-tissue stable isotope13C and Δ15N) discrimination factors for multiple tissues from terrestrial reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Steinitz, R; Lemm, JM; Pasachnik, SA; Kurle, CM

    2016-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Rationale Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool for reconstructing trophic interactions to better understand drivers of community ecology. Taxon-specific stable isotope discrimination factors contribute to the best use of this tool. We determined the first Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values for Rock Iguanas (Cyclura spp.) to better understand isotopic fractionation and estimate wild reptile foraging ecology. Methods The Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values between di...

  16. Strontium stable isotope behaviour accompanying basalt weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K. W.; Parkinson, I. J.; Gíslason, S. G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The strontium (Sr) stable isotope composition of rivers is strongly controlled by the balance of carbonate to silicate weathering (Krabbenhöft et al. 2010; Pearce et al. 2015). However, rivers draining silicate catchments possess distinctly heavier Sr stable isotope values than their bedrock compositions, pointing to significant fractionation during weathering. Some have argued for preferential release of heavy Sr from primary phases during chemical weathering, others for the formation of secondary weathering minerals that incorporate light isotopes. This study presents high-precision double-spike Sr stable isotope data for soils, rivers, ground waters and estuarine waters from Iceland, reflecting both natural weathering and societal impacts on those environments. The bedrock in Iceland is dominantly basaltic, d88/86Sr ≈ +0.27, extending to lighter values for rhyolites. Geothermal waters range from basaltic Sr stable compositions to those akin to seawater. Soil pore waters reflect a balance of input from primary mineral weathering, precipitation and litter recycling and removal into secondary phases and vegetation. Rivers and ground waters possess a wide range of d88/86Sr compositions from +0.101 to +0.858. Elemental and isotope data indicate that this fractionation primarily results from the formation or dissolution of secondary zeolite (d88/86Sr ≈ +0.10), but also carbonate (d88/86Sr ≈ +0.22) and sometimes anhydrite (d88/86Sr ≈ -0.73), driving the residual waters to heavier or lighter values, respectively. Estuarine waters largely reflect mixing with seawater, but are also be affected by adsorption onto particulates, again driving water to heavy values. Overall, these data indicate that the stability and nature of secondary weathering phases, exerts a strong control on the Sr stable isotope composition of silicate rivers. [1] Krabbenhöft et al. (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 4097-4109. [2] Pearce et al. (2015) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 157, 125-146.

  17. Stable isotope ratio measurements in hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen using Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, R.C.; Bloom, S.D.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1975-01-01

    A method for measuring stable isotope ratios using laser Raman scattering was developed which may prove of significant utility and benefit in stable isotope tracer studies. Crude isotope ratio measurements obtained with a low-power laser indicate that with current technology it should be possible to construct an isotope ratio measurement system using laser Raman scattering that is capable of performing 0.1 percent accuracy isotope ratio measurements of 16 O/ 18 O in natural abundance oxygen gas or 14 N/ 15 N in natural abundance nitrogen gas in times less than two minutes per sample. Theory pertinent to the technique, designs of specific isotope ratio spectrometer systems, and data relating to isotope ratio measurements in hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen are presented. In addition, the current status of several studies utilizing this technique is discussed. (auth)

  18. Moulting and wintering grounds of Marsh Warblers Acrocephalus palustris: evidence from stable isotopes and ring recoveries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, Petr; Kralj, J.; Pearson, D. J.; Yohannes, E.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2014), s. 193-200 ISSN 0001-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06451S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : bird migration * feather stable isotopes * ring recoveries * stopover * migratory connectivity * δ13C * δ15N Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.745, year: 2014

  19. Diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum) in Arizona as indicated by fecal analysis and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We assessed diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum (J.A. Allen, 1891)) by visual analysis of bat feces and stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis of bat feces, wing, hair, and insect prey. We collected 33 fecal samples from spotted bats and trapped 3755 insect...

  20. Stable isotope evidence of food web connectivity by a top predatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, food web connectivity within the Kowie Estuary on the south-east coast of South Africa was evidenced by the trophic behaviour of the predominantly piscivorous Argyrosomus japonicus. We examined stable isotopes of carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) in the dominant consumers (zooplankton, invertebrates ...

  1. Satellite tracking and stable isotope analysis link wintering and feeding grounds of North Atlantic baleen whales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    e Silva, Monica Almeida; Prieto, Rui; Gauffier, Pauline; Palsboll, Per; Bérubé, Martine; Colaco, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of baleen whales throughout their annual cycle is critical for understanding their ecology, life history and behavior, and for their effective conservation. We combined analysis of stable isotopes15N and δ13C) and satellite tracking data of blue (Balaenoptera

  2. Intercomparison of enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.; Clements, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an intercomparison exercise organized by the IAEA during the latter part of 1988 and 1989. Data are presented for 13 different kinds of enriched stable isotope reference material containing 2 H, 13 C, 15 N and 18 O. Results were submitted by forty participants in twenty countries. 2 refs, 13 figs, 18 tabs

  3. Use of stable isotope techniques in soil organic matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Plants differ distinctly in their C-isotopic composition. The largest differences occur between plant species with different photosynthetic pathways. C 3 - and C 4 -plants are differentiated by approximately 1.4% on the δ-scale (approx. -2.7% 13 C versus -1.3% 13 C). Modern elemental analyser - mass spectrometer combinations reach accuracies of at least 0.01% δ 13 C. Therefore, the difference between C 3 and C 4 plants is sufficient to be used for tracer studies. Several investigations of soil organic mater (SOM) turnover under field conditions were undertaken using the fact that the vegetation cover changed between C 3 and C 4 plants. The discrimination between SOM originating from indigenous vegetation (forest, C 3 ) and sugar cane (C 4 ) after 50 years of cropping introducing two SOM compartments of different stability was described. Another example is the change from prairie vegetation (C 4 ) to different C 3 -crops and the evaluation of the carbon origin at or near equilibrium. More recent studies use 15 N-labelled C 4 -plant residues or 13 C-labelled C 3 -plants to elucidate the fate of carbon and nitrogen in soils developed under C 3 -vegetation. Both in situ experiments and laboratory incubations were used to evaluate carbon and nitrogen fluxes from crop residues. Physical fractionation of bulk soil into particle sizes proved to be of advantage to follow short and long-term dynamics of crop residues within SOM. Changes in the natural abundance of 13 C and 15 N within soil profiles can elucidate leaching or mineralization of humic substances. Changes in the natural abundance of stable isotopes are also possible due to the application of organic manures, quantification, however is not easy because of the small isotopic differences between soil and manure carbon and nitrogen. 15 N labelling of soil nitrogen has been widely used in the last two decades to quantify biological nitrogen fixation. Considerable progress has been made due to the isotope dilution

  4. petrography, compositional characteristics and stable isotope ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Subsurface samples of the predominantly carbonate Ewekoro Formation, obtained from Ibese core hole within the Dahomey basin were used in this study. Investigations entail petrographic, elemental composition as well as stable isotopes (carbon and oxygen) geochemistry in order to deduce the different microfacies and ...

  5. The use of stable isotopes for studies on the physiology of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyse, Alexis.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the stable isotopes 15 N, 18 O, 13 C for studies on the physiology of plants especially of plants grown under natural environment conditions is reviewed. Analysis of isotopic discrimination give estimates of the various patterns of carbon and nitrogen nutrition and of the rate of water circulation. The method can also be used for paleoclimatology and for the detection of frauds in food products [fr

  6. The production of stable isotopes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgel, M; Iglesias, J; Casas, J; Saviron, J M; Quintanilla, M

    1965-07-01

    The activities developed in the field of the production of stable isotopes by means of ion-exchange chromatography and thermal diffusion techniques are reported. The first method was used to study the separation of the nitrogen and boron isotopes, whereby the separation factor was determined by the break through method. Values ranging from 1,028 to 1,022 were obtained for the separation factor of nitrogen by using ammonium hydroxide solutions while the corresponding values as obtained for boron amounted to 1,035-1,027 using boric acid solutions. Using ammonium chloride or acetate and sodium borate, respectively, resulted in the obtention of values for the separation factor approaching unity. The isotopic separation has been carried out according to the method of development by displacement. The separation of the isotopes of the noble gases, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon has been accomplished resorting to the method of thermal diffusion. (Author) 16 refs.

  7. Shifts in rotifer life history in response to stable isotope enrichment: testing theories of isotope effects on organismal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In ecology, stable isotope labelling is commonly used for tracing material transfer in trophic interactions, nutrient budgets and biogeochemical processes. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism growth and metabolism. This assumption is, however, challenged by theoretical considerations and experimental studies on kinetic isotope effects in vivo. Here, I demonstrate profound changes in life histories of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis fed 15N-enriched algae (0.4–5.0 at%); i.e. at the enrichment levels commonly used in ecological studies. These findings support theoretically predicted effects of heavy isotope enrichment on growth, metabolism and ageing in biological systems and underline the importance of accounting for such effects when using stable isotope labelling in experimental studies. PMID:28405367

  8. Use of the natural abundance of stable isotopes in animal physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies on the natural abundance (δ-value) of stable isotopes in animals are reviewed. The δ 13 C value of livestock varies among different portions of the body and depending on living conditions, etc. Typically, however, it is about 1 percent larger than that of the feed used. The value of δ 15 N of the blood, milk and droppings is reported to be larger than that of the feed while that of urine is smaller with the decrease showing changes through the day. Natural δ 13 C and δ 15 N of animals are known to vary among the various organs and tissues. Investigations on cattle and two types musseks have shown that δ 13 C and δ 15 N have no significant relations with their age. The isotopic ratio of stable isotopes in animals is largely dependent on that of the feed used. Study results are cited on the changes in isotopic ratio of carbon and nitrogen along the digestion process of ruminants. Discussion is made on the causes for the changes in isotopic ratio during the metabolic process. Measurement of natural abundance of stable isotopes can be used as a tool for determining the eating habits of ungulate animals raised on grazing lands. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah B Vander Zanden

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H and oxygen (δ18O isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applications using δ2H and, to a lesser extent, δ18O values have demonstrated potential for these elements to provide novel insights in modern food web studies. We explore the advantages and challenges associated with three applications of δ2H and δ18O values in food web studies. First, large δ2H differences between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem end members can permit the quantification of energy inputs and nutrient fluxes between these two sources, with potential applications for determining allochthonous vs. autochthonous nutrient sources in freshwater systems and relative aquatic habitat utilization by terrestrial organisms. Next, some studies have identified a relationship between δ2H values and trophic position, which suggests that this marker may serve as a trophic indicator, in addition to the more commonly used δ15N values. Finally, coupled measurements of δ2H and δ18O values are increasing as a result of reduced analytical challenges to measure both simultaneously and may provide additional ecological information over single element measurements. In some organisms, the isotopic ratios of these two elements are tightly coupled, whereas the isotopic disequilibrium in other organisms may offer insight into the diet and physiology of individuals. Although a coherent framework for interpreting δ2H and δ18O data in the context of food web studies is emerging, many fundamental uncertainties remain. We highlight directions for targeted research that

  10. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  11. 15N in biological nitrogen fixation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.

    1986-05-01

    A bibliography with 298 references on the use of the stable nitrogen isotope 15 N in the research on the biological fixation of dinitrogen is presented. The literature pertaining to this bibliography covers the period from 1975 to the middle of 1985. (author)

  12. Stable isotope separation by thermal diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasaru, Gheorghe

    2001-01-01

    Thermal diffusion in both gaseous and liquid phase has been subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations, especially after the invention of K. Clusius and G. Dickel of the thermal diffusion column, sixty three years ago. This paper gives a brief overview of the most important research and developments performed during the time at the National Institute for Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technology (ITIM) at Cluj - Napoca, Romania in the field of separation of stable isotopes by thermal diffusion. An retrospective analysis of the research and results concerning isotope separation by thermal diffusion entails the following conclusions: - thermal diffusion is an adequate method for hydrogen isotope separation (deuterium and tritium) and for noble gas isotope separation (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe); - thermal diffusion is attractive also for 13 C enrichment using methane as raw material for separation, when annual yields of up to 100 g are envisaged; - lately, the thermal diffusion appears to be chosen as a final enrichment step for 17 O. An obvious advantage of this method is its non-specificity, i.e. the implied equipment can be utilized for isotope separation of other chemical elements too. Having in view the low investment costs for thermal diffusion cascades the method appears economically attractive for obtaining low-scale, laboratory isotope production. The paper has the following content: 1. The principle of method; 2. The method's application; 3. Research in the field of thermal diffusion at ITIM; 4. Thermal diffusion cascades for N, C, Ne, Ar and Kr isotope separation; 5. Conclusion

  13. The conflict between cheetahs and humans on Namibian farmland elucidated by stable isotope diet analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian C Voigt

    Full Text Available Large areas of Namibia are covered by farmland, which is also used by game and predator species. Because it can cause conflicts with farmers when predators, such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus, hunt livestock, we assessed whether livestock constitutes a significant part of the cheetah diet by analysing the stable isotope composition of blood and tissue samples of cheetahs and their potential prey species. According to isotopic similarities, we defined three isotopic categories of potential prey: members of a C4 food web with high δ15N values (gemsbok, cattle, springhare and guinea fowl and those with low δ15N values (hartebeest, warthog, and members of a C3 food web, namely browsers (eland, kudu, springbok, steenbok and scrub hare. We quantified the trophic discrimination of heavy isotopes in cheetah muscle in 9 captive individuals and measured an enrichment for 15N (3.2‰ but not for 13C in relation to food. We captured 53 free-ranging cheetahs of which 23 were members of groups. Cheetahs of the same group were isotopically distinct from members of other groups, indicating that group members shared their prey. Solitary males (n = 21 and males in a bachelor groups (n = 11 fed mostly on hartebeest and warthogs, followed by browsers in case of solitary males, and by grazers with high δ15N values in case of bachelor groups. Female cheetahs (n = 9 predominantly fed on browsers and used also hartebeest and warthogs. Mixing models suggested that the isotopic prey category that included cattle was only important, if at all, for males living in bachelor groups. Stable isotope analysis of fur, muscle, red blood cells and blood plasma in 9 free-ranging cheetahs identified most individuals as isotopic specialists, focussing on isotopically distinct prey categories as their food.

  14. The Conflict between Cheetahs and Humans on Namibian Farmland Elucidated by Stable Isotope Diet Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Christian C.; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jörg; Blanc, Anne-Sophie; Jago, Mark; Wachter, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Large areas of Namibia are covered by farmland, which is also used by game and predator species. Because it can cause conflicts with farmers when predators, such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), hunt livestock, we assessed whether livestock constitutes a significant part of the cheetah diet by analysing the stable isotope composition of blood and tissue samples of cheetahs and their potential prey species. According to isotopic similarities, we defined three isotopic categories of potential prey: members of a C4 food web with high δ15N values (gemsbok, cattle, springhare and guinea fowl) and those with low δ15N values (hartebeest, warthog), and members of a C3 food web, namely browsers (eland, kudu, springbok, steenbok and scrub hare). We quantified the trophic discrimination of heavy isotopes in cheetah muscle in 9 captive individuals and measured an enrichment for 15N (3.2‰) but not for 13C in relation to food. We captured 53 free-ranging cheetahs of which 23 were members of groups. Cheetahs of the same group were isotopically distinct from members of other groups, indicating that group members shared their prey. Solitary males (n = 21) and males in a bachelor groups (n = 11) fed mostly on hartebeest and warthogs, followed by browsers in case of solitary males, and by grazers with high δ15N values in case of bachelor groups. Female cheetahs (n = 9) predominantly fed on browsers and used also hartebeest and warthogs. Mixing models suggested that the isotopic prey category that included cattle was only important, if at all, for males living in bachelor groups. Stable isotope analysis of fur, muscle, red blood cells and blood plasma in 9 free-ranging cheetahs identified most individuals as isotopic specialists, focussing on isotopically distinct prey categories as their food. PMID:25162403

  15. Principles and limitations of stable isotopes in differentiating organic and conventional foodstuffs: 1. Plant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Caio Teves; Chalk, Phillip Michael; Magalhães, Alberto M T

    2015-01-01

    Among the lighter elements having two or more stable isotopes (H, C, N, O, S), δ(15)N appears to be the most promising isotopic marker to differentiate plant products from conventional and organic farms. Organic plant products vary within a range of δ(15)N values of +0.3 to +14.6%, while conventional plant products range from negative to positive values, i.e. -4.0 to +8.7%. The main factors affecting δ(15)N signatures of plants are N fertilizers, biological N2 fixation, plant organs and plant age. Correlations between mode of production and δ(13)C (except greenhouse tomatoes warmed with natural gas) or δ(34)S signatures have not been established, and δ(2)H and δ(18)O are unsuitable markers due to the overriding effect of climate on the isotopic composition of plant-available water. Because there is potential overlap between the δ(15)N signatures of organic and conventionally produced plant products, δ(15)N has seldom been used successfully as the sole criterion for differentiation, but when combined with complementary analytical techniques and appropriate statistical tools, the probability of a correct identification increases. The use of organic fertilizers by conventional farmers or the marketing of organic produce as conventional due to market pressures are additional factors confounding correct identification. The robustness of using δ(15)N to differentiate mode of production will depend on the establishment of databases that have been verified for individual plant products.

  16. Utilization of stable isotopes in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The ten lectures given at this round table are presented together with a discussion. Five lectures, relating to studies in which deuterium oxide was employed as a tracer of body water, dealt with pulmonary water measurements in man and animals, the total water pool in adipose subjects, and liquid compartments in children undergoing hemodyalisis. The heavy water is analysed by infrared spectrometry and a new double spectrodoser is described. Two studies using 13 C as tracer, described the diagnosis of liver troubles and diabetes respectively. A general review of the perspectives of the application of stable isotopes in clinical medicine is followed by a comparison of the use of stable and radioactive isotopes in France [fr

  17. Methods of 15N tracer research in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschberg, K.; Faust, H.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the stable isotope 15 N is of increasing importance in different scientific disciplines, especially in medicine, agriculture, and the biosciences. The close correlation between the growing interest and improvements of analytical procedures resulted in remarkable advances in the 15 N tracer technique. On the basis of the latest results of 15 N tracer research in life sciences and agriculture methods of 15 N tracer research in biological systems are compiled. The 15 N methodology is considered under three headings: Chemical analysis with a description of methods of sample preparation (including different separation and isolation methods for N-containing substances of biological and agricultural origin) and special procedures converting ammonia to molecular nitrogen. Isotopic analysis with a review on the most important methods of isotopic analysis of nitrogen: mass spectrometry (including the GC-MS technique), emission spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and other analytical procedures. 15 N-tracer techniques with a consideration of the role of the isotope dilution analysis as well as different labelling techniques and the mathematical interpretation of tracer data (modelling, N turnover experiments). In these chapters also sources of errors in chemical and isotopic analysis, the accuracy of the different methods and its importance on tracer experiments are discussed. Procedures for micro scale 15 N analysis and aspects of 15 N analysis on the level of natural abundance are considered. Furthermore some remarks on isotope effects in 15 N tracer experiments are made. (author)

  18. Stable isotope measurements of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.W.C.; Ferretti, D.F.; Vaughn, B.H.; Francey, R.J.; Allison, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide, δ 13 CO 2 are useful for partitioning surface-atmospheric fluxes into terrestrial and oceanic components. δC 18 OO also has potential for segregating photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we describe in detail the techniques for making these measurements. The primary challenge for all of the techniques used to measure isotopes of atmospheric CO 2 is to achieve acceptable accuracy and precision and to maintain them over the decades needed to observe carbon cycle variability. The keys to success such an approach are diligent intercalibrations of laboratories from around the world, as well as the use of multiple techniques such as dual inlet and GC-IRMS and the intercomparison of such measurements. We focus here on two laboratories, the Stable Isotope Lab at the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado is described and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation - Atmospheric Research (CSIRO). Different approaches exist at other laboratories (e.g. programs operated by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) and The Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies, Toboku University (TU)) however these are not discussed here. Finally, we also discuss the recently developed Gas Chromatography - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-IRMS) technique which holds significant promise for measuring ultra-small samples of gas with good precision. (author)

  19. The effect of different levels of fertilizer on nitrogen nutrient of pasture using 15N-isotope dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Dongpu; Bai Lingyu; Hua Luo; Yao Yunyin

    2000-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study the effect of different levels of fertilizer on N% of ryegrass in monoculture or mixed culture with white clover and symbiotic dinitrogen fixation of white clover by using 15 N-isotope dilution method. It showed that (1) N% of ryegrass in monoculture or mixed culture was the highest at 67 days after fertilizing (DAF) and decreased with time; (2) N% of white clover was the greatest at 67 DAF, slightly decreased at 92 DAF, and then increased at 137 DAF, related to the increasing of nitrogen fixation by white clover; (3) At 164 kg 15 NH 4 SO 4 /hm 2 , N% of ryegrass in mixed culture at different cutting time was greater than that in monoculture. It obviously occurred that fixed nitrogen was transferred from white clover to ryegrass in mixed; (4) During the whole growth period, the main nitrogen resource of white clover was symbiotic dinitrogen fixation and that of ryegrass was soil nitrogen; (5) Effect of different levels of applied N on N% of ryegrass and white clover was significant

  20. Stable isotope investigation of insect and plant use in the diets of two Puerto Rican bat species

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N) analysis to estimate the importance of plants and insects to the diet of two nectar-feeding bats on Puerto Rico, the brown flower bat (Erophylla bombifrons) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat (Monophyllus redmani). Stable carbon and nit...

  1. Stable isotope analysis in primatology: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Paul A; Loudon, James E; Sponheimer, Matt

    2012-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become an important tool in ecology over the last 25 years. A wealth of ecological information is stored in animal tissues in the relative abundances of the stable isotopes of several elements, particularly carbon and nitrogen, because these isotopes navigate through ecological processes in predictable ways. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been measured in most primate taxonomic groups and have yielded information about dietary content, dietary variability, and habitat use. Stable isotopes have recently proven useful for addressing more fine-grained questions about niche dynamics and anthropogenic effects on feeding ecology. Here, we discuss stable carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics and critically review the published stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data for modern primates with a focus on the problems and prospects for future stable isotope applications in primatology. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Stable isotope signatures reflect dietary diversity in European forest moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Marc-Oliver; Seifert, Carlo Lutz; Lehner, Lisamarie; Truxa, Christine; Wanek, Wolfgang; Fiedler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Information on larval diet of many holometabolous insects remains incomplete. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope analysis in adult wing tissue can provide an efficient tool to infer such trophic relationships. The present study examines whether moth feeding guild affiliations taken from literature are reflected in isotopic signatures. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and permutational analysis of variance indicate that centroids of dietary groups differ significantly. In particular, species whose larvae feed on mosses or aquatic plants deviated from those that consumed vascular land plants. Moth δ(15)N signatures spanned a broader range, and were less dependent on species identity than δ(13)C values. Comparison between moth samples and ostensible food sources revealed heterogeneity in the lichenivorous guild, indicating only Lithosia quadra as an obligate lichen feeder. Among root-feeding Agrotis segetum, some specimens appear to have developed on crop plants in forest-adjacent farm land. Reed-feeding stem-borers may partially rely on intermediary trophic levels such as fungal or bacterial growth. Diagnostic partitioning of moth dietary guilds based on isotopic signatures alone could not be achieved, but hypotheses on trophic relationships based on often vague literature records could be assessed with high resolution. Hence, the approach is well suited for basic categorization of moths where diet is unknown or notoriously difficult to observe (i.e. Microlepidoptera, lichen-feeders).

  3. Using stable isotopes to assess dietary changes of American black bears from 1980 to 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen van Manen, Jennapher L; Muller, Lisa I; Li, Zheng-hua; Saxton, Arnold M; Pelton, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in 117 hair samples from American black bears (Ursus americanus) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, during 1980-2001 from live-trapped bears. We also collected hair from bears with known diets to compare with the wild bears. We hypothesized that biological factors (age, mass, and sex), food availability (hard mast and wild hogs (Sus scrofa)), and nuisance status would influence food selection by black bears and changes in their feeding history would be measureable using stable isotopes. We developed a set of a priori models using nine variables to examine changes in black bear stable isotope values. We found no support for changes in δ(13)C values associated with any of the nine variables we analyzed. Bears had enriched (15)N in years with low white oak mast production and depleted (15)N when white oak mast was abundant. Subadults had enriched (15)N compared with adults and older adults. Variation in δ(15)N increased from 1980-1991 to 1992-2000 when hard mast production had greater fluctuations. Bears in a better physical condition appeared more likely to access foods with higher protein content. In years of low white oak acorn production, larger bears and subadults likely turned to alternative food sources. The long-term variation detected in this study was important in identifying which bears were potentially more susceptible to changes in availability of hard mast.

  4. Lifetime Stable isotopes profiles in whale earplug: assessment of foraging and migrations in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, F.; Crain, D.; Winfield, Z.; Trumble, S.; Usenko, S.

    2017-12-01

    Whale earplugs, historically used for aging, were used to reconstruct lifetime stable isotope profiles for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) for individual whales by delaminating lamina within the earplug. These stable isotope profile, which provide Continuous lifetime records of feeding, foraging ecology, and migration, were determined for 20 individuals from 4 baleen species including fin, minke, humpback, and blue whales spanning more than a century (1869 - 2014) using stable isotope analysis. Approximately 1 mg tissue from each lamina (n=1200) was analyzed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). This research using whale earplugs have combined age estimates with stable isotope measurements to reconstruct lifetime foraging profiles with a 6-month resolution, providing an unprecedented opportunity to assess periods and trends in dietary fluctuations as well as migration between different foraging area which have distinct isotope values. Trends with these profiles suggest long-term changing in migration, while annual variability highlights seasonal fasting and feeding. Isotopic ratios were also used to identify subpopulations of Atlantic fin whales, which enabled us to assign unidentified humpback and minke whales to the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans. This historical archive of data provides us an unprecedented tool to assess long term marine ecosystem and subsequently marine organism transition to alternate foraging area and shed light on the whale's population status in the Northern hemisphere.

  5. Geochemistry of the stable isotopes of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douthitt, C B [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1982-08-01

    One hundred thirty two new measurements of the relative abundances of the stable isotopes of silicon in terrestrial materials are presented. The total variation of delta/sup 30/Si found is 6.2 parts per thousand, centered on the mean of terrestrial mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks, delta/sup 30/Si = -0.4 parts per thousand. Igneous rocks show limited variation; coexisting minerals exhibit small, systematic silicon isotopic fractionations that are roughly 1/3 the magnitude of concomitant oxygen isotopic fractionations at 1150/sup 0/C. In both igneous minerals and rocks, delta/sup 30/Si shows a positive correlation with silicon content, as does delta/sup 18/O. Opal from both sponge spicules and sinters is light, with delta/sup 30/Si = -2.3 and -1.4 parts per thousand respectively. Large delta/sup 30/Si values of both positive and negative sign are reported for the first time from clay minerals, opaline phytoliths, and authigenic quartz. All highly fractionated samples were precipitated from solution at low temperatures; however, aqueous silicon is not measurably fractionated relative to quartz at equilibrium. A kinetic isotope fractionation of approximately 3.5 parts per thousand is postulated to occur during the low temperature precipitation of opal and, possibly, poorly ordered phyllosilicates, with the silicate phase being enriched in /sup 28/Si. This fractionation, coupled with a Rayleigh precipitation model, is capable of explaining most non-magmatic delta/sup 30/Si variations.

  6. NMR-based stable isotope resolved metabolomics in systems biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    An important goal of metabolomics is to characterize the changes in metabolic networks in cells or various tissues of an organism in response to external perturbations or pathologies. The profiling of metabolites and their steady state concentrations does not directly provide information regarding the architecture and fluxes through metabolic networks. This requires tracer approaches. NMR is especially powerful as it can be used not only to identify and quantify metabolites in an unfractionated mixture such as biofluids or crude cell/tissue extracts, but also determine the positional isotopomer distributions of metabolites derived from a precursor enriched in stable isotopes such as 13 C and 15 N via metabolic transformations. In this article we demonstrate the application of a variety of 2-D NMR editing experiments to define the positional isotopomers of compounds present in polar and non-polar extracts of human lung cancer cells grown in either [U– 13 C]-glucose or [U– 13 C, 15 N]-glutamine as source tracers. The information provided by such experiments enabled unambiguous reconstruction of metabolic pathways, which is the foundation for further metabolic flux modeling.

  7. Study of the dissolution of uranium nitrides in nitric acid by measuring the isotope ratios, 15N/14N, of the formed products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadibi-Olschewski, Nathalie

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dissolution behavior of nitride fuels in nitric acid. The use of nitride fuels in nuclear reactor has many advantages compared with the oxide fuels. One problem in employing nitrides as fuels is the formation of radio-toxic 14 C upon irradiation of natural nitrogen ( 14 N:99.64 pc, 15 N:0.36 pc) in a nuclear reactor ( 14 N (n,p) 14 C reaction). The use of 15 N-enriched fuels avoids these drawbacks. This study was undertaken so as to better understand the mechanisms of the dissolution process and also to follow the distribution of the expensive nitrogen isotope 15 N from the point of view of its behaviour during the recycling process. This study is based on previous work, where the evolution of the nitrogen compounds formed during the dissolution was measured as a function of time for different dissolution parameters. Using 15 N-enriched uranium nitrides or 15 N-enriched nitric acid, two methods were developed to study the influence of the dissolution parameters, nitric acid temperature and concentration, on the 15 N/ 14 N ratios of the nitrogen, nitrogen oxides and ammonium ions utilising a coupled gas-chromatograph/mass spectrometer. The main results are: - similar isotopic composition for NH 4 + and UN; - mixed 14 N/ 15 N composition for N 2 and N 2 O; - similar isotopic composition for NO, NO 2 and HNO 3 ; - no influence of the dissolution parameters on the isotopic composition of the products; an exception maybe made for the N 2 case, which contains more 15 N with increasing acidity and temperature. This work confirms that the first dissolution step is the oxidation of UN with HNO 3 to form NH 4 + and HNO 2 and that HNO 2 has a catalytic role in the dissolution to form other products. And we can conclude that to recycle 15 N, the ammonium ions must be recycled, at least for the case where nitrides are dissolved directly in HNO 3 . (author) [fr

  8. Enhanced understanding of ectoparasite: host trophic linkages on coral reefs through stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Sikkel, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism, although the most common type of ecological interaction, is usually ignored in food web models and studies of trophic connectivity. Stable isotope analysis is widely used in assessing the flow of energy in ecological communities and thus is a potentially valuable tool in understanding the cryptic trophic relationships mediated by parasites. In an effort to assess the utility of stable isotope analysis in understanding the role of parasites in complex coral-reef trophic systems, we performed stable isotope analysis on three common Caribbean reef fish hosts and two kinds of ectoparasitic isopods: temporarily parasitic gnathiids (Gnathia marleyi) and permanently parasitic cymothoids (Anilocra). To further track the transfer of fish-derived carbon (energy) from parasites to parasite consumers, gnathiids from host fish were also fed to captive Pederson shrimp (Ancylomenes pedersoni) for at least 1 month. Parasitic isopods had δ13C and δ15N values similar to their host, comparable with results from the small number of other host–parasite studies that have employed stable isotopes. Adult gnathiids were enriched in 15N and depleted in13C relative to juvenile gnathiids, providing insights into the potential isotopic fractionation associated with blood-meal assimilation and subsequent metamorphosis. Gnathiid-fed Pedersen shrimp also had δ13C values consistent with their food source and enriched in 15N as predicted due to trophic fractionation. These results further indicate that stable isotopes can be an effective tool in deciphering cryptic feeding relationships involving parasites and their consumers, and the role of parasites and cleaners in carbon transfer in coral-reef ecosystems specifically.

