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Sample records for stable ion species

  1. The influence of seawater carbonate ion concentration [CO32-] on the stable carbon isotope composition of the planktic foraminifera species Globorotalia inflata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilke, I; Bickert, T.; Peeters, F.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    We sampled the upper water column for living planktic foraminifera along the SW-African continental margin. The species Globorotalia inflata strongly dominates the foraminiferal assemblages with an overall relative abundance of 70-90%. The shell δ

  2. Ion source developments for stable and radioactive ion beams at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, R; Lecesne, N; Jardin, P; Gaubert, G; Huguet, Y; Pacquet, J Y; Villari, A C C; Lecler, D; Been, T

    1999-01-01

    Since now many years, the Ganil ion source team has in charge to develop ion sources with three main purposes. The first one concerns the radioactive ion production that implies high efficiency ion sources as the amount of created exotic atoms is very low (between 10 to 108 particle per second). The second one deals with high intensities of stable metallic ion beams for the injectors of the accelerator while the last one tries to increase the intensities of very high charge state ion beams for atomic physic. Concerning radioactive ion production, the recent results obtained, in collaboration with the ISN Grenoble group, with the 1+/n+ method drove us to develop a new concept of ecr ion source for monocharged ion production. The results of the first tests of this source will be given. This new idea for the construction of ecr ion source can be applied to multicharged ion production. Concerning the high charge state ion beam production, a new source called SUPERSHYPIE has been built that allow to increase by a ...

  3. Stable Langmuir solitons in plasma with diatomic ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dvornikov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We study stable axially and spherically symmetric spatial solitons in plasma with diatomic ions. The stability of a soliton against collapse is provided by the interaction of induced electric dipole moments of ions with the rapidly oscillating electric field of a plasmoid. We derive the new cubic-quintic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which governs the soliton dynamics and numerically solve it. Then we discuss the possibility of implementation of such plasmoids in realistic atmospheric plasma. In particular, we suggest that spherically symmetric Langmuir solitons, described in the present work, can be excited at the formation stage of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures. The implication of our model for the interpretation of the results of experiments for the plasmoids generation is discussed.

  4. Progress Toward a Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2009-01-01

    There was an update on the subject of two previous NASA Tech Briefs articles: Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock (NPO-43075), Vol. 32, No. 5 (May 2008), page 63; and Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock (NPO-42919), Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 62. To recapitulate: A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump maintains the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a neon buffer gas. There was progress in the development of the clock, with emphasis on the design, fabrication, pump-down, and bake-out of the vacuum tube (based on established practice in the travelingwave- tube-amplifier industry) and the ability of the tube to retain a vacuum after a year of operation. Other developments include some aspects of the operation of mercury-vapor source (a small appendage oven containing HgO) so as to maintain the optimum low concentration of mercury vapor, and further efforts to miniaturize the vacuum and optical subsystems to fit within a volume of 2 L.

  5. Target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by method of stable ion beam implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Panteleev, V.N; Fedorov, D.V; Moroz, F.V; Orlov, S.Yu; Volkov, Yu.M

    The ionization efficiency is one of the most important parameters of an on-line used target-ion source system exploited for production of exotic radioactive beams. The ionization efficiency value determination as a characteristic of a target-ion source unit in the stage of its normalizing before on-line use is a very important step in the course of the preparation for an on-line experiment. At the IRIS facility (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina) a reliable and rather precise method of the target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by the method of stable beam implantation has been developed. The method worked out exploits an off-line mass-separator for the implantation of the ion beams of selected stable isotopes of different elements into a tantalum foil placed inside the Faraday cup in the focal plane of the mass-separator. The amount of implanted ions has been measured with a high accuracy by the current integrator connected to the Faraday cup. After the implantation of needed a...

  6. Trophic position of coexisting krill species: a stable isotope approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Bode, Antonio; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2014-01-01

    .2) indicating carnivory, while T. inermis (TP = 2.4 ± 0.3) had a more omnivorous diet. In turn, T. longicaudata and T. raschii (TP = 2.2 ± 0.2) were herbivorous. Along the fjord, nutrient and plankton composition affected trophic position. Thysanoessa longicaudata was more omnivorous offshore than inshore where......Four krill species with overlapping functional biology coexist in Greenland waters. Here, we used stable isotopes to investigate and discuss their trophic role and mode of coexistence. Bulk carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope analyses of Thysanoessa longicaudata, T. inermis, T. raschii...... and Meganyctiphanes norvegica sampled in June 2010 in the Godthåbsfjord, SW Greenland revealed new insight into their trophic roles and positions. There was a general positive correlation between body length and trophic position. The largest species M. norvegica had the highest trophic position (TP = 2.8 ± 0...

  7. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Amendt, P.; Divol, L.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH 2 foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2ω probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of ±0.06 in species fraction.

  8. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and environment. SIMS as applied to the detection of stable and radioactive isotopes in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassard-Bouchaud, C.; Escaig, F.; Hallegot, P.

    1984-01-01

    Several marine species of economical interest, Crustacea (crabs and prawns) and Molluscs (common mussels and oysters) were collected from coastal waters of France: English Channel, Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea and of Japan. Microanalyses which were performed at the tissue and cell levels, using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, revealed many contaminants; stable isotopes as well as radioactive actinids such as uranium were detected. Uptake, storage and excretion target organs were identified [fr

  9. A water-stable lanthanide metal-organic framework for fluorimetric detection of ferric ions and tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Bermejo-Gómez, Antonio; Martín-Matute, Belén; Zou, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    The preparation of a highly water stable and porous lanthanide metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles (denoted SUMOF-7II; SU refers to Stockholm University) is described. SUMOF-7II was synthesized starting from the tritopic linker of 2,4,6-tri-p-carboxyphenyl pyridine (H 3 L2) and La(III) as metal clusters. SUMOF-7II forms a stable dispersion and displays high fluorescence emission with small variation over the pH range of 6 to 12. Its fluorescence is selectively quenched by Fe(III) ions compared to other metal ions. The intensity of the fluorescene emission drops drops linearly in 16.6-167 μM Fe(III) concentration range, and Stern-Volmer plots are linear. The limit of detection (LOD) is 16.6 μM (at an S/ N  ratio of >3). This indicator probe can also be used for selective detection of tryptophan among several amino acids. Compared to the free linker H 3 L2, SUMOF-7II offers improved sensitivity and selectivity of the investigated species. Graphical abstractA water-stable porous lanthanide metal-organic framework SUMOF-7II (La) has shown to be an excellent probe for the detection of ferric ions among other metal ions, and tryptophan among other amino acids in aqueous solution. The new probe displays high and stable fluorescence signal in a wide pH range (6-12).

  10. Stochastic species turnover and stable coexistence in a species-rich, fire-prone plant community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Thuiller

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that maintain diversity is important for managing ecosystems for species persistence. Here we used a long-term data set to understand mechanisms of coexistence at the local and regional scales in the Cape Floristic Region, a global hotspot of plant diversity. We used a dataset comprising 81 monitoring sites, sampled in 1966 and again in 1996, and containing 422 species for which growth form, regeneration mode, dispersal distance and abundances at both the local (site and meta-community scales are known. We found that species presence and abundance were stable at the meta-community scale over the 30 year period but highly unstable at the local scale, and were not influenced by species' biological attributes. Moreover, rare species were no more likely to go extinct at the local scale than common species, and that alpha diversity in local communities was strongly influenced by habitat. We conclude that stochastic environmental fluctuations associated with recurrent fire buffer populations from extinction, thereby ensuring stable coexistence at the meta-community scale by creating a "neutral-like" pattern maintained by niche-differentiation.

  11. Heavy stable isotope separation by ion cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvet, P.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Larousse, B.; Patris, M.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific feasibility of the ion cyclotron resonance process (ICR), as well as the technical one, has been investigated carefully for light metallic elements, whose masses lies between 40 and 100/1,2/. The present work deals mainly with the same demonstration for heavier elements such as ytterbium, gadolinium and barium. Recent results, as well as future prospects, are considered here. (authors)

  12. External excitation of ion cyclotron drift waves in a two-ion species plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kando, M.; Ikezawa, S.; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Ion cyclotron drift waves propagating across a density gradient and a magnetic field have been excited externally in a two-ion species plasma, with its concentration ratio controlled. The measured dispersion relations agree with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  13. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  14. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Alexandra [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO2 and NO3) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH2]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  15. 2,6,10-Tris(dialkylamino)-trioxatriangulenium Ions. Synthesis, Structure, and Properties of Exceptionally Stable Carbenium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bo W.; Krebs, Frederik C; Nielsen, Merete F.

    1998-01-01

    is expressed as the pK(R+) value, which is determined in strongly basic nonaqueous solution on-the basis of a new acidity function C-. The pK(R+) value of 5a is measured to be 19.7, which is 10 orders of magnitude higher than the values found for the most stable carbenium ions previously reported...

  16. Latest developments at GANIL for stable and radioactive ion beam production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, P.; Barue, C.; Bajeat, O.; Canet, C.; Clement, E.; Cornell, J. C.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Flambard, J. L.; Fraanberg, H.; Frigot, R.; Leboucher, C.; Lecesne, N.; Lecomte, P.; Leherissier, P.; Lemagnen, F.; Leroy, R.; Maunoury, L.; Mery, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the frame of the SPIRAL II (Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Acceleres en Ligne Partie II) project, several developments of stable and radioactive ion production systems have been started up. In parallel, GANIL has the ambition to preserve the existing stable and radioactive beams and also to increase its range by offering new ones. In order to identify the best directions for this development, a new group called GANISOL has been formed. Its preliminary conclusions and the latest developments at GANIL are presented.

  17. ATLAS One of the first Heavy ions collisions with stable beams- Event Display - November 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    One of the first heavy ions collisions with stable beams recorded by ATLAS in November 2015. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as orange arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the Liquid Argon and Scintillating Tile calorimeters respectively. The beam pipe and the inner detectors are also shown.

  18. Heat stable peroxidases from Vigna species (V) | Mbassi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoots of three landraces of a Vigna species from two climatic areas of Cameroon were evaluated for their content of heat-resistant peroxidases. The peroxidase activity in the three landraces was detected with a greater catalytic efficiency for oxidation of O-dianisidine relative to ABTS (2, 2'-azino-bis-(3- ...

  19. 2,6,10-Tris(dialkylamino)trioxatriangulenium ions. Synthesis, structure, and properties of exceptionally stable carbenium ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B.W.; Krebs, Frederik C; Nielsen, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    A general synthetic route to a novel type of triamino-substituted planar carbenium ions (5) is reported. The synthetic method is based on a facile and selective nucleophilic aromatic substitution on the 4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)carbenium ion (1) with amines and gives access to a wide variety of more...... complex amino-substituted carbenium ions. X-ray crystallography shows that the cis(N-pyrrolidinyl)-4,8,12-trioxatriangulenium ion (5b) is planar and forms segregated stacks of cations and PF6 anions in the solid phase. The stability of the 2,6, 0-tris(diethylamino)- 4,8,12-trioxatriangulenium ion 5a...... is expressed as the pK(R+) value, which is determined in strongly basic nonaqueous solution on-the basis of a new acidity function C-. The pK(R+) value of 5a is measured to be 19.7, which is 10 orders of magnitude higher than the values found for the most stable carbenium ions previously reported...

  20. Ion Acceleration by Double Layers with Multi-Component Ion Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Timothy; Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; West Virginia University Team

    2017-10-01

    Current-free double layers (CFDL) models have been proposed to explain observations of magnetic field-aligned ion acceleration in plasmas expanding into divergent magnetic field regions. More recently, experimental studies of the Bohm sheath criterion in multiple ion species plasma reveal an equilibration of Bohm speeds at the sheath-presheath boundary for a grounded plate in a multipole-confined filament discharge. We aim to test this ion velocity effect for CFDL acceleration. We report high resolution ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) measurements using laser induced fluorescence downstream of a CFDL in a helicon plasma. Combinations of argon-helium, argon-krypton, and argon-xenon gases are ionized and measurements of argon or xenon IVDFs are investigated to determine whether ion acceleration is enhanced (or diminished) by the presence of lighter (or heavier) ions in the mix. We find that the predominant effect is a reduction of ion acceleration consistent with increased drag arising from increased gas pressure under all conditions, including constant total gas pressure, equal plasma densities of different ions, and very different plasma densities of different ions. These results suggest that the physics responsible for acceleration of multiple ion species in simple sheaths is not responsible for the ion acceleration observed in these expanding plasmas. Department of Physics, Gettysburg College.

  1. Active and Stable Methane Oxidation Nano-Catalyst with Highly-Ionized Palladium Species Prepared by Solution Combustion Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Khader

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and testing of active and stable nano-catalysts for methane oxidation. The nano-catalyst was palladium/ceria supported on alumina prepared via a one-step solution-combustion synthesis (SCS method. As confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM, SCS preparative methodology resulted in segregating both Pd and Ce on the surface of the Al2O3 support. Furthermore, HTEM showed that bigger Pd particles (5 nm and more were surrounded by CeO2, resembling a core shell structure, while smaller Pd particles (1 nm and less were not associated with CeO2. The intimate Pd-CeO2 attachment resulted in insertion of Pd ions into the ceria lattice, and associated with the reduction of Ce4+ into Ce3+ ions; consequently, the formation of oxygen vacancies. XPS showed also that Pd had three oxidation states corresponding to Pd0, Pd2+ due to PdO, and highly ionized Pd ions (Pd(2+x+ which might originate from the insertion of Pd ions into the ceria lattice. The formation of intrinsic Ce3+ ions, highly ionized (Pd2+ species inserted into the lattice of CeO2 Pd ions (Pd(2+x+ and oxygen vacancies is suggested to play a major role in the unique catalytic activity. The results indicated that the Pd-SCS nano-catalysts were exceptionally more active and stable than conventional catalysts. Under similar reaction conditions, the methane combustion rate over the SCS catalyst was ~18 times greater than that of conventional catalysts. Full methane conversions over the SCS catalysts occurred at around 400 °C but were not shown at all with conventional catalysts. In addition, contrary to the conventional catalysts, the SCS catalysts exhibited superior activity with no sign of deactivation in the temperature range between ~400 and 800 °C.

  2. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  3. Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, David; Lykke, Keith

    1998-01-01

    A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H.sup.+, D.sup.+, O.sup.+, N.sup.+, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H.sub.2 O, D.sub.2 O, O.sub.2, and SF.sub.6, among others, with the most effective being water (H.sub.2 O) and deuterated water (D.sub.2 O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H.sup.+) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D.sup.+). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H.sub.2.sup.+,H.sub.3.sup.+ and D.sub.2.sup.+, D.sub.3.sup.+, into the desired ion species, H.sup.+ and D.sup.+, respectively.

  4. Energetics of multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayer, P.; Berger, R. L.; Callahan, D.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; London, R. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P. A.; Ross, J. S.; Sorce, C.; Widmann, K.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-05-01

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmas at conditions similar to those expected in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with electron densities of 5.5×1020 and 9×1020cm-3 are heated by 14.3kJ of laser energy (wavelength 351nm) to electron temperatures of 3keV and backscattered laser light is measured. Landau damping of the ion acoustic waves is increased by adding hydrogen to a CO2 or CF4 gas. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering of a 351nm probe beam is found to decrease monotonically with increasing Landau damping, accompanied by a comparable increase in the transmission. More efficient energy coupling into the hohlraum by suppression of backscatter from the heater beams results in an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics. The reduction in backscatter is reproduced by linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale three-dimensional laser-plasma interaction simulations, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in inertial confinement fusion relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. These findings have led to the inclusion of multiple-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  5. Isolation and stable nitrogen isotope analysis of ammonium ions in ammonium nitrate prills using sodium tetraphenylborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howa, John D; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2014-07-15

    Because of the threat of bombings using improvised explosives containing ammonium nitrate (AN), law enforcement and intelligence communities have been interested in stable isotope techniques for tracking and discriminating AN sources. Separate analysis of the AN component ions ammonium and nitrate would add discriminatory power to these techniques. Ammonium ions in dissolved AN solution were isolated from samples by precipitation using sodium tetraphenylborate solution. We tested the isolation of ammonium from nitrates using solutions of ammonium and nitrate salts with different (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios. Ammonium tetraphenylborate and AN were separately analyzed for their (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios using EA-ConFlo-IRMS, and the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of the nitrate ions were calculated using mass balance. Ammonium and nitrate nitrogen isotope ratios were plotted as two separate variables. Isolation of ammonium precipitate from solutions containing dissolved nitrates did not influence the nitrogen isotope ratios of test ammonium salts. A survey set of 42 AN samples showed that the ammonium and nitrate (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios were not significantly correlated, and the paired mean differences were not statistically significant. Both ammonium and nitrate were depleted in (15)N relative to their theoretical atmospheric sources. Isolation of the ammonium ion from AN adds another dimension for the discrimination of forensic AN samples. This technique using sodium tetraphenylborate is robust and does not require specialized equipment. Our observations indicated that ammonium nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen have independent sources of isotopic variation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Stable isotope ratiometer-multiple ion detector (SIRMID) unit for quantitative and qualitative stable isotope studies by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, P.D.; Haumann, J.R.; Hachey, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    A stable isotope ratiometer-multiple ion detector (SIRMID) unit which can drive existing gas chromatograph-quadrupole or magnetic sector mass spectrometers to monitor up to six ions in turn is described. Each of the three pairs of ions can be selected for quantitation; thus three different or successive components can be analyzed in a single GC run. A background subtraction option permits the ion intensity in the absence of sample to be subtracted automatically during sample measurement. Displays of accumulated counts and isotope ratio are updated twice per second during the measurement and can be printed out at its conclusion. All six ions can be monitored in the analog mode by parallel outputs to a multipen recorder. Experience gained in the construction of this prototype indicates that SIRMID units could be commercially available for $10K, or about 1 / 3 rd to 1 / 6 th of the cost of even an inexpensive computer system. (U.S.)

  7. Collisional transport for a superthermal ion species in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.; Horton, W.

    1985-04-01

    The transport theory of a high energy ion species, injected isotropically in a magnetized plasma is considered for arbitrary values of Ω/sub HE/tau/sub sl/, Ω/sub HE/ being the high energy ion cyclotron frequency and tau/sub sl/ the slowing down time, respectively. The assumption of low density of the high energy species and the scaling on the velocities: v/sub i/ << v/sub HE/ << v/sub e/ are used to decouple the kinetic equation for the high energy species from the kinetic equation for background ions and electrons, and to simplify the cross collisional integrals. The kinetic equation is solved by a ''Chapman-Enskog'' expansion in the strength of the gradients; an equation for the first correction to the lowest order distribution function is obtained without scaling a priori the collision frequency with respect to the gyrofrequency. Various transport coefficients are explicitly calculated for the two cases of an unmagnetized and a strongly magnetized plasma

  8. Multi-species ion transport in ICF relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, Erik; Kagan, Grigory; Simakov, Andrei; Molvig, Kim; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Classical transport theory based on Chapman-Enskog methods provides self consistent approximations for kinetic fluxes of mass, heat and momentum for each ion species in a multi-ion plasma characterized with a small Knudsen number. A numerical method for solving the classic forms of multi-ion transport, self-consistently including heat and species mass fluxes relative to the center of mass, is given in [Kagan-Baalrud, arXiv '16] and similar transport coefficients result from recent derivations [Simakov-Molvig, PoP, '16]. We have implemented a combination of these methods in a standalone test code and in xRage, an adaptive-mesh radiation hydrodynamics code, at LANL. Transport mixing is examined between a DT fuel and a CH capsule shell in ICF conditions. The four ion species develop individual self-similar density profiles under the assumption of P-T equilibrium in 1D and show interesting early time transient pressure and center of mass velocity behavior when P-T equilibrium is not enforced. Some 2D results are explored to better understand the transport mix in combination with convective flow driven by macroscopic fluid instabilities at the fuel-capsule interface. Early transient and some 2D behaviors from the fluid transport are compared to kinetic code results. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program.

  9. Highly stable antibacterial silver nanoparticles as selective fluorescent sensor for Fe³⁺ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, Bharat A; Vyas, Disha J; Bhatt, Keyur D; Jain, Vinod K; Agrawal, Yadvendra K

    2015-01-05

    Calix[4]resorcinarene polyhydrazide (CPH) protected water dispersible fluorescent silver nanaoparticles (AgNps) were prepared by one-pot method using water soluble CPH and AgNO₃. (CPH) bearing hydrazide group on its periphery acts as a reducing agent and its web type of structure as a stabilizing agent for the formation of calix protected silver nanoparticles (CPH-AgNps). CPH-AgNps were found to be highly stable over 120 days at room temperature and at varied pH. CPH-AgNps were characterized by UV/Vis-spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Duly characterized nanoparticles were explored for their application as sensitive and selective fluorescent chemosensors for various metal ions. It was found that nanoparticles were selective and sensitive only for Fe(3+) ions with the linear range of detection from 0.1 μM to 10 μM. CPH-AgNps were also found to exhibit good antimicrobial activity when compared with standard Chloramphenicol. The selectivity and antimicrobial activity of CPH-AgNps suggests its potential use as a sensor for Fe(III) ions in ecosystems prone to industrial pollution and as an antimicrobial agent in biological applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Highly stable antibacterial silver nanoparticles as selective fluorescent sensor for Fe3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, Bharat A.; Vyas, Disha J.; Bhatt, Keyur D.; Jain, Vinod K.; Agrawal, Yadvendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Calix[4]resorcinarene polyhydrazide (CPH) protected water dispersible fluorescent silver nanaoparticles (AgNps) were prepared by one-pot method using water soluble CPH and AgNO3. (CPH) bearing hydrazide group on its periphery acts as a reducing agent and its web type of structure as a stabilizing agent for the formation of calix protected silver nanoparticles (CPH-AgNps). CPH-AgNps were found to be highly stable over 120 days at room temperature and at varied pH. CPH-AgNps were characterized by UV/Vis-spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Duly characterized nanoparticles were explored for their application as sensitive and selective fluorescent chemosensors for various metal ions. It was found that nanoparticles were selective and sensitive only for Fe3+ ions with the linear range of detection from 0.1 μM to 10 μM. CPH-AgNps were also found to exhibit good antimicrobial activity when compared with standard Chloramphenicol. The selectivity and antimicrobial activity of CPH-AgNps suggests its potential use as a sensor for Fe(III) ions in ecosystems prone to industrial pollution and as an antimicrobial agent in biological applications.

  11. Application of stable isotopes to investigate the metabolism of fatty acids, glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Josef; Liebisch, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Nature provides an enormous diversity of lipid molecules that originate from various pathways. To gain insight into the metabolism and dynamics of lipid species, the application of stable isotope-labeled tracers combined with mass spectrometric analysis represents a perfect tool. This review provides an overview of strategies to track fatty acid, glycerophospholipid, and sphingolipid metabolism. In particular, the selection of stable isotope-labeled precursors and their mass spectrometric analysis is discussed. Furthermore, examples of metabolic studies that were performed in cell culture, animal and clinical experiments are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stable coexistence of ecologically identical species: conspecific aggregation via reproductive interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokolainen, Lasse; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    Stable coexistence of ecologically identical species is not possible according to the established ecological theory. Many coexistence mechanisms have been proposed, but they all involve some form of ecological differentiation among the competing species. The aggregation model of coexistence would predict coexistence of identical species if there would be a mechanism that generates spatially aggregated distributions that are not completely correlated among the species. Our aim is to demonstrate that continued dispersal, triggered by reproductive interference between ecologically identical species, is such a mechanism. This study has been motivated by species using ephemeral patchy resources, such as decomposing fruits, fungal sporophores, carrion, and dung. We analyse an individual-based model with sexual reproduction, in which the progeny develops in ephemeral resource patches and the new generation disperses to a new set of patches. We assume spatially restricted dispersal, that patches differ in detectability, and that unmated females continue dispersal. In the model, reproductive interference (males spend some time searching for and/or attempting to mate with heterospecific females) reduces the mating rate of females, especially in the less common species, which leads to increased dispersal and reduces spatial correlation in species' distributions. For a wide range of parameter values, coexisting species show a systematic difference in their relative abundances due to two opposing forces: (1) uncommon species have reduced growth rate (Allee effect), which decreases abundance; (2) an abundance difference between the species reduces interspecific spatial correlation, which in turn reduces interspecific competition and allows the rarer species to persist at low density. Our results demonstrate a new mechanism for coexistence that is not based on ecological differentiation between species. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological

  13. Confined silicon nanospheres by biomass lignin for stable lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaoying; Zhou, Jinqiu; Qian, Tao; Wang, Mengfan; Yan, Chenglin

    2017-10-01

    Biomass lignin, as a significant renewable resource, is one of the most abundant natural polymers in the world. Here, we report a novel silicon-based material, in which lignin-derived functional conformal network crosslinks the silicon nanoparticles via self-assembly. This newly-developed material could greatly solve the problems of large volume change during lithiation/delithiation process and the formation of unstable solid electrolyte interphase layers on the silicon surface. With this anode, the battery demonstrates a high capacity of ˜3000 mA h g-1, a highly stable cycling retention (˜89% after 100 cycles at 300 mA g-1) and an excellent rate capability (˜800 mA h g-1 at 9 A g-1). Moreover, the feasibility of full lithium-ion batteries with the novel silicon-based material would provide wide range of applications in the field of flexible energy storage systems for wearable electronic devices.

  14. Highly stable carbon coated Mg2Si intermetallic nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirat, Andebet Gedamu; Hou, Mengyan; Liu, Yao; Bin, Duan; Sun, Yunhe; Fan, Long; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is an ideal candidate anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, it suffers from rapid capacity fading due to large volume expansion upon lithium insertion. Herein, we design and fabricate highly stable carbon coated porous Mg2Si intermetallic anode material using facile mechano-thermal technique followed by carbon coating using thermal vapour deposition (TVD), toluene as carbon source. The electrode exhibits an excellent first reversible capacity of 726 mAh g-1 at a rate of 100 mA g-1. More importantly, the electrode demonstrates high rate capability (380 mAh g-1 at high rate of 2 A g-1) as well as high cycle stability, with capacity retentions of 65% over 500 cycles. These improvements are attributable to both Mg supporting medium and the uniform carbon coating, which can effectively increase the conductivity and electronic contact of the active material and protects large volume alterations during the electrochemical cycling process.

  15. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, Magnus B; Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    both circumstances. No cerebral net exchange of Na(+) or K(+) was evident. Likewise, no significant net-exchange of water over the brain was demonstrated and the arterial and jugular venous hemoglobin concentrations were similar. CONCLUSION: Challenging exercise in hypoxia for 30 min affected muscle......Avnstorp, Magnus B., Peter Rasmussen, Patrice Brassard, Thomas Seifert, Morten Overgaard, Peter Krustrup, Niels H. Secher, and Nikolai B. Nordsborg. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise. High Alt Med Biol 16:000-000, 2015.-Background...... intense exercise is carried out in hypoxia and monitored the influence of muscle metabolism for changes in arterial variables. METHODS: On two separate days, in random order, 30 min cycling exercise was performed in either hypoxia (10% O2) or normoxia at an intensity that was exhaustive in the hypoxic...

  16. Stable water use efficiency under climate change of three sympatric conifer species at the Alpine treeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard eWieser

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of treeline associated conifers in the Central Alps to cope with recent climate warming and increasing CO2 concentration is still poorly understood. We determined tree ring stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of Pinus cembra, Picea abies and Larix decidua trees from 1975-2010. Stable isotope ratios were compared with leaf level gas exchange measurements carried out in situ between 1979 and 2007. Results indicate that tree ring derived intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE of P. cembra, P. abies and L. decidua remained constant during the last 36 years despite climate warming and rising atmospheric CO2. Temporal patterns in Δ13C and Δ18O mirrored leaf level gas exchange assessments, suggesting parallel increases of CO2-fixation and stomatal conductance of treeline conifer species. As at the study site soil water availability was not a limiting factor iWUE remained largely stable throughout the study period. The stability in iWUE was accompanied by an increase in basal area increment (BAI suggesting that treeline trees benefit from both recent climate warming and CO2 fertilization. Finally, our results suggest that iWUE may not change species composition at treeline in the Austrian Alps due to similar ecophysiological responses to climatic changes of the three sympatric study species.

  17. Stable Water Use Efficiency under Climate Change of Three Sympatric Conifer Species at the Alpine Treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Gerhard; Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Leo, Marco; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten Erhard Edgar

    2016-01-01

    The ability of treeline associated conifers in the Central Alps to cope with recent climate warming and increasing CO2 concentration is still poorly understood. We determined tree ring stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of Pinus cembra, Picea abies, and Larix decidua trees from 1975 to 2010. Stable isotope ratios were compared with leaf level gas exchange measurements carried out in situ between 1979 and 2007. Results indicate that tree ring derived intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) of P. cembra, P. abies and L. decidua remained constant during the last 36 years despite climate warming and rising atmospheric CO2. Temporal patterns in Δ(13)C and Δ(18)O mirrored leaf level gas exchange assessments, suggesting parallel increases of CO2-fixation and stomatal conductance of treeline conifer species. As at the study site soil water availability was not a limiting factor iWUE remained largely stable throughout the study period. The stability in iWUE was accompanied by an increase in basal area increment (BAI) suggesting that treeline trees benefit from both recent climate warming and CO2 fertilization. Finally, our results suggest that iWUE may not change species composition at treeline in the Austrian Alps due to similar ecophysiological responses to climatic changes of the three sympatric study species.

  18. Nitrate stable isotopes and major ions in snow and ice samples from four Svalbard sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Vega

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing reactive nitrogen (Nr deposition in the Arctic may adversely impact N-limited ecosystems. To investigate atmospheric transport of Nr to Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic, snow and firn samples were collected from glaciers and analysed to define spatial and temporal variations (1–10 years in major ion concentrations and the stable isotope composition (δ15N and δ18O of nitrate (NO3- across the archipelago. The δ15N NO3- and δ18ONO3- averaged −4‰ and 67‰ in seasonal snow (2010–11 and −9‰ and 74‰ in firn accumulated over the decade 2001–2011. East–west zonal gradients were observed across the archipelago for some major ions (non-sea salt sulphate and magnesium and also for δ15NNO3- and δ18ONO3- in snow, which suggests a different origin for air masses arriving in different sectors of Svalbard. We propose that snowfall associated with long-distance air mass transport over the Arctic Ocean inherits relatively low δ15NNO3- due to in-transport N isotope fractionation. In contrast, faster air mass transport from the north-west Atlantic or northern Europe results in snowfall with higher δ15NNO3- because in-transport fractionation of N is then time-limited.

  19. Miniaturizable Ion-Selective Arrays Based on Highly Stable Polymer Membranes for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mònica Mir

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinylchloride (PVC is the most common polymer matrix used in the fabrication of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs. However, the surfaces of PVC-based sensors have been reported to show membrane instability. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, here we developed two alternative methods for the preparation of highly stable and robust ion-selective sensors. These platforms are based on the selective electropolymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT, where the sulfur atoms contained in the polymer covalently interact with the gold electrode, also permitting controlled selective attachment on a miniaturized electrode in an array format. This platform sensor was improved with the crosslinking of the membrane compounds with poly(ethyleneglycol diglycidyl ether (PEG, thus also increasing the biocompatibility of the sensor. The resulting ISE membranes showed faster signal stabilization of the sensor response compared with that of the PVC matrix and also better reproducibility and stability, thus making these platforms highly suitable candidates for the manufacture of robust implantable sensors.

  20. Finding all multiple stable fixpoints of n-species Lotka-Volterra competition models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischke, Heike; Löffler, Thomas J

    2017-06-01

    One way to explore assembly of extant and novel communities from species pools, and by that biodiversity and species ranges, is to study the equilibrium behavior of dynamic competition models such as the Lotka-Volterra competition (LVC) model. We present a novel method (COMMUSTIX) to determine all stable fixpoints of the general LVC model with abundances x from a given pool of n species. To that purpose, we split the species in potentially surviving species (x i >0) and in others going extinct (x i =0). We derived criteria for the stability of x i =0 and for the equilibrium of x i >0 to determine possible combinations of extinct and surviving species by iteratively applying a mixed binary linear optimization algorithm. We tested this new method against (a) the numerical solution at equilibrium of the LVC ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and (b) the fixpoints of all combinations of surviving and extinct species (possible only for small n), tested for stability and non-negativity. The tests revealed that COMMUSTIX is reliable, it detects all multiple stable fixpoints (SFPs), which is not guaranteed by solving the ODEs, and more efficient than the combinations method. With COMMUSTIX, we studied the dependence of the fixpoint behavior on the competition strengths relative to the intra-specific competition. If inter-specific competition was considerably lower than intra-specific competition, only globally SFPs occurred. In contrast, if all inter-specific was higher than intra-specific competition, multiple SFPs consisting of only one species occurred. If competition strengths in the species pool ranged from below to above the intra-specific competition, either global or multiple SFPs strongly differing in species composition occurred. The species richness over all SFPs was high for pools of species with similar, either weak or strong competition, and lower for species with dissimilar or close to intra-specific competition strengths. The new approach is a reliable

  1. Species A rotavirus NSP3 acquires its translation inhibitory function prior to stable dimer formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo I Contreras-Treviño

    Full Text Available Species A rotavirus non-structural protein 3 (NSP3 is a translational regulator that inhibits or, under some conditions, enhances host cell translation. NSP3 binds to the translation initiation factor eIF4G1 and evicts poly-(A binding protein (PABP from eIF4G1, thus inhibiting translation of polyadenylated mRNAs, presumably by disrupting the effect of PABP bound to their 3'-ends. NSP3 has a long coiled-coil region involved in dimerization that includes a chaperone Hsp90-binding domain (HS90BD. We aimed to study the role in NSP3 dimerization of a segment of the coiled-coil region adjoining the HS90BD. We used a vaccinia virus system to express NSP3 with point mutations in conserved amino acids in the coiled-coil region and determined the effects of these mutations on translation by metabolic labeling of proteins as well as on accumulation of stable NSP3 dimers by non-dissociating Western blot, a method that separates stable NSP3 dimers from the monomer/dimerization intermediate forms of the protein. Four of five mutations reduced the total yield of NSP3 and the formation of stable dimers (W170A, K171E, R173E and R187E:K191E, whereas one mutation had the opposite effects (Y192A. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 revealed that stable NSP3 dimers and monomers/dimerization intermediates are susceptible to proteasome degradation. Surprisingly, mutants severely impaired in the formation of stable dimers were still able to inhibit host cell translation, suggesting that NSP3 dimerization intermediates are functional. Our results demonstrate that rotavirus NSP3 acquires its function prior to stable dimer formation and remain as a proteasome target throughout dimerization.

  2. Resolving the trophic relations of cryptic species: an example using stable isotope analysis of dolphin teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Owen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the foraging ecology and diet of animals can play a crucial role in conservation of a species. This is particularly true where species are cryptic and coexist in environments where observing feeding behaviour directly is difficult. Here we present the first information on the foraging ecology of a recently identified species of dolphin (Southern Australian bottlenose dolphin (SABD and comparisons to the common bottlenose dolphin (CBD in Victoria, Australia, using stable isotope analysis of teeth. Stable isotope signatures differed significantly between SABD and CBD for both δ(13C (-14.4‰ vs. -15.5‰ respectively and δ(15N (15.9‰ vs. 15.0‰ respectively, suggesting that the two species forage in different areas and consume different prey. This finding supports genetic and morphological data indicating that SABD are distinct from CBD. In Victoria, the SABD is divided into two distinct populations, one in the large drowned river system of Port Phillip Bay and the other in a series of coastal lakes and lagoons called the Gippsland Lakes. Within the SABD species, population differences were apparent. The Port Phillip Bay population displayed a significantly higher δ(15N than the Gippsland Lakes population (17.0‰ vs. 15.5‰, suggesting that the Port Phillip Bay population may feed at a higher trophic level--a result which is supported by analysis of local food chains. Important future work is required to further understand the foraging ecology and diet of this newly described, endemic, and potentially endangered species of dolphin.

  3. Stable cyclic performance of nickel oxide–carbon composite anode for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susantyoko, Rahmat Agung; Wang, Xinghui; Fan, Yu; Xiao, Qizhen; Fitzgerald, Eugene; Pey, Kin Leong; Zhang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) directly grown on nickel foam is regarded as a promising lithium ion battery anode material which shows good cyclic and rate performances with a theoretical specific capacity of 718 mA h g −1 . In this study, we demonstrated a carbon-incorporated NiO anode (NiO–C) with a capacity per unit area of 2.11 mA h cm −2 and 1.76 mA h cm −2 at 0.2 C and 0.5 C rates, respectively, fabricated by thermal oxidation of carbon coated nickel foam. The specific capacity of our NiO–C composite samples at 0.5 C rate is found to be typically 389.16 mA h g −1 , with a stable cyclic performance up to more than 100 cycles. This remarkable performance is apparently superior to the control samples of pure NiO samples. The improved performance is contributed to carbon incorporation which serves as a fluent channel for electrons and a flexible network preventing NiO nanostructures from structural deformation during charge and discharge processes. The advantage of using our approach is the easy preparation of the NiO–C composite using a simple two-step process: chemical vapor deposition of ethanol and annealing in air. - Highlights: • We demonstrated a directly grown NiO–C anode on nickel foam substrate. • NiO–C anode was made using simple processes: CVD of ethanol and annealing in air. • The NiO–C anode has a stable cycle life up to 102 cycles. • It has an acceptable areal capacity (1.76 mA h cm −2 at 0.5 C rate) for practical use. • Carbon provides electrons path and buffering matrix preventing NiO pulverization

  4. One of the first heavy-ion collisions with stable beams recorded by ATLAS in November 2015.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    One of the first heavy-ion collisions with stable beams recorded by ATLAS in November 2015. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as orange arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the Liquid Argon and Scintillating Tile calorimeters respectively.

  5. High-Temperature Stable Anatase Titanium Oxide Nanofibers for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Eom, Wonsik; Park, Hun; Han, Tae Hee

    2017-08-02

    Control of the crystal structure of electrochemically active materials is an important approach to fabricating high-performance electrodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Here, we report a methodology for controlling the crystal structure of TiO 2 nanofibers by adding aluminum isopropoxide to a common sol-gel precursor solution utilized to create TiO 2 nanofibers. The introduction of aluminum cations impedes the phase transformation of electrospun TiO 2 nanofibers from the anatase to the rutile phase, which inevitably occurs in the typical annealing process utilized for the formation of TiO 2 crystals. As a result, high-temperature stable anatase TiO 2 nanofibers were created in which the crystal structure was well-maintained even at high annealing temperatures of up to 700 °C. Finally, the resulting anatase TiO 2 nanofibers were utilized to prepare LIB anodes, and their electrochemical performance was compared to pristine TiO 2 nanofibers that contain both anatase and rutile phases. Compared to the electrode prepared with pristine TiO 2 nanofibers, the electrode prepared with anatase TiO 2 nanofibers exhibited excellent electrochemical performances such as an initial Coulombic efficiency of 83.9%, a capacity retention of 89.5% after 100 cycles, and a rate capability of 48.5% at a current density of 10 C (1 C = 200 mA g -1 ).

  6. Determination of the Geographical Origin of All Commercial Hake Species by Stable Isotope Ratio (SIR) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Mónica; Gallardo, José M

    2017-02-08

    The determination of the geographical origin of food products is relevant to comply with the legal regulations of traceability, to avoid food fraud, and to guarantee food quality and safety to the consumers. For these reasons, stable isotope ratio (SIR) analysis using an isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) instrument is one of the most useful techniques for evaluating food traceability and authenticity. The present study was aimed to determine, for the first time, the geographical origin for all commercial fish species belonging to the Merlucciidae family using SIR analysis of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N). The specific results enabled their clear classification according to the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) fishing areas, latitude, and geographical origin in the following six different clusters: European, North African, South African, North American, South American, and Australian hake species.

  7. Freedom: a transient fission-product release model for radioactive and stable species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, L.D.; Lewis, B.J.; Iglesias, F.C.

    1989-05-01

    A microstructure-dependent fission-gas release and swelling model (FREEDOM) has been developed for UO 2 fuel. The model describes the transient release behaviour for both the radioactive and stable fission-product species. The model can be applied over the full range of operating conditions, as well as for accident conditions that result in high fuel temperatures. The model accounts for lattice diffusion and grain-boundary sweeping of fusion products to the grain boundaries, where the fission gases accumulate in grain-face bubbles as a result of vacancy diffusion. Release of fission-gas to the free void of the fuel element occurs through the interlinkage of bubbles and cracks on the grain boundaries. This treatment also accounts for radioactive chain decay and neutron-induced transmutation effects. These phenomena are described by mass balance equations which are numerically solved using a moving-boundary, finite-element method with mesh refinement. The effects of grain-face bubbles on fuel swelling and fuel thermal conductivity are included in the ELESIM fuel performance code. FREEDOM has an accuracy of better than 1% when assessed against an analytic solution for diffusional release. The code is being evaluated against a fuel performance database for stable gas release, and against sweep-gas and in-cell fission-product release experiments at Chalk River for active species

  8. Experimental studies of ion flow near the sheath edge in multiple ion species plasma including argon, xenon and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severn, Greg; Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-05-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion was studied with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. It was found in the first LIF studies of three ion species plasma (Yip et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 050703) in which krypton was added to a mixture of argon and xenon plasma confined in a multidipole, dc hot filament discharge, that the addition of krypton served to turn off instability enhanced collisional friction (IEF) found in two ion species plasma (Yip et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas). In this study, neon, a less massive atomic gas than argon was added. Argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) were measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate, and the Ne+ density was systematically increased. We found in both cases that once the added ion density significantly exceeded the density of the other two ions, IVDF measurements consistent with the absence of the instability were obtained, and the measured ion sheath edge speeds tended toward their individual Bohm velocities. For all other relative concentrations, the ions reached the sheath edge neither at their Bohm speeds nor the ion sound speed of the system, consistent, qualitatively, with the action of the IEF.

  9. Long-term stable transmission of 3-keV Ne{sup 7+} ions guided through nanocapillaries in polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N., E-mail: nico@stolterfoht.com [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fnr Materialien und Energie, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Herczku, P.; Juhász, Z.; Kovács, S.T.S.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Sulik, B. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), 4001 Debrecen (Hungary)

    2016-11-15

    We studied blocking effects on 3-keV Ne{sup 7+} ion guiding through nanocapillaries in highly insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) manufactured at different laboratories. The experiments were motivated in view of previous measurement with PET capillaries prepared at the GSI Helmholtz-Zentrum for which significant blocking effects were observed, whereas in various previous studies with PET capillaries these effects could not be detected. As the blocking effect on the GSI capillaries strongly depends on their areal density, similar dependencies were studied with the FLNR capillaries. Long-term stable transmission was observed for all densities of the FLNR capillaries in contrast to the previous results. These observations are interpreted by differences in the capillary surface conductivities in accordance with charge patch formations within the capillaries. It is pointed out that the observed stable transmission is favorable for applications of ion guiding in capillaries.

  10. Long-term stable transmission of 3-keV Ne7+ ions guided through nanocapillaries in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Herczku, P.; Juhász, Z.; Kovács, S.T.S.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Sulik, B.

    2016-01-01

    We studied blocking effects on 3-keV Ne 7+ ion guiding through nanocapillaries in highly insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) manufactured at different laboratories. The experiments were motivated in view of previous measurement with PET capillaries prepared at the GSI Helmholtz-Zentrum for which significant blocking effects were observed, whereas in various previous studies with PET capillaries these effects could not be detected. As the blocking effect on the GSI capillaries strongly depends on their areal density, similar dependencies were studied with the FLNR capillaries. Long-term stable transmission was observed for all densities of the FLNR capillaries in contrast to the previous results. These observations are interpreted by differences in the capillary surface conductivities in accordance with charge patch formations within the capillaries. It is pointed out that the observed stable transmission is favorable for applications of ion guiding in capillaries.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Four Calypogeia Species Revealed Unexpected Change in Evolutionarily-Stable Liverwort Mitogenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ślipiko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Liverwort mitogenomes are considered to be evolutionarily stable. A comparative analysis of four Calypogeia species revealed differences compared to previously sequenced liverwort mitogenomes. Such differences involve unexpected structural changes in the two genes, cox1 and atp1, which have lost three and two introns, respectively. The group I introns in the cox1 gene are proposed to have been lost by two-step localized retroprocessing, whereas one-step retroprocessing could be responsible for the disappearance of the group II introns in the atp1 gene. These cases represent the first identified losses of introns in mitogenomes of leafy liverworts (Jungermanniopsida contrasting the stability of mitochondrial gene order with certain changes in the gene content and intron set in liverworts.

  12. Design for simultaneous acceleration of stable and unstable beams in a superconducting heavy-ion linear accelerator for RISP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwon; Son, Hyock-Jun; Park, Young-Ho

    2017-11-01

    The post-accelerator of isotope separation on-line (ISOL) system for rare isotope science project (RISP) is a superconducting linear accelerator (SC-linac) with a DC equivalent voltage of around 160 MV. An isotope beam extracted from the ISOL is in a charge state of 1+ and its charge state is increased to n+ by charge breeding with an electron beam ion source (EBIS). The charge breeding takes tens of ms and the pulse width of extracted beam from the EBIS is tens of μs, which operates at up to 30 Hz. Consequently a large portion of radio frequency (rf) time of the post SC-linac is unused. The post-linac is equipped also with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for stable ion acceleration. Thanks to the large phase acceptance of SC-linac, it is possible to accelerate simultaneously both stable and radioisotope ions with a similar charge to mass ratio by sharing rf time. This operation scheme is implemented for RISP with the addition of an electric chopper and magnetic kickers. The facility will be capable of providing the users of the ISOL and in-flight fragmentation (IF) systems with different beams simultaneously, which would help nuclear science users in obtaining a beam time as high-precision measurements often need long hours.

  13. Mercury Trapped Ion Frequency Standard for Ultra-Stable Reference Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Hamell, Robert L. (Inventor); Tucker, Blake C. (Inventor); Larsen, Kameron (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An atomic clock including an ion trap assembly, a C-field coil positioned for generating a first magnetic field in the interrogation region of the ion trap assembly, a compensation coil positioned for generating a second magnetic field in the interrogation region, wherein the combination of the first and second magnetic fields produces an ion number-dependent second order Zeeman shift (Zeeman shift) in the resonance frequency that is opposite in sign to an ion number-dependent second order Doppler shift (Doppler shift) in the resonance frequency, the C-field coil has a radius selected using data indicating how changes in the radius affect an ion-number-dependent shift in the resonance frequency, such that a difference in magnitude between the Doppler shift and the Zeeman shift is controlled or reduced, and the resonance frequency, including the adjustment by the Zeeman shift, is used to obtain the frequency standard.

  14. Drift mode in a bounded plasma having two-ion species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Ali; Sajid, M.; Saleem, H.

    2008-01-01

    The drift wave is investigated in a two-ion species plasma in several different cases. The global drift mode is studied in a plasma bounded in a cylinder having Gaussian density profile corresponding to different poloidal wavenumbers. The frequency of the mode becomes a little larger when it is investigated without including the ion cyclotron wave dynamics. The effect of magnetic shear on the wave propagation along the density gradient is studied in a Cartesian geometry assuming absorbing boundary. It is found that the wave amplitude is reduced when two-ion species are present (with the same concentration) compared to pure electron-ion plasma

  15. Stable propagation of light-ion beam in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, T.; Murakami, H.

    1996-01-01

    The stabilization mechanism of the filamentation instability for a light ion beam (LIB) penetrating plasma is investigated. For the stabilization of the filamentation instability, external magnetic field which is parallel to the direction of the light ion beam propagation is applied. Linear growth rates of filamentation instabilities in a light ion beam-plasma system with an external magnetic field were obtained by means of a dispersion relation. Numerical simulations were carried out using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The stabilizing mechanism of the filamentation instability is described. The theory and simulation comparisons illustrate the results. (author). 1 tab., 1 fig., 10 refs

  16. Synthetical Analysis for Morphology, biological Species, and stable Isotopes (SAMSI) of single-cell planktonic foraminifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Y.; Kimoto, K.; Ishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifers are widely used in the studies of paleontology and paleoceanography, because the morphology of their calcareous shells is enough highly variable to identify the morphospecies and the chemical composition of the shells reflect ambient seawater condition. Although the morphospecies were believed to represent environments associating with latitudinal temperature range of the world ocean, molecular phylogeographic studies have unveiled the presence of multiple biological species in a single morphospecies and their species-specific distributions. This implicates the actual complexity of planktonic foraminiferal ecology. Conversely, these biological species have a high potential for providing novel ecological and environmental information to us. In order to reassess the morphological and geochemical characters of biological species, the DNA extraction method with the guanidium isothiocyanate buffer was developed to preserve the calcareous shells. The present study carefully tested the physical and chemical damages of the DNA extraction process to the shells, by our novel approaches with geochemical analysis of the shells after non-destructive analysis for morphometrics on a same specimen. First, we checked the changes of the shell densities between pre- and post-DNA extraction by using the micro-focus X-ray CT (MXCT) scanning. Based on the simultaneous measurement of a sample and the standard material, we confirmed no significant changes to the shell densities through the DNA extraction process. As a next step, we compared stable oxygen and carbon isotopes among individuals of three sample sets: (1) no chemical and incubation as control, (2) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 40 minutes as standard way, and (3) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 120 minutes, by using the microscale isotopic analytical system (MICAL3c). Consequently, there were no significant differences among the three sample sets. These

  17. A comparison of stable caesium uptake by six grass species of contrasting growth strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willey, N.J.; Martin, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    Six plants in the family Gramineae were used to investigate the relationship between Cs uptake, nutrient regime and plant growth strategy sensu Grime (1979: Plant Growth Strategies and Vegetation Processes, John Wiley). The roots of 66 day old Elymus repens (L.) Gould., Bromus sterilis L., Agrostis stolonifera L., Anthoxanthum odoratum L., Festuca ovina L. and Nardus stricta L. plants grown in acid-washed sand at high and low nutrient levels were exposed to a 96 h pulse of stable Cs at 0.05 mM, 0.15 mM, 0.3 mM, 1.0 mM and 3.0 mM concentrations. Different nutrient regimes induced large differences in dry wt in E. repens, B. sterilis and A. stolonifera plants but only small differences in N. stricta and F. ovina plants. At high nutrient concentrations, A. stolonifera, A. odoratum, F. ovina and N. stricta shoots showed significantly greater increases in internal Cs concentration with rising external Cs concentrations than did E. repens and B. sterilis shoots. The relationship between increases in shoot and external Cs concentrations was statistically indistinguishable between species in plants grown at the low nutrient concentration. These patterns of Cs uptake ensured that with long-term high K concentrations the more competitive plants (E. repens and B. sterilis) accumulated higher concentrations of Cs from low external concentrations than did non-competitive plants or competitive plants grown at low nutrient levels. It is suggested that the relationship between plant growth strategy sensu Grime (1979) and Cs accumulation patterns may help to explain the different concentrations to which species accumulate radiocaesium from the soil. (author)

  18. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, E.; Scheckel, K.; Sekine, R.; Popelka-Filcoff, R.S.; Bennett, J.W.; Brunetti, G.; Naidu, R.; McGrath, S.P.; Lombi, E.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with 110m Ag showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO 3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 μg/kg (0.002–3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability. - Highlights: • Biosolids silver (Ag) concentrations appear to have decreased in recent decades. • Ag 2 S dominates Ag speciation in freshly produced sludge. • Ag 2 S is also the dominant species in aged biosolids. • Upon land application biosolids will mainly contain Ag-sulfides and have low isotopic lability. - Analysis of historic and contemporary biosolids from three continents indicated decreasing wastewater silver releases, and non-labile, extremely stable silver speciation

  19. Rational Functionalization of Perylene Diimide for Stable Capacity and Long-term Cycling Performance for Li-ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M, Veerababu; R, Kothandaraman

    2017-01-01

    Perylene based dilithium salt of N,N'-bis (glycinyl) perylene diimide (Li 2 -PDI) was synthesized and studied as an electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. The −CH 2 −COOLi functionalization of perylene diimide is a simple strategy to mitigate the dissolution of the monomer in the electrolyte. The Li 2 -PDI electrode exhibits excellent capacity retention behaviour and delivers a stable specific capacity of 101 mAh g −1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 17 mA g −1 , which is 98% of theoretical specific capacity. A remarkably stable capacity of 87 mAh g −1 was observed even after 1000 cycles with 100% coulombic efficiency at a current density of 200 mA g −1 . The reversible electrochemical lithiation/delithiation mechanism of Li 2 -PDI was studied by ex-situ XRD and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Effect of ion species on apatite-forming ability of silicone elastomer substrates irradiated by cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashita, Masakazu [Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1306-1 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: m-kawa@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Araki, Rei; Takaoka, Gikan H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Indwelling catheters made of silicone elastomers sometimes cause serious infections owing to their poor biocompatibility. It is believed that these infections can be prevented by coating the silicone surface with apatite, which has excellent biocompatibility. If the surface of the silicone elastomer is in advance modified to have an apatite-forming ability, apatite can be coated on the modified silicone surface by soaking it in an aqueous solution such as a simulated body fluid (SBF) supersaturated with respect to apatite. In this study, silicone substrates were irradiated by four types of ion beams (Ar cluster, Ar cluster and monomer (Ar CM), O{sub 2} cluster, and O{sub 2} cluster and monomer (O{sub 2} CM) ion beams) at an acceleration voltage of 7 kV and a dose of 1 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and subsequently soaked in CaCl{sub 2} solution. The apatite-forming abilities of the substrates were examined using a metastable calcium phosphate solution whose ion concentration was 1.5 times that of SBF (1.5 SBF). Silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) clusters were formed on the silicone surface and the hydrophilicity of the substrates was improved by the irradiation, irrespective of the ion species used. The irradiation with O{sub 2} CM ion beams resulted in the highest apatite-forming ability among the analyzed ion beams.

  1. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Charged Species in the Afterglow of Plasmas Containing Negative Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor

    2000-10-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of charged species densities and wall fluxes during the afterglow of an electronegative discharge have been investigated. It was found that the decay of a plasma with negative ions is quite different than that of an electropositive plasma. Decay of a plasma with negative ions consists of two stages. During the first stage, electrons dominate plasma diffusion and negative ions are trapped inside the vessel by the static electric field; the flux of negative ions to the walls is nearly zero. During the second stage of the afterglow, electrons have disappeared, and positive and negative ions diffuse to the walls with the ion-ion ambipolar diffusion coefficient. The transition time between two stages depends greatly on ratio of ion (T_i) and electron (T_e) temperatures. Theories for plasma decay have been developed for equal and strongly different ion and electron temperatures. In the case T_i=T_e, the species spatial profiles are similar and an analytic solution exists. When detachment is important in the afterglow the plasma decay crucially depends on the product of negative ion detachment frequency and diffusion time. If this factor is larger than two, negative ions convert to electrons during their diffusion towards the walls. The presence of detached electrons results in ``self-trapping" of the negative ions, due to emerging electric fields, and the negative ion flux to the walls is extremely small. Thus, negative ions can be extracted in the afterglow only if detachment is small. In case T_inew type of nonlinear structure, different from conventional hydrodynamic nonlinear waves.

  2. Ion transport properties of mechanically stable symmetric ABCBA pentablock copolymers with quaternary ammonium functionalized midblock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertem, S. Piril [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive Amherst Massachusetts 01003; Caire, Benjamin R. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado 80401; Tsai, Tsung-Han [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive Amherst Massachusetts 01003; Zeng, Di [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive Amherst Massachusetts 01003; Vandiver, Melissa A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado 80401; Kusoglu, Ahmet [Energy Conversion Group, Energy Technologies Area, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California 94720; Seifert, Soenke [Energy Conversion Group, Energy Technologies Area, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California 94720; Hayward, Ryan C. [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive Amherst Massachusetts 01003; Weber, Adam Z. [Energy Conversion Group, Energy Technologies Area, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California 94720; Herring, Andrew M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado 80401; Coughlin, E. Bryan [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive Amherst Massachusetts 01003; Liberatore, Matthew W. [Department of Chemical Engineering Department, University of Toledo, 2801 W Bancroft Street MS305 Toledo Ohio 43606

    2017-02-07

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) are a promising class of materials for applications that require selective ion transport, such as fuel cells, water purification, and electrolysis devices. Studies of structure–morphology–property relationships of ion-exchange membranes revealed that block copolymers exhibit improved ion conductivity and mechanical properties due to their microphase-separated morphologies with well-defined ionic domains. While most studies focused on symmetric diblock or triblock copolymers, here, the first example of a midblock quaternized pentablock AEM is presented. A symmetric ABCBA pentablock copolymer was functionalized to obtain a midblock brominated polymer. Solution cast films were then quaternized to obtain AEMs with resulting ion exchange capacities (IEC) ranging from 0.4 to 0.9 mmol/g. Despite the relatively low IEC, the polymers were highly conductive (up to 60 mS/cm Br2 at 90 8C and 95%RH) with low water absorption (<25 wt %) and maintained adequate mechanical properties in both dry and hydrated conditions. Xray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed formation of cylindrical non-ionic domains in a connected ionic phase.

  3. Distribution of positive ion species above a diffuse midnight aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the hot plasma in the Earth's magnetosphere is still open to investigation. Mass composition is an indicator of source region, while the distribution functions bear the signatures of transport and energization processes. Only ions identified as H + and He ++ were detected, and the He ++ was statistically marginal. Coincident magnetic storms are likely to play a crucial role in populating the magnetosphere with energized ionospheric ions. The measured proton distribution was nearly isotropic over downcoming pitch angles at all energies and showed a depleted atmospheric source cone. The high-altitude proton energy distribution had a best fit temperature of 4.5 keV and a number density of 0.17 cm- 3 , corresponding to a peak intensity just over 10 5 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 keV -1 . Altitudinal variations are consistent with the theory of charge exchange of a time-steady incident proton population. Simultaneous electron measurements can be interpreted in terms of an incident electron distribution that is also thermal wih a similar number density but a temperature of 2.5 keV. Taken together, the ion and electron data are consistent with the model of diffuse auroras in which plasma convecting in from the magnetospheric tail precipitates due to strong pitch angle diffusion on auroral field lines linking the near Earth plasma sheet

  4. Porous one-dimensional carbon/iron oxide composite for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries with high and stable capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jiadeng, E-mail: jzhu14@ncsu.edu; Lu, Yao, E-mail: ylu14@ncsu.edu; Chen, Chen, E-mail: cchen20@ncsu.edu; Ge, Yeqian, E-mail: yge3@ncsu.edu; Jasper, Samuel, E-mail: smjasper@ncsu.edu; Leary, Jennifer D., E-mail: jdleary@ncsu.edu; Li, Dawei, E-mail: ldw19900323@163.com; Jiang, Mengjin, E-mail: mjiang5@ncsu.edu; Zhang, Xiangwu, E-mail: xiangwu_zhang@ncsu.edu

    2016-07-05

    Hematite iron oxide (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is considered to be a prospective anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of its high theoretical capacity (1007 mAh g{sup −1}), nontoxicity, and low cost. However, the low electrical conductivity and large volume change during Li insertion/extraction of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hinder its use in practical batteries. In this study, carbon-coated α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofibers, prepared via an electrospinning method followed by a thermal treatment process, are employed as the anode material for LIBs. The as-prepared porous nanofibers with a carbon content of 12.5 wt% show improved cycling performance and rate capability. They can still deliver a high and stable capacity of 715 mAh g{sup −1} even at superior high current density of 1000 mA g{sup −1} after 200 cycles with a large Coulombic efficiency of 99.2%. Such improved electrochemical performance can be assigned to their unique porous fabric structure as well as the conductive carbon coating which shorten the distance for Li ion transport, enhancing Li ion reversibility and kinetic properties. It is, therefore, demonstrated that carbon-coated α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofiber prepared under optimized conditions is a promising anode material candidate for LIBs. - Graphical abstract: Carbon-coated α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofibers are employed as anode material to achieve high and stable electrochemical performance for lithium-ion batteries, enhancing their commercial viability. - Highlights: • α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/C nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning and thermal treatment. • α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/C nanofibers exhibit stable cyclability and good rate capability. • α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–C nanofibers maintain high capacity at 1000 mA g{sup −1} for 200 cycles. • A capacity retention of 99.2% is achieved by α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–C nanofibers after 200 cycles.

  5. Highly Stable Aqueous Zinc-ion Storage Using Layered Calcium Vanadium Oxide Bronze Cathode

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2018-02-12

    Cost-effective aqueous rechargeable batteries are attractive alternatives to non-aqueous cells for stationary grid energy storage. Among different aqueous cells, zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs), based on Zn2+ intercalation chemistry, stand out as they can employ high-capacity Zn metal as anode material. Herein, we report a layered calcium vanadium oxide bronze as cathode material for aqueous Zn batteries. For the storage of Zn2+ ions in aqueous electrolyte, we demonstrate that calcium based bronze structure can deliver a high capacity of 340 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C, good rate capability and very long cycling life (96% retention after 3000 cycles at 80 C). Further, we investigate the Zn2+ storage mechanism, and the corresponding electrochemical kinetics in this bronze cathode. Finally, we show that our Zn cell delivers an energy density of 267 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 53.4 W kg-1.

  6. Towards a stable ion-solvating polymer electrolyte for advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Wright, Andrew G.; Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær

    2017-01-01

    Advanced alkaline water electrolysis using ion-solvating polymer membranes as electrolytes represents a new direction in the field of electrochemical hydrogen production. Polybenzimidazole membranes equilibrated in aqueous KOH combine the mechanical robustness and gas-tightness of a polymer......-dimensional electrodes completely free from noble metals, they show polarization characteristics comparable to those of commercially available separators and good performance stability over several days....

  7. Nuclear Structure Studies with Stable and Radioactive Beams: The SPES radioactive ion beam project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; SPES Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  8. Behaviour of selenium and tellurium species and their determination by ion chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzoniti, M.C.; Mentasti, E.; Sarzanini, C. [Turin Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Analitica; Cavalli, S. [Laboratorio Applicazioni, Dionex S.r.l, Pieve Emanuele (Italy)

    1997-07-01

    An ion chromatographic method has been developed for the separation of Te(IV) and Se(IV) in hydrochloric acid mobile phases; the method has been used to determine tellurium in a high-purity non-stoichiometric semiconducting ZnCdTe-based material. Different cation-exchange columns (IonPac CS2, CS3, CS10), a mixed bed ion-exchange column (IonPac CS5), a multi-mode cation-exchange column (OmniPac PCX-500), anion-exchange columns (IonPac AS4, AS4A, AS5, AS5A, AS10, AS11) and a multi-mode anion-exchange column (OmniPac PAX-500) were evaluated for ion chromatographic separation of Se and Te and to study the chemical forms in which the analytes were eluted. The chromatographic data obtained enabled the calculation of both the sign and the charge of the eluting species. (orig.)

  9. A stable production of intense electron beam plasma with ion back stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uramoto, Johshin.

    1975-12-01

    An intense electron beam is extracted without space charge limit from a dc plasma source along a magnetic field. The beam space charge is neutralized stably through back streaming of self-ionized ions from the beam extracting anode region where a neutral gas is fed locally. In Appendix I, a space charge free electron gun is designed under this neutralization method. In Appendix II, a dynamic discharge through a series resistance is described, where an operative mechanism of the well-known TP-D plasma is clarified. (auth.)

  10. Stable interstitial layer to alleviate fatigue fracture of high nickel cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengkai; Shao, Ruiwen; Mi, Yingying; Shen, Lanyao; Zhao, Binglu; wang, Qian; Wu, Kai; Lui, Wen; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Henghui

    2018-02-01

    High nickel cathodes can deliver higher capacity with lower cost than conventional LiCoO2, however, the irreversible structural and morphology degradation with long-term cycling hinder their further application. In this paper, LiNi0.815Co0.15Al0.035O2 agglomerates are treated by LiNi0.333Co0.333Mn0.333O2 coating to get a stable interstitial layer without capacity loss. The interstitial layer is about 10 nm in thickness and has a layered (R-3m) structure, which can improve the chemical and mechanical stability of cathode materials with capacity retention of 88.5% after 200 cycles. The structural analysis and in-situ compression test proves that the morphology degradation is a fatigue process within long-term electrochemical reaction, and the coated sample has an excellent elastic recovery capacity thus leading to long cycle life.

  11. Ion beam induced surface pattern formation and stable travelling wave solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Smith, Roger

    2013-03-06

    The formation of ripple structures on ion bombarded semiconductor surfaces is examined theoretically. Previous models are discussed and a new nonlinear model is formulated, based on the infinitesimal local atomic relocation induced by elastic nuclear collisions in the early stages of collision cascades and an associated density change in the near surface region. Within this framework ripple structures are shown to form without the necessity to invoke surface diffusion or large sputtering as important mechanisms. The model can also be extended to the case where sputtering is important, and it is shown that in this case certain 'magic' angles can occur at which the ripple patterns are most clearly defined. The results are in very good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. A universal carbonate ion effect on stable oxygen isotope ratios in unicellular planktonic calcifying organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ziveri, P.; Thoms, S.; Probert, I.; Geisen, M.; Langer, H.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of calcium carbonate of planktonic calcifying organisms is a key tool for reconstructing both past seawater temperature and salinity. The calibration of paloeceanographic proxies relies in general on empirical relationships derived from field experiments on extant species. Laboratory experiments have more often than not revealed that variables other than the target parameter influence the proxy signal, which makes proxy c...

  13. Trace element and stable isotope analysis of fourteen species of marine invertebrates from the Bay of Fundy, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Matthew D; Robertson, Gregory J; Mallory, Mark L

    2015-12-15

    The Bay of Fundy, Canada, is a macrotidal bay with a highly productive intertidal zone, hosting a large abundance and diversity of marine invertebrates. We analysed trace element concentrations and stable isotopic values of δ(15)N and δ(13)C in 14 species of benthic marine invertebrates from the Bay of Fundy's intertidal zone to investigate bioaccumulation or biodilution of trace elements in the lower level of this marine food web. Barnacles (Balanus balanus) consistently had significantly greater concentrations of trace elements compared to the other species studied, but otherwise we found low concentrations of non-essential trace elements. In the range of trophic levels that we studied, we found limited evidence of bioaccumulation or biodilution of trace elements across species, likely due to the species examined occupying similar trophic levels in different food chains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transport of a multiple ion species plasma in the Pfirsch--Schluter regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshman, S.P.

    1976-10-01

    The classical parallel friction coefficients, which relate the collisional friction forces to the flow of particles and heat along the magnetic field, are calculated for a multiple ion species plasma. In the short mean free path regime, the neoclassical Pfirsch--Schlueter transport coefficients for a toroidally confined multispecies plasma are computed in terms of the classical friction coefficients. The dependence of the neoclassical cross-field transport on the equilibration of the parallel ion temperature profiles is determined

  15. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Hallén, A.; Du, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from 11 B to 209 Bi) to ion doses up to 2 × 10 16  cm −2 . The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600 °C, while co-implantation with B (via BF 2 ) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ∼500 °C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900 °C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability

  16. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Hallén, A.; Du, X. L.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.

    2014-02-01

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from 11B to 209Bi) to ion doses up to 2 × 1016 cm-2. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600 °C, while co-implantation with B (via BF2) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ˜500 °C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900 °C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

  17. Positive ion species in high-density discharges containing chlorine and boron endash trichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodworth, J.R.; Nichols, C.A.; Hamilton, T.W.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a quadrupole mass spectrometer to measure the positive ion species striking the wafer in a high-density plasma processing discharge containing chlorine and boron endash trichloride. Since the relative transmission of our mass spectrometer versus ion mass is known, we are able to report the relative concentrations of the ion species striking the wafer. Our measurements were made in an inductively coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference Reference Cell operating at pressures between 15 and 50 mTorr and at electron densities up to 10 11 /cm 3 . The ion spectrum in these discharges is normally dominated by Cl + , Cl 2 + , BCl 2 + , and etch products. However, reactor wall or wafer surface conditions can strongly affect the ion species in the discharge. When a stainless steel open-quotes waferclose quotes was replaced with a bare Si wafer, the dominant chlorine ion changed from Cl + to Cl 2 + . A bare aluminum wafer strongly quenched both Cl + and Cl 2 + signals. copyright 1998 American Vacuum Society

  18. Magnesium ions mitigate biofilm formation of Bacillus species via downregulation of matrix genes expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilla eOknin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Mg2+ ions on biofilm formation by Bacillus species, which are considered as problematic microorganisms in the food industry. We found that magnesium ions are capable to inhibit significantly biofilm formation of Bacillus species at 50 mM concentration and higher. We further report that Mg2+ ions don't inhibit bacterial growth at elevated concentrations; hence, the mode of action of Mg2+ ions is apparently specific to inhibition of biofilm formation. Biofilm formation depends on the synthesis of extracellular matrix, whose production in Bacillus subtilis is specified by two major operons: the epsA-O and tapA operons. We analyzed the effect of Mg2+ ions on matrix gene expression using transcriptional fusions of the promoters for eps and tapA to the gene encoding β galactosidase. The expression of the two matrix operons was reduced drastically in response to Mg2+ ions suggesting about their inhibitory effect on expression of the matrix genes in B. subtilis. Since the matrix gene expression is tightly controlled by Spo0A dependent pathway, we conclude that Mg2+ ions could affect the signal transduction for biofilm formation through this pathway.

  19. Deconstructing the landscape of fear in stable multi-species societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, A E; Parra, E; Collado, L F; Vredenburg, V T

    2017-09-01

    Animal distributions are influenced by variation in predation risk in space, which has been described as the "landscape of fear." Many studies suggest animals also reduce predation risk by eavesdropping on heterospecific alarm calls, allowing them to occupy otherwise risky habitats. One unexplored area of study is understanding how different species' alarms vary in quality, and how this variation is distributed in the landscape. We tested this phenomenon in a unique system of avian mixed species flocks in Amazonian rainforests: flock mates (eavesdropping species) strongly associate with alarm-calling antshrikes (genus Thamnomanes), which act as sentinel species. Up to 70 species join these flocks, presumably following antshrike behavioral cues. Since flocks in this region of the Amazon are exclusively led by a single antshrike species, this provides a unique natural system to compare differences in sentinel quality between flocks. We simulated predation threat by flying three species of live trained raptors (predators) towards flocks to compare sentinel probability to (1) produce alarm calls, and (2) encode information about magnitude and type of threat within such alarm calls. Our field experiments show significant differences in the probability of different sentinel species to produce alarm calls and distinguish predators. This variation may have important fitness consequences and shape the "landscape of fear" for eavesdropping species. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  20. High and Stable Ionic Conductivity in 2D Nanofluidic Ion Channels between Boron Nitride Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si; Liu, Dan; Wang, Guang; Portehault, David; Garvey, Christopher J; Gogotsi, Yury; Lei, Weiwei; Chen, Ying

    2017-05-10

    Achieving a high rate of ionic transport through porous membranes and ionic channels is important in numerous applications ranging from energy storage to water desalination, but it still remains a challenge. Herein we show that ions can quickly pass through interlayer spaces in hydrated boron nitride (BN) membranes. Measurements of surface-charge governed ionic currents between BN nanosheets in a variety of salt solutions (KCl, NaCl and CaCl 2 ) at low salt concentrations (<10 -4 M) showed several orders of magnitude higher ionic conductivity compared to that of the bulk solution. Moreover, due to the outstanding chemical and thermal stability of BN, the ionic conduits remain fully functional at temperatures up to 90 °C. The BN conduits can operate in acidic and basic environments and do not degrade after immersing in solutions with extreme pH (pH ∼ 0 or 14) for 1 week. Those excellent properties make the BN ionic conduits attractive for applications in nanofluidic devices and membrane separation.

  1. A retrospective analysis of pollen host plant use by stable and declining bumble bee species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, D.; Raemakers, I.P.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding population declines has been the objective of a wide range of ecological studies. When species have become rare such studies are complicated because particular behavior or life history traits may be the cause but also the result of the decline of a species. We approached this problem

  2. Sex allocation promotes the stable co-occurrence of competitive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya

    2017-03-01

    Biodiversity has long been a source of wonder and scientific curiosity. Theoretically, the co-occurrence of competitive species requires niche differentiation, and such differences are well known; however, the neutral theory, which assumes the equivalence of all individuals regardless of the species in a biological community, has successfully recreated observed patterns of biodiversity. In this research, the evolution of sex allocation is demonstrated to be the key to resolving why the neutral theory works well, despite the observed species differences. The sex allocation theory predicts that female-biased allocation evolves in species in declining density and that this allocation improves population growth, which should lead to an increase in density. In contrast, when the density increases, a less biased allocation evolves, which reduces the population growth rate and leads to decreased density. Thus, sex allocation provides a buffer against species differences in population growth. A model incorporating this mechanism demonstrates that hundreds of species can co-occur over 10,000 generations, even in homogeneous environments, and reproduces the observed patterns of biodiversity. This study reveals the importance of evolutionary processes within species for the sustainability of biodiversity. Integrating the entire biological process, from genes to community, will open a new era of ecology.

  3. Weeping Glass: The Identification of Ionic Species on the Surface of Vessel Glass Using Ion Chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, G.; van Bommel, M.R.; Tennent, N.H.; Roemich, H.; Fair, L.

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous films on the surface of unstable vessel glass were analysed. Five cation and eight anion species from eleven glass items in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Hamburg Museum and the Corning Museum of Glass have been quantified by ion chromatography. Sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium

  4. Using species-specific enriched stable isotopes to study the effect of fresh mercury inputs in soil-earthworm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, C Rodríguez; Jiménez-Moreno, M; Bernardo, F J Guzmán; Martín-Doimeadios, R C Rodríguez; Nevado, J J Berzas

    2018-01-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in the soil-earthworm system is still far from being fully understood, especially regarding recurrent and challenging questions about the importance of the reactivity of exogenous Hg species. Thus, to predict the potential effect of Hg inputs in terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to evaluate separately the reactivity of the endogenous and exogenous Hg species and, for this purpose, the use of enriched stable isotope tracers is a promising tool. In the present work, earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were exposed to historically Hg contaminated soils from the Almadén mining district, Spain. The soils were either non-spiked, which contain only endogenous or native Hg naturally occurring in the soil, or spiked with isotopically enriched inorganic Hg ( 199 IHg), representing exogenous or spiked Hg apart from the native one. The differential reactivity of endogenous and exogenous Hg in the soil conditioned the processes of methylation, mobilization, and assimilation of inorganic Hg by earthworms. Both endogenous and exogenous Hg species also behave distinctly regarding their bioaccumulation in earthworms, as suggested by the bioaccumulation factors, being the endogenous methylmercury (MeHg) the species more readily bioaccumulated by earthworms and in a higher extent. To the best of our knowledge, this work demonstrates for the first time the potential of enriched stable isotopes to study the effects of fresh Hg inputs in soil-earthworm systems. The findings of this work can be taken as a case study on the dynamics of Hg species in complex terrestrial systems and open a new door for future experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stable isotopes reveal the effect of trawl fisheries on the diet of commercially exploited species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Hilmar; Moranta, Joan; Balestrini, Stephen; Sciberras, Marija; Pantin, Julia R; Monnington, James; Zalewski, Alex; Kaiser, Michel J; Sköld, Mattias; Jonsson, Patrik; Bastardie, Francois; Hiddink, Jan Geert

    2017-07-24

    Bottom trawling can change food availability for benthivorous demersal species by (i) changing benthic prey composition through physical seabed impacts and (ii) by removing overall benthic consumer biomass increasing the net availability of benthic prey for remaining individuals. Thus trawling may both negatively and positively influence the quantity and quality of food available. Using δ 13 C and δ 15 N we investigated potential diet changes of three commercially exploited species across trawling gradients in the Kattegat (plaice, dab and Norway lobster (Nephrops)) and the Irish Sea (Nephrops). In the Kattegat, trawling affected primarily the biomass of benthic consumers, lowering competition. Nephrops showed significant positive relationships for δ 13 C and a domed relationship for δ 15 N with trawling. In the Irish Sea, intense trawling had a negative effect on benthic prey. δ 13 C and δ 15 N thus showed the inverse relationships to those observed in the Kattegat. Plaice from the Kattegat, showed a significant relationship with trawling intensity for δ 13 C, but not for δ 15 N. No relationship was found for dab. Changes of δ 13 C and δ 15 N correlated with changes in condition of species. The results show that the removal of demersal competitors and benthos by trawling can change the diets of commercial species, ultimately affecting their body condition.

  6. Stable isotopes reveal the effect of trawl fisheries on the diet of commercially exploited species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinz, Hilmar; Moranta, Joan; Balestrini, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Bottom trawling can change food availability for benthivorous demersal species by (i) changing benthic prey composition through physical seabed impacts and (ii) by removing overall benthic consumer biomass increasing the net availability of benthic prey for remaining individuals. Thus trawling ma...

  7. Production of an {sup 15}O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Akram, E-mail: mohammadi.akram@qst.go.jp; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-21

    In advanced ion therapy, the {sup 15}O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an {sup 15}O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable {sup 16}O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors’ group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of {sup 15}O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of {sup 15}O fragments. The highest production rate of {sup 15}O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the {sup 15}O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is

  8. Production of an 15O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Akram; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-01

    In advanced ion therapy, the 15O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an 15O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable 16O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors' group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of 15O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of 15O fragments. The highest production rate of 15O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the 15O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is sufficiently high. In-beam PET imaging was also

  9. Manganese Ion Increases LAB-yeast Mixed-species Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaka, Soma; Furukawa, Soichi; Sasaki, Miwa; Hirayama, Satoru; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable LAB-yeast mixed-species biofilm was formed by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 isolated from Fukuyama pot vinegar and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This mixed-species biofilm formation increased in proportion to the YPD medium concentration but decreased in proportion to the MRS medium concentration. The effect of MRS components on mixed-species biofilm formation was investigated in a YPD medium environment, and it was clarified that beef extract (one of the MRS medium components) decreased mixed-species biofilm formation. On the other hand, manganese sulfate (another component in MRS) remarkably increased both LAB single- and LAB-yeast mixed-species biofilm formation. LAB single- and mixed-species biofilm formation were increased in proportion to the manganese sulfate concentration up to 1 mM and 100 μM, respectively. The growth of L. plantarum ML11-11 was increased significantly by the addition of 10 μM manganese sulfate and was resistant to higher concentration of up to 100 mM, but growth of S. cerevisiae was sensitive to manganese ion above 100 μM. These results suggested that mixed-species biofilm formation could be controlled artificially by controlling the manganese ion level.

  10. Oxygen stable isotopic disparities among sympatric small land snail species from northwest Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Yurena; Nekola, Jeffery C.; Rech, Jason A.; Pigati, Jeffery S.

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of land snail shells can be a valuable paleoenvironmental archive if the climatic parameters that influence the isotopic system are fully understood. Previous calibration studies have examined a limited number of species or individuals, and most have focused on larger (> 10 mm) taxa, which do not represent the dominant shell material in the Quaternary fossil record. In this study, we evaluate the δ18O values of small land snails (isotopic information in their shells, regardless of differences in their ecology, dietary habits, behavior, and/or body size. We collected and analyzed 265 individuals of 11 species from 12 sites in northwest Minnesota (USA), which exhibits extremely abundant and diverse terrestrial malacofauna in North America. We did not observe significant correlations between shell δ18O values and the type of ecosystem (forest/grassland) or hydrologic setting (upland/lowland). However, the majority of species differed significantly in shell δ18O values. Larger taxa (Catinella, Succinea, Discus) consistently yielded higher δ18O values than smaller taxa (Euconulus, Gastrocopta, Hawaiia, Vallonia), by up to ~ 3‰. These isotopic offsets among sympatric taxa could be attributed to a number of physical, behavioral, and/or evolutionary traits, including the ability of larger species to tolerate drier conditions better than their smaller counterparts, differences in their preferred microhabitats or phylogentic non-independence. Regardless of the reason, our results imply that researchers should not combine isotopic data from different types of land snails without first investigating modern specimens to determine if it is appropriate. Moreover, our data suggest that combining instrumental climate data, a snail flux-balance model, and shell δ18O values can help us to better understand the ecology of land snails.

  11. C and N Stable Isotope Variability in Soft Tissue of Invasive Species Ficopomatus enigmaticus (Annelida, Polychaeta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cukrov, Neven; Cukrov, Marijana; Lojen, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    Serpulidae Rafinesque, 1815 is a family of polychaete annelids with calcareous tubes found in worldwide from littoral to abyssal depths. Of more than 350 described species of serpulid polychaetes, Marifugia cavatica Absolon and Hrabe 1930 is the only known cave-dwelling stygobiotic and freshwater serpulid, five other serpulid species comprising the genus Ficopomatus are found in brackish water, otherwise serpulids are all marine organisms. Ficopomatus enigmaticus (Fauvel, 1923), previously known as Mercierella enigmatica, is a truly cosmopolitan with disjunct distribution. It has been found worldwide inhabiting coastal brackish waters, lagoons and estuaries of warm temperate areas of both hemispheres. This tubeworm builds calcareous tubes on any hard substrate. With distinctive collar-like rings at irregular intervals it is relatively easy to identify. It is an efficient suspension-feeder, very tolerant and physiologically well adapted to temperature and salinity variations, eutrophic conditions and low dissolved oxygen content. The fact that populations of F. enigmaticus appear near the ports suggests that the probable mechanism of introduction was ship fouling or ballast water. Generally, F. enigmaticus is considered as a fouling nuisance species which negatively affects ships, buoys and harbour structures.

  12. Uniform climate sensitivity in tree-ring stable isotopes across species and sites in a mid-latitude temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl-Meier, Claudia; Zang, Christian; Büntgen, Ulf; Esper, Jan; Rothe, Andreas; Göttlein, Axel; Dirnböck, Thomas; Treydte, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Tree-ring stable isotopes, providing insight into drought-induced eco-physiological mechanisms, are frequently used to reconstruct past changes in growing season temperature and precipitation. Their climatic response is, however, still not fully understood, particularly for data originating from non-extreme, mid-latitude environments with differing ecological conditions. Here, we assess the response of δ(13)C, δ(18)O and tree-ring width (TRW) from a temperate mountain forest in the Austrian pre-Alps to climate and specific drought events. Variations in stem growth and isotopic composition of Norway spruce, common beech and European larch from dry, medium and moist sites are compared with records of sunshine, temperature, moisture, precipitation and cloud cover. Results indicate uniform year-to-year variations in δ(13)C and δ(18)O across sites and species, but distinct differences in TRW according to habitat and species. While the climate sensitivity of TRW is overall weak, the δ(13)C and δ(18)O chronologies contain significant signals with a maximum sensitivity to cloud cover changes (r = -0.72 for δ(18)O). The coherent inter-annual isotopic variations are accompanied by substantial differences in the isotopic signatures with offsets up to ∼3‰ for δ(13)C, indicating species-specific physiological strategies and varying water-use efficiencies. During severe summer drought, beech and larch benefit from access to deeper and moist soils, allowing them to keep their stomata open. This strategy is accompanied by an increased water loss through transpiration, but simultaneously enables enhanced photosynthesis. Our findings indicate the potential of tree-ring stable isotopes from temperate forests to reconstruct changes in cloud cover, and to improve knowledge on basic physiological mechanisms of tree species growing in different habitats to cope with soil moisture deficits. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  13. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO + ) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO + and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO + /NO, HCO + /CO, and NO + /NO.

  14. Final Technical Report: Improved ECR Charge Breeder for Rare Ion Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, Wayne D

    2011-04-29

    The purpose of this project was to develop a charge-breeder system not only for producing the highly charged ion species needed for nuclear physics experiments, but one that could be used as a test bed for testing and developing additional techniques and technologies. The charge-breeder ion source developed under this grant was designed as a charge-breeder from the beginning and has none of the limitations inherent of converted primary ECR sources. Additionally, the major source components are designed to be easily replaced. This document describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Scientific Solutions charge-breeder ion source. This source was delivered to Texas A&M University in October 2007 for further testing.

  15. A stable gold(i)-enyne species obtained by alkyne carboauration in a complex rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, Jéssica; Blanco, M Carmen; Laguna, Antonio; Naumov, Panče; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2017-08-15

    An unprecedented tetranuclear gold derivative with unusual gold-enyne moieties is prepared by a mild and neat rearrangement of a dinuclear gold complex with a bridging bis(diphenylphosphino)alkyne and terminal alkynyl ligands. The complex originates as a consequence of an intramolecular addition of the AuC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CTol fragment to the internal diphosphine triple bond Ph 2 PC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh 2 . The crystal structure of the tetranuclear complex shows a dinuclear metallacycle with a very short AuAu bond interaction and bridging phosphino-enyne ligands. This disposition clearly stabilises the elusive vinyl gold species omnipresent as intermediates in gold-catalysed reactions.

  16. Ion and atomic species produced in large scale oxygen plasma used for treatments sensitive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasic, Kosta; Skoro, Nikola; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2013-09-01

    Asymmetric CCP plasma system operating at 13.56 MHz was successfully used for treatments of textile, seeds and polymers. Central electrode (aluminium rod) was powered electrode while the cylindrical wall of the chamber was grounded electrode. We have used mass spectrometry for detections of ions and neutrals in order to get better insight in plasma chemistry involved in surface reactions on treated samples. Besides of ions, one of the important species for surface modifications is atomic oxygen. Actinometry was used as an additional diagnostic tool to determine the extent of atomic oxygen produced in plasma. Measurements were made in several different mixtures of oxygen with addition of several percent of argon. The range of pressures investigated was 150 to 450 mTorr for powers from 100 to 500 W. Measured atomic oxygen density has a steady rise with power (1019-1020 m-3) . Apart from atomic oxygen species we have detected mass spectra of positive and negative ions. Most abundant ion was O2+while the amounts of O+ and O- were smaller by the order of magnitude compared to O2+. Supported by MESTD, RS, III41011 and ON 171037.

  17. Separation of seven arsenic species by ion-pair and ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Hansen, Sven Hedegaard

    1992-01-01

    Arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate, dimethylarsinate, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and the tetramethylarsonium ion were subjected to ion-exchange and ion-pair reversed phase HPLC. The ion exchange method was superior in selectivity and time of analysis for the arsenic anions. The ammonium ions...... used for the ion-pair method only resulted in separation of some of the anionic arsenic compounds. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for on-line arsenic-specific detection....

  18. Ion-exchange chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry for the identification of organic and inorganic species in topiramate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, X; Ko, C Y; Guh, H Y

    1996-11-01

    An ion-exchange chromatograph/electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (IC/ESI-MS) was used successfully to identify organic and inorganic species present in topiramate tablets. An ion suppressor is placed between the column and detectors to replace sodium ions in the mobile phase with hydrogen ions supplied by the suppressor. The ensuing combination of the hydrogen ions with the mobile phase hydroxide ions produces water and thus allows simultaneous ion detection by an ion conductivity detector and a mass spectrometer. Analytes, including lactate, glycolate, chloride, formate, sulfate, and oxalate, were unambiguously identified by matching the mass spectra and retention times with those of the authentic compounds. Due to its capability of detecting positive and negative as well as neutral species, ESI-MS provides valuable information which is not available with ion conductivity detection alone. Though the coupling of ion-exchange chromatography to mass spectrometry has been reported previously, this is the first demonstration of IC/ESI-MS for the identification of unknown species in real samples. Finally, with the use of deuterium/carbon-13 labeling and MS/MS techniques, we have confirmed that oxalic acid (HOOC-COOH) is formed from formic acid (HCOOH) at the electrospray interface in the presence of the electric field. This observation not only confirms the identity of an unknown peak, but it also provides new insight into chemistry that can take place during electrospray ionization.

  19. Stable luminescent metal-organic frameworks as dual-functional materials to encapsulate ln(3+) ions for white-light emission and to detect nitroaromatic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Zhang, Shu-Ran; Du, Dong-Ying; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Bao, Shao-Juan; Li, Jing; Su, Zhong-Min; He, Wen-Wen; Fu, Qiang; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2015-04-06

    A stable porous carbazole-based luminescent metal-organic framework, NENU-522, was successfully constructed. It is extremely stable in air and acidic/basic aqueous solutions, which provides the strategy for luminescent material encapsulation of Ln(3+) ions with tunable luminescence for application in light emission. More importantly, Ln(3+)@NENU-522 can emit white light by encapsulating different molar ratios of Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions. Additionally, Tb(3+)@NENU-522 is found to be useful as a fluorescent indicator for the qualitative and quantitative detection of nitroaromatic explosives with different numbers of -NO2 groups, and the concentrations of complete quenching are about 2000, 1000, and 80 ppm for nitrobenzene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, respectively. Meanwhile, Tb(3+)@NENU-522 displays high selectivity and recyclability in the detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  20. 'Applications of stable isotopes in life sciences'. Lead and strontium stable isotope measurements by using a high lateral resolution secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    The method of Pb and Sr isotope measurements at about 5 μm resolution was developed by using a high lateral resolution secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS NS50). Since the both elements have radiogenic nuclides such as 206 Pb, 207 Pb, and 87 Sr, natural variations of isotopic ratios are large. It is possible to detect a meaningful variation in a terrestrial sample, even though the experimental error is relatively large. In the case of monazite U-Pb dating, a 4 nA O - primary beam was used to sputter the sample and secondary positive ions were extracted for mass analysis using a Mattauch-Herzog geometry. The multi-collector system was modified to detect 140 Ce + , 204 Pb + , 206 Pb + , 238 U 16 O + , and 238 U 16 O 2 + ions simultaneously. Based on the monazite standard from North-Central Madagascar, we have determined the 206 Pb/ 238 U ratios of samples. 207 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios were measured by a magnet scanning with a single collector mode. 44 monazite grains extracted from a sedimentary rock in Taiwan were analyzed. Observed ages were consistent with the U-Th-Pb chemical ages by EPMA. Then NanoSIMS has been used to measure 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios in natural calcium carbonate samples. Multi-collector system was adjusted to detect 43 Ca + , 80 Ca 2 + , 86 Sr + , and 87 Sr + ions at the same time. Magnetic field was scanning for the EM no.4 counter to detect 85 Rb + , 86 Sr + and 87 Sr + , while the EM no.4b can measure 86 Sr + , 87 Sr + , and 88 Sr + , respectively. Repeated analyses of a coral skeleton standard (JCp-1) show that 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio agrees well with the seawater signature, after the series of corrections such as Ca dimer, 87 Rb, and a mass bias estimated by 88 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio. The method is applied to an otolith from ayu (Pleco-glossus altivelis altivelis) collected from the Yodo river, Japan. The spatial variation of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios was consistent with amphidromous migration of the fish, namely, born in the lake and grown in the coastal sea

  1. Ecological differences in three autochthonous equid species in Mongolian Gobi inferred from stable isotopes in tail hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnik Šturm, Martina; Voigt, Christian C.; Oyunsaikhan, Ganbaatar; Kaczensky, Petra

    2014-05-01

    In the Dzungarian Gobi of Mongolia three equid species, Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus), domestic horse (Equus caballus), and re-introduced Przewalski's horse (Equus ferus przewalskii) share the same habitat and thus provide a unique opportunity for comparative ecological studies. In our project we use the stable isotope analysis of tail hair as a tool to study feeding ecology, water use and movement pattern of the three extant sympatric equid species to reveal species specific differences and thus strengthen our understanding of the ecological adaptations of the three species to the harsh environment of the Gobi desert. Since tail hair grow continuously and is isotopically inert after formation, when sampled and analysed longitudinally, provides temporary explicit information on dietary regime and movement pattern. We use the carbon isotopes in the tail hair to determine the quantitative dependence of each animal on isotopically distinct C3 (grasses) and C4 (multitude of annuals and perennials) diet. Nitrogen isotopes reflect the isotopic composition of the diet and hydrogen isotopes reflect the isotopic composition of the water that animals utilize, while both elements have been reported to also give information on the physical status of the animal. Combined isotope data will be used to describe the movement patterns and habitat use of the three equid species. We will present the methodology and first preliminary results of carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of potential forage plants of the study area and of the tail hair analysis. Among the analysed plants, collected in the pilot sampling campaign in 2012 (n = 192), we identified 14 C3 and two C4species and found no general trend that could explain the effect of altitude on carbon isotopic composition in C3 plants and no correlation between carbon isotopic composition and longitude or latitude. We performed additional, more detailed plant sampling in 2013. The first results obtained from the tail hair

  2. 1+-n+ ECR ION SOURCE DEVELOPMENT TEST STAND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald P. May

    2006-01-01

    A test stand for the investigation of 1+-n+ charge boosting using an ECR ion sources is currently being assembled at the Texas A and M Cyclotron Institute. The ultimate goal is to relate the charge-boosting of ions of stable species to possible charge-boosting of ions of radioactive species extracted from the diverse, low-charge-state ion sources developed for radioactive ion beams

  3. Collisionless damping of perpendicular magnetosonic pulses in a two-ion-species plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogen, Daiju; Toida, Mieko; Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    1998-01-01

    One dimensional electromagnetic simulation code based on a three-fluid model is used to study evolution of perpendicular magnetosonic pulses in a two-ion-species plasma. A magnetosonic pulse accelerates heavy ions in the direction parallel to the wave front, which results in the excitation of a long-wavelength perturbation behind the original pulse. Thus the original pulse is damped even if the plasma is collisionless and the pulse amplitude is small. The damping rate of a solitary pulse is theoretically obtained. It decreases with increasing amplitude. The theory is in good agreement with the simulation result. Also, it is confirmed that small-amplitude periodic waves are not damped. (author)

  4. Pedestal structure and inter-ELM evolution for different main ion species in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laggner, F. M.; Wolfrum, E.; Cavedon, M.; Mink, F.; Bernert, M.; Dunne, M. G.; Schneider, P. A.; Kappatou, A.; Birkenmeier, G.; Fischer, R.; Willensdorfer, M.; Aumayr, F.

    2017-05-01

    In tokamak plasmas with different main ion species, a change in confinement occurs, known as the isotope effect. Experiments comparing hydrogen (H), deuterium (D), and helium (4He) plasmas have been performed to identify processes that define the pedestal structure and evolution in between the crashes of edge localized modes (ELMs). The pedestal top electron densities and temperatures have been matched to compare the pedestal shape and stability. In the D and H discharges, the pedestal electron temperature profiles do not differ, whereas the density profile in H has shallower gradients. Furthermore, the heat flux across the pedestal in H is roughly a factor of two higher than in D. In 4He plasmas at similar stored energy, the pedestal top electron density is roughly a factor of 1.5 larger than in the references owing to the larger effective charge. The peeling-ballooning theory, which is independent of the main ion species mass, can sufficiently describe the pedestal stability in the hydrogenic plasmas. The inter-ELM pedestal evolution has the same sequence of recovery phases for all investigated species, giving evidence that similar mechanisms are acting in the pedestals. This is further supported by a similar evolution of the inter-ELM magnetic signature and the corresponding toroidal structure.