  9. Enhanced understanding of ectoparasite–host trophic linkages on coral reefs through stable isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda W.J. Demopoulos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Parasitism, although the most common type of ecological interaction, is usually ignored in food web models and studies of trophic connectivity. Stable isotope analysis is widely used in assessing the flow of energy in ecological communities and thus is a potentially valuable tool in understanding the cryptic trophic relationships mediated by parasites. In an effort to assess the utility of stable isotope analysis in understanding the role of parasites in complex coral-reef trophic systems, we performed stable isotope analysis on three common Caribbean reef fish hosts and two kinds of ectoparasitic isopods: temporarily parasitic gnathiids (Gnathia marleyi and permanently parasitic cymothoids (Anilocra. To further track the transfer of fish-derived carbon (energy from parasites to parasite consumers, gnathiids from host fish were also fed to captive Pederson shrimp (Ancylomenes pedersoni for at least 1 month. Parasitic isopods had δ13C and δ15N values similar to their host, comparable with results from the small number of other host–parasite studies that have employed stable isotopes. Adult gnathiids were enriched in 15N and depleted in 13C relative to juvenile gnathiids, providing insights into the potential isotopic fractionation associated with blood-meal assimilation and subsequent metamorphosis. Gnathiid-fed Pedersen shrimp also had δ13C values consistent with their food source and enriched in 15N as predicted due to trophic fractionation. These results further indicate that stable isotopes can be an effective tool in deciphering cryptic feeding relationships involving parasites and their consumers, and the role of parasites and cleaners in carbon transfer in coral-reef ecosystems specifically.

  10. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N chemical shifts of intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enaminocarbonyl derivatives of Meldrum’s and Tetronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Saif; Zhang, Wei; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-07-01

    Secondary deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N nuclear shieldings in a series of cyclic enamino-diesters and enamino-esters and acyclic enaminones and enamino-esters have been examined and analysed using NMR and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)) methods. One-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra of enaminocarbonyl and their deuterated analogues were recorded in CDCl 3 and CD 2Cl 2 at variable temperatures and assigned. 1JNH coupling constants for the derivatives of Meldrum's and tetronic acids reveal that they exist at the NH-form. It was demonstrated that deuterium isotope effects, for the hydrogen bonded compounds, due to the deuterium substitution at the nitrogen nucleus lead to large one-bond isotope effects at nitrogen, 1Δ 15N(D), and two-bond isotope effects on carbon nuclei, 2ΔC(ND), respectively. A linear correlations exist between 2ΔC(ND) and 1Δ 15N(D) whereas the correlation with δNH is divided into two. A good agreement between the experimentally observed 2ΔC(ND) and calculated dσ 13C/dR NH was obtained. A very good correlation between calculated NH bond lengths and observed NH chemical shifts is found. The observed isotope effects are shown to depend strongly on Resonance Assisted Hydrogen bonding.

  11. Disentangling effects of growth and nutritional status on seabird stable isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, J.; Hatch, Shyla A.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that an individual's physiology affects its carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures, obscuring a signal often assumed to be only a reflection of diet and foraging location. We examined effects of growth and moderate food restriction on red blood cell (RBC) and feather ??15N and ??13C in rhinoceros auklet chicks (Cerorhinca monocerata), a piscivorous seabird. Chicks were reared in captivity and fed either control (75 g/day; n = 7) or ~40% restricted (40 g/day; n = 6) amounts of high quality forage fish. We quantified effects of growth on isotopic fractionation by comparing ??15N and ??13C in control chicks to those of captive, non-growing subadult auklets (n = 11) fed the same diet. To estimate natural levels of isotopic variation, we also collected blood from a random sample of free-living rhinoceros auklet adults and chicks in the Gulf of Alaska (n = 15 for each), as well as adult feather samples (n = 13). In the captive experiment, moderate food restriction caused significant depletion in ??15N of both RBCs and feathers in treatment chicks compared to control chicks. Growth also induced depletion in RBC ??15N, with chicks exhibiting lower ??15N when they were growing the fastest. As growth slowed, ??15N increased, resulting in an overall pattern of enrichment over the course of the nestling period. Combined effects of growth and restriction depleted ??15N in chick RBCs by 0.92???. We propose that increased nitrogen-use efficiency is responsible for 15N depletion in both growing and food-restricted chicks. ??15N values in RBCs of free-ranging auklets fell within a range of only 1.03???, while feather ??15N varied widely. Together, our captive and field results suggest that both growth and moderate food restriction can affect stable isotope ratios in an ecologically meaningful way in RBCs although not feathers due to greater natural variability in this tissue. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Protein labelling with stable isotopes: strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lirsac, P.N.; Gilles, N.; Jamin, N.; Toma, F.; Gabrielsen, O.; Boulain, J.C.; Menez, A.

    1994-01-01

    A protein labelling technique with stable isotopes has been developed at the CEA: a labelled complete medium has been developed, performing as well as the Luria medium, but differing from it because it contains not only free aminated acids and peptides, but also sugars (96% of D-glucopyrannose) and labelled nucleosides. These precursors are produced from a labelled photosynthetic micro-organisms biomass, obtained with micro-algae having incorporated carbon 13, nitrogen 15 and deuterium during their culture. Labelling costs are reduced. 1 fig., 1 tab., 3 refs

  13. Linking Isotopes and Panmixia: High Within-Colony Variation in Feather δ2H, δ13C, and δ15N across the Range of the American White Pelican.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Reudink

    Full Text Available Complete panmixia across the entire range of a species is a relatively rare phenomenon; however, this pattern may be found in species that have limited philopatry and frequent dispersal. American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhyncos provide a unique opportunity to examine the role of long-distance dispersal in facilitating gene flow in a species recently reported as panmictic across its broad breeding range. This species is also undergoing a range expansion, with new colonies arising hundreds of kilometers outside previous range boundaries. In this study, we use a multiple stable isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N approach to examine feather isotopic structuring at 19 pelican colonies across North America, with the goal of establishing an isotopic basemap that could be used for assigning individuals at newly established breeding sites to source colonies. Within-colony isotopic variation was extremely high, exceeding 100‰ in δ2H within some colonies (with relatively high variation also observed for δ13C and δ15N. The high degree of within-site variation greatly limited the utility of assignment-based approaches (42% cross-validation success rate; range: 0-90% success. Furthermore, clustering algorithms identified four likely isotopic clusters; however, those clusters were generally unrelated to geographic location. Taken together, the high degree of within-site isotopic variation and lack of geographically-defined isotopic clusters preclude the establishment of an isotopic basemap for American white pelicans, but may indicate that a high incidence of long-distance dispersal is facilitating gene flow, leading to genetic panmixia.

  14. Trends in the use of stable isotopes in biochemistry and pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.; Walker, T.E.

    1977-01-01

    Recent trends in the use of the stable isotopes 13 C, 15 N and 18 O in biochemistry and pharmacology are reviewed with emphasis on the studies that have employed nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as analytical techniques. Pharmacological studies with drugs and other compounds labelled with stable isotopes have developed in parallel with the rapid progress in the enhancement of sensitivity and selectivity of gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analyses, and have been directed largely to an evaluation of pharmako-kinetics and drug metabolic pathways. In these studies, illustrated with selected samples, isotopically labelled compounds have been used to advantage as internal standards for the mass spectrometric analyses and as in vivo tracers for metabolites. In the broader discipline of biochemistry, stable isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds have been used increasingly in conjuction with both nmr spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in tracer and structural studies. The more recent trends in the use of stable isotopes in these biochemical studies are discussed in the context of the improvements in analytical techniques. Specific examples will be drawn from investigations of the biosynthesis of natural products by micro-organisms; the protein, fat and carbohydrate fluxes in humans; and the structure and function of enzymes, membranes and other macro-molecular assemblages. The potential for the future development of stable isotopes in biochemistry and pharmacology are considered briefly, together with some of the problems that must be solved if their considerable potential is to be realized. (author)

  15. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen as markers of dietary variation among sociocultural subgroups of Inuit in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Larsen, Christina V L; Dahl-Petersen, Inger K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed the use of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen as biomarkers for traditional versus store-bought food among the Inuit. Furthermore, we compared the isotope patterns among sociocultural population groups. METHODS: As a part of a country-wide health survey in Greenland...... food in the diet was estimated at 21% from the mean δ(13) C value, 25% from the mean δ(15) N value, and 23% from the FFQ. CONCLUSION: Nail samples for analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were convenient to collect during a large population health survey among the Inuit. Isotope...

  16. Variations of the natural isotopic composition (15N) of mineral nitrogen from calcareous soils, studied during incubation experiment and on the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariotti, A.; Guillemot, J.

    1980-01-01

    This study was intended to follow the variations of isotope composition of mineral nitrogen formed during incubation of calcareous soils (rendzine), humidity and temperature conditions approximating natural ones. We compared the isotope composition with that of mineral nitrogen formed in a lysimeter cut out from a natural soil with the same pedological features. During the incubation experiments, two steps were recognized. A step with production of nitrates and nitrites depleted in 15 N and a second step where the isotope composition leans towards an equilibrium value. During the first step, the 15 N depletion for the sum NO 3 + NO 2 correlates with a 15 N enrichment for ammonium. On the whole, the total mineral nitrogen isotope composition is approximately constant. This first step corresponds also to a great speed of nitrification, to the presence of nitrite and to a large evolution (production or use) of ammonium. On the contrary, nitrites have disappeared and ammonium is in dynamic equilibrium (constant concentration) when the delta 15 N of nitrates is stabilized. In another set of experiments, with the same conditions, small quantity of a nitrogen substrate (vegetal proteins or amino acids) easily mineralizable, was added to the soil: the 15 N depletion of NO 3 + NO 2 formed during the first step is much greater than with the mere soil. It is concluded that the initial step corresponds to the fast mineralization of a very labile organic component which could be, for the mere soil, the microbial biomass destroyed during air-drying of sample before incubations: this could correspond to the 'flush effect'. On the contrary, the step when nitrates becomes constant could correspond to the mineralization (slower and more regular) of an another organic pool, perhaps part of humified organic matter [fr

  17. Evaluation of the isotopic dilution method with addition of 15 N fertilizer to the soil, for quantification of BNF by legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, E.R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Two pot experiments were carried out in greenhouse, with the objective of evaluating the isotopic dilution method with the addition of 15 N fertilizer to the soil for evaluation of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) by legumes. Experiment I: with addition of 15 N-fertilizer, according to FRIED and MIDDELBOE (1977), and Experiment II: Without adding the fertilizer, by natural variation of 15 N15 N). In experiment I, the following crops were utilized as test plants: soybean, bean and cowpea and for the control plants: non nodulating soybean, rice and wheat, with distinct number of plants per pot. The pots containing 8 Kg a Dark red latossol (LE) of Sao Paulo state, Brazil, received the same rate of nitrogen fertilizer with same 15 N enrichment. In experiment II, bean was utilized as test crop and non nodulating soybean and rice as controls, and they did not receive any nitrogen fertilizer. The experiments lasted 81 days, from July to October 1989. The above ground parts of the plants were harvested, for which dry matter weight, total-N and 15 N were determined. (author)

  18. Stable isotopes as tracers for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, A.; Bartolo, D. de; Cantone, M.C.; Zilker, T.; Greim, H.; Roth, P.; Werner, E.

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of internal dose after incorporation of radionuclides requires as input data the knowledge of the uptake into the systemic circulation, the distribution and retention in selected organs, the excretion pathways. Realistic biokinetic models are needed for reliable estimates, correct interpretation of bioassay measurements, appropriate decision-making in radiological emergencies. For many radionuclides, however, the biokinetic models currently recommended are often generic, with very few specific parameters, due to the lack of experimental human data. The use of stable isotopes as tracers enables to determine important biokinetic parameters such as the fractional uptake, the clearance from the transfer compartment, the excretion patterns under experimentally controlled conditions. The subjects investigated are not exposed to any radiation risk, so this technique enables to obtain biokinetic information also for sensitive groups of the population, such as children or pregnant women, and to determine age- and gender-specific model parameters. Sophisticated analytical method, able to discriminate and quantitate different isotopes of the same element in complex matrices such as biological fluids, have to be purposely developed and optimized. Activation analysis and mass spectrometry are the most proper techniques of choice. Experiments were conducted with molybdenum, tellurium, ruthenium and zirconium. Activation analysis with protons, thermal ionization mass spectrometry and inductively coupled mass spectrometry were employed for the determination of stable isotopes of these elements in blood plasma and urine samples. Several deviations from the predictions of the ICRP models were observed. For example, modifications to the current model for molybdenum have been suggested on the basis of these results. The dose coefficients to the target regions calculated with this proposed model are even of one order of magnitude different than the ICRP estimates

  19. Gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry of Pinot Noir wine volatile compounds (δ13C) and solid residues (δ13C, δ15N) for the reassessment of vineyard water-status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E; Vogiatzaki, Maria; Zufferey, Vivian

    2017-09-29

    This paper describes a novel approach to reassess the water status in vineyards based on compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of wine volatile organic compounds (δ 13 C VOC/VPDB ) and bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopes, and the C/N molar ratios of the wine solid residues (δ 13 C SR/VPDB , δ 15 N SR/Air-N2 ). These analyses link gas chromatography/combustion and elemental analysis to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS, EA/IRMS). Field-grown cultivars of Pinot Noir grapevines were exposed during six growing seasons (2009-2014) to controlled soil water availability, while maintaining identical the other environmental variables and agricultural techniques. Wines were produced from the grapes by the same oenological protocol. This permitted for the assessment of the effects in the biochemistry of wines solely induced by the changes in the plant-soil water status. This mimicked the more recurrent and prolonged periods of soil water deficiency due to climate changes. Water stress in grapevine was assessed by the measurement of the predawn leaf water potential (Ψ pd ) and the stable carbon isotope composition of the berry sugars during harvest (must sugars). For quantitation purposes and the normalization of the measured stable carbon isotope ratios of the VOCs, the wine samples were spiked with three standard compounds with known concentration and δ 13 C VPDB values. VOCs were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID), gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and GC/C/IRMS. δ 13 C values were obtained for eighteen VOCs. The solid residues were obtained by freeze-drying wine aliquots and were analyzed for their C and N content and isotope composition by EA/IRMS. All the isotopic ratios (δ 13 C SR , δ 15 N SR , δ 13 C VOC ) are highly correlated with the Ψ pd values, indicating that the proposed gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry approach is a useful tool to

  20. Variability in the fractionation of stable isotopes during degradation of two intertidal red algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jaclyn M.; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2009-04-01

    Macroalgae contribute to intertidal food webs primarily as detritus, with unclear implications for food web studies using stable isotope analysis. We examined differences in the thallus parts of two South African rhodophytes ( Gelidium pristoides and Hypnea spicifera) and changes in overall δ13C, δ15N signatures and C:N ratios during degradation in both the field and laboratory. We hypothesized that both degrading macroalgal tissue and macroalgal-derived suspended particulate material (SPM) would show negligible changes in δ13C, but enriched δ15N signatures and lower C:N ratios relative to healthy plants. Only C:N laboratory ratios conformed to predictions, with both species of macroalgae showing decomposition related changes in δ13C and significant depletions in δ15N in both the field and laboratory. In the laboratory, algal tissue and SPM from each species behaved similarly (though some effects were non-significant) but with differing strengths. Gelidium pristoides δ13C increased and C:N ratios decreased over time in tissue and SPM; δ15N became depleted only in SPM. Hypnea spicifera, δ13C, δ15N and C:N ratios all decreased during degradation in both SPM and algae. Over 60 days in the field, δ13C was depleted in both species (1-2‰) and in naturally senescent Gelidium pristoides fronds. δ15N was depleted in Hypnea spicifera (approx. 1‰), while C:N ratios of both species were unaffected. The two species differed in δ13C, δ15N and C:N after degradation, but only in C:N beforehand. We suggest isotope changes in the laboratory mainly reflect microbial effects, while in the field these are combined with leaching due to constant water replenishment and agitation. Differences between these two species in the isotope responses to degradation highlight the difficulty of linking the signature of SPM to its multiple sources.

  1. A theory of stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, J.F.; McPherson, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    In order to perform quantitative analysis using stable isotope dilution with mass spectrometry, an equation is derived which describes the relationship between the relative proportions of natural and labelled material and measured isotope ratios

  2. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry in forensic science and food adulteration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.

    2009-01-01

    Stable Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (SIRMS) is an established technique for the determination of origin of geological, biological, chemical and physio-chemical samples/materials. With the development of highly precise mass spectrometers, the stable isotope ratio determination of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen have gained considerable interest in the fields of forensic science and food authentication. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of lighter elements occur due to fractionation effects, resulting in the finger printing of specific isotope ratio values that are characteristic of the origin, purity, and manufacturing processes of the products and their constituents. Forensic science uses scientific and technical methods to investigate traceable evidence of criminal acts. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry has been applied to numerous aspects of the forensic science. The analysis of explosives such as ammonium nitrate, gun powder and tri-nitro-toluene (TNT), cases of murder, armed robbery, drug smuggling, terrorism, arson and hit and run traffic accidents are a few of them. The main types of geological evidences in such cases are mud, soil, rocks, sand, gravel, dust particles, biological materials, organic particles and anthropogenic components. Stable isotopes are used as tools to corroborate and confirm the evidential leads in the investigation of such crimes. The variation in natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic ratios δ 13 C and δ 15 N can identify links between items found at crime scene with those of suspect. The paper discusses the applications of SIRMS in the field of forensic science and food adulteration research

  3. [Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes in the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniak, Iu E; Grigor'ev, A I; Skuratov, V M; Ivanova, S M; Pokrovskiĭ, B G

    2006-01-01

    Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes was studied in 9 human subjects in a chamber with normal air pressure imitating a space cabin. Mass-spectrometry of isotopes in blood, urine, saliva, and potable water evidenced increases in the contents of heavy H isotope (deuterium) in the body liquids as compared with water. These results support one of the theories according to which the human organism eliminates heavy stable isotopes of biogenous chemical elements.

  4. Kinetic fractionation of stable nitrogen isotopes during amino acid transamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macko, S.A.; Fogel Estep, M.L.; Engel, M.H.; Hare, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluates a kinetic isotope effect involving 15 N, during the transamination reactions catalyzed by glutamic oxalacetic transaminase. During the transfer of amino nitrogen from glutamic acid to oxaloacetate to form aspartic acid, 14 NH 2 reacted 1.0083 times faster than 15 NH 2 . In the reverse reaction transferring NH 2 from aspartic acid to α-ketoglutarate, 14 NH 2 was incorporated 1.0017 times faster than 15 NH 2 . Knowledge of the magnitude and sign of these isotope effects will be useful in the interpretation of the distribution of 15 N in biological and geochemical systems. (author)

  5. Tellurium Stable Isotopes as a Paleoredox Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, N.; Johnson, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Despite arguments for variably-oxygenated shallow waters and anoxic deep marine waters, which delayed animal development until the Neoproterozoic Oxidation Event, the magnitude of atmospheric oxygen during the Proterozoic is still uncertain [1]. The evidence for low pO2 (<0.1-1% PAL) is based on geochemical and isotopic proxies, which track the mobilization of Fe and Mn on the continents. For example, large chromium isotope shifts occur at the Neoproterozoic Oxidation Event due to the initiation of Cr redox cycling, but this proxy is insensitive to fluctuations in the lower-pO2 conditions at other times during the Proterozoic. Tellurium, a metalloid with a lower threshold to oxidation, may be sensitive to pO2 shifts in a lower range. In the reduced forms, Te(-II) and Te(0), the element is insoluble and immobile. However, in the more oxidized phases, Te(IV) and Te(VI), Te can form soluble oxyanions (though it tends to adsorb to Fe-oxyhydroxides and clays) [2]. Te stable isotopes have been shown to fractionate during abiotic or biologic reduction of Te(VI) or Te(IV) to elemental Te(0) [3, 4]. Utilizing hydride generation MC-ICP-MS, we are able to obtain high precision (2σ 0.04‰) measurements of δ128Te/125Te for natural samples containing < 10 ng of Te. A suite of Phanerozoic and Proterozoic ironstones show significant variation in δ128Te/125Te (<0.5‰), suggesting that the Te redox cycle was active during the Proterozoic. Future directions will include Te isotope measurements of Precambrian paleosols to determine natural isotope variation before the Great Oxidation Event and experiments to determine fractionation during adsorption to Fe-oxyhydroxides. [1] Planavsky et al. (2014) Science 346 (6209), pp. 635-638 [2] Qin et al. (2017) Environmental Science and Technology 51 (11), pp 6027-6035 [3] Baesman et al. (2007) Applied Environmental Microbiology 73 (7), pp 2135-2143 [4] Smithers and Krause (1968) Canadian Journal of Chemistry 46(4): pp 583-591

  6. Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, W David; Kurle, Carolyn M; Hopkins, John B

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, we provide a brief introduction and summarize the 10 research articles included in this Special Issue on Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology. The first three articles report correction and discrimination factors that can be used to more accurately estimate the diets of extinct and extant mammals using stable isotope analysis. The remaining seven applied research articles use stable isotope analysis to address a variety of wildlife conservation and management questions from the oceans to the mountains.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of different green payments in the handling of the nitrogen nutrition of the tomato by means of the Isotope 15 n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monederos, Milagros; Duennas, Graciela; Alfonso, C.A.; Hernandez, Marcela; Almeida, Grisel

    1999-01-01

    With the objective of evaluating in a preliminary way the effect of some leguminous ones (Leucaena, Canavalia, Crotalaria and Mucuna) used as green payments in the handling of the tomato nutrition its later validation under field conditions was carried out a rehearsal under controlled conditions and on a red ferralitic soils compact. I it determined the derived nitrogen of each source by means of the isotope 15N

  8. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments: FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.C.

    1975-10-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: an alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; an alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; an alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and a tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope, with the totals for loaned isotopes shown at the end of the table. (auth)

  9. STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY OF MASSIVE ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurij K. Vasil’chuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises stable-isotope research on massive ice in the Russian and North American Arctic, and includes the latest understanding of massive-ice formation. A new classification of massive-ice complexes is proposed, encompassing the range and variabilityof massive ice. It distinguishes two new categories of massive-ice complexes: homogeneousmassive-ice complexes have a similar structure, properties and genesis throughout, whereasheterogeneous massive-ice complexes vary spatially (in their structure and properties andgenetically within a locality and consist of two or more homogeneous massive-ice bodies.Analysis of pollen and spores in massive ice from Subarctic regions and from ice and snow cover of Arctic ice caps assists with interpretation of the origin of massive ice. Radiocarbon ages of massive ice and host sediments are considered together with isotope values of heavy oxygen and deuterium from massive ice plotted at a uniform scale in order to assist interpretation and correlation of the ice.

  10. Multi-Isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N Tracing of Molt Origin for Red-Winged Blackbirds Associated with Agro-Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Werner

    Full Text Available We analyzed stable-hydrogen (δ2H, carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ 15N isotope ratios in feathers to better understand the molt origin and food habits of Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus near sunflower production in the Upper Midwest and rice production in the Mid-South of the United States. Outer primary feathers were used from 661 after-second-year (ASY male blackbirds collected in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota (spring collection, and Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas (winter collection. The best-fit model indicated that the combination of feather δ2H, δ13C and δ15N best predicted the state of sample collections and thus supported the use of this approach for tracing molt origins in Red-winged Blackbirds. When considering only birds collected in spring, 56% of birds were classified to their collection state on the basis of δ2H and δ13C alone. We then developed feather isoscapes for δ13C based upon these data and for δ2H based upon continental patterns of δ2H in precipitation. We used 81 birds collected at the ten independent sites for model validation. The spatially-explicit assignment of these 81 birds to the δ2H isoscape resulted in relatively high rates (~77% of accurate assignment to collection states. We also modeled the spatial extent of C3 (e.g. rice, sunflower and C4 (corn, millet, sorghum agricultural crops grown throughout the Upper Midwest and Mid-South United States to predict the relative use of C3- versus C4-based foodwebs among sampled blackbirds. Estimates of C3 inputs to diet ranged from 50% in Arkansas to 27% in Minnesota. As a novel contribution to blackbird conservation and management, we demonstrate how such feather isoscapes can be used to predict the molt origin and interstate movements of migratory blackbirds for subsequent investigations of breeding biology (e.g. sex-specific philopatry, agricultural depredation, feeding ecology, physiology of migration and

  11. Multi-Isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Tracing of Molt Origin for Red-Winged Blackbirds Associated with Agro-Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Scott J; Hobson, Keith A; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L; Fischer, Justin W

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed stable-hydrogen (δ2H), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotope ratios in feathers to better understand the molt origin and food habits of Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) near sunflower production in the Upper Midwest and rice production in the Mid-South of the United States. Outer primary feathers were used from 661 after-second-year (ASY) male blackbirds collected in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota (spring collection), and Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas (winter collection). The best-fit model indicated that the combination of feather δ2H, δ13C and δ15N best predicted the state of sample collections and thus supported the use of this approach for tracing molt origins in Red-winged Blackbirds. When considering only birds collected in spring, 56% of birds were classified to their collection state on the basis of δ2H and δ13C alone. We then developed feather isoscapes for δ13C based upon these data and for δ2H based upon continental patterns of δ2H in precipitation. We used 81 birds collected at the ten independent sites for model validation. The spatially-explicit assignment of these 81 birds to the δ2H isoscape resulted in relatively high rates (~77%) of accurate assignment to collection states. We also modeled the spatial extent of C3 (e.g. rice, sunflower) and C4 (corn, millet, sorghum) agricultural crops grown throughout the Upper Midwest and Mid-South United States to predict the relative use of C3- versus C4-based foodwebs among sampled blackbirds. Estimates of C3 inputs to diet ranged from 50% in Arkansas to 27% in Minnesota. As a novel contribution to blackbird conservation and management, we demonstrate how such feather isoscapes can be used to predict the molt origin and interstate movements of migratory blackbirds for subsequent investigations of breeding biology (e.g. sex-specific philopatry), agricultural depredation, feeding ecology, physiology of migration and sensitivity to

  12. Evaluating the consequences of salmon nutrients for riparian organisms: Linking condition metrics to stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizza, Carmella; Sanderson, Beth L; Coe, Holly J; Chaloner, Dominic T

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope ratios (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) have been used extensively to trace nutrients from Pacific salmon, but salmon transfer more than carbon and nitrogen to stream ecosystems, such as phosphorus, minerals, proteins, and lipids. To examine the importance of these nutrients, metrics other than isotopes need to be considered, particularly when so few studies have made direct links between these nutrients and how they affect riparian organisms. Our study specifically examined δ 13 C and δ 15 N of riparian organisms from salmon and non-salmon streams in Idaho, USA, at different distances from the streams, and examined whether the quality of riparian plants and the body condition of invertebrates varied with access to these nutrients. Overall, quality and condition metrics did not mirror stable isotope patterns. Most notably, all riparian organisms exhibited elevated δ 15 N in salmon streams, but also with proximity to both stream types suggesting that both salmon and landscape factors may affect δ 15 N. The amount of nitrogen incorporated from Pacific salmon was low for all organisms (1950s. In addition, our results support those of other studies that have cautioned that inferences from natural abundance isotope data, particularly in conjunction with mixing models for salmon-derived nutrient percentage estimates, may be confounded by biogeochemical transformations of nitrogen, physiological processes, and even historical legacies of nitrogen sources. Critically, studies should move beyond simply describing isotopic patterns to focusing on the consequences of salmon-derived nutrients by quantifying the condition and fitness of organisms putatively using those resources.

  13. Stable isotope composition of cocoa beans of different geographical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Matteo; Bontempo, Luana; Ziller, Luca; Barbero, Alice; Caligiani, Augusta; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The isotopic profile (δ(13) C, δ(15) N, δ(18) O, δ(2) H, δ(34) S) was used to characterise a wide selection of cocoa beans from different renowned production areas (Africa, Asia, Central and South America). The factors most influencing the isotopic signatures of cocoa beans were climate and altitude for δ(13) C and the isotopic composition of precipitation water for δ(18) O and δ(2) H, whereas δ(15) N and δ(34) S were primarily affected by geology and fertilisation practises. Multi-isotopic analysis was shown to be sufficiently effective in determining the geographical origin of cocoa beans, and combining it with Canonical Discriminant Analysis led to more than 80% of samples being correctly reclassified. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of pelagic zooplankton elucidate ecohydrographic features in the oligotrophic Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Kü rten, Benjamin; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; Kurten, Saskia; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M.; Devassy, Reny P.; Struck, Ulrich; Zarokanellos, Nikolaos; Jones, Burton; Hansen, Thomas; Bruss, Gerd; Sommer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Although zooplankton occupy key roles in aquatic biogeochemical cycles, little is known about the pelagic food web and trophodynamics of zooplankton in the Red Sea. Natural abundance stable isotope analysis (SIA) of carbon (δ13C) and N (δ15N) is one

  15. Multivariate Stable Isotope Analysis to Determine Linkages between Benzocaine Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, H. F.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Collins, M.; Salouros, H.; Cunningham, A.; Harrison, M.