  5. Porous, Hyper-cross-linked, Three-Dimensional Polymer as Stable, High Rate Capability Electrode for Lithium-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debdyuti; Gowda Y K, Guruprasada; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Sampath, S

    2017-06-14

    Organic materials containing active carbonyl groups have attracted considerable attention as electrodes in Li-ion batteries due to their reversible redox activity, ability to retain capacity, and, in addition, their ecofriendly nature. Introduction of porosity will help accommodate as well as store small ions and molecules reversibly. In the present work, we introduce a mesoporous triptycene-related, rigid network polymer with high specific surface area as an electrode material for rechargeable Li-ion battery. The designed polymer with a three-dimensional (3D), rigid porous network allows free movement of ions/electrolyte as well as helps in interacting with the active anhydride moieties (containing two carbonyl groups). Considerable intake of Li + ions giving rise to very high specific capacity of 1100 mA h g -1 at a discharge current of 50 mA g -1 and ∼120 mA h g -1 at a high discharge current of 3 A g -1 are observed with excellent cyclability up to 1000 cycles. This remarkable rate capability, which is one of the highest among the reported organic porous polymers to date, makes the triptycene-related rigid 3D network a very good choice for Li-ion batteries and opens up a new method to design polymer-based electrode materials for metal-ion battery technology.

  6. Variable eigenmode excitation in the beach heating of two-ion-species mirror plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Variable eigenmode excitation scans of the ion species ratio of hydrogen-helium and hydrogen-deuterium plasmas has been examined in the bench-heating configuration of the Phaedrus-B central cell. m = -1 fields were selectively excited by a ''rotating-field'' antenna array at ω/Ω H = 0.8. The coupled wave energy propagates through a steep axial magnetic gradient into a region of strong ion-cyclotron resonance absorption which is located triangle z = 50cm from the antenna. Evidence of varied fast- and slow-wave eigenmode excitation and absorption, including variations in the radial profiles of waves magnetic field and plasma parameters, was observed during the scans. Optimal peak parameters in the plasma core, n e = 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , T eparallel = 20eV, T iparallel = 140eV, T iperpendicular = 450eV, and β = 0.2, were obtained for moderate helium or deuterium ion fractions (puffed n He /n e = n D /n e ∼ 0.25). These parameters exceed those obtained under the same conditions with ''pure'' hydrogen plasmas: n e = 7.0 x 10 12 cm -3 , T eparallel = 25eV, T iparallel = 80eV, T iperpendicular = 300eV, and β = 0.1. These variations are in agreement with those expected from antenna-eigenmode coupling considerations

  7. Sensitive determination of thallium species in drinking and natural water by ionic liquid-assisted ion-pairing liquid-liquid microextraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Leticia B; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G; Olsina, Roberto A

    2013-01-15

    A fast and simple method involving separation and determination of thallium (Tl) species, based on novel ionic liquid-assisted ion pairing dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method, was developed. Initially, Tl(III) was selectively complexed with chloride ion to form [TlCl(4)](-) chlorocomplex. Subsequently, tetradecyl(trihexyl)phosphonium chloride ionic liquid (CYPHOS(®) IL 101) was used to form the ion-pair with [TlCl(4)](-) anion followed by extraction. The DLLME procedure was developed by dispersing 80 μL of carbon tetrachloride with 100 μL of ethanol added to the aqueous solution. After DLLME, the upper aqueous phase containing Tl(I) only was removed and analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In contrast to Tl(III), Tl(I) species does not form neither stable nor anionic complexes with chloride ions and it was not extracted into the organic phase. Total Tl concentration was obtained by direct introduction of sample into ICP-MS instrument. The calibration graph for the analyte was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9989. Under optimal conditions, detection limit of Tl species was 0.4 ng L(-1). The relative standard deviation (n=10) at 1 ng mL(-1) Tl concentration level was 1.3% for Tl(I) and 1.5% for Tl(III). The method was successfully applied for fast speciation analysis of Tl at ultratrace levels in real water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Profiling of lipid species by normal-phase liquid chromatography, nanoelectrospray ionization, and ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Elena; Almeida, Reinaldo; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2013-01-01

    chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS) and LC-ITMS(2) (ion trap tandem mass spectrometry) for profiling and structural analysis of lipid species. The workflow uses a normal-phase LC system for efficient separation of apolar and polar lipid species combined with sensitive and specific...... analysis powered by a chip-based nanoelectrospray ion source and a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. The workflow was executed using a primary LC-FTMS survey routine for identification and profiling of lipid species based on high-mass accuracy and retention time followed by a targeted LC-ITMS(2...... of low-abundant triacylglycerol and ceramide species in mouse brain cerebellum and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, respectively. The workflow described here is generic and can be extended for detailed lipid analysis of sample matrices having a wide range of lipid compositions....

  9. Functional implications of species differences in the size and morphology of the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Gutiérrez-Ibáñez

    Full Text Available In birds, there is a retinofugal projection from the brain to the retina originating from the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in the midbrain. Despite a large number of anatomical, physiological and histochemical studies, the function of this retinofugal system remains unclear. Several functions have been proposed including: gaze stabilization, pecking behavior, dark adaptation, shifting attention, and detection of aerial predators. This nucleus varies in size and organization among some species, but the relative size and morphology of the ION has not been systematically studied. Here, we present a comparison of the relative size and morphology of the ION in 81 species of birds, representing 17 different orders. Our results show that several orders of birds, besides those previously reported, have a large, well-organized ION, including: hummingbirds, woodpeckers, coots and allies, and kingfishers. At the other end of the spectrum, parrots, herons, waterfowl, owls and diurnal raptors have relatively small ION volumes. ION also appears to be absent or unrecognizable is several taxa, including one of the basal avian groups, the tinamous, which suggests that the ION may have evolved only in the more modern group of birds, Neognathae. Finally, we demonstrate that evolutionary changes in the relative size and the cytoarchitectonic organization of ION have occurred largely independent of phylogeny. The large relative size of the ION in orders with very different lifestyles and feeding behaviors suggest there is no clear association with pecking behavior or predator detection. Instead, our results suggest that the ION is more complex and enlarged in birds that have eyes that are emmetropic in some parts of the visual field and myopic in others. We therefore posit that the ION is involved in switching attention between two parts of the retina i.e. from an emmetropic to a myopic part of the retina.

  10. Redox Species-Based Electrolytes for Advanced Rechargeable Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Ming, Jun

    2016-08-15

    Seeking high-capacity cathodes has become an intensive effort in lithium ion battery research; however, the low energy density still remains a major issue for sustainable handheld devices and vehicles. Herein, we present a new strategy of integrating a redox species-based electrolyte in batteries to boost their performance. Taking the olivine LiFePO4-based battery as an example, the incorporation of redox species (i.e., polysulfide of Li2S8) in the electrolyte results in much lower polarization and superior stability, where the dissociated Li+/Sx2– can significantly speed up the lithium diffusion. More importantly, the presence of the S82–/S2– redox reaction further contributes extra capacity, making a completely new LiFePO4/Li2Sx hybrid battery with a high energy density of 1124 Wh kgcathode–1 and a capacity of 442 mAh gcathode–1. The marriage of appropriate redox species in an electrolyte for a rechargeable battery is an efficient and scalable approach for obtaining higher energy density storage devices.

  11. Stable isotope investigation of insect and plant use in the diets of two Puerto Rican bat species

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N) analysis to estimate the importance of plants and insects to the diet of two nectar-feeding bats on Puerto Rico, the brown flower bat (Erophylla bombifrons) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat (Monophyllus redmani). Stable carbon and nit...

  12. Ultra-low cost and highly stable hydrated FePO4 anodes for aqueous sodium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Feng, Zimin; Laul, Dharminder; Zhu, Wen; Provencher, Manon; Trudeau, Michel L.; Guerfi, Abdelbast; Zaghib, Karim

    2018-01-01

    The growing demands for large-scale energy storage devices have put a spotlight on aqueous sodium-ion batteries, which possess a number of highly desirable features, such as sodium abundance, low cost and safety over organic electrolytes. While lots of cathode materials were reported, only few candidate materials like active carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3 were proposed as anodes. It is a long-standing common knowledge that the low cost, non-toxicity, and highly reversible FePO4·2H2O is known as an attractive cathode material for non-aqueous lithium- and sodium-ion batteries, but we demonstrate for the first time that nano-size non-carbon coated amorphous FePO4·2H2O can be used as the anode for an aqueous sodium-ion battery. Its optimum operating voltage (∼2.75 V vs. Na+/Na) avoids hydrogen evolution. The capacity is as high as 80 mAh/g at a rate of 0.5 C in a three-electrode system. The full cell, using the Na0.44MnO2 as cathode, maintained 90% of the capacity at 300 cycles at a rate of 3 C. The calculations also show that its volume change during the intercalation of Na ions is below 2%. Its low cost, high safety, along with its outstanding electrochemical performance makes amorphous FePO4·2H2O a promising anode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.

  13. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farhan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C, epicatechin (EC, epigallocatechin (EGC and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  14. Effects of the instability enhanced friction on relative ion densities in a two-ion species low-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The instability enhanced friction theory of Baalrud & Hegna (Phys. Plasmas 18, 023505 (2011)) predicts that for comparable ion densities the ions nearly reach a common velocity near the sheath edge in a low temperature plasma. The theory was experimentally confirmed by Yip, Hershkowitz, & Severn (Phys. Rev. Letters 104, 225003 (2010)). We will explore the effects of the theory on relative ion densities in a numerical simulation of an Ar/Xe plasma. Results for a 0D plasma model (Lieberman, Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials Processing, 2005) will be presented.

  15. A Stable Pentagonal Bipyramidal Dy(III) Single-Ion Magnet with a Record Magnetization Reversal Barrier over 1000 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Vieru, Veacheslav; Ungur, Liviu; Jia, Jian-Hua; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Lan, Yanhua; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Gao, Song; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-04-27

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with a large spin reversal barrier have been recognized to exhibit slow magnetic relaxation that can lead to a magnetic hysteresis loop. Synthesis of highly stable SMMs with both large energy barriers and significantly slow relaxation times is challenging. Here, we report two highly stable and neutral Dy(III) classical coordination compounds with pentagonal bipyramidal local geometry that exhibit SMM behavior. Weak intermolecular interactions in the undiluted single crystals are first observed for mononuclear lanthanide SMMs by micro-SQUID measurements. The investigation of magnetic relaxation reveals the thermally activated quantum tunneling of magnetization through the third excited Kramers doublet, owing to the increased axial magnetic anisotropy and weaker transverse magnetic anisotropy. As a result, pronounced magnetic hysteresis loops up to 14 K are observed, and the effective energy barrier (Ueff = 1025 K) for relaxation of magnetization reached a breakthrough among the SMMs.

  16. Synthesis of Hierarchical Sisal-Like V2O5with Exposed Stable {001} Facets as Long Life Cathode Materials for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Naiteng; Du, Wuzhou; Liu, Guilong; Zhou, Zhan; Fu, Hong-Ru; Tang, Qianqian; Liu, Xianming; He, Yan-Bing

    2017-12-20

    Vanadium pentoxide (V 2 O 5 ) is considered a promising cathode material for advanced lithium-ion batteries owing to its high specific capacity and low cost. However, the application of V 2 O 5 -based electrodes has been hindered because of their inferior conductivity, cycling stability, and power performance. Herein, hierarchical sisal-like V 2 O 5 microstructures consisting of primary one-dimensional (1D) nanobelts with [001] facets orientation growth and rich oxygen vacancies are synthesized through a facile hydrothermal process using polyoxyethylene-20-cetyl-ether as the surface control agent, followed by calcination. The primary 1D nanobelt shortens the transfer path of electrons and ions, and the stable {001} facets could reduce the side reaction at the interface of electrode/electrolyte, simultaneously. Moreover, the formation of low valence state vanadium would generate the oxygen vacancies to facilitate lithium-ion diffusion. As a result, the sisal-like V 2 O 5 manifests excellent electrochemical performances, including high specific capacity (297 mA h g -1 at a current of 0.1 C) and robust cycling performance (capacity fading 0.06% per cycle). This work develops a controllable method to craft the hierarchical sisal-like V 2 O 5 microstructures with excellent high rate and long-term cyclic stability.

  17. Solid-State Li-Ion Batteries Using Fast, Stable, Glassy Nanocomposite Electrolytes for Good Safety and Long Cycle-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guoqiang; Wu, Feng; Zhan, Chun; Wang, Jing; Mu, Daobin; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2016-03-09

    The development of safe, stable, and long-life Li-ion batteries is being intensively pursued to enable the electrification of transportation and intelligent grid applications. Here, we report a new solid-state Li-ion battery technology, using a solid nanocomposite electrolyte composed of porous silica matrices with in situ immobilizing Li(+)-conducting ionic liquid, anode material of MCMB, and cathode material of LiCoO2, LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, or LiFePO4. An injection printing method is used for the electrode/electrolyte preparation. Solid nanocomposite electrolytes exhibit superior performance to the conventional organic electrolytes with regard to safety and cycle-life. They also have a transparent glassy structure with high ionic conductivity and good mechanical strength. Solid-state full cells tested with the various cathodes exhibited high specific capacities, long cycling stability, and excellent high temperature performance. This solid-state battery technology will provide new avenues for the rational engineering of advanced Li-ion batteries and other electrochemical devices.

  18. Analysis of intensities of positive and negative ion species from silicon dioxide films using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and electronegativity of fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intensities of positive and negative ion species emitted from thermally oxidized and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) SiO 2 films were analyzed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and the Saha-Boltzmann equation. Intensities of positive and negative secondary ion species were normalized to those of 28 Si + and 28 Si - ions, respectively, and an effective temperature of approximately (7.2 ± 0.1) x 10 3 K of the sputtered region bombarded with pulsed 22 kV Au 3 + primary ions was determined. Intensity spectra showed polarity dependence on both n and m values of Si n O m fragments, and a slight shift to negative polarity for PECVD SiO 2 compared to thermally oxidized SiO 2 films. By dividing the intensity ratios of negative-to-positive ions for PECVD SiO 2 by those for thermally oxidized SiO 2 films to cancel statistical factors, the difference in absolute electronegativity (half the sum of ionization potential and electron affinity of fragments) between both films was obtained. An increase in electronegativity for SiO m (m = 1, 2) and Si 2 O m (m = 1-4) fragments for PECVD SiO 2 films compared to thermally oxidized films was obtained to be 0.1-0.2 Pauling units, indicating a more covalent nature of Si-O bonds for PECVD SiO 2 films compared to the thermally oxidized SiO 2 films.

  19. Is 30 years enough time to niche segregation between a non-native and a native congeneric fish species? Evidences from stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Zaia Alves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The invasion of non-native species that are phylogenetically similar to native species was observed in the Upper Paraná River following the construction of the Itaipu hydroelectric plant and subsequent removal of a natural geographic barrier (Sete Quedas Falls. Endemic fish species from the Lower Paraná River, such as the piranha Serrasalmus marginatus, successfully colonized the new environment. A few years later, S. marginatus had become the dominant species, while the prevalence of the congeneric species, Serrasalmus maculatus, had declined. Considering that the two piranha species naturally coexist in the Pantanal and that S. marginatus is a non-native species in the Upper Paraná River floodplain, we hypothesized that trophic niche overlap between Serrasalmus species only occurred in the Upper Paraná River floodplain due to short-term co-existence. The study area in which the isotopic niche overlap between S. maculatus and S. marginatus was evaluated consisted of two ponds located in different floodplains, the Pantanal and the Upper Paraná River. We used carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis to elucidate the differences in the energy intake by the native and non-native species. We used mixing models and calculated the isotopic niche area and niche overlap to infer the nature of the trophic interactions between the species in both habitats. According to the mixing model, the predominant source of carbon for both species was terrestrial. Nevertheless, in Upper Paraná River, the δ13C signature of the two species differed significantly and the non-native species had a greater niche width than the native species. In the Pantanal, there were no differences in δ13C, but the species differed with respect to δ 15N, and the niche widths were narrow for both species.Based on these results, it can be inferred that the species depend on different food sources. Piranhas obtain energy from distinct prey species, which probably consume

  20. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  1. High-level expression and purification of Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels in a tetracycline-inducible stable mammalian cell line: GABAA and serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalova, Zuzana; Liu, Aiping; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Farmer, Sarah L; Krenzel, Eileen S; Arevalo, Enrique; Desai, Rooma; Feinberg-Zadek, Paula L; Davies, Paul A; Yamodo, Innocent H; Forman, Stuart A; Miller, Keith W

    2010-09-01

    The human neuronal Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily of ion channels are important determinants of human behavior and the target of many drugs. It is essential for their structural characterization to achieve high-level expression in a functional state. The aim of this work was to establish stable mammalian cell lines that enable high-level heterologous production of pure receptors in a state that supports agonist-induced allosteric conformational changes. In a tetracycline-inducible stable human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293S) cell line, GABA(A) receptors containing α1 and β3 subunits could be expressed with specific activities of 29-34 pmol/mg corresponding to 140-170 pmol/plate, the highest expression level reported so far. Comparable figures for serotonin (5-HT(3A)) receptors were 49-63 pmol/mg and 245-315 pmol/plate. The expression of 10 nmol of either receptor in suspension in a bioreactor required 0.3-3.0 L. Both receptor constructs had a FLAG epitope inserted at the N-terminus and could be purified in one step after solubilization using ANTI-FLAG affinity chromatography with yields of 30-40%. Purified receptors were functional. Binding of the agonist [(3)H]muscimol to the purified GABA(A)R was enhanced allosterically by the general anesthetic etomidate, and purified 5-hydroxytryptamine-3A receptor supported serotonin-stimulated cation flux when reconstituted into lipid vesicles. Copyright © 2010 The Protein Society.

  2. Assessing food web dynamics and relative importance of organic matter sources for fish species in two Portuguese estuaries: a stable isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Susana; Vasconcelos, Rita P; Tanner, Susanne; Máguas, Cristina; Costa, Maria José; Cabral, Henrique N

    2011-10-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ¹³C, δ¹⁵N) were used to analyse food web dynamics of two of the main estuaries of the Portuguese coast: Tejo and Mira. The ultimate sources of organic matter supporting production of some of the most abundant and commercially important fish species were determined; and seasonal, inter- and intra- estuarine differences in the trophic relations among producers and consumers were identified. Stable isotope analysis was performed in different producers, primary consumers (main prey items for fish) and fish species (Solea solea, Solea senegalensis, Pomatoschistus microps, Dicentrarchus labrax, Liza ramada, Diplodus vulgaris and Atherina presbyter) of two areas in each estuary, in July and October 2009. Model calculations showed that the main prey for the fish species in the Tejo estuary used mostly salt marsh-derived organic matter as nutritional sources, with no marked differences between the sampled months. Trophic levels of fish species from the same estuary differed at multiple scales: inter-species, seasonally and spatially (both between and within estuaries). Significant differences in isotopic composition of fish species were more pronounced spatially (between the two sampled areas in the estuary) than seasonally (between sampled months). Trophic relationships in both estuaries demonstrated that organic matter is transferred to higher trophic positions mainly through benthic pathways. This shows the flexibility of these species to share resources and to exploit temporary peaks in prey populations. The present results showed that extensive disturbance in intertidal habitats from both estuaries may potentially change the balance of organic matter in the base of these complex food webs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fractional Diffusion, Low Exponent Lévy Stable Laws, and 'Slow Motion' Denoising of Helium Ion Microscope Nanoscale Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasso, Alfred S; Vladár, András E

    2012-01-01

    Helium ion microscopes (HIM) are capable of acquiring images with better than 1 nm resolution, and HIM images are particularly rich in morphological surface details. However, such images are generally quite noisy. A major challenge is to denoise these images while preserving delicate surface information. This paper presents a powerful slow motion denoising technique, based on solving linear fractional diffusion equations forward in time. The method is easily implemented computationally, using fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms. When applied to actual HIM images, the method is found to reproduce the essential surface morphology of the sample with high fidelity. In contrast, such highly sophisticated methodologies as Curvelet Transform denoising, and Total Variation denoising using split Bregman iterations, are found to eliminate vital fine scale information, along with the noise. Image Lipschitz exponents are a useful image metrology tool for quantifying the fine structure content in an image. In this paper, this tool is applied to rank order the above three distinct denoising approaches, in terms of their texture preserving properties. In several denoising experiments on actual HIM images, it was found that fractional diffusion smoothing performed noticeably better than split Bregman TV, which in turn, performed slightly better than Curvelet denoising.

  4. SiOx-C dual-phase glass for lithium ion battery anode with high capacity and stable cycling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Pengpeng; Zhao, Hailei; Gao, Chunhui; Du, Zhihong; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Glass-like Si-O-C composites have recently attracted considerable attention because of their potential as high capacity anode for rechargeable lithium ion batteries. However, the existence of Si-C bonds in Si-O-C phase restricts in a certain degree the electrochemical activity of silicon. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis and electrochemical performance of SiOx-C dual-phase glass consisting of amorphous SiOx and free carbon phases and without Si-C bonds in SiOx phase. Dual-phase glass synthesis is achieved through a simple sol-gel route. The SiOx-C dual-phase glass electrode delivers high reversible capacity of 840 mAh g-1 for 100 cycles and exhibits excellent rate-capability. The superior electrochemical properties can be attributed to the unique dual-phase glass structure that the amorphous SiOx phase well-disperses and dense-contacts with free carbon component at nanoscale level. The SiOx phase with a lower O/Si ratio contributes the high reversible capacity while the well-contacted free carbon provides a good electronic conductivity for electrode reaction. In addition, the free carbon component can alleviate the volume change of SiOx component during discharge/charge process, which ensures an enhanced structural stability and an excellent cycling performance.

  5. Selective alkaline stripping of metal ions after solvent extraction by base-stable 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiguel, Stijn; Depuydt, Daphne; Vander Hoogerstraete, Tom; Thomas, Joice; Dehaen, Wim; Binnemans, Koen

    2017-04-19

    Novel 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids with a high base stability were synthesized for use in solvent extraction of first-row transition elements and rare earths from chloride media. The synthesis of these ionic liquids makes use of a recently reported, metal-free multicomponent reaction that allows full substitution of the 1,2,3-triazolium skeleton. The physical and chemical properties of these ionic liquids are compared with those of a trisubstituted analog. Peralkylation of the 1,2,3-triazolium skeleton leads to ionic liquids with superior properties, such as low viscosity, low solubility in water and higher thermal and base stability. Iodide and thiocyanate ionic liquids with peralkylated cations were applied to the solvent extraction of metal ions, and their stability in alkaline media was exploited in the selective stripping of the metals from the loaded ionic liquid phase by alkaline solutions. EXAFS and Raman spectroscopy were performed to gain insight into the extraction mechanism. The applicability of these extraction systems was demonstrated in separations relevant for the recovery of metals from ores and end-of-life products: Fe(iii)/Cu(ii)/Zn(ii) (copper ores, brass scraps) and Fe(iii)/Nd(iii) (rare earth magnets).

  6. Highly selective capture of phosphate ions from water by a water stable metal-organic framework modified with polyethyleneimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hui; Yang, Luyang; Liu, Fengling; Zhao, Yunxia; Liu, LeLe; Zhu, Jinhong; Song, Mingxia

    2017-10-01

    In this work, a series of polyethyleneimine (PEI) impregnated metal-organic framework (UiO-66) with varying PEI loadings were prepared and applied as sorbents to capture phosphate ions from water. As indicated by SEM and XRD analysis, PEI was dispersed on the outer surface and the inner pores of UiO-66. At 9.45% PEI loadings (UiO-66-3), the saturated adsorption capacity of phosphate reached 73.15 mg P/g at 298 K, which is superior to most sorbents ever reported. UiO-66-3 could sequestrate phosphate over a wide pH range from 2.0 to 7.0 with high efficiency. The sorption toward phosphate reached equilibrium in 50 min. Unlike commercial anion exchanger IRA-900, UiO-66-3 still exhibited high removal toward phosphate even large amount of coexisted anions were present. Successive sorption assay demonstrated that the removal efficiency of UiO-66-3 toward phosphate remained constant after six cyclic runs. All the above results indicated the great potential of UiO-66-3 as a promising sorbent for the decontamination of water from phosphate.

  7. Examination of the metastable and stable pitting corrosion of aluminum modified with carbon by ion beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lensch, O.; Enders, B.; Knecht, J.; Ensinger, W.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that aluminum and aluminum alloys are sensitive to pitting corrosion when exposed to aqueous solutions containing aggressive anions like halides. The destructive nature of pitting is due to its high local dissolution rates at electrode potentials above the so-called pitting potential U p . Recently, it has been realized that also at potentials below U p , in the passive and cathodic regions and around the free corrosion potential, anodic current transients appear which have been attributed to metastable pitting events. For the purpose of full characterization of the pitting behavior, a program routine has been developed where the occurrence frequency, lifetime and rate of metastable pitting events are extracted from potentiostatic current/time-measurements depending on the electrode potential. The routine has been applied to measurements of carbon modified pure aluminum. Carbon modifications were done with carbon evaporation and carbon sputtering under concurrent argon ion bombardment. The results are discussed in terms of the applied modification technique, their parameters and their effects on the corrosion protection ability of aluminum modified by carbon

  8. Mo-doped Na3V2(PO4)3@C composites for high stable sodium ion battery cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Wanwan; Zhu, Baichuan; Qian, Fangfang; Fang, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    NASICON-type Na3V2(PO4)3 (NVP) with superior electrochemical performance has attracted enormous attention with the development of sodium ion batteries. The structural aggregation as well as poor conductivity of NVP hinder its application in high rate perforamance cathode with long stablity. In this paper, Na3V2- x Mo x (PO4)3@C was successfully prepared through two steps method, including sol-gel and solid state thermal reduction. The optimal doping amount of Mo was defined by experiment. When x was 0.15, the Na3V1.85Mo0.15(PO4)3@C sample has the best cycle performance and rate performance. The discharge capacity of Na3V1.85Mo0.15(PO4)3@C could reach 117.26 mA·h·g-1 at 0.1 C. The discharge capacity retention was found to be 94.5% after 600 cycles at 5 C.

  9. Effect of radical species density and ion bombardment during ashing of extreme ultralow-κ interlevel dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worsley, M. A.; Bent, S. F.; Fuller, N. C. M.; Tai, T. L.; Doyle, J.; Rothwell, M.; Dalton, T.

    2007-01-01

    The significance of ion impact and radical species density on ash-induced modification of an extreme ultralow-κ interlevel dielectric (ILD) material (κ 2 and Ar/N 2 dual frequency capacitive discharges is determined by combining plasma diagnostics, modeling of the ion angular distribution function, and material characterization such as angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Radical species density was determined by optical emission actinometry under the same conditions and in the same reactor in a previous study by the present authors. ILD modification is observed and correlated with changes in the plasma for a range of pressures (5-60 mTorr), bias powers (0-350 W), and percent Ar in the source gas (0%, 85%). For the Ar/O 2 discharge, extensive modification of the ILD sidewall was observed for significant ion scattering conditions, whereas minimal modification of the ILD sidewall was observed under conditions of minimal or no ion scattering. Further, for an identical increase in the O-radical density (∼ an order of magnitude), a different degree of modification was induced at the ILD trench bottom surface depending on whether pressure or percent Ar was used to increase the radical density. The different degrees of modification seemingly correlated with the relative changes in the ion current for increasing pressure or percent Ar. For the Ar/N 2 discharge, reduced damage of the ILD sidewall and trench bottom surfaces was observed for increasing pressure (increasing N-radical density) and decreasing ion current to both surfaces. It is, thus, proposed that the mechanism for modification of the porous ILD is dominated by the creation of reactive sites by ion impact under the present conditions. A detailed discussion of the results which support this proposal is presented

  10. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Functionalized MoS2 Composite Paper as a Stable Lithium-Ion Battery Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, L.; Bhandavat, R.; Barrera, U.; Singh, G.

    2015-04-01

    A facile process is demonstrated for the synthesis of layered SiCN-MoS2 structure via pyrolysis of polysilazane functionalized MoS2 flakes. The layered morphology and polymer to ceramic transformation on MoS2 surfaces was confirmed by use of electron microscopy and spectroscopic techniques. Tested as thick film electrode in a Li-ion battery half-cell, SiCN-MoS2 showed the classical three-stage reaction with improved cycling stability and capacity retention than neat MoS2. Contribution of conversion reaction of Li/MoS2 system on overall capacity was marginally affected by the presence of SiCN while Li-irreversibility arising from electrolyte decomposition was greatly suppressed. This is understood as one of the reasons for decreased first cycle loss and increased capacity retention. SiCN-MoS2 in the form of self-supporting paper electrode (at 6 mg.cm-2) exhibited even better performance, regaining initial charge capacity of approximately 530 mAh.g-1 when the current density returned to 100 mA.g-1 after continuous cycling at 2400 mA.g-1 (192 mAh.g-1). MoS2 cycled electrode showed mud-cracks and film delamination whereas SiCN-MoS2 electrodes were intact and covered with a uniform solid electrolyte interphase coating. Taken together, our results suggest that molecular level interfacing with precursor-derived SiCN is an effective strategy for suppressing the metal-sulfide/electrolyte degradation reaction at low discharge potentials.

  11. One-step argon/nitrogen binary plasma jet irradiation of Li4Ti5O12 for stable high-rate lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chun-Kai; Chuang, Shang-I.; Bao, Qi; Liao, Yen-Ting; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure Ar/N2 binary plasma jet irradiation has been introduced into the manufacturing process of lithium ions batteries as a facile, green and scalable post-fabrication treatment approach, which enhanced significantly the high-rate anode performance of lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12). Main emission lines in Ar/N2 plasma measured by optical emission spectroscopy reveal that the dominant excited high-energy species in Ar/N2 plasma are N2*, N2+, N∗ and Ar∗. Sufficient oxygen vacancies have been evidenced by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and Raman spectra. Nitrogen doping has been achieved simultaneously by the surface reaction between pristine Li4Ti5O12 particles and chemically reactive plasma species such as N∗ and N2+. The variety of Li4Ti5O12 particles on the surface of electrodes after different plasma processing time has been examined by grazing incident X-Ray diffraction. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) confirm that the Ar/N2 atmospheric plasma treatment facilitates Li+ ions diffusion and reduces the internal charge-transfer resistance. The as-prepared Li4Ti5O12 anodes exhibit a superior capacity (132 mAh g-1) and excellent stability with almost no capacity decay over 100 cycles under a high C rate (10C).

  12. reSpect: software for identification of high and low abundance ion species in chimeric tandem mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Hoopmann, Michael R; Sun, Zhi; Schmidt, Frank; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Most shotgun proteomics data analysis workflows are based on the assumption that each fragment ion spectrum is explained by a single species of peptide ion isolated by the mass spectrometer; however, in reality mass spectrometers often isolate more than one peptide ion within the window of isolation that contribute to additional peptide fragment peaks in many spectra. We present a new tool called reSpect, implemented in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), which enables an iterative workflow whereby fragment ion peaks explained by a peptide ion identified in one round of sequence searching or spectral library search are attenuated based on the confidence of the identification, and then the altered spectrum is subjected to further rounds of searching. The reSpect tool is not implemented as a search engine, but rather as a post-search engine processing step where only fragment ion intensities are altered. This enables the application of any search engine combination in the iterations that follow. Thus, reSpect is compatible with all other protein sequence database search engines as well as peptide spectral library search engines that are supported by the TPP. We show that while some datasets are highly amenable to chimeric spectrum identification and lead to additional peptide identification boosts of over 30% with as many as four different peptide ions identified per spectrum, datasets with narrow precursor ion selection only benefit from such processing at the level of a few percent. We demonstrate a technique that facilitates the determination of the degree to which a dataset would benefit from chimeric spectrum analysis. The reSpect tool is free and open source, provided within the TPP and available at the TPP website. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. ions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MP2 B2). In order to draw the final conclusion about the content of the isomers of pentaatomic ions in saturated vapor over cesium chloride, we have taken into account the entropy factor. We considered the isomerization reactions which are given below: Cs3Cl2. + (V-shaped) = Cs3Cl2. + (cyclic or bipyramidal). (1). Cs2Cl3.

  14. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the VC-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) and annihilation of VC's in the epi-layer "bulk". Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the VC annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating VC's. Concentrations of VC below ˜2 × 1011 cm-3 can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the VC-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote Ci-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These Ci-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced Ci injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the VC-concentration, which limit the net effect of the Ci injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  15. Studies on the surface modification of TiN coatings using MEVVA ion implantation with selected metallic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.P.; Purushotham, K.P.; Manory, R.R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced surface roughness was observed after ion implantation. • W implantation increased residual stress. • Reduced friction and wear accompanied Mo implantation. • Mo implanted layer was more resistant to breakdown during wear testing. • Ion implantation effects can be complex on various implanting species properties. - Abstract: Improvement in the performance of TiN coatings can be achieved using surface modification techniques such as ion implantation. In the present study, physical vapor deposited (PVD) TiN coatings were implanted with Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and W using the metal evaporation vacuum arc (MEVVA) technique at a constant nominal dose of 4 × 10 16 ions cm −2 for all species. The samples were characterized before and after implantation, using Rutherford backscattering (RBS), glancing incident angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. Friction and wear studies were performed under dry sliding conditions using a pin-on-disc CSEM Tribometer at 1 N load and 450 m sliding distance. A reduction in the grain size and surface roughness was observed after implantation with all five species. Little variation was observed in the residual stress values for all implanted TiN coatings, except for W implanted TiN which showed a pronounced increase in compressive residual stress. Mo-implanted samples showed a lower coefficient of friction and higher resistance to breakdown during the initial stages of testing than as-received samples. Significant reduction in wear rate was observed after implanting with Zr and Mo ions compared with unimplanted TiN. The presence of the Ti 2 N phase was observed with Cr implantation.

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  17. Stable stomatal number per minor vein length indicates the coordination between leaf water supply and demand in three leguminous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wan-Li; Siddiq, Zafar; Fu, Pei-Li; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2017-05-19

    The coordination between minor vein density (MVD) and stomatal density (SD) has been found in many plants. However, we still know little about the influence of leaf node on this correlation relationship. Here, we devised the new functional trait 'stomatal number per minor vein length' (SV). By measuring leaflet area (LA), MVD, SD, and SV, we demonstrated the significance of this functional trait in Arachis hypogaea (peanut) grown under different light regimes and in sun leaves of Dalbergia odorifera and Desmodium renifolium. We found that SV did not change significantly with leaflet node or with LA within each light treatment, while shading caused a significant decrease in SV. The positive correlation between SD and MVD was found in peanut under each light regime. Sun leaves of D. odorifera and D. renifolium also had stable SV along the leaflet node, with a positive correlation between MVD and SD. We conclude that under a certain light regime, a stable SV similar to the positive correlation between MVD and SD can also indicate the coordination between leaf water supply and demand. Our findings highlight the significance of SV and provide new insight into the coordination between stomatal number and minor vein length.

  18. Species-specific responses of tree ring and leaf stable isotope signals in isohydric and anisohydric trees to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Y.; Welp, L.; Yi, K.; Maxwell, J. T.; Novick, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Eastern US forests, like many globally, have experienced a significant increase in temperature and summer drought. Recently, it has been suggested to classify tree's water use strategy in response to drought along the spectrum of isohydric to anisohydric species depending on their leaf-level hydraulic regulation. The differences in water use strategy lead to differences in internal leaf CO2 concentrations (Ci). Changes in Ci from stomatal conductance (gs) response to drought and changes in carbon assimilation rates (A) contribute to the tree's intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE), which is the ratio of A to gs. Changes in iWUE are recorded in 13C/12C (d13C) ratios of stem wood in annual tree rings. Further information from the 18O/16O ratio (d18O) of wood is hypothesized to qualitatively separate the impact of A or gs using the dual-isotope method (Scheideggar et al. 2000). However, recent studies have questioned the applicability of the dual-isotope approach in cases of severe drought. In this study, we will use 3 years (2011-2013) of bulk leaf samples and tree ring cellulose from three isohydric and two anisohydric species in Morgan-Monroe State Forest to examine how the iWUE of each tree species responds to drought in d13C and d18O. To examine dual-isotope approach applied to tree ring measurements in a mechanistic way, we will compare the temporal changes of bulk leaf isotope measurements and leaf gas exchange measurements from an infrared gas analyzer. We will further use the annual dual-isotope signals in leaves and tree rings to test the coupling between leaf and tree ring signals. We hypothesize that (1) the iWUE of isohydric species will respond more sensitively to the severe drought in 2012 than the anisohydric species, and (2) the dual-isotope approach may be more applicable for isohydric species since isotope signals are mainly controlled by the stomata, not the leaf's complicated downstream process. This study will show that oxygen and carbon isotope

  19. Ion and acid-base balance in three species of Amazonian fish during gradual acidification of extremely soft water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R W; Wood, C M; Gonzalez, R J; Patrick, M L; Bergman, H L; Narahara, A; Val, A L

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity to acid water was assessed in three species of Amazonian fish that encounter naturally acidic blackwaters to differing degrees in the wild: tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), matrincha (Brycon erythropterum), and tamoatá (Hoplosternum littorale), in decreasing order of occurrence in blackwater. Fish were exposed to a graded reduction in water pH, from pH 6 to 5 to 4 to 3.5, followed by return to pH 6. Fish were exposed to each new pH for 24 h. During these exposures, net transfers of ions (Na+, K+, Cl-, and Ca2+) and acid-base equivalents to and from the external water were used as physiological indicators of acid tolerance. Exposure to pH 5 had a minimal effect on net ion fluxes. Significant net losses of all ions (except Ca2+) were recorded in all three species during the first few hours of exposure to pH 4. However, ion balance was usually restored within 18 h at pH 4. Exposure to pH 3.5 caused even greater ion losses in all three species and proved to be acutely lethal to tamoatá. Matrincha sustained irreversible physiological damage at pH 3.5, as ion fluxes did not recover following return to pH 6 and there was some mortality. Tambaqui suffered the least ionoregulatory disturbances at pH 3.5 and was the only species to make a full recovery on return to pH 6. In all species, there was a tendency for ammonia excretion to increase at low water pH, but even at pH 3.5, there was no significant net uptake of acid from the water. Overall, there was a strong relationship between the magnitude of ionic disturbances and the lethality of exposure to low pH. The relative insensitivity of the ionoregulatory system of tambaqui to low pH indicates that this is a feature of fish native to blackwater systems rather than one that is common to all Amazon fish.

  20. Catalytically active Au-O(OH)x- species stabilized by alkali ions on zeolites and mesoporous oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M.; Li, S.; Wang, Y.; Herron, J. A.; Xu, Y.; Allard, L. F.; Lee, S.; Huang, J.; Mavrikakis, M.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    2014-11-27

    We report that the addition of alkali ions (sodium or potassium) to gold on KLTL-zeolite and mesoporous MCM-41 silica stabilizes mononuclear gold in Au-O(OH)x-(Na or K) ensembles. This single-site gold species is active for the low-temperature (< 200°C) water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. Unexpectedly, gold is thus similar to platinum in creating –O and –OH linkages with more than eight alkali ions and establishing an active site on various supports. The intrinsic activity of the single-site gold species is the same on irreducible supports as on reducible ceria, iron oxide, and titania supports; apparently all sharing a common, similarly structured gold active site. This finding paves the way for using earth-abundant supports to disperse and stabilize precious metal atoms with alkali additives for the WGS and potentially other fuel processing reactions.

  1. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  2. Osmoregulation in larvae and juveniles of two recently separated Macrobrachium species: Expression patterns of ion transporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudour-Boucheker, Nesrine; Boulo, Viviane; Charmantier-Daures, Mireille; Anger, Klaus; Charmantier, Guy; Lorin-Nebel, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    In this comparative study, osmoregulatory mechanisms were analyzed in two closely related species of palaemonid shrimp from Brazil, Macrobrachium pantanalense and Macrobrachium amazonicum. A previous investigation showed that all postembryonic stages of M. pantanalense from inland waters of the Pantanal are able to hyper-osmoregulate in fresh water, while this species was not able to hypo-osmoregulate at high salinities. In M. amazonicum originating from the Amazon estuary, in contrast, all stages are able to hypo-osmoregulate, but only first-stage larvae, late juveniles and adults are able to hyper-osmoregulate in fresh water. The underlying molecular mechanisms of these physiological differences have not been known. We therefore investigated the expression patterns of three ion transporters (NKA α-subunit, VHA B-subunit and NHE3) following differential salinity acclimation in different ontogenetic stages (stage-V larvae, juveniles) of both species. Larval NKAα expression was at both salinities significantly higher in M. pantanalense than in M. amazonicum, whereas no difference was noted in juveniles. VHA was also more expressed in larvae of M. pantanalense than in those of M. amazonicum. When NHE3 expression is compared between the larvae of the two species, further salinity-related differences were observed, with generally higher expression in the inland species. Overall, a high expression of ion pumps in M. pantanalense suggests an evolutionary key role of these transporters in freshwater invasion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Consuming algal products: trophic interactions of bacteria and a diatom species determined by RNA stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Melanie; Gerdts, Gunnar; Wellinger, Marco; Wichels, Antje

    2008-09-01

    Heterotrophic marine bacteria utilise a wide range of carbon sources. Recently, techniques were developed to link bacterial identity and physiological capacity of microorganisms within natural communities. One of these methods is stable isotope probing (SIP) which allows an identification of active microorganisms using particular growth substrates. In this study, we present the first attempt to analyse bacterial communities associated with microalgae by rRNA-SIP. This approach was used to analyse bacterial populations consuming algal products of Thalassiosira rotula by applying SIP followed by reverse transcription of 16S rRNA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Generally, our results indicate that bacteria which consume algal products can be detected by isotope arrays coupled with fingerprinting methods.

  4. Multishelled Si@Cu Microparticles Supported on 3D Cu Current Collectors for Stable and Binder-free Anodes of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zailei; Wang, Zhong Lin; Lu, Xianmao

    2018-04-13

    Silicon has proved to be a promising anode material of high-specific capacity for the next-generation lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, during repeated discharge/charge cycles, Si-based electrodes, especially those in microscale size, pulverize and lose electrical contact with the current collectors due to large volume expansion. Here, we introduce a general method to synthesize Cu@M (M = Si, Al, C, SiO 2 , Si 3 N 4 , Ag, Ti, Ta, SnIn 2 O 5 , Au, V, Nb, W, Mg, Fe, Ni, Sn, ZnO, TiN, Al 2 O 3 , HfO 2 , and TiO 2 ) core-shell nanowire arrays on Cu substrates. The resulting Cu@Si nanowire arrays were employed as LIB anodes that can be reused via HCl etching and H 2 -reduction. Multishelled Cu@Si@Cu microparticles supported on 3D Cu current collectors were further prepared as stable and binder-free LIB anodes. This 3D Cu@Si@Cu structure allows the interior conductive Cu network to effectively accommodate the volume expansion of the electrode and facilitates the contact between the Cu@Si@Cu particles and the current collectors during the repeated insertion/extraction of lithium ions. As a result, the 3D Cu@Si@Cu microparticles at a high Si-loading of 1.08 mg/cm 2 showed a capacity retention of 81% after 200 cycles. In addition, charging tests of 3D Cu@Si@Cu-LiFePO 4 full cells by a triboelectric nanogenerator with a pulsed current demonstrated that LIBs with silicon anodes can effectively store energy delivered by mechanical energy harvesters.

  5. Differences in food assimilation between two coot species assessed with stable isotopes and particle size in faeces: linking physiology and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varo, Nico; Amat, Juan A

    2008-02-01

    The red-knobbed coot Fulica cristata experienced a dramatic population decline in Spain, where the common coot F. atra does not face conservation problems. This is puzzling because both species have similar ecologies. It has been suggested that habitat alterations affected the quality of food plants, and this impacted differentially both coots. To verify this, we conducted experiments to determine the assimilation efficiency of both species in relation to food quality. Two types of diets differing in fibre content (commercial food and Potamogeton pectinatus) were offered to captive red-knobbed and common coots, during both spring and autumn. We examined variations in faecal particle size among coot species and diets, indicative of the facility with which food can be assimilated, and used the stable isotope technique to study differences between coot species in stable isotope fractionations from consumption to excretion. Faecal particle size was larger in red-knobbed than in common coots when fibre content was high, but was similar when it was low. Faecal particle sizes were larger in autumn, when fibre content was higher, than in spring. In general, delta(15)N in faeces of red-knobbed coots was greater than in faeces of common coots. These results suggest that the digestive efficiency of the red-knobbed coot was lower than that of the common coot, and that the differences increased when the fibre content in food plants increased. Managers should try to make available to coots wetland habitat with high quality food, which may be facilitated by prolonging the hydroperiods.

  6. Large-scale synthesis of ternary Sn5SbP3/C composite by ball milling for superior stable sodium-ion battery anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Mao, Jianfeng; Pang, Wei Kong; Guo, Zaiping; Chen, Zhixin

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Large-scaled Sn 5 SbP 3 /C composite is developed for stable sodium-ion battery anode, which delivers superior electrochemical performance to Sn 4 P 3 /C and SnSb/C composites. - Highlights: • Large scaled Sn 5 SbP 3 /C synthesized by ball milling as sodium-ion battery anode. • The Sn 5 SbP 3 /C composite contains active Sn 4 P 3 and SnSb and Sn nanoparticles. • The composite shows superior electrochemical performance to Sn 4 P 3 /C or SnSb/C. • Each of the active phases in the composite functions as a buffer for the others - Abstract: Alloy-based materials (i.e. Sn, Sb, P) are promising candidates for sodium-ion battery (SIB) anodes, but they suffer from capacity decay during charge/discharge cycling due to the pulverization caused by their huge volume change. Nanostructures can slow down the capacity fade, but most of the synthesis methods of such nanostructured anodes are difficult to scale-up. Herein, a ternary Sn 5 SbP 3 /C composite was fabricated by a green, low cost, one-step and easily scalable ball-milling of elementary Sn, Sb, P, and C. The microstructure of the ball-milled powders consists of micrometric agglomerates of active nano Sn 4 P 3 and SnSb and Sn particles. Carbon in the composite acts as a conducting matrix, and it does not only benefit to the ball milling efficiency, but also benefit to the cycle life of the electrode. Each of the active Sn 4 P 3 and SnSb and Sn phases in the composite functions mutually as a buffer for the others. As a result, this ternary composite anode delivers a good capacity of 352 mA h g −1 at the current density of 2 A g −1 , which is notably higher than that of the binary Sn 4 P 3 /C and SnSb/C composites produced under the same conditions.

  7. Antifungal activities against toxigenic Fusarium specie and deoxynivalenol adsorption capacity of ion-exchanged zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, Geovana D; Cardoso, William A; Furtado, Bianca G; Bortolotto, Tiago; Zanoni, Elton T; Scussel, Rahisa; Rezende, Lucas F; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Montedo, Oscar R K; Angioletto, Elidio

    2018-03-04

    Zeolites are often used as adsorbents materials and their loaded cations can be exchanged with metal ions in order to add antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to use the 4A zeolite and its derived ion-exchanged forms with Zn 2+ , Li + , Cu 2+ and Co 2+ in order to evaluate their antifungal properties against Fusarium graminearum, including their capacity in terms of metal ions release, conidia germination and the deoxynivalenol (DON) adsorption. The zeolites ion-exchanged with Li + , Cu 2+ , and Co 2+ showed an excellent antifungal activity against F. graminearum, using an agar diffusion method, with a zone of inhibition observed around the samples of 45.3 ± 0.6 mm, 25.7 ± 1.5 mm, and 24.7 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. Similar results using agar dilution method were found showing significant growth inhibition of F. graminearum for ion-exchanged zeolites with Zn 2+ , Li + , Cu 2+ , and Co 2+ . The fungi growth inhibition decreased as zeolite-Cu 2+ >zeolite-Li + >zeolite-Co 2+ >zeolite-Zn 2+ . In addition, the conidia germination was strongly affected by ion-exchanged zeolites. With regard to adsorption capacity, results indicate that only zeolite-Li + were capable of DON adsorption significantly (P concentration. The antifungal effects of the ion-exchanged zeolites can be ascribed to the interactions of the metal ions released from the zeolite structure, especially for zeolite-Li + , which showed to be a promising agent against F. graminearum and its toxin.

  8. Facile synthesis and stable cycling ability of hollow submicron silicon oxide–carbon composite anode material for Li-ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong-Yeon; Nguyen, Dan Thien [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joon-Sup [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Seung-Wan, E-mail: swsong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Hollow submicron SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite material was synthesized using Si{sup 4+}-citrate chelation. • Composite material possessed a homogeneous distribution of SiO{sub 2} and carbon. • Composite electrode delivered ⩾600 mAh/g with a stable cycling stability. • This materials design and synthesis provides a useful platform for scalable production. - Abstract: Advanced SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite anode active material for lithium-ion battery has been synthesized through a simple chelation of silicon cation with citrate in a glyme-based solvent. The resultant composite material demonstrates a homogeneous distribution of constituents over the submicron particles and a unique hollow spherical microstructure, which provides an enhanced electrical conductivity and better accommodation of volume change of silicon during electrochemical charge–discharge cycling, respectively. As a result, the composite electrode exhibits a high cycling stability delivering the capacity retention of 91% at the 100th cycle and discharge capacities of 662–602 mAh/g and coulombic efficiencies of 99.8%. This material synthesis is scalable and cost-effective in preparing various submicron or micron composite electrode materials.

  9. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  10. Why are tropical mountain passes "low" for some species? Genetic and stable-isotope tests for differentiation, migration and expansion in elevational generalist songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadek, Chauncey R; Newsome, Seth D; Beckman, Elizabeth J; Chavez, Andrea N; Galen, Spencer C; Bautista, Emil; Witt, Christopher C

    2017-11-06

    gradient, potentially concurrent with Holocene anthropogenic habitat conversion for agriculture. In different ways, each species defies the tendency for tropical birds to have long-term stable distributions and sedentary habits. We conclude that tropical elevational generalism is rare due to evolutionary instability. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  11. Manganese Ion Increases LAB-yeast Mixed-species Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    NOZAKA, Soma; FURUKAWA, Soichi; SASAKI, Miwa; HIRAYAMA, Satoru; OGIHARA, Hirokazu; MORINAGA, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable LAB-yeast mixed-species biofilm was formed by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 isolated from Fukuyama pot vinegar and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This mixed-species biofilm formation increased in proportion to the YPD medium concentration but decreased in proportion to the MRS medium concentration. The effect of MRS components on mixed-species biofilm formation was investigated in a YPD medium environment, and it was clarified that beef extract (one of the M...

  12. Organotin persistence in contaminated marine sediments and porewaters: In situ degradation study using species-specific stable isotopic tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furdek, Martina; Mikac, Nevenka [Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Bueno, Maite; Tessier, Emmanuel; Cavalheiro, Joana [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l’Environnement et les Matériaux, CNRS UMR 5254, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, Hélioparc Pau Pyrénées, 2, Av. P. Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Monperrus, Mathilde, E-mail: mathilde.monperrus@univ-pau.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l’Environnement et les Matériaux, CNRS UMR 5254, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, Hélioparc Pau Pyrénées, 2, Av. P. Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Limiting step in OTC degradation in sediments is their desorption into porewater. • TBT persistence in contaminated sediments increases in sediments rich in organic matter. • DBT does not accumulate in sediments as degradation product of TBT. • TBT and DBT degradation in porewaters occurs with half-lives from 2.9 to 9.2 days. • PhTs degradation is slower than BuTs degradation in oxic porewaters. - Abstract: This paper provides a comprehensive study of the persistence of butyltins and phenyltins in contaminated marine sediments and presents the first data on their degradation potentials in porewaters. The study’s aim was to explain the different degradation efficiencies of organotin compounds (OTC) in contaminated sediments. The transformation processes of OTC in sediments and porewaters were investigated in a field experiment using species-specific, isotopically enriched organotin tracers. Sediment characteristics (organic carbon content and grain size) were determined to elucidate their influence on the degradation processes. The results of this study strongly suggest that a limiting step in OTC degradation in marine sediments is their desorption into porewaters because their degradation in porewaters occurs notably fast with half-lives of 9.2 days for tributyltin (TBT) in oxic porewaters and 2.9 ± 0.1 and 9.1 ± 0.9 days for dibutyltin (DBT) in oxic and anoxic porewaters, respectively. By controlling the desorption process, organic matter influences the TBT degradation efficiency and consequently defines its persistence in contaminated sediments, which thus increases in sediments rich in organic matter.

  13. Behavior of cationic, anionic and colloidal species of titanium, zirconium and thorium in presence of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Filho, G. de; Abrao, A.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of titanium, zirconium and thorium is aqueous and resin phases has been studied using strong cationic resin in the R-NH 4 form. Solutions of the above elements in perchloric, nitric, hydrochloric and suphuric media were used. Each set of experiments was made by separately varying one of the five parameters - type of anion present, acidity of solution, temperature of percolation, age of solution and concentration of the element. It was found that, depending on the particular balance of these parameters, the elements investigated may be found in acidic solutions either as cationic, anionic or colloidal species. It is emphasized that the colloidal species of titanium, zirconium or thorium are not retained by the ion exchangers, and from this property a method for the separation and purification of the above elements has been outlined [pt

  14. The influence of anode/target ion species on the magnetically immersed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Welch, Dale Robert; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Rose, David Vincent; Bruner, Nichelle Lee

    2005-01-01

    The magnetically immersed (B z ) diode is being investigated as a source for pulsed-power driven flash radiography. Experiments fielding this diode have revealed a limit on its achievable current density on target. Either a small spot produces a low dose, or a high dose is achieved with a large spot. It has been proposed that this limit is due to non-protonic ions liberated from the anode surface and subsequently ionizing to higher states. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell code LSP is used to investigate this proposal. Data from the recent immersed diode experiments conducted on the RITS-3 accelerator are compared to LSP models of the experimental configuration, including the B z field map. We report on how the non-protonic and protonic ion models compare to data, and proposals for future investigation.

  15. R-O-C(triple bond)N species produced by ion irradiation of ice mixtures: comparison with astronomical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, M. E.; Strazzulla, G.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the effects induced by ion bombardment of mixtures containing nitrogen-bearing compounds at low temperatures. The results show the formation of a band at 2080 cm-1 in binary mixtures, NH3:CH4 and N2:CH4, which we attribute to HCN embedded in the organic residue formed by ion irradiation. In addition to this band, ternary mixtures containing an oxygen-bearing species (i.e., H2O) form a compound with a prominent absorption band at about 2165 cm-1 (4.62 microns). We ascribe this band to a nitrile compound containing O that is bonded to the organic residue. A detailed comparison of the laboratory results with astronomical data of the 4.62 microns absorption band in protostellar spectra shows good agreement in peak position and profile. Our experimental studies show that N2, which is a more likely interstellar ice component than NH3, can be the molecular progenitor of the carrier of the interstellar band. This is an alternative to the pathway by which UV photolysis of NH3-containing ices produces the 4.62 microns band and implies that ion bombardment may well play an important role in the evolution of interstellar ices. Here, we discuss the implications of our studies for the chemical route by which the carrier of the 4.62 microns band is formed in these laboratory experiments.

  16. Specificity of the ion exchange/atomic absorption method for free copper(II) species determination in natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweileh, J.A.; Lucyk, D.; Kratochvil, B.; Cantwell, F.F.

    1987-02-15

    Concentrations of the free copper(II) species (Cu/sup 2 +/) measured by the ion exchange/atomic absorption (IEX) method in the presence of various concentrations of the ligands citrate, glycinate, phthalate, salicylate, chloride, and fulvate are compared to concentrations measured with a cupric ion selective electrode (ISE) and/or to concentrations calculated from known metal-ligand formation constants. The IEX method is considerably more sensitive for Cu/sup 2 +/ than the ISE method but is subject to interference from cationic and neutral copper complexes as well as from filterable colloids copper-hydroxo species at higher pH values. Accurate values of Cu/sup 2 +/ concentration are obtained by both methods in the presence of anionic copper-ligand complexes. Since fulvate, which is the principal ligand present in natural freshwaters, forms anionic copper complexes, the IEX method possesses adequate selectivity for measuring Cu/sup 2 +/ at trace levels in such waters. The complexing capacity of an acidic lake water with a very low dissolved organic carbon content was measured as 3.0 x 10/sup -8/ M by monitoring Cu/sup 2 +/ concentration by the IEX method during titration with copper nitrate.

  17. Modified Thomson spectrometer design for high energy, multi-species ion sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gwynne, D.; Kar, S.; Doria, D.; Ahmed, H.; Cerchez, M.; Fernández, J.; Gray, R.J.; Green, J.S.; Hanton, F.; MacLellan, D.A.; McKenna, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Neely, D.; Ruiz, J.A.; Schiavi, A.; Streeter, M.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 3 (2014), "033304-1"-"033304-6" ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : high power laser * protons * ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.614, year: 2014

  18. Nectar sugars and amino acids in day- and night-flowering Nicotiana species are more strongly shaped by pollinators' preferences than organic acids and inorganic ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Tiedge

    Full Text Available Floral nectar contains mainly sugars but also amino acids, organic acids, inorganic ions and secondary compounds to attract pollinators. The genus Nicotiana exhibits great diversity among species in floral morphology, flowering time, nectar compositions, and predominant pollinators. We studied nectar samples of 20 Nicotiana species, composed equally of day- and night-flowering plants and attracting different groups of pollinators (e.g. hummingbirds, moths or bats to investigate whether sugars, amino acids, organic acids and inorganic ions are influenced by pollinator preferences. Glucose, fructose and sucrose were the only sugars found in the nectar of all examined species. Sugar concentration of the nectar of day-flowering species was 20% higher and amino acid concentration was 2-3-fold higher compared to the nectar of night-flowering species. The sucrose-to-hexose ratio was significantly higher in night-flowering species and the relative share of sucrose based on the total sugar correlated with the flower tube length in the nocturnal species. Flowers of different tobacco species contained varying volumes of nectar which led to about 150-fold higher amounts of total sugar per flower in bat- or sunbird-pollinated species than in bee-pollinated or autogamous species. This difference was even higher for total amino acids per flower (up to 1000-fold. As a consequence, some Nicotiana species invest large amounts of organic nitrogen for certain pollinators. Higher concentrations of inorganic ions, predominantly anions, were found in nectar of night-flowering species. Therefore, higher anion concentrations were also associated with pollinator types active at night. Malate, the main organic acid, was present in all nectar samples but the concentration was not correlated with pollinator type. In conclusion, statistical analyses revealed that pollinator types have a stronger effect on nectar composition than phylogenetic relations. In this context

  19. Tobacco Smoke: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Stable Free Radicals in Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage, Carcinogenesis and Synergistic Effects with Other Respirable Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Fiotakis

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke contains many toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals, as well as stable and unstable free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS in the particulate and the gas phase with the potential for biological oxidative damage. Epidemiological evidence established that smoking is one of the most important extrinsic factor of premature morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative and carcinogenic mechanisms of tobacco and synergistic action with other respirable particles in the respiratory system of smokers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR and spin- trapping techniques were used to study stable free radicals in the cigarette tar, and unstable superoxide anion (O2·- and hydroxyl (HO· radicals in the smoke Results showed that the semiquinone radical system has the potential for redox recycling and oxidative action. Further, results proved that aqueous cigarette tar (ACT solutions can generate adducts with DNA nucleobases, particularly the mutagenic 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (a biomarker for carcinogenesis.Also, we observed synergistic effects in the generation of HO·, through the Fenton reaction, with environmental respirable particles (asbestos fibres, coal dust, etc. and ambient particulate matter (PM, such as PM10, PM2.5 and diesel exhaust particles (DEP. The highest synergistic effects was observed with the asbestos fibres (freshly grounded, PM2.5 and DEP. Finally, we discuss results from our previous study of conventional cellulose acetate filters and “bio-filters” with hemoglobin impregnated activated carbon, which showed that these filters do not substantially alter the free radical content of smoke in the particulate and in the gaseous phase.

  20. Construction of a stable replicating shuttle vector for Caldicellulosiruptor species: use for extending genetic methodologies to other members of this genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Chung

    Full Text Available The recalcitrance of plant biomass is the most important barrier to its economic conversion by microbes to products of interest. Thermophiles have special advantages for biomass conversion and members of the genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes known. In this study, we report the construction of a replicating shuttle vector for Caldicellulosiruptor species based on pBAS2, the smaller of two native C. bescii plasmids. The entire plasmid was cloned into an E. coli cloning vector containing a pSC101 origin of replication and an apramycin resistance cassette for selection in E. coli. The wild-type C. bescii pyrF locus was cloned under the transcriptional control of the regulatory region of the ribosomal protein S30EA (Cbes2105, and the resulting vector was transformed into a new spontaneous deletion mutant in the pyrFA locus of C. bescii that allowed complementation with the pyrF gene alone. Plasmid DNA was methylated in vitro with a recently described cognate methyltransferase, M.CbeI, and transformants were selected for uracil prototrophy. The plasmid was stably maintained in low copy with selection but rapidly lost without selection. There was no evidence of DNA rearrangement during transformation and replication in C. bescii. A similar approach was used to screen for transformability of other members of this genus using M.CbeI to overcome restriction as a barrier and was successful for transformation of C. hydrothermalis, an attractive species for many applications. Plasmids containing a carbohydrate binding domain (CBM and linker region from the C. bescii celA gene were maintained with selection and were structurally stable through transformation and replication in C. bescii and E. coli.

  1. Analysis of polyphenolic antioxidants from the fruits of three pouteria species by selected ion monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Yang, Hui; Basile, Margaret J; Kennelly, Edward J

    2004-09-22

    Pouteria campechiana, Pouteria sapota, and Pouteria viridis are tropical plants in the Sapotaceae family that bear edible fruits. The fresh fruits of these three Pouteria species were each extracted, and activity-guided fractionations were performed to identify the antioxidant constituents. Seven polyphenolic antioxidants, gallic acid (1), (+)-gallocatechin (2), (+)-catechin (3), (-)-epicatechin (4), dihydromyricetin (5), (+)-catechin-3-O-gallate (6), and myricitrin (7), were isolated and identified. Extracts of the three Pouteria fruits were analyzed by a selected ion monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantify their polyphenolic antioxidants. The highest level of the seven measured polyphenols was found in P. sapota, the second highest in P. viridis, and the lowest in P. campechiana. The levels of the seven polyphenols corresponded with the results of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay, by which P. sapota had the highest antioxidant activity, P. viridis the second highest, and P. campechiana the lowest.

  2. PVP-coated silver nanoparticles and silver ions induce reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and necrosis in THP-1 monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Olesen, Ping Liu; Hougaard, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in vitro. Silver ions (Ag+) have been used in medical treatments for decades whereas Ag NPs have been used in a variety of consumer products within recent years. This study was undertaken to compare......, both Ag NPs and Ag+ were shown to induce apoptosis and necrosis in THP-1 cells depending on dose and exposure time. Furthermore, the presence of apoptosis could be confirmed by the TUNEL method. A number of studies have implicated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytotoxicity mediated...... by NPs. We used the fluorogenic probe, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein to assess the levels of intracellular ROS during exposure to Ag NPs and Ag+. A drastic increase in ROS levels could be detected after 6–24 h suggesting that oxidative stress is an important mediator of cytotoxicity caused by Ag NPs and Ag+....

  3. Direct Tracking and Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis Identifies Dispersal Routes and Cryptic Latitudinal Trends in the Winter Distribution of Two Antarctic Penguin Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, M. J.; Houghton, L. A.; Hinke, J.; Thorrold, S.

    2016-02-01

    Animal dispersal behaviors have both ecological and evolutionary significance. However, due to the logistical challenges of tracking animals in the Antarctic marine environment little is known about the winter dispersal and migration of Antarctic marine predators. We used a combination of direct tracking (Geolocation sensors; GLS) and compound-specific stable isotope analysis of carbon in essential amino acids (CSIA-AA) to describe the winter distribution of two wide-ranging marine predators, the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) and chinstrap penguin (P. antarctica) along the Antarctic Peninsula and Scotia Arc. GLS and CSIA-AA identified two general migration strategies, with animals overwintering to the east or west of the Antarctic Peninsula, with CSIA-AA also being able to discriminate between ice-free vs. pack-ice habitats. In addition, CSIA-AA provided the ability to assign non GLS-tracked chinstrap penguins from multiple breeding sites across the Scotia Arc to specific over-wintering areas. This provided a first ever, regional-scale analyses of the winter movements and distributions of the species and identified a cryptic latitudinal trend that would have been otherwise undetectable. Breeding colonies farther north were more likely to have individuals dispersing eastwards relative to colonies further south where most individual dispersed westwards, possibly due to a combination of proximity and competition avoidance. Finally we highlight how CSIA-AA approaches can be applied to other studies of the distribution and ecology of marine top predators.

  4. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g l(-1) level...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  5. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  6. A survey of the interaction of calcium ions with mitochondria from different tissues and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1971-01-01

    A survey was made of the capacity of mitochondria isolated from a number of different tissues and species to accumulate Ca2+ from the suspending medium during electron transport. The species examined included the rat, mouse, rabbit, hamster, guinea pig, cow, chicken, turtle, blowfly, yeast and Neurospora crassa. The tissues examined included vertebrate liver, kidney, brain, heart, spleen, thyroid and adrenal cortex, and the flight muscle of the blowfly. The mitochondria from all vertebrate tissues examined showed: (a) stimulation of State 4 respiration by added Ca2+ (Ca2+/~ activation ratio about 2.0), accompanied by accumulation of Ca2+ and ejection of H+, with a H+/Ca2+ ratio about 1.0; (b) a requirement of phosphate for accumulation of large amounts of Ca2+; (c) respiration-independent high-affinity binding sites for Ca2+; (d) endogenous Ca2+, which is largely released by uncoupling agents. However, mitochondria from yeast and blowfly flight muscle are unable to accumulate Ca2+ in a respiration-dependent process and possess no high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites. These findings support the view that the high-affinity sites represent the ligand-binding sites of a specific Ca2+ `permease' or transport system in the membrane. The relatively high affinity for Ca2+, which equals or exceeds the affinity for ADP, and the generally uniform characteristics of Ca2+ transport in all the vertebrate mitochondria tested strongly suggest that respiration-linked Ca2+ accumulation plays a general and fundamental role in vertebrate cell physiology. PMID:5129264

  7. [Determination of iodine and its species in plant samples using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Chen, Guang; Chen, Yuhong

    2011-07-01

    A method was established for the determination of iodine and its species in plant samples using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP/ MS). Alkaline extraction and IC-ICP/MS were applied as the sample pre-treatment method and the detection technique respectively, for iodate and iodide determination. Moreover, high-temperature pyrolysis absorption was adopted as the pre-treatment method for total iodine analysis, which finally converted all the iodine species into iodide and measured the iodide by IC-ICP/MS. The recoveries of iodine for alkaline extraction and high-temperature pyrolysis absorption were 89.6%-97.5% and 95.2%-111.2%, respectively. The results were satisfactory. The detection limit of iodine was 0.010 mg/kg. The iodine and its speciation contents in several kinds of plant samples such as seaweeds, kelp, cabbage, tea leaf and spinach were investigated. It was shown that the iodine in seaweeds mainly existed as organic iodine; while the ones in kelp, cabbage, tea leaf and spinach mainly existed as inorganic iodine.

  8. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils is associated with nitrogen deposition-induced species loss in an Inner Mongolia steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Q.-Y.; Liu, N.-N.; Bai, W.-M.; Li, L.-H.; Zhang, W.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) resulting from anthropogenic activities has negative impacts on plant diversity in grassland ecosystems globally. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the species loss. Ion toxicity due to N deposition-induced soil acidification has been suggested to be responsible for species loss in acidic grasslands, while few studies have evaluated the role of soil-mediated homeostasis of ions in species loss under elevated N deposition in alkaline grasslands. To determine whether soil-mediated processes are involved in changes in species composition by N deposition, the effects of 9 yr N addition on soil properties, aboveground biomass (AGB) and species composition were investigated in an Inner Mongolia steppe. Low to moderate N addition rate (2, 4, 8 g N m-2 yr-1) significantly enhanced AGB of grasses, while high N addition rate (> 16 g N m-2 yr-1) reduced AGB of forbs, leading to an overall increase in AGB of the community under low to moderate N addition rates. Forb richness was significantly reduced by N addition at rates greater than 8 g N m-2 yr-1, while no effect of N addition on grass richness was observed, resulting in decline in total species richness. N addition depleted base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+) in soils, reduced soil pH and mobilized Mn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+ ions in soils. Soil inorganic-N concentration was negatively correlated with forb richness, explaining 27.2% variation of forb richness. The concentrations of base cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and metal ions (Mn2+ and Cu2+) showed positively and negatively linear correlation with forb richness, accounting for 25.9 and 41.4% variation of forb richness, respectively. These results reveal that disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils by N addition, particularly enhanced release of soil Mn2+ and Cu2+ may be associated with reduction in forb richness in temperate steppe of Inner Mongolia.

  9. Ion fluxes across the pitcher walls of three Bornean Nepenthes pitcher plant species: flux rates and gland distribution patterns reflect nitrogen sequestration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jonathan A; Hawkins, Barbara J; Gowen, Brent E; Robbins, Samantha L

    2010-03-01

    Nepenthes pitcher plant species differ in their prey capture strategies, prey capture rates, and pitcher longevity. In this study, it is investigated whether or not interspecific differences in nutrient sequestration strategy are reflected in the physiology and microstructure of the pitchers themselves. Using a non-invasive technique (MIFE), ion fluxes in pitchers of Nepenthes ampullaria Jack, Nepenthes bicalcarata Hook.f., and Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack were measured. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to characterize the distribution of glandular and other structures on the inner pitcher walls. The results demonstrate that nutrient sequestration strategy is indeed mirrored in pitcher physiology and microstructure. Species producing long-lived pitchers with low prey capture rates (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) showed lower rates of NH(4)(+) uptake than N. rafflesiana, a species producing short-lived pitchers with high capture rates. Crucially, species dependent upon aquatic commensals (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) actively manipulated H(+) fluxes to maintain less acid pitcher fluid than found in 'typical' species; in addition, these species lacked the lunate cells and epicuticular waxes characteristic of 'typical' insectivorous congeners. An unexpected finding was that ion fluxes occurred in the wax-covered, non-glandular zones in N. rafflesiana. The only candidates for active transport of aqueous ions in these zones appear to be the epidermal cells lying beneath the lunate cells, as these are the only sites not visibly coated with epicuticular waxes.

  10. Different Reactive Oxygen Species Lead to Distinct Changes of Cellular Metal Ions in the Eukaryotic Model Organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Rogers

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Elemental uptake and export of the cell are tightly regulated thereby maintaining the ionomic homeostasis. This equilibrium can be disrupted upon exposure to exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to reduction or elevation of the intracellular metal ions. In this study, the ionomic composition in the eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae was profiled using the inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES following the treatment with individual ROS, including hydrogen peroxide, cumen hydroperoxide, linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LAH, the superoxide-generating agent menadione, the thiol-oxidising agent diamide [diazine-dicarboxylic acid-bis(dimethylamide], dimedone and peroxynitrite. The findings demonstrated that different ROS resulted in distinct changes in cellular metal ions. Aluminium (Al3+ level rose up to 50-fold after the diamide treatment. Cellular potassium (K+ in LAH-treated cells was 26-fold less compared to the non-treated controls. The diamide-induced Al3+ accumulation was further validated by the enhanced Al3+ uptake along the time course and diamide doses. Pre-incubation of yeast with individual elements including iron, copper, manganese and magnesium failed to block diamide-induced Al3+ uptake, suggesting Al3+-specific transporters could be involved in Al3+ uptake. Furthermore, LAH-induced potassium depletion was validated by a rescue experiment in which addition of potassium increased yeast growth in LAH-containing media by 26% compared to LAH alone. Taken together, the data, for the first time, demonstrated the linkage between ionomic profiles and individual oxidative conditions.

  11. Highly active and stable ion-exchanged Fe–Ferrierite catalyst for N2O decomposition under nitric acid tail gas conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melián-Cabrera, I.; Mentruit, C.; Pieterse, J.A.Z.; Brink, R.W. van den; Mul, G.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    This communication reports on the excellent performance and durability of a wet ion-exchanged Fe–Ferrierite catalysts for N2O decomposition under conditions of nitric acid plants, especially in the presence of water (0.5% vol) and at a high space time W/F0(N2O) = 900 kgcat s mol-1. In contrast to

  12. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  13. The effects of LiBOB additive for stable SEI formation of PP13TFSI-organic mixed electrolyte in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Yongxin; Zuo Pengjian; Cheng Xinqun; Liao Lixia; Yin Geping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → LiBOB as the additive of SEI formation. → LiBOB containing mixed electrolyte shows well thermal stability and safety. → LiBOB improves the electrochemical performance of PP13TFSI-organic mixture. - Abstract: A safe electrolyte system is prepared from N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (PP13TFSI), organic electrolyte (1 mol L -1 LiPF 6 /EC-DEC) and lithium bis (oxalato) borate (LiBOB). The additive of LiBOB enhances the stability of interface between electrolyte and anode. The LiBOB-containing mixed electrolytes show non-flammability and good compatibility with active materials. The performance of anode for lithium ion battery is successfully improved by LiBOB-containing mixed electrolytes, which shows 200 mA h g -1 reversible capacities at 0.3 C rate. The ionic conductivity and the lithium ion transference number in LiBOB-containing mixed electrolytes system also suits to application for lithium ion battery.

  14. EMIC-wave-moderated flux limitations of ring current energetic ion intensities in the multi-species plasmas of Earth's inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B.

    2013-12-01

    One of the early sophisticated integrations of theory and observations of the space age was the development in 1966 of the integral Kennel-Petschek flux limit for trapped energetic electrons and ions within Earth's inner magnetosphere. Specifically, it was proposed that: 1) trapped particle distributions in the magnetic bottle configuration of the inner magnetosphere are intrinsically unstable to the generation various plasma waves and 2) ionospheric reflection of some waves back into the trapped populations leads to runaway growth of the waves and dramatic loss of particles for particle integral intensities that rise above a fairly rigidly specified upper limit. While there has been a long hiatus in utilization of the KP limit in inner magnetospheric research, there have been recent highly successful reconsiderations of more general forms of the KP limit for understanding radiation belt electron intensities and spectral shapes, resulting from improvements in theoretical tools. Such a reconsideration has not happened for energetic trapped ions, perhaps due to the perceived immense complexity of the generation of the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, that scatter the energetic ions, for plasmas containing multiple ionic species (H, He, O). Here, a differential Kennel-Petschek (KP) flux limit for magnetospheric energetic ions is devised taking into account multiple ion species effects on the EMIC waves. This new theoretical approach is applied to measured Earth magnetosphere energetic ion spectra (~ keV to ~ 1 MeV) for radial positions (L) 3 to 6.7 RE. The flatness of the most intense spectral shapes for Van Allen Probes mission will likely resolve outstanding uncertainties.

  15. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Cortázar, O D; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H +, H+2 , and H+3 ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed.

  16. Ultrasmall Tin Nanodots Embedded in Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: Metal-Organic-Framework Derivation and Electrochemical Application as Highly Stable Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Ruoling; Sun, Weiwei; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sn-based metal-organic-framework (MOF) is prepared. • Ultrasmall tin nanodots (2–3 nm) are embedded in nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. • The Sn/C composite anode shows high capacity and ultralong cycle life. - Abstract: This work reports a facile metal-organic-framework based approach to synthesize Sn/C composite, in which ultrasmall Sn nanodots with typical size of 2–3 nm are uniformly embedded in the nitrogen-doped porous carbon matrix (denoted as Sn@NPC). The effect of thermal treatment and nitrogen doping are also explored. Owing to the delicate size control and confined volume change within carbon matrix, the Sn@NPC composite can exhibit reversible capacities of 575 mAh g −1 (Sn contribution: 1091 mAh g −1 ) after 500 cycles at 0.2 A g −1 and 507 mAh g −1 (Sn contribution: 1077 mAh g −1 ) after 1500 cycles at 1 A g −1 . The excellent long-life electrochemical stability of the Sn@NPC anode has been mainly attributed to the uniform distribution of ultrasmall Sn nanodots and the highly-conductive and flexible N-doped carbon matrix, which can effectively facilitate lithium ion/electron diffusion, buffer the large volume change and improve the structure stability of the electrode during repetitive cycling with lithium ions.

  17. Electrochemical performance of lithium-ion capacitors evaluated under high temperature and high voltage stress using redox stable electrolytes and additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltersdorf, Jonathan; Delp, Samuel A.; Yan, Jin; Cao, Ben; Zheng, Jim P.; Jow, T. Richard; Read, Jeffrey A.

    2018-01-01

    Lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) were investigated for high power, moderate energy density applications for operation in extreme environments with prolonged cycle-life performance. The LICs were assembled as three-layered pouch cells in an asymmetric configuration employing Faradaic pre-lithiated hard carbon anodes and non-Faradaic ion adsorption-desorption activated carbon (AC) cathodes. The capacity retention was measured under high stress conditions, while the design factor explored was electrolyte formulation using a set of carbonates and electrolyte additives, with a focus on their stability. The LIC cells were evaluated using critical performance tests under the following high stress conditions: long-term voltage floating-cycling stability at room temperature (2.2-3.8 V), high temperature storage at 3.8 V, and charge voltages up to 4.4 V. The rate performance of different electrolytes and additives was measured after the initial LIC cell formation for a 1C-10C rate. The presence of vinylene carbonate (VC) and tris (trimethylsilyl) phosphate (TMSP) were found to be essential to the improved electrochemical performance of the LIC cells under all testing conditions.

  18. Green synthesis and stable li-storage performance of FeSi(2)/Si@C nanocomposite for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Qian, Jiangfeng; Cao, Yuliang; Yang, Hanxi; Ai, Xinping

    2012-07-25

    Si-based alloy materials have received great attention as an alternative anode for high capacity and safe Li-ion batteries, but practical implementation of these materials is hindered by their poor electrochemical utilization and cyclability. To tackle this problem, we developed a core-shelled FeSi2/Si@C nanocomposite by a direct ball-milling of Fe and Si powders. Such a nanostructured composite can effectively buffer the volumetric change by alloying active Si phase with inactive FeSi2 matrix in its inner cores and prevent the aggregation of the active Si particles by outer graphite shells, so as to improve the cycling stability of the composite material. As a result, the FeSi2/Si@C composite exhibits a high Li-storage capacity of ∼1010 mA g(-1) and an excellent cyclability with 94% capacity retention after 200 cycles, showing a great promise for battery applications. More significantly, the synthetic method developed in this work possesses several advantages of low cost, zero emission, and operational simplicity, possibly to be extended for making other Li-storage alloys for large-scale applications in Li-ion batteries.

  19. Computer simulation of scattered ion and sputtered species effects in ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.; Auciello, O.

    1992-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposition is a technique currently used by many groups to produce single and multicomponent thin films. This technique provides several advantages over other deposition methods, which include the capability for yielding higher film density, accurate stoichiometry control, and smooth surfaces. However, the relatively high kinetic energies associated with ion beam sputtering also lead to difficulties if the process is not properly controlled. Computer simulations have been performed to determine net deposition rates, as well as the secondary erosion, lattice damage, and gas implantation in the films, associated with primary ions scattered from elemental Y, Ba and Cu targets used to produce high temperature superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O films. The simulations were performed using the TRIM code for different ion masses and kinetic energies, and different deposition geometries. Results are presented for primary beams of Ar + , Kr + and Xe + incident on Ba and Cu targets at 0 degrees and 45 degrees with respect to the surface normal, with the substrate positioned at 0 degrees and 45 degrees. The calculations indicate that the target composition, mass and kinetic energy of the primary beam, angle of incidence on the target, and position and orientation of the substrate affect the film damage and trapped primary beam gas by up to 5 orders of magnitude

  20. Analysis of molecular species of triacylglycerols from vegetable oils containing fatty acids with non-methylene-interrupted double bonds, by HPLC in the silver-ion mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Y.; Kim, S. [Dong A Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-20

    The possibilities for application of silver ion HPLC to analysis of the triacylglycerols containing conjugate trienoic acids and {Delta}{sup 5}-polymethylene-interrupted acids and proportions of triacylglycerol fractions obtained by silver-ion HPLC from the seed oil of Momordica charantia double bonds were examined, respectively. The triacylglycerols of seed oils containing conjugate trienoic acids such as {alpha}-eleostearic acid (C{sub 18:3 9c,11t,13t}) and punicic acid (C{sub 18:3} {sub 9c,11t,13c}) were resolved by silver-ion HPLC. Fractions were fractionated on the basis of the number and configuration of double bonds in the species, and the elution profile is quite different from that of the species comprising exclusively saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with methylene-interrupted double bonds ; for instance, the species (DT(c2)) composed of one dienoic acid and two conjugate trienoic acids eluted much earlier than the species (D{sub 2}T{sub c}) composed of two dienoic acids and one conjugate trienoic acid, in spite of having larger number of double bonds. This means that the interaction of conjugate double bonds with silver ions is weaker than that of methylene-interrupted double bonds, presumably because of the delocalization of {pi}-electrons in conjugate double bonds. In this instance, the strength of interaction of a conjugate trienoic double bond system with silver ions seemed to be between that of methylene-interrupted dienoic and monoenoic double bond systems. Triacylglycerols of the seeds of Ginkgo biloba have been resolved by HPLC in the silver-ion mode according to the number and position of double bonds. In this instance, the strength of interaction between the {pi}-electrons of double bonds in the fatty acyl residues and silver ions is in the order; C{sub 18:3{omega}3}>C(20:3){Delta}{sup 5,11,14}C{sub 18:3}{Delta}{sup 5,9,12}>= C{sub 18:2{omega}6}>C{sub 18:2}{Delta}{sup 5,9}>C{sub 18:1{omega}9}>C{sub 18:1ome= ga7}. 49 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis in soils is associated with nitrogen deposition-induced species loss in an Inner Mongolia steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Q.-Y.; Liu, N.-N.; Bai, W.-M.; Li, L.-H.; Zhang, W.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) resulting from anthropogenic activities has negative impacts on plant diversity in ecosystems. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the species loss. Ion toxicity due to N deposition-induced soil acidification has been suggested to be responsible for species loss in acidic grasslands, while few studies have evaluated the role of soil-mediated homeostasis of ions in species loss under elevated N deposition in grasslands with neutral or alkaline soils. To determine whether soil-mediated processes are involved in changes in biodiversity induced by N deposition, the effects of 9-year N addition on soil properties, aboveground biomass (AGB) and species richness were investigated in an Inner Mongolia steppe. Low to moderate N addition rate (2, 4, 8 g N m-2 yr-1) significantly enhanced AGB of graminoids, while high N addition rate (≥ 16 g N m-2 yr-1) reduced AGB of forbs, leading to an overall increase in AGB of the community under low to moderate N addition rates. Forb richness was significantly reduced by N addition at rates greater than 8 g N m-2 yr-1, while no effect of N addition on graminoid richness was observed, resulting in decline in total species richness. N addition reduced soil pH, depleted base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+) and mobilized Mn2+, Fe3+, Cu2+ and Al3+ ions in soils. Soil inorganic-N concentration was negatively correlated with forb richness and biomass, explaining 23.59% variation of forb biomass. The concentrations of base cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and metal ions (Mn2+, Cu2+ and, Fe3+) showed positively and negatively linear correlation with forb richness, respectively. Changes in the metal ion concentrations accounted for 42.77% variation of forb richness, while reduction of base cations was not associated with the reduction in forb richness. These results reveal that patterns of plant biodiversity in the temperate steppe of Inner Mongolia are primarily driven by increases in metal ion

  2. Intra-lake stable isotope ratio variation in selected fish species and their possible carbon sources in Lake Kyoga (Uganda): implications for aquatic food web studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbabazi, D.; Makanga, B.; Orach-Meza, F.; Hecky, R.E.; Balirwa, J.S.; Ogutu-Ohwayo, R.; Verburg, P.H.; Chapman, L.; Muhumuza, E.

    2010-01-01

    The stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta 15N) and carbon (delta 13C) provide powerful tools for quantifying trophic relationships and carbon flow to consumers in food webs; however, the isotopic signatures of organisms vary within a lake. Assessment of carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures in a

  3. Species-dependent partitioning of C and N stable isotopes between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and their C3 and C4 hosts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Courty, P.-E.; Doubková, Pavla; Calabrese, S.; Niemann, H.; Lehmann, M. F.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Selosse,, M.-A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 82, Mar 2015 (2015), s. 52-61 ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis * carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes * C3 and C4 plants Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.152, year: 2015

  4. The Impact of Experimental Hypoxia and Subsequent Normoxia on the Content of Some Ions and Markers of Physiological Stress-adaptation in Gastropod Species Lymnaea stagnalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubyaga J.А.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of hypoxia and subsequent normoxiaon the maintenance of respiratory pigment hemocyanin, total protein, lactate and some ions (Na +, K +, Ca2+, NH4+, Mg2+ in the mantle liquid in palaearctic gastropod species Lymnaea stagnalis. It was shown that short-term experimental hypoxia leads to the activation of the physiological mechanisms of stress adaptation in widespread Palaearctic eurybiotic gastropod species and does not lead to the activation of the stress-resistance mechanisms on the biochemical and molecular levels.

  5. A dimensionally stable and fast-discharging graphite-silicon composite Li-ion battery anode enabled by electrostatically self-assembled multifunctional polymer-blend coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Shiang; Chou, Jackey; Wu, Nae-Lih

    2015-05-18

    A high-performance graphite-Si composite anode for Li-ion batteries containing Si nanoparticles (NPs) attached onto graphite microparticles was synthesized by adopting a polymer-blend of poly(diallyl dimethyl-ammonium chloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate). The polymer-blend enabled uniform distribution of Si NPs during synthesis and served as a robust artificial solid-electrolyte interphase that substantially enhanced the cycle stability and rate performance of the composite electrode. The electrode exhibited a specific capacity of 450 mA h g(-1), 96% capacity retention at a 10 C-rate, 95% retention after 200 cycles, and the same electrode expansion behavior as a pristine graphite electrode.

  6. Multi-species Ionic Diffusion in Concrete with Account to Interaction Between Ions in the Pore Solution and the Cement Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    relevance in terms of standard solubility thermodynamics. On the other hand the presented model is capable of accurately simulate the well documented peak behavior of the chloride profiles and the measured high content of calcium ions in pore solution under conditions when also chlorides is present....... In this sense the established multi-species models for concrete based on standard solubility calculations alone is still incomplete....

  7. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  8. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  9. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  10. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  11. Assessing the dietary sources of two cichlid species in River Nile sub-branches: Stomach contents, fatty acids and stable isotopes analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Abd El-Karim, Mohamad S.; Ali, Mohamad H.H.; Mahmoud, Abeer M.A.

    2016-01-01

    We assess the importance of four different food sources as dietary components of Oreochromis niloticus and Sarotherodon galilaeus in Nile sub-branches using stomach contents, fatty acids (FA) and stable isotopes (SI) analyses. Diatoms were the dominant food items, whereas sand and mud constitute a major part of the stomach contents of both cichlids in the northern ElBehery canal. FAs and SI were compared in cichlids and four potential food sources. Carbon isotopes excluded the fresh macrophyt...

  12. Effects of tetrodotoxin and ion replacements on the short-circuit current induced by Escherichiacoli heat stable enterotoxin across small intestine of the gerbil (Gerbillus cheesmani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Yaqoub Al-Balool

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mucosally added Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa 30 ng ml-1 on the basal short-circuit current (Isc in µA cm-2 across stripped and unstripped sheets of jejuna and ilea taken from fed, starved (4 days, water ad lib and undernourished (50% control food intake for 21 days gerbil (Gerbillus cheesmani were investigated. The effect of neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX 10 µM and the effects of replacing chloride by gluconate or the effects of removing bicarbonate from bathing buffers on the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa were also investigated. The maximum increase in Isc which resulted from the addition of STa were significantly higher in jejuna and ilea taken from starved and undernourished gerbils when compared with the fed control both using stripped and unstripped sheets. In the two regions of the small intestine taken from fed and starved animals TTX reduced the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across unstripped sheets only. Moreover in jejuna and ilea taken from undernourished gerbils TTX reduced significantly the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across stripped and unstripped sheets. Replacing chloride by gluconate decreased the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across jejuna and ilea taken from undernourished gerbils only. Removing bicarbonates from bathing buffer decreased the maximum increase in Isc across the jejuna and ilea taken from starved and undernourished gerbils.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Stable and Binder-Free Electrodes of TiO2 Nanofibers for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phontip Tammawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrospinning technique was used to fabricate TiO2 nanofibers for use as binder-free electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. The as-electrospun nanofibers were calcined at 400–1,000°C and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. SEM and TEM images showed that the fibers have an average diameter of ~100 nm and are composed of nanocrystallites and grains, which grow in size as the calcination temperature increases. The electrochemical properties of the nanofibers were evaluated using galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The TiO2 nanofibers calcined at 400°C showed higher electronic conductivity, higher discharge capacity, and better cycling performance than the nanofibers calcined at 600, 800, and 1,000°C. The TiO2 nanofibers calcined at 400°C delivered an initial reversible capacity of 325 mAh·g−1 approaching their theoretical value at 0.1 C rate and over 175 mAh·g−1 at 0.3 C rate with limited capacity fading and Coulombic efficiency between 96 and 100%.

  14. Hierarchical MoS2 tubular structures internally wired by carbon nanotubes as a highly stable anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu Ming; Yu, Xin Yao; Li, Zhen; Paik, Ungyu; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a typical two-dimensional material, is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries because it has three times the theoretical capacity of graphite. The main challenges associated with MoS2 anodes are the structural degradation and the low rate capability caused by the low intrinsic electric conductivity and large strain upon cycling. Here, we design hierarchical MoS2 tubular structures internally wired by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to tackle these problems. These porous MoS2 tubular structures are constructed from building blocks of ultrathin nanosheets, which are believed to benefit the electrochemical reactions. Benefiting from the unique structural and compositional characteristics, these CNT-wired MoS2 tubular structures deliver a very high specific capacity of ~1320 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 0.1 A g(-1), exceptional rate capability, and an ultralong cycle life of up to 1000 cycles. This work may inspire new ideas for constructing high-performance electrodes for electrochemical energy storage.

  15. A giant polyaluminum species S-Al32 and two aluminum polyoxocations involving coordination by sulfate ions S-Al32 and S-K-Al13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong; Wang, Hui; Tong, Honggeer; Sun, Shaofan

    2011-01-17

    The giant polyaluminum species [Al32O8(OH)60(H2O)28(SO4)2](16+) (S-Al32) and [Al13O4(OH)25(H2O)10(SO4)](4+) (S-K-Al13) [S means that sulfate ions take part in coordination of the aluminum polycation; K represents the Keggin structure] were obtained in the structures of [Al32O8(OH)60(H2O)28(SO4)2][SO4]7[Cl]2·30H2O and [Al13O4(OH)25(H2O)10(SO4)]4[SO4]8·20H2O, respectively. They are the first two aluminum polyoxocations coordinated by sulfate ions. The "core-shell" structure of S-Al32 is similar to that of Al30, but the units are linked by two [Al(OH)2(H2O)3(SO4)](-) groups with replacement of four η(1)-H2O molecules. The structure of S-K-Al13 is similar to the well-known structure of ε-K-Al13, but the units are linked by two (SO4(2-))0.5 with replacement of a H3O(+) ion. It was shown that strong interaction exists between the polyoxocations and counterions. On the basis of their structural features and preparation conditions, a formation and evolution mechanism (from ε-K-Al13 to S-K-Al13 and S-Al32) has been proposed. A local basification degree symmetrical equalization principle was extracted based on a comparison of the calculated results of the local basification degree for each central Al(3+) ion included in a polycation. They can be used to explain how the two aluminum species are formed and evolved and why the sulfate ions can coordinate to them and to predict where the OH-bridging positions will be upon further hydrolysis.

  16. [Application of simultaneous determination of inorganic ionic species by advanced ion chromatography for water quality monitoring of river water and wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    In this study, our recent work on advanced ion chromatographic methods for the simultaneous determination of inorganic ionic species such as common anions (SO4(2-), Cl(-) and NO3(-)) and cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+), nutrients (phosphate and silicate) and hydrogen ion/alkalinity are summarized first. Then, the applications using these methods for monitoring environmental water quality are also presented. For the determination of common anions and cations with nutrients, the separation was successfully performed by a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange column of TSKgel Super IC-A/C (Tosoh, 150 mm x 6.0 mm i. d.) and a mixture solution of 100 mmol/L ascorbic acid and 4 mmol/L 18-crown-6 as acidic eluent with dual detection of conductivity and spectrophotometry. For the determination of hydrogen ion/alkalinity, the separation was conducted by TSKgel ODS-100Z column (Tosoh, 150 mm x 4.5 mm i. d.) modified with lithium dodecylsulfate and an eluent of 40 mmol/L LiCl/0.1 mmol/L lithium dodecylsulfate/0.05 mmol/L H2SO4 with conductivity detector. The differences of ion concentration between untreated and treated wastewater showed the variation of ionic species during biological treatment process in a sewage treatment plant. Occurrence and distribution of water-quality conditions were related to the bioavailability and human activity in watershed. From these results, our advanced ion chromatographic methods have contributed significantly for water quality monitoring of environmental waters.

  17. Importance of the alphaC-helix in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain for the stable channel regulation and function of cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kimberley; Moeder, Wolfgang; Abdel-Hamid, Huda; Shahinas, Dea; Gupta, Deepali; Yoshioka, Keiko

    2010-05-01

    The involvement of cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels (CNGCs) in the signal transduction of animal light and odorant perception is well documented. Although plant CNGCs have recently been revealed to mediate multiple stress responses and developmental pathways, studies that aim to elucidate their structural and regulatory properties are still very much in their infancy. The structure-function relationship of plant CNGCs was investigated here by using the chimeric Arabidopsis AtCNGC11/12 gene that induces multiple defence responses in the Arabidopsis mutant constitutive expresser of PR genes 22 (cpr22) for the identification of functionally essential residues. A genetic screen for mutants that suppress cpr22-conferred phenotypes identified over 20 novel mutant alleles in AtCNGC11/12. One of these mutants, suppressor S58 possesses a single amino acid substitution, arginine 557 to cysteine, in the alphaC-helix of the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). The suppressor S58 lost all cpr22 related phenotypes, such as spontaneous cell death formation under ambient temperature conditions. However, these phenotypes were recovered at 16 degrees C suggesting that the stability of channel function is affected by temperature. In silico modelling and site-directed mutagenesis analyses suggest that arginine 557 in the alphaC-helix of the CNBD is important for channel regulation, but not for basic function. Furthermore, another suppressor mutant, S136 that lacks the entire alphaC-helix due to a premature stop codon, lost channel function completely. Our data presented here indicate that the alphaC-helix is functionally important in plant CNGCs.