    2012-04-01

    In July 2010, a woman was jailed for nine years in the UK after the prosecution successfully argued that attempting to import a cutting agent was proof of involvement in a conspiracy to supply Cocaine. That landmark ruling provided law enforcement agencies with much greater scope to tackle those involved in this aspect of the drug trade, specifically targeting those importing the likes of benzocaine or lidocaine. Huge quantities of these compounds are imported into the UK and between May and August 2010, four shipments of Benzocaine amounting to more then 4 tons had been seized as part of Operation Kitley, a joint initiative between the UK Border Agency and the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA). By diluting cocaine, traffickers can make it go a lot further for very little cost, leading to huge profits. In recent years, dealers have moved away from inert substances, like sugar and baby milk powder, in favour of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including anaesthetics like Benzocaine and Lidocaine. Both these mimic the numbing effect of cocaine, and resemble it closely in colour, texture and some chemical behaviours, making it easier to conceal the fact that the drug has been diluted. API cutting agents have helped traffickers to maintain steady supplies in the face of successful interdiction and even expand the market in the UK, particularly to young people aged from their mid teens to early twenties. From importation to street-level, the purity of the drug can be reduced up to a factor of 80 and street level cocaine can have a cocaine content as low as 1%. In view of the increasing use of Benzocaine as cutting agent for Cocaine, a study was carried out to investigate if 2H, 13C, 15N and 18O stable isotope signatures could be used in conjunction with multivariate chemometric data analysis to determine potential linkage between benzocaine exhibits seized from different locations or individuals to assist with investigation and prosecution of drug

  16. Raman spectroscopic studies of isotopic diatomic molecules and a technique for measuring stable isotope ratios using Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method for measuring stable isotope ratios using Raman scattering has been developed. This method consists of simultaneously counting photons scattered out of a high-intensity laser beam by different isotopically-substituted molecules. A number of studies of isotopic diatomic molecules have been made. The Q-branches of the Raman spectra of the isotopic molecules 14 N 15 N and 16 O 18 O were observed at natural abundance in nitrogen and oxygen samples. Comparison of the ratios of the intensities of the Q-branches of the major nitrogen and oxygen isotopic molecules with mass spectrometric determinations of the isotopic compositions yielded scattering cross sections of 14 N 15 N relative to 14 N 14 N and 16 O 18 O relative to 16 O 16 O. These cross section ratios differ from unity, a difference which can be explained by considering nuclear mass effects on the Franck-Condon factors of the molecular transitions. The measured intensities of the 14 N 15 N and 16 O 18 O Q-branches provided the baseline data needed to make the previously-mentioned extrapolation. High-resolution (approximately 0.15 cm -1 ) spectra of the Q-branches of 14 N 14 N and 16 O 16 O yielded a direct determination of α/sub e/ (the difference between the rotational constant in the ground and first excited vibrational states) for these molecules. The measured values are in excellent agreement with those obtained by other means. Complete Raman spectra (pure rotation, rotation-vibration, and high-resolution Q-branch) were obtained on a sample of pure 18 O 18 O. Analysis of this data yielded the molecular parameters: the equilibrium internuclear separation r/sub e/, the moment of inertia I/sub e/, and the energy parameters α/sub e/, B/sub e/, and ΔG/sub 1 / 2 /. These are in good agreement with data obtained by microwave spectroscopy

  17. Interrogating pollution sources in a mangrove food web using multiple stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Iara da C; Arrivabene, Hiulana P; Craig, Carol-Ann; Midwood, Andrew J; Thornton, Barry; Matsumoto, Silvia T; Elliott, Michael; Wunderlin, Daniel A; Monferrán, Magdalena V; Fernandes, Marisa N

    2018-06-01

    Anthropogenic activities including metal contamination create well-known problems in coastal mangrove ecosystems but understanding and linking specific pollution sources to distinct trophic levels within these environments is challenging. This study evaluated anthropogenic impacts on two contrasting mangrove food webs, by using stable isotopes (δ 13 C, δ 15 N, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, 206 Pb/ 207 Pb and 208 Pb/ 207 Pb) measured in sediments, mangrove trees (Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa, Avicennia schaueriana), plankton, shrimps (Macrobranchium sp.), crabs (Aratus sp.), oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) and fish (Centropomus parallelus) from both areas. Strontium and Pb isotopes were also analysed in water and atmospheric particulate matter (PM). δ 15 N indicated that crab, shrimp and oyster are at intermediate levels within the local food web and fish, in this case C. parallelus, was confirmed at the highest trophic level. δ 15 N also indicates different anthropogenic pressures between both estuaries; Vitória Bay, close to intensive human activities, showed higher δ 15 N across the food web, apparently influenced by sewage. The ratio 87 Sr/ 86 Sr showed the primary influence of marine water throughout the entire food web. Pb isotope ratios suggest that PM is primarily influenced by metallurgical activities, with some secondary influence on mangrove plants and crabs sampled in the area adjacent to the smelting works. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the effect of anthropogenic pollution (probable sewage pollution) on the isotopic fingerprint of estuarine-mangrove systems located close to a city compared to less impacted estuarine mangroves. The influence of industrial metallurgical activity detected using Pb isotopic analysis of PM and mangrove plants close to such an impacted area is also notable and illustrates the value of isotopic analysis in tracing the impact and species affected by atmospheric pollution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B

  18. Study on the effect of different fertilizer on the stable nitrogen isotope of soil, leaf and cucumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yuwei; Zhang Zhiheng; Xu Mingfei; Yang Guiling; Zheng Jici; Wang Qiang; Zhao Ming

    2010-01-01

    The effect of combined application of organic and chemical fertilizers on stable nitrogen isotope abundance (δ 15 N-%), nitrate and nitrate reductase active was studied for the soil, cucumber and leaf,respectively. The results showed that the δ 15 N of cucumber was with the trend of low, high and low as the application rate of organic manure decreased, and it was significantly different (P 0.05) for the other treatments. The δ 15 N of cucumber was not significantly different during different harvest time (P>0.05) for the same treatment. The correlation of δ 15 N between the cucumber and the leaf was 0.9836 for the different treatment, whose δ 15 N was more affected more by the fertilizer and less by the soil. The content of nitrate in cucumber was reducing with the rate of organic manure decreasing, which had a bad correlation (r=0.6568) with the δ 15 N of cucumber; however the active of nitrate reductase was increasing which had a positive correlation with the treatments of control treatment, 100%, 80% and 60% of organic manure applied (r=0.9187), and a negative correlation with the treatments of 60%, 40%, 20% of organic manure and 100% chemical fertilizer applied (r=-0.9773). To sum up, the δ 15 N can be used as marks to discriminate the cucumbers grown with organic manure and chemical fertilizer, but the pattern of fractionation and distribution of the stable nitrogen isotope should be further studied. (authors)

  19. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D-alanine, L-alanine, and valine: application of diastereomer separation to delta15N and microbial peptidoglycan studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2009-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method to determine the compound-specific nitrogen isotope compositions of individual amino acid enantiomers using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A novel derivatization of amino acid diastereomers by optically active (R)-(-)-2-butanol or (S)-(+)-2-butanol offers two advantages for nitrogen isotope analysis. First, chromatographic chiral separation can be achieved without the use of chiral stationary-phase columns. Second, the elution order of these compounds on the chromatogram can be switched by a designated esterification reaction. We applied the method to the compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D- and L-alanine in a peptidoglycan derived from the cell walls of cultured bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus staphylolyticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Streptomyces sp.), natural whole bacterial cells (Bacillus subtilis var. natto), (pseudo)-peptidoglycan from archaea (Methanobacterium sp.), and cell wall from eukaryota (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We observed statistically significant differences in nitrogen isotopic compositions; e.g., delta15N ( per thousand vs air) in Staphylococcus staphylolyticus for d-alanine (19.2 +/- 0.5 per thousand, n = 4) and L-alanine (21.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand, n = 4) and in Bacillus subtilis for D-alanine (6.2 +/- 0.2 per thousand, n = 3) and L-alanine (8.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand, n = 3). These results suggest that enzymatic reaction pathways, including the alanine racemase reaction, produce a nitrogen isotopic difference in amino acid enantiomers, resulting in 15N-depleted D-alanine. This method is expected to facilitate compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acid stereoisomers.

  20. Plan of study to determine if the isotopic ratios [delta]15 N and [delta]18 O can reveal the sources of nitrate discharged by the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, William A.; Kendall, Carol; Goolsby, Donald A.; Boyer, Laurie L.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate and other nutrients discharged from the Mississippi River basin are suspected of causing a zone of depleted dissolved oxygen (hypoxic zone) in the Gulf of Mexico each summer. The hypoxic zone may have an adverse effect on aquatic life and commercial fisheries. Commercial fertilizers are the dominant source of nitrogen input to the Mississippi basin. Other nitrogen sources include animal waste, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by legumes, precipitation, domestic and industrial effluent, and the soil. The inputs of nitrogen from most of these sources to the Mississippi basin can be estimated and the outputs in surface water can be measured. However, nitrogen from each source is affected differently by physical, chemical, and biological processes that control nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Hence, the relative contributions from the various sources of nitrogen to nitrate load in the Mississippi River are unknown because the different sources may not contribute proportionally to their inputs in the basin. It may be possible to determine the relative contributions of the major sources of nitrate in river water using the stable isotopic ratios d15N and d18O of the nitrate ion. A few researchers have used the d15N and/or d18O isotope ratios to determine sources of nitrate in ground water, headwater catchments, and small rivers, but little is known about the isotopic composition of nitrate in larger rivers. The objective of this study is to measure the isotopic composition of nitrate and suspended organic matter in the Mississippi River and its major tributaries, in discharge to the Gulf of Mexico, and in streamflow from smaller watersheds that have distinct sources of nitrogen (row crops, animal wastes, and urban effluents) or are minimally impacted by man (undeveloped). Samples from seven sites on the Mississippi River and its tributaries and from 17 sites in smaller watersheds within the Mississippi River basin will be analyzed for d15N and

  1. Unit of stable isotopic N15 analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera de Bisbal, Evelin; Paredes U, Maria

    1997-01-01

    The continuous and growing demand of crops and cattle for the domestic inhabitants, forces the search of technical solutions in agriculture. One of the solutions able to be covered in a near future it is the escalation of agricultural production in lands already being cultivated, either by means of an intensification of cultivation and / or increasing the unitary yields. In the intensive cropping systems, the crops extract substantial quantities of nutriments that is recovered by means of the application of fertilizers. Due to the lack of resources and to the increase of commercial inputs prices, it has been necessary to pay attention to the analysis and improvement of low inputs cropping systems and to the effective use of resources. Everything has made to establish a concept of plant nutrition focused system, which integrate the sources of nutriments for plants and the production factors of crops in a productive cropping system, to improve the fertility of soils, the agricultural productivity and profitability. This system includes the biggest efficiency of chemical fertilizers as the maximum profit of alternative sources of nutriments, such as organic fertilizers, citrate-phosphate rocks and biological nitrogen fixation. By means of field experiments under different environmental conditions (soils and climate) it can be determined the best combination of fertilizers practice (dose, placement, opportunity and source) for selected cropping systems. The experimentation with fertilizer, marked with stable and radioactive isotopes, provides a direct and express method to obtain conclusive answers to the questions: where, when and how should be applied. The fertilizers marked with N 1 5 have been used to understand the application of marked fertilizer to the cultivations, and the determination of the proportion of crops nutritious element derived from fertilizer. The isotopic techniques offer a fast and reliable mean to obtain information about the distribution of

  2. Metabolism and pharmacokinetic of cyclo-peptides and peptides. Use of radioelement and stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aninat, C.

    2003-10-01

    More and more peptides and proteins are used in therapeutic. Three mainly techniques are used for pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies: immunoassay, radioactively labeled molecules and mass spectrometry. In the first part of this work, we have used uniformly labelled peptides (C-peptide and insulin) with stables ( 13 C, 15 N, and 13 C/ 15 N) or radioactive ( 14 C) isotopes to investigated these kind of studies. These works are based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry assay. In a second time we have investigated the metabolism of a particular cyclo-peptides families composed of two amino acids: the diketo-piperazine. These compounds are found in mammals and in microorganisms. There are not recognized by proteolytic enzymes. We have estimated if the main enzymes implicated in the metabolism of xenobiotics, the P450 cytochrome mono-oxygenases, were able to recognized them

  3. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets.

  4. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiene Maria Jesus

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis (SIA is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i freshly processed (control; preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii 15 and (iii 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv 15 and (v 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi 15 and (vii 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%, C(% and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls. We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets.

  5. Principles and limitations of stable isotopes in differentiating organic and conventional foodstuffs: 2. Animal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Caio T; Chalk, Phillip M

    2017-01-02

    In this review, we examine the variation in stable isotope signatures of the lighter elements (δ 2 H, δ 13 C, δ 15 N, δ 18 O, and δ 34 S) of tissues and excreta of domesticated animals, the factors affecting the isotopic composition of animal tissues, and whether stable isotopes may be used to differentiate organic and conventional modes of animal husbandry. The main factors affecting the δ 13 C signatures of livestock are the C3/C4 composition of the diet, the relative digestibility of the diet components, metabolic turnover, tissue and compound specificity, growth rate, and animal age. δ 15 N signatures of sheep and cattle products have been related mainly to diet signatures, which are quite variable among farms and between years. Although few data exist, a minor influence in δ 15 N signatures of animal products was attributed to N losses at the farm level, whereas stocking rate showed divergent findings. Correlations between mode of production and δ 2 H and δ 18 O have not been established, and only in one case of an animal product was δ 34 S a satisfactory marker for mode of production. While many data exist on diet-tissue isotopic discrimination values among domesticated animals, there is a paucity of data that allow a direct and statistically verifiable comparison of the differences in the isotopic signatures of organically and conventionally grown animal products. The few comparisons are confined to beef, milk, and egg yolk, with no data for swine or lamb products. δ 13 C appears to be the most promising isotopic marker to differentiate organic and conventional production systems when maize (C4) is present in the conventional animal diet. However, δ 13 C may be unsuitable under tropical conditions, where C4 grasses are abundant, and where grass-based husbandry is predominant in both conventional and organic systems. Presently, there is no universal analytical method that can be applied to differentiate organic and conventional animal products.

  6. Enriching stable isotopes: Alternative use for Urenco technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhorst, H.; de Jong, P.G.T.; Dawson, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    The International Urenco Group utilizes a technologically advanced centrifuge process to enrich uranium in the fissionable isotope 235 U. The group operates plants in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Germany and currently holds a 10% share of the multibillion dollar world enrichment market. In the early 1990s, Urenco embarked on a strategy of building on the company's uniquely advanced centrifuge process and laser isotope separation (LIS) experience to enrich nonradioactive isotopes colloquially known as stable isotopes. This paper summarizes the present status of Urenco's stable isotopes business

  7. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2005-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. (author). 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments: FY 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.

    1984-12-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope

  9. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments - FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.C.

    1983-12-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope

  10. Application of stable isotopes in ecological research : it's all elemental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been used traditionally in the physical sciences, primarily in geochemistry, sedimentology, and oceanography. Increasingly, however, stable isotopes are also being used in the biological sciences. Application of stable isotopes in ecological studies can provide new and innovative ways of examining a host of topics of fundamental importance to biologists. These topics include, among others, feeding ecology and food webs, nutrient flow and assimilation, habitat use, migration patterns, and distribution and discrimination of species subpopulations. Furthermore, ecological research with isotopes can be applied at many levels (i.e. tissue and organ, whole animal, population, community, and ecosystem). (author). 38 refs., 2 figs

  11. Stable isotope methodology and its application to nutrition and gastroenterology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, P.D.; Hachey, D.L.; Wong, W.W.; Abrams, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the Stable Isotope Laboratory in its function as a core resource facility for stable isotope applications in human nutrition research. Three aspects are covered: Training of visitors, assessment of new instrumentation, and development of new methodology. The research achievements of the laboratory are indicated in the publications that appeared during this period. (author). 23 refs

  12. Biomedical applications of mass spectrometry. Clinical uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahmer, U.I.; McCloskey, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The review covers typical or important examples of stable isotope usage in clinical fields during the period since the last triennial mass spectrometry conference in 1973. Items are included which involve uses of stable isotopes in human or clinically oriented studies, including measurements carried out on materials of human origin. 163 references. (U.K.)

  13. Stable isotope geochemistry. 3. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefs, J.

    1987-01-01

    Stable Isotope Geochemistry is an authoritative book comprising theoretical and experimental principles; surveying important fractionation mechanisms affecting the most important elements; discussing the natural variations of geologically important reservoirs. This updated 3rd edition, with a completely rewritten and extended main part, contains two new chapters on stable isotope composition of mantle material and on changes of the ocean during the geological past. (orig.)

  14. Auto-inducing media for uniform isotope labeling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthertz, Nicolas [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Structural Biology (United Kingdom); Klopp, Julia; Winterhalter, Aurélie; Fernández, César; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Auto-inducing media for protein expression offer many advantages like robust reproducibility, high yields of soluble protein and much reduced workload. Here, an auto-inducing medium for uniform isotope labelling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and/or {sup 2}H in E. coli is presented. So far, auto-inducing media have not found widespread application in the NMR field, because of the prohibitively high cost of labeled lactose, which is an essential ingredient of such media. Here, we propose using lactose that is only selectively labeled on the glucose moiety. It can be synthesized from inexpensive and readily available substrates: labeled glucose and unlabeled activated galactose. With this approach, uniformly isotope labeled proteins were expressed in unattended auto-inducing cultures with incorporation of {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N of 96.6 % and {sup 2}H, {sup 15}N of 98.8 %. With the present protocol, the NMR community could profit from the many advantages that auto-inducing media offer.

  15. Problems and prospects in future applications of stable isotopes in the life sciences and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.; Unkefer, C.J.; Walker, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the use of stable isotopes of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in the life sciences and medicine fueled by the increased availability of the isotopes and isotopically labeled compounds and of instruments for their detection. Accelerated development of 13 C, 15 N, and 17 18 O can be expected in the future for studies of drug bioavailability, nutrition and body protein economy, viability of organs for transplant, and for non-invasive tests of metabolic diseases and dysfunctions. These accelerated developments depend on continued improvements in nmr and ms instrumentation and in methods for the synthesis of isotopically labeled compounds. The main part of this paper explores the possibilities of biosynthesis for the selective enrichment of natural products, especially amino acids, with 13 C

  16. Applications of isotopes. [Need and cost of stable iotopes for use as tracers in biomedical and environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby-Smith, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Current and potential applications of stable isotopes as tracers in a number of biomedical and environmental areas are discussed. It is pointed out that a wide variety of problems exist in these fields whose solutions in principle are amenable to the isotopic approach. The number and diversity of these problems as well as the unique role stable isotopes can play in their solution illustrate the importance of achieving and maintaining a broad inventory of isotopic species. Experience has demonstrated unequivocally an additional overriding requirement for widespread exploration of stable isotopes by the scientific and technical community, i.e., the need for low cost availability of the materials in quantity. Some representative applications of /sup 12/C, /sup 13/C, /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 16/O, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O are discussed.

  17. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  18. Verification of Egg Farming Systems from The Netherlands and New Zealand Using Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karyne M; van Ruth, Saskia; Alewijn, Martin; Philips, Andy; Rogers, Pam

    2015-09-30

    Stable isotopes were used to develop authentication criteria of eggs laid under cage, barn, free range, and organic farming regimens from The Netherlands and New Zealand. A training set of commercial poultry feeds and egg albumen from 49 poultry farms across The Netherlands was used to determine the isotopic variability of organic and conventional feeds and to assess trophic effects of these corresponding feeds and barn, free range, and organic farming regimens on corresponding egg albumen. A further 52 brands of New Zealand eggs were sampled from supermarket shelves in 2008 (18), 2010 (30), and 2014 (4) to characterize and monitor changes in caged, barn, free range, and organic egg farming regimens. Stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopes of 49 commercial poultry feeds and their corresponding egg albumens reveals that Dutch poultry are fed exclusively on a plant-based feed and that it is possible to discriminate between conventional and organic egg farming regimens in The Netherlands. Similarly, it is possible to discriminate between New Zealand organic and conventional egg farming regimens, although in the initial screening in 2008, results showed that some organic eggs had isotope values similar to those of conventional eggs, suggesting hens were not exclusively receiving an organic diet. Dutch and New Zealand egg regimens were shown to have a low isotopic correlation between both countries, because of different poultry feed compositions. In New Zealand, both conventional and organic egg whites have higher δ(15)N values than corresponding Dutch egg whites, due to the use of fishmeal or meat and bone meal (MBM), which is banned in European countries. This study suggests that stable isotopes (specifically nitrogen) show particular promise as a screening and authentication tool for organically farmed eggs. Criteria to assess truthfulness in labeling of organic eggs were developed, and we propose that Dutch organic egg whites should have a minimum

  19. Historical and contemporary stable isotope tracer approaches to studying mammalian protein metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Over a century ago, Frederick Soddy provided the first evidence for the existence of isotopes; elements that occupy the same position in the periodic table are essentially chemically identical but differ in mass due to a different number of neutrons within the atomic nucleus. Allied to the discovery of isotopes was the development of some of the first forms of mass spectrometers, driven forward by the Nobel laureates JJ Thomson and FW Aston, enabling the accurate separation, identification, and quantification of the relative abundance of these isotopes. As a result, within a few years, the number of known isotopes both stable and radioactive had greatly increased and there are now over 300 stable or radioisotopes presently known. Unknown at the time, however, was the potential utility of these isotopes within biological disciplines, it was soon discovered that these stable isotopes, particularly those of carbon (13C), nitrogen (15N), oxygen (18O), and hydrogen (2H) could be chemically introduced into organic compounds, such as fatty acids, amino acids, and sugars, and used to “trace” the metabolic fate of these compounds within biological systems. From this important breakthrough, the age of the isotope tracer was born. Over the following 80 yrs, stable isotopes would become a vital tool in not only the biological sciences, but also areas as diverse as forensics, geology, and art. This progress has been almost exclusively driven through the development of new and innovative mass spectrometry equipment from IRMS to GC‐MS to LC‐MS, which has allowed for the accurate quantitation of isotopic abundance within samples of complex matrices. This historical review details the development of stable isotope tracers as metabolic tools, with particular reference to their use in monitoring protein metabolism, highlighting the unique array of tools that are now available for the investigation of protein metabolism in vivo at a whole body down to a single protein level

  20. Keratin decomposition by trogid beetles: evidence from a feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    The decomposition of vertebrate carcasses is an important ecosystem function. Soft tissues of dead vertebrates are rapidly decomposed by diverse animals. However, decomposition of hard tissues such as hairs and feathers is much slower because only a few animals can digest keratin, a protein that is concentrated in hairs and feathers. Although beetles of the family Trogidae are considered keratin feeders, their ecological function has rarely been explored. Here, we investigated the keratin-decomposition function of trogid beetles in heron-breeding colonies where keratin was frequently supplied as feathers. Three trogid species were collected from the colonies and observed feeding on heron feathers under laboratory conditions. We also measured the nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) stable isotope ratios of two trogid species that were maintained on a constant diet (feathers from one heron individual) during 70 days under laboratory conditions. We compared the isotopic signatures of the trogids with the feathers to investigate isotopic shifts from the feathers to the consumers for δ15N and δ13C. We used mixing models (MixSIR and SIAR) to estimate the main diets of individual field-collected trogid beetles. The analysis indicated that heron feathers were more important as food for trogid beetles than were soft tissues under field conditions. Together, the feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis provided strong evidence of keratin decomposition by trogid beetles.

  1. Stable isotope ratio analysis: A potential analytical tool for the authentication of South African lamb meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Sara Wilhelmina; Muller, Magdalena; van der Rijst, Marieta; Hoffman, Louwrens Christiaan

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotope ratios ((13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N) of South African Dorper lambs from farms with different vegetation types were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), to evaluate it as a tool for the authentication of origin and feeding regime. Homogenised and defatted meat of the Longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle of lambs from seven different farms was assessed. The δ(13)C values were affected by the origin of the meat, mainly reflecting the diet. The Rûens and Free State farms had the lowest (p ⩽ 0.05) δ(15)N values, followed by the Northern Cape farms, with Hantam Karoo/Calvinia having the highest δ(15)N values. Discriminant analysis showed δ(13)C and δ(15)N differences as promising results for the use of IRMS as a reliable analytical tool for lamb meat authentication. The results suggest that diet, linked to origin, is an important factor to consider regarding region of origin classification for South African lamb. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stable isotope ratios in freshwater mussel shells as high resolution recorders of riverine environmental variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolich, S.; Kendall, C.; Dettman, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The geochemical record stored in growth increments of freshwater mussel shells reveals annual to sub-annual changes in environmental conditions during the lifetime of the organism. The carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen stable isotope composition of aragonite shells responds to changes in water chemistry, temperature, streamflow, turbidity, growth rate, size, age, and reproduction. The goals of this study are to determine how stable isotopes can be used to reconstruct the conditions in which the mussels lived and to illuminate any vital effects that might obscure the isotopic record of those conditions. Previous research has suggested that annual δ13C values decrease in older freshwater mussel shells due to lower growth rates and greater incorporation of dietary carbon into the shell with increasing age. However, a high-resolution, seasonal investigation of δ13C, δ15N, and δ18O as they relate to organism age has not yet been attempted in freshwater mussels. A total of 28 Unionid mussels of three different species were collected live in 2011 in the Tennessee River near Paducah, Kentucky, USA. In this study, we analyzed the shell nacre and external organic layers for stable carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotope ratios, focusing on growth bands formed between 2006 and 2011. We present a time series of shell δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N values with monthly resolution. We also compare the shell-derived geochemical time series to a time series of the δ13C and δ15N of particulate organic matter, δ13C of DIC, δ18OWater, and water temperature in which the mussels lived. Results show that environmental factors such as water temperature and primary productivity dominate shell chemistry while animal age has little or no effect.

  3. Stable isotope views on ecosystem function: challenging or challenged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resco, Víctor; Querejeta, José I; Ogle, Kiona; Voltas, Jordi; Sebastià, Maria-Teresa; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Linares, Juan C; Moreno-Gutiérrez, Cristina; Herrero, Asier; Carreira, José A; Torres-Cañabate, Patricia; Valladares, Fernando

    2010-06-23

    Stable isotopes and their potential for detecting various and complex ecosystem processes are attracting an increasing number of scientists. Progress is challenging, particularly under global change scenarios, but some established views have been challenged. The IX meeting of the Spanish Association of Terrestrial Ecology (AAET, Ubeda, 18-22 October 2009) hosted a symposium on the ecology of stable isotopes where the linear mixing model approach of partitioning sinks and sources of carbon and water fluxes within an ecosystem was challenged, and new applications of stable isotopes for the study of plant interactions were evaluated. Discussion was also centred on the need for networks that monitor ecological processes using stable isotopes and key ideas for fostering future research with isotopes.

  4. The use of stable isotopes in medicinal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, D.; Thompson, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been employed increasingly as tracers over the last decade both to provide the clinician with the opportunity to broaden, in a quantitative manner, discrete areas of diagnosis and research, and the clinical chemist with definitive methodology for specific analyte analysis. These non-radioactive 'heavy' isotopes contain one or more extra neutrons in the nucleus compared with their more abundant 'lighter' analogues. Impetus in the application of stable isotopes for in vivo studies has come from an increased awareness of the possible harmful effects in the use of radionuclides, and a realisation of several positive advantages conferred by the use of stable isotopes in their own right - certain elements of clinical importance (especially nitrogen) lack a useable radio-nuclide equivalent; use of a 'cocktail' of stable isotopes permits a range of studies to be performed in the same patient simultaneously and, within specific constraints, serial studies can be performed in the same patients. (author)

  5. Stable isotope views on ecosystem function: challenging or challenged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resco, Víctor; Querejeta, José I.; Ogle, Kiona; Voltas, Jordi; Sebastià, Maria-Teresa; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Linares, Juan C.; Moreno-Gutiérrez, Cristina; Herrero, Asier; Carreira, José A.; Torres-Cañabate, Patricia; Valladares, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotopes and their potential for detecting various and complex ecosystem processes are attracting an increasing number of scientists. Progress is challenging, particularly under global change scenarios, but some established views have been challenged. The IX meeting of the Spanish Association of Terrestrial Ecology (AAET, Úbeda, 18–22 October 2009) hosted a symposium on the ecology of stable isotopes where the linear mixing model approach of partitioning sinks and sources of carbon and water fluxes within an ecosystem was challenged, and new applications of stable isotopes for the study of plant interactions were evaluated. Discussion was also centred on the need for networks that monitor ecological processes using stable isotopes and key ideas for fostering future research with isotopes. PMID:20015858

  6. Deuterium isotope shifts for backbone {sup 1}H, {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C nuclei in intrinsically disordered protein {alpha}-synuclein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltsev, Alexander S.; Ying Jinfa; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in nature and characterization of their potential structural propensities remains a widely pursued but challenging task. Analysis of NMR secondary chemical shifts plays an important role in such studies, but the output of such analyses depends on the accuracy of reference random coil chemical shifts. Although uniform perdeuteration of IDPs can dramatically increase spectral resolution, a feature particularly important for the poorly dispersed IDP spectra, the impact of deuterium isotope shifts on random coil values has not yet been fully characterized. Very precise {sup 2}H isotope shift measurements for {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C Prime , {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H{sup N} have been obtained by using a mixed sample of protonated and uniformly perdeuterated {alpha}-synuclein, a protein with chemical shifts exceptionally close to random coil values. Decomposition of these isotope shifts into one-bond, two-bond and three-bond effects as well as intra- and sequential residue contributions shows that such an analysis, which ignores conformational dependence, is meaningful but does not fully describe the total isotope shift to within the precision of the measurements. Random coil {sup 2}H isotope shifts provide an important starting point for analysis of such shifts in structural terms in folded proteins, where they are known to depend strongly on local geometry.

  7. Stable isotope discrimination factors and between-tissue isotope comparisons for bone and skin from captive and wild green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Tomaszewicz, Calandra N; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Price, Mike; Kurle, Carolyn M

    2017-11-30

    The ecological application of stable isotope analysis (SIA) relies on taxa- and tissue-specific stable carbon (Δ 13 C) and nitrogen (Δ 15 N) isotope discrimination factors, determined with captive animals reared on known diets for sufficient time to reflect dietary isotope ratios. However, captive studies often prohibit lethal sampling, are difficult with endangered species, and reflect conditions not experienced in the wild. We overcame these constraints and determined the Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values for skin and cortical bone from green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) that died in captivity and evaluated the utility of a mathematical approach to predict discrimination factors. Using stable carbon (δ 13 C values) and nitrogen (δ 15 N values) isotope ratios from captive and wild turtles, we established relationships between bone stable isotope (SI) ratios and those from skin, a non-lethally sampled tissue, to facilitate comparisons of SI ratios among studies using multiple tissues. The mean (±SD) Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values (‰) between skin and bone from captive turtles and their diet (non-lipid-extracted) were 2.3 ± 0.3 and 4.1 ± 0.4 and 2.1 ± 0.6 and 5.1 ± 1.1, respectively. The mathematically predicted Δ 13 C and Δ 15 N values were similar (to within 1‰) to the experimentally derived values. The mean δ 15 N values from bone were higher than those from skin for captive (+1.0 ± 0.9‰) and wild (+0.8 ± 1.0‰) turtles; the mean δ 13 C values from bone were lower than those from skin for wild turtles (-0.6 ± 0.9‰), but the same as for captive turtles. We used linear regression equations to describe bone vs skin relationships and create bone-to-skin isotope conversion equations. For sea turtles, we provide the first (a) bone-diet SI discrimination factors, (b) comparison of SI ratios from individual-specific bone and skin, and (c) evaluation of the application of a mathematical approach to predict stable isotope discrimination factors. Our approach

  8. Trophic relationships and habitat preferences of delphinids from the southeastern Brazilian coast determined by carbon and nitrogen stable isotope composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Lemos Bisi

    Full Text Available To investigate the foraging habitats of delphinids in southeastern Brazil, we analyzed stable carbon (δ(13C and nitrogen (δ(15N isotopes in muscle samples of the following 10 delphinid species: Sotalia guianensis, Stenella frontalis, Tursiops truncatus, Steno bredanensis, Pseudorca crassidens, Delphinus sp., Lagenodelphis hosei, Stenella attenuata, Stenella longirostris and Grampus griseus. We also compared the δ(13C and δ(15N values among four populations of S. guianensis. Variation in carbon isotope results from coast to ocean indicated that there was a significant decrease in δ(13C values from estuarine dolphins to oceanic species. S. guianensis from Guanabara Bay had the highest mean δ(13C value, while oceanic species showed significantly lower δ(13C values. The highest δ(15N values were observed for P. crassidens and T. truncatus, suggesting that these species occupy the highest trophic position among the delphinids studied here. The oceanic species S. attenuata, G. griseus and L. hosei had the lowest δ(15N values. Stable isotope analysis showed that the three populations of S. guianensis in coastal bays had different δ(13C values, but similar δ(15N results. Guiana dolphins from Sepetiba and Ilha Grande bays had different foraging habitat, with specimens from Ilha Grande showing more negative δ(13C values. This study provides further information on the feeding ecology of delphinids occurring in southeastern Brazil, with evidence of distinctive foraging habitats and the occupation of different ecological niches by these species in the study area.

  9. Signatures of nitrogen stable isotope and determination of organic food authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yuwei; Zhang Zhiheng; Yang Guiling; Wang Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Chemical fertilizers were not permitted to be applied in organic agricultural production, so fertilizer as one of agricultural inputs is an important regulatory aspect in the organic food accreditation. Natural stable isotope abundances δ 15 N from different nitrogenous fertilizers are different, the same as in the agricultural products. Natural abundances δ 15 N in the agricultural products using organic fertilizer is higher than those in the products without using any fertilizer, while it is the lowest in the products using chemical nitrogenous fertilizer. Natural abundances δ 15 N are also affected by the ways of fertilizer treatment, the types of the crops and the growth stages as well as the different parts of crops. Generally, natural abundances of δ 15 N are preferred to trace nitrogenous fertilizer for the vegetables with shorter growing period, but not for the crops with longer growing period or nitrogen fixation. The techniques to trace the nitrogen abundances of δ 15 N in the crops play a positive role, which is useful for the determination of organic food authentication, perfecting the system of quality and supervision and protecting public health, therefore it has a theoretical and applied value. (authors)

  10. Using Stable Isotopes to Detect Land Use Change and Nitrogen Sources in Aquatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, K. M. [National Isotope Center, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2013-05-15

    Changing land use is one of the primary causes of increased sedimentation and nutrient levels in aquatic systems, resulting in contamination and reduction of biodiversity. Detecting and quantifying these inputs is the first step towards remediation, and enabling targeted reductions of transport processes into waterways from human impacted land surfaces. More recently, stable isotope analyses are being used as detection and quantification tools in aquatic environments. Carbon ({delta}{sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) isotopes of sediments, as well as algae and invertebrates from aquatic systems can be used as proxies to record both short and long term environmental change. Excess nitrogen (or nitrogen-compounds) derived from urbanization, industry, forestry, farming and agriculture, increase the bioavailability of nitrogen to aquatic organisms, changing their natural {delta}15N isotopic signatures. Allochthonous (terrestrial) input from soil destabilization and human activity in surrounding catchments changes {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic compositions and increases the C:N ratio of sediments. Heavy metal and other organic pollutants can also be used to indicate urbanization and industrial contamination. The combined use of carbon and nitrogen isotopes, C:N ratios and heavy metals are powerful environmental monitoring tools, which are useful indicators of source and transport pathways of terrestrial derived material and anthropogenic pollutants into streams, rivers and estuaries. (author)

  11. Legacy of contaminant N sources to the NO3- signature in rivers: a combined isotopic15N-NO3-, δ18O-NO3-, δ11B) and microbiological investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Cyrielle; Sebilo, Mathieu; Louvat, Pascale; Chesnot, Thierry; Vaury, Véronique; Schneider, Maude; Plagnes, Valérie

    2017-02-01

    Nitrate content of surface waters results from complex mixing of multiple sources, whose signatures can be modified through N reactions occurring within the different compartments of the whole catchment. Despite this complexity, the determination of nitrate origin is the first and crucial step for water resource preservation. Here, for the first time, we combined at the catchment scale stable isotopic tracers (δ15N and δ18O of nitrate and δ11B) and fecal indicators to trace nitrate sources and pathways to the stream. We tested this approach on two rivers in an agricultural region of SW France. Boron isotopic ratios evidenced inflow from anthropogenic waters, microbiological markers revealed organic contaminations from both human and animal wastes. Nitrate δ15N and δ18O traced inputs from the surface leaching during high flow events and from the subsurface drainage in base flow regime. They also showed that denitrification occurred within the soils before reaching the rivers. Furthermore, this study highlighted the determinant role of the soil compartment in nitrate formation and recycling with important spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability.