  18. Differentiated stable isotopes signatures between pre- and post-flexion larvae of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) and of its associated tuna species of the Balearic Sea (NW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alberto; Laiz-Carrión, Raúl; Uriarte, Amaya; Quintanilla, José M.; Morote, Elvira; Rodríguez, José M.; Alemany, Francisco

    2017-06-01

    The trophic ecology of bluefin tuna larvae (Thunnus thynnus) from the Balearic Sea, together with its co-existing tuna species such as albacore (T. alalunga), bullet (Auxis rochei) and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus) were examined by nitrogen and carbon stable isotope analyses. A total of 286 larvae were analyzed for this study, of which 72 larvae corresponded to bluefin, 57 to albacore, 81 to bullet tuna and 76 to little tunny. Tuna larvae were separated into the pre-flexion and post-flexion developmental stages. Within the size 3-9 mm standard length (SL), the stable isotope of nitrogen (δ15N) showed significant differences between species where bluefin tuna larvae ranked highest. Pre-flexion bluefin tuna and little tunny larvae showed significantly higher δ15N signatures than the post-flexion larvae. This effect is attributed to a biochemical trace of maternal δ15N signatures. However, neither albacore nor bullet tuna larvae showed this pattern in δ15N signatures, possibly owing to a compensation effect between lower maternal δ15N values transmitted to pre-flexion larvae and the early increase of δ15N values in post-flexion stages. One way ANOVA showed significant differences between species in the stable isotope ratio of carbon (δ13C) values, which suggests specific differences of carbon sources. Furthermore, a similar significant ontogenic effect between δ13C signatures of pre-flexion and post-flexion larvae is also evidenced in all four species. At pre-flexion stages, all species except bullet tuna larvae showed significant negative relationships between δ15N and larval standard length. At post-flexion stages, a significant linear relationship with larval size was only observed in albacore and bullet tuna larvae indicating a possible trophic shift towards early piscivory. With respect to δ13C values with larval size, all four species showed significant linear decreases. It may be explained by the metabolism of growth of somatic mass subject to

  19. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  20. Ion beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    An ion beam analyzer is specified, having an ion source for generating ions of a sample to be analyzed, means for extracting the sample ions, means for focusing the sample ions into a beam, separation means positioned along the ion beam for selectively deflecting species of ions, and means for detecting the selected species of ions. According to the specification, the analyzer further comprises (a) means for disabling at least a portion of the separation means, such that the ion beam from the source remains undeflected; (b) means located along the path of the undeflected ion beam for sensing the sample ions; and (c) enabling means responsive to the sensing means for automatically re-enabling the separation means when the sample ions reach a predetermined intensity level. (author)

  1. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Heavy Ion Track Structure Calculation of Local Dose and 3D Time Evolution of Radiolytic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ions have gained considerable importance in radiotherapy due to their advantageous dose distribution profile and high Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Heavy ions are difficult to produce on Earth, but they are present in space and it is impossible at this moment to completely shield astronauts from them. The risk of these radiations is poorly understood, which is a concern for a 3-years Mars mission. The effects of radiation are mainly due to DNA damage such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), although non-targeted effects are also very important. DNA can be damaged by the direct interaction of radiation and by reactions with chemical species produced by the radiolysis of water. The energy deposition is of crucial importance to understand biological effects of radiation. Therefore, much effort has been done recently to improve models of radiation tracks.

  2. Stable sulphur isotope ratios in the moss species Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. and Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. from the Kielce area (south-central Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Dolegowska, S.; Halas, S.; Trembaczowski, A. [Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Stable sulphur isotope determinations were performed on 18 moss samples collected at nine sites in forested areas of the city of Kielce. The {delta}{sup 34} S of Hylocomium splendens varied from 4.4 to 7.1%, whereas the {delta}{sup 34} S of Pleurozium schreberi was in the range of 3.7-9.1%. The Holy Cross Mountains mosses display a positive delta S-34 signature of airborne SO{sub 2} and sulphates of anthropogenic origin, which is characteristic for this part of Europe. Some spatial variations in the {delta}{sup 34}S of mosses are due to the interactions that occur between coal combustion emissions with diverse isotopic imprints, variations in wind direction and topographic features combined with biological fractionation.

  3. R-O-C N species produced by ion irradiation of ice mixtures : Comparison with astronomical observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palumbo, ME; Strazzulla, G; Pendleton, YJ; Tielens, AGGM

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the effects induced by ion bombardment of mixtures containing nitrogen-bearing compounds at low temperatures. The results show the formation of a band at 2080 cm(-1) in binary mixtures, NH(3):CH(4) and N(2):CH(4), which we attribute to HCN embedded in the organic residue formed

  4. Associative Ionization of Excited Sodium Species with Various Ligands: Assessing Relative Bonding Strengths of Ion-ligand Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gilligan, J. J.; McCunn, L. R.; Leskiw, B. D.; Herman, Zdeněk; Castleman Jr., A. W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 204, 1/3 (2001), s. 247-253 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : associative ionization * cluster ions * sodium bonding energies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2001

  5. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žáček, Petr; Bukowski, M.; Rosenberger, T. A.; Picklo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 12 (2016), s. 2225-2234 ISSN 0022-2275 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : shotgun lipidomics * triple quadrupole/ion-trap * human blood plasma * phosphatidylcholines Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.810, year: 2016 http://www.jlr.org/content/57/12/2225.full

  6. Simultaneous determination of heat stable peptides for eight animal and plant species in meat products using UPLC-MS/MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingying; Zhang, Yingying; Li, Huichen; Zhao, Wentao; Guo, Wenping; Wang, Shouwei

    2018-04-15

    Food adulteration and fraud is driven by economic interests; it is thus necessary to establish a high-through method that allows quantitative identification of familiar animal and plant proteins for global use. In this study, a sensitive mass spectrometric approach for the detection of eight species, including pork, beef, lamb, chicken, duck, soy, peanut, and pea, is presented and the heat stability and specificity of screened peptides are verified. To improve screening efficiency of specific peptides, several key data searching parameters, including peptides, sequence lengths, sequence coverage, and unique peptides, are investigated. Using this approach, it is possible to detect a 0.5% contamination of any of the eight species. The method is proven to have high sensitivity, specificity, repeatability, and a low quantitative detection limit with respect to adulteration of diverse types of meat products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Present status of NIRS ECR ion sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Iwata, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Ogawa, H.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Honma, T.; Takasugi, W.; Wakaisami, M.; Yoshida, Y.; Kubo, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    Four ECR ion sources have been operated in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Two ECR ion sources supply various ion species for the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The 10GHz NIRS-ECR ion source mainly produces C2+ ions for the heavy-ion therapy. Ions of Si, Ar, Fe,

  8. Annotating N termini for the human proteome project: N termini and Nα-acetylation status differentiate stable cleaved protein species from degradation remnants in the human erythrocyte proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Philipp F; Huesgen, Pitter F; Nguyen, Karen; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-04-04

    A goal of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project is to identify all human protein species. With 3844 proteins annotated as "missing", this is challenging. Moreover, proteolytic processing generates new protein species with characteristic neo-N termini that are frequently accompanied by altered half-lives, function, interactions, and location. Enucleated and largely void of internal membranes and organelles, erythrocytes are simple yet proteomically challenging cells due to the high hemoglobin content and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations that impedes protein identification. Using the N-terminomics procedure TAILS, we identified 1369 human erythrocyte natural and neo-N-termini and 1234 proteins. Multiple semitryptic N-terminal peptides exhibited improved mass spectrometric identification properties versus the intact tryptic peptide enabling identification of 281 novel erythrocyte proteins and six missing proteins identified for the first time in the human proteome. With an improved bioinformatics workflow, we developed a new classification system and the Terminus Cluster Score. Thereby we described a new stabilizing N-end rule for processed protein termini, which discriminates novel protein species from degradation remnants, and identified protein domain hot spots susceptible to cleavage. Strikingly, 68% of the N-termini were within genome-encoded protein sequences, revealing alternative translation initiation sites, pervasive endoproteolytic processing, and stabilization of protein fragments in vivo. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier .

  9. Acceleration of heavy-ion beams at the SF cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Yuzo; Yamazaki, Tsutomu.

    1984-10-01

    With the development of the new arc-heated cathode PIG type source, heavy-ion acceleration in the SF cyclotron has been drastically augmented, which means that a stable routine operation is being realized as well as the number of ion species is increasing. Excellent performance is also being exhibited with the arc power supply and gas feeding system required for the operation of the heavy-ion source. At present, the gaseous ions which are being accelerated are as follows: He, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, S, Ar and Xe. In the meantime, the metallic ions which are being accelerated likewise are Li, Be, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, Fe and Cu. In this paper, results of mainly the research of heavy-ion acceleration conducted during the period from 1983 to July 1984 are described. (author)

  10. A simple alkali-metal and noble gas ion source for SIMS equipments with mass separation of the primary ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duesterhoeft, H.; Pippig, R.

    1986-01-01

    An alkali-metal ion source working without a store of alkali-metals is described. The alkali-metal ions are produced by evaporation of alkali salts and ionization in a low-voltage arc discharge stabilized with a noble gas plasma or in the case of small alkali-metal ion currents on the base of the well known thermic ionization at a hot tungsten wire. The source is very simple in construction and produces a stable ion current of 0.3 μA for more than 100 h. It is possible to change the ion species in a short time. This source is applicable to all SIMS equipments using mass separation for primary ions. (author)

  11. Offline Ion Source Developments for the BECOLA Facility at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Andrew; Mantica, Paul; Minamisono, Kei

    2013-04-01

    Singly-charged beams of the stable isotope(s) of K, Ca, Mn, and Fe have been produced using either a commercial plasma ion source or a home-built electron ionization source for the BEam COoler and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University. For each element, collinear laser spectroscopy was performed to confirm the presence of the respective element. Production of stable ion beams for a given element is necessary to obtain reference hyperfine spectra of species with known electromagnetic moments before such nuclear properties can be deduced from the laser hyperfine-structure measurements of rare isotopes that are planned at NSCL. The results from the commissioning tests of the plasma and electron ionization sources will be presented, and development of a new Penning Ion Gauge (PIG) ion source will be discussed.

  12. Assessing the dietary sources of two cichlid species in River Nile sub-branches: Stomach contents, fatty acids and stable isotopes analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad S. Abd El-Karim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the importance of four different food sources as dietary components of Oreochromis niloticus and Sarotherodon galilaeus in Nile sub-branches using stomach contents, fatty acids (FA and stable isotopes (SI analyses. Diatoms were the dominant food items, whereas sand and mud constitute a major part of the stomach contents of both cichlids in the northern ElBehery canal. FAs and SI were compared in cichlids and four potential food sources. Carbon isotopes excluded the fresh macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum and its epiphytes as a potential food source, whereas FA biomarkers indicated that M. spicatum is assimilated in cichlids’ muscles as detrital materials. FA profiles of cichlids’ muscles were highly enriched by live diatom markers whereas decayed diatoms and bacterial markers were partially present. Carbon isotope signatures of cichlids were much close to that of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM which elucidated that SPOM was the source of diatoms and bacterial detritus incorporated in cichlids muscles. Cichlids were highly enriched with nitrogen signatures which was a result of increased anthropogenic effects and incorporation of bacterial films. SI and FA analyses precisely indicated that live diatoms and bacteria, detrital macrophytes are the main sources of organic matter incorporated in cichlids muscles.

  13. A Parallel 3D Model for The Multi-Species Low Energy Beam Transport System of the RIA Prototype ECR Ion Source Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.

    2005-01-01

    The driver linac of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires a great variety of high intensity, high charge state ion beams. In order to design and to optimize the low energy beamline optics of the RIA front end,we have developed a new parallel three-dimensional model to simulate the low energy, multi-species ion beam formation and transport from the ECR ion source extraction region to the focal plane of the analyzing magnet. A multisection overlapped computational domain has been used to break the original transport system into a number of each subsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge density distribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved within the subdomain and particle tracking is repeated until the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on a combination of the spectral method and the multigrid method have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindrical coordinates for the beam extraction region and in the Frenet-Serret coordinates for the bending magnet region. Some test examples and initial applications will also be presented

  14. Core top confirmation of the carbonate ion effect in multiple species of planktic foraminifera and a reassessment of the upper water column equatorial Pacific δ13CFORAM records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Spero, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera carbon (δ13CFORAM) and oxygen (δ18OFORAM) isotope records play a vital role in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18OFORAM values are typically minimally offset from equilibrium δ18O-calcite and are widely applied in oceanographic reconstructions of upper water column hydrography. In contrast, δ13CFORAM are underutilized in paleoceanographic reconstructions. δ13CFORAM are more difficult to interpret due to species-specific δ13CFORAM offsets from the δ13C of the dissolved inorganic carbon of seawater (δ13CDIC). In this study, we analyzed the δ18OFORAM and δ13CFORAM of individual foraminifera shells from a suite of planktic foraminifer species obtained from core top (Holocene) intervals from Eastern Equatorial Pacific (TR163-19), Western Caribbean (ODP 999A), and Equatorial Indian Ocean (ODP 714A) cores. We also include published records from the Western Equatorial Pacific (MW91-9 15GGC). We find the δ13CFORAM offsets from the local water column δ13CDIC are large, variable, region specific, and are correlated to the ambient carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) of seawater. We show that the regional offsets from δ13CDIC are due to the carbonate ion effect (CIE) on δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997; Bijma et al., 1999) and variations in water column [CO32-]. More importantly, our results demonstrate that regional and/or culture based δ13CFORAM offsets from δ13CDIC are not applicable globally. Rather, owing to regional differences in water column [CO32-] and species-specific relationships between [CO32-] and δ13CFORAM, δ13CFORAM must be corrected for the regional CIE in order to infer vertical δ13CDIC gradients or to compare δ13CFORAM records from one region to another. Laboratory culture suggests the carbonate ion effect on δ18OFORAM is 1/3 that of δ13CFORAM (Spero et al., 1997). Thus, in order to obtain correct δ18OFORAM temperatures or δ18OSW (when used in conjunction with Mg/Ca) the δ18OFORAM offsets from δ18

  15. Organic solvent-free reversed-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry for organoarsenic species determination in several matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monasterio, Romina P; Londonio, Juan A; Farias, Silvia S; Smichowski, Patricia; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2011-04-27

    A novel method has been developed to determine As-containing animal feed additives including roxarsone (ROX), p-arsanilic acid (p-ASA) and nitarsone (NIT), as well as other organic As species (dimethylarsonic acid (DMAA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMAA)) by ion-pairing high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (IP-HPLC-HG-AFS). A simple isocratic reversed-phase (RP) HPLC method with a mobile phase containing citric acid and sodium hexanesulfonate (pH 2.0) was developed using a C(18) column. The use of an organic solvent free mobile phase turns this methodology into an environmentally friendly alternative. Several ion pair forming agents, such as sodium hexanesulfonate, tetrabutylammonium bisulfate and perfluoroheptanoic acid, were studied. The limits of detection for As species were calculated in standard solution and resulted to be 0.2, 0.5, 0.6, 1.6, and 1.6 μg As L(-1) for MMAA, DMAA, p-ASA, ROX and NIT, respectively. This method exhibited convenient operation, high sensitivity and good repeatability. It was applied to As speciation in different samples including arugula, dog food, dog urine and chicken liver.

  16. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) species in human plasma are used as biomarkers of disease. PC biomarkers are often limited by the inability to separate isobaric PC. In this work, we developed a targeted shotgun approach for analysis of isobaric and isomeric PC. This approach is comprised of two mass spectr...

  17. Alkaline cation complexing with calixarenes in electro-spray / mass spectrometry. Specificity for cesium, influence of solvation on ion species and radiolytic stability of the complexing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, Francoise

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is a rather difficult issue. In order to reduce the volume of waste storage, particularly the Cs 135 (radioactive half-life 2.3 10 6 years), liquid-liquid extraction experiments have shown that crown calixarenes were able to selectively extract cesium cation in wastes. However, the stability under radiolysis of this type of macrocycle is unknown and is the theme of this thesis. Through the coupling of electro-spray and mass spectrometry, the selectivity of crown calixarenes for cesium has been confirmed. The necessity to optimize operating conditions during the utilization of this ionization mode was acknowledged for a correct interpretation of mass spectrum. The solvent nature, source temperature, applied voltage on the cone, gaseous phase stability and species ionization desorption rate are indeed parameters that should be taken into account. Experiments show that the solution species stability is inverse to the one in gaseous phase. In a solution, species stability is linked to the nature of the solvent (solvating power) whereas in gaseous phase, it is linked to the cationic affinity. In the current radiolysis conditions it has been demonstrated that calixarenes have a stable structure. Degradation products are very largely substitution products and do not hinder the caesium cation complexing. Concerning the quantitative aspect, an estimation was produced, however results are not satisfying: reference product synthesis is in fact necessary in order to establish calibration curves that will allow to precisely dose the various components derived from radiolysis [fr

  18. Liquid metal alloy ion sources—An alternative for focussed ion beam technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, Lothar; Mazarov, Paul; Bruchhaus, Lars; Gierak, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Today, Focused Ion Beam (FIB) processing is nearly exclusively based on gallium Liquid Metal Ion Sources (LMIS). But, many applications in the μm- or nm range could benefit from ion species other than gallium: local ion implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam synthesis, or Focused Ion Beam Lithography (IBL). Therefore, Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Sources (LMAIS) represent a promising alternative to expand the remarkable application fields for FIB. Especially, the IBL process shows potential advantages over, e.g., electron beam or other lithography techniques: direct, resistless, and three-dimensional patterning, enabling a simultaneous in-situ process control by cross-sectioning and inspection. Taking additionally into account that the used ion species influences significantly the physical and chemical nature of the resulting nanostructures—in particular, the electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanic properties leading to a large potential application area which can be tuned by choosing a well suited LMAIS. Nearly half of the elements of the periodic table are recently available in the FIB technology as a result of continuous research in this area during the last forty years. Key features of a LMAIS are long life-time, high brightness, and stable ion current. Recent developments could make these sources feasible for nano patterning issues as an alternative technology more in research than in industry. The authors will review existing LMAIS, LMIS other than Ga, and binary and ternary alloys. These physical properties as well as the fabrication technology and prospective domains for modern FIB applications will similarly be reviewed. Other emerging ion sources will be also presented and their performances discussed.

  19. Influence of molecular structure on stopping power of chemical species for He+ ions from a low-energy particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.

    1980-01-01

    Results are reported of a 10-year study of the stopping power of approx. 70 compounds in the vapor state for He + ions of energy 0.3-2.0 MeV. The compounds include alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, n-alchols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, organic ring compounds, sulfur-containing organic and inorganic compounds, and halogen-containing organic and inorganic compounds, and simple gases, such as H 2 , O 2 , N 2 , NH 3 , CO, and CO 2 . The technique of the application of the Bragg Rule, which defines the stopping power of a 2-element compound as the additive sum of the atomic stopping power of the elements, was used to interpret the results. It is demonstrated in both measured and calculated atomic stopping power that the measured hierarchy of double bond ring structure single bond holds for C, O, and S with maximum differences of approx. 28%, 17%, and 5%, respectively

  20. Predicting criteria continuous concentrations of 34 metals or metalloids by use of quantitative ion character-activity relationships–species sensitivity distributions (QICAR–SSD) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Yunsong; Wu, Fengchang; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yuedan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Haiqing Liao; Giesy, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Criteria continuous concentrations (CCCs) are useful for describing chronic exposure to pollutants and setting water quality standards to protect aquatic life. However, because of financial, practical, or ethical restrictions on toxicity testing, few data are available to derive CCCs. In this study, CCCs for 34 metals or metalloids were derived using quantitative ion character-activity relationships–species sensitivity distributions (QICAR–SSD) and the final acute-chronic ratio (FACR) method. The results showed that chronic toxic potencies were correlated with several physico-chemical properties among eight species chosen, where the softness index was the most predictive characteristic. Predicted CCCs for most of the metals, except for Lead and Iron, were within a range of 10-fold of values recommended by the U.S. EPA. The QICAR–SSD model was superior to the FACR method for prediction of data-poor metals. This would have significance for predicting toxic potencies and criteria thresholds of more metals or metalloids. - Highlights: • We investigate relationships between σp and log-NOEC in eight species. • The QICAR–SSD model, FACR, and CMC/CCC were used to predict CCCs. • They are as a supplement to screening for toxicities, criteria and standards. - CCCs for 34 metals/metalloids were predicted by use of QICAR–SSD model and FACR method

  1. Quantitative determination of isoquinoline alkaloids and chlorogenic acid in Berberis species using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Kumar, Sunil; Arya, Kamal Ram; Sharma, Kulwant Rai; Kumar, Brijesh

    2015-06-01

    Berberis species are well known and used extensively as medicinal plants in traditional medicine. They have many medicinal values attributable to the presence of alkaloids having different pharmacological activities. In this study, a method was developed and validated as per international conference on harmonization guidelines using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry operated in the multiple reaction monitoring mode for nine bioactive compounds, including protoberberine alkaloids, aporphine alkaloids and chlorogenic acid. This method was applied in different plant parts of eight Berberis species to determine variations in content of nine bioactive compounds. The separation was achieved on an ACQUITY UPLC CSH™ C18 column using a gradient mobile phase at flow rate 0.3 mL/min. Calibration curves for all the nine analytes provided optimum linear detector response (with R(2) ≥0.9989) over the concentration range of 0.5-1000 ng/mL. The precision and accuracy were within RSDs ≤2.4 and ≤2.3%, respectively. The results indicated significant variation in the total contents of the nine compounds in Berberis species. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Construction of an optimized method for quality evaluation and species discrimination of Coptidis Rhizoma by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography combined with response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tian-Jin; Lu, Jun; Ni, Hui; Li, Ping; Jiang, Yan; Li, Hui-Jun

    2018-05-10

    Coptidis Rhizoma (CR), the dried rhizome of three perennial Coptis specices, was widely used as a famous herbal medicine in China. Although the quantification of main alkaloids in CR has been extensively conducted, the existing analytical methods suffer from some flaws that restrict the general applicability in the routine quality assessment. In this work, we constructed an optimized method for quality evaluation and species discrimination of CR by ion-pairing high performance liquid chromatography (IP-HPLC) combined with response surface methodology (RSM). By employing Box-Behnken designs (BBD), 30 sets of experimental runs were performed to build the response surface models, and Derringer's desirability was used to optimize the IP-HPLC separation conditions by simultaneously taking resolutions between two pairs of hardly - separated alkaloids and the retention time of the last eluted analyte as optimization criteria. Meanwhile, a single standard to determine multi-components (SSDMC) method based on the optimized IP-HPLC was set up and fully validated, to simultaneously determine six alkaloids including jatrorrhizine (JAT), columbamine (COL), epiberberine (EPI), coptisine (COP), palmatine (PAL) and berberine (BER), using BER as internal standard. Finally, the quantitative data from 33 batches of CR samples were comparatively analyzed, and the ratios of JAT/COL and EPI/JAT were discovered for species classification. Collectively, the established IP-HPLC method can be adopted for comprehensive quality evaluation and species discrimination of CR due to its general applicability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dual Core-Shell Structured Si@SiOx@C Nanocomposite Synthesized via a One-Step Pyrolysis Method as a Highly Stable Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bolun; Zeng, Shi; Wang, Hui; Liu, Daotan; Qian, Jiangfeng; Cao, Yuliang; Yang, Hanxi; Ai, Xinping

    2016-11-23

    Silicon (Si) has been regarded as a promising high-capacity anode material for developing advanced lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), but the practical application of Si anodes is still unsuccessful mainly due to the insufficient cyclability. To deal with this issue, we propose a new route to construct a dual core-shell structured Si@SiO x @C nanocomposite by direct pyrolysis of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer on the surface of Si nanoparticles. Since the PMMA polymers can be chemically bonded on the nano-Si surface through the interaction between ester group and Si surface group, and thermally decomposed in the subsequent pyrolysis process with their alkyl chains converted to carbon and the residue oxygen recombining with Si to form SiO x , the dual core-shell structure can be conveniently formed in a one-step procedure. Benefiting from the strong buffering effect of the SiO x interlayer and the efficient blocking action of dense outer carbon layer in preventing electrolyte permeation, the obtained nanocomposite demonstrates a high capacity of 1972 mA h g -1 , a stable cycling performance with a capacity retention of >1030 mA h g -1 over 500 cycles, and particularly a superiorly high Coulombic efficiency of >99.5% upon extended cycling, exhibiting a great promise for practical uses. More importantly, the synthetic method proposed in this work is facile and low cost, making it more suitable for large-scale production of high capacity anode for advanced LIBs.

  4. A Parallel 3D Model for the Multi-Species Low Energy Beam Transport System of the RIA Prototype ECR Ion Source VENUS

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Ji; Todd, Damon

    2005-01-01

    The driver linac of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires a great variety of high intensity, high charge state ion beams. In order to design and optimize the low energy beam line optics of the RIA front end, we have developed a new parallel three-dimensional model to simulate the low energy, multi-species beam transport from the ECR ion source extraction region to the focal plane of the analyzing magnet. A multi-section overlapped computational domain has been used to break the original transport system into a number of independent subsystems. Within each subsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge density distribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved within the subdomain and particle tracking is repeated until the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on a combination of the spectral method and the multigrid method have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindrical coordinates for the beam extraction region and in...

  5. Detection of characteristic metabolites of Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida species using ion mobility spectrometry-metabolic profiling by volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Thorsten; Jünger, Melanie; Vautz, Wolfgang; Nolte, Jürgen; Kuhns, Martin; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete; Quintel, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Volatile metabolites of Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida species can be detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A multi-capillary column - ion mobility spectrometer (MCC-IMS) was used in this study to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace above A. fumigatus and the four Candida species Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis in an innovative approach, validated for A. fumigatus and C. albicans by GC/MS analyses. For the detection of VOCs, a special stainless steel measurement chamber for the microbial cultures was used. The gas outlet was either attached to MCC-IMS or to adsorption tubes (Tenax GR) for GC/MS measurements. Isoamyl alcohol, cyclohexanone, 3-octanone and phenethylalcohol can be described as discriminating substances by means of GC/MS. With MCC-IMS, the results for 3-octanone and phenethylalcohol are concordant and additionally to GC/MS, ethanol and two further compounds (p_0642_1/p_683_1 and p_705_3) can be described. Isoamyl alcohol and cyclohexanone were not properly detectable with MCC-IMS. The major advantage of the MCC-IMS system is the feasibility of rapid analysis of complex gas mixtures without pre-concentration or preparation of samples and regardless of water vapour content in an online setup. Discrimination of fungi on genus level of the investigated germs by volatile metabolic profile and therefore detection of VOC is feasible. However, a further discrimination on species level for Candida species was not possible. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Extraction of metal ions in aqueous polyethylene glycol-inorganic salt two-phase systems in the presence of inorganic extractants: correlation between extraction behaviour and stability constants of extracted species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Laura; Bulgariu, Dumitru

    2008-07-04

    The use of aqueous polyethylene glycol-inorganic salt two-phase systems for the extraction of metal ions has a great potential due to their durability, non-toxicity and relative low cost. The aqueous phases can be easily separated by centrifugation, and the operation is possible in a range of experimental conditions. The experimental results have shown that for a given aqueous two-phase system, the extraction behaviour of metal ions in presence of inorganic extractants is mainly dependent on the stability of extracted species. In this paper we review our results obtained at metal ion extraction using inorganic extractants and discuss three major types of extraction behaviours.

  7. Investigation of production method, geographical origin and species authentication in commercially relevant shrimps using stable isotope ratio and/or multi-element analyses combined with chemometrics: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortea, Ignacio; Gallardo, José M

    2015-03-01

    Three factors defining the traceability of a food product are production method (wild or farmed), geographical origin and biological species, which have to be checked and guaranteed, not only in order to avoid mislabelling and commercial fraud, but also to address food safety issues and to comply with legal regulations. The aim of this study was to determine whether these three factors could be differentiated in shrimps using stable isotope ratio analysis of carbon and nitrogen and/or multi-element composition. Different multivariate statistics methods were applied to different data subsets in order to evaluate their performance in terms of classification or predictive ability. Although the success rates varied depending on the dataset used, the combination of both techniques allowed the correct classification of 100% of the samples according to their actual origin and method of production, and 93.5% according to biological species. Even though further studies including a larger number of samples in each group are needed in order to validate these findings, we can conclude that these methodologies should be considered for studies regarding seafood product authenticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a tool to determine mercurial species in freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Heyong; Chen, Xiaopan; Shen, Lihuan; Wang, Yuanchao; Xu, Zigang; Liu, Jinhua

    2018-01-05

    Most of analytical community is focused on reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) for mercury speciation by employing mobile phases comprising of high salts and moderate amounts of organic solvents. This study aims at rapid mercury speciation analysis by ion-pairing RP-HPLC with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection only using low salts for the sake of green analytical chemistry. Two ion-pairing HPLC methods were developed on individual usage of positively and negatively charged ion-pairing reagents (tetrabutylammonium hydroxide -TBAH and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate -SDBS), where sodium 3-mercapto-1-propysulfonate (MPS) and l-cysteine (Cys) were individually added in mobile phases to transform mercury species into negative and positive Hg-complexes for good resolution. Addition of phenylalanine was also utilized for rapid baseline separation in combination of short C 18 guard columns. Optimum mobile phases of 2.0mM SDBS+2.0mM Cys+1.0mM Phe (pH 3.0) and 4.0mM TBAH+2.0mM MPS+2.0mM Phe (pH 6.0) both achieved baseline separation of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ), methylmercury (MeHg), ethylmercury (EtHg) and phenylmercury (PhHg) on two consecutive 12.5-mm C 18 columns. The former mobile phase was selected for mercury speciation in freshwater fish because of short separation time (3.0min). Detection limits of 0.015 for Hg 2+ , 0.014 for MeHg, 0.028 for EtHg and 0.042μgL -1 for PhHg were obtained along with satisfactory precisions of peak height and area (1.0-2.8% for 5.0μgL -1 Hg-mixture standard). Good accordance of determined values of MeHg and total mercury in certified reference materials of fish tissue (GBW 10029) and tuna fish (BCR-463) with certified values as well as good recoveries (91-106%) proved good accuracy of the proposed method. An example application to freshwater fish indicated its potential in routine analysis, where MeHg was presented at 3.7-20.3μgkg -1 as the dominate species. Copyright © 2017

  9. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  10. Sterile mutant of Verbena hybrida induced by heavy ion beam irradiation and wild species V. peruviana exhibit self-incompatible phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Abe, T.; Kanaya, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Garden verbenas (Verbena hybrida) belonging to the Verbenaceae family are originated from interspecific hybridization among several species, many cultivars frequently produce seeds. Recently, a sterile mutant has been isolated in the verbena cultivar 'Coral Pink' of Temari series (Suntory Flowers Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) by mutation induction using heavy-ion beams at RIKEN Accelarator Research Facility (RARF, Saitama, Japan). We investigated pollen and ovule fertility assessed by acetocarmin staining, seed-set following controlled-pollination tests and behavior of pollen tubes in pistils with the sterile mutant of 'Coral Pink' (SC) and its original fertile one (FC). As the results, although SC has functional male and female gametes, few self-pollinated flowers carry out seed-set, leading to sterile phenotype. Additionally, the sterile mechanism of SC was compared with the wild species V. peruviana (VP) which is one of origin of Temari series and exhibits sterility. Interestingly, similar phenotype was observed in PV. We further investigated, therefore, whether there are differences on self-incompatible reaction between SC and VP. (author)

  11. Predicting criteria continuous concentrations of 34 metals or metalloids by use of quantitative ion character-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yunsong; Wu, Fengchang; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yuedan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Haiqing Liao; Giesy, John P

    2014-05-01

    Criteria continuous concentrations (CCCs) are useful for describing chronic exposure to pollutants and setting water quality standards to protect aquatic life. However, because of financial, practical, or ethical restrictions on toxicity testing, few data are available to derive CCCs. In this study, CCCs for 34 metals or metalloids were derived using quantitative ion character-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD) and the final acute-chronic ratio (FACR) method. The results showed that chronic toxic potencies were correlated with several physico-chemical properties among eight species chosen, where the softness index was the most predictive characteristic. Predicted CCCs for most of the metals, except for Lead and Iron, were within a range of 10-fold of values recommended by the U.S. EPA. The QICAR-SSD model was superior to the FACR method for prediction of data-poor metals. This would have significance for predicting toxic potencies and criteria thresholds of more metals or metalloids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plant polyphenol induced cell death in human cancer cells involves mobilization of intracellular copper ions and reactive oxygen species generation: a mechanism for cancer chemopreventive action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Husain Yar; Zubair, Haseeb; Faisal, Mohd; Ullah, Mohd Fahad; Farhan, Mohd; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz

    2014-03-01

    Anticancer polyphenolic nutraceuticals from fruits, vegetables, and spices are generally recognized as antioxidants, but can be prooxidants in the presence of copper ions. We earlier proposed a mechanism for such activity of polyphenols and now we provide data in multiple cancer cell lines in support of our hypothesis. Through multiple assays, we show that polyphenols luteolin, apigenin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, and resveratrol are able to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. Such cell death is prevented to a significant extent by cuprous chelator neocuproine and reactive oxygen species scavengers. We also show that normal breast epithelial cells, cultured in a medium supplemented with copper, become sensitized to polyphenol-induced growth inhibition. Since the concentration of copper is significantly elevated in cancer cells, our results strengthen the idea that an important anticancer mechanism of plant polyphenols is mediated through intracellular copper mobilization and reactive oxygen species generation leading to cancer cell death. Moreover, this prooxidant chemopreventive mechanism appears to be a mechanism common to several polyphenols with diverse chemical structures and explains the preferential cytotoxicity of these compounds toward cancer cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  14. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  15. Quercetin inhibits advanced glycation end product formation via chelating metal ions, trapping methylglyoxal, and trapping reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad Nazrul Islam; Mitsuhashi, Shinya; Sigetomi, Kengo; Ubukata, Makoto

    2017-05-01

    Physiological concentration of Mg 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ accelerated AGE formation only in glucose-mediated conditions, which was effectively inhibited by chelating ligands. Only quercetin (10) inhibited MGO-mediated AGE formation as well as glucose- and ribose-mediated AGE formation among 10 polyphenols (1-10) tested. We performed an additional structure-activity relationship (SAR) study on flavanols (10, 11, 12, 13, and 14). Morin (12) and kaempherol (14) showed inhibitory activity against MGO-mediated AGE formation, whereas rutin (11) and fisetin (13) did not. These observations indicate that 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxy and 4-keto groups of 10 are important to yield newly revised mono-MGO adducts (16 and 17) and di-MGO adduct (18) having cyclic hemiacetals, while 3'-hydroxy group is not essential. We propose here a comprehensive inhibitory mechanism of 10 against AGE formation including chelation effect, trapping of MGO, and trapping of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to oxidative degradation of 18 to 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (15) and other fragments.

  16. Double Layers, Ion Holes, and Ion-Acoustic Solitons in the Auroral Upward Current Region: Simulations and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, D. S.; Newman, D.; Ergun, R.; Goldman, M.

    2006-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the ionosphere auroral cavity boundary has been studied using 1-D and 2-D kinetic Vlasov simulations. The simulations are initialized with a strong observation-based double layer (DL) and include two ion species (H+,O+) and electrons. The initial 1-D DL models are stationary solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson system, though they are not necessarily stable. Because FAST observations suggest that most DLs are oblique to the magnetic field, we have studied the 2-D evolution of a related DL in an oblique geometry (i.e., the initial DL normal and geomagnetic field are not parallel to each other). Results from the 1-D and oblique 2-D simulations will be presented. We show that the DL is quasi-stable in both 1-D and 2-D. In addition, the simulations verify that the streaming interaction between accelerated H+ and O+ populations, continuously replenished by the DL, provides the free energy for the persistent formation of ion phase-space holes. A comparison between FAST observations of ion holes and the ion holes seen in the simulation will be made. A surpising result from both the 1-D and 2-D simulations is that under certain conditions an ion-acoustic soliton (IAS) forms in the auroral upward current region that is associated with a population of earthward-traveling ions. FAST observations of an IAS and earthward traveling ions will be shown which compares favorably with the simulations.

  17. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico); Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J., E-mail: arturoj.hernandez@upr.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico)

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  18. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  19. Identification and characterization of pesticide metabolites in Brassica species by liquid chromatography travelling wave ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TWIMS-QTOF-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Anna; Luetjohann, Jens; Hanschen, Franziska S; Schreiner, Monika; Kuballa, Jürgen; Jantzen, Eckard; Rohn, Sascha

    2018-04-01

    A new mass spectrometric method for evaluating metabolite formation of the pesticides thiacloprid, azoxystrobin, and difenoconazole was developed for the Brassica species pak choi and broccoli. Both, distribution and transformation kinetics of the active compounds and their metabolites were analyzed by UPLC-TWIMS-QTOF-MS. Additionally, HR-MS analysis and structure elucidation tools such as diagnostic ions, isotopic matches, and collision cross sections were applied for metabolites identification. Following the application of two plant protection products (containing the above-mentioned active compounds) in a greenhouse study plant material was cryo-milled and extracted with water/methanol. The residual levels of active compounds were identified at certain timepoints during pre-harvest intervals and in the final products. Different phase I and phase II metabolites of the pesticides were identified in different plant organs such as leaves, stems, (broccoli) heads, and roots. Three individual degradation pathways and distribution profiles are suggested including eight thiacloprid, eleven azoxystrobin and three difenoconazole metabolites. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Predicting criteria continuous concentrations of metals or metalloids for protecting marine life by use of quantitative ion characteristic-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Yu; Chen, Cheng; Guo, Fei; Mu, Yunsong; Sun, Fuhong; Wang, Hao; Wang, Ying; Wang, Huanhua; Wu, Fengchang; Hu, Qing; Dang, Zhi; Giesy, John P

    2017-11-30

    Marine pollution by metals has been a major challenge for ecological systems; however, water quality criteria (WQC) for metals in saltwater is still lacking. Especially from a regulatory perspective, chronic effects of metals on marine organisms should receive more attention. A quantitative ion characteristic-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD) model, based on chronic toxicities for eight marine organisms, was established to predict the criteria continuous concentrations (CCCs) of 21 metals. The results showed that the chronic toxicities of various metals had good relationships with their physicochemical properties. Predicted CCCs of six metals (Hg 2+ , Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ ) were in accordance with the values recommended by the U.S. EPA, with prediction errors being less than an order of magnitude. The QICAR-SSD approach provides an alternative tool to empirical methods and can be useful for deriving scientifically defensible WQC for metals for marine organisms and conducting ecological risk assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective complexation of the uranyl ion using modified polymeric supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roundhill, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    We have recently examined the complexation properties of aminomethylenebis(phosphonic acids) towards selected trivalent metal ions, and have found that they form highly stable complexes with these oxophilic metal centers. These metal complexes were found resistant to metal ion dissociation in acidic media and present in aqueous solution as both 1:1 and 1:2 (metal ion:ligand, M:L) species. The uranyl ion, although structurally different from simple M 3+ ions because of its linear geometry, possesses a similar +3 to +4 charge at the metal center. Because of the high positive charge on uranium in the ion UO 2 2+ , and because of the potential capacity of the axial oxygens on this ion to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds with a proton on the ligand, there is a good possibility that the uranyl ion will form stable complexes having 1:1,1:2 and 1:3 (M:L) stoichometries with aminomethylenebis(phosphonates) as ligand. There is considerable precedent that a phosphonate group will form strong complexes with the UO 2 , 2+ ion, and there is the additional possibility that the amino moiety on these ligands will provide further selectivity for complexation via hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, these ligands are simple and inexpensive to synthesize, thus making them potentially useful for application in large scale batch separation processes. To test these concepts, we have measured the stability and protonation constants of the different complexes formed in aqueous solution. From this data we can evaluate the potential for compounds of this type to be useful as uranyl ion sequestering agents

  2. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis induces IL-1β production in a human prostate epithelial cell line by activating the NLRP3 inflammasome via reactive oxygen species and potassium ion efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Na-Yeong; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Im, Su-Jeong; Seo, Min-Young; Chung, Yong-Hoon; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted protozoan parasite that causes vaginitis in women, and urethritis and prostatitis in men. IL-1β is synthesized as immature pro-IL-1β, which is cleaved by activated caspase-1. Caspase-1 is, in turn, activated by a multi-protein complex known as an inflammasome. In this study, we investigated the inflammatory response of a prostate epithelial cell line (RWPE-1) to T. vaginalis and, specifically, the capacity of T. vaginalis to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. RWPE-1 cells were stimulated by live T. vaginalis, and subsequent expression of pro-IL-1β, IL-1β, NLRP3, ASC and caspase-1 was determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. IL-1β and caspase-1 production was also measured by ELISA. To evaluate the effects of NLRP3 and caspase-1 on IL-1β production, the activated RWPE-1 cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs to silence the NLRP3 and caspase-1 genes. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated by spectrofluorometry. When RWPE-1 cells were stimulated with live T. vaginalis, the mRNA and protein expression of IL-1β, NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 increased. Moreover, silencing of NLRP3 and caspase-1 attenuated T. vaginalis-induced IL-1β secretion. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI and high extracellular potassium ion suppressed the production of IL-1β, caspase-1, and the expression of NLRP3 and ASC proteins. The specific NF-κB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, inhibited IL-1β production, and also inhibited the production of caspase-1, ASC and NLRP3 proteins. T. vaginalis induces the formation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human prostate epithelial cells via ROS and potassium ion efflux, and this results in IL-1β production. This is the first evidence for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the inflammatory response by prostate epithelial cells infected with T. vaginalis. Prostate 76:885-896, 2016. © 2016 Wiley

  4. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  5. "Live" (stained) benthic foraminiferal living depths, stable isotopes, and taxonomy offshore South Georgia, Southern Ocean: implications for calcification depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejardin, Rowan; Kender, Sev; Allen, Claire S.; Leng, Melanie J.; Swann, George E. A.; Peck, Victoria L.

    2018-01-01

    It is widely held that benthic foraminifera exhibit species-specific calcification depth preferences, with their tests recording sediment pore water chemistry at that depth (i.e. stable isotope and trace metal compositions). This assumed depth-habitat-specific pore water chemistry relationship has been used to reconstruct various palaeoenvironmental parameters, such as bottom water oxygenation. However, many deep-water foraminiferal studies show wide intra-species variation in sediment living depth but relatively narrow intra-species variation in stable isotope composition. To investigate this depth-habitat-stable-isotope relationship on the shelf, we analysed depth distribution and stable isotopes of living (Rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminifera from two box cores collected on the South Georgia shelf (ranging from 250 to 300 m water depth). We provide a comprehensive taxonomic analysis of the benthic fauna, comprising 79 taxonomic groupings. The fauna shows close affinities with shelf assemblages from around Antarctica. We find live specimens of a number of calcareous species from a range of depths in the sediment column. Stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O) were measured on stained specimens of three species, Astrononion echolsi, Cassidulinoides porrectus, and Buccella sp. 1, at 1 cm depth intervals within the downcore sediment sequences. In agreement with studies in deep-water settings, we find no significant intra-species variability in either δ13Cforam or δ18Oforam with sediment living depth on the South Georgia shelf. Our findings add to the growing evidence that infaunal benthic foraminiferal species calcify at a fixed depth. Given the wide range of depths at which we find living, infaunal species, we speculate that they may actually calcify predominantly at the sediment-seawater interface, where carbonate ion concentration and organic carbon availability is at a maximum.

  6. Stable sheath formation in expanding magnetic field to divertor plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; Takamaru, H.; Sato, T.

    2002-01-01

    The stable sheath formation and the effects of charge exchange collisions of ions with cold neutrals for the stable presheath formation in an expanding magnetic field towards a divertor plate is studied by a one-dimensional analysis. The requirement for flow velocity of ions at a plasma-sheath boundary is more restricted than that of the uniform magnetic field, which should be greater than the ion sound speed. The difference, however, between both cases is an order of the Debye length to plasma radius, which is negligibly small. The requirement for ion flow velocity inside a quasi-neutral plasma is investigated by taking into account the effects of the charge exchange collisions. Without neutrals in the quasi-neutral plasma, the ion flow velocity at an injection point should be much greater than the ion sound speed. The unisotropic velocity distribution of injected ions with coupling the expanding magnetic field and the charge exchange collisions might mitigate this requirement. (orig.)

  7. Studies on the dryolysis reactions of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Research is reported on metallic ions produced in solutions at low concentrations as mononuclear hydrolysis products. The method for studying the mononuclear species is to measure the solubility of the oxide or hydroxide solid phase that is stable under the conditions of interest. Column solubility measurements of Al(OH) 3 (Gibbsite) in NaCl solution as a function of pH, temperature, and ionic strength are being conducted in order to better establish the stability of the intermediate species Al(OH) 2 + and Al(OH) 3 (aq)

  8. Dynamics of the ion-ion acoustic instability in the thermalization of ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.H.; Horton, W. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies); Leboeuf, J.N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Particle simulation using a nonlinear adiabatic electron response with two streaming ion species and nonlinear theory are used to study the collisionless thermalization of ion beams in a hot electron plasma. The slow beam or subsonic regime is investigated and the criterion for the transition from predominantly light ion to predominantly heavy ion heating is developed. Long-lived ion hole structures a-re observed in the final state.

  9. Multistep Redox Sequences of Azopyridyl (L) Bridged Reaction Centres in Stable Radical Complex Ions {(.mu.-L)[MCl(.eta.5-C5Me5)]2}.+, M = Rh or Ir: Spectroelectrochemistry and High-frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantz, S.; Reinhardt, R.; Greulich, S.; Wanner, M.; Fiedler, Jan; Duboc-Toia, C.; Kaim, W.

    č. 18 (2003), s. 3370-3375 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0821; GA MŠk OC D15.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : EPR spectroscopy * radical complex ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.908, year: 2003

  10. Positive ion mobilities in normal liquid 3He at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, P.W.

    1978-11-01

    The mobility has been measured of positive ions in liquid 3 he in the range 2.5 mK 3 sub(m)/sup(V) 5 sub(m)/sup(V). The effects of 500 p.p.m. 4 He in the 3 He were investigated. It was found that, at low temperatures, several stable ion species could be produced for 3 He pressures of 23 bar and above and, between 25 mK and 60 mK, time dependent conversion from one species of ion to another was observed at all pressures. The creation mechanism, mobility and stability of multiple positive ions were studied. Possible explanations of the phenomena are discussed. The measured drift field dependence of mobility is used to test the quasiparticle scattering model assumed for the liquid. (U.K.)