  12. Stable isotopes for improving human nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uauy, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    recent FAO review of nutrition programs in 19 Latin American countries found that over 20 percent of the population - approximately 83 million people out of an estimated 414 million in the study countries - receives some level of benefits in nutrition-related programs. The allocation of limited national and international assistance resources for these activities in the region is on the order of several billion dollars annually. Undoubtedly these programs are influencing child growth. Significant reductions in underweight and wasting have occurred; but stunting has been more resistant to change. In this setting providing food supplements may be beneficial for some while it may be detrimental for others. The definition of who should benefit from the programs and what is the right combination of nutrients/foods, education, and lifestyle interventions that is required to optimise nutrition and health at each stage of the life cycle is a truly complex problem. This demands the use of the best scientific tools to define who should benefit, what should done and measured as an outcome, how programs should be evaluated, when programs should be expanded, and when they should be stopped. Isotopic and nuclear techniques are tools, not solutions. This presentation will serve to demonstrate how isotopes can contribute to refining nutrition interventions and their impact on public health. Isotopic methods can shorten the time needed to evaluate impact, because they provide sensitive measurements of biological effects. They are faster than traditional methods such as anthropometry for detecting changes in growth and body composition. Micronutrient malnutrition, and especially the bioavailability of vitamins and minerals from traditional foods, are not well evaluated using routine biochemical methods. Radioisotopes have been used successfully in the past. But recent developments in stable isotope techniques offer unique advantages for the design and evaluation of programmes that address

  13. From the ground up: global nitrous oxide sources are constrained by stable isotope values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Snider

    Full Text Available Rising concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O in the atmosphere are causing widespread concern because this trace gas plays a key role in the destruction of stratospheric ozone and it is a strong greenhouse gas. The successful mitigation of N2O emissions requires a solid understanding of the relative importance of all N2O sources and sinks. Stable isotope ratio measurements (δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O, including the intramolecular distribution of 15N (site preference, are one way to track different sources if they are isotopically distinct. 'Top-down' isotope mass-balance studies have had limited success balancing the global N2O budget thus far because the isotopic signatures of soil, freshwater, and marine sources are poorly constrained and a comprehensive analysis of global N2O stable isotope measurements has not been done. Here we used a robust analysis of all available in situ measurements to define key global N2O sources. We showed that the marine source is isotopically distinct from soil and freshwater N2O (the continental source. Further, the global average source (sum of all natural and anthropogenic sources is largely controlled by soils and freshwaters. These findings substantiate past modelling studies that relied on several assumptions about the global N2O cycle. Finally, a two-box-model and a Bayesian isotope mixing model revealed marine and continental N2O sources have relative contributions of 24-26% and 74-76% to the total, respectively. Further, the Bayesian modeling exercise indicated the N2O flux from freshwaters may be much larger than currently thought.

  14. Investigating Pathways of Nutrient and Energy Flows Through Aquatic Food Webs Using Stable Isotopes of Carbon and Nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadwen, W. L.; Bunn, S. E. [Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan Campus, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2013-05-15

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes can provide valuable insights into pathways of nutrient and energy flows in aquatic ecosystems. Carbon stable isotopes are principally used to trace pathways of organic matter transfer through aquatic food webs, particularly with regard to identifying the dominant sources of nutrition for aquatic biota. Stable isotopes of carbon have been widely used to answer one of the most pressing questions in aquatic food web ecology - to what degree do in-stream (autochthonous) and riparian (allochthonous) sources of energy fuel riverine food webs? In conjunction with carbon stable isotopes, nitrogen stable isotopes have been used to determine the trophic position of consumers and to identify the number of trophic levels in aquatic food webs. More recently, stable nitrogen isotopes have been recommended as indicators of anthropogenic disturbances. Specifically, agricultural land uses and/or sewage effluent discharge have been shown to significantly increase {delta}{sup 15}N signatures in primary producers and higher order consumers in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. Together, carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes can be used to examine natural food web functions as well as the degree to which human modifications to catchments and aquatic environments can influence aquatic ecosystem function. (author)

  15. Diet reconstruction and resource partitioning of a Caribbean marine mesopredator using stable isotope bayesian modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Alexander; López-Angarita, Juliana; Turner, John R

    2013-01-01

    The trophic ecology of epibenthic mesopredators is not well understood in terms of prey partitioning with sympatric elasmobranchs or their effects on prey communities, yet the importance of omnivores in community trophic dynamics is being increasingly realised. This study used stable isotope analysis of (15)N and (13)C to model diet composition of wild southern stingrays Dasyatis americana and compare trophic niche space to nurse sharks Ginglymostoma cirratum and Caribbean reef sharks Carcharhinus perezi on Glovers Reef Atoll, Belize. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models were used to investigate prey choice as well as viable Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors for use with stingrays. Stingray δ(15)N values showed the greatest variation and a positive relationship with size, with an isotopic niche width approximately twice that of sympatric species. Shark species exhibited comparatively restricted δ(15)N values and greater δ(13)C variation, with very little overlap of stingray niche space. Mixing models suggest bivalves and annelids are proportionally more important prey in the stingray diet than crustaceans and teleosts at Glovers Reef, in contrast to all but one published diet study using stomach contents from other locations. Incorporating gut contents information from the literature, we suggest diet-tissue discrimination factors values of Δ(15)N ≈ 2.7‰ and Δ(13)C ≈ 0.9‰ for stingrays in the absence of validation experiments. The wide trophic niche and lower trophic level exhibited by stingrays compared to sympatric sharks supports their putative role as important base stabilisers in benthic systems, with the potential to absorb trophic perturbations through numerous opportunistic prey interactions.

  16. Diet reconstruction and resource partitioning of a Caribbean marine mesopredator using stable isotope bayesian modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tilley

    Full Text Available The trophic ecology of epibenthic mesopredators is not well understood in terms of prey partitioning with sympatric elasmobranchs or their effects on prey communities, yet the importance of omnivores in community trophic dynamics is being increasingly realised. This study used stable isotope analysis of (15N and (13C to model diet composition of wild southern stingrays Dasyatis americana and compare trophic niche space to nurse sharks Ginglymostoma cirratum and Caribbean reef sharks Carcharhinus perezi on Glovers Reef Atoll, Belize. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models were used to investigate prey choice as well as viable Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors for use with stingrays. Stingray δ(15N values showed the greatest variation and a positive relationship with size, with an isotopic niche width approximately twice that of sympatric species. Shark species exhibited comparatively restricted δ(15N values and greater δ(13C variation, with very little overlap of stingray niche space. Mixing models suggest bivalves and annelids are proportionally more important prey in the stingray diet than crustaceans and teleosts at Glovers Reef, in contrast to all but one published diet study using stomach contents from other locations. Incorporating gut contents information from the literature, we suggest diet-tissue discrimination factors values of Δ(15N ≈ 2.7‰ and Δ(13C ≈ 0.9‰ for stingrays in the absence of validation experiments. The wide trophic niche and lower trophic level exhibited by stingrays compared to sympatric sharks supports their putative role as important base stabilisers in benthic systems, with the potential to absorb trophic perturbations through numerous opportunistic prey interactions.

  17. Study of a case of essential hypoproteinaemia using the isotopes {sup 131}I and {sup 15}N; Etude a l'aide des isotopes {sup 131}I et {sup 15}N d'un cas d'hypoproteinemie essentielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubert, A; Coursaget, J; Fallot, P; Royer, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Hopital des Enfants Malades, 75 - Paris (France)

    1959-07-01

    Hypoproteinaemia both human and experimental has been studied with the help of nuclear labelling. A comparative study has been made of the fate of serum proteins labelled by an endogenous path after administration of nitrogen-15 glycine and also of serum albumin labelled by exogenous path using iodine-131. We have determined the biological period of the serum albumin and serum globulins and also the magnitude of the vascular and extravascular pools of serum albumin. In this way it has been possible to measure the speed of replacement of plasma proteins. A presentation of results taken from both clinical observation and experiment leads to a discussion on the pathogenic mechanism of hypoproteinaemia. (author) [French] Les hypoproteinemies humaine et experimentale ont ete explorees a l'aide d'indicateurs nucleaires. Une etude comparative du devenir des proteines seriques marquees par voie endogene, apres administration de glycocolle-{sup 15}N et de l'albumine serique marquee par voie exogene a l'iode-131 a ete realisee. On a determine la periode biologique de la serumalbumine et des globulines seriques ainsi que la grandeur des 'pools' vasculaire et extravasculaire de la serumalbumine. Il a ete ainsi possible d'evaluer la vitesse de renouvellement des proteines plasmatiques. La confrontation des resultats tires de l'observation clinique et de l'experimentation conduit a une discussion sur le mecanisme pathogenique de l'hypoproteinemie. (auteur)

  18. Use of stable isotopes in human nutrition in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, the Laboratory of Nutrition of the Department of Animal Biology of the Faculty of Science and Technology of UCAD has been using stable isotopic techniques for nearly twenty years. Stable isotopes were applied to different target populations to measure milk production, exclusive breastfeeding, body composition, micronutrient bioavailability and total energy expenditure.The application of stable isotopic techniques in nutrition has contributed to advocacy for exclusive breastfeeding for up to 6 months in Senegal. It enabled government decision-makers to obtain essential information on the quality of foods needed for optimal effect during pregnancy and for infant growth and the results were reflected in the national policy on micronutrient supplementation.

  19. Effects of euthanasia method on stable-carbon and stable-nitrogen isotope analysis for an ectothermic vertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Meredith A

    2013-04-30

    Stable isotope analysis is a critical tool for understanding ecological food webs; however, results can be sensitive to sample preparation methods. To limit the possibility of sample contamination, freezing is commonly used to euthanize invertebrates and preserve non-lethal samples from vertebrates. For destructive sampling of vertebrates, more humane euthanasia methods are preferred to freezing and it is essential to evaluate how these euthanasia methods affect stable isotope results. Stable isotope ratios and elemental composition of carbon and nitrogen were used to evaluate whether the euthanasia method compromised the integrity of the sample for analysis. Specifically, the stable isotope and C:N ratios were compared for larval wood frogs (Rana sylvatica  =  Lithobates sylvaticus), an ectothermic vertebrate, that had been euthanized by freezing with four different humane euthanasia methods: CO2, benzocaine, MS-222 (tricaine methanesulfonate), and 70% ethanol. The euthanasia method was not related to the δ(13)C or δ(15)N values and the comparisons revealed no differences between freezing and any of the other treatments. However, there were slight (non-significant) differences in the isotope ratios of benzocaine and CO2 when each was compared with freezing. The elemental composition was altered by the euthanasia method employed. The percentage nitrogen was higher in CO2 treatments than in freezing, and similar (non-significant) trends were seen for ethanol treatments relative to freezing. The resulting C:N ratios were higher for benzocaine treatments than for both CO2 and ethanol. Similar (non-significant) trends suggested that the C:N ratios were also higher for animals euthanized by freezing than for both CO2 and ethanol euthanasia methods. The euthanasia method had a larger effect on elemental composition than stable isotope ratios. The percentage nitrogen and the subsequent C:N ratios were most affected by the CO2 and ethanol euthanasia methods, whereas

  20. Complementary Constraints from Carbon (13C) and Nitrogen (15N) Isotopes on the Efficiency of the Glacial Ocean's Soft-Tissue Biological Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which mimicks iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) than the pre-industrial control. Dissolved oxygen in the thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3. This simulation already fits observed carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the fit. Modest increases in μmax result in higher subpolar δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, and better agreement with reconstructions. Large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models with modest increases in μmax reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient during the LGM. Both circulation and biological nutrient utilization contribute. However, these conclusions are preliminary given our idealized experiments, which do not consider changes in benthic denitrification and spatially inhomogenous changes in aeolian iron fluxes. The analysis illustrates interactions

  1. Stable isotopes confirm a coastal diet for critically endangered Mediterranean monk seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanlidis, Alexandros A; Curtis, P Jeff; Hirons, Amy C; Psaradellis, Marianna; Dendrinos, Panagiotis; Hopkins, John B

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the ecology and behaviour of endangered species is essential for developing effective management and conservation strategies. We used stable isotope analysis to investigate the foraging behaviour of critically endangered Mediterranean monk seals (Monachus monachus) in Greece. We measured carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (expressed as δ(13)C and δ(15)N values, respectively) derived from the hair of deceased adult and juvenile seals and the muscle of their known prey to quantify their diets. We tested the hypothesis that monk seals primarily foraged for prey that occupy coastal habitats in Greece. We compared isotope values from seal hair to their coastal and pelagic prey (after correcting all prey for isotopic discrimination) and used these isotopic data and a stable isotope mixing model to estimate the proportion of coastal and pelagic resources consumed by seals. As predicted, we found that seals had similar δ(13)C values as many coastal prey species and higher δ(13)C values than pelagic species; these results, in conjunction with mean dietary estimates (coastal=61 % vs. pelagic=39 %), suggest that seals have a diverse diet comprising prey from multiple trophic levels that primarily occupy the coast. Marine resource managers should consider using the results from this study to inform the future management of coastal habitats in Greece to protect Mediterranean monk seals.

  2. Isotopic signatures (13C/12C; 15N/14N) of blue penguin burrow soil invertebrates : carbon sources and trophic relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, D.J.; Clark, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Seabird burrows provide a soil environment for processing discards such as feathers and guano, hence constituting a primary interface between the sea and the land. This study involved collection and culturing of soil invertebrates from three blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) burrows, and examined their 13 C/ 12 C and 15 N/ 14 N isotopic composition in relation to potential burrow resources (terrestrial plant litter, burrow soil, guano, blue penguin feathers). Two taxa (cerylonid beetles and small tineid moth larvae) had a depleted 13 C/ 12 C indicative of a level of dependence on C from terrestrial soil. Tineid moth larvae (Monopis crocicapitella and (or) M. ethelella) substantially increased their 13 C/ 12 C enrichment during development, implying increasing dependence on marine C. Remaining taxa, both decomposers and predators, had 13 C/ 12 C intermediate between guano and feathers. Larval and emergent fleas had the most enriched 13 C/ 12 C , indicative of a greater dependence on feather C and the likelihood of co-processing with guano. Pseudoscorpions and histerid beetles had overlapping isotopic enrichments implying competition for prey, but were spatially separated in burrow soil. With their highly enriched 15 N/ 14 N and marine 13 C/ 12 C, larvae and protonymphs of the histiostomatid mite Myianoetus antipodus stood alone. Blue penguin burrows therefore support a diverse invertebrate fauna that incorporates terrestrial soil as well as varying proportions of the various blue penguin discards. (author). 45 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Multiple stable isotope fronts during non-isothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Stable isotope signatures of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements in minerals from hydrothermal veins and metasomatized host rocks are widely used to investigate fluid sources and paths. Previous theoretical studies mostly focused on analyzing stable isotope fronts developing during single-phase, isothermal fluid flow. In this study, numerical simulations were performed to assess how temperature changes, transport phenomena, kinetic vs. equilibrium isotope exchange, and isotopic source signals determine mineral oxygen isotopic compositions during fluid-rock interaction. The simulations focus on one-dimensional scenarios, with non-isothermal single- and two-phase fluid flow, and include the effects of quartz precipitation and dissolution. If isotope exchange between fluid and mineral is fast, a previously unrecognized, significant enrichment in heavy oxygen isotopes of fluids and minerals occurs at the thermal front. The maximum enrichment depends on the initial isotopic composition of fluid and mineral, the fluid-rock ratio and the maximum change in temperature, but is independent of the isotopic composition of the incoming fluid. This thermally induced isotope front propagates faster than the signal related to the initial isotopic composition of the incoming fluid, which forms a trailing front behind the zone of transient heavy oxygen isotope enrichment. Temperature-dependent kinetic rates of isotope exchange between fluid and rock strongly influence the degree of enrichment at the thermal front. In systems where initial isotope values of fluids and rocks are far from equilibrium and isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetics, the temperature increase accelerates the approach of the fluid to equilibrium conditions with the host rock. Consequently, the increase at the thermal front can be less dominant and can even generate fluid values below the initial isotopic composition of the input fluid. As kinetics limit the degree of isotope exchange, a third front may

  4. Insights from quantitative metaproteomics and protein-stable isotope probing into microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico; Taubert, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bastida, Felipe; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Schmidt, Frank; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Seifert, Jana

    2013-10-01

    The recent development of metaproteomics has enabled the direct identification and quantification of expressed proteins from microbial communities in situ, without the need for microbial enrichment. This became possible by (1) significant increases in quality and quantity of metagenome data and by improvements of (2) accuracy and (3) sensitivity of modern mass spectrometers (MS). The identification of physiologically relevant enzymes can help to understand the role of specific species within a community or an ecological niche. Beside identification, relative and absolute quantitation is also crucial. We will review label-free and label-based methods of quantitation in MS-based proteome analysis and the contribution of quantitative proteome data to microbial ecology. Additionally, approaches of protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) for deciphering community structures are reviewed. Information on the species-specific metabolic activity can be obtained when substrates or nutrients are labeled with stable isotopes in a protein-SIP approach. The stable isotopes ((13)C, (15)N, (36)S) are incorporated into proteins and the rate of incorporation can be used for assessing the metabolic activity of the corresponding species. We will focus on the relevance of the metabolic and phylogenetic information retrieved with protein-SIP studies and for detecting and quantifying the carbon flux within microbial consortia. Furthermore, the combination of protein-SIP with established tools in microbial ecology such as other stable isotope probing techniques are discussed.

  5. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.

    1988-03-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: alphabetical lists of domestic and foreign customers;alphabetical lists of isotopes and services;alphabetical lists of states and countries;tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for each isotope and dollars for services divided into domestic, foreign, and DOE project categories. During FY 1987 sales of stable isotope products and services were made to 272 differnt customers, of whom 159 were domestic and 113 were foreign, representing 18 different foreign countries. The total revenue was $3,785,609 of which 12.3% was from sales to DOE project customers, 60.4% was from sales to other domestic customers, and 27.3% was from sales to foreign customers. this represented sales of 189 different stable isotopes plus associated services and was a 16.5% increase over FY 1986

  6. Parasites in Myodes glareolus and their association with diet assessed by stable isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Christina; Woolsey, Ian David; Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman

    2018-01-01

    Vertebrates are hosts to numerous parasites, belonging to many different taxa. These parasites differ in transmission, being through either direct contact, a faecal-oral route, ingestion of particular food items, vertical or sexual transmission, or by a vector. Assessing the impact of diet...... on parasitism can be difficult because analysis of faecal and stomach content are uncertain and labourious; and as with molecular methods, do not provide diet information over a longer period of time. We here explored whether the analysis of stable isotopes in hair provides insight into the impact of diet...... and the presence of parasites in the rodent Myodes glareolus. Twenty-one animals were examined for parasites and their hair analysed for stable isotopes (C and N). A positive correlation between δ15N and one species of intestinal parasite was observed in females. Furthermore, several ectoparasites were negatively...

  7. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori, E-mail: kigawa@riken.jp [RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center (QBiC), Laboratory for Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as “encoding and decoding” processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells.

  8. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as “encoding and decoding” processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells

  9. Nitrogen removal through N cycling from sediments in a constructed coastal marsh as assessed by 15N-isotope dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Hee-Myong; Kim, Pan-Gun; Park, Ji-Suk; Yun, Seok-In; Han, Junho

    2018-04-01

    Constructed coastal marsh regulates land-born nitrogen (N) loadings through salinity-dependent microbial N transformation processes. A hypothesis that salinity predominantly controls N removal in marsh was tested through incubation in a closed system with added- 15 NH 4 + using sediments collected from five sub-marshes in Shihwa marsh, Korea. Time-course patterns of concentrations and 15 N-atom% of soil-N pools were analyzed. Sediments having higher salinity and lower soil organic-C and acid-extractable organic-N exhibited slower rates of N mineralization and immobilization, nitrification, and denitrification. Rates of denitrification were not predicted well by sediment salinity but by its organic-C, indicating heterotrophic denitrification. Denitrification dominated N-loss from this marsh, and nitrogen removal capacity of this marsh was estimated at 337 kg N day -1 (9.9% of the daily N-loadings) considering the current rooting depth of common reeds (1.0 m). We showed that sediment N removal decreases with increasing salinity and can increase with increasing organic-C for heterotrophic denitrification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Some Organic Residues on the Availability of Nutrients to wheat Plants Using '15N Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.A.I.; Ismail, M.M.; El-akel, E.A.; Abdel Aziz, A.H.A.; Abdel-Wadood, A.

    2008-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in pots under greenhouse conditions to evaluate chicken manure and rice straw either individually or combined with mineral fertilizer rates on wheat plant grown in sandy soils. Organic materials were mixed with 5 kg soil pot 1 . 15 N-labeled ammonium sulfate was added after thinned wheat plants. Basal recommended dose of P and K were applied. The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized block design At harvest, the dry weight of straw and grains were recorded. Also Ndff, Ndfs and FUE were calculated. The obtained results showed that the application of organic and inorganic nitrogen fertilizer was significantly improved the yield of wheat straw and grains and have the order of ammonium sulfate (AS) > chicken manure (CM) > rice straw (RS). The effect was more pronounced when both CM and RS were applied in combined with labelled ammonium sulfate at the rates of (25% + 75%) and (50% + 50%). Fertilizer use efficiency (%FUE) was in the range of 3.9% to 13% in straw and 7.9% to 35.3% in grains. N derived from fertilizer (Ndff) by either straw or grains was ranged from 25.32 - 48.90% dependent on N fertilization forms and rates. Results indicated the importance of organic-N as a supplemental source for nitrogen and other elements which may be useful for enhancement of plant growth as well as saving the environment from pollution

  11. Stable Isotope Systematics of Martian Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Farley, K. A.; Archer, D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairen, A.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine isotopic compositions in HCl released during evolved gas analysis (EGA) runs have been detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover ranging from approximately -9‰ to -50‰ δ37Cl, with two spatially and isotopically separated groups of samples averaging -15‰ and -45‰. These extremely low values are the first such detection of any known natural material; common terrestrial values very rarely exceed ±5‰, and the most extreme isotopic signature yet detected elsewhere in the solar system are values of around +24‰ on the Moon. The only other known location in the solar system with large negative chlorine isotopes is the Atacama Desert, where perchlorate with -14‰ δ37Cl has been detected. The Atacama perchlorate has unusual Δ17O signatures associated with it, indicating a formation mechanism involving O3, which suggests an atmospheric origin of the perchlorate and associated large isotopic anomalies. Identification of non-zero positive Δ17O signatures in the O2 released during EGA runs would allow definitive evidence for a similar process having occurred on Mars. Perchlorate is thought to be the most likely source of HCl in EGA runs due to the simultaneous onset of O2 release. If perchlorate is indeed the HCl source, atmospheric chemistry could be responsible for the observed isotopic anomalies, with variable extents of perchlorate production producing the isotopic variability. However, chloride salts have also been observed to release HCl upon heating; if the timing of O2 release is merely coincidental, observed HCl could be coming from chlorides. At thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor of perchlorate reduction is 0.93, meaning that differing amounts of post-deposition reduction of isotopically normal perchlorate to chloride could account for the highly variable Cl isotopes. Additionally, post-deposition reduction could account for the difference between the two Cl isotopic groups if perchlorate

  12. Study on utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus from compound fertilizer by rice using isotopes 15N and 32P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xianfang; Li Dongyang; Zhang Xizhong; Chen Yizhu

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the application of urea plus ordinary superphospate (OSP) which gave higher grains yield than by application of compound fertilizer UPA (ureaplus compound ammonium phosphates). Isotopes tracer experiment showed that the utilizations of nitrogen fertilizer are: mixed urea and OSP > urea and OSP separately > urea > urea - ammonium phosphates. The utilizations of phosphorus by rice are: urea-ammomium phosphate > mixed urea and OSP > urea and OSP separately > OSP. It is shown that the A N -value of soil was significantly correlated with yield of rice grains

  13. Melting point of high-purity germanium stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavva, V. A.; Bulanov, A. D.; Kut'in, A. M.; Plekhovich, A. D.; Churbanov, M. F.

    2018-05-01

    The melting point (Tm) of germanium stable isotopes 72Ge, 73Ge, 74Ge, 76Ge was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. With the increase in atomic mass of isotope the decrease in Tm is observed. The decrease was equal to 0.15 °C per the unit of atomic mass which qualitatively agrees with the value calculated by Lindemann formula accounting for the effect of "isotopic compression" of elementary cell.

  14. Biogeochemistry of the stable hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estep, M.F.; Hoering, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    The fractionation of H isotopes between the water in the growth medium and the organically bonded H from microalgae cultured under conditions, where light intensity and wavelength, temperature, nutrient availability, and the H isotope ratio of the water were controlled, is reproducible and light dependent. All studies were based either on the H isotope ratios of the total organic H or on the lipids, where most of the H is firmly bonded to C. H bonded into other macromolecules, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, does not exchange with water, when algae are incubated in water enriched with deuterium. Only after the destruction of quaternary H bonds are labile hydrogens in macromolecules free to exchange with water. By growing algae (18 strains), including blue-green algae, green algae and diatoms, in continuous light, the isotope fractionations in photosynthesis were reproducibly -93 to -178 per thousand, depending on the organism tested. This fractionation was not temperature dependent. Microalgae grown in total darkness with an organic substrate did not show the isotope fractionation seen in cells grown in light. In both light- and dark-grown algae, however, additional depletion of deuterium (-30 to -60 per thousand) in cellular organic matter occurs during the metabolism of carbohydrates to form lipids. Plants from several natural populations also fractionated isotopes during photosynthesis by an average of -90 to -110 per thousand. In addition, the organically bonded H in nonsaponifiable lipids was further fractionated by -80 per thousand from that in saponifiable lipids, isolated from two geographically distinct populations of marsh plants. This difference between H isotope ratios of these two groups of lipids provides an endogenous isotopic marker. (author)

  15. Biogeochemistry of the stable hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estep, M F; Hoering, T C [Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (USA)

    1980-08-01

    The fractionation of H isotopes between the water in the growth medium and the organically bonded H from microalgae cultured under conditions, where light intensity and wavelength, temperature, nutrient availability, and the H isotope ratio of the water were controlled, is reproducible and light dependent. All studies were based either on the H isotope ratios of the total organic H or on the lipids, where most of the H is firmly bonded to C. H bonded into other macromolecules, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, does not exchange with water, when algae are incubated in water enriched with deuterium. Only after the destruction of quaternary H bonds are labile hydrogens in macromolecules free to exchange with water. By growing algae (18 strains), including blue-green algae, green algae and diatoms, in continuous light, the isotope fractionations in photosynthesis were reproducibly -93 to -178 per thousand, depending on the organism tested. This fractionation was not temperature dependent. Microalgae grown in total darkness with an organic substrate did not show the isotope fractionation seen in cells grown in light. In both light- and dark-grown algae, however, additional depletion of deuterium (-30 to -60 per thousand) in cellular organic matter occurs during the metabolism of carbohydrates to form lipids. Plants from several natural populations also fractionated isotopes during photosynthesis by an average of -90 to -110 per thousand. In addition, the organically bonded H in nonsaponifiable lipids was further fractionated by -80 per thousand from that in saponifiable lipids, isolated from two geographically distinct populations of marsh plants. This difference between H isotope ratios of these two groups of lipids provides an endogenous isotopic marker.

  16. Testing sequential extraction methods for the analysis of multiple stable isotope systems from a bone sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Arppe, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Stable isotope composition of bones, analysed either from the mineral phase (hydroxyapatite) or from the organic phase (mainly collagen) carry important climatological and ecological information and are therefore widely used in paleontological and archaeological research. For the analysis of the stable isotope compositions, both of the phases, hydroxyapatite and collagen, have their more or less well established separation and analytical techniques. Recent development in IRMS and wet chemical extraction methods have facilitated the analysis of very small bone fractions (500 μg or less starting material) for PO43-O isotope composition. However, the uniqueness and (pre-) historical value of each archaeological and paleontological finding lead to preciously little material available for stable isotope analyses, encouraging further development of microanalytical methods for the use of stable isotope analyses. Here we present the first results in developing extraction methods for combining collagen C- and N-isotope analyses to PO43-O-isotope analyses from a single bone sample fraction. We tested sequential extraction starting with dilute acid demineralization and collection of both collagen and PO43-fractions, followed by further purification step by H2O2 (PO43-fraction). First results show that bone sample separates as small as 2 mg may be analysed for their δ15N, δ13C and δ18OPO4 values. The method may be incorporated in detailed investigation of sequentially developing skeletal material such as teeth, potentially allowing for the investigation of interannual variability in climatological/environmental signals or investigation of the early life history of an individual.

  17. Dietary heterogeneity among Western industrialized countries reflected in the stable isotope ratios of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Luciano O; Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2012-01-01

    Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization). Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of different dietary patterns and the use of local food products. Here we report isotopic differences among carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope ratios of human hair collected in thirteen Western European countries and in the USA. European hair samples had significantly lower δ(13)C values (-22.7 to -18.3‰), and significantly higher δ(15)N (7.8 to 10.3‰) and δ(34)S (4.8 to 8.3‰) values than samples from the USA (δ(13)C: -21.9 to -15.0‰, δ(15)N: 6.7 to 9.9‰, δ(34)S: -1.2 to 9.9‰). Within Europe, we detected differences in hair δ(13)C and δ(34)S values among countries and covariation of isotope ratios with latitude and longitude. This geographic structuring of isotopic data suggests heterogeneity in the food resources used by citizens of industrialized nations and supports the presence of different dietary patterns within Western Europe despite globalization trends. Here we showed the potential of stable isotope analysis as a population-wide tool for dietary screening, particularly as a complement of dietary surveys, that can provide additional information on assimilated macronutrients and independent verification of data obtained by those self-reporting instruments.

  18. Dietary heterogeneity among Western industrialized countries reflected in the stable isotope ratios of human hair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano O Valenzuela

    Full Text Available Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization. Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of different dietary patterns and the use of local food products. Here we report isotopic differences among carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope ratios of human hair collected in thirteen Western European countries and in the USA. European hair samples had significantly lower δ(13C values (-22.7 to -18.3‰, and significantly higher δ(15N (7.8 to 10.3‰ and δ(34S (4.8 to 8.3‰ values than samples from the USA (δ(13C: -21.9 to -15.0‰, δ(15N: 6.7 to 9.9‰, δ(34S: -1.2 to 9.9‰. Within Europe, we detected differences in hair δ(13C and δ(34S values among countries and covariation of isotope ratios with latitude and longitude. This geographic structuring of isotopic data suggests heterogeneity in the food resources used by citizens of industrialized nations and supports the presence of different dietary patterns within Western Europe despite globalization trends. Here we showed the potential of stable isotope analysis as a population-wide tool for dietary screening, particularly as a complement of dietary surveys, that can provide additional information on assimilated macronutrients and independent verification of data obtained by those self-reporting instruments.

  19. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2014-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author)

  1. Stable isotope geochemistry: definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2015-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  2. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2012-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 89 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2008-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2016-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  6. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2013-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 91 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Traceability of poultry viscera meal by stable isotopes in broiler feathers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Priscila Cavalca de; Sartori, Jose Roberto; Pezzato, Antonio Celso; Stradiotti, Ana Cristina; Pelicia, Vanessa Cristina; Ducatti, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the presence of poultry viscera meal (VM) in the diet of broiler chickens, through the feather analyses by stable isotopes of carbon ( 13 C/ 12 C) and nitrogen ( 15 N/ 14 N) and mass spectrophotometry. Seven hundred and twenty Cobb male broiler chicks were subjected to the following treatments: vegetable diet based on corn and soybean meal, from 1 to 42 days of age; diet with 8% poultry viscera meal, from 1 to 42 days of age; vegetable diet from 1 to 21 days, and diet with VM from 22 to 42 days; vegetable diet from 1 to 35 days, and diet with VM from 36 to 42 days; diet with VM from 1 to 21 days and, and vegetable diet from 22 to 42 days; diet with VM from 1 to 35 days, and vegetable diet from 36 to 42 days. Feather samples were collected from four birds per treatment at 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days of age, which were subjected to isotopic analysis for carbon ( 13 C/ 12 C) and nitrogen ( 15 N/ 14 N) by mass spectrometry. The use of the stable C and N isotope technique in feathers allow the VM detection in broiler chicken diet after 21 days of VM inclusion. (author)

  8. Temporal diet changes recorded by stable isotopes in Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, R N; Goto, M; Izumiyama, S; Yoh, M; Ogura, N; Hayashi, H

    2005-03-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were measured in hair samples of the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) inhabiting the Northern Japanese Alps (NJA) (n = 20) and the periphery of Nagano City (NC) (n = 6), in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. The hair of NJA bears, which did not have access to anthropogenic foods, showed lower values of d13C and d15N than that of NC bears which had access to garbage and corn fields, especially during the summer. These results reflect somewhat differing diets between the NJA and NC bears. We attempted to assess the feeding history during the hair growth cycle using the growth section analysis method. Each hair sample had been cut into 3?mm lengths from root to tip, labeled, and analyzed along the hair growth. We measured the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of each 3?mm length of hair sample from one NC bear which had been killed while raiding a corn field. The sections showed wide ranges of isotope ratios, from -23.2% to -14.6% for delta13C, and from 0.3% to 4.6% for delta15N. It was shown that the diet of this bear shifted dramatically from principally C3 plants to more C4 plants and to foods of animal origin. An analysis of the whole hair reflects just the average feeding habit during hair growth, but the present method can trace its diet history. This method can contribute to obtain precise ecological information of wildlife.

  9. Evaluating cleansing effects on trace elements and stable isotope values in feathers of oiled birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Sonia; Moreno, Roćio; Jover, Lluis; Sanpera, Carola

    2010-01-01

    Feathers of seabirds are widely used as a nondestructive tissue for pollution monitoring of trace elements, as well as convenient samples for trophic ecology studies by means of stable isotope analysis (SIA). Nevertheless, feathers can be occasionally impregnated with oil from deliberate ship discharges and from massive oil spill accidents. The feather structure makes them effective traps for particles and are subject to external contamination. It is unknown to what extent the oil adhered to feathers can change trace element concentrations or stable isotope signatures. This study has two primary objectives: (1) to assess if there are differences between trace element concentrations and stable isotope signatures of oiled and clean feathers, and (2) to determine if the cleansing of oiled feathers using commonly applied techniques such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) washes in combination with an organic solvent (hexane) is more effective than using NaOH alone. In order to do this, we analysed trace elements (Se, Hg, Pb, Cu and Zn) and stable isotopes (delta(13)C and delta(15)N) of individual feathers of yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis) which were affected by the 2002 Prestige oil spill in Galicia (NW Spain). Two sets of feathers were analysed, one group were oil-free (Control group) and the other had oil adhered to its surface (Oiled group). We expected to find differences between control and oiled feathers when cleaning exclusively with NaOH and no differences when using hexane. Our results did not show significant differences between Control and Oiled groups as a consequence of the cleansing method used. Unexpectedly, the additional cleansing with hexane resulted in decreasing selenium concentrations and increasing zinc and delta(15)N values in all groups of feathers.

  10. Factors controlling stable isotope composition of European precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, K.; Sonntag, C.; Muennich, K.O.

    1982-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial variations of stable isotope ratios in present day European precipitation are simulated with a simple multibox model of the mean west-east horizontal transport of the atmospheric water vapour across the European continent. Isotope fractionation during the formation of precipitation leads to an increasing depletion of heavy isotopes in the residual air moisture as it moves towards the centre of the continent. This isotopic depletion is partly compensated, particularly in summer, by evapotranspiration, which is assumed to transfer soil water into the atmosphere without isotope fractionation. The model estimates are based on horizontal water vapour flux data, varying seasonally between 88 and 130 kg m -1 s -1 for the Atlantic coast region, and on the monthly precipitation, evapotranspiration and surface air temperature data available for various locations in Europe. Both continental and seasonal temperature effects observed in the stable isotope composition of European precipitation are fairly well reproduced by the model. The calculations show that the isotopic composition of local precipitation is primarily controlled by regional scale processes, i.e. by the water vapour transport patterns into the continent, and by the average precipitation-evapotranspiration history of the air masses precipitating at a given place. Local parameters such as the surface and/or cloud base temperature or the amount of precipitation modify the isotope ratios only slightly. Implications of the model predictions for the interpretation of stable isotope ratios in earlier periods as they are preserved in ice cores and in groundwater are also discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Natural abundance N stable isotopes in plants and soils as an indicator of N deposition hotspots in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    The natural abundance of stable isotopes in plants and soils has been utilized to understand ecological phenomenon. Foliar δ15N is an integrator of soil δ15N, atmospheric N sources, and fractionation processes that occur during plant N uptake, plant N assimilation, and mycorrhizal associations. The amount of reactive N in the environment has greatly increased due to human activities, and urban ecosystems experience excess N deposition that can have cascading effects on plants and soils. Foliar δ15N has been shown to increase with increasing N deposition and nitrification rates suggesting increased foliar δ15N occurs with greater N inputs as a result of accelerated soil N cycling. Thus, foliar δ15N can be an indication of soil N availability for plant uptake and soil N cycling rates, since high N availability results in increased soil N cycling and subsequent loss of 14N. Limited research has utilized foliar and soil δ15N in urban forests to assess the importance of plant uptake of atmospheric N deposition and to gain insight about ecosystem processes. Previous investigations found foliar δ15N of mature trees in urban forests is not only related to elevated pollutant-derived N deposition, but also to soil N availability and soil N cycling rates. Similarly, enriched foliar δ15N of urban saplings was attributed to soil characteristics that indicated higher nitrification, thus, greater nitrate leaching and low N retention in the urban soils. These studies demonstrate the need for measuring the δ15N of various plant and soil N sources while simultaneously measuring soil N processes (e.g., net nitrification rates) in order to use natural abundance δ15N of plants and soils to assess N sources and cycling in urban forests. A conceptual framework that illustrates biogenic and anthropogenic controls on nitrogen isotope composition in urban plants and soils will be presented along with foliar and soil δ15N from urban forests across several cities as a proof of

  12. Stable isotope variations in benthic primary producers along the Bosphorus (Turkey): A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Aktan, Yelda; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen pollution along the Bosphorus Strait was investigated. • C and N isotopic and elemental analyses on benthic primary producers were performed. • δ 15 N decreased, while δ 13 C and N% increased from north to south along the Strait. • Ulva lactuca was more useful than epiphytes as indicator of nitrogen pollution. • Preliminary isotopic analyses on resident organisms are useful monitoring tools. - Abstract: The Bosphorus Strait is a dynamic and complex system. Recent evidences showed nitrogen and heavy metal concentrations to follow opposite patterns across the Strait, suggesting a complex spatial organisation of the anthropogenic disturbance in this system. Here, we provide isotopic information on the origin and transportation of dissolved nitrogen along the Bosphorus. C and N isotopic and elemental analyses were performed on specimens of Ulva lactuca and associated epiphytes sampled in five locations across the Strait. Variations in C and N isotopic signatures were observed in U. lactuca, pointing to a decrease in the availability of anthropogenic organic dissolved nitrogen along a north-south direction. Conversely, epiphytes did not show isotopic or elemental patterns across the Strait. These results suggest that preliminary stable isotope surveys in extended costal systems basing on U. lactuca can represent a valuable tool to focus meaningful targets and hypotheses for pollution studies in the Mediterranean region

  13. Dual element ((15)N/(14)N, (13)C/(12)C) isotope analysis of glyphosate and AMPA by derivatization-gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) combined with LC/IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogusu, Emmanuel O; Wolbert, J Benjamin; Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Jochmann, Maik A; Elsner, Martin

    2015-07-01

    To assess sources and degradation of the herbicide glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] and its metabolite AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid), concentration measurements are often inconclusive and even (13)C/(12)C analysis alone may give limited information. To advance isotope ratio analysis of an additional element, we present compound-specific (15)N/(14)N analysis of glyphosate and AMPA by a two step derivatization in combination with gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The N-H group was derivatized with isopropyl chloroformate (iso-PCF), and remaining acidic groups were subsequently methylated with trimethylsilyldiazomethane (TMSD). Iso-PCF treatment at pH 10 indicated decomposition of the derivative. At pH 10, and with an excess of iso-PCF by 10-24, greatest yields and accurate (15)N/(14)N ratios were obtained (deviation from elemental analyzer-IRMS: -0.2 ± 0.9% for glyphosate; -0.4 ± 0.7% for AMPA). Limits for accurate δ(15)N analysis of glyphosate and AMPA were 150 and 250 ng injected, respectively. A combination of δ(15)N and δ(13)C analysis by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) (1) enabled an improved distinction of commercial glyphosate products and (2) showed that glyphosate isotope values during degradation by MnO2 clearly fell outside the commercial product range. This highlights the potential of combined carbon and nitrogen isotopes analysis to trace sources and degradation of glyphosate.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios and mercury concentration in the scalp hair of residents from Taiji, a whaling town

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tetsuya; Hayasaka, Moriaki; Hisamichi, Yohsuke; Kimura, Osamu; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyzed δ 13 C, δ 15 N and Hg in hair from Japanese whale meat-eaters and non-eaters. ► The δ 15 N and δ 13 C values in whale meat-eaters were higher than those in non-eaters. ► The Hg concentration in whale meat-eaters was higher than that in non-eaters. ► A positive correlation was seen between δ 15 N and Hg in whale meat-eaters. ► Consumption of whale meat may increase δ 15 N, δ 13 C and Hg in the scalp hair. -- Abstract: We analyzed stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N) as well as mercury (Hg) concentration in the scalp hair of Japanese who consumed whale meat and those who did not, and investigated the relationships among the δ 13 C and δ 15 N values and Hg concentration. The average δ 15 N and δ 13 C values of whale meat-eaters (10.11‰ and −18.5‰) were significantly higher than those of non-eaters (9.28‰ and −18.9‰), respectively. The average Hg concentration of whale meat-eaters (20.6 μg/g) was significantly higher than that of non-eaters (2.20 μg/g). Significant positive correlations were found between the δ 13 C and δ 15 N values and between the δ 15 N value and Hg concentration in the hair of whale meat-eaters, while the correlation between the δ 15 N value and Hg concentration was not statistically significant in the non-eaters. The consumption of whale meat may increase Hg concentration as well as δ 15 N and δ 13 C values in scalp hair

  15. Small Tails Tell Tall Tales--Intra-Individual Variation in the Stable Isotope Values of Fish Fin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Hayden

    Full Text Available Fish fin is a widely used, non-lethal sample material in studies using stable isotopes to assess the ecology of fishes. However, fish fin is composed of two distinct tissues (ray and membrane which may have different stable isotope values and are not homogeneously distributed within a fin. As such, estimates of the stable isotope values of a fish may vary according to the section of fin sampled.To assess the magnitude of this variation, we analysed carbon (δ13C, nitrogen (δ15N, hydrogen (δ2H and oxygen (δ18O stable isotopes of caudal fin from juvenile, riverine stages of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and brown trout (Salmo trutta. Individual fins were sub-sectioned into tip, mid and base, of which a further subset were divided into ray and membrane.Isotope variation between fin sections, evident in all four elements, was primarily related to differences between ray and membrane. Base sections were13C depleted relative to tip (~1‰ with equivalent variation evident between ray and membrane. A similar trend was evident in δ2H, though the degree of variation was far greater (~10‰. Base and ray sections were 18O enriched (~2‰ relative to tip and membrane, respectively. Ray and membrane sections displayed longitudinal variation in 15N mirroring that of composite fin (~1‰, indicating that variation in15N values was likely related to ontogenetic variation.To account for the effects of intra-fin variability in stable isotope analyses we suggest that researchers sampling fish fin, in increasing priority, 1 also analyse muscle (or liver tissue from a subsample of fish to calibrate their data, or 2 standardize sampling by selecting tissue only from the extreme tip of a fin, or 3 homogenize fins prior to analysis.

  16. Tracing anthropogenic inputs to production in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan - A stable isotope approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Todd W.; Omori, Koji; Hamaoka, Hideki; Shibata, Jun-ya; Hidejiro, Onishi

    2010-01-01

    The Seto Inland Sea (SIS) receives waste runoff from ∼24% of Japan's total population, yet it is also important in regional fisheries, recreation and commerce. During August 2006 we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of particulate organic matter (POM) and zooplankton across urban population gradients of the SIS. Results showed a consistent trend of increasing δ 15 N in POM and zooplankton from the western to eastern subsystems of the SIS, corresponding to increasing population load. Principal components analysis of environmental variables indicated high positive loadings of δ 15 N and δ 13 C with high chlorophyll-a and surface water temperatures, and negative loadings of low salinities related to inputs from large rivers and high urban development in the eastern SIS. Anthropogenic nitrogen was therefore readily integrated into the SIS food web from primary production to copepods, which are a critical food source for many commercially important fishes.

  17. Tracing anthropogenic inputs to production in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan--a stable isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd W; Omori, Koji; Hamaoka, Hideki; Shibata, Jun-ya; Hidejiro, Onishi

    2010-10-01

    The Seto Inland Sea (SIS) receives waste runoff from ∼24% of Japan's total population, yet it is also important in regional fisheries, recreation and commerce. During August 2006 we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of particulate organic matter (POM) and zooplankton across urban population gradients of the SIS. Results showed a consistent trend of increasing δ(15)N in POM and zooplankton from the western to eastern subsystems of the SIS, corresponding to increasing population load. Principal components analysis of environmental variables indicated high positive loadings of δ(15)N and δ(13)C with high chlorophyll-a and surface water temperatures, and negative loadings of low salinities related to inputs from large rivers and high urban development in the eastern SIS. Anthropogenic nitrogen was therefore readily integrated into the SIS food web from primary production to copepods, which are a critical food source for many commercially important fishes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nitrogen dynamics in subtropical fringe and basin mangrove forests inferred from stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Carla Roberta Gonçalves; Nardoto, Gabriela Bielefeld; Rochelle, André Luis Casarin; Vieira, Simone Aparecida; Oliveira, Rafael Silva

    2017-03-01

    Mangroves exhibit low species richness compared to other tropical forests, but great structural and functional diversity. Aiming to contribute to a better understanding of the functioning of mangrove forests, we investigated nitrogen (N) dynamics in two physiographic types of mangroves (fringe and basin forests) in southeastern Brazil. Because fringe forests are under great influence of tidal flushing we hypothesized that these forests would exhibit higher N cycling rates in sediment and higher N losses to the atmosphere compared to basin forests. We quantified net N mineralization and nitrification rates in sediment and natural abundance of N stable isotopes15 N) in the sediment-plant-litter system. The fringe forest exhibited higher net N mineralization rates and δ 15 N in the sediment-plant-litter system, but net nitrification rates were similar to those of the basin forest. The results of the present study suggest that fringe forests exhibit higher N availability and N cycling in sediment compared to basin forests.

  19. Stable-carbon isotope variability in tree foliage and wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavitt, S.W.; Long, A.

    1986-01-01

    This study documents variation of stable-carbon isotope ratios ( 13 C/ 12 C) in trees of genera Juniperus and Pinus under field conditions. Results are from cellulose analysis on leaves, twigs, and wood from a number of localities in the southwestern US. Substantial variability, typically 1-3%, exists among leaves, within wood (radially, vertically, circumferentially), and between individuals at a site. These results may help guide sampling in tracer-type studies with stable-carbon isotope ratios and aid in the interpretation of isotopic results from such studies

  20. Stable Isotopic Insights into the Foraging Ecology of an Endangered Marine Predator, the Hawaiian Petrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, A. E.; Ostrom, P. H.; James, H. F.

    2010-12-01

    Seabirds play vital roles in their ecosystems, both as predators in their oceanic foraging grounds and conduits of marine nutrients to island nesting sites. Despite growing evidence that food availability limits seabird populations, characterization of the diet and even foraging locations of some seabird species remains elusive. Here, we use stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes to study the foraging ecology of an endangered and poorly known seabird, the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis). This species nests solely on the main Hawaiian Islands but forages widely across the NE Pacific, sometimes traveling over 10,000km on single foraging trips. δ13C and δ15N values vary with trophic level and at the base of food webs throughout the marine range of the Hawaiian petrel. Thus, we are able to use isotope signatures in modern and ancient petrel tissues to track spatial and temporal variation in foraging location and diet. We find strong evidence of foraging segregation between populations, with hatch-year birds from the island of Hawaii exhibiting feather δ15N and δ13C values over 3‰ and 1 ‰ higher, respectively, than those found in Maui and Kauai hatch-year birds. There is also significant variation in δ15N values between feathers from Kauai, Hawaii, and Maui adults, indicating additional foraging segregation during the winter molt. To distinguish between the effects of trophic level and foraging location, we relate our data to those from seabirds with known diet and foraging location, as well as to previous characterizations of isoscapes in the NE Pacific and at-sea observations of our study species. Finally, we track Hawaiian petrel foraging ecology back in time through examination of stable isotope values in historical feathers and ancient bone collagen. We find that, despite a species-wide decline in δ15N values (consistent with trophic level decline), populations have maintained divergent isotopic niches through at least the past 1

  1. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen as markers of dietary variation among sociocultural subgroups of Inuit in Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Larsen, Christina V L; Dahl-Petersen, Inger K; Buchardt, Bjørn

    2017-09-10

    We assessed the use of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen as biomarkers for traditional versus store-bought food among the Inuit. Furthermore, we compared the isotope patterns among sociocultural population groups. As a part of a country-wide health survey in Greenland during 2005-2010, we analyzed the isotope composition of toenails from 1025 adult Inuit and meat of common species hunted for food. Information on diet and sociocultural variables was collected by interviews. Weighted by sex and place of residence to the total population of Inuit in Greenland, the average δ 13 C value in toenails was -20.2‰ and the δ 15 N value was 12.0‰ which are higher than in a general Danish omnivorous population. Both isotopes were significantly associated with other biomarkers of marine food and with results of a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). The percentage of marine food in the diet was estimated at 21% from the mean δ 13 C value, 25% from the mean δ 15 N value, and 23% from the FFQ. Nail samples for analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were convenient to collect during a large population health survey among the Inuit. Isotope enrichment levels showed statistically significant associations with other biomarkers for consumption of marine food and with results of an FFQ and were used to estimate the percentage of marine food in the diet. Isotope levels were significantly associated with a novel score of sociocultural transition. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hydrochemistry and isotopic composition (δ"1"3C, δ"1"5N) in six dunes lagoons in the National Park of Lencois Maranhenses, Maranhao, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Junior, Jayme Teixeira; Suzuki, Marina Satika; Meirelles, Brunele de Araujo; Rangel, Thiago Pessanha; Oliveira, Braulio Cherene Vaz de

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the physicochemical parameters, nutrients and isotopic composition (δ"1"3C, δ"1"5N) of dissolved organic matter and MPS in six lakes located in the Maranhenses National Park, Maranhao State, under varying degrees of anthropic impact and distance from the sea. The physical and chemical parameters were measured in the field with portable devices; for total alkalinity, nutrients and photosynthetic pigments, samples were collected and analysed in the laboratory; the isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen was determined from the particulate material retained on the filter and in the extract generated in the PPL filtration resin column. The limnological variables were assessed in both the dry and rainy seasons. The high rainfall caused a dilution effect for most of the elements studied in the rainy season. The elemental composition of the particulate fraction was 58% lower than the fraction dissolved. The carbon isotopic composition was lighter in the rainy season as a result of dilution and loading of allochthonous impoverished organic matter. (author)

  3. Stable isotopes applied in life sciences in UNESP - Botucatu campus, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Denadai, Juliana C.; Sartori, Maria M.P.; Ducatti, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Universities and research centers that use stable isotopes follow a worldwide trend in owning laboratories isotope ratio that serves multiple users, as well as minimize maintenance costs, operation and staff training. For this purpose it was created in 1998, the Center Stable Isotopes 'Centro de Isotopos Estaveis' - CIE, which is an auxiliary unit linked to the Institute of Biosciences (IB) of the Sao Paulo State University - UNESP Botucatu Campus, Brazil. The best way to CIE grow and achieve excellence are already disclose the methodologies employed and practice areas consolidated to find new partnerships with different applications, and also seek new methods of analysis that can expand areas. The aim of this study is to disseminate methodologies for analysis of isotope ratio and areas of the CIE. The CIE analyzes the isotopic ratios 13 C/ 12 C, 15 N/ 14 N, 2 H/ 1 H and 18 O/ 16 O (CHON), and for the carbon samples can be solid, liquid and gas (in the form of CO 2 ) for the other elements is only possible to analyze in solid or liquid form. All samples are always analyzed separately by the destructive method. The CIE addition to performing scientific partnerships with all university, complementary and auxiliaries units of UNESP Botucatu campus also have partnerships in other academic units on campus of UNESP Jaboticabal and Dracena and Sao Paulo University in Piracicaba campus and is open to new partnerships in other research units. (author)

  4. Development of O-18 stable isotope separation technology using membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Woo; Kim, Taek Soo; Choi, Hwa Rim; Park, Sung Hee; Lee, Ki Tae; Chang, Dae Shik

    2006-06-15

    The ultimate goal of this investigation is to develop the separation technology for O-18 oxygen stable isotope used in a cyclotron as a target for production of radioisotope F-18. F-18 is a base material for synthesis of [F-18]FDG radio-pharmaceutical, which is one of the most important tumor diagnostic agent used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography). More specifically, this investigation is focused on three categories as follow, 1) development of the membrane distillation isotope separation process to re-enrich O-18 stable isotope whose isotopic concentration is reduced after used in a cyclotron, 2) development of organic impurity purification technology to remove acetone, methanol, ethanol, and acetonitrile contained in a used cyclotron O-18 enriched target water, and 3) development of a laser absorption spectroscopic system for analyzing oxygen isotopic concentration in water.

  5. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman; Nor Afiqah Harun; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Md Suhaimi Elias; Salmah Moosa

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalization of food markets and the relative ease with which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents, means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are use as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  6. Searching for the true diet of marine predators: incorporating Bayesian priors into stable isotope mixing models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Chiaradia

    Full Text Available Reconstructing the diet of top marine predators is of great significance in several key areas of applied ecology, requiring accurate estimation of their true diet. However, from conventional stomach content analysis to recent stable isotope and DNA analyses, no one method is bias or error free. Here, we evaluated the accuracy of recent methods to estimate the actual proportion of a controlled diet fed to a top-predator seabird, the Little penguin (Eudyptula minor. We combined published DNA data of penguins scats with blood plasma δ(15N and δ(13C values to reconstruct the diet of individual penguins fed experimentally. Mismatch between controlled (true ingested diet and dietary estimates obtained through the separately use of stable isotope and DNA data suggested some degree of differences in prey assimilation (stable isotope and digestion rates (DNA analysis. In contrast, combined posterior isotope mixing model with DNA Bayesian priors provided the closest match to the true diet. We provided the first evidence suggesting that the combined use of these complementary techniques may provide better estimates of the actual diet of top marine predators- a powerful tool in applied ecology in the search for the true consumed diet.

  7. Organic carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in the intertidal sediments from the Yangtze Estuary, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M. . E-mail mliu@geo.ecnu.edu.cn; Hou, L.J.; Xu, S.Y.; Ou, D.N.; Yang, Y.; Yu, J.; Wang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    The natural isotopic compositions and C/N elemental ratios of sedimentary organic matter were determined in the intertidal flat of the Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that the ratios of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes were respectively -29.8 per mille to - 26.0 per mille and 1.6 per mille -5.5 per mille in the flood season (July), while they were -27.3 per mille to - 25.6 per mille and 1.7 per mille -7.8 per mille in the dry season (February), respectively. The δ 13 C signatures were remarkably higher in July than in February, and gradually increased from the freshwater areas to the brackish areas. In contrast, there were relatively complex seasonal and spatial changes in stable nitrogen isotopes. It was also reflected that δ 15 N and C/N compositions had been obviously modified by organic matter diagenesis and biological processing, and could not be used to trace the sources of organic matter at the study area. In addition, it was considered that the mixing inputs of terrigenous and marine materials generally dominated sedimentary organic matter in the intertidal flat. The contribution of terrigenous inputs to sedimentary organic matter was roughly estimated according to the mixing balance model of stable carbon isotopes

  8. Role of stable isotope analyses in reconstructing past life-histories and the provenancing human skeletal remains: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehrawat Jagmahender Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the present scenario of use of stable isotopes (mainly δ13C, δ15N, δ18O, 87Sr to trace past life behaviours like breast feeding and weaning practices, the geographic origin, migration history, paleodiet and subsistence patterns of past populations from the chemical signatures of isotopes imprinted in human skeletal remains. This approach is based on the state that food-web isotopic signatures are seen in the human bones and teeth and such signatures can change parallely with a variety of biogeochemical processes. By measuring δ13C and δ15N isotopic values of subadult tissues of different ages, the level of breast milk ingestion at particular ages and the components of the complementary foods can be assessed. Strontium and oxygen isotopic analyses have been used for determining the geographic origins and reconstructing the way of life of past populations as these isotopes can map the isotopic outline of the area from where the person acquired water and food during initial lifetime. The isotopic values of strontium and oxygen values are considered specific to geographical areas and serve as reliable chemical signatures of migration history of past human populations (local or non-local to the site. Previous isotopic studies show that the subsistence patterns of the past human populations underwent extensive changes from nomadic to complete agricultural dependence strategies. The carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of local fauna of any archaeological site can be used to elucidate the prominence of freshwater resources in the diet of the past human populations found near the site. More extensive research covering isotopic descriptions of various prehistoric, historic and modern populations is needed to explore the role of stable isotope analysis for provenancing human skeletal remains and assessing human migration patterns/routes, geographic origins, paleodiet and subsistence practices of past populations.

  9. Leaf water stable isotopes and water transport outside the xylem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, M M; Farquhar, G D; Buckley, T N

    2017-06-01

    How water moves through leaves, and where the phase change from liquid to vapour occurs within leaves, remain largely mysterious. Some time ago, we suggested that the stable isotope composition of leaf water may contain information on transport pathways beyond the xylem, through differences in the development of gradients in enrichment within the various pathways. Subsequent testing of this suggestion provided ambiguous results and even questioned the existence of gradients in enrichment within the mesophyll. In this review, we bring together recent theoretical developments in understanding leaf water transport pathways and stable isotope theory to map a path for future work into understanding pathways of water transport and leaf water stable isotope composition. We emphasize the need for a spatially, anatomically and isotopically explicit model of leaf water transport. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Application of enriched stable isotopes as tracers in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stürup, Stefan; Hansen, Helle Rüsz; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The application of enriched stable isotopes of minerals and trace elements as tracers in biological systems is a rapidly growing research field that benefits from the many new developments in inorganic mass spectrometric instrumentation, primarily within inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry...... (ICP-MS) instrumentation, such as reaction/collision cell ICP-MS and multicollector ICP-MS with improved isotope ratio measurement and interference removal capabilities. Adaptation and refinement of radioisotope tracer experiment methodologies for enriched stable isotope experiments......, and the development of new methodologies coupled with more advanced compartmental and mathematical models for the distribution of elements in living organisms has enabled a broader use of enriched stable isotope experiments in the biological sciences. This review discusses the current and future uses of enriched...

  11. The status of applying stable isotope in the studies of environmental science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Zhipeng; Zhang Liwen; Zhu Tan; Feng Yinchang

    2007-01-01

    The stable isotope composition is characteristic in the pollution source, and it is relatively fixed in the process of transferring and reaction. At present the precise analysis result of stable isotope ratio can be obtained easily. So the stable isotopes can be applied to the pollution affair arbitration and source study. The concept and analytical method of stable isotopes are introduced. The research status of the stable isotopes in the field of environmental science and the isotope fractionation is reviewed. (authors)

  12. Linking foraging strategies of marine calanoid copepods to patterns of nitrogen stable isotope signatures in a mesocosm study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Frank; Saage, A.; Santer, B.

    2005-01-01

    foraging mode and, further, with its nitrogen stable isotope signature (delta(15)N). This is because a more carnivorous diet may be expected to result in a higher delta(15)N. We tested this hypothesis in a mesocosm study using a density gradient (0 to 80 ind. 1(-1)) of calanoid copepods. We expected......The foraging modes of calanoid copepods differ in that stationary suspension-feeding is more easily detected by prey with strong escape responses (ciliates) than is 'cruising' or 'ambushing' feeding. Thus, the ability of a copepod to include heterotrophic prey in its diet may be associated with its...

  13. Using 15N isotope technique on evaluation of starter N effect on soybean-bacteria symbiosis intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagheb, N.; Majd, F.; Porrdavai, H.; Yousefy, F.

    1994-02-01

    Nuclear techniques have solved many agricultural research problems during the last two decades, while resolving these problems with classical methods have been very difficult if not impossible. With this technique evaluation of unknown effects of biological nitrogen fixation became possible. The advantage of using 1 5N technique is its ability to e specify and identify exact amount of nitrogen from soil, fertilizer and that existing in the atmosphere as molecular nitrogen. Soybean crop (Elycine max(L.) Merill) is able to receive large portion of its nitrogen through biological nitrogen fixation from symbiosis of Rhizobium-Japonicum bacterium. In this study three soybean cultivars received 20 and 100 Kg of N ha -1 as starter nitrogen fertilizer and in form of 1 5N -labelled ammonium phosphate. In collected plant materials 1 5N /1 4N ratios were determined by the Kjeldahl procedure. By using 1 5N isotope method the amount of nitrogen derived from different sources (Soil, Fertilizer and atmosphere) at 20 and 100 Kg N ha -1 were evaluated. Significant differences were observed in percent and amounts of nitrogen fixed (Kg ha 1 ) from atmosphere. There were no significant differences in total N yield and total dry matter at two different levels of nitrogen fertilizer applied. (author)

  14. Availability of enriched stable isotopes: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Isotope Enrichment Facility (EMIEF) is currently used to produce 225 enriched stable isotopes of 50 elements. Among these are included most of the known elements with stable isotopes except for the noble gases, certain light elements, monisotopic elements, etc. The EMIEF can also be used to produce enriched samples of radioactive species, most notably the isotopes of uranium and plutonium. These enriched materials are placed in either the Sales Inventory of in the Research Materials Collection (RMC). The materials in the Sales Inventory are for sale to anyone on a first come, first served basis. Prices in the most recent catalog range from $0.05/mg for 99.8% 140 Ce to $1,267/mg for 98.5% 176 Lu. The materials in the RMC are made available to US researchers (or groups that include a US investigator) on a loan basis for use in non-destructive experiments and applications. In addition, certain samples have been provided to European investigators for cross-section studies through the auspices of EURATOM and the European-American Nuclear Data Committee. The status of the enriched isotopes included in the Sales Inventory is tabulated where isotopes are listed that are either not available or are in insufficient quantity or quality to meet current requests, as of 6/30/86. These can be summarized in the following subcategories: isotopes with zero inventory (22), Isotopes of insufficient quantity (17), and isotopes with insufficient enrichment quality (10). Of these 49 species, the supplies of 10 will be replenished by the scheduled FY86 enrichments in process (isotopes of bromine, calcium, nickel, potassium, rubidium, and strontium). In Table 3 are listed isotopes where the current inventory is less than the average annual sales level for the past five years. There are 47 isotopes listed, representing 25 different elements. Thus, there exists considerable potential for a substantial increase in the number of isotopes with zero inventory

  15. Variation in stable isotopes of freshwater mussel shells in a Kentucky river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, A. M.; Haag, W.; Price, S.; Weisrock, D.