  11. Measurement of ion species produced due to bombardment of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with hydrocarbons-covered surface of tungsten: Formation of tungsten nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Bhatt, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Singh, B.K.; Singh, B.; Prajapati, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-08-01

    A laboratory experiment has been performed to study the ions that are produced due to collisions of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with a hydrocarbons-covered surface of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature. Using a TOF mass spectrometry technique, the product ions formed in these collisions have been detected, identified and analyzed. Different ion–surface reaction processes, namely, neutralization, reflection, surface induced dissociation, surface induced chemical reactions and desorption are observed and discussed. Apart from the presence of desorbed aliphatic hydrocarbon and other ions, the mass spectra obtained from the considered collisions show the formation and sputtering of tungsten nitride (WN). A layer of WN on tungsten surface is known to decrease the sputtering of bulk tungsten in fusion devices more effectively than when the tungsten is bombarded with other seeding gases (He, Ar). It is further noted that there is a negligible diffusion of N in the bulk tungsten at room temperature.

  12. Continuous liquid sheet generator for ion stripping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, B.; Batson, P.; Leemann, B.; Rude, B.

    1984-10-01

    Many of the technical problems of generating a large thin liquid sheet from 0.02 to 0.20 μm thick (3 to 40 μgm/cm 2 ) have been solved. It is shown that this perennial sheet is stable and consonant in dimension. Several ion beam species from the SuperHILAC have been used for evaluation; at 0.11 MeV/n. In one of three modes this sheet serves as an equivalent substitute for a carbon foil. The second mode is characterized by a solid-like charge state distribution but with a varying fraction of unstripped ions. The third mode gives stripping performance akin to a vapor stripping medium. 9 references, 7 figures

  13. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  14. Identification of oxidized organic atmospheric species during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) using a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (IMS-ToF-CIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Surratt, J. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the field deployment of a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). IMS-TOF is a 2-dimensional analysis method, which separates gas-phase ions by mobility prior to determination of mass-to-charge ratio by mass spectrometry. Ion mobility is a unique physical property that is determined by the collisional cross section of an ion. Because mobility depends on size and shape, the IMS measurement is able to resolve isomers and isobaric compounds. Additionally, trends in IMS-TOF data space can be used to identify relationships between ions, such as common functionality or polymeric series. During SOAS we interfaced the IMS-TOF to a nitrate ion (NO3-) chemical ionization source that enables the selective ionization of highly oxidized gas phase species (those having a high O:C ratio) through clustering with the reagent ion. Highly oxidized products of terpenes and isoprene are important secondary organic aerosol precursors (SOA) that play an uncertain but important role in particle-phase chemistry. We present several case studies of atmospheric events during SOAS that exhibited elevated concentrations of sulfuric acid and/or organics. These events exhibited a rise in particle number and provide an opportunity to examine the role that organic species may have in local atmospheric new particle formation events. We also present the results from the field deployment and subsequent laboratory studies utilizing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor as the inlet for the CI-IMS-TOF. The reactor draws in ambient air and exposes it to high concentrations of the OH radical, created by photolysis O3 in the presence of water. The highly oxidized products are then sampled directly by the CI-IMS-TOF. We performed several experiments including placing pine and deciduous plants directly in front of the reactor opening and observed large increases in the number and

  15. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  16. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  17. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  18. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  19. The Reactivity of Stable Metallacyclobutenes and Vinylcarbenes

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Ryan Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 1. Historical Development of Stable Metallacyclobutenes Fred Tebbe and co-workers synthesized the first stable metallacyclobutene complexes in the late 1970’s by treatment of an intermediate titanium methylene species – later popularized as the “Tebbe reagent” – with acetylenes. Robert Grubbs at Caltech further studied this system, using it to detail a degenerate metathesis reaction and to isolate a metallacyclobutane complex – which was implicated in the emerging field of alkene meta...

  20. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  1. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  2. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  3. Stable Fly, (L., Dispersal and Governing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T. Showler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the movement of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L., has been studied, its extent and significance has been uncertain. On a local scale (13 km is mainly wind-driven by weather fronts that carry stable flies from inland farm areas for up to 225 km to beaches of northwestern Florida and Lake Superior. Stable flies can reproduce for a short time each year in washed-up sea grass, but the beaches are not conducive to establishment. Such movement is passive and does not appear to be advantageous to stable fly's survival. On a regional scale, stable flies exhibit little genetic differentiation, and on the global scale, while there might be more than one “lineage”, the species is nevertheless considered to be panmictic. Population expansion across much of the globe likely occurred from the late Pleistocene to the early Holocene in association with the spread of domesticated nomad livestock and particularly with more sedentary, penned livestock.

  4. Stable Organic Neutral Diradical via Reversible Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenpin; Quanz, Henrik; Burghaus, Olaf; Hofmann, Jonas; Logemann, Christian; Beeck, Sebastian; Schreiner, Peter R; Wegner, Hermann A

    2017-12-27

    We report the formation of a stable neutral diboron diradical simply by coordination of an aromatic dinitrogen compound to an ortho-phenyldiborane. This process is reversible upon addition of pyridine. The diradical species is stable above 200 °C. Computations are consistent with an open-shell triplet diradical with a very small open-shell singlet-triplet energy gap that is indicative of the electronic disjointness of the two radical sites. This opens a new way of generating stable radicals with fascinating electronic properties useful for a large variety of applications.

  5. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH)52-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH) 5 2- has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH) 5 2- complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  6. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inst. Lavoisier, IREM UMR 8637, Univ. de Versailles Saint-Quentin, Versailles (France); Eysseric, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  7. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  8. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  9. Cluster Ions and Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    We investigate the properties and possible roles of naturally occurring ions under at- mospheric conditions. Among other things, the formation of stable charged molecular clusters represents the initial stages of aerosol nucleation [e.g., Keesee and Castle- man, 1982], while the conversion of vapor to aggregates is the first step in certain atmospheric phase transitions [e.g. Hamill and Turco, 2000]. We analyze the stability and size distributions of common ionic clusters by solving the differential equations describing their growth and loss. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are deter- mined using kinetic and thermodynamic data. The latter are derived from direct labo- ratory measurements of equilibrium constants, from the classical charged liquid drop model applied to large aggregates (i.e., the Thomson model [Thomson, 1906]), and from quantum mechanical calculations of the thermodynamic potentials associated with the cluster structures. This approach allows us to characterize molecular clusters across the entire size range from true molecular species to larger aggregates exhibiting macroscopic behavior [D'Auria, 2001]. Cluster systems discussed in this talk include the proton hydrates (PHs) and nitrate-water and nitrate-nitric acid series [D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. These ions have frequently been detected in the stratosphere and tropo- sphere [e.g., Arnold et al., 1977; Viggiano and Arnold, 1981]. We show how the pro- posed hybrid cluster model can be extended to a wide range of ion systems, including non-proton hydrates (NPHs), mixed-ligand clusters such as nitrate-water-nitric acid and sulfate-sulfuric acid-water, as well as more exotic species containing ammonia, pyridine and other organic compounds found on ions [e.g., Eisele, 1988; Tanner and Eisele, 1991]. References: Arnold, F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of posi- tive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. D'Auria, R., A study of ionic

  10. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  11. Analytical method for the determination of various arsenic species in rice, rice food products, apple juice, and other juices by ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, David; Zywicki, Richard; Sullivan, Darryl

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that there are detectable levels of arsenic (As) in rice, rice food products, and apple juice. This has created significant concern to the public, the food industry, and various regulatory bodies. Classic test methods typically measure total As and are unable to differentiate the various As species. Since different As species have greatly different toxicities, an analytical method was needed to separate and quantify the different inorganic and organic species of As. The inorganic species arsenite [As(+3)] and arsenate [As(+5)] are highly toxic. With this in mind, an ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma (IC-ICP/MS) method was developed and validated for rice and rice food products that can separate and individually measure multiple inorganic and organic species of As. This allows for the evaluation of the safety or risk associated with any product analyzed. The IC-ICP/MS method was validated on rice and rice food products, and it has been used successfully on apple juice. This paper provides details of the validated method as well as some lessons learned during its development. Precision and accuracy data are presented for rice, rice food products, and apple juice.

  12. Novel lanthanide doped micro- and mesoporous solids. Characterization of ion-host-interactions, species distribution and luminescence properties using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy; Neuartige Lanthanoid-dotierte mikro- und mesoporoese Feststoffe. Charakterisierung von Ion-Wirt-Wechselwirkungen, Speziesverteilung und Lumineszenzeigenschaften mittels zeitaufgeloester Lumineszenzspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessner, Andre

    2010-12-15

    In this work lanthanide-doped microporous zeolites, microporous-mesoporous hybrid materials and mesoporous silicates were investigated regarding their luminescence properties and the ion-host-interactions using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Thereby, time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) provide information in the wavelength and time domain. For the analysis of the TRES a broad set of analytic methods was applied and thus a corresponding ''toolbox'' developed. Fitting of the luminescence decays was performed with a discrete number of exponentials and supported by luminescence decay times distributions. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra (TRANES), an advancement of TRES, could be used for the determination of the number of emissive lanthanide species in porous materials for the first time. Calculation of the decay-associated spectra (DAS) allowed the correlation of spectral information with luminescence decay times and thus delivered the luminescence spectra of the different europium species. For europium(III) we could use in addition the time-dependent asymmetry ratio and spectral evolution of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 0}-transition with time to obtain further information about the distribution of the lanthanide ions in the host material. Luminescence decay times and spectra allowed conclusions on the number of OH-oscillators in and the symmetry of the first coordination sphere. For the microporous and microporous-mesoporous materials were found different lanthanide species, which were characterized by the above mentioned methods. These lanthanide species can be found on different positions in the host material. One position is located deep in the pore system. Here, lanthanide ions are hardly accessible for water and mainly coordinated by framework oxygens. This results in long luminescence decay times and distorted coordination spheres. The second position can be found near or on the outer surface or in the

  13. Modification of polyvinyl alcohol surface properties by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukhova, I.V., E-mail: ivpuhova@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Kurzina, I.A. [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K.P. [Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Laput, O.A. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E.M. [Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    We describe our investigations of the surface physicochemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified by silver, argon and carbon ion implantation to doses of 1 × 10{sup 14}, 1 × 10{sup 15} and 1 × 10{sup 16} ion/cm{sup 2} and energies of 20 keV (for C and Ar) and 40 keV (for Ag). Infrared spectroscopy (IRS) indicates that destructive processes accompanied by chemical bond (−C=O) generation are induced by implantation, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates that the implanted silver is in a metallic Ag3d state without stable chemical bond formation with polymer chains. Ion implantation is found to affect the surface energy: the polar component increases while the dispersion part decreases with increasing implantation dose. Surface roughness is greater after ion implantation and the hydrophobicity increases with increasing dose, for all ion species. We find that ion implantation of Ag, Ar and C leads to a reduction in the polymer microhardness by a factor of five, while the surface electrical resistivity declines modestly.

  14. Ion implantation in ices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G.A.; Palumbo, M.E.; Satorre, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied, by in situ infrared spectroscopy, some effects due to ion implantation in frozen ices. In particular mixtures containing C, N and O atoms (e.g., N 2 :H 2 O:CH 4 ) have been irradiated with unreactive (noble gases) ions: the resulting alteration of the frozen sample induces the formation of other molecules (e.g., CO 2 , R- - -OCN, CO and HCN) and of a refractory organic residue. Similar products are formed when mixtures containing only C and O atoms (e.g., H 2 O:CH 4 ) are irradiated with N ions, i.e. molecular species that include the projectile are formed. These results are important, in particular for their applications to planetary physics. In planetary environments ice thickness is usually much larger than the penetration depth of the relevant ion populations (solar wind ions, magnetospheric particles, etc.) and ion implantation phenomena are expected. Our results indicate that some molecular species observed on icy planetary surfaces could not be native of that object but formed by ion irradiation and/or by implantation of reactive ions

  15. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  16. Green approach for ultratrace determination of divalent metal ions and arsenic species using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and mercapto-modified graphene oxide nanosheets as a novel adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Rafal; Janik, Paulina; Zawisza, Beata; Talik, Ewa; Margui, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi

    2015-03-17

    A new method based on dispersive microsolid phase extraction (DMSPE) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is proposed for multielemental ultratrace determination of heavy metal ions and arsenic species. In the developed methodology, the crucial issue is a novel adsorbent synthesized by grafting 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on a graphene oxide (GO) surface. Mercapto-modified graphene oxide (GO-SH) can be applied in quantitative adsorption of cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium, and lead ions. Moreover, GO-SH demonstrates selectivity toward arsenite in the presence of arsenate. Due to such features of GO-SH nanosheets as wrinkled structure and excellent dispersibility in water, GO-SH seems to be ideal for fast and simple preconcentration and determination of heavy metal ions using methodology based on DMSPE and TXRF measurement. The suspension of GO-SH was injected into an analyzed water sample; after filtration, the GO-SH nanosheets with adsorbed metal ions were redispersed in a small volume of internal standard solution and deposited onto a quartz reflector. The high enrichment factor of 150 allows obtaining detection limits of 0.11, 0.078, 0.079, 0.064, 0.054, and 0.083 ng mL(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), As(III), Cd(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Such low detection limits can be obtained using a benchtop TXRF system without cooling media and gas consumption. The method is suitable for the analysis of water, including high salinity samples difficult to analyze using other spectroscopy techniques. Moreover, GO-SH can be applied to the arsenic speciation due to its selectivity toward arsenite.

  17. Leaf gas exchange, fv/fm ratio, ion content and growth conditions of the two moringa species under magnetic water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.M.; Alharby, H.F.; Hajar, A.; Hakeem, K.R.

    2017-01-01

    The current greenhouse experiment investigates the role of magnetic water on the two Moringa species (Moringa oleifera and Moringa peregrina). Both species were exposed to the magnetic field (30 mT). The magnetic water increased the plant height, leaf number, leaflet number, and internode distances in both the species, respectively. Relative water content (RWC) and leaf area in both the species showed changes under magnetic water treatment. The results showed in magnetic water treatment, the leaf gas exchange parameters such as assimilation (A), stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration rate (E), and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) were increased. Similarly, Photosynthetic pigments (Chl a, Chl b, Chl (a+b), Carotenoids), photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE) were also increased significantly. Magnetized water had also significant effects on the maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm). Our study suggested that magnetic water treatment could be used as an environment-friendly technology for improving the growth and physiology of Moringa species. In addition, this technology could be further incorporated into the traditional methods of agriculture for the improvement of crop plants, particularly in the arid and sub-arid areas of the world. (author)

  18. Multivalent ion conducting solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanaka, N. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Solid electrolytes possess important characteristics for industrial applications. Only a single ionic species can macroscopically migrate in these solids. This paper described a the new NASICON (M-Zr-Nb-P-O) type system, exhibiting an exceptionally high level of trivalent M3+ ion conductivity on polycrystalline solids. The partial substitution of the smaller higher valent Nb5+ ion for Zr4+ stabilized the NASICON phase and realized the M3+ ion conduction in the NASICON structure. It was concluded that the conductivities of the series are comparable to those of the practically applied solid electrolytes of oxide anion conductors of YSZ and CSZ. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  20. Intense negative heavy ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiharu; Takagi, Akira; Ikegami, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Akira; Fukumoto, Sadayoshi

    1990-08-01

    Negative ion sources based on plasma-surface interactions (BLAKE ion source) have been developed at KEK for producing negative heavy ions. The first negative heavy ion source (BLAKE-II) was developed by modifying the ordinary negative hydrogen ion source with converter (BLAKE-I) placed into the plasma. It generates various species of negative heavy ions with intense beam currents. For example, a more than 10 mA Au- ion beam was obtained from the ion source. Recently, the large scaled negative heavy ion source (BLAKE-III) has been developed and in the preliminary test experiment, more than 100 mA Cu- ion beam has been stably obtained with a 10% duty factor in pulsed operation. The BLAKE-II ion source was attached to the BNL 15 MV and Tsukuba University TANDEM accelerators and large current negative heavy ion beams were successfully accelerated in pulsed mode operation. Also, it was found that the space charge effect should be carefully considered for such a large current acceleration in a tandem accelerator, especially at the injection beam line and low energy end. In order to examine the negative ion formation process fundamentally, negative ion production probability related on sputtered particle velocity was measured and the results showed exponential dependence of the production probability on particle velocity as Norskov and Lindquist's theory predicted.

  1. Multiply charged ions from solid substances with the mVINIS Ion Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragani, I; Nedeljkovi, T; Jovovi, J; Siljegovic, M; Dobrosavljevic, A

    2007-01-01

    We have used the well known metal-ions-from-volatile-compounds (MIVOC) method at the mVINIS Ion Source to produce the multiply charged ion beams form solid substances. Based on this method the very intense and stable multiply charged ion beams of several solid substances having the high melting points were extracted. The ion yields and the spectra of multiply charged ion beams obtained from solid materials like Fe and Hf will be presented. We have utilized the multiply charged ion beams from solid substances to irradiate the polymers, fullerenes and glassy carbon at the low energy channel for modification of materials

  2. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  3. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  4. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  5. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  6. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  7. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  8. Flavonoids-induced redox cycling of copper ions leads to generation of reactive oxygen species: A potential role in cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Hussain; Sohail, Aamir; Farhan, Mohd; Rehman, Ahmed Abdur; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, S M

    2018-01-01

    Flavonoids, a class of polyphenols are known to be effective inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. It is believed that antioxidant activity of polyphenols cannot fully account for induction of apoptosis and chemotherapeutic prevention in various cancers. In this article, by employing single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis (comet assay), we established that antioxidants, flavonoids such as (myricetin=MN, fisetin=FN, quercetin=QN, kaempferol=KL and galangin=GN) can cause cellular DNA breakage, also act as pro-oxidant in presence of transition metal ion such as copper. It was observed that the extent of cellular DNA breakage was found significantly higher in presence of copper. Hydroxyl radicals are generated as a sign of flavonoids' pro-oxidant nature through redox recycling of copper ions. Further, a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 by MN was found leading to pro-oxidant cell death, as assessed by MTT assay. Since levels of copper are considerably elevated in tissue, cell and serum during various malignancies, suggesting that cancer cells would be more subject to copper induced oxidative DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent pro-oxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis chemical species of long-lived radicals generated by ion beam radiation to mammalian cells and relationship with mutation and genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Jun; Ehara, Masafumi; Harada, Akira

    2006-01-01

    We carried out carbon ion radiation to cultured Syrian golden Hamster Embryo (SHE) cells at Nagoya University in order to measure Long-Lived Radicals (LLRs), which may play important role for induction of mutation, directly by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The cultured cells were irradiated by carbon beam at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) or γ-ray at Nagoya Univ. and frozen in liquid nitrogen at 15 min after irradiation for ESR measurement. ESR spectra were recorded at 77K with microwave power of 5 μW and accumulated over 8 to 16 times. The control cells show a broadened singlet ESR signal, which has not been detected by using our previous SHE cells. The new signal might be assigned as semiquinone radicals in dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in mitochondria, and this could be the first direct measurement from mammalian cells. The semiquinone radicals were suppressed not by γ-ray but by carbon beam, which indicates that carbon beam decompose the function of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in mitochondria. H-added phenylalanine radicals were also detected from γ-ray irradiated cultured cells but sulfinyl radicals, which had been key LLRs, were not found. Because the cells which we had been used were kept in frozen in the air, oxygen molecules have diffused into the cells, which made easier to produce sulfinyl radicals. Further study is required for the effect of the semiquinone and H-added phenylalanine radicals on delayed radiation biology. (author)

  10. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  11. Positive feedback in species communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes the eventual population densities in a species community depend on the initial densities or the arrival times of species. If arrival times determine species composition, a priority effect has occurred. Priority effects may occur if the species community exhibits alternative stable states

  12. High current ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.

    1989-06-01

    The concept of high current ion source is both relative and evolutionary. Within the domain of one particular kind of ion source technology a current of microamperers might be 'high', while in another area a current of 10 Amperes could 'low'. Even within the domain of a single ion source type, what is considered high current performance today is routinely eclipsed by better performance and higher current output within a short period of time. Within their fields of application, there is a large number of kinds of ion sources that can justifiably be called high current. Thus, as a very limited example only, PIGs, Freemen sources, ECR sources, duoplasmatrons, field emission sources, and a great many more all have their high current variants. High current ion beams of gaseous and metallic species can be generated in a number of different ways. Ion sources of the kind developed at various laboratories around the world for the production of intense neutral beams for controlled fusion experiments are used to form large area proton deuteron beams of may tens of Amperes, and this technology can be used for other applications also. There has been significant progress in recent years in the use of microwave ion sources for high current ion beam generation, and this method is likely to find wide application in various different field application. Finally, high current beams of metal ions can be produced using metal vapor vacuum arc ion source technology. After a brief consideration of high current ion source design concepts, these three particular methods are reviewed in this paper

  13. Stable and sporadic symbiotic communities of coral and algal holobionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Eric R; Barott, Katie L; Nulton, Jim; Vermeij, Mark JA; Rohwer, Forest L

    2016-01-01

    Coral and algal holobionts are assemblages of macroorganisms and microorganisms, including viruses, Bacteria, Archaea, protists and fungi. Despite a decade of research, it remains unclear whether these associations are spatial–temporally stable or species-specific. We hypothesized that conflicting interpretations of the data arise from high noise associated with sporadic microbial symbionts overwhelming signatures of stable holobiont members. To test this hypothesis, the bacterial communities associated with three coral species (Acropora rosaria, Acropora hyacinthus and Porites lutea) and two algal guilds (crustose coralline algae and turf algae) from 131 samples were analyzed using a novel statistical approach termed the Abundance-Ubiquity (AU) test. The AU test determines whether a given bacterial species would be present given additional sampling effort (that is, stable) versus those species that are sporadically associated with a sample. Using the AU test, we show that coral and algal holobionts have a high-diversity group of stable symbionts. Stable symbionts are not exclusive to one species of coral or algae. No single bacterial species was ubiquitously associated with one host, showing that there is not strict heredity of the microbiome. In addition to the stable symbionts, there was a low-diversity community of sporadic symbionts whose abundance varied widely across individual holobionts of the same species. Identification of these two symbiont communities supports the holobiont model and calls into question the hologenome theory of evolution. PMID:26555246

  14. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  15. Collective focusing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldin, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The principal subject of this dissertation is the trapping confinement of pure electron plasmas in bumpy toroidal magnetic fields, with particular attention given to the trapping procedure and the behavior of the plasma during the final equilibrium. The most important aspects of the equilibrium studied were the qualitative nature of the plasma configuration and motion and its density, distribution and stability. The motivation for this study was that an unneutralized cloud of electrons contained in a toroidal system, sufficiently dense and stable, may serve to electrostatically focus ions (against centrifugal and self space charge forces) in a cyclic ion accelerator. Such an accelerator, known as a Collective Focusing Ion Accelerator (CFIA) could be far smaller than conventional designs (which use external magnetic fields directly to focus the ions) due to the smaller gyro-radium of an electron in a magnetic field of given strength. The electron cloud generally drifted poloidally at a finite radius from the toroidal minor axis. As this would preclude focusing ions with such clouds, damping this motion was investigated. Finite resistance in the normally perfectly conductive vessel wall did this. In further preparation for a working CFIA, additional experiments studied the effect of ions on the stability of the electron cloud

  16. Enhanced TOF-SIMS imaging of a micropatterned protein by stable isotope protein labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belu, A M; Yang, Z; Aslami, R; Chilkoti, A

    2001-01-15

    Patterning of biomolecules on surfaces is an increasingly important technological goal. Because the fabrication of biomolecule arrays often involves stepwise, spatially resolved derivatization of surfaces, spectroscopic imaging of these arrays is important in their fabrication and optimization. Although imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is a powerful method for spatially resolved surface analysis, TOF-SIMS images of micropatterned proteins on organic substrates can be difficult to acquire, because of the lack of high intensity, protein-specific molecular ions that are essential for imaging under static conditions. In contrast, low-mass ions are of suitable intensity for imaging, but can originate from different chemical species on the surface. A potential solution to this problem is to utilize stable isotope labeled proteins, an approach that has heretofore not been explored in TOF-SIMS imaging of micropatterned proteins and peptides. To investigate the feasibility of stable isotope enhanced TOF-SIMS imaging of proteins, we synthesized 15N-labeled streptavidin by labeling of the protein during expression from a recombinant gene. The spatial distribution of streptavidin bound to biotin micropatterns, fabricated on a polymer and on a self-assembled monolayer on gold, was imaged by TOF-SIMS. Imaging of high-intensity, low-m/z secondary ions (e.g., C15N-) unique to streptavidin enabled unambiguous spatial mapping of the micropatterned protein with a lateral resolution of a few micrometers. TOF-SIMS imaging of micropatterned 15N-labeled streptavidin also illustrated the exquisite sensitivity of TOF-SIMS to low fractional coverage of protein (5 A effective thickness) in the background regions of the protein micropattern.

  17. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  18. A stable isotopic study of the diet of Potamonautes sidneyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natal, South Africa. Recent flood events in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park have allowed a substantial range expansion of this species, including previously hypersaline and desiccated areas. A stable isotope study was conducted to examine ...

  19. Growth Rates, Stable Oxygen Isotopes (18O), and Strontium (Sr/Ca) Composition in Two Species of Pacific Sclerosponges (Acanthocheatetes wellsi and Astrosclera willeyana) with 18O Calibration and Application to Paleoceanography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grottoli, A.; Adkins, J; Panero, W; Reaman, D; Moots, K

    2010-01-01

    The isotopic and elemental composition of sclerosponge skeletons is used to reconstruct paleoceanographic records. Yet few studies have systematically examined the natural variability in sclerosponge skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O, growth, and Sr/Ca, and how that may influence the interpretation of sclerosponge proxy records. Here, we analyzed short records in seven specimens of Acanthocheatetes wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Palau, four A. wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Saipan, and three Astrosclera willeyana (aragonite) sclerosponges from Saipan, as well as one long record in an A. wellsi specimen from Palau spanning 1945-2001.5. In Saipan, species-specific and mineralogical effects appear to have a negligible effect on sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O, facilitating the direct comparison of {delta}{sup 18}O records between species at a given location. At both sites, A. wellsi {delta}{sup 18}O and growth rates were sensitive to environmental conditions, but Sr/Ca was not sensitive to the same conditions. High-resolution {delta}{sup 18}O analyses confirmed this finding as both A. wellsi and A. willeyana deposited their skeleton in accordance with the trends in isotopic equilibrium with seawater, though with a 0.27{per_thousand} offset in the case of A. willeyana. In the high-Mg-calcite species A. wellsi, Mg may be interfering with Sr incorporation into the skeleton. On multidecadal timescales, A. wellsi sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O in Palau tracked the Southern Oscillation Index variability post-1977, but not pre-1977, coincident with the switch in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) at {approx}1976. This suggests that water mass circulation in the region is influenced by El Nino-Southern Oscillation variability during positive PDO phases, but not during negative ones.

  20. Ion bombardment induced topography evolution on low index crystal surfaces of Cu and Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanovic, L.; Tanovic, N.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    (100), (110) and (111) oriented single crystal surfaces of Cu and Pb have been bombarded with inert gas ions, self ions, ions of the other substrate species and Bi in the energy range 50-150 keV and in the fluence range 10 15 -10 18 ions.cm 2 . The evolving surface topography was observed by scanning electron microscopy. This topography was observed to be strongly influenced by ion species and surface orientation but the habit of the topography was delineated at low fluences and the features increased in size and density with increasing fluence with some mutation to the more stable of the features. As an example Bi and Pb bombardment of (100) Cu leads to little topographic evolution, (110) Cu develops a system of parallel ridges with (100) facets and (111) Cu develops a prismatic surface, each prism possessing (100) facets. These, and the more general, results cannot be explained by surface erosion by sputtering theory alone (this predicts surface stability of the lowest sputtering yield orientation (110), nor by surface free energy density minimisation criteria (this predicts stability of (111) surfaces). It is proposed that the observed topography is most strongly related to the crystallographic form of precipitates of implanted species. (orig.)

  1. Ion bombardment induced topography evolution on low index crystal surfaces of Cu and Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanovic, L.; Tanovic, N.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    (100), (110) and (111) oriented single crystal surfaces of Cu and Pb have been bombarded with inert gas ions, self ions, ions of the other substrate species and Bi in the energy range 50-150 keV and in the fluence range 10 15 -10 18 ions cm 2 . The evolving surface topography was observed by scanning electron microscopy. This topography was observed to be strongly influenced by ion species and surface orientation but the habit of the topography was delineated at low fluences and the features increased in size and density with increasing fluence with some mutation to the more stable of the features. As an example Bi and Pb bombardment of (100) Cu leads to little topographic evolution, (110) Cu develops a system of parallel ridges with (100) facets and (111) Cu develops a prismatic surface, each prism possessing (100) facets. These, and the more general, results cannot be explained by surface erosion by sputtering theory alone (this predicts surface stability of the lowest sputtering yield orientation (110), nor by surface free energy density minimisation criteria (this predicts stability of (111) surfaces). It is proposed that the observed topography is most strongly related to the crystallographic form of precipitates of implanted species. (orig.)

  2. Ion sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

    2004-05-18

    The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

  3. MIVOC method at the mVINIS ion source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovović Jovica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the metal-ions-from-volatile-compounds (MIVOC method with the mVINIS ion source, we have produced multiply charged ion beams from solid substances. Highly in tense, stable multiply charged ion beams of several solid substances with high melting points were extracted by using this method. The spectrum of multiply charged ion beams obtained from the element hafnium is presented here. For the first time ever, hafnium ion beam spectra were recorded at an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. Multiply charged ion beams from solid substances were used to irradiate the polymer, fullerene and glassy carbon samples at the channel for the modification of materials.

  4. Hydrolytically stable titanium-45

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Gregory; Fonslet, Jesper; Zhuravlev, Fedor

    2014-01-01

    . The high cross-section and production rates on an unenriched metal foil target contribute to make 45Ti an ideal PET radionuclide. In order to bring 45Ti to even a preclinical plat-form, the hydrolytic instability of aqueous Ti(IV) needs to be addressed. Recently, the groups of Edit Tshuva (Hebrew...... to ion-pairing, and eluted with isopropanol. iv. 45Ti was extracted onto a polystyrene based 1,3 diol resin (RAPP polymers) and labeling commenced on the column. Radiolabeling was slightly different in each condition, but in general the salan and dipic ligands were added to the 45Ti in pyridine...

  5. A Cahn-Hilliard-type phase-field theory for species diffusion coupled with large elastic deformations: Application to phase-separating Li-ion electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Claudio V.; Rejovitzky, Elisha; Anand, Lallit

    2014-10-01

    We formulate a unified framework of balance laws and thermodynamically-consistent constitutive equations which couple Cahn-Hilliard-type species diffusion with large elastic deformations of a body. The traditional Cahn-Hilliard theory, which is based on the species concentration c and its spatial gradient ∇c, leads to a partial differential equation for the concentration which involves fourth-order spatial derivatives in c; this necessitates use of basis functions in finite-element solution procedures that are piecewise smooth and globally C1-continuous. In order to use standard C0-continuous finite-elements to implement our phase-field model, we use a split-method to reduce the fourth-order equation into two second-order partial differential equations (pdes). These two pdes, when taken together with the pde representing the balance of forces, represent the three governing pdes for chemo-mechanically coupled problems. These are amenable to finite-element solution methods which employ standard C0-continuous finite-element basis functions. We have numerically implemented our theory by writing a user-element subroutine for the widely used finite-element program Abaqus/Standard. We use this numerically implemented theory to first study the diffusion-only problem of spinodal decomposition in the absence of any mechanical deformation. Next, we use our fully coupled theory and numerical-implementation to study the combined effects of diffusion and stress on the lithiation of a representative spheroidal-shaped particle of a phase-separating electrode material.

  6. Sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeltkemeier, Bastian

    2016-10-27

    In this thesis the dynamics of a trapped ion immersed in a spatially localized buffer gas is investigated. For a homogeneous buffer gas, the ion's energy distribution reaches a stable equilibrium only if the mass of the buffer gas atoms is below a critical value. This limitation can be overcome by using multipole traps in combination and/or a spatially confined buffer gas. Using a generalized model for elastic collisions of the ion with the buffer gas atoms, the ion's energy distribution is numerically determined for arbitrary buffer gas distributions and trap parameters. Three regimes characterized by the respective analytic form of the ion's equilibrium energy distribution are found. One of these is a novel regime at large atom-to-ion mass ratios where the final ion temperature can tuned by adiabatically decreasing the spatial extension of the buffer gas and the effective ion trap depth (forced sympathetic cooling). The second part of the thesis presents a hybrid atom ion trap designed for sympathetic cooling of hydroxide anions. In this hybrid trap the anions are immersed in a cloud of laser cooled rubidium atoms. The translational and rovibrational temperatures of the anions is probed by photodetachment tomography and spectroscopy which shows the first ever indication of sympathetic cooling of anions by laser cooled atoms.

  7. Experimental studies of stable confined electron clouds using Gabor lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Meusel, O.; Glaeser, B.; Schulte, K.

    2013-04-22

    Based on the idea of D. Gabor [1] space charge lenses are under investigation to be a powerful focussing device for intense ion beams. A stable confined electron column is used to provide strong radially symmetric electrostatic focussing, e.g. for positively charged ion beams. The advantages of Gabor lenses are a mass independent focussing strength, space charge compensation of the ion beam and reduced magnetic or electric fields compared to conventional focussing devices. Collective phenomena of the electron cloud result in aberrations and emittance growth of the ion beam. The knowledge of the behaviour of the electron cloud prevents a decrease of the beam brilliance. Numerical models developed to describe the electron confinement and dynamics within a Gabor lens help to understand the interaction of the ion beam with the electron column and show the causes of non-neutral plasma instabilities. The diagnosis of the electron cloud properties helps to evaluate the numerical models and to investigate the influen...

  8. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  9. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  10. The role of energetic ion bombardment during growth of TiO2 thin films by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, A.; Köhl, D.; Wuttig, M.

    2010-10-01

    TiO2 thin films have been deposited by several different sputtering processes: (i) dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) employing various geometrical conditions, (ii) ion-assisted dc magnetron sputtering where additional ion bombardment of the growing films was performed with an auxiliary ECR ion source and (iii) high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). Films have been investigated mainly by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that the highly energetic oxygen ions inherent in reactive sputtering of metal oxides are the dominant energetic species governing structure formation of TiO2 films by their kinetic impact. The trajectories of these energetic oxygen ions strongly depend on the shape of the erosion trace and hence on the age of the target, which therefore has a strong influence on structure formation. Furthermore, in a HiPIMS discharge the role of this energetic oxygen ion bombardment is strongly intensified due to the increased target voltage and the lower deposition rate compared with a dcMS discharge. It is also demonstrated that films with pure rutile structure which are stable under a post-deposition thermal treatment can be deposited under intense energetic ion bombardment at low temperatures either by HiPIMS at high peak power densities or by ion-assisted dcMS.

  11. Soft landing of polyatomic ions for selective modification of fluorinated self-assembled monolayer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hai; Miller, Scott A.; Cooks, R. Graham; Pachuta, Steven J.

    1998-03-01

    timing have not been elucidated. The extent and nature of surface modification is controlled by choice of the total ion dose, the projectile ion and its energy. Total ion doses used in these experiments typically corresponded to ~7% of a monolayer; however, inefficiencies in deposition mean that the actual surface coverages achieved are much lower. For a series of pyridine ions, correlations are evident between successful soft landing and the steric bulk of the projectile ion. It is suggested that the bulky groups facilitate energy loss by the projectile as it moves into the SAM surface and subsequently assist in its trapping there. Ex situ TOF-SIMS analysis and in situ sputtering using projectile ions with different recombination energies provide evidence that the ions deposited into the F-SAM surface are present in the matrix as isolated charged species, a result which is further supported by thermal desorption experiments. The modified surfaces are stable in both air and vacuum for several hours, although the trapped ion signal slowly decreases with time. The present method of surface modification appears to represent a new technique for producing long-lived metastable structures by allowing trapping of unusual and chemically reactive species at interfaces.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    primary ions were used and negative secondary ions were detected. A difference in the distribution of the CrN and the alleged N signal was observed and attributed to CrN acting as a diffusion barrier for nitrogen diffusion. It may be noted here that nitrogen does not form stable elemental negative ions [2] and is thus.

  13. Stable isotope analysis of dynamic lipidomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Joost; Bailey, Andrew P; Koster, Grielof; Gould, Alex P; Postle, Anthony D

    2017-08-01

    Metabolic pathway flux is a fundamental element of biological activity, which can be quantified using a variety of mass spectrometric techniques to monitor incorporation of stable isotope-labelled substrates into metabolic products. This article contrasts developments in electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the measurement of lipid metabolism with more established gas chromatography mass spectrometry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodologies. ESI-MS combined with diagnostic tandem MS/MS scans permits the sensitive and specific analysis of stable isotope-labelled substrates into intact lipid molecular species without the requirement for lipid hydrolysis and derivatisation. Such dynamic lipidomic methodologies using non-toxic stable isotopes can be readily applied to quantify lipid metabolic fluxes in clinical and metabolic studies in vivo. However, a significant current limitation is the absence of appropriate software to generate kinetic models of substrate incorporation into multiple products in the time domain. Finally, we discuss the future potential of stable isotope-mass spectrometry imaging to quantify the location as well as the extent of lipid synthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: BBALIP_Lipidomics Opinion Articles edited by Sepp Kohlwein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lithium ion storage between graphenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we investigate the storage of lithium ions between two parallel graphene sheets using the continuous approximation and the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. The continuous approximation assumes that the carbon atoms can be replaced by a uniform distribution across the surface of the graphene sheets so that the total interaction potential can be approximated by performing surface integrations. The number of ion layers determines the major storage characteristics of the battery, and our results show three distinct ionic configurations, namely single, double, and triple ion forming layers between graphenes. The number densities of lithium ions between the two graphenes are estimated from existing semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations, and the graphene sheets giving rise to the triple ion layers admit the largest storage capacity at all temperatures, followed by a marginal decrease of storage capacity for the case of double ion layers. These two configurations exceed the maximum theoretical storage capacity of graphite. Further, on taking into account the charge-discharge property, the double ion layers are the most preferable choice for enhanced lithium storage. Although the single ion layer provides the least charge storage, it turns out to be the most stable configuration at all temperatures. One application of the present study is for the design of future high energy density alkali batteries using graphene sheets as anodes for which an analytical formulation might greatly facilitate rapid computational results.

  15. Contact ionization ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, N.; Van Der Houven Van Oordt, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    An ion source in which an apertured or foraminous electrode having a multiplicity of openings is spaced from one or more active surfaces of an ionisation electrode, the active surfaces comprising a material capable of ionising by contact ionization a substance to be ionized supplied during operation to the active surface or surfaces comprises means for producing during operation a magnetic field which enables a stable plasma to be formed in the space between the active surface or surfaces and the apertured electrode, the field strength of the magnetic field being preferably in the range between 2 and 8 kilogauss. (U.S.)

  16. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  17. Decay of equatorial ring current ions and associated aeronomical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M.-C.; Kozyra, J. U.; Nagy, A. F.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1993-01-01

    The decay of the major ion species which constitute the ring current is studied by solving the time evolution of their distribution functions during the recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm. In this work, only equatorially mirroring particles are considered. Particles are assumed to move subject to E x B and gradient drifts. They also experience loses along their drift paths. Two loss mechanisms are considered: charge exchange with neutral hydrogen atoms and Coulomb collisions with thermal plasma in the plasmasphere. Thermal plasma densities are calculated with a plasmaspheric model employing a time-dependent convection electric field model. The drift-loss model successfully reproduces a number of important and observable features in the distribution function. Charge exchange is found to be the major loss mechanism for the ring current ions; however the important effects of Coulomb collisions on both the ring current and thermal populations are also presented. The model predicts the formation of a low-energy (less than 500 eV) ion population as a result of energy degradation caused by Coulomb collision of the ring current ions with the plasmaspheric electrons; this population may be one source of the low-energy ions observed during active and quiet periods in the inner magnetosphere. The energy transferred to plasmaspheric electrons through Coulomb collisions with ring current ions is believed to be the energy source for the electron temperature enhancement and the associated 6300 A (stable auroral red (SAR) arc) emission in the subauroral region. The calculated energy deposition rate is sufficient to produce a subauroral electron temperature enhancement and SAR arc emissions that are consistent with observations of these quantities during moderate magnetic activity levels.

  18. WORKSHOP: Stable particle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro G.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Particle beam stability is crucial to any accelerator or collider, particularly big ones, such as Brookhaven's RHIC heavy ion collider and the larger SSC and LHC proton collider schemes. A workshop on the Stability of Particle Motion in Storage Rings held at Brookhaven in October dealt with the important issue of determining the short- and long-term stability of single particle motion in hadron storage rings and colliders, and explored new methods for ensuring it. In the quest for realistic environments, the imperfections of superconducting magnets and the effects of field modulation and noise were taken into account. The workshop was divided into three study groups: Short-Term Stability in storage rings, including chromatic and geometric effects and correction strategies; Long-Term Stability, including modulation and random noise effects and slow varying effects; and Methods for determining the stability of particle motion. The first two were run in parallel, but the third was attended by everyone. Each group considered analytical, computational and experimental methods, reviewing work done so far, comparing results and approaches and underlining outstanding issues. By resolving conflicts, it was possible to identify problems of common interest. The workshop reaffirmed the validity of methods proposed several years ago. Major breakthroughs have been in the rapid improvement of computer capacity and speed, in the development of more sophisticated mathematical packages, and in the introduction of more powerful analytic approaches. In a typical storage ring, a particle may be required to circulate for about a billion revolutions. While ten years ago it was only possible to predict accurately stability over about a thousand revolutions, it is now possible to predict over as many as one million turns. If this trend continues, in ten years it could become feasible to predict particle stability over the entire storage period. About ninety participants

  19. An Aqueous Ca-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheytani, Saman; Liang, Yanliang; Wu, Feilong; Jing, Yan; Dong, Hui; Rao, Karun K; Chi, Xiaowei; Fang, Fang; Yao, Yan

    2017-12-01

    Multivalent-ion batteries are emerging as low-cost, high energy density, and safe alternatives to Li-ion batteries but are challenged by slow cation diffusion in electrode materials due to the high polarization strength of Mg- and Al-ions. In contrast, Ca-ion has a low polarization strength similar to that of Li-ion, therefore a Ca-ion battery will share the advantages while avoiding the kinetics issues related to multivalent batteries. However, there is no battery known that utilizes the Ca-ion chemistry due to the limited success in Ca-ion storage materials. Here, a safe and low-cost aqueous Ca-ion battery based on a highly reversible polyimide anode and a high-potential open framework copper hexacyanoferrate cathode is demonstrated. The prototype cell shows a stable capacity and high efficiency at both high and low current rates, with an 88% capacity retention and an average 99% coloumbic efficiency after cycling at 10C for 1000 cycles. The Ca-ion storage mechanism for both electrodes as well as the origin of the fast kinetics have been investigated. Additional comparison with a Mg-ion cell with identical electrodes reveals clear kinetics advantages for the Ca-ion system, which is explained by the smaller ionic radii and more facile desolvation of hydrated Ca-ions.

  20. Accurate and precise measurement of oxygen isotopic fractions and diffusion profiles by selective attenuation of secondary ions (SASI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez, Helena; Druce, John; Hong, Jong-Eun; Ishihara, Tatsumi; Kilner, John A

    2015-03-03

    The accuracy and precision of isotopic analysis in Time-of-Flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) relies on the appropriate reduction of the dead-time and detector saturation effects, especially when analyzing species with high ion yields or present in high concentrations. Conventional approaches to avoid these problems are based on Poisson dead-time correction and/or an overall decrease of the total secondary ion intensity by reducing the target current. This ultimately leads to poor detection limits for the minor isotopes and high uncertainties of the measured isotopic ratios. An alternative strategy consists of the attenuation of those specific secondary ions that saturate the detector, providing an effective extension of the linear dynamic range. In this work, the selective attenuation of secondary ion signals (SASI) approach is applied to the study of oxygen transport properties in electroceramic materials by isotopic labeling with stable (18)O tracer and ToF-SIMS depth profiling. The better analytical performance in terms of accuracy and precision allowed a more reliable determination of the oxygen surface exchange and diffusion coefficients while maintaining good mass resolution and limits of detection for other minor secondary ion species. This improvement is especially relevant to understand the ionic transport mechanisms and properties of solid materials, such as the parallel diffusion pathways (e.g., oxygen diffusion through bulk, grain boundary, or dislocations) in electroceramic materials with relevant applications in energy storage and conversion devices.

  1. Longitudinal instabilities of the experimentally generated laser accelerated ion beam relevant to fast ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshbinfar, S.

    2017-11-01

    The advent of laser-assisted ion acceleration technology promises an alternative candidate to conventional accelerator drivers used in inertial confinement fusion. The experimental generation of quasi-monoenergetic heavier ion species i.e. carbon and aluminum, applicable to fast ignition studies has been recently reported. The propagation of these energetic ions may impact on the proper ignition phase through growing of micro-instabilities of beam-plasma system. The growth of flow-aligned instabilities is much more important for heavier ions transport in the dense plasma. Here, we have presented a general non-relativistic one-dimensional dispersion relation of cold fluid model as well as corresponding kinetic theory of incident ion beam with atomic number, Zb enters into a fast ignition DT plasma. The longitudinal instabilities of some selected average energies of experimentally generated C6+ (EC=50, 100 and 200 MeV with δE/E ∼ 10 %) and Al11+ (EAl=150 and 300 MeV with δE/E ∼25%) quasi-monoenergetic beams were examined and beam-plasma system stable configuration have been then derived. It has been shown that in the kinetic theory framework, carbon and aluminum ions may be completely stabilized by the combination of beam to plasma density ratio (αb) and plasma temperature (Tp) of ignition phase parameters. Moreover, in complete stabilization, αb parameter of aluminum beam is an order of magnitude lower than carbon.

  2. CAMECA IMS 1300-HR3: The New Generation Ion Microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, P.; Choi, S. Y.; Renaud, L.; Saliot, P.; Larson, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The success of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in Geo- and Cosmo-chemistry relies on its performance in terms of: 1) very high sensitivity (mandatory for high precision measurements or to achieve low detection limits); 2) a broad mass range of elemental and isotopic species, from low mass (H) to high mass (U and above); 3) in-situ analysis of any solid flat polished surface; and 4) high spatial resolution from tens of microns down to sub-micron scale. The IMS 1300-HR3 (High Reproducibility, High spatial Resolution, High mass Resolution) is the latest generation of CAMECA's large geometry magnetic sector SIMS (or ion microprobe), successor to the internationally recognized IMS 1280-HR. The 1300-HR3delivers unmatched analytical performance for a wide range of applications (stable isotopes, geochronology, trace elements, nuclear safeguards and environmental studies…) due to: • High brightness RF-plasma oxygen ion source with enhanced beam density and current stability, dramatically improving spatial resolution, data reproducibility, and throughput • Automated sample loading system with motorized sample height (Z) adjustment, significantly increasing analysis precision, ease-of-use, and productivity • UV-light microscope for enhanced optical image resolution, together with dedicated software for easy sample navigation (developed by University of Wisconsin, USA) • Low noise 1012Ω resistor Faraday cup preamplifier boards for measuring low signal intensities In addition, improvements in electronics and software have been integrated into the new instrument. In order to meet a growing demand from geochronologists, CAMECA also introduces the KLEORA, which is a fully optimized ion microprobe for advanced mineral dating derived from the IMS 1300-HR3. Instrumental developments as well as data obtained for stable isotope and U-Pb dating applications will be presented in detail.