    2017-12-01

    Isotopic signatures in freshwater mussel shells can reflect environmental differences among streams and human impacts on river systems. In the southeastern United States, mussels exhibit extraordinary biodiversity, serve an important role as filter feeders, and are sensitive to environmental change. Additionally, their long life-span (up to 50 years) and seasonal shell deposition can permit high-resolution environmental reconstructions. We examined variation in shell stable isotope values among mussel species and locations throughout the Licking River system in Kentucky. We sampled 8 species at 11 locations. These species represented a range of life-history traits, and locations were distributed among tributaries and the main stem of the Licking River. Samples of the outer organic periostracum layer were analysed for organic δ13C and δ15N, while organic δ15N and inorganic δ13C and δ18O were measured in the inner carbonate portion of the shell. At the same location, preliminary results show variations 2‰ in δ13C and 1‰ in δ15N between different species. We suspect these relationships are due to variations in diet and/or body size. Some, though not all, specimens show variation along the growth axis. For the same species at different locations, preliminary results showed a range of 4‰ in δ13C and 10‰ in δ15N values. Isotope ratios of specimens from the main stem were distinct from those of specimens from the river's largest tributary. Overall, δ13C shows distinct values for each tributary, while δ15N shows a general decline downstream. These variations are likely the result of environmental factors such as the degree of karstification and the ratio of forest to pasture within the catchment. We hope to use this study to identify if any isotopically distinct sources, such as fertilizers or animal manure, contribute to the high nutrient load in these systems. These results represent an exploratory effort to describe watershed-scale and mussel

  16. The relative isotopic abundance (δ13C, δ15N) during composting of agricultural wastes in relation to compost quality and feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Caio T; Magalhães, Alberto M T; Souza, Paulo O; Chalk, Phillip M; Urquiaga, Segundo

    2018-05-01

    Variations in the relative isotopic abundance of C and N (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) were measured during the composting of different agricultural wastes using bench-scale bioreactors. Different mixtures of agricultural wastes (horse bedding manure + legume residues; dairy manure + jatropha mill cake; dairy manure + sugarcane residues; dairy manure alone) were used for aerobic-thermophilic composting. No significant differences were found between the δ 13 C values of the feedstock and the final compost, except for dairy manure + sugarcane residues (from initial ratio of -13.6 ± 0.2 ‰ to final ratio of -14.4 ± 0.2 ‰). δ 15 N values increased significantly in composts of horse bedding manure + legumes residues (from initial ratio of +5.9 ± 0.1 ‰ to final ratio of +8.2 ± 0.5 ‰) and dairy manure + jatropha mill cake (from initial ratio of +9.5 ± 0.2 ‰ to final ratio of +12.8 ± 0.7 ‰) and was related to the total N loss (mass balance). δ 13 C can be used to differentiate composts from different feedstock (e.g. C 3 or C 4 sources). The quantitative relationship between N loss and δ 15 N variation should be determined.

  17. Amide or Amine: Determining the Origin of the 3300 cm−1 NH Mode in Protein SFG Spectra Using 15N Isotope Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Tobias; Breen, Nicholas F.; Drobny, Gary P.; Castner, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been employed in biomaterials research and protein adsorption studies with growing success in recent years. A number of studies focusing on understanding SFG spectra of proteins and peptides at different interfaces have laid the foundation for future, more complex studies. In many cases a strong NH mode near 3300 cm−1 is observed in the SFG spectra, but the relationship of this mode to the peptide structure is uncertain since it has been assigned to either a backbone amide mode or a side chain related amine resonance. A thorough understanding of the SFG spectra of these first model systems is an important first step for future experiments. To clarify the origin of the NH SFG mode we studied 15N isotopically labeled 14-amino acid amphiphilic model peptides composed of lysine (K) and leucine (L) in an α-helical secondary structure (LKα14) that were adsorbed onto charged surfaces in situ at the solid-liquid interface. 15N substitution at the terminal amine group of the lysine side chains resulted in a red-shift of the NH mode of 9 cm−1 on SiO2 and 13 cm−1 on CaF2. This clearly shows the 3300 cm−1 NH feature is associated with side chain NH stretches and not with backbone amide modes. PMID:19873996

  18. Amide or amine: determining the origin of the 3300 cm(-1) NH mode in protein SFG spectra using 15N isotope labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Tobias; Breen, Nicholas F; Drobny, Gary P; Castner, David G

    2009-11-26

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been employed in biomaterials research and protein adsorption studies with growing success in recent years. A number of studies focusing on understanding SFG spectra of proteins and peptides at different interfaces have laid the foundation for future, more complex studies. In many cases, a strong NH mode near 3300 cm(-1) is observed in the SFG spectra, but the relationship of this mode to the peptide structure is uncertain, since it has been assigned to either a backbone amide mode or a side chain related amine resonance. A thorough understanding of the SFG spectra of these first model systems is an important first step for future experiments. To clarify the origin of the NH SFG mode, we studied (15)N isotopically labeled 14-amino acid amphiphilic model peptides composed of lysine (K) and leucine (L) in an alpha-helical secondary structure (LKalpha14) that were adsorbed onto charged surfaces in situ at the solid-liquid interface. (15)N substitution at the terminal amine group of the lysine side chains resulted in a red-shift of the NH mode of 9 cm(-1) on SiO(2) and 13 cm(-1) on CaF(2). This clearly shows the 3300 cm(-1) NH feature is associated with side chain NH stretches and not with backbone amide modes.

  19. Applications of Stable Isotopes in Nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwangi, C.

    2006-01-01

    This is an IAEA sponsored project No. RAF/7/006 using Isotopes Techniques to assess Nutritional Intervention Programs related to people living with HIV/AIDS in Africa. The report indicates that, improved nutrition is a global objective and development co-operation priority not only in the fight against nutrition but also for poverty eradication, reproductive health, children's rights and elimination of hunger. The role of the IAEA in the global objective is to support nations in achieving the most and best outcomes of food interventions through the reliable biological tools of efficacy, effective and impact, using isotope based techniques by transferring nuclear technology and knowledge in a sustainable manner to it's member states

  20. Insights into Ancient Human Populations and their Environment through Stable Isotope Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Fundamental to the understanding of human history is the ability to make interpretations based on artifacts and other remains which are used to gather information about an ancient population. Sequestered in the organic matrices of these remains can be information concerning incidence of disease, population interactions, genetic defects and diet. Stable isotopes have long been used to interpret diet and trophic interactions in modern ecosystems. We suggest that the isotope compositions of a commonly overlooked material, human hair, is an ideal tool to be used in gleaning information, especially on human diets, about ancient civilizations. Hair can be well-preserved and is amenable to routine measurements of 13C, 15N and 34S isotope analyses and distinguishing sources of nutrition. We have isotopically characterized hair from both modern and ancient individuals. There is a wide diversity in isotope values owing, at least partially, to the levels of seafood, corn-fed animals and other grains in diet. Using these isotope tracers, new information regarding historical figures (George Washington, 1799 AD) to perhaps the most ancient of mummies, the Chinchorro of Chile (more than 7000 BP) as well as the Moche of Peru (1500 BP) and the best preserved mummy, the Neolithic Ice Man of the Oetztaler Alps (5200 BP), have been deciphered. It appears that the often-overlooked hair in archaeological sites represents a significant approach for understanding ancient human communities and their environments, as well as new perspectives on our use of our own modern nutritional sources.

  1. Spatial distribution of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inferred from stable isotopes and priority organic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Rachel Marie; Kucklick, John R.; Balmer, Brian C.; Wells, Randall S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Nowacek, Douglas P.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in priority organic pollutants (POPs), analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and stable isotope ratios (δ 13 C, δ 34 S, and δ 15 N; analyzed by isotope ratio-mass spectrometry), divide 77 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the Florida Gulf Coast into three distinct groups. POP levels reflect human population and historical contamination along the coast. In the least disturbed site, concentrations of ΣPOP in male dolphins were 18,000 ng g −1 ± 6000 (95% confidence interval here and throughout); in the intermediate bay, males had ΣPOP concentrations of 19,000 ng g −1 ± 10,000. St Andrews Bay was home to dolphins with the highest ΣPOP concentrations: 44,000 ng g −1 ± 10,300. δ 34 S and δ 15 N, differed significantly between St. George Sound dolphins and those frequenting each of the other two bays, but not between St. Andrews and St. Joseph Bays. ΣPOP concentrations were statistically higher in dolphins frequenting St. Andrews Bay, but were not significantly different between dolphins occupying St. Joseph Bay and St. George Sound. Thus, using either POP or isotope values alone, we would only be able to identify two dolphin groups, but when POP and isotope data are viewed cumulatively, the results clearly define three distinct communities occupying this region. - Highlights: ► We compare isotopes and POP levels in dolphins occupying three embayments. ► POP levels varied significantly among two embayments separated by < 50 km. ► Differentiation correlated with historical contamination from a SuperFund site. ► Cumulatively, isotopes and POP levels indicate 3 distinct dolphin communities. ► This data provides the first assessment of dolphin POP contamination in the region.

  2. Spatial distribution of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inferred from stable isotopes and priority organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Rachel Marie, E-mail: ryounge@ocean.fsu.edu [Department of EOAS-Oceanography, Florida State University, 117 North Woodward Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306 (United States); Kucklick, John R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Hollings Marine Laboratory, Charleston, 331 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, South Carolina 29412 (United States); Balmer, Brian C.; Wells, Randall S. [Chicago Zoological Society c/o Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway Sarasota, FL, 34236 (United States); Chanton, Jeffrey P. [Department of EOAS-Oceanography, Florida State University, 117 North Woodward Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306 (United States); Nowacek, Douglas P. [Nicholas School of the Environment and Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University - Marine Laboratory, 135 Duke Marine Lab Rd., Beaufort, NC 28516 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Differences in priority organic pollutants (POPs), analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and stable isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C, {delta}{sup 34}S, and {delta}{sup 15}N; analyzed by isotope ratio-mass spectrometry), divide 77 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the Florida Gulf Coast into three distinct groups. POP levels reflect human population and historical contamination along the coast. In the least disturbed site, concentrations of {Sigma}POP in male dolphins were 18,000 ng g{sup -1} {+-} 6000 (95% confidence interval here and throughout); in the intermediate bay, males had {Sigma}POP concentrations of 19,000 ng g{sup -1} {+-} 10,000. St Andrews Bay was home to dolphins with the highest {Sigma}POP concentrations: 44,000 ng g{sup -1} {+-} 10,300. {delta}{sup 34}S and {delta}{sup 15}N, differed significantly between St. George Sound dolphins and those frequenting each of the other two bays, but not between St. Andrews and St. Joseph Bays. {Sigma}POP concentrations were statistically higher in dolphins frequenting St. Andrews Bay, but were not significantly different between dolphins occupying St. Joseph Bay and St. George Sound. Thus, using either POP or isotope values alone, we would only be able to identify two dolphin groups, but when POP and isotope data are viewed cumulatively, the results clearly define three distinct communities occupying this region. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare isotopes and POP levels in dolphins occupying three embayments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer POP levels varied significantly among two embayments separated by < 50 km. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation correlated with historical contamination from a SuperFund site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cumulatively, isotopes and POP levels indicate 3 distinct dolphin communities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This data provides the first assessment of dolphin POP contamination in the region.

  3. Trophic Niche Differentiation in Rodents and Marsupials Revealed by Stable Isotopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Galetti

    Full Text Available Tropical rainforests support the greatest diversity of small mammals in the world, yet we have little understanding about the mechanisms that promote the coexistence of species. Diet partitioning can favor coexistence by lessening competition, and interspecific differences in body size and habitat use are usually proposed to be associated with trophic divergence. However, the use of classic dietary methods (e.g. stomach contents is challenging in small mammals, particularly in community-level studies, thus we used stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N to infer about trophic niche. We investigated i how trophic niche is partitioned among rodent and marsupial species in three Atlantic forest sites and ii if interspecific body size and locomotor habit inequalities can constitute mechanisms underlying the isotopic niche partitioning. We found that rodents occupied a broad isotopic niche space with species distributed in different trophic levels and relying on diverse basal carbon sources (C3 and C4 plants. Surprisingly, on the other hand, marsupials showed a narrow isotopic niche, both in δ13C and δ15N dimensions, which is partially overlapped with rodents, contradicting their description as omnivores and generalists proposed classic dietary studies. Although body mass differences did not explained the divergence in isotopic values among species, groups of species with different locomotor habit presented clear differences in the position of the isotopic niche space, indicating that the use of different forest strata can favor trophic niche partitioning in small mammals communities. We suggest that anthropogenic impacts, such as habitat modification (logging, harvesting, can simplify the vertical structure of ecosystems and collapse the diversity of basal resources, which might affect negatively small mammals communities in Atlantic forests.

  4. Combined use of stable isotopes and fallout radionuclides as soil erosion indicators in a forested mountain site, South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meusburger, K.; Mabit, L.; Alewell, C.; Park, J.H.; Sandor, T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and to validate the suitability of the stable nitrogen and carbon isotope signature as soil erosion indicators in a mountain forest site in South Korea. Our approach is based on the comparison of the isotope signature of ''stable'' landscape positions (reference sites), which are neither affected by erosion nor deposition, with eroding sites. For undisturbed soils we expect that the enrichment of δ 15 N and δ 13 C with soil depth, due to fractionation during decomposition, goes in parallel with a decrease in nitrogen and carbon content. Soil erosion processes potentially weaken this correlation. The 137 Cs method and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) were applied for the soil erosion quantification. Erosion rates obtained with the 137 Cs method range from 0.9 t ha -1 yr -1 to 7 t ha -1 yr -1 . Considering the steep slopes of up to 40 and the erosive monsoon events (R factor of 6600 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 ), the rates are plausible and within the magnitude of the RUSLE-modeled soil erosion rates, varying from 0.02 t ha -1 yr -1 to 5.1 t ha -1 yr -1 . The soil profiles of the reference sites showed significant (p < 0.0001) correlations between nitrogen and carbon content and its corresponding δ 15 N and δ 13 C signatures. In contrast, for the eroding sites this relationship was weaker and for the carbon not significant. These results confirm the usefulness of the stable carbon isotope signature as a qualitative indicator for soil disturbance. We could show further that the δ 15 N isotope signature can be used similarly for uncultivated sites. We thus propose that the stable δ 15 N and δ 13 C signature of soil profiles could serve as additional indicators confirming the accurate choice of the reference site in soil erosion studies using the 137 Cs method.

  5. High-precision measurement of phenylalanine δ15N values for environmental samples: a new approach coupling high-pressure liquid chromatography purification and elemental analyzer isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broek, Taylor A B; Walker, Brett D; Andreasen, Dyke H; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-11-15

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is a powerful new tool for tracing nitrogen (N) source and transformation in biogeochemical cycles. Specifically, the δ(15)N value of phenylalanine (δ(15)N(Phe)) represents an increasingly used proxy for source δ(15)N signatures, with particular promise for paleoceanographic applications. However, current derivatization/gas chromatography methods require expensive and relatively uncommon instrumentation, and have relatively low precision, making many potential applications impractical. A new offline approach has been developed for high-precision δ(15)N measurements of amino acids (δ(15)N(AA)), optimized for δ(15)N(Phe) values. Amino acids (AAs) are first purified via high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), using a mixed-phase column and automated fraction collection. The δ(15)N values are determined via offline elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). The combined HPLC/EA-IRMS method separated most protein AAs with sufficient resolution to obtain accurate δ(15)N values, despite significant intra-peak isotopic fractionation. For δ(15)N(Phe) values, the precision was ±0.16‰ for standards, 4× better than gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS; ±0.64‰). We also compared a δ(15)N(Phe) paleo-record from a deep-sea bamboo coral from Monterey Bay, CA, USA, using our method versus GC/C/IRMS. The two methods produced equivalent δ(15)N(Phe) values within error; however, the δ(15)N(Phe) values from HPLC/EA-IRMS had approximately twice the precision of GC/C/IRMS (average stdev of 0.27‰ ± 0.14‰ vs 0.60‰ ± 0.20‰, respectively). These results demonstrate that offline HPLC represents a viable alternative to traditional GC/C/IMRS for δ(15)N(AA) measurement. HPLC/EA-IRMS is more precise and widely available, and therefore useful in applications requiring increased precision for data interpretation (e.g. δ(15)N paleoproxies

  6. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli eCarlisle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves nitrate (NO3– reduction to nitrite (NO2– catalyzed via nitrate reductase (NR. Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO3–. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22‰ to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022 to 1.032 among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%. As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO3– increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO3– and NO2– in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of artifactual results with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils.

  7. Detecting animal by-product intake using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, D A F; Biscola, N P; Dos Santos, L D; Sartori, M M P; Denadai, J C; da Silva, E T; Ducatti, C; Bicudo, S D; Barraviera, B; Ferreira, R S

    2016-11-01

    Sheep are used in many countries as food and for manufacturing bioproducts. However, when these animals consume animal by-products (ABP), which is widely prohibited, there is a risk of transmitting scrapie - a fatal prion disease in human beings. Therefore, it is essential to develop sensitive methods to detect previous ABP intake to select safe animals for producing biopharmaceuticals. We used stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) for 13 C and 15 N to trace animal proteins in the serum of three groups of sheep: 1 - received only vegetable protein (VP) for 89 days; 2 - received animal and vegetable protein (AVP); and 3 - received animal and vegetable protein with animal protein subsequently removed (AVPR). Groups 2 and 3 received diets with 30% bovine meat and bone meal (MBM) added to a vegetable diet (from days 16-89 in the AVP group and until day 49 in the AVPR group, when MBM was removed). The AVPR group showed 15 N equilibrium 5 days after MBM removal (54th day). Conversely, 15 N equilibrium in the AVP group occurred 22 days later (76th day). The half-life differed between these groups by 3.55 days. In the AVPR group, 15 N elimination required 53 days, which was similar to this isotope's incorporation time. Turnover was determined based on natural 15 N signatures. IRMS followed by turnover calculations was used to evaluate the time period for the incorporation and elimination of animal protein in sheep serum. The δ 13 C and δ 15 N values were used to track animal protein in the diet. This method is biologically and economically relevant for the veterinary field because it can track protein over time or make a point assessment of animal feed with high sensitivity and resolution, providing a low-cost analysis coupled with fast detection. Isotopic profiles could be measured throughout the experimental period, demonstrating the potential to use the method for traceability and certification assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stable isotope enrichment by thermal diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasaru, Gheorghe

    2003-01-01

    Thermal diffusion (TD) in both gaseous and liquid phase has been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations, especially after the invention by K. Clusius and G. Dickel of the thermal diffusion column, sixty years ago. This paper gives a brief overview of the most important applications and developments of this transport phenomenon for enrichment of 13 C and of some noble gases isotopes in our institute. The results of calculations of the transport coefficients H and K for a concentric tube type TD column, operated with methane as process gas, are presented. Static separation factor at equilibrium vs gas pressure has been calculated for various molecular models. The experimental separation factors for different gas pressure were found to be consistent with those calculated for the inverse power repulsion model and the Lennard-Jones model. The most important characteristics of a seven-stage cascade consisting of 19 TD columns of concentric tube type are given. This system has been constructed and successfully operated at a temperature of 673 K and produces an enrichment of methane of natural isotopic 13 C abundance, up to the concentration of 25% 13 CH 4 . Enrichment of the noble gases isotopes implies: - a . Enrichment of 20 Ne and 22 Ne in a eight-stage cascade consisting of 8 TD columns; - b. enrichment of 46 Ar in a seven-stage cascade consisting of TD columns and finally; - c. enrichment of 78 Kr and 86 Kr in a fifteen-stage cascade, consisting of 35 TD columns. For all these installations we have adopted TD columns of hot wire type (4 m in length), operated at a temperature of 1073 K. (author)

  9. Trophic structure of a coastal fish community determined with diet and stable isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, A J; Collie, J S; Taylor, D L

    2016-09-01

    A combination of dietary guild analysis and nitrogen (δ(15) N) and carbon (δ(13) C) stable-isotope analysis was used to assess the trophic structure of the fish community in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds, an area off southern New England identified for offshore wind energy development. In the autumn of 2009, 2010 and 2011, stomach and tissue samples were taken from 20 fish and invertebrate species for analysis of diet composition and δ(15) N and δ(13) C signatures. The food chain in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds comprises approximately four trophic levels within which the fish community is divided into distinct dietary guilds, including planktivores, benthivores, crustacivores and piscivores. Within these guilds, inter-species isotopic and dietary overlap is high, suggesting that resource partitioning or competitive interactions play a major role in structuring the fish community. Carbon isotopes indicate that most fishes are supported by pelagic phytoplankton, although there is evidence that benthic production also plays a role, particularly for obligate benthivores such as skates Leucoraja spp. This type of analysis is useful for developing an ecosystem-based approach to management, as it identifies species that act as direct links to basal resources as well as species groups that share trophic roles. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Stable isotope labeling of glycoprotein expressed in silkworms using immunoglobulin G as a test molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Hirokazu [Nagoya City University, Faculty and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Nakamura, Masatoshi [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Genetic Resources Conservation Research Unit, Genetic Resources Center (Japan); Yokoyama, Jun [Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation, Tsukuba Laboratories (Japan); Zhang, Ying; Yamaguchi, Takumi [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Institute for Molecular Science and Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience (Japan); Kondo, Sachiko [Nagoya City University, Faculty and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Kobayashi, Jun [Yamaguchi University, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture (Japan); Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y. [Shizuoka University, Laboratory of Biotechnology, Research Institute of Green Science and Technology (Japan); Nakazawa, Shiori [Nagoya University, Sugashima Marine Biological Laboratory, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana [National Institute of Health Sciences, Division of Biological Chemistry and Biologicals (Japan); Kato, Koichi, E-mail: kkato@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City University, Faculty and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Silkworms serve as promising bioreactors for the production of recombinant proteins, including glycoproteins and membrane proteins, for structural and functional protein analyses. However, lack of methodology for stable isotope labeling has been a major deterrent to using this expression system for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural biology. Here we developed a metabolic isotope labeling technique using commercially available silkworm larvae. The fifth instar larvae were infected with baculoviruses for co-expression of recombinant human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a test molecule, with calnexin as a chaperone. They were subsequently reared on an artificial diet containing {sup 15}N-labeled yeast crude protein extract. We harvested 0.1 mg of IgG from larva with a {sup 15}N-enrichment ratio of approximately 80 %. This allowed us to compare NMR spectral data of the Fc fragment cleaved from the silkworm-produced IgG with those of an authentic Fc glycoprotein derived from mammalian cells. Therefore, we successfully demonstrated that our method enables production of isotopically labeled glycoproteins for NMR studies.

  11. Co-ordinated research programme on applications of stable isotope tracers in human nutrition research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) was formally established by the Agency in October 1988, and has since then expanded to encompass 13 participants in 13 countries. Its general objective is to help establish competence in the use of stable isotope techniques, particularly in developing countries, and particularly with reference to applications of 2 H, 13 C, 15 N, and 18 O. This report summarizes the discussions that took place during the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM). Working papers (progress reports) presented by the participants are included as annexes together with a preliminary report on the results of a series of intercomparison exercises involving enriched stable isotope reference materials containing 2 H, 13 C, 15 N and 18 O. For the future it was agreed that more work needs to be done to harmonize the analytical techniques being used, and to obtain support for new CRPs relating to human energy expenditure studies in pregnancy, lactation, growth and other conditions, and to studies of nitrogen turnover in relation to malnutrition and liver function. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. What can Fe stable isotopes tell us about magmas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausberg, Niklas

    the differentiation of magmas from the perspective of Fe stable isotopes, integrated with petrology, by studying igneous rocks and their constituent phases (minerals and glasses) from the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, Thingmuli, Iceland, Pantelleria, Italy, and the Bishop Tuff, USA. The findings are interpreted......The majority of the Earth’s crust is formed by magmas, and understanding their production and differentiation is important to interpret the geologic rock record. A powerful tool to investigate magmatic processes is the distribution of the stable isotopes of the major redox-sensitive element...... in magmas, Fe. Fe isotope compositions of magmatic rocks exhibit systematic differences, where the heaviest compositions are found in rhyolites and granites. Understanding of these systematics is complicated by a lack of constraints on Fe isotope fractionation among minerals and liquids under magmatic...

  13. Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, A., E-mail: anton.wallner@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights (Australia); Melber, K. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Ott, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Joh.-J.-Becherweg 27, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-15

    Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of {sup 198}Pt/{sup 195}Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction.

  14. Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.; Melber, K.; Merchel, S.; Ott, U.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of 198 Pt/ 195 Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction.

  15. Determination of the Geographical Origin of All Commercial Hake Species by Stable Isotope Ratio (SIR) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Mónica; Gallardo, José M

    2017-02-08

    The determination of the geographical origin of food products is relevant to comply with the legal regulations of traceability, to avoid food fraud, and to guarantee food quality and safety to the consumers. For these reasons, stable isotope ratio (SIR) analysis using an isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) instrument is one of the most useful techniques for evaluating food traceability and authenticity. The present study was aimed to determine, for the first time, the geographical origin for all commercial fish species belonging to the Merlucciidae family using SIR analysis of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N). The specific results enabled their clear classification according to the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) fishing areas, latitude, and geographical origin in the following six different clusters: European, North African, South African, North American, South American, and Australian hake species.

  16. Stable isotope utilization for research on human nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjeux, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of nutritional molecule metabolism research, this paper presents the various stable isotopes used as labels for biological molecules, the reasons for their application in human nutritional study (mainly because of their non toxicity) and the various analysis methods (isotope ratio mass spectrometry, coupled gaseous chromatography and mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance). Several application examples in nutrition research are then discussed: metabolic conversion measurement for a molecule into its different metabolites, energetic losses. 23 refs

  17. Analysis of growth and tissue replacement rates by stable sulfur isotope turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, L. S.; Macko, S. A.; Macavoy, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool to study animal ecology. Analysis of stable isotope ratios of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, hydrogen, oxygen and others have been used to trace migratory routes, reconstruct dietary sources and determine the physiological condition of individual animals. The isotopes most commonly used are carbon, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and nitrogen, due to the approximately 3% enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although all cells express sulfur-containing compounds, such as cysteine, methionine, and coenzyme A, the turnover rate of sulfur in tissues has not been examined in most studies, owing to the difficulty in determining the δ 34S signature. In this study, we have assessed the rate of sulfur isotopic turnover in mouse tissues following a diet change from terrestrial (7%) to marine (19%) source. Turnover models reflecting both growth rate and metabolic tissue replacement will be developed for blood, liver, fat and muscle tissues.

  18. Trophic position of soil nematodes in boreal forests as indicated by stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alexey; Tsurikov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Despite the well-developed trophic classification of soil nematodes, their position in soil food webs is still little understood. Observed deviations from the typical feeding strategy indicate that a simplified trophic classification probably does not fully reflect actual trophic interactions. Furthermore, the extent and functional significance of nematodes as prey for other soil animals remains unknown. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is powerful tool for investigating the structure of soil food webs, but its application to the study of soil nematodes has been limited to only a few studies. We used stable isotope analysis to gain a better understanding of trophic links of several groups of soil nematodes in two boreal forests on albeluvisol. We investigated four taxonomic groups of nematodes: Mononchida, Dorylaimida, Plectidae and Tylenchidae (mostly from the genus Filenchus), that according to the conventional trophic classification represent predators, omnivores, bacterivores and root-fungal feeders, respectively. To assess the trophic position of nematodes, we used a comparison against a set of reference species including herbivorous, saprophagous and predatory macro-invertebrates, oribatid and mesostigmatid mites, and collembolans. Our results suggest that trophic position of the investigated groups of soil nematodes generally corresponds to the conventional classification. All nematodes were enriched in 13C relative to Picea abies roots and litter, and mycorrhizal fungal mycelium. Root-fungal feeders Tylenchidae had δ15N values similar to those of earthworms, enchytraeids and Entomobrya collembolans, but slightly lower δ13C values. Bacterivorous Plectidae were either equal or enriched in 15N compared with saprophagous macroinvertebrates and most mesofauna species. Omnivorous Dorylaimida and predatory Mononchida were further enriched in 15N and their isotopic signature was similar to that of predatory arthropods. These data confirm a clear separation of

  19. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalisation of food markets and the relative ease which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance of stable isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are used as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice that been determined by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  20. Stable isotope tracers and exercise physiology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Brook, Matthew S; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2017-05-01

    Stable isotope tracers have been invaluable assets in physiological research for over 80 years. The application of substrate-specific stable isotope tracers has permitted exquisite insight into amino acid, fatty-acid and carbohydrate metabolic regulation (i.e. incorporation, flux, and oxidation, in a tissue-specific and whole-body fashion) in health, disease and response to acute and chronic exercise. Yet, despite many breakthroughs, there are limitations to 'substrate-specific' stable isotope tracers, which limit physiological insight, e.g. the need for intravenous infusions and restriction to short-term studies (hours) in controlled laboratory settings. In recent years significant interest has developed in alternative stable isotope tracer techniques that overcome these limitations, in particular deuterium oxide (D 2 O or heavy water). The unique properties of this tracer mean that through oral administration, the turnover and flux through a number of different substrates (muscle proteins, lipids, glucose, DNA (satellite cells)) can be monitored simultaneously and flexibly (hours/weeks/months) without the need for restrictive experimental control. This makes it uniquely suited for the study of 'real world' human exercise physiology (amongst many other applications). Moreover, using D 2 O permits evaluation of turnover of plasma and muscle proteins (e.g. dynamic proteomics) in addition to metabolomics (e.g. fluxomics) to seek molecular underpinnings, e.g. of exercise adaptation. Here, we provide insight into the role of stable isotope tracers, from substrate-specific to novel D 2 O approaches, in facilitating our understanding of metabolism. Further novel potential applications of stable isotope tracers are also discussed in the context of integration with the snowballing field of 'omic' technologies. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  1. Stable isotopic composition of East African lake waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odada, E.O.

    2001-01-01

    The investigation of stable isotopic composition of East African lake waters was conducted by scientists from the Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, as part of the International Decade for the East African Lakes (IDEAL) project and in close collaboration with the scientists from Large Lakes Observatory of the University of Minnesota and the Isotope Hydrology Laboratory of the IAEA in Vienna. The Research Contract was part of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Isotope Techniques in Lake Dynamics Investigations, and was sponsored by the Agency. Water and grab sediment samples were obtained from East African Lakes during the month of January and February 1994 and July/August 1995. Water samples were analysed for oxygen and deuterium isotopic composition at the IAEA Laboratories in Vienna, Austria. In this final paper we report the results of the study of oxygen and deuterium isotopic composition from the East African lake waters. (author)

  2. Ontogenetic and among-individual variation in foraging strategies of northeast Pacific white sharks based on stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sora L; Tinker, M Tim; Estes, James A; Koch, Paul L

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence for individuality in dietary preferences and foraging behaviors within populations of various species. This is especially important for apex predators, since they can potentially have wide dietary niches and a large impact on trophic dynamics within ecosystems. We evaluate the diet of an apex predator, the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), by measuring the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of vertebral growth bands to create lifetime records for 15 individuals from California. Isotopic variations in white shark diets can reflect within-region differences among prey (most importantly related to trophic level), as well as differences in baseline values among the regions in which sharks forage, and both prey and habitat preferences may shift with age. The magnitude of isotopic variation among sharks in our study (>5‰ for both elements) is too great to be explained solely by geographic differences, and so must reflect differences in prey choice that may vary with sex, size, age and location. Ontogenetic patterns in δ(15)N values vary considerably among individuals, and one third of the population fit each of these descriptions: 1) δ(15)N values increased throughout life, 2) δ(15)N values increased to a plateau at ∼5 years of age, and 3) δ(15)N values remained roughly constant values throughout life. Isotopic data for the population span more than one trophic level, and we offer a qualitative evaluation of diet using shark-specific collagen discrimination factors estimated from a 3+ year captive feeding experiment (Δ(13)C(shark-diet) and Δ(15)N(shark-diet) equal 4.2‰ and 2.5‰, respectively). We assess the degree of individuality with a proportional similarity index that distinguishes specialists and generalists. The isotopic variance is partitioned among differences between-individual (48%), within-individuals (40%), and by calendar year of sub-adulthood (12%). Our data reveal substantial ontogenetic and

  3. Ontogenetic and among-individual variation in foraging strategies of northeast Pacific white sharks based on stable isotope analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora L Kim

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence for individuality in dietary preferences and foraging behaviors within populations of various species. This is especially important for apex predators, since they can potentially have wide dietary niches and a large impact on trophic dynamics within ecosystems. We evaluate the diet of an apex predator, the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, by measuring the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of vertebral growth bands to create lifetime records for 15 individuals from California. Isotopic variations in white shark diets can reflect within-region differences among prey (most importantly related to trophic level, as well as differences in baseline values among the regions in which sharks forage, and both prey and habitat preferences may shift with age. The magnitude of isotopic variation among sharks in our study (>5‰ for both elements is too great to be explained solely by geographic differences, and so must reflect differences in prey choice that may vary with sex, size, age and location. Ontogenetic patterns in δ(15N values vary considerably among individuals, and one third of the population fit each of these descriptions: 1 δ(15N values increased throughout life, 2 δ(15N values increased to a plateau at ∼5 years of age, and 3 δ(15N values remained roughly constant values throughout life. Isotopic data for the population span more than one trophic level, and we offer a qualitative evaluation of diet using shark-specific collagen discrimination factors estimated from a 3+ year captive feeding experiment (Δ(13C(shark-diet and Δ(15N(shark-diet equal 4.2‰ and 2.5‰, respectively. We assess the degree of individuality with a proportional similarity index that distinguishes specialists and generalists. The isotopic variance is partitioned among differences between-individual (48%, within-individuals (40%, and by calendar year of sub-adulthood (12%. Our data reveal substantial ontogenetic and

  4. Stable isotope geochemistry of deep sea cherts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolodny, Y; Epstein, S [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA). Div. of Geological Sciences

    1976-10-01

    Seventy four samples of DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) recovered cherts of Jurassic to Miocene age from varying locations, and 27 samples of on-land exposed cherts were analyzed for the isotopic composition of their oxygen and hydrogen. These studies were accompanied by mineralogical analyses and some isotopic analyses of the coexisting carbonates. delta/sup 18/0 of chert ranges between 27 and 39 parts per thousand relative to SMOW, delta/sup 18/0 of porcellanite - between 30 and 42 parts per thousand. The consistent enrichment of opal-CT in porcellanites in /sup 18/0 with respect to coexisting microcrystalline quartz in chert is probably a reflection of a different temperature (depth) of diagenesis of the two phases. delta/sup 18/0 of deep sea cherts generally decrease with increasing age, indicating an overall cooling of the ocean bottom during the last 150 m.y. A comparison of this trend with that recorded by benthonic foraminifera (Douglas et al., Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project; 32:509(1975)) indicates the possibility of delta/sup 18/0 in deep sea cherts not being frozen in until several tens of millions of years after deposition. Cherts of any Age show a spread of delta/sup 18/0 values, increasing diagenesis being reflected in a lowering of delta/sup 18/0. Drusy quartz has the lowest delta/sup 18/0 values. On land exposed cherts are consistently depleted in /sup 18/0 in comparison to their deep sea time equivalent cherts. Water extracted from deep sea cherts ranges between 0.5 and 1.4 wt%. deltaD of this water ranges between -78 and -95 parts per thousand and is not a function of delta/sup 18/0 of the cherts (or the temperature of their formation).

  5. [Progress in stable isotope labeled quantitative proteomics methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Shan, Yichu; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative proteomics is an important research field in post-genomics era. There are two strategies for proteome quantification: label-free methods and stable isotope labeling methods which have become the most important strategy for quantitative proteomics at present. In the past few years, a number of quantitative methods have been developed, which support the fast development in biology research. In this work, we discuss the progress in the stable isotope labeling methods for quantitative proteomics including relative and absolute quantitative proteomics, and then give our opinions on the outlook of proteome quantification methods.

  6. Stable isotope dimethyl labelling for quantitative proteomics and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jue-Liang; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Stable-isotope reductive dimethylation, a cost-effective, simple, robust, reliable and easy-to- multiplex labelling method, is widely applied to quantitative proteomics using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This review focuses on biological applications of stable-isotope dimethyl labelling for a large-scale comparative analysis of protein expression and post-translational modifications based on its unique properties of the labelling chemistry. Some other applications of the labelling method for sample preparation and mass spectrometry-based protein identification and characterization are also summarized. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644970

  7. Stable isotopes and diet of hunters gatherers of southwest of Buenos Aires province (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scabuzzo, Clara; Frontini, Romina; Vecchi, Rodrigo; Bayon, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Results of the first stable isotopes analysis (δ""1"3C and δ"1"5N) of archaeological sites located in the southwest of the province of Buenos Aires (Argentina) are presented. Both the construction of an isotopic ecology and prehistoric human diets of the sector are explored. The isotopic ecology indicates diverse environments in which marine animals have enriched δ"1"3C col. values; while terrestrial species such as coypo, greater rhea and large-sized herbivores have the poorest values that are indistinguishable among the different taxa. Furthermore, ducks and a hairy armadillo showed intermediate values. Human isotopic values indicate a diet based on the consumption of meat. These proteins came predominantly from terrestrial animals complemented by marine resources. The local archaeological record is consistent with this information, as the main faunal resources are terrestrial species; nevertheless a scarce representation of marine fauna, mainly Otariids, is registered. In this paper we present the first isotopic values for the studied area and thus it is a preliminary contribution that must be further investigated with new samples

  8. Nutrient Concentrations and Stable Isotopes of Runoff from a Midwest Tile-Drained Corn Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, B. P.; Woo, D.; Li, J.; Michalski, G. M.; Kumar, P.; Conroy, J. L.; Keefer, D. A.; Keefer, L. L.; Hodson, T. O.

    2017-12-01

    Tile drains are a common crop drainage device used in Midwest agroecosystems. While efficient at drainage, the tiles provide a quick path for nutrient runoff, reducing the time available for microbes to use nutrients (e.g., NO3- and PO43-) and reduce export to riverine systems. Thus, understanding the effects of tile drains on nutrient runoff is critical to achieve nutrient reduction goals. Here we present isotopic and concentration data collected from tile drain runoff of a corn field located near Monticello, IL. Tile flow samples were measured for anion concentrations and stable isotopes of H2O and NO3-, while precipitation was measured for dual isotopes of H2O. Results demonstrate early tile flow from rain events have a low Cl- concentration (60% contribution) in the beginning of the hydrograph. As flow continues H2O isotopic values reflect pre-event water (ground and soil water), and Cl- concentrations increase representing a greater influence by matrix flow (60-90% contribution). Nitrate concentrations change dramatically, especially during the growing season, and do not follow a similar trend as the conservative Cl-, often decreasing days before, which represents missing nitrate in the upper surface portion of the soil. Nitrate isotopic data shows significant changes in 15N (4‰) and 18O (4‰) during individual hydrological events, representing that in addition to plant uptake and leaching, considerate NO3- is lost through denitrification. It is notable, that throughout the season d15N and d18O of nitrate change significantly representing that seasonally, substantial denitrification occurs.

  9. Stable isotopes in fish eye lenses as potential recorders of trophic and geographic history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy A Wallace

    Full Text Available We evaluated eye lenses as potential recorders of stable isotope histories in fish because they consist of metabolically inert optical proteins that are deposited in successive, concentric circles (laminae much like otolith circuli and tree rings. We conducted four different tests on lenses from red snapper, red grouper, gag, and white grunt. The first test was a low-resolution screening of multiple individuals (4-5 radial groups of laminae per lens, all species except white grunt. Along the radial axis, all individuals exhibited substantial isotopic variability. Red snapper individuals separated into two groups based on δ15N and gag separated into two groups based on δ13C. Two gag with the greatest variation were chosen for high-resolution temporal analysis using individual laminae from their second eye lenses. The first-order patterns from the high-resolution analysis generally mimicked patterns from the low-resolution screening of grouped laminae, yet the high-resolution plots revealed early-life details that were not apparent in the low-resolution screenings. For the third test, left- versus right-eye variation was compared using high-resolution methods. White grunt left- and right-eye radial isotopic patterns were almost identical for both δ13C and δ15N, suggesting the variations observed among individual fish were not artifacts. The final test evaluated intra-laminar variation; multiple samples were analyzed from different parts of the same lamina. Seven laminae from three individuals of two species were analyzed in this manner; variations among laminae were found to be much higher than variations within laminae. However, nominal intra-laminar variations were comparable to nominal differences between left and right lenses, suggesting intra-laminar variation established measurement precision. Eye lens isotopes appear to be useful for reconstructing the isotopic histories of individual fish; these histories can be compared with spatially

  10. Effect of time course application of nitrogen fertilizer on the N-fertilizer use efficiency, lint properties and seed cotton yield using 15N isotopic dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janat, M.; Khalifa, Kh

    2001-12-01

    Field experiment was carried out at Der El-Hajar research station during 1998 growing season to evaluate the effect of time course application of nitrogen fertilizer on N-recovery, seed cotton yield and lint properties using 15 N isotope dilution technique. Aleppo 40 variety was tested, irrigation scheduling was set up at 80% of field capacity. Phosphorus fertilizer was applied as TSP 46% before planting at a rate of 180 kg/ha. N fertilizer was applied as urea (46%) in four different applications follows: one application 180 kg N/ha before planting (T1), two split application 180 (90 + 90) kg N/ha (T2), three equally split applications 180 (60 + 60 + 60) kg N/ha (T3), and four equally split applications 180 (45 + 45 + 45 + 45) kg N/ha (T4). Labeled N-fertilizer (5.09 a.e%) was also applied as urea 46% to the subplots (1.0 m 2 each) of the corresponding treatments. All agricultural practices were carried out as the common practices locally employed. Soil samples were analyzed for CEC, ph, EC, OM, total N, available P, and CaCO 3 as outlined by our laboratory standard procedure. Plant samples were collected at physiological maturity and analyzed for 15 N enrichment to assess N recovery. Lint samples were analyzed for lint properties. the results showed no significant effect of the nitrogen fertilizer time course application on the tested parameters such as dry matter production, seed cotton yield, N uptake and lint properties. on the other hand the T2, T3 and T4 treatments where shown to have a positive significant response toward time course application relative to T1 treatment. (authors)

  11. Reconstructing diet by stable isotope analysis: Two case studies from Bronze Age and Early Medieval Lower Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpelmayr, K.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis is nowadays a method frequently applied for the reconstruction of past human diets. The principles of this technique were developed in the late 1970s and 1980s, when it was shown that the isotopic composition of an animal's body reflected that of its diet. Given that the investigated material (often bone collagen) is well enough preserved, several aspects of diet can be investigated by carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures - expressed as δ13C- und δ15N-values - as e.g. whether nutrition was based on C3 or C4 plants. Furthermore, these signatures can be used for the detection of a marine component in the diet and they contain information about the trophic level of an individual. The goal of the work presented in this talk was to investigate certain aspects of diet using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of human and animal skeletal remains from Austrian archaeological sites. Two sites (both in Lower Austria) were selected for this study, the Bronze Age Cemetery of Gemeinlebarn and the Early Medieval settlement of Thunau/Gars am Kamp. Previous archaeological and anthropological examinations suggested that both sites were inhabited by socially differentiated populations. Hence, during the stable isotope analysis special attention was paid to the detection of variation in nutritional habits due to sociogenic or gender-related differences. δ13C- und δ15N-values were measured in collagen, extracted from bone samples, by means of elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). The obtained stable isotope data were examined for significant differences between social groups and the sexes using statistical hypothesis testing (MANOVA and ANOVA). (author)

  12. Stable isotope applications of AMS in geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucklidge, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The subject of geochemistry has become increasingly concerned with the distribution of trace elements in and between mineral phases. Part per million detection is routine, but part per billion measurements are, for certain elements, beyond the range of such sensitive analytical methods as neutron activation analysis (NAA). Tandem AMS has the ability to extend this limit several orders of magnitude for those elements which readily form negative ions. There is no doubt that such information can be most valuable for elements which are partitioned strongly between different mineral phases. While bulk analyses may indicate trace levels of certain elements to be present in a rock, it has always been difficult to state with certainty whether the trace element occurs at a uniformly low level throughout the various phases, or whether it is concentrated at a high level in small grains of an extremely rare phase scattered through the rock. The milli- or micro-probe analytical capability, which can be part of AMS, enables such problems concerning ultra-low level element concentrations to be tackled. With the same approach isotopic ratios of both major and minor elements in microgram amounts of material may be undertaken

  13. Uncovering trophic positions and food resources of soil animals using bulk natural stable isotope composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Anton M; Tiunov, Alexei V; Scheu, Stefan

    2018-06-19

    Despite the major importance of soil biota in nutrient and energy fluxes, interactions in soil food webs are poorly understood. Here we provide an overview of recent advances in uncovering the trophic structure of soil food webs using natural variations in stable isotope ratios. We discuss approaches of application, normalization and interpretation of stable isotope ratios along with methodological pitfalls. Analysis of published data from temperate forest ecosystems is used to outline emerging concepts and perspectives in soil food web research. In contrast to aboveground and aquatic food webs, trophic fractionation at the basal level of detrital food webs is large for carbon and small for nitrogen stable isotopes. Virtually all soil animals are enriched in 13 C as compared to plant litter. This 'detrital shift' likely reflects preferential uptake of 13 C-enriched microbial biomass and underlines the importance of microorganisms, in contrast to dead plant material, as a major food resource for the soil animal community. Soil organic matter is enriched in 15 N and 13 C relative to leaf litter. Decomposers inhabiting mineral soil layers therefore might be enriched in 15 N resulting in overlap in isotope ratios between soil-dwelling detritivores and litter-dwelling predators. By contrast, 13 C content varies little between detritivores in upper litter and in mineral soil, suggesting that they rely on similar basal resources, i.e. little decomposed organic matter. Comparing vertical isotope gradients in animals and in basal resources can be a valuable tool to assess trophic interactions and dynamics of organic matter in soil. As indicated by stable isotope composition, direct feeding on living plant material as well as on mycorrhizal fungi is likely rare among soil invertebrates. Plant carbon is taken up predominantly by saprotrophic microorganisms and channelled to higher trophic levels of the soil food web. However, feeding on photoautotrophic microorganisms and non

  14. Applicability of stable C and N isotope analysis in inferring the geographical origin and authentication of commercial fish (Mackerel, Yellow Croaker and Pollock).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejoong; Suresh Kumar, K; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Globalisation of seafood and aquaculture products and their convenient marketing worldwide, increases the possibility for the distribution of mislabelled products; thereby, underlining the need to identify their origin. Stable isotope analysis is a promising approach to identify the authenticity and traceability of seafood and aquaculture products. In this investigation, we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of three commercial fish, viz. Mackerel, Yellow Croaker and Pollock, originating from various countries. Apart from the species-dependent variation in the isotopic values, marked differences in the δ(13)C and δ(15)N ratios were also observed with respect to the country of origin. This suggests that C and N isotopic signatures could be reliable tools to identify and trace the origin of commercial fish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discrimination of ginseng cultivation regions using light stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwook; Song, Joo-Hyun; Heo, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Jin-Hee; Jung, In-Woo; Min, Ji-Sook

    2015-10-01

    Korean ginseng is considered to be a precious health food in Asia. Today, thieves frequently compromise ginseng farms by pervasive theft. Thus, studies regarding the characteristics of ginseng according to growth region are required in order to deter ginseng thieves and prevent theft. In this study, 6 regions were selected on the basis of Korea regional criteria (si, gun, gu), and two ginseng-farms were randomly selected from each of the 6 regions. Then 4-6 samples of ginseng were acquired from each ginseng farm. The stable isotopic compositions of H, O, C, and N of the collected ginseng samples were analyzed. As a result, differences in the hydrogen isotope ratios could be used to distinguish regional differences, and differences in the nitrogen isotope ratios yielded characteristic information regarding the farms from which the samples were obtained. Thus, stable isotope values could be used to differentiate samples according to regional differences. Therefore, stable isotope analysis serves as a powerful tool to discriminate the regional origin of Korean ginseng samples from across Korea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. New Organic Stable Isotope Reference Materials for Distribution through the USGS and the IAEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping

    2014-05-01

    the 10 laboratories. Successfully calibrated organic RMs could become available as early as 2015. - n-Hexadecane (C16 n-alkane), three H, C-isotopic varieties; - Glycine (amino acid), three H, C, N-isotopic varieties; - L-valine (amino acid), three H, C, N-isotopic varieties; - Methyl n-heptadecanoate (methyl ester of C17 n-alkanoic fatty acid); - Methyl icosanoate (methyl ester of C20 n-alkanoic fatty acid), three H, C-isotopic varieties; - Caffeine, three H, C, N-isotopic varieties; - Hydrocarbon vacuum pump oils, two H-isotopic varieties; - Polyethylene powder, and possibly a 2H and 13C-enriched polyethylene string. [1] Qi H., Coplen T.B., Geilmann H., Brand W.A., Böhlke J.K. (2003) Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 17, 2483-2487. [2] Coplen T.B. (1996) New guidelines for reporting stable hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen isotope-ratio data. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 60, 3359-3360. [3] Coplen T.B., Brand W.A., Gehre M., Gröning M., Meijer H.A.J., Toman B., Verkouteren R.M. (2006) New guidelines for δ13C measurements. Analytical Chemistry 78 (7), 2439-2441. [4] Werner R.A., Brand W.A. (2001) Referencing strategies and techniques in stable isotope ratio analysis. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 15, 501-519.

  17. Stable isotope variation as a tool to trace the authenticity of beef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boner, M.; Foerstel, H.

    2004-01-01

    Organic beef coming principally from Germany was analysed for the hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotopic composition to test the possibility of tracing back the geographical origin. Since there is a well-known pattern of D/H and 18 O/ 16 O in meteoric water and in ground water, there is an existing link to tissue water in the beef. By including the stable isotope ratios of the other elements of life further information is available: soils show different isotope ratios of 15 N/ 14 N and 34 S/ 32 S depending on the geological composition, cultivation and atmospheric sulfur deposition. As organic farming is mainly obliged to use only their produced fodder, that ratio is reflected in the beef as well. Different organic beef samples from various German farms have been collected and analysed over nearly two years. To check the differentiation of foreign beef, samples from Argentina and Chile were also included in the study. The analyses of meat samples indicate that it is possible to trace back the region (e.g. Argentina and Germany) by using isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. A local geographical differentiation can be done by using the stable isotopes of nitrogen and sulfur, as was demonstrated for three farms in Colonia Bay. An optimal differentiation also depends on the quality of further information (e.g. the season, kind of cattle breeding or the declaration of the local geographical origin). Certainly authenticity of beef is not only linked with the geographical origin but can also reflect the differentiation of organic and conventional farming. The fodder of organic cattle farming consists mainly of C 3 plants and the use of C 4 plants is more usual in conventional cattle farming. A 13 C/ 12 C ratio above -20 permille appears as a limit for organic farming. Increased values have to be controlled based on their authenticity. (orig.)

  18. Stable isotope analysis indicates a lack of inter- and intra-specific dietary redundancy among ecologically important coral reef fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plass-Johnson, J. G.; McQuaid, C. D.; Hill, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    Parrotfish are critical consumers on coral reefs, mediating the balance between algae and corals, and are often categorised into three functional groups based on adult morphology and feeding behaviour. We used stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N) to investigate size-related ontogenetic dietary changes in multiple species of parrotfish on coral reefs around Zanzibar. We compared signatures among species and functional groups (scrapers, excavators and browsers) as well as ontogenetic stages (immature, initial and terminal phase) within species. Stable isotope analysis suggests that ontogenetic dietary shifts occurred in seven of the nine species examined; larger individuals had enriched δ13C values, with no relationship between size and δ15N. The relationship between fish length and δ13C signature was maintained when species were categorised as scrapers and excavators, but was more pronounced for scrapers than excavators, indicating stronger ontogenetic changes. Isotopic mixing models classified the initial phase of both the most abundant excavator ( Chlorurus sordidus) as a scraper and the immature stage of the scraper Scarus ghobban (the largest species) as an excavator, indicating that diet relates to size rather than taxonomy. The results indicate that parrotfish may show similar intra-group changes in diet with length, but that their trophic ecology is more complex than suggested by morphology alone. Stable isotope analyses indicate that feeding ecology may differ among species within functional groups, and according to ontogenetic stage within a species.

  19. Fate of nitrate and origin of ammonium during infiltration of treated wastewater investigated through stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Matthew; Schlögl, Johanna; Knöller, Kay; Schüth, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The EU FP7 project MARSOL addresses water scarcity challenges in arid regions, where managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an upcoming technology to recharge depleted aquifers using alternative water sources. However, a potential impact to water quality is increasing ammonium concentrations, which are known to be a problem resulting from bank filtration. In the context of MAR, increasing ammonium concentrations have received little attention so far. A soil column experiment was conducted to investigate transformations of nitrogen species when secondary treated wastewater (TWW) is infiltrated through a natural soil (organic matter content 5.6%) being considered for MAR. The TWW contains nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), but typically very low (samples were collected from six depths. Results show that the largest decreases in nitrate concentration occur in the upper part of the soil, with on average 77% attenuated by 15 cm depth and 94% by 30 cm depth. Starting at 30 cm and continuing downward, ammonium concentrations increased, with concentrations reaching as high as 4 mg-N/L (the EU drinking water limit is 0.41 mg-N/L). Selected samples were also measured for stable nitrogen and oxygen isotopes. Nitrate became isotopically heavier (both N and O) with increasing depth (samples collected at 5 and 15 cm below the soil surface), with most results forming a linear trend for δ18O vs. δ15N. This pattern is consistent with denitrification, which is also supported by the fact that the ammonium concentration first increases at a depth below where most of the nitrate is consumed. However, the relationship between δ15N-NO3- and nitrate concentration is not clearly logarithmic, so processes other than denitrification are not ruled out for explaining the fate of nitrate. The δ15N of ammonium in the water samples and of nitrogen in the soil were also measured. With increasing depth and time, the δ15N-NH4+ (mean 4.3‰) decreases and approaches the δ15N of the pre

  20. Heavy element stable isotope ratios. Analytical approaches and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimizu, Masaharu; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Continuous developments in inorganic mass spectrometry techniques, including a combination of an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a magnetic sector-based mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple-collector array, have revolutionized the precision of isotope ratio measurements, and applications of inorganic mass spectrometry for biochemistry, geochemistry, and marine chemistry are beginning to appear on the horizon. Series of pioneering studies have revealed that natural stable isotope fractionations of many elements heavier than S (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ce, Nd, Mo, Cd, W, Tl, and U) are common on Earth, and it had been widely recognized that most physicochemical reactions or biochemical processes induce mass-dependent isotope fractionation. The variations in isotope ratios of the heavy elements can provide new insights into past and present biochemical and geochemical processes. To achieve this, the analytical community is actively solving problems such as spectral interference, mass discrimination drift, chemical separation and purification, and reduction of the contamination of analytes. This article describes data calibration and standardization protocols to allow interlaboratory comparisons or to maintain traceability of data, and basic principles of isotope fractionation in nature, together with high-selectivity and high-yield chemical separation and purification techniques for stable isotope studies.

  1. Internal motion time scales of a small, highly stable and disulfide-rich protein: A 15N, 13C NMR and molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenneugues, Marc; Gilquin, Bernard; Wolff, Nicolas; Menez, Andre; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    1999-01-01

    Motions of the backbone CαHα and threonine CβHβ bonds of toxin α were investigated using natural abundance 13C NMR and molecular dynamics. Measurement of the 13C longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates employed ACCORDION techniques together with coherence selection by pulsed field gradients and sensitivity enhancement through the use of preservation of equivalent pathway, thus allowing a considerable reduction of the required spectrometer time. 13C R1, R2, 1H → 13C NOE were obtained, as well as the variations of R1ρ(90 deg.) as a function of the rf field strength. These data were compared to those recorded by 1H and 15N NMR on a labelled sample of the toxin [Guenneugues et al. (1997) Biochemistry, 36, 16097-16108]. Both sets of data showed that picosecond to nanosecond time scale motions are well correlated to the secondary structure of the protein. This was further reinforced by the analysis of a 1 ns molecular dynamics simulation in water. Several CαHα and threonine CβHβ experimentally exhibit fast motions with a correlation time longer than 500 ps, that cannot be sampled along the simulation. In addition, the backbone exhibits motions on the microsecond to millisecond time scale on more than half of its length. Thus, toxin α, a highly stable protein (Tm=75 deg. C at acidic pH) containing 61 amino acids and 4 disulfides, shows important internal motions on time scales ranging from 0.1-0.5 ps, to 10-100 ps, 1 ns, and about 30 μs to 10 ms

  2. 24-Hour protein, arginine and citrulline metabolism in fed critically ill children – a stable isotope tracer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Betue, Carlijn T.I.; Garcia Casal, Xiomara C.; van Waardenburg, Dick A.; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Joosten, Koen F.M.; Deutz, Nicolaas E.P.; Engelen, Marielle P.K.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims The reference method to study protein and arginine metabolism in critically ill children is measuring plasma amino acid appearances with stable isotopes during a short (4–8h) time period and extrapolate results to 24-hour. However, 24-hour measurements may be variable due to critical illness related factors and a circadian rhythm could be present. Since only short duration stable isotope studies in critically ill children have been conducted before, the aim of this study was to investigate 24-hour appearance of specific amino acids representing protein and arginine metabolism, with stable isotope techniques in continuously fed critically ill children. Methods In eight critically ill children, admitted to the pediatric (n=4) or cardiovascular (n=4) intensive care unit, aged 0–10 years, receiving continuous (par)enteral nutrition with protein intake 1.0–3.7 g/kg/day, a 24-hour stable isotope tracer protocol was carried out. L-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine, L-[3,3-2H2]-tyrosine, L-[5,5,5-2H3]-leucine, L-[guanido-15N2]-arginine and L-[5-13C-3,3,4,4-2H4]-citrulline were infused intravenously and L-[15N]-phenylalanine and L-[1-13C]leucine enterally. Arterial blood was sampled every hour. Results Coefficients of variation, representing intra-individual variability, of the amino acid appearances of phenylalanine, tyrosine, leucine, arginine and citrulline were high, on average 14–19% for intravenous tracers and 23–26% for enteral tracers. No evident circadian rhythm was present. The pattern and overall 24-hour level of whole body protein balance differed per individual. Conclusions In continuously fed stable critically ill children, the amino acid appearances of phenylalanine, tyrosine, leucine, arginine and citrulline show high variability. This should be kept in mind when performing stable isotope studies in this population. There was no apparent circadian rhythm. PMID:28089618

  3. Stable isotopes in plant nutrition, soil fertility and environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The individual contributions in these proceedings are indexed separately. Main topics covered include the measurement of biological nitrogen fixation, studies of soil organic matter, investigations of nutrient uptake and use by plants, studies of plant metabolism and new methodologies in the analysis of stable isotopes. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Applications of DNA-Stable Isotope Probing in Bioremediation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Vohra, Jyotsna; Murrell, J. Colin

    DNA-stable isotope probing, a method to identify active microorganisms without the prerequisite of cultivation, has been widely applied in the study of microorganisms involved in the degradation of environmental pollutants. Recent advances and technique considerations in applying DNA-SIP in bioremediation are highlighted. A detailed protocol of a DNA-SIP experiment is provided.

  5. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P.L.; Downing, J.A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFAs) was studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The d13C of different PLFAs were used as

  6. Stable isotope compositions of organic carbon and contents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stable isotope compositions of organic carbon (OC), and contents of OC and nitrogen for four sediment cores recovered from lakes Makat (located in the Ngorongoro Crater), Ndutu and Masek (located in the Serengeti Plains) are used to document sources of organic matter (OM) and climatic changes in sub-arid ...

  7. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: thermometry, tracers, reaction mechanisms and chemostratigraphy. 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Production of stable isotopes at Urenco. 10 years of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, C.A.; Rakhorst, H.

    2003-01-01

    In the last ten years, Urenco has built its spin-off activity of stable isotopes in a multi-million dollar business. It is a high quality, ISO certified, client oriented and profitable European business with further growth potential. (author)

  9. COMBINING SOURCES IN STABLE ISOTOPE MIXING MODELS: ALTERNATIVE METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotope mixing models are often used to quantify source contributions to a mixture. Examples include pollution source identification; trophic web studies; analysis of water sources for soils, plants, or water bodies; and many others. A common problem is having too many s...

  10. Production and use of stable isotopes in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Letolle, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper can not cover the field of production and use of stable isotopes in France exhaustively within six pages. We have chosen to concentrate on highlights of the subject and on recent work, and to give references for further reading. 26 refs

  11. Using stable isotopes to investigate individual diet specialization in California sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, S.D.; Tinker, M.T.; Monson, Daniel H.; Oftedal, O.T.; Ralls, K.; Staedler, M.M.; Fogel, M.L.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Differences in diet composition among conspecifics (dietary specialization) have been documented across a broad range of taxonomic groups and habitats, and such variation at the individual level is increasingly recognized as an important component of diversity in trophic interactions. Accurate identification of individual dietary specialization, however, requires longitudinal dietary records that are labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive to obtain for many species. Here we explore the use of stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) as a promising technique for detecting and quantifying patterns of individual dietary specialization. Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) offer a unique opportunity for testing this approach because (1) they consume a wide variety of prey that span multiple trophic levels, habitats, and ecologically defined functional groups; and (2) individual diet specialization can be validated with existing observational data. We analyzed the isotopic composition of sea otter vibrissae (n = 31) in order to characterize inter- and intra-individual variation in sea otter diets at Monterey Bay, California, USA. At the population level, sea otters showed substantial variation in both δ13C and δ15N values, occupying nearly all of the “isotopic space” created by the diversity of isotopic signatures of potential prey taxa. Most of the variation in sea otter vibrissae was accounted for by differences between individuals, with much less contributed by within-individual variation. A majority of sea otters (∼80%) showed relatively little temporal variability in isotopic composition, suggesting that the proportional composition of most individuals' diets is relatively constant over time; a few individuals (∼20%) exhibited a high degree of intra-vibrissa isotopic variability, suggesting seasonal shifts in diet composition. These results and our interpretation of them were supported by long-term observational data on the diets of radio-tagged sea otters

  12. Fractionation of Stable Isotopes in Atmospheric Aerosol Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl

    -independent) fractionation processes of stable isotopes of C, N, O and S in order to investigate three different systems related to aerosols: 1. Post-depositional processes of nitrate in snow that obscure nitrate ice core records 2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol generated by ozonolysis of X...... reactions and undergo complex chemical and physical changes during their lifetimes. In order to assess processes that form and alter aerosols, information provided by stable isotopes can be used to help constrain estimates on the strength of aerosol sources and sinks. This thesis studies (mass...... as required. The kndings provide important results for the studies' respective felds, including a description of the isotopic fractionation and quantum yield of nitrate photolysis in snow, equilibrium fractionation in secondary organic aerosol and fractionation constants of different oxidation pathways of SO2....

  13. Stereoselective synthesis of stable-isotope-labeled amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Lodwig, S.N. [Centralia College, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    For magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopies to reach their full potential, they must be used in combination with sophisticated site-specific stable isotope labeling of biological macromolecules. Labeled amino acids are required for the study of the structure and function of enzymes and proteins. Because there are 20 common amino acids, each with its own distinguishing chemistry, they remain a synthetic challenge. The Oppolzer chiral auxiliary provides a general tool with which to approach the synthesis of labeled amino acids. By using the Oppolzer auxiliary, amino acids can be constructed from several small molecules, which is ideal for stable isotope labeling. In addition to directing the stereochemistry at the {alpha}-carbon, the camphorsultam can be used for stereo-specific isotope labeling at prochiral centers in amino acids. By using the camphorsultam auxiliary we have the potential to synthesize virtually any isotopomer of all of the common amino acids.