  3. Dynamical attraction to stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Albert M.; Talet, Marina

    2012-01-01

    We apply dynamical ideas within probability theory, proving an almost-sure invariance principle in log density for stable processes. The familiar scaling property (self-similarity) of the stable process has a stronger expression, that the scaling flow on Skorokhod path space is a Bernoulli flow. We prove that typical paths of a random walk with i.i.d. increments in the domain of attraction of a stable law can be paired with paths of a stable process so that, after applying a non-random regula...

  4. Pesticides Curbing Soil Fertility: Effect of Complexation of Free Metal Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Sukhmanpreet

    2017-07-04

    Researchers have suggested that the reason behind infertility is pernicious effect of broad spectrum pesticides on non target, beneficial microorganism of soil. Here, studying the chelating effect of selective organophosphate and carbamate pesticides with essential metal ions, at all possible combinations of three different pH (4 ± 0.05, 7 ± 0.05 and 9 ± 0.05) and three different temperatures (15 ± 0.5°C, 30 ± 0.5°C and 45 ± 0.5°C), shows very fast rate of reaction which further increases with increase of pH and temperature. Carbonyl oxygen of carbamate and phosphate oxygen of organophosphate were found to be common ligating sites among all the complexes. Formed metal complexes were found to be highly stable and water insoluble on interaction with essential metal ions in solvent medium as well as over silica. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations not only reinforced the experimental observations, but, after a wide computational conformational analysis, unraveled the nature of the high stable undesired species that consist of pesticides complexed by metal ions from the soil. All in all, apart from the direct toxicity of pesticides, the indirect effect by means of complexation of free metal ions impoverishes the soil.

  5. Pesticides Curbing Soil Fertility: Effect of Complexation of Free Metal Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhmanpreet; Kumar, Vijay; Chawla, Mohit; Cavallo, Luigi; Poater, Albert; Upadhyay, Niraj

    2017-07-01

    Researchers have suggested that the reason behind infertility is pernicious effect of broad spectrum pesticides on non target, beneficial microorganism of soil. Here, studying the chelating effect of selective organophosphate and carbamate pesticides with essential metal ions, at all possible combinations of three different pH (4±0.05, 7±0.05 and 9±0.05) and three different temperatures (15±0.5°C, 30±0.5°C and 45±0.5°C), shows very fast rate of reaction which further increases with increase of pH and temperature. Carbonyl oxygen of carbamate and phosphate oxygen of organophosphate were found to be common ligating sites among all the complexes. Formed metal complexes were found to be highly stable and water insoluble on interaction with essential metal ions in solvent medium as well as over silica. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations not only reinforced the experimental observations, but, after a wide computational conformational analysis, unraveled the nature of the high stable undesired species that consist of pesticides complexed by metal ions from the soil. All in all, apart from the direct toxicity of pesticides, the indirect effect by means of complexation of free metal ions impoverishes the soil.

  6. Hemolymph metabolites and osmolality are tightly linked to cold tolerance of Drosophila species: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Trine; MacMillan, Heath A; Nyberg, Nils; Staerk, Dan; Malmendal, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes

    2016-08-15

    Drosophila, like most insects, are susceptible to low temperatures, and will succumb to temperatures above the freezing point of their hemolymph. For these insects, cold exposure causes a loss of extracellular ion and water homeostasis, leading to chill injury and eventually death. Chill-tolerant species are characterized by lower hemolymph [Na(+)] than chill-susceptible species and this lowered hemolymph [Na(+)] is suggested to improve ion and water homeostasis during cold exposure. It has therefore also been hypothesized that hemolymph Na(+) is replaced by other 'cryoprotective' osmolytes in cold-tolerant species. Here, we compared the hemolymph metabolite profiles of five drosophilid species with marked differences in chill tolerance. All species were examined under 'normal' thermal conditions (i.e. 20°C) and following cold exposure (4 h at 0°C). Under benign conditions, total hemolymph osmolality was similar among all species despite chill-tolerant species having lower hemolymph [Na(+)]. Using NMR spectroscopy, we found that chill-tolerant species instead have higher levels of sugars and free amino acids in their hemolymph, including classical 'cryoprotectants' such as trehalose and proline. In addition, we found that chill-tolerant species maintain a relatively stable hemolymph osmolality and metabolite profile when exposed to cold stress while sensitive species suffer from large increases in osmolality and massive changes in their metabolic profiles during a cold stress. We suggest that the larger contribution of classical cryoprotectants in chill-tolerant Drosophila plays a non-colligative role for cold tolerance that contributes to osmotic and ion homeostasis during cold exposure and, in addition, we discuss how these comparative differences may represent an evolutionary pathway toward more extreme cold tolerance of insects. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Complexes of vanadyl and uranyl ions with the chelating groups of humic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, M.L.S.; Mota, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The uranyl and vanadyl complexes formed with salicylic, phthalic and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acids have been studied by potentiometry in order to determine the stability constants of the Msub(m) Lsub(n) species formed in solution, and the constants for hydrolysis and polymeric complexes, at 25.0 0 , in 0.10, 0.40 and 0.70M sodium perchlorate. MINIQUAD was used in process the data to find the best models for the species in solution, and calculate the formation constants. The uranyl-salicylic acid sytem was also studied by spectrophotometry and the program SQUAD used to process the data obtained. The best models for these systems show that co-ordination of the uranyl ion by carboxylate groups is easier than for the vanadyl ion, whereas the vanadyl ion seems to form more stable complexes with phenolate groups. Both oxo-cations seem to tend to hydrolyse rather than form complexes when the L:M ratios are greater than unity. Although the change in the constants with ionic strength is small, the activity coefficients of the salicylate and phthalate species have been calculated at ionic strengths 0.40 and 0.70M, along with the interaction parameters with Na + , from the stability constants found for the species ML and H 2 L, according to the Bronsted-Guggenheim expression. (author)

  8. Beam dynamics calculations for the acceleration of different ions in a heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitinghoff, H.; Parisi, G.; Sauer, A.; Pabst, M.

    1996-01-01

    Heavy ion linear accelerators are well suited as driver in heavy ion inertial fusion facilities. In present scenarios the acceleration of different ion species or the simultaneous acceleration of different isotopes in the same linac are discussed. Beam dynamics calculations have been performed to check the beam behaviour and the conditions for such a kind of operation in RFQ and DTL. (author)

  9. Amorphization of metals by ion implantation and ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Heera, V.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic systems can be formed either by high-fluence ion implantation of glassforming species or by irradiation of layered metal systems with inert gas ions. Both techniques and experimental examples are presented. Empirical rules are discussed which predict whether a given system can be transformed into an amorphous phase. Influence of temperature, implantation dose and pre-existing crystalline metal composition on amorphization is considered. Examples are given of the implantation induced amorphous structure, recrystallization and formation of quasicrystalline structures. (author)

  10. THE ROLES OF METAL IONS IN REGULATION BY RIBOSWITCHES

    OpenAIRE

    Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian; Winkler, Wade C.

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions are required by all organisms in order to execute an array of essential molecular functions. They play a critical role in many catalytic mechanisms and structural properties. Proper homeostasis of ions is critical; levels that are aberrantly low or high are deleterious to cellular physiology. To maintain stable intracellular pools, metal ion-sensing regulatory (metalloregulatory) proteins couple metal ion concentration fluctuations with expression of genes encoding for cation trans...

  11. Descriptors for ions and ion-pairs for use in linear free energy relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E

    2016-01-22

    The determination of Abraham descriptors for single ions is reviewed, and equations are given for the partition of single ions from water to a number of solvents. These ions include permanent anions and cations and ionic species such as carboxylic acid anions, phenoxide anions and protonated base cations. Descriptors for a large number of ions and ionic species are listed, and equations for the prediction of Abraham descriptors for ionic species are given. The application of descriptors for ions and ionic species to physicochemical processes is given; these are to water-solvent partitions, HPLC retention data, immobilised artificial membranes, the Finkelstein reaction and diffusion in water. Applications to biological processes include brain permeation, microsomal degradation of drugs, skin permeation and human intestinal absorption. The review concludes with a section on the determination of descriptors for ion-pairs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Propagation of light ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Niu, Keishiro.

    1983-01-01

    A method of rotating ion layer is proposed as a possible driver for inertial confinement fusion for the purpose of obtaining more stable ion beam against various micro- and macroinstabilities. The analysis was carried out within the frameworks of Vlasov and fluid models. A rotating ion layer propagating in the Z-direction is considered. The beam is described by a distribution function which satisfies the Vlasov equation. The equilibrium and microstability were studied. The filamentation instability is suppressed by a magnetic field due to the rotation of ion beam. To study the properties of the equilibrium state from the macroscopic standpoint, the equation of continuity of ion beam, the equation of motion and the Maxwell equations are considered. It is shown that the macroinstability is stabilized by the magnetic field in the Z-direction. It was found that the most dangerous instability for the problem of the propagation of ion beam was able to be atabilized by using a rotating ion layer. (Kato, T.)

  13. The production of stable isotopes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgel, M.; Iglesias, J.; Casas, J.; Saviron, J. M.; Quintanilla, M.

    1965-07-01

    The activities developed in the field of the production of stable isotopes by means of ion-exchange chromatography and thermal diffusion techniques are reported. The first method was used to study the separation of the nitrogen and boron isotopes, whereby the separation factor was determined by the break through method. Values ranging from 1,028 to 1,022 were obtained for the separation factor of nitrogen by using ammonium hydroxide solutions while the corresponding values as obtained for boron amounted to 1,035-1,027 using boric acid solutions. Using ammonium chloride or acetate and sodium borate, respectively, resulted in the obtention of values for the separation factor approaching unity. The isotopic separation has been carried out according to the method of development by displacement. The separation of the isotopes of the noble gases, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon has been accomplished resorting to the method of thermal diffusion. (Author) 16 refs.

  14. The production of stable isotopes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urgel, M.; Iglesias, J.; Casas, J.; Saviron, J. M.; Quintanilla, M.

    1965-01-01

    The activities developed in the field of the production of stable isotopes by means of ion-exchange chromatography and thermal diffusion techniques are reported. The first method was used to study the separation of the nitrogen and boron isotopes, whereby the separation factor was determined by the break through method. Values ranging from 1,028 to 1,022 were obtained for the separation factor of nitrogen by using ammonium hydroxide solutions while the corresponding values as obtained for boron amounted to 1,035-1,027 using boric acid solutions. Using ammonium chloride or acetate and sodium borate, respectively, resulted in the obtention of values for the separation factor approaching unity. The isotopic separation has been carried out according to the method of development by displacement. The separation of the isotopes of the noble gases, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon has been accomplished resorting to the method of thermal diffusion. (Author) 16 refs

  15. HIAF: New opportunities for atomic physics with highly charged heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Wen, W. Q.; Zhang, S. F.; Yu, D. Y.; Cheng, R.; Yang, J.; Huang, Z. K.; Wang, H. B.; Zhu, X. L.; Cai, X.; Zhao, Y. T.; Mao, L. J.; Yang, J. C.; Zhou, X. H.; Xu, H. S.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Zhao, H. W.; Xiao, G. Q.; Zhan, W. L.

    2017-10-01

    A new project, High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF), is currently being under design and construction in China. HIAF will provide beams of stable and unstable heavy ions with high energies, high intensities and high quality. An overview of new opportunities for atomic physics using highly charged ions and radioactive heavy ions at HIAF is given.

  16. Effect of temperature and salinity on stable isotopic composition of shallow water benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Linshy, V.N.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    Quantitative estimation of past climatic parameters from stable isotopic composition of foraminifera relies on estimating the precise relationship between stable isotopic composition of the species analyzed and the physico-chemical factors...

  17. Rotation characteristics of main ions and impurity ions in H-mode tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Burrell, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Kim, Y.; St. John, H.E.; Seraydarian, R.P.; Wade, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Poloidal and toroidal rotation of the main ions (He 2+ ) and the impurity ions (C 6+ and B 5+ ) in H-mode helium plasmas have been measured via charge exchange recombination spectroscopy in the DIII-D tokamak. It was discovered that the main ion poloidal rotation is in the ion diamagnetic drift direction while the impurity ion rotation is in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, in qualitative agreement with the neoclassical theory. The deduced radial electric field in the edge is of the same negative-well shape regardless of which ion species is used, validating the fundamental nature of the electric field in L-H transition phenomenology

  18. Ion dip spectroscopy of cold molecules and ions. Progress report and renewal proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessel, J.

    1987-08-13

    A research program is underway with the objective of developing techniques of high resolution multiphoton spectroscopy for selective, ultrasensitive molecular detection. Methods under study include various forms of ion dip spectroscopy and new methods of ion fragmentation spectroscopy. The studies are providing a new understanding of the fundamental spectroscopy and photophysics of large molecular ions. Dimer and cluster ions of polynuclear aromatics and related species are also being investigated, with potential detection applications.

  19. Determination of inorganic ions in natural water by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Eewiat Edin Put; Abdul Khalik Wood; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Md Suhaimi Elia

    2010-01-01

    Ion chromatography (IC) is a well established methodology for analysis of ionic species. The concentration of ionic species was determined using suppressed IC with conductivity detection. Anion species were determined in a single 15-min run with Na 2 CO 3 and NaHCO 3 eluent. Cation species were analysed by direct injection of 1 ml and isocratic elution with a methanesulfonic acid (MSA) eluent. Natural water were collected from various sources such as rainwater, lake, river and groundwater. Analysis performance of IC system was validated by evaluating the linear regression of calibration curve, recovery of spike sample and quality control sample. (author)

  20. Development of a compact powdery sample negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Tanabe, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sasao, Mamiko; Kawano, Hiroyuki

    1997-02-01

    A gas-feed-free compact negative ion source can be realized by utilizing the process of electron stimulated desorption from powdery sample. A negative ion source of this type is designed to be attached to a standard 1.33 inch copper-gasket-flange. The ion source is operated stable with LiH powder for more than 10 hours with the mass-separated negative hydrogen ion current of 1 nA. The source causes minute gas emission, and particularly suitable for ion beam applications in which a good vacuum is required. The present status of the compact ion source development is briefly described. (author)

  1. Chemical Shuttle Additives in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Mary

    2013-03-31

    than NMC) and the DDB is useful for lithium ion cells with LFP cathodes (potential that is lower than NMC). A 4.5 V class redox shuttle provided by Argonne National Laboratory was evaluated which provides a few cycles of overcharge protection for lithium ion cells containing NMC cathodes but it is not stable enough for consideration. Thus, a redox shuttle with an appropriate redox potential and sufficient chemical and electrochemical stability for commercial use in larger format lithium ion cells with NMC cathodes was not found. Molecular imprinting of the redox shuttle molecule during solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation likely contributes to the successful reduction of oxidized redox shuttle species at carbon anodes. This helps to understand how a carbon anode covered with an SEI layer, that is supposed to be electrically insulating, can reduce the oxidized form of a redox shuttle.

  2. Application of stable isotope to breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yasuto

    1988-01-01

    Needles to say, radioisotopes have good characteristics as a tracer for examining biological functions. In fact, scyntigraphy is widely used over Japan. It is true, however, that there are some difficulties in applying radioisotopes to humans. Thus, greater attention began to be attracted to stable isotopes in the late 1960s, because these substances can be used for infants and pregnant women. They can be stored for a long period of time since they do not suffer damping as in the case of radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a tracer, stable isotopes can provide structural-chemical information including the position of isotope labels, and the mass and atomic composition of fragment ions. Such techniques as NMR spectroscopy is employed for this purpose. The method is currently used to perform examinations of congenital metabolic disorders. The carbon isotopes of 13 C and 14 C are used for breath test. Compounds labeled with these isotopes are administered and their ratio to the total CO 2 in breath is measured to diagnose diseases. In the early 1970s, 13 C has come into use for breath test. Similar breath test is applied to diagnosis of the bacterial overgrowth syndrome and ileal dysfunction syndrome. (Nogami, K.)

  3. Color stable manganese-doped phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Robert Joseph [Burnt Hills, NY; Setlur, Anant Achyut [Niskayuna, NY; Deshpande, Anirudha Rajendra [Twinsburg, OH; Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev [Sofia, BG

    2012-08-28

    A process for preparing color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphors includes providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof. A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor composition radiationally coupled to the light source, and which includes a color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor.

  4. Stable sheath formation in expanding magnetic field to divertor plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; Takamaru, H.; Sato, T.

    2001-01-01

    The stable sheath formation in expanding magnetic field to a divertor plate was studied theoretically by one-dimensional analysis. In fusion devices the magnetic field is expanding in the direction of the plate, i.e. the magnitude of magnetic field is decreasing to the plate. In this configuration ions are accelerated to the plate due to the gradient of the magnetic field strength, so called a mirror force. The bombardment of accelerated ions to the plate may cause several severe problems to fusion plasmas, for example, release of large amount of impurities from the diverter plate. Limited research efforts have been carried out describing magnetic field effects on various potential formation and particle and heat fluxes to the divertor plate. The plasma-wall interaction in an oblique to the plate but uniform magnetic field has been studied by means of 1D-PIC numerical simulation. This analysis shows the formation of a quasi-neutral magnetic pre-sheath preceding the electrostatic Debye sheath, which scales to the ion gyroradius at the sound speed and to the incidence angle of the magnetic field. Sato clarifies this magnetic pre-sheath is attributed to the ion polarisation drift by the two dimensional kinetic analysis. None of effects, however, of non-uniformity of the magnetic field has been taken into account on the stable electrostatic potential and sheath formation. In this paper, we consider a collisionless sheath model between an infinite metal plate and a quasi-neutral plasma in the expanding magnetic field to the plate. One dimensional kinetic analysis leads that a condition for flow velocity of ions at a plasma-sheath boundary is more restricted than that of the uniform magnetic field, which should be larger than the ion sound speed. The difference, however, between both cases is an order of the Debye length to a plasma radius, which is negligible small. The requirement for the ion flow velocity inside the plasma is obtained from the condition of the quasi

  5. High-power electrochemical energy storage system employing stable radical pseudocapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Nakano, Hideyuki; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira

    2014-01-27

    The development of electrical energy storage devices that can operate at high charge and discharge rates is fundamentally important, however although electrochemical capacitors (ECs) can charge and discharge at high rates, their electrochemical storage capacity remains an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional lithium-ion batteries. Novel pseudocapasitors are developed, based on the stable persilyl-susbtituted free radicals of the heavy group 14 elements, (tBu2 MeSi)3 E(.) [E=Si (1), Ge (2), and Sn (3)], as anode materials for energy storage system. Such systems showed a remarkable cycle stability without significant loss of power density, in comparison with similar characteristics of the known organic radical batteries, the dual carbon cell, and the electrochemical capacitor. Particularly important is that these novel electrochemical energy storage systems employing stable heavy group 14 element radicals are lithium-free. The electrochemical properties and structures of the reduced and oxidized species were studied by the cyclic voltammetry (CV), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. National uses and needs for separated stable isotopes in physics, chemistry, and geoscience research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Present uses of separated stable isotopes in the fields of physics, chemistry, and the geosciences have been surveyed to identify current supply problems and to determine future needs. Demand for separated isotopes remains strong, with 220 different nuclides having been used in the past three years. The largest needs, in terms of both quantity and variety of isotopes, are found in nuclear physics research. Current problems include a lack of availability of many nuclides, unsatisfactory enrichment of rare species, and prohibitively high costs for certain important isotopes. It is expected that demands for separated isotopes will remain roughly at present levels, although there will be a shift toward more requests for highly enriched rare isotopes. Significantly greater use will be made of neutron-rich nuclides below A = 100 for producing exotic ion beams at various accelerators. Use of transition metal nuclei for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will expand. In addition, calibration standards will be required for the newer techniques of radiological dating, such as the Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf methods, but in relatively small quantities. Most members of the research community would be willing to pay considerably more than they do now to maintain adequate supplies of stable isotopes

  7. National uses and needs for separated stable isotopes in physics, chemistry, and geoscience research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Present uses of separated stable isotopes in the fields of physics, chemistry, and the geosciences have been surveyed to identify current supply problems and to determine future needs. Demand for separated isotopes remains strong, with 220 different nuclides having been used in the past three years. The largest needs, in terms of both quantity and variety of isotopes, are found in nuclear physics research. Current problems include a lack of availability of many nuclides, unsatisfactory enrichment of rare species, and prohibitively high costs for certain important isotopes. It is expected that demands for separated isotopes will remain roughly at present levels, although there will be a shift toward more requests for highly enriched rare isotopes. Significantly greater use will be made of neutron-rich nuclides below A = 100 for producing exotic ion beams at various accelerators. Use of transition metal nuclei for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will expand. In addition, calibration standards will be required for the newer techniques of radiological dating, such as the Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf methods, but in relatively small quantities. Most members of the research community would be willing to pay considerably more than they do now to maintain adequate supplies of stable isotopes.

  8. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an MRE? Is an MRE shelf stable? What foods are packaged in retort packages? What is aseptic ... type of package is used for aseptic processing? What foods are packaged in aseptic packages? Can I microwave ...

  9. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  10. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  11. Microbiological characterization of stable resuspended dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Kováts

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Air quality in the stables is characterized by elevated level of dust and aeroallergens which are supposed to directly cause or exacerbate several respiratory disorders. The most often recognized problem is recurrent airway obstruction (RAO, previously known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. There is some indication that aeroallergens (among them endotoxins may also cause inflammation in human airways and may exceed safe levels in stables. Monitoring studies have covered mainly the determination of the concentration of respirable particles and of culturable fungi and their toxins. However, these particles do not only directly affect the respiratory system, but might act as a carrier conveying toxic contaminants and biological agents such as bacteria. In a typical, 20-horse Hungarian stable, microbial community of respirable fraction of resuspended dust has been characterized to reveal if these particles convey hazardous pathogenic bacteria, posing risk to either horses or staff. Material and Methods: Resuspended dust was sampled using a mobile instrument. The instrument contains a PARTISOL-FRM model 2000 sampler that was operated at a flow rate of 16.7 l/min and a cyclone separator which collected the particulate matter with an aerodynamic size between 1 μm and 10 μm (PM1–10 fraction. Microbial taxa were identified by culture-independent next generation sequencing (NGS of variable 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA gene regions. Results: In total, 1491 different taxa were identified, of them 384 were identified to species level, 961 to genus level. The sample was dominated by common ubiquitous soil and organic material-dwelling taxa. Conclusions: Pathogens occurred at low abundance, and were represented by mostly facultative human pathogens, with the prevalence of Staphylococcus species.

  12. Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Endangered Species Protection Program helps promote recovery of listed species. The ESPP determines if pesticide use in a geographic area may affect any listed species. Find needed limits on pesticide use in Endangered Species Protection Bulletins.

  13. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The ion source comprises a cylindrically shaped chamber with a longitudinal outlet slot formed therein and two uniform anode wires which extend along the length of the chamber in the middle region thereof and which are symmetrically introduced with respect to the length axis of the chamber and the outlet groove, characterised in that at each outer end of the outlet groove at a nearly null potential or direct potential is introduced a mask, whereby the lowest distance between the inner and outer ends of the mask is equivalent to the breadth of the ion beam emitted from the source. (G.C.)

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Templated Ion Exchange Resins for the Selective Complexation of Actinide Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uy, O. Manual

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a polymeric extractant for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and even body fluids). Chemical insights into what makes a good complexation site will be used to synthesize reagents tailor-made for the complexation of uranyl and other actinide ions. These insights, derived from studies of molecular recognition include ion coordination number and geometry, ionic size and ionic shape, as well as ion to ligand thermodynamic affinity. Selectivity for a specific actinide ion will be obtained by providing the polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced by using a specific ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The complexing ligands will be ones containing functional groups known to form stable complexes with a specific ion and less stable complexes with other cations. Prior investigator's approaches for making templated resins for metal ions have had marginal success. We have extended and amended these methodologies in our work with Pb(II) and uranyl ion, by changing the order of the steps, by the inclusion of sonication, by using higher complex loading, and the selection of functional groups with better complexation constants. This has resulted in significant improvements to selectivity. The unusual shape of the uranyl ion suggests that this approach will result in even greater selectivities than already observed for Pb(II). Preliminary data obtained for uranyl templated polymers shows unprecedented selectivity and has resulted in the first ion selective electrode for uranyl ion.

  15. High-energy ion implantation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    High-energy ion implantation is an extremely flexible type of surface treatment technique, in that it offers the possibility of treating almost any type of target material or product with ions of almost any chemical species, or combinations of chemical species. In addition, ion implantations can be combined with variations in temperature during or after ion implantation. As a result, the possibility of approaching a wide variety of surface-related materials science problems exists with ion implantation. This paper will outline factors pertinent to application of high-energy ion implantation to surface engineering problems. This factors include fundamental advantages and limitations, economic considerations, present and future equipment, and aspects of materials science

  16. Surface microhardening by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amarjit

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the process and the underlying mechanism of surface microhardening by implanting suitable energetic ions in materials like 4145 steel, 304 stainless steel, aluminium and its 2024-T351 alloy. It has been observed that boron and nitrogen implantation in materials like 4145 steel and 304 stainless steel can produce a significant increase in surface hardness. Moreover the increase can be further enhanced with suitable overlay coatings such as aluminium (Al), Titanium (Ti) and carbon (C). The surface hardening due to implantation is attributed to precipitation hardening or the formation of stable/metastable phase or both. The effect of lithium implantation in aluminium and its alloy on microhardness with increasing ion dose and ion beam energy is also discussed. (author)

  17. Effect of sharp maximum in ion diffusivity for liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, A. V.; Orekhov, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Ion diffusion in a liquid usually could be treated as a movement of an ion cluster in a viscous media. For small ions this leads to a special feature: diffusion coefficient is either independent of the ion size or increases with it. We find a different behavior for small ions in liquid xenon. Calculation of the dependence of an ion diffusion coefficient in liquid xenon on the ion size is carried out. Classical molecular dynamics method is applied. Calculated dependence of the ion diffusion coefficient on its radius has sharp maximums at the ion radiuses 1.75 and 2 Å. Every maximum is placed between two regions with different stable ion cluster configurations. This leads to the instability of these configurations in a small region between them. Consequently ion with radius near 1.75 or 2 Å could jump from one configuration to another. This increases the speed of the diffusion. A simple qualitative model for this effect is suggested. The decomposition of the ion movement into continuous and jump diffusion shows that continuous part of the diffusion is the same as for the ion cluster in the stable region.

  18. Ion channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramli, H.; Blondiaux, G.

    1994-01-01

    Channeling phenomenon was predicted, many years ago, by stark. The first channeling experiments were performed in 1963 by Davies and his coworkers. Parallely Robinson and Oen have investigated this process by simulating trajectories of ions in monocrystals. This technique has been combined with many methods like Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (R.B.S.), Particles Induced X-rays Emission (P.I.X.E) and online Nuclear Reaction (N.R.A.) to localize trace elements in the crystal or to determine crystalline quality. To use channeling for material characterization we need data about the stopping power of the incident particle in the channeled direction. The ratios of channeled to random stopping powers of silicon for irradiation in the direction have been investigated and compared to the available theoretical results. We describe few applications of ion channeling in the field of materials characterization. Special attention is given to ion channeling combined with Charged Particle Activation Analysis (C.P.A.A.) for studying the behaviour of oxygen atoms in Czochralski silicon lattices under the influence of internal gettering and in different gaseous atmospheres. Association between ion channeling and C.P.A.A was also utilised for studying the influence of the growing conditions on concentration and position of carbon atoms at trace levels in the MOVPE Ga sub (1-x) Al sub x lattice. 6 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs. (author)

  19. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  20. Using stable isotopes to determine seabird trophic relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Keith A.; Piatt, John F.; Pitocchelli, Jay

    1994-01-01

    1. The stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) were analysed in 22 species of marine birds from coastal waters of the northeast Pacific Ocean. Analyses confirm that stable nitrogen isotopes can predict seabird trophic positions.2. Based on δ15N analyses, seabird trophic-level inferences generally agree with those of conventional dietary studies, but suggest that lower trophic-level organisms are more important to several seabirds than was recognized previously.3. Stable-carbon isotope analysis may be a good indicator of inshore vs. offshore feeding preference.4. In general, stable-isotope analysis to determine trophic level offers many advantages over conventional dietary approaches since trophic inferences are based on time-integrated estimates of assimilated and not just ingested foods, and isotopic abundance represents a continuous variable that is amenable to statistical analysis.

  1. Stable and sporadic symbiotic communities of coral and algal holobionts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hester, E.R.; Barott, K.L.; Nulton, J.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Rohwer, F.L.

    2016-01-01

    Coral and algal holobionts are assemblages of macroorganisms and microorganisms, including viruses, Bacteria, Archaea, protists and fungi. Despite a decade of research, it remains unclear whether these associations are spatial-temporally stable or species-specific. We hypothesized that conflicting

  2. The use of stable isotopes in drug metabolism studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, F P

    2001-06-01

    Although there is a long history of stable isotopes use in drug metabolism research, it is appropriate to evaluate them in pregnancy drug studies in which safety takes highest priority. It is well established through a number of human and animal experiments that stable isotopes themselves rarely generate additional toxicities beyond the molecules to which they are attached. For the analysis of stable isotopes involved in metabolism studies, mass spectrometry plays the predominant role. Several mass spectrometry-based techniques now exist that enable the selective quantitative detection of stable isotopes with better sensitivity and better retention of chromatographic resolution than do in-line radioactivity monitors for 14C. Even mass balance studies can be performed by using stable isotopes, a type of experiment that still predominantly uses radioisotopes. Some of the newest developments in the use of stable isotopes involve biopolymers, in which fully isotope-labeled species can be generated from cells grown in isotopically labeled growth media. Having shown safety, sensitivity, specificity, and versatility, stable isotopes should play an important role in drug metabolism studies in pregnancy.

  3. Ion-source development at Argonne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilquist, P. J.; Yntema, J. L.

    Brief descriptions are given of the ion source test stand, the ANIS source, a copy of the SNIC source, and the Chapman inverted sputter source. Relative performance is discussed, particularly for the inverted sputter source. Beam currents are given for several ion species.

  4. Metal Ion Controlled Polymorphism of a Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Jancso, Attila; Szunyogh, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    , …) in the peptide, and the ligand and structural preferences of the metal ion (in our studies Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Cu+/2+). Simultaneously, new species such as metal ion bridged ternary complexes or even oligomers may be formed. In recent previous studies we have observed similar polymorphism of zinc finger model...

  5. Inorganic ion composition in Tardigrada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Larsen, Kristine Wulff; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    composition and total osmotic concentration of five different species of tardigrades (Echiniscus testudo, Milnesium tardigradum, Richtersius coronifer, Macrobiotus cf. hufelandi and Halobiotus crispae) using high-performance liquid chromatography and nanoliter osmometry. Quantification of the ionic content....... Concentrations of most inorganic ions are largely identical between active and dehydrated groups of R. coronifer, suggesting that this tardigrade does not lose large quantities of inorganic ions during dehydration. The large osmotic and ionic gradients maintained by both limno-terrestrial and marine species...... are indicative of a powerful ion-retentive mechanism in Tardigrada. Moreover, our data indicate that cryptobiotic tardigrades contain a large fraction of unidentified organic osmolytes, the identification of which is expected to provide increased insight into the phenomenon of cryptobiosis....

  6. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation

  7. Radioactive ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    A novel approach has been studied for the characterization of specimens with a spatial resolution at the micron level. The technique dubbed Radioactive Ion Microscopy, (RIM) uses a beam of radioactive ions, specifically tritium ions, of sufficient energy to pass through a thick specimen (e.g. greater than or equal to 10 μm). After passage through the object, the ions are implanted in a stack of thin mylar sheets (1.5 microns thick). Their rest position is proportional to the thickness and the density of the sample transversed. The location of the radioactive species can be pinpointed by autoradiographing the successive mylar foils. The radiographs are photographed and converted into digital data which is used to generate a density map of the object. From these plots, physical and chemical features may be deduced. The feasibility of RIM has been demonstrated with specimen images obtained from different objects exposed to a 3 MeV 3 H + beam. The specimens used included metal grids to examine spatial resolution and a series of biological samples (cork, wood, mosquito wing) to explore the performance and applicability of RIM. On these samples, which were 10 to 30 microns thick with surface areas of up to 1 cm 2 , a lateral resolution of approx. 1.5 microns was achieved. A depth resolution or sensitivity to density gradients of 0.2 mg/cm 2 was obtained. These detailed specimen images can be obtained with low beam exposures, e.g., in the case of tritium approx. 6 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 must be implanted, which corresponds to an irradiation of approx. 10 pA/cm 2 for 1000 s. The corresponding low radiation doses and minimal heat dissipation render RIM well suited for biological specimens. In comparison to light microscopy, RIM features enhanced microscopic capabilities as it can handle objects that are at the same time opaque to light, thick (up to tens of microns), and fragile

  8. Laser-Cooling for Light Ion Accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N

    2000-01-01

    The ALICE Experiment to be installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will initially look at Pb82+-Pb82+ collisions. In a later stage, collisions of lighter ions are also foreseen. For lead ions, fast electron cooling will be used in the accumulation process at low energy to reach the beam brightness necessary for the experiment. For lighter ions, electron cooling becomes less efficient as the ratio Q2/A decreases (Q and A are respectively charge state and mass number of the ion). For this reason, a study has been made of the possibility to use the maturing technology of laser-cooling of fast ion beams to reach the desired emittances for lighter ions. The main problems encountered are the availability of useful ion species, the availability of corresponding laser systems, and the efficiency with which the transverse emittance can be reduced by the laser-cooling mechanism (which works mainly in the longitudinal plane).

  9. Low temperature diffusion of hydrogenic species in oxide crystals: Radiation induced diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gonzalez, R. [Universidad `Carlos III` de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria

    1993-10-01

    Normally stable configurations of substitutional protons or deuterons in oxide crystal become highly unstable during ionizing radiation at room temperature, resulting in the displacements of these species. The cross section for radiation-induced-displacements of protons is exceedingly large and is a strong function of temperature. The displacement cross section of protons from cation sites is twice that of deuterons. Diffusion of these species can be induced at temperatures not otherwise possible by thermal means. For example, using electron irradiation near room temperature the O-H bond is readily broken and the hydrogenic species can be channeled along the c-axis in TiO{sub 2} by an applied electric field. Radiation induced displacements of protons from anion sites (hydride ions) at room temperature are also discussed.

  10. ION VATAMANU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    l. Povar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion Vatamanu was a chemist, writer and public figure. He was equally passionate about both his chosen fields of activity: chemistry and poetry. Chemistry, with its perfect equilibrium of logic and precision, provided inspiration for lyrical creativity, whereas poetry writing enlivened his imagination and passion for chemistry. He loved his parents. He adored his wife Elena, whom he often gifted a sea of flowers. He loved his daughters Mihaela, Mariana, and Leontina. He loved life, and he loved people.

  11. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Fusao; Okuyama, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    In a negative ion source having magnetic filters, bisecting magnetic fields are formed using electromagnets disposed at the outside of a plasma source. The position of the electromagnets is made adjustable and removable to optimize a negative ion generation efficiency. Further, a plurality of electromagnets are disposed in longitudinal direction of the plasma source, and the intensity of the magnetic fields of the filters in the longitudinal direction is made adjustable to control a beam distribution. Since uniform magnetic fields which bisect the plasma source can be formed by the electromagnets, and magnetomotive force of the electromagnets can be increased easily compared with that of permanent magnets, the magnetomotive force is changed to obtain appropriate filter magnetic fields easily. Then, optimum magnetic fields corresponding to the state of source plasmas can be generated by the control of the power source of the electromagnets, which also increases the negative ion drawing current density, thereby enabling to reduce the drawing area and size of the plasma source. (N.H.)

  12. Study on surface modification of M2 steel induced by Cu ions and Al ions implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chao; Liu Zhengmin

    2001-01-01

    Changes of surface hardness and wear resistances in M2 type steel implanted by Cu Al ions were reported. The dependence of surface strengthening on ion species and dose was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) for microhardness and wear resistances measurement. It is shown that both hardness and wear resistance increases apparently after ion implantation. XRD analysis indicates that different phases formed after Al Cu ions implanted. It is also suggested that Cu, Al ions have different role in surface strengthening

  13. Radiation-stable polyolefin compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekers, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions of olefinic polymers suitable for high energy radiation treatment. In particular, the invention relates to olefinic polymer compositions that are stable to sterilizing dosages of high energy radiation such as a gamma radiation. Stabilizers are described that include benzhydrol and benzhydrol derivatives; these stabilizers may be used alone or in combination with secondary antioxidants or synergists

  14. Monitoring of stable glaucoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Holtzer-Goor (Kim); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); H.G. Lemij (Hans); T. Plochg; E. van Sprundel (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA high workload for ophthalmologists and long waiting lists for patients challenge the organization of ophthalmic care. Tasks that require less specialized skills, like the monitoring of stable (well controlled) glaucoma patients could be substituted from ophthalmologists to other

  15. Synthesis, characterization and ion recognition studies of lower rim ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , which yields highly fluo- rescent species as given in scheme 2. During metal ion titrations in fluorescence, as ring-opened species grow, concentration of L decreases and hence emis- sion intensity of 485 nm band decreases, while that of.

  16. Ion Beam Extraction by Discrete Ion Focusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus (900) and methods are disclosed for ion beam extraction. In an implementation, the apparatus includes a plasma source (or plasma) (802) and an ion extractor (804). The plasma source is adapted to generate ions and the ion extractor is immersed in the plasma source to extract a fraction...... of the generated ions. The ion extractor is surrounded by a space charge (810) formed at least in part by the extracted ions. The ion extractor includes a biased electrode (806) forming an interface with an insulator (808). The interface is customized to form a strongly curved potential distribution (812......) in the space-charge surrounding the ion extractor. The strongly curved potential distribution focuses the extracted ions towards an opening (814) on a surface of the biased electrode thereby resulting in an ion beam....

  17. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Lili [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  18. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 (micro)m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance

  19. Ion beam processes in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; Narayan, J.; Fathy, D.

    1984-07-01

    Observation of the effects of implants of energetic ions at high dose rates into Si have produced some exciting and interesting results. The mechanism whereby displacement damage produced by ions self-anneals during high dose rate implantation is discussed. It is shown that ion beam annealing (IBA) offers in certain situations unique possibilities for damage annealing. Annealing results of the near surface in Si with a buried oxide layer, formed by high dose implantation, are presented in order to illustrate the advantages offered by IBA. It is also shown that ion irradiation can stimulate the epitaxial recrystallization of amorphous overlayers in Si. The nonequilibrium alloying which results from such epitaxial processes is discussed as well as mechanisms which limit the solid solubility during irradiation. Finally, a dose rate dependency for the production of stable damage by ion irradiation at a constant fluence has been observed. For low fluence implants, the amount of damage is substantially greater in the case of high flux rather than low flux implantation

  20. Wave Propagation in an Ion Beam-Plasma System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T. D.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1979-01-01

    The spatial evolution of a velocity- or density-modulated ion beam is calculated for stable and unstable ion beam plasma systems, using the linearized Vlasov-Poisson equations. The propagation properties are found to be strongly dependent on the form of modulation. In the case of velocity...

  1. Generation of three-mode nonclassical vibrational states of ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba An; Truong Minh Duc

    2002-01-01

    We propose using eight lasers with appropriate orientations and conditions to generate stable trio coherent states of an ion in a three-dimensional isotropic trap. Seven lasers whose orientations are important should be detuned to the third lower sideband of the ion vibrational motion. The eighth laser whose direction is not important should be in resonance with the ionic transition

  2. Stable nuclear transformation of Eudorina elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerche Kai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental step in evolution was the transition from unicellular to differentiated, multicellular organisms. Volvocine algae have been used for several decades as a model lineage to investigate the evolutionary aspects of multicellularity and cellular differentiation. There are two well-studied volvocine species, a unicellular alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and a multicellular alga with differentiated cell types (Volvox carteri. Species with intermediate characteristics also exist, which blur the boundaries between unicellularity and differentiated multicellularity. These species include the globular alga Eudorina elegans, which is composed of 16–32 cells. However, detailed molecular analyses of E. elegans require genetic manipulation. Unfortunately, genetic engineering has not yet been established for Eudorina, and only limited DNA and/or protein sequence information is available. Results Here, we describe the stable nuclear transformation of E. elegans by particle bombardment using both a chimeric selectable marker and reporter genes from different heterologous sources. Transgenic algae resistant to paromomycin were achieved using the aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII gene of Streptomyces rimosus, an actinobacterium, under the control of an artificial promoter consisting of two V. carteri promoters in tandem. Transformants exhibited an increase in resistance to paromomycin by up to 333-fold. Co-transformation with non-selectable plasmids was achieved with a rate of 50 - 100%. The luciferase (gluc gene from the marine copepod Gaussia princeps, which previously was engineered to match the codon usage of C. reinhardtii, was used as a reporter gene. The expression of gluc was mediated by promoters from C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Heterologous heat shock promoters induced an increase in luciferase activity (up to 600-fold at elevated temperatures. Long-term stability and both constitutive and

  3. Failla Memorial lecture. The future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C A

    1985-07-01

    Interplanetary space contains fluxes of fast moving atomic nuclei. The distribution of these reflects the atomic composition of the universe, and such particles may pose limitations for space flight and for life in space. Over the past 50 years, since the invention of Ernest Lawrence's cyclotron, advances in accelerator technology have permitted the acceleration of charged nuclei to very high velocities. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. Recently, new areas of particle physics research relating to the mechanisms of spallation and fission have opened up for investigation, and it is now realistic to search for nuclear super-dense states that might be produced in heavy nuclear collisions. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Individual heavy ions can also interrupt the continuity of membraneous regions in cells. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Cells attempt to repair these lesions, and many of the deleterious effects are due to misrepair or misrejoining of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects, and hypoxic cells in necrotic regions have nearly the same sensitivity as cells in well-oxygenated tissues. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. Heavy ions are also strong enhancers of viral-induced cell transformation, a process that requires integration of foreign DNA. Some cell

  4. Effects of dissolved species on radiolysis of diluted seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Kuniki; Hanawa, Satoshi; Kasahara, Shigeki; Motooka, Takafumi; Tsukada, Takashi; Muroya, Yusa; Yamashita, Shinichi; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) experienced seawater injection into the cores and fuel pools as an emergent measure after the accident. After the accident, retained water has been continuously desalinized, and subsequently the concentration of chloride ion (Cl - ) has been kept at a lower level these days. These ions in seawater are known to affect water radiolysis, which causes the production of radiolytic products, such as hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) and molecular oxygen (O 2 ). However, the effects of dissolved ions relating seawater on the production of the stable radiolytic products are not well understood in the diluted seawater. To understand of the production behavior in diluted seawater under radiation, radiolysis calculations were carried out. Production of H 2 is effectively suppressed by diluting by up to vol10%. The concentrations of oxidants (H 2 O 2 and O 2 ) are also suppressed by dilution of dissolved species. The effect of oxidants on corrosion of materials is thought to be low when the seawater was diluted by less than 1 vol% by water. It is also shown that deaeration is one of the effective measure to suppress the concentrations of oxidants at a lower level for any dilution conditions. (author)

  5. Correlation between molecular secondary ion yield and cluster ion sputtering for samples with different stopping powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heile, A.; Muhmann, C.; Lipinsky, D.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2012-07-01

    In static SIMS, the secondary ion yield, defined as detected ions per primary ion, can be increased by altering several primary ion parameters. For many years, no quantitative predictions could be made for the secondary ion yield enhancement of molecular ions. For thick samples of organic compounds, a power dependency of the secondary ion yield on the sputtering yield was shown. For this article, samples with thick molecular layers and (sub-)monolayers composed of various molecules were prepared on inorganic substrates such as silicon, silver, and gold, and subsequently analyzed. For primary ion bombardment, monoatomic (Ne+, Ar+, Ga+, Kr+, Xe+, Bi+) as well as polyatomic (Bin+, Bin++) primary ions were used within an energy range of 10-50 keV. The power dependency was found to hold true for the different samples; however, the exponent decreased with increasing stopping power. Based on these findings, a rule of thumb is proposed for the prediction of the lower limit of the secondary ion yield enhancement as a function of the primary ion species. Additionally, effects caused by the variation of the energy deposition are discussed, including the degree of molecular fragmentation and the non-linear increase of the secondary ion yield when polyatomic primary ions are used.

  6. SUERC AMS ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maden, C.; Anastasi, P. A. F.; Dougans, A.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Kitchen, R.; Klody, G.; Schnabel, C.; Sundquist, M.; Vanner, K.; Xu, S.

    2007-06-01

    In a short time Be, C, Al, Cl, Ca and I accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) have been established on the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) 5 MV pelletron system at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC). While summarising the present performance of the system, this report will focus on the details of ion detection, which sample materials are used and the analytical procedures employed for each individual species during routine analysis. All rare isotope detection is with a single flexible detector and ion event analysis system, but switching of analysed species typically requires a detector reconfiguration. Configurations for routine 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 129I detection have been established and will be presented here. Notably, there has proven to be sufficient suppression of the isobaric interferences of 36Cl and 41Ca in the 5+ charge state using an argon gas stripper at a terminal voltage of 5.0 MV to allow for routine analysis of these isotopes.

  7. Stable Fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), Dispersal and Governing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showler, Allan T; Osbrink, Weste L A

    2015-01-01

    Although the movement of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), has been studied, its extent and significance has been uncertain. On a local scale (fly movement occurs between host animals and resting sites to feed and mate, mainly at on-farm locations where herbivorous livestock regularly congregate. Small numbers emigrate from livestock congregation sites in search of other hosts and oviposition substrate, mostly within stable flies are active year-round in warm latitudes, cold winters in temperate areas result in substantial population and activity declines, limiting movement of any sort to warmer seasons. Long-distance dispersal (>13 km) is mainly wind-driven by weather fronts that carry stable flies from inland farm areas for up to 225 km to beaches of northwestern Florida and Lake Superior. Stable flies can reproduce for a short time each year in washed-up sea grass, but the beaches are not conducive to establishment. Such movement is passive and does not appear to be advantageous to stable fly's survival. On a regional scale, stable flies exhibit little genetic differentiation, and on the global scale, while there might be more than one "lineage", the species is nevertheless considered to be panmictic. Population expansion across much of the globe likely occurred from the late Pleistocene to the early Holocene in association with the spread of domesticated nomad livestock and particularly with more sedentary, penned livestock.

  8. Toward Practical Secure Stable Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazi M. Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stable Matching (SM algorithm has been deployed in many real-world scenarios including the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP and financial applications such as matching of suppliers and consumers in capital markets. Since these applications typically involve highly sensitive information such as the underlying preference lists, their current implementations rely on trusted third parties. This paper introduces the first provably secure and scalable implementation of SM based on Yao’s garbled circuit protocol and Oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our scheme can securely compute a stable match for 8k pairs four orders of magnitude faster than the previously best known method. We achieve this by introducing a compact and efficient sub-linear size circuit. We even further decrease the computation cost by three orders of magnitude by proposing a novel technique to avoid unnecessary iterations in the SM algorithm. We evaluate our implementation for several problem sizes and plan to publish it as open-source.

  9. Towards stable acceleration in LINACS

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A D

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-stable and -reproducible high-energy particle beams with short bunches are needed in novel linear accelerators and, in particular, in the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. A passive beam phase stabilization system based on a bunch compression with a negative transfer matrix element R56 and acceleration at a positive off-crest phase is proposed. The motivation and expected advantages of the proposed scheme are outlined.