  14. Stereoselective synthesis of stable-isotope-labeled amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III; Lodwig, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    For magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopies to reach their full potential, they must be used in combination with sophisticated site-specific stable isotope labeling of biological macromolecules. Labeled amino acids are required for the study of the structure and function of enzymes and proteins. Because there are 20 common amino acids, each with its own distinguishing chemistry, they remain a synthetic challenge. The Oppolzer chiral auxiliary provides a general tool with which to approach the synthesis of labeled amino acids. By using the Oppolzer auxiliary, amino acids can be constructed from several small molecules, which is ideal for stable isotope labeling. In addition to directing the stereochemistry at the α-carbon, the camphorsultam can be used for stereo-specific isotope labeling at prochiral centers in amino acids. By using the camphorsultam auxiliary we have the potential to synthesize virtually any isotopomer of all of the common amino acids

  15. Stable isotopes as a tool to differentiate eggs laid by caged, barn, free range, and organic hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karyne M

    2009-05-27

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of whole yolk, delipidized yolk, albumen, and egg membrane were analyzed from 18 different brands of chicken eggs laid under caged, barn, free range, and organic farming regimes. In general, free range and organic egg components showed enrichment of (15)N values up to 4‰ relative to caged and barn laid eggs, suggesting a higher animal protein (trophic) contribution to the chicken's diet than pure plant-based foods and/or that the feed was organically manufactured. One sample of free range and two samples of organic eggs had δ(15)N values within the range of caged or barn laid eggs, suggesting either that these eggs were mislabeled (the hens were raised under "battery" or "barn" conditions, and not permitted to forage outside) or that there was insufficient animal protein gained by foraging to shift the δ(15)N values of their primary food source. δ(13)C values of potential food sources are discussed with respect to dietary intake and contribution to the isotopic signature of the eggs to determine mixing of C(3) and C(4) diets, although they did not elucidate laying regimen. The study finds that stable nitrogen isotope analysis of egg components is potentially a useful technique to unravel dietary differences between caged or barn hens and free range hens (both conventional and organic) and could be further developed as an authentication tool in the egg industry.

  16. Analysis of stable isotope assisted metabolomics data acquired by GC-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Shi, Biyun; Koo, Imhoi; Yin, Xinmin; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Suhail, Hamid; Rattan, Ramandeep; Giri, Shailendra; McClain, Craig J.

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope assisted metabolomics (SIAM) measures the abundance levels of metabolites in a particular pathway using stable isotope tracers (e.g., 13 C, 18 O and/or 15 N). We report a method termed signature ion approach for analysis of SIAM data acquired on a GC-MS system equipped with an electron ionization (EI) ion source. The signature ion is a fragment ion in EI mass spectrum of a derivatized metabolite that contains all atoms of the underivatized metabolite, except the hydrogen atoms lost during derivatization. In this approach, GC-MS data of metabolite standards were used to recognize the signature ion from the EI mass spectra acquired from stable isotope labeled samples, and a linear regression model was used to deconvolute the intensity of overlapping isotopologues. A mixture score function was also employed for cross-sample chromatographic peak list alignment to recognize the chromatographic peaks generated by the same metabolite in different samples, by simultaneously evaluating the similarity of retention time and EI mass spectrum of two chromatographic peaks. Analysis of a mixture of 16 13 C-labeled and 16 unlabeled amino acids showed that the signature ion approach accurately identified and quantified all isotopologues. Analysis of polar metabolite extracts from cells respectively fed with uniform 13 C-glucose and 13 C-glutamine further demonstrated that this method can also be used to analyze the complex data acquired from biological samples. - Highlights: • A signature ion approach is developed for analysis of stable isotope GC-MS data. • GC-MS data of compound standards are used for selection of the signature ion. • Linear regression model is used to deconvolute the overlapping isotopologue peaks. • The developed method was tested by known compounds and biological samples.

  17. FAO/IAEA - interregional training course on the use of 15N in soil science and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.

    1981-03-01

    This training manual provides an introduction for the basic methodology and principles of application of the stable isotope 15 N. After preliminary remarks on stable isotope terminology fundamentals, experimental problems and methods of quantitative nitrogen determination in soil and plant studies are reported in the main part of the manual. An appendix with a compilation of different parameters such as natural abundance of stable isotopes, selected atomic weights and multiples of them conversion factors of chemical compounds, and much more concludes the manual

  18. Stable isotope geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal system, Leyte, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulston, J.R.; Stewart, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    Stable isotope and geochemical data on samples from natural features, shallow wells and deep wells collected over a number of years from the Tongonan area of Leyte have been evaluated. The variations in the isotopic compositions of the thermal waters are used to describe natural processes occurring within the system. The effect of the ''excess enthalpy'' of the deep wells on the isotope data is formulated. Water from the deep Tongonan wells shows an oxygen-18 shift of 5 per mille, which is larger than at Wairakei and Broadlands, probably in part because of the high temperatures at Tongonan. Recent measurements indicate that the deuterium shift is very much smaller than previously thought. Isotopic measurements of methane in the gases suggests differing flows from the Eastern and Central Philippine faults

  19. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (δ13C and δ15N.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine J Briand

    Full Text Available A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef, different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰ and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰. Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰ whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰. The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that δ13C was a more useful fingerprint than δ15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is

  20. Inferring foliar water uptake using stable isotopes of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Gregory R; Lehmann, Marco M; Cernusak, Lucas A; Arend, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf T W

    2017-08-01

    A growing number of studies have described the direct absorption of water into leaves, a phenomenon known as foliar water uptake. The resultant increase in the amount of water in the leaf can be important for plant function. Exposing leaves to isotopically enriched or depleted water sources has become a common method for establishing whether or not a plant is capable of carrying out foliar water uptake. However, a careful inspection of our understanding of the fluxes of water isotopes between leaves and the atmosphere under high humidity conditions shows that there can clearly be isotopic exchange between the two pools even in the absence of a change in the mass of water in the leaf. We provide experimental evidence that while leaf water isotope ratios may change following exposure to a fog event using water with a depleted oxygen isotope ratio, leaf mass only changes when leaves are experiencing a water deficit that creates a driving gradient for the uptake of water by the leaf. Studies that rely on stable isotopes of water as a means of studying plant water use, particularly with respect to foliar water uptake, must consider the effects of these isotopic exchange processes.

  1. Applications of 15N-isotopic dilution techniques to study the recovery of nitrogen fertilizer in the soil and plant uptake in wheat cropping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouanet, Juan Luis; Godoy, Alejandra; Montenegro, Adolfo; Mera, Mario; Uribe, Hamil; Pino, Ines; Parada, Ana Maria; Nario, Adriana

    1999-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major concern of the Chilean Ministry of Agriculture, which supports actions to develop new approaches in order to decrease the loss of this fragile natural resource and to promote sustainable production systems. This study, based on the management of biological, chemical and physical characteristics of the soil, was aimed to save nitrogen fertilizer. Nitrogen fertilization is the most costly production factor in wheat cropping systems on Ultisols, one of the most eroded soil types in southern Chile. A field experiment was undertaken on a Ultisol (''Buenos Aires'' Farm) at Imperial, IX Region, during 1997 and 1998, in order to assess the nitrogen and water use efficiency by a wheat crop (cv. Dalcahue-INIA) under alternative soil tillage systems. 15 N-isotopic dilution techniques allowed determining aspects of plant nutrition, nitrogen and water movement in the soil, processes not evaluated so far under these conditions. A strip-plot field layout with four replications was used , with soil tillage systems (traditional, burning/no-till, and no burning/no-till) as the main plots and crop successions (wheat-lupin-wheat and lupin-wheat-oat) as the subplots (30 m-2). In each subplot, a microplot (1m-2 ) was delimited. N fertilizer in the form of urea was added on subplots, except the microplot, at the rate of 150 kg N ha-1. 15N-labelled urea at c. 10 atom % excess, at the rate of 150 kg N ha-1, was added to the microplots. The fertilizer was split three times, 10% at planting, 45% at tillering and 45% jointing stage. No significant differences were found for wheat grain yield among tillage treatments. N fertilizer recovery by the wheat crop was 43%, and 56% on the nitrogen found in plants was derived from soil. No significant differences for these proportions were found among treatments. Although the wheat crop did not respond to tillage treatments in terms of 15N recovery, the physiological nitrogen use efficiency, or grain production per unit of

  2. The use of the 15N isotope dilution technique to estimate the contribution of associated biological nitrogen fixation to the nitrogen nutrition of Paspalum notatum cv. batatais

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddey, R.M.; Doebereiner, Johanna

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a field experiment to investigate the use of the 15 N-dilution technique to measure the contribution of biological N 2 fixation to the N nutrition of the batatais cultivar of Paspalum notatum. The pensacola cultivar of this grass supports little associated N 2 fixation as evidenced by the low associated C 2 H 2 reduction activity and was thus used as a nonfixing control plant. The grasses were grown in 60-cm diameter concrete cylinders sunk into the soil, and the effects of four different addition rates of labelled nitrogen (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , were investigated. The data from seven harvests clearly demonstrated that there was a significant input of plant associated N 2 fixation to the nutrition of the batatais cultivar amounting to approximately 20 kg N ha -1 year -1 . Problems associated with the conduct of such isotope dilution experiments are discussed including the importance of using nonfixing control plants of similar growth habit, the advantages and disadvantages of growing the plants in cylinders as opposed to field plots, and the various methods of application of labelled N fertilizer

  3. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade {sup 15}N-, {sup 13}C- and {sup 2}H-labeled yeast extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan, E-mail: Stephan.Grzesiek@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor.

  4. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade 15N-, 13C- and 2H-labeled yeast extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein 15 N and 13 C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor

  5. performance of sorghum grown on a salt affected soil manured with dhaincha plant residues using a 15N isotopic dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Ain, F.; Razok, A.; Al-Shamma, M.

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted on a salt-affected soil to determine the effect of application of three types of Dhaincha (Sesbania aculeata pers.) residues (R, roots; L, shoots; L+R, shoots plus roots) of on the performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) using the indirect 15 N isotopic dilution technique. Results indicated that Sesbania residues (L and L+R), used as green manures significantly increased grain yield, dry matter production, N uptake, and water use efficiency of sorghum. Percentages of N derived from residues (%Ndfr) in sorghum ranged from 6.4 to 28%. The N recoveries in sorghum were 52, 19. and 19.7% of the total amount contained in Sesbania roots, shoots and roots plus shoots, respectively. The beneficial effects of Sesbania residues are attributed not only to the additional N availability to the plants, but also to effects on the enhancement of soil N uptake, particularly in the L+R treatment. The findings suggest that the use of Sesbania aculeata residues, as a green manure, can provide a substantial portion of total N in sorghum. In addition, the use of Sesbania green manure in salt-affected soils, as a bio-reclaiming material, can be a promising approach for enhancing plant growth on a sustainable basis. (author)

  6. Manual for the Use of Stable Isotopes in Entomology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    result of problem driven inquisitiveness and technological advances, and are framed by the social and political environment. Although the external environment may mould the technological path, a technology will only become obsolete if there are viable substitution products or methods. Stable isotope methods are a substitute for many radionuclide methods. The progress made in stable isotope science over the past twenty years is a direct result of the interplay of the above factors. Stable isotopes are omnipresent in the environment and pose no health or environmental risks. Advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry in terms of detection, accuracy and automation have broadened experimental possibilities immensely over the past twenty years. It was recognised that there was significant potential for answering many of the entomologist?s biological and ecological questions using stable isotopes, an expertise the Soil Science Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory in Seibersdorf had long fostered; therefore collaboration with the Entomology Unit at the same Laboratory was established. A number of collaborative experiments were carried and subsequently published. It was soon recognised that stable isotopes have tremendous potential in entomological research and although there were numerous studies using stable isotopes in ecology, their use in entomology per se was limited. Thus it was felt that a publication was required to make stable isotope techniques more widely known among entomologists. This manual will attempt to provide an introduction to the use of stable isotopes in entomological research. It will strive to communicate the basic principles and techniques of stable isotope science and provide a springboard for further interest and research in this area

  7. Changes in algal stable isotopes following nutrient and peat amendments in oil sands aquatic reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwell, A.; Chen, H.; Boutsivongskad, M.; Dixon, D.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of oil sands in Alberta generates large volumes of processed material that must be reclaimed. Processed water and solids (PW/S) contain higher levels of naturally occurring compounds such as naphthenic acids (NAs) and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Organic carbon and nitrogen are some of the constituents in PW/S that may provide nutrient sources for aquatic reclamation sites as they develop into viable ecosystems. This study was conducted to assess the modifying factors that may affect the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of primary production in oil sands aquatic reclamation. Both field-based microcosm studies and laboratory studies were used to evaluate the changes in the growth and stable isotope values of phytoplankton, periphyton and/or filamentous algae along gradients of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), nitrogen and phosphorus. Various types of reclamation substrates were used in the study, including various combinations of sand, mature fine tailings, peat and process water. Results showed different levels of growth depending on both the water and substrate type. Typically, periphyton from oil sands reclamation sites were more enriched in 15N than the reference site. Periphyton from one site known as the MP site was more enriched in 13C than periphyton from another site know as the Shallow Wetland South Ditch (SWSD). However, periphyton in the demonstration pond (DP) was more 13C depleted than the reference site. Findings from this study indicate that carbon isotopes are influenced by other factors, such as nutrients.

  8. Growth versus metabolic tissue replacement in mouse tissues determined by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macavoy, S. E.; Jamil, T.; Macko, S. A.; Arneson, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis is becoming an extensively used tool in animal ecology. The isotopes most commonly used for analysis in terrestrial systems are those of carbon and nitrogen, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and the approximately 3‰ enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although isotope signatures in animal tissues presumably reflect the local food web, analysis is often complicated by differential nutrient routing and fractionation by tissues, and by the possibility that large organisms are not in isotopic equilibrium with the foods available in their immediate environment. Additionally, the rate at which organisms incorporate the isotope signature of a food through both growth and metabolic tissue replacement is largely unknown. In this study we have assessed the rate of carbon and nitrogen isotopic turnover in liver, muscle and blood in mice following a diet change. By determining growth rates, we were able to determine the proportion of tissue turnover caused by growth versus that caused by metabolic tissue replacement. Growth was found to account for approximately 10% of observed tissue turnover in sexually mature mice (Mus musculus). Blood carbon was found to have the shortest half-life (16.9 days), followed by muscle (24.7 days). Liver carbon turnover was not as well described by the exponential decay equations as other tissues. However, substantial liver carbon turnover was observed by the 28th day after diet switch. Surprisingly, these tissues primarily reflect the carbon signature of the protein, rather than carbohydrate, source in their diet. The nitrogen signature in all tissues was enriched by 3 - 5‰ over their dietary protein source, depending on tissue type, and the isotopic turnover rates were comparable to those observed in carbon.

  9. Application of heavy stable isotopes in forensic isotope geochemistry: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Jugdeep; Habicht-Mauche, Judith; Juarez, Chelsey

    2008-01-01

    Light stable isotopes have been used for many years to characterize the source and transport of materials. More recently heavy isotope systems such as Sr, Nd and Pb have been added to this list in order to aid source identification. With the advent of multiple collector ICP-MS, the range of isotopic tools now available has increased considerably, however, until the isotope systematics of these new non-traditional isotope systems have become better understood, they will not be as useful in characterizing material source and transportation. Applications using heavy metal stable isotopes (mostly traditional heavy isotopes) have reached most avenues in science, including earth sciences, archaeology, anthropology, animal physiology, ecology and toxicology. This field will continue to grow as new applications are developed and techniques become simpler and quicker. This paper provides a review of how this field has grown and presents two new applications using Pb and Sr isotopes in glazes to determine the source of ore used in glazes, and using Sr isotopes to determine the origin of undocumented deceased Mexican border crossers

  10. Application of heavy stable isotopes in forensic isotope geochemistry: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Jugdeep [W.M. Keck Isotope Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)], E-mail: jaggarwal@pmc.ucsc.edu; Habicht-Mauche, Judith; Juarez, Chelsey [Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Light stable isotopes have been used for many years to characterize the source and transport of materials. More recently heavy isotope systems such as Sr, Nd and Pb have been added to this list in order to aid source identification. With the advent of multiple collector ICP-MS, the range of isotopic tools now available has increased considerably, however, until the isotope systematics of these new non-traditional isotope systems have become better understood, they will not be as useful in characterizing material source and transportation. Applications using heavy metal stable isotopes (mostly traditional heavy isotopes) have reached most avenues in science, including earth sciences, archaeology, anthropology, animal physiology, ecology and toxicology. This field will continue to grow as new applications are developed and techniques become simpler and quicker. This paper provides a review of how this field has grown and presents two new applications using Pb and Sr isotopes in glazes to determine the source of ore used in glazes, and using Sr isotopes to determine the origin of undocumented deceased Mexican border crossers.

  11. Stable isotope ratios of marijuana. I. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes describe growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jason B; Hurley, Janet M; Ehleringer, James R

    2009-01-01

    There remains significant uncertainty in illicit marijuana cultivation. We analyzed the delta(13)C and delta(15)N of 508 domestic samples from known U.S.A. counties, 31 seized from a single location, 5 samples grown in Mexico and Colombia, and 10 northwest border seizures. For a subset, inflorescences and leaves were analyzed separately. These data revealed a strong correspondence, with inflorescences having slightly higher delta(13)C and delta(15)N values than leaves. A framework for interpreting these results is introduced and evaluated. Samples identified as outdoor-grown by delta(13)C were generally recorded as such by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). DEA-classified indoor-grown samples had the most negative delta(13)C values, consistent with indoor cultivation, although many were also in the outdoor-grown domain. Delta(15)N indicated a wide range of fertilizers across the dataset. Samples seized at the single location suggested multiple sources. Northwest border delta(13)C values suggested indoor growth, whereas for the Mexican and Colombian samples they indicated outdoor growth.

  12. The impact of Great Cormorants on biogenic pollution of land ecosystems: Stable isotope signatures in small mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balčiauskas, Linas; Skipitytė, Raminta; Jasiulionis, Marius; Trakimas, Giedrius; Balčiauskienė, Laima; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2016-01-01

    Studying the isotopic composition of the hair of two rodent species trapped in the territories of Great Cormorant colonies, we aimed to show that Great Cormorants transfer biogens from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems, and that these substances reach small mammals through the trophic cascade, thus influencing the nutrient balance in the terrestrial ecosystem. Analysis of δ"1"3C and δ"1"5N was performed on two dominant species of small mammals, Apodemus flavicollis and Myodes glareolus, inhabiting the territories of the colonies. For both species, the values of δ"1"3C and δ"1"5N were higher in the animals trapped in the territories of the colonies than those in control territories. In the hair of A. flavicollis and M. glareolus, the highest values of δ"1"5N (16.31 ± 3.01‰ and 17.86 ± 2.76‰, respectively) were determined in those animals trapped in the biggest Great Cormorant colony. δ"1"5N values were age dependent, highest in adult A. flavicollis and M. glareolus and lowest in juvenile animals. For δ"1"3C values, age-dependent differences were not registered. δ"1"5N values in both small mammal species from the biggest Great Cormorant colony show direct dependence on the intensity of influence. Biogenic pollution is at its strongest in the territories of the colonies with nests, significantly diminishing in the ecotones of the colonies and further in the control zones, where the influence of birds is negligible. Thus, Great Cormorant colonies alter ecosystem functioning by enrichment with biogens, with stable isotope values in small mammals significantly higher in the affected territories. - Highlights: • Cormorants transport nutrients from water to land ecosystems and pollute biogenically. • We studied stable isotope composition of small mammal hair in 3 cormorant colonies. • δ"1"3C and δ"1"5N were measured using elemental analyzer–isotope ratio mass spectrometer. • δ"1"3C and δ"1"5N values were higher in rodents inhabiting

  13. The impact of Great Cormorants on biogenic pollution of land ecosystems: Stable isotope signatures in small mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balčiauskas, Linas, E-mail: linasbal@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Skipitytė, Raminta, E-mail: raminta.skipityte@ftmc.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jasiulionis, Marius, E-mail: mjasiulionis@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Trakimas, Giedrius, E-mail: giedrius.trakimas@gf.vu.lt [Center for Ecology and Environmental Research, Vilnius University, Vilnius (Lithuania); Institute of Life Sciences and Technology, Daugavpils University, Parades Str. 1a, Daugavpils, LV-5401 (Latvia); Balčiauskienė, Laima, E-mail: laiba@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Remeikis, Vidmantas, E-mail: vidrem@fi.lt [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2016-09-15

    Studying the isotopic composition of the hair of two rodent species trapped in the territories of Great Cormorant colonies, we aimed to show that Great Cormorants transfer biogens from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems, and that these substances reach small mammals through the trophic cascade, thus influencing the nutrient balance in the terrestrial ecosystem. Analysis of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N was performed on two dominant species of small mammals, Apodemus flavicollis and Myodes glareolus, inhabiting the territories of the colonies. For both species, the values of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N were higher in the animals trapped in the territories of the colonies than those in control territories. In the hair of A. flavicollis and M. glareolus, the highest values of δ{sup 15}N (16.31 ± 3.01‰ and 17.86 ± 2.76‰, respectively) were determined in those animals trapped in the biggest Great Cormorant colony. δ{sup 15}N values were age dependent, highest in adult A. flavicollis and M. glareolus and lowest in juvenile animals. For δ{sup 13}C values, age-dependent differences were not registered. δ{sup 15}N values in both small mammal species from the biggest Great Cormorant colony show direct dependence on the intensity of influence. Biogenic pollution is at its strongest in the territories of the colonies with nests, significantly diminishing in the ecotones of the colonies and further in the control zones, where the influence of birds is negligible. Thus, Great Cormorant colonies alter ecosystem functioning by enrichment with biogens, with stable isotope values in small mammals significantly higher in the affected territories. - Highlights: • Cormorants transport nutrients from water to land ecosystems and pollute biogenically. • We studied stable isotope composition of small mammal hair in 3 cormorant colonies. • δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N were measured using elemental analyzer–isotope ratio mass spectrometer. • δ{sup 13}C and

  14. Application of stable isotopes to hydrogeology in coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Qi; Duan Yucheng

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotopes including Oxygen-18 and Deuterium have been applied to investigation of hydrogeology in main coal mines. By determination of stable isotopic composition of hydrogen and oxygen together with water analysis, the following studies have been developed: Identification of the hydrogeochemical characteristics of the groundwater from varied aquifers; Analysis of the hydraulic relationship between varied aquifers; Interpretation of the probable recharge source of mine water. The research results mentioned above reveal that: 1. The groundwater from main aquifers at coal mines in north China is of meteoric origin, which is recharged from hilly area surrounding the coal mine. Its isotopic composition differs slightly from that of the local precipitation. 2. There is a mutual hydraulic relationship between the Ordovician and Quarternary aquifers, so the difference of isotopic composition is very small. 3. By way of the variation of isotopic composition of groundwater from coal-bearing strata, we can infer the hydraulic relationship extent between overlaid alluvial layer and underlaid Ordovician limestone. (author). 9 refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs

  15. Tracking ENSO with tropical trees: Progress in stable isotope dendroclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. N.; Poussart, P. F.; Saleska, S. R.; Schrag, D. P.

    2002-12-01

    The terrestrial tropics remain an important gap in the growing proxy network used to characterize past ENSO behavior. Here we describe a strategy for development of proxy estimates of paleo-ENSO, via proxy rainfall estimates derived from stable isotope (δ18O) measurements made on tropical trees. The approach applies a new model of oxygen isotopic composition of alpha-cellulose (Roden et al., 2000), a rapid method for cellulose extraction from raw wood (Brendel et al., 2000), and continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (Brand, 1996) to develop proxy chronological, rainfall and growth rate estimates from tropical trees, even those lacking annual rings. The promise and pitfalls of the approach are illustrated in pilot datasets from the US, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Peru, which show isotopic cycles of 4-6 per mil, and interannual anomalies of up to 8 per mil. Together with the mature ENSO proxies (corals, extratropical tree-rings, varved sediments, and ice cores), replicated and well-dated stable isotope chronologies from tropical trees may eventually improve our understanding of ENSO history over the past several hundred years.

  16. Non-traditional Stable Isotope Systematics of Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O. J.

    2009-05-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges is one of the fundamental processes controlling the chemistry of the oceans and the altered oceanic crust. Past studies have demonstrated the complexity and diversity of seafloor hydrothermal systems and have highlighted the importance of subsurface environments in controlling the composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralization types. Traditionally, the behavior of metals in seafloor hydrothermal systems have been investigated by integrating results from laboratory studies, theoretical models, mineralogy and fluid and mineral chemistry. Isotope ratios of various metals and metalloids, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Sb have recently provided new approaches for the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. Despite these initial investigations, the cause of the isotopic variability of these elements remains poorly constrained. We have little understanding of the isotope variations between vent types (black or white smokers) as well as the influence of source rock composition (basalt, felsic or ultrabasic rocks) and alteration types. Here, I will review and present new results of metal isotope systematics of seafloor hydrothermal systems, in particular: (1) determination of empirical isotope fractionation factors for Zn, Fe and Cu-isotopes through isotopic analysis of mono-mineralic sulfide grains lining the internal chimney wall in contact with hydrothermal fluid; (2) comparison of Fe- and Cu-isotope signatures of vent fluids from mid- oceanic and back-arc hydrothermal fields, spanning wide ranges of pH, temperature, metal concentrations and contributions of magmatic fluids enriched in SO2. Ultimately, the use of complementary non-traditional stable isotope systems may help identify and constrain the complex interactions between fluids,minerals, and organisms in seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  17. Use of stable isotopes to identify dietary differences across subpopulations and sex for a free-ranging generalist herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, W David

    2014-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen isotopes in tissues can be used to understand plants consumed by various taxa, but can they provide additional information about consumers? Values of δ(13)C and δ(15)N were assessed from tissue of free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) occupying disparate habitats of mixed prairie-oak savannah that contained C3 agricultural crops in a C4-dominated landscape and in key plants consumed by elk. Muscle and hoof samples were collected from female and male elk in two subpopulations (forested land and grassland) from private land and one subpopulation from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge (refuge) in 2001-2006. Previous research identified differences between mean muscle δ(13)C and δ(15)N and mean hoof δ(13)C and δ(15)N indicating that isotopes differed between tissues of varying metabolic activity. Mean δ(13)C in hoof of elk on forested land and grassland were lower than hoof δ(13)C from elk in the refuge indicating greater long-term consumption of C3 plants by elk on forested land and grassland subpopulations. The δ(15)N in hoof was greater for elk outside the refuge than that for elk in the refuge. Interaction of sex and subpopulation only occurred for hoof δ(15)N suggesting that factors such as tissue type, sex, and habitat need to be considered to understand free-ranging ecology of generalist herbivores using stable isotopes. Availability of C3 agricultural crops high in percent nitrogen on a nearly annual basis in a C4-dominated landscape was likely driving differences in tissue δ(13)C and δ(15)N among subpopulations of free-ranging elk. An increase in tissue δ(15)N resulted from an increase in the consumption of higher δ(15)N in forage for sexes and subpopulations of a free-ranging ungulate in North America but δ(15)N should be further evaluated as an index of nutrition for subpopulations of generalist herbivores.

  18. Ontogenetic and among-individual variation in foraging strategies of northeast Pacific white sharks based on stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.L.; Tinker, M. Tim; Estes, J.A.; Koch, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence for individuality in dietary preferences and foraging behaviors within populations of various species. This is especially important for apex predators, since they can potentially have wide dietary niches and a large impact on trophic dynamics within ecosystems. We evaluate the diet of an apex predator, the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), by measuring the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of vertebral growth bands to create lifetime records for 15 individuals from California. Isotopic variations in white shark diets can reflect within-region differences among prey (most importantly related to trophic level), as well as differences in baseline values among the regions in which sharks forage, and both prey and habitat preferences may shift with age. The magnitude of isotopic variation among sharks in our study (>5‰ for both elements) is too great to be explained solely by geographic differences, and so must reflect differences in prey choice that may vary with sex, size, age and location. Ontogenetic patterns in δ15N values vary considerably among individuals, and one third of the population fit each of these descriptions: 1) δ15N values increased throughout life, 2) δ15N values increased to a plateau at ~5 years of age, and 3) δ15N values remained roughly constant values throughout life. Isotopic data for the population span more than one trophic level, and we offer a qualitative evaluation of diet using shark-specific collagen discrimination factors estimated from a 3+ year captive feeding experiment (Δ13Cshark-diet and Δ15Nshark-diet equal 4.2‰ and 2.5‰, respectively). We assess the degree of individuality with a proportional similarity index that distinguishes specialists and generalists. The isotopic variance is partitioned among differences between-individual (48%), within-individuals (40%), and by calendar year of sub-adulthood (12%). Our data reveal substantial ontogenetic and individual dietary

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  20. Food-web inferences of stable isotope spatial patterns in copepods and yellowfin tuna in the pelagic eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Robert J.; Popp, Brian N.; Graham, Brittany S.; López-Ibarra, Gladis A.; Galván-Magaña, Felipe; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E.; Bocanegra-Castillo, Noemi; Wallsgrove, Natalie J.; Gier, Elizabeth; Alatorre-Ramírez, Vanessa; Ballance, Lisa T.; Fry, Brian

    2010-07-01

    Evaluating the impacts of climate and fishing on oceanic ecosystems requires an improved understanding of the trophodynamics of pelagic food webs. Our approach was to examine broad-scale spatial relationships among the stable N isotope values of copepods and yellowfin tuna ( Thunnus albacares), and to quantify yellowfin tuna trophic status in the food web based on stable-isotope and stomach-contents analyses. Using a generalized additive model fitted to abundance-weighted-average δ 15N values of several omnivorous copepod species, we examined isotopic spatial relationships among yellowfin tuna and copepods. We found a broad-scale, uniform gradient in δ 15N values of copepods increasing from south to north in a region encompassing the eastern Pacific warm pool and parts of several current systems. Over the same region, a similar trend was observed for the δ 15N values in the white muscle of yellowfin tuna caught by the purse-seine fishery, implying limited movement behavior. Assuming the omnivorous copepods represent a proxy for the δ 15N values at the base of the food web, the isotopic difference between these two taxa, “ ΔYFT-COP,” was interpreted as a trophic-position offset. Yellowfin tuna trophic-position estimates based on their bulk δ 15N values were not significantly different than independent estimates based on stomach contents, but are sensitive to errors in the trophic enrichment factor and the trophic position of copepods. An apparent inshore-offshore, east to west gradient in yellowfin tuna trophic position was corroborated using compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids conducted on a subset of samples. The gradient was not explained by the distribution of yellowfin tuna of different sizes, by seasonal variability at the base of the food web, or by known ambit distances (i.e. movements). Yellowfin tuna stomach contents did not show a regular inshore-offshore gradient in trophic position during 2003-2005, but the trophic

  1. Effect of baking and fermentation on the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of grain-based food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Joshua N; Palafox, Sherilyn J; Rottmueller, Marina E; Jahren, A Hope

    2015-05-30

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is used extensively to reconstruct general attributes of prehistoric and modern diets in both humans and animals. In order to apply these methods to the accurate determination of specific intakes of foods/nutrients of interest, the isotopic signature of individually consumed foods must be constrained. For example, 86% of the calories consumed in the USA are derived from processed and prepared foods, but the relationship between the stable isotope composition of raw ingredients and the resulting products has not been characterized. To examine the effect of common cooking techniques on the stable isotope composition of grain-based food items, we prepared yeast buns and sugar cookies from standardized recipes and measured bulk δ(13) C and δ(15) N values of samples collected throughout a 75 min fermentation process (buns) and before and after baking at 190°C (buns and cookies). Simple isotope mixing models were used to determine if the isotopic signatures of 13 multi-ingredient foods could be estimated from the isotopic signatures of their constituent raw ingredients. No variations in δ(13) C or δ(15) N values were detected between pre- and post-baked yeast buns (pre: -24.78‰/2.61‰, post: -24.75‰/2.74‰), beet-sugar cookies (pre: -24.48‰/3.84‰, post: -24.47‰/3.57‰), and cane-sugar cookies (pre: -19.07‰/2.97‰, post: -19.02‰/3.21‰), or throughout a 75 min fermentation process in yeast buns. Using isotopic mass balance equations, the δ(13) C/δ(15) N values of multi-ingredient foods were estimated from the isotopic</