  10. Gyrokinetic stability of electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, A.; Zocco, A.; Helander, P.; Könies, A.

    2018-02-01

    The gyrokinetic stability of electron-positron plasmas contaminated by an ion (proton) admixture is studied in a slab geometry. The appropriate dispersion relation is derived and solved. Stable K-modes, the universal instability, the ion-temperature-gradient-driven instability, the electron-temperature-gradient-driven instability and the shear Alfvén wave are considered. It is found that the contaminated plasma remains stable if the contamination degree is below some threshold and that the shear Alfvén wave can be present in a contaminated plasma in cases where it is absent without ion contamination.

  11. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM, which uses finely focussed He+ or Ne+ beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 1018 ions/cm2. Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance.

  12. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Geise, Geoffrey M.

    2014-08-26

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The

  13. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  14. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Antinori, Federico

    2001-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  15. ION GUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-10-24

    An ion gun is described for the production of an electrically neutral ionized plasma. The ion gun comprises an anode and a cathode mounted in concentric relationship with a narrow annulus between. The facing surfaces of the rear portions of the anode and cathode are recessed to form an annular manifold. Positioned within this manifold is an annular intermediate electrode aligned with the an nulus between the anode and cathode. Gas is fed to the manifold and an arc discharge is established between the anode and cathode. The gas is then withdrawn from the manifold through the annulus between the anode and cathode by a pressure differential. The gas is then ionized by the arc discharge across the annulus. The ionized gas is withdrawn from the annulus by the combined effects of the pressure differential and a collimating magnetic field. In a 3000 gauss magnetic field, an arc voltage of 1800 volts, and an arc current of 0.2 amp, a plasma of about 3 x 10/sup 11/ particles/cc is obtained. (AEC)

  16. In-terminal ECR Ion Source of the Tandem Accelerator at JAERI

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, M; Takeuchi, S

    1999-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source(ECRIS)s are able to produce intense beams of highly charged positive ions and used injection system for cyclotron, linac as well as experiments of atomic physics. The tandem accelerator system has been benefiting from use of an electron stripper at the high voltage terminal. The most probable charged state after a foil stripper is, however, much lower than the highest charge state of ions with an intensity of more than several emA from a high performance ECRIS. With respect to beam current, the life time of stripper foils decrease with increasing beam current. Especially for very heavy ions, it is difficult to obtain a stable and intense beam for a long time without foil exchange. Use of an ECRIS in a tandem accelerator is expected to increase beam intensity, beam energy and beam species. A small permanent magnet ECRIS has been installed in the high voltage terminal of the vertical and folded type 20UR Pelletron tandem accelerator at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institu...

  17. Ionization phenomena and sources of negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion source technology has rapidly advanced during the past several years as a direct consequence of the discovery of Krohn that negative ion yields can be greatly enhanced by sputtering in the presence of Group IA elements. Today, most negative ion sources use this discovery directly or the principles implied to effect negative ion formation through surface ionization. As a consequence, the more traditional direct extraction plasma and charge exchange sources are being used less frequently. However, the charge exchange generation mechanism appears to be as universal, is very competitive in terms of efficiency and has the advantage in terms of metastable ion formation. In this review, an attempt has been made to briefly describe the principal processes involved in negative ion formation and sources which are representative of a particular principle. The reader is referred to the literature for specific details concerning the operational characteristics, emittances, brightnesses, species and intensity capabilities of particular sources. 100 references

  18. Design issues of radioactive ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieuvin, M.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in Radioactive Ion Beams throughout the world. These ions open new domains of research for nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics and atomic physics. Two methods are used for the production of these beams: fragmentation of a primary, high energy heavy ion beam passing through a thin target or nuclei production in a thick target bombarded either by a heavy ion beam, a proton beam or by neutrons. When radioactive species are produced in a thick target, they must be extracted, ionised, separated, identified and finally accelerated. This requires a radioactive ion source, a mass separator and a post accelerator. This paper reviews these two methods, their respective domains and the specific problems related to the control and the accelerator of radioactive ion beams. (author). 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Stability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a multi-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We find that the frequencies and growth/damping rates are dependent on the densities and temperatures of all species of ions. A detailed numerical study, for parameters relevant to comet Halley, shows that the growth rate is dependent on the magnitude of the frequency. The ion cyclotron waves are driven ...

  20. Study of In-Trap Ion Clouds by Ion Trajectory Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xinwei; Cao, Wenbo; Wang, Xiao; Li, Ming; Qiao, Haoxue; Ouyang, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Gaussian distribution has been utilized to describe the global number density distribution of ion cloud in the Paul trap, which is known as the thermal equilibrium theory and widely used in theoretical modeling of ion clouds in the ion traps. Using ion trajectory simulations, however, the ion clouds can now also be treated as a dynamic ion flow field and the location-dependent features could now be characterized. This study was carried out to better understand the in-trap ion cloud properties, such as the local particle velocity and temperature. The local ion number densities were found to be heterogeneously distributed in terms of mean and distribution width; the velocity and temperature of the ion flow varied with pressure depending on the flow type of the neutral molecules; and the "quasi-static" equilibrium status can only be achieved after a certain number of collisions, for which the time period is pressure-dependent. This work provides new insights of the ion clouds that are globally stable but subjected to local rf heating and collisional cooling. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Stable carbon isotope time series from tropical tree rings indicate a precipitation signal

    OpenAIRE

    E. Fichtler; Gerhard Helle; M. Worbes

    2010-01-01

    Although studies on stable-carbon isotopes in trees from temperate zones provide abundant paleoclimatic data, tropical trees are still understudied in this context. Therefore this study examined the variability of intra- and inter-annual stable-carbon isotopic pattern in several tree species from various tropical climates. The delta C-13 Values of samples of 12 broadleaved trees (seven species) from various paleotropical and neotropical sites along a climatic moisture gradient were investigat...

  2. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    published in the internationally leading journal Physical Review Letters. We continued to progress this pionee 15.  SUBJECT TERMS ion therapy, heavy ion ...Thomson parabola spectrometer: To separate and provide a measurement of the charge -to-mass ratio and energy spectrum of the different ion species...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE

  3. Ranking stability and super-stable nodes in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab; Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-07-19

    Pagerank, a network-based diffusion algorithm, has emerged as the leading method to rank web content, ecological species and even scientists. Despite its wide use, it remains unknown how the structure of the network on which it operates affects its performance. Here we show that for random networks the ranking provided by pagerank is sensitive to perturbations in the network topology, making it unreliable for incomplete or noisy systems. In contrast, in scale-free networks we predict analytically the emergence of super-stable nodes whose ranking is exceptionally stable to perturbations. We calculate the dependence of the number of super-stable nodes on network characteristics and demonstrate their presence in real networks, in agreement with the analytical predictions. These results not only deepen our understanding of the interplay between network topology and dynamical processes but also have implications in all areas where ranking has a role, from science to marketing.

  4. The use and development of ion dispensers for laser-cooled atomic ion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucul, David; Christensen, Justin E.; Hudson, Eric R.; Campbell, Wesley C.

    2017-04-01

    Fast, reliable, efficient loading of ions in ion traps is important for laser cooled ion trapping experiments. We utilize a simple surface ionization technique where ions are directly emitted from a platinum surface upon sublimation. This technique of direct ion production has wide applicability to ion trapping experiments and should apply to the direct production of positively charged atomic and molecular species as well as molecular anions. We experimentally demonstrate the ease and flexibility of this technique by directly producing calcium, strontium, cesium, barium, and potassium ions from a heated platinum surface. In addition, this technique is useful for loading rare isotopes into an ion trap. We experimentally demonstrate this by loading large numbers barium ions into an ion trap and distilling rare, isotopically pure ion chains through voltage control and laser heating and cooling. These techniques are directly applicable to the loading of 133Ba+ ions, a candidate qubit that combines the favorable atomic structure of 171Yb+, long-lived metastable states to ensure high fidelity detection, and visible optical transitions to leverage existing optical technologies.

  5. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  6. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  7. Stable Hemiaminals: 2-Aminopyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kwiecień

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stable hemiaminals can be obtained in the one-pot reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine and nitrobenzaldehyde derivatives. Ten new hemiaminals have been obtained, six of them in crystal state. The molecular stability of these intermediates results from the presence of both electron-withdrawing nitro groups as substituents on the phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring, so no further stabilisation by intramolecular interaction is required. Hemiaminal molecules possess a tetrahedral carbon atom constituting a stereogenic centre. As the result of crystallisation in centrosymmetric space groups both enantiomers are present in the crystal structure.

  8. Organic synthesis with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daub, G.H.; Kerr, V.N.; Williams, D.L.; Whaley, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Some general considerations concerning organic synthesis with stable isotopes are presented. Illustrative examples are described and discussed. The examples include DL-2-amino-3-methyl- 13 C-butanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-valine- 13 C 3 ); methyl oleate-1- 13 C; thymine-2,6- 13 C 2 ; 2-aminoethanesulfonic- 13 C acid (taurine- 13 C); D-glucose-6- 13 C; DL-2-amino-3-methylpentanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-isoleucine- 13 C 2 ); benzidine- 15 N 2 ; and 4-ethylsulfonyl-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide- 15 N

  9. Stable agents for imaging investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofe, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns highly stable compounds useful in preparing technetium 99m based scintiscanning exploration agents. The compounds of this invention include a pertechnetate reducing agent or a solution of oxidized pertechnetate and an efficient proportion, sufficient to stabilize the compounds in the presence of oxygen and of radiolysis products, of ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of this acid. The invention also concerns a perfected process for preparing a technetium based exploration agent, consisting in codissolving the ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of such an acid and a pertechnetate reducing agent in a solution of oxidized pertechnetate [fr

  10. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  11. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  12. Pyridine and phosphonate containing ligands for stable lanthanide complexation. An experimental and theoretical study to assess the solution structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato-Iglesias, Marta; Balogh, Edina; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tóth, Eva; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez Blas, Teresa

    2006-12-07

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the stability and solution structure of lanthanide complexes with two novel ligands containing pyridine units and phosphonate pendant arms on either ethane-1,2-diamine (L2) or cyclohexane-1,2-diamine (L3) backbones. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the protonation constants of the ligands and the stability constants of the complexes with Gd(III) and the endogenous metal ions Zn(II) and Cu(II). While the stability constant of the GdL2 complex is too high to be determined by direct pH-potentiometric titrations, the cyclohexyl derivative GdL3 has a lower and assessable stability (log K(GdL3)=17.62). Due to the presence of the phosphonate groups, various protonated species can be detected up to pH approximately 8 for both ligands and all metal ions studied. The molecular clusters [Ln(L)(H2O)](3-).19H2O (Ln=La, Nd, Ho or Lu; L=L2 or L3) were characterized by theoretical calculations at the HF level. Our calculations provide two minimum energy geometries where the ligand adopts different conformations: twist-wrap (tw), in which the ligand wraps around the metal ion by twisting the pyridyl units relative to each other, and twist-fold (tf), where the slight twisting of the pyridyl units is accompanied by an overall folding of the two pyridine units towards one of the phosphonate groups. The relative free energies of the tw and tf conformations of [Ln(L)(H2O)]3- (L=L2, L3) complexes calculated in aqueous solution (C-PCM) by using the B3LYP model indicate that the tw form is the most stable one along the whole lanthanide series for the complexes of L3, while for those of L2 only the Gd(III) complex is more stable in the tf conformation by ca. 0.5 kcal mol-1. 1H NMR studies of the Eu(III) complex of L3 show the initial formation of the tf complex in aqueous solution, which slowly converts to the thermodynamically stable tw form. The structures calculated for the Nd(III) complexes are in reasonably

  13. Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species have significantly changed the Great Lakes ecosystem. An invasive species is a plant or animal that is not native to an ecosystem, and whose introduction is likely to cause economic, human health, or environmental damage.

  14. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  15. Aqueous speciation is likely to control the stable isotopic fractionation of cerium at varying pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Masato; Tanimizu, Masaharu; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2017-12-01

    Cerium (Ce) can be used as a plaeoredox proxy as shown by a recent study of stable isotopic fractionation of Ce during adsorption and precipitation. However, the experiments in that study were performed at pH conditions lower than that of natural seawater. In the current study, adsorption and precipitation experiments were performed at pH 6.80, 8.20, and 11.00 with 2.25 mM dissolved carbonate to simulate Ce isotopic fractionation in the natural environment and examine the relationship between isotopic fractionation and Ce speciation in the liquid phase. Mean isotopic fractionation factors between liquid and solid phases (αLq-So) of Ce adsorbed on ferrihydrite did not depend on pH conditions or dissolved Ce species. In the Ce/δ-MnO2 system,αLq-So values decreased from 1.000411 (±0.000079) to 1.000194 (±0.000067) with increasing pH or number of carbonate ions, from Ce3+ to Ce(CO3)2-. In the Ce/precipitation system at pH 8.20 and 11.00 where Ce(CO3)2- is present in solution, the αLq-So values were 0.999821 (±0.000071) and 0.999589 (±0.000074), respectively, meaning that lighter isotope enrichment was observed in the liquid phase, which is the contrary to those of the other systems. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses were also performed to investigate the coordination structure of the adsorbed or precipitated Ce species that control the isotopic fractionation during adsorption. Even at higher pH, where Ce(CO3)+ or Ce(CO3)2- are the dominant dissolved species, the first coordination sphere of Ce in the solid phase in the Ce/ferrihydrite and Ce/precipitation systems was similar to that observed at pH 5.00 where Ce3+ was the main species in solution. A slight elongation in the Cesbnd O bond length in the solid phase at pH 11.00, where negatively charged dissolved species are dominant in the liquid phase, may cause a decrease in isotopic fractionation in the Ce/δ-MnO2 system. The coordination environment of Ce may not change significantly

  16. Stable cosmology in chameleon bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji; Oliosi, Michele; Watanabe, Yota

    2018-02-01

    The recently proposed chameleonic extension of bigravity theory, by including a scalar field dependence in the graviton potential, avoids several fine-tunings found to be necessary in usual massive bigravity. In particular it ensures that the Higuchi bound is satisfied at all scales, that no Vainshtein mechanism is needed to satisfy Solar System experiments, and that the strong coupling scale is always above the scale of cosmological interest all the way up to the early Universe. This paper extends the previous work by presenting a stable example of cosmology in the chameleon bigravity model. We find a set of initial conditions and parameters such that the derived stability conditions on general flat Friedmann background are satisfied at all times. The evolution goes through radiation-dominated, matter-dominated, and de Sitter eras. We argue that the parameter space allowing for such a stable evolution may be large enough to encompass an observationally viable evolution. We also argue that our model satisfies all known constraints due to gravitational wave observations so far and thus can be considered as a unique testing ground of gravitational wave phenomenologies in bimetric theories of gravity.

  17. THOR Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) onboard THOR will provide the first high-time resolution measurements of mass-resolved ions in near-Earth space, focusing on hot ions in the foreshock, shock and magnetosheath turbulent regions. These measurements are required to study how kinetic-scale turbulent fluctuations heat and accelerate different ion species. IMS will measure the full three-dimensional distribution functions of main ion species (H+, He++, O+) in the energy range 10 eV/q to 30 keV/q with energy resolution DE/E down to 10% and angular resolution down to 11.25˚ . The time resolution will be 150 ms for O+, 300 ms for He++ and ˜ 1s for O+, which correspond to ion scales in the the foreshock, shock and magnetosheath regions. Such high time resolution is achieved by mounting four identical IMS units phased by 90˚ in the spacecraft spin plane. Each IMS unit combines a top-hat electrostatic analyzer with deflectors at the entrance together with a time-of-flight section to perform mass selection. Adequate mass-per-charge resolution (M/q)/(ΔM/q) (≥ 8 for He++ and ≥ 3 for O+) is obtained through a 6 cm long Time-of-Flight (TOF) section. IMS electronics includes a fast sweeping high voltage board that is required to make measurements at high cadence. Ion detection includes Micro Channel Plates (MCPs) combined with Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for charge amplification and discrimination and a discrete Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) to determine the ion time of flight. A processor board will be used to for ion events formatting and will interface with the Particle Processing Unit (PPU), which will perform data processing for THOR particle detectors. The IMS instrument is being designed and will be built and calibrated by an international consortium of scientific institutes from France, USA, Germany and Japan and Switzerland.

  18. Automated parallel recordings of topologically identified single ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Ryuji; Tsuji, Yutaro; Sato, Koji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Hirano, Minako; Ide, Toru; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Although ion channels are attractive targets for drug discovery, the systematic screening of ion channel-targeted drugs remains challenging. To facilitate automated single ion-channel recordings for the analysis of drug interactions with the intra- and extracellular domain, we have developed a parallel recording methodology using artificial cell membranes. The use of stable lipid bilayer formation in droplet chamber arrays facilitated automated, parallel, single-channel recording from reconstituted native and mutated ion channels. Using this system, several types of ion channels, including mutated forms, were characterised by determining the protein orientation. In addition, we provide evidence that both intra- and extracellular amyloid-beta fragments directly inhibit the channel open probability of the hBK channel. This automated methodology provides a high-throughput drug screening system for the targeting of ion channels and a data-intensive analysis technique for studying ion channel gating mechanisms.

  19. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  20. Multifunctional scanning ion conductance microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Ashley; Perry, David; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2017-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based technique that has traditionally been used to image topography or to deliver species to an interface, particularly in a biological setting. This article highlights the recent blossoming of SICM into a technique with a much greater diversity of applications and capability that can be used either standalone, with advanced control (potential–time) functions, or in tandem with other methods. SICM can be used to elucidate functional...

  1. Existence and construction of large stable food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerter, Jan O.; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2017-09-01

    Ecological diversity is ubiquitous despite the restrictions imposed by competitive exclusion and apparent competition. To explain the observed richness of species in a given habitat, food-web theory has explored nonlinear functional responses, self-interaction, or spatial structure and dispersal—model ingredients that have proven to promote stability and diversity. We return instead here to classical Lotka-Volterra equations, where species-species interaction is characterized by a simple product and spatial restrictions are ignored. We quantify how this idealization imposes constraints on coexistence and diversity for many species. To this end, we introduce the concept of free and controlled species and use this to demonstrate how stable food webs can be constructed by the sequential addition of species. The resulting food webs can reach dozens of species and generally yield nonrandom degree distributions in accordance with the constraints imposed through the assembly process. Our model thus serves as a formal starting point for the study of sustainable interaction patterns between species.

  2. Scintillation screen materials for beam profile measurements of high energy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnakumar, Renuka

    2016-06-22

    For the application as a transverse ion beam diagnostics device, various scintillation screen materials were analysed. The properties of the materials such as light output, image reproduction and radiation stability were investigated with the ion beams extracted from heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18. The ion species (C, Ne, Ar, Ta and U) were chosen to cover the large range of elements in the periodic table. The ions were accelerated to the kinetic energies of 200 MeV/u and 300 MeV/u extracted with 300 ms pulse duration and applied to the screens. The particle intensity of the ion beam was varied from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 9} particles per pulse. The screens were irradiated with typically 40 beam pulses and the scintillation light was captured using a CCD camera followed by characterization of the beam spot. The radiation hardness of the screens was estimated with high intensity Uranium ion irradiation. In the study, a linear light output for 5 orders of magnitude of particle intensities was observed from sensitive scintillators and ceramic screens such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The highest light output was recorded by CsI:Tl and the lowest one by Herasil. At higher beam intensity saturation of light output was noticed from Y and Mg doped ZrO{sub 2} screens. The light output from the screen depends not only on the particle intensity but also on the ion species used for irradiation. The light yield (i.e. the light intensity normalised to the energy deposition in the material by the ion) is calculated from the experimental data for each ion beam setting. It is shown that the light yield for light ions is about a factor 2 larger than the one of heavy ions. The image widths recorded exhibit a dependence on the screens material and differences up to 50 % were registered. On radiation stability analysis with high particle intensity of Uranium ions of about 6 x 10{sup 8} ppp, a stable performance in light output and image reproduction was documented from Al

  3. An ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer with high mass resolution for cold trapped ion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. C.; Greenberg, J.; Miller, M. I.; Loeffler, K.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Trapping molecular ions that have been sympathetically cooled with laser-cooled atomic ions is a useful platform for exploring cold ion chemistry. We designed and characterized a new experimental apparatus for probing chemical reaction dynamics between molecular cations and neutral radicals at temperatures below 1 K. The ions are trapped in a linear quadrupole radio-frequency trap and sympathetically cooled by co-trapped, laser-cooled, atomic ions. The ion trap is coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to readily identify product ion species and to accurately determine trapped ion numbers. We discuss, and present in detail, the design of this ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the electronics required for driving the trap and mass spectrometer. Furthermore, we measure the performance of this system, which yields mass resolutions of m/Δm ≥ 1100 over a wide mass range, and discuss its relevance for future measurements in chemical reaction kinetics and dynamics.

  4. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  5. Stable rotating dipole solitons in nonlocal media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Skupin, Stefan; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2006-01-01

    We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons.......We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons....

  6. Synthesis of a stable gold hydrosol by the reduction of chloroaurate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 5. Synthesis of a stable gold hydrosol by the reduction of chloroaurate ions by the amino acid, aspartic acid. Saikat Mandal P R Selvakannan Sumant Phadtare Renu Pasricha Murali Sastry. Physical and Theoretical Volume 114 Issue 5 October 2002 pp ...

  7. Enhanced electron/fuel-ion equilibration through impurity ions: Studies applicable to NIF and Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Simpson, R.; Parker, C.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Casey, D.; Grabowski, P.; Graziani, F.; Taitano, W.; Le, A.; Chacon, L.; Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Simakov, A.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Betti, R.; Srinivasan, B.; Mancini, R.

    2017-10-01

    In shock-driven exploding-pushers, a platform used extensively to study multi-species and kinetic effects, electrons and fuel ions are far out of equilibrium, as reflected by very different temperatures. However, impurity ions, even in small quantities, can couple effectively to the electrons, because of a Z2 dependence, and in turn, impurity ions can then strongly couple to the fuel ions. Through this mechanism, electrons and fuel-ions can equilibrate much faster than they otherwise would. This is a quantitative issue, depending upon the amount and Z of the impurity. For NIF and Omega, we consider the role of this process. Coupled non-linear equations, reflecting the temperatures of the three species, are solved for a range of conditions. Consideration is also given to ablatively driven implosions, since impurities can similarly affect the equilibration. This work was supported in part by DOE/NNSA DE-NA0002949 and DE-NA0002726.

  8. Liberation of H2 from (o-C6H4Me)3P—H(+) + (-)H—B(p-C6F4H)3 ion-pair: A transition-state in the minimum energy path versus the transient species in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Maoping; Heshmat, Mojgan; Privalov, Timofei

    2017-07-01

    Using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) with density functional theory, transition-state (TS) calculations, and the quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA), we examined the mechanism of H2-liberation from LB—H(+) + (-)H—LA ion-pair, 1, in which the Lewis base (LB) is (o-C6H4Me)3P and the Lewis acid (LA) is B(p-C6F4H)3. BOMD simulations indicate that the path of H2 liberation from the ion-pair 1 goes via the short-lived transient species, LB⋯H2⋯LA, which are structurally reminiscent of the TS-structure in the minimum-energy-path describing the reversible reaction between H2 and (o-C6H4Me)3P/B(p-C6F4H)3 frustrated Lewis pair (FLP). With electronic structure calculations performed on graphics processing units, our BOMD data-set covers more than 1 ns of evolution of the ion-pair 1 at temperature T ≈ 400 K. BOMD simulations produced H2-recombination events with various durations of H2 remaining fully recombined as a molecule within a LB/LA attractive "pocket"—from very short vibrational-time scale to time scales in the range of a few hundred femtoseconds. With the help of perturbational approach to trajectory-propagation over a saddle-area, we directly examined dynamics of H2-liberation. Using EDA, we elucidated interactions between the cationic and anionic fragments in the ion-pair 1 and between the molecular fragments in the TS-structure. We have also considered a model that qualitatively takes into account the potential energy characteristics of H—H recombination and H2-release plus inertia of molecular motion of the (o-C6H4Me)3P/B(p-C6F4H)3 FLP.

  9. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  10. Periodicity of the stable isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, J C A

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all stable (non-radioactive) isotopes are formally interrelated as the products of systematically adding alpha particles to four elementary units. The region of stability against radioactive decay is shown to obey a general trend based on number theory and contains the periodic law of the elements as a special case. This general law restricts the number of what may be considered as natural elements to 100 and is based on a proton:neutron ratio that matches the golden ratio, characteristic of biological and crystal growth structures. Different forms of the periodic table inferred at other proton:neutron ratios indicate that the electronic configuration of atoms is variable and may be a function of environmental pressure. Cosmic consequences of this postulate are examined. (author)

  11. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.; Yukalova, E. P.; Henry, J.-Y.; Cobb, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  12. Theory of stable allocations II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish Royal Academy awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics to Lloyd Shapley and Alvin Roth, for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design. These two American researchers worked independently from each other, combining basic theory and empirical investigations. Through their experiments and practical design they generated a flourishing field of research and improved the performance of many markets. Shapley provided the fundamental theoretical contribution to this field of research, whereas Roth, a professor at the Harvard University in Boston, developed and upgraded these theoretical investigations by applying them to the American market of medical doctors. Namely, their research helps explain the market processes at work, for instance, when doctors are assigned to hospitals, students to schools and human organs for transplant to recipients.

  13. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  14. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes1, 2, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other2. Electrostatic stabilization3, 4 of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains2, 5. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  15. Dewatered sewage biosolids provide a productive larval habitat for stable flies and house flies (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doud, C W; Taylor, D B; Zurek, L

    2012-03-01

    Species diversity and seasonal abundance of muscoid flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in biosolid cake (dewatered biosolids) stored at a wastewater treatment facility in northeastern Kansas were evaluated. Emergence traps were deployed 19 May through 20 October 2009 (22 wk) and 27 May through 18 November 2010 (25 wk). In total, 11,349 muscoid flies were collected emerging from the biosolid cake. Stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) and house flies (Musca domestica (L.)), represented 80 and 18% of the muscoid flies, respectively. An estimated 550 stable flies and 220 house flies per square-meter of surface area developed in the biosolid cake annually producing 450,000 stable flies and 175,000 house flies. Stable fly emergence was seasonally bimodal with a primary peak in mid-July and a secondary peak in late August. House fly emergence peaked with the first stable fly emergence peak and then declined gradually for the remainder of the year. House flies tended to emerge from the biosolid cake sooner after its deposition than did stable flies. In addition, house fly emergence was concentrated around midsummer whereas stable fly emergence began earlier in the spring and continued later into the fall. Biosolid age and temperature were the most important parameters affecting emergence for house flies and stable flies, whereas precipitation was not important for either species. This study highlights the importance of biosolid cake as a larval developmental habitat for stable flies and house flies.

  16. Ion mass and energy selective hyperthermal ion-beam assisted deposition setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, J. W.; Schumacher, P.; Mensing, M.; Rauschenbach, S.; Cermak, I.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2017-06-01

    For the synthesis of high-quality thin films, ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is a frequently used technique providing precise control over several substantial film properties. IBAD typically relies on the use of a broad-beam ion source. Such ion sources suffer from the limitation that they deliver a blend of ions with different ion masses, each of them possessing a certain distribution of kinetic energy. In this paper, a compact experimental setup is presented that enables the separate control of ion mass and ion kinetic energy in the region of hyperthermal energies (few 1 eV - few 100 eV). This ion energy region is of increasing interest not only for ion-assisted film growth but also for the wide field of preparative mass spectrometry. The setup consists of a constricted glow-discharge plasma beam source and a tailor-made, compact quadrupole system equipped with entry and exit ion optics. It is demonstrated that the separation of monoatomic and polyatomic nitrogen ions (N+ and N2+) is accomplished. For both ion species, the kinetic energy is shown to be selectable in the region of hyperthermal energies. At the sample position, ion current densities are found to be in the order of 1 μA/cm2 and the full width at half maximum of the ion beam profile is in the order of 10 mm. Thus, the requirements for homogeneous deposition processes in sufficiently short periods of time are fulfilled. Finally, employing the described setup, for the first time in practice epitaxial GaN films were deposited. This opens up the opportunity to fundamentally study the influence of the simultaneous irradiation with hyperthermal ions on the thin film growth in IBAD processes and to increase the flexibility of the technique.

  17. Ion beam source construction and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torab, S.I.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to improve the performance of a new shape cold cathode Penning ion source to be suitable for some applications. In this work, many trials have been made to reach the optimum dimensions of the new shape of cold Molybdenum cathode Penning ion source with radial extraction. The high output ion beam can be extracted in a direction transverse to the discharge region. The new shape cold cathode Penning ion source consists of Copper cylindrical hollow anode of 40 mm length, 12 mm diameter and has two similar cone ends of 15 mm length, 22 mm upper cone diameter and 12 mm bottom cone diameter. The two movable Molybdenum cathodes are fixed in Perspex insulator and placed symmetrically at two ends of the anode. The Copper emission disc of 2 mm thickness and has central aperture of different diameters is placed at the middle of the anode for ion beam exit. The inner surface of the emission disc is isolated from the anode by Perspex insulator except an area of diameter 5 mm to confine the electrical discharge in this area. A movable Faraday cup is placed at different distances from the emission electrode aperture and used to collect the output ion beam from the ion source. The working gases are admitted to the ion source through a hole in the anode via a needle valve which placed between the gas cylinder and the ion source. The optimum anode- cathode distance, the uncovered area diameter of the emission disc, the central aperture diameter of the emission electrode, the distance between emission electrode and Faraday cup have been determined using Argon gas. The optimum distances of the ion source were found to be equal to 6 mm, 5 mm, 2.5 mm, and 3 cm respectively where stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current at low discharge current can be obtained. The discharge characteristics, ion beam characteristics, and the efficiency of the ion source have been measured at different operating conditions and different gas pressures using

  18. Studies of transition states and radicals by negative ion photodetachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Ricardo Baer [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photodetachment is a versatile tool for the production and study of transient neutral species such as reaction intermediates and free radicals. Photodetachment of the stable XHY- anion provides a direct spectroscopic probe of the transition state region of the potential energy surface for the neutral hydrogen transfer reaction X + HY → XH + Y, where X and Y are halogen atoms. The technique is especially sensitive to resonances, which occur at a specific energy, but the spectra also show features due to direct scattering. We have used collinear adiabatic simulations of the photoelectron spectra to evaluate trail potential energy surfaces for the biomolecular reactions and have extended the adiabatic approach to three dimensions and used it to evaluate empirical potential energy surfaces for the I + Hl and Br + HI reactions. In addition, we have derived an empirical, collinear potential energy surface for the Br + HBr reaction that reproduces our experimental results and have extended this surface to three dimensions. Photodetachment of a negative ion can be also used to study neutral free radicals. We have studied the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of CH2NO2 by photoelectron spectroscopy of CH2NO2-, determining the electron affinity of CH2NO2, gaining insight on the bonding of the 2B1 ground state and observing the 2A2 excited state for the first time. Negative ion photodetachment also provides a novel and versatile source of mass-selected, jet-cooled free radicals. We have studied the photodissociation of CH2NO2 at 270, 235, and 208 nm, obtaining information on the dissociation products by measuring the kinetic energy release in the photodissociation.

  19. Studies of transition states and radicals by negative ion photodetachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photodetachment is a versatile tool for the production and study of transient neutral species such as reaction intermediates and free radicals. Photodetachment of the stable XHY{sup {minus}} anion provides a direct spectroscopic probe of the transition state region of the potential energy surface for the neutral hydrogen transfer reaction X + HY {yields} XH + Y, where X and Y are halogen atoms. The technique is especially sensitive to resonances, which occur at a specific energy, but the spectra also show features due to direct scattering. We have used collinear adiabatic simulations of the photoelectron spectra to evaluate trail potential energy surfaces for the biomolecular reactions and have extended the adiabatic approach to three dimensions and used it to evaluate empirical potential energy surfaces for the I + Hl and Br + HI reactions. In addition, we have derived an empirical, collinear potential energy surface for the Br + HBr reaction that reproduces our experimental results and have extended this surface to three dimensions. Photodetachment of a negative ion can be also used to study neutral free radicals. We have studied the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} by photoelectron spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, determining the electron affinity of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}, gaining insight on the bonding of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} ground state and observing the {sup 2}A{sub 2} excited state for the first time. Negative ion photodetachment also provides a novel and versatile source of mass-selected, jet-cooled free radicals. We have studied the photodissociation of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} at 270, 235, and 208 nm, obtaining information on the dissociation products by measuring the kinetic energy release in the photodissociation.

  20. New chemistry of the uranyl ion in non aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siffredi, G.

    2008-12-01

    This work deals with new aspects of the chemistry of the uranyl(VI) ion {UO 2 } 2+ in anhydrous polar organic solvents such as the activation of the reputedly inert U-O yl bond and the controlled reduction of this species which represent a particularly active field of research that attracts much attention for both its fundamental aspects and applications. Treatment of uranyl(VI) compounds UO 2 X' 2 (X' = I, OTf, Cl) with Me 3 SiX (X = Cl, Br, I) reagents, in various anhydrous polar organic solvents, has been first considered. In most cases, reduction into tetravalent species with complete de-oxygenation of the uranyl {UO 2 } 2+ ion is observed. The reaction is particularly efficient in acetonitrile where the tetravalent [UX 4 (MeCN) 4 ] complexes, which are useful precursors in uranium chemistry, are isolated. In the course of these reactions, the influence of the solvent, the nature of X' and X in the UO 2 X' 2 precursor and the Me 3 SiX reagent are pointed out. Reaction of the uranyl(VI) UO 2 X 2 (X = I, Cl, OTf, NO 3 ) precursors with the anionic MC 5 R 5 (M = K, R = H, Me; M= Li, R = Me; M= Tl, R = H) reagents did not lead to the organometallic [(η 5 -C 5 R 5 ) n UO 2 X 2-n ] species (n = 1, 2) but to pentavalent uranyl(V) complexes. This method is a facile and rapid route towards the formation of stable pentavalent uranyl which offers promising sources for further U(V) chemical developments and for fundamental and applied interests. Their structure is strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent, the additional ligands X and of the M + cation. In pyridine, the {UO 2 (py) 5 } + ion appears to be an ubiquitous and a quite stable entity. The coordinating properties of the basic oxo groups, which coordinate easily to M + ions (M= Li, K, Tl), favour structural diversity with formation of hetero-polymetallic complexes such as [{UO 2 (py) 5 }{MX(py) 2 }] (M= Li, X I), [{UO 2 (py) 5 }{MX 2 (py) 2 }] ∞ (M= K, Tl, X= OTf; M= K, X= I), [{UO 2 (py) 5 }(M 2 X 3 )]

  1. Theoretical prediction of rare gas inserted hydronium ions: HRgOH2(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ayan; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2013-05-21

    A possibility of existence of new species through insertion of a rare gas atom in hydronium ion resulting into HRgOH2(+) cation (Rg = He, Ar, Kr, and Xe) has been explored by using various ab initio quantum chemical techniques. Structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, stability, and charge distribution of HRgOH2(+) species as obtained using density functional theory, second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and coupled-cluster theory based methods are reported in this work. All the calculated results suggest that the HRgOH2(+) species are stable enough with respect to all the dissociation channels, except the 2-body dissociation path (H3O(+) + Rg). Nevertheless, this 2-body dissociation channel connected through the relevant transition state is associated with a finite barrier, which in turn would prevent the metastable species in transforming to global minimum products. The calculated values of topological properties within the framework of quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules are found to be consistent with the bond length values. Structural and energetic parameters clearly suggest that it might be possible to prepare and characterize the HRgOH2(+) species (except HHeOH2(+)) using electron bombardment matrix isolation technique in a way similar to that of the preparation of (Rg2H)(+) or mixed (RgHRg('))(+) cations.

  2. Observation of migrating superoxide species in YBa2Cu3(57Co)O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelev, N.; Chechersky, V.; Tian Jing; Homonnay, Z.; Wei Yen; Nath, A.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of the migrating superoxide ion O 2 - with the central cobalt-57 atom of the four coordinate species at the chain site is probed with the help of emission Moessbauer spectroscopy. The bond formation between 57 Co and O 2 - requires some thermal activation, and consequently the five-coordinate species is stable only above ∝350 K. The equilibrium shifts in its favor at higher temperatures, and the interconversion between the two species is completely reversible. The O 2 - ion can either attach to cobalt end-on with one of the oxygen atoms or interact equivalently with both. The amount of the five-coordinate species formed seems to be limited by the availability of O 2 - . The interconversion ceases to occur after a prolonged thermal treatment of the YBa 2 Cu 3 ( 57 Co)O 7-δ pellet at 420degC under argon flow. All the interstitial oxygen species are presumably removed without any measurable loss of oxygen from the Cu-O chains. (orig.)

  3. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  4. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R; Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J

    2009-01-01

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca + and Ba + . Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  5. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av del Canal OlImpic, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)], E-mail: francois.dubin@icfo.es

    2009-01-15

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca{sup +} and Ba{sup +}. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  6. Ion-pair structure of vaporized ionic liquid studied by matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy with DFT calculations: a case of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-09

    The matrix-isolation infrared spectrum of a thermally evaporated ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([Emim][OTf]), was measured by FTIR spectroscopy and analyzed with the aid of DFT calculations. The main chemical species in the observed IR spectrum was mainly identified as the 1:1 cation-anion pair, which corresponds to the second stable ion-pair structure bonded through five hydrogen bonds between three O atoms of the anion side and four H atoms of the cation.

  7. Stabilization of gas-phase uranyl complexes enables rapid speciation using electrospray ionization and ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Austen L; Clowers, Brian H

    2018-01-01

    Significant challenges exist when characterizing f-element complexes in solution using traditional approaches such as electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques as they do not always capture information for lower abundance species. However, provided a metal-complex with sufficient stability, soft ionization techniques such as electrospray offer a means to quantify and probe the characteristics of such systems using mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, the gas-phase species observed in ESI-MS systems do not always reflect the solution phase distributions due to the inherent electrochemical mechanism of the electrospray process, ion transfer from ambient to low pressures conditions, and other factors that are related to droplet evaporation. Even for simple systems (e.g. hydrated cations), it is not always clear whether the distribution observed reflects the solution phase populations or whether it is simply a result of the ionization process. This complexity is further compounded in mixed solvent systems and when multiply charged species are present. Despite these challenges, the benefits of mass spectrometry with respect to speed, sensitivity, and the ability to resolve isotopes continue to drive efforts to develop techniques for the speciation of metal complexes. Using an electrospray ionization atmospheric pressure ion mobility mass spectrometer (ESI-apIMS-MS), we demonstrate an approach to stabilize simple uranyl complexes during the ionization process and mobility separation to aid speciation and isotope profile analysis. Specifically, we outline and demonstrate the capacity of ESI-apIMS-MS methods to measure mobilities of different uranyl species, in simple mixtures, by promoting stable gas phase conformations with the addition of sulfoxides (i.e. dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dibutyl sulfoxide (DBSO), and methyl phenyl sulfoxide (MPSO)). Addition of these sulfoxides, as observed in the mass spectrum and mobility domain, produce stable gas-phase conformations that

  8. Introducing Stable Radicals into Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2017-09-27

    Ever since their discovery, stable organic radicals have received considerable attention from chemists because of their unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. Currently, one of the most appealing challenges for the chemical community is to develop sophisticated artificial molecular machines that can do work by consuming external energy, after the manner of motor proteins. In this context, radical-pairing interactions are important in addressing the challenge: they not only provide supramolecular assistance in the synthesis of molecular machines but also open the door to developing multifunctional systems relying on the various properties of the radical species. In this Outlook, by taking the radical cationic state of 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY •+ ) as an example, we highlight our research on the art and science of introducing radical-pairing interactions into functional systems, from prototypical molecular switches to complex molecular machines, followed by a discussion of the (i) limitations of the current systems and (ii) future research directions for designing BIPY •+ -based molecular machines with useful functions.

  9. Mutation induction of orchids by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affrida Abu Hassan; Zaiton Ahmad; Sakinah Ariffin; Oono, Yutaka; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono; Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Mutation induction using ionizing radiation provides an effective alternative means for improvement of orchids. In this study, ion beams were used because they have much higher linear energy transfer (LET) than X-rays or gamma rays, and subsequently lead to higher mutation frequency and broad mutation spectrum. The proto corm-like bodies (PLBs) of three orchid species (Dendrobium crumenatum, Dendrobium mirbellianum) were irradiated at various doses with 320 MeV 12 C 6+ ions accelerated by Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron at JAEAs Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA). The optimum irradiation condition and the effect of irradiation on each species were studied, particularly on flower colour and morphology, flowering habit and insect resistance. Dose effects on plantlet regeneration for each species were also obtained. Some morphological changes were observed in flowers of Dendrobium crumenatum, whilst one insect resistant mutant was obtained in Dendrobium mirbellianum. (author)

  10. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  11. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  12. Stable Treemaps via Local Moves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondag, Max; Speckmann, Bettina; Verbeek, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Treemaps are a popular tool to visualize hierarchical data: items are represented by nested rectangles and the area of each rectangle corresponds to the data being visualized for this item. The visual quality of a treemap is commonly measured via the aspect ratio of the rectangles. If the data changes, then a second important quality criterion is the stability of the treemap: how much does the treemap change as the data changes. We present a novel stable treemapping algorithm that has very high visual quality. Whereas existing treemapping algorithms generally recompute the treemap every time the input changes, our algorithm changes the layout of the treemap using only local modifications. This approach not only gives us direct control over stability, but it also allows us to use a larger set of possible layouts, thus provably resulting in treemaps of higher visual quality compared to existing algorithms. We further prove that we can reach all possible treemap layouts using only our local modifications. Furthermore, we introduce a new measure for stability that better captures the relative positions of rectangles. We finally show via experiments on real-world data that our algorithm outperforms existing treemapping algorithms also in practice on either visual quality and/or stability. Our algorithm scores high on stability regardless of whether we use an existing stability measure or our new measure.

  13. Determination of the stability of the uranyl ion sipped in {tau}-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodic form; Determinacion de la estabilidad del ion uranilo sorbido en {tau}-hidrogenofosfato de zirconio en forma sodica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Drot, R.; Simoni, E. [Universite de Paris-Sud-XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Groupe de radiochimie, Bat. 100, 91406 Orsay (France)]. e-mail: edo@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The stability of the uranyl sipped in the zirconium {tau}-hydrogen phosphate in sodic form ({tau}-NaZrP), was carried out characterizing the complexes formed by Laser spectroscopy in the visible region and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material was prepared by a new synthesis technique working in nitrogen atmosphere and to low temperatures. The sorption of the uranyl ion was made in acid media with concentrations of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -5} of uranyl nitrate and with ion forces of 0.1 and 0.5 M of NaClO{sub 4}. The spectra of induced fluorescence with laser (TRLFS) show that the uranyl is fixed in very acid media in three well differentiated species, to pH less acid, the specie of long half life disappears and are only those of short half life. The results of the binding energy obtained by XPS indicate that the binding energy of the uranyl confer it a stable character to the complex formed in the {tau}-NaZP, that makes to this material appropriate to retain to the uranyl in solution to high ion forces and in acid media. (Author)

  14. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  15. A hybrid simulation model for a stable auroral arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    Full Text Available We present a new type of hybrid simulation model, intended to simulate a single stable auroral arc in the latitude/altitude plane. The ionospheric ions are treated as particles, the electrons are assumed to follow a Boltzmann response and the magnetospheric ions are assumed to be so hot that they form a background population unaffected by the electric fields that arise. The system is driven by assumed parallel electron energisation causing a primary negative charge cloud and an associated potential structure to build up. The results show how a closed potential structure and density depletion of an auroral arc build up and how they decay after the driver is turned off. The model also produces upgoing energetic ion beams and predicts strong static perpendicular electric fields to be found in a relatively narrow altitude range (~ 5000–11 000 km.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; auroral phenomena – Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  16. Characterization of the Cathode Electrolyte Interface in Lithium Ion Batteries by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Min; G Nicolau, Bruno; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-07-19

    The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed via electrolyte decomposition on the anode of lithium ion batteries is largely responsible for the stable cycling of conventional lithium ion batteries. Similarly, there is a lesser-known analogous layer on the cathode side of a lithium ion battery, termed the cathode electrolyte interface (CEI), whose composition and role are debated. To confirm the existence and composition of the CEI, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is applied to study common lithium ion battery cathodes. We observe CEI formation on the LiMn2O4 cathode material after cycling between 3.5 and 4.5 V vs Li/Li(+) in electrolyte solution containing 1 M LiPF6 or LiClO4 in 1:1 (v/v) ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Intact poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether is identified as the electrolyte degradation product on the cathode surface by the high mass-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. When EC is paired with ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether, poly(ethylene glycol) ethyl methyl ether, and poly(ethylene glycol) are found on the surface simultaneously. The presence of ethoxy and methoxy end groups indicates both methoxide and ethoxide are produced and involved in the process of oligomerization. Au surfaces cycled under different electrochemical windows as model systems for Li-ion battery anodes are also examined. Interestingly, the identical oligomeric species to those found in the CEI are found on Au surfaces after running five cycles between 2.0 and 0.1 V vs Li/Li(+) in half-cells. These results show that DESI-MS provides intact molecular information on battery electrodes, enabling deeper understanding of the SEI or CEI composition.

  17. Determination of the stability of the uranyl ion sipped in τ-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodic form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M.; Drot, R.; Simoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    The stability of the uranyl sipped in the zirconium τ-hydrogen phosphate in sodic form (τ-NaZrP), was carried out characterizing the complexes formed by Laser spectroscopy in the visible region and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material was prepared by a new synthesis technique working in nitrogen atmosphere and to low temperatures. The sorption of the uranyl ion was made in acid media with concentrations of 10 -4 and 10 -5 of uranyl nitrate and with ion forces of 0.1 and 0.5 M of NaClO 4 . The spectra of induced fluorescence with laser (TRLFS) show that the uranyl is fixed in very acid media in three well differentiated species, to pH less acid, the specie of long half life disappears and are only those of short half life. The results of the binding energy obtained by XPS indicate that the binding energy of the uranyl confer it a stable character to the complex formed in the τ-NaZP, that makes to this material appropriate to retain to the uranyl in solution to high ion forces and in acid media. (Author)

  18. Surface engineering by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Bjarne Roger

    1995-01-01

    Awidespread commercial applica tion iof particle accelerators is for ion implantation. Accelerator beams are used for ion implantation into metals, alloying a thin surface layer with foreign atoms to concentrations impossible to achieve by thermal processes, making for dramatic improvements in hardness and in resistance to wear and corrosion. Traditional hardening processes require high temperatures causing deformation; ion implantation on the other hand is a ''cold process'', treating the finished product. The ionimplanted layer is integrated in the substrate, avoiding the risk of cracking and delamination from normal coating processes. Surface properties may be ''engineered'' independently of those of the bulk material; the process does not use environmentally hazardous materials such as chromium in the surface coating. The typical implantation dose required for the optimum surface properties of metals is around 2 x 10 17 ion/cm 2 , a hundred times the typical doses for semiconductor processing. When surface areas of more than a few square centimetres have to be treated, the implanter must therefore be able to produce high beam currents (5 to 10 mA) to obtain an acceptable treatment time. Ion species used include nitrogen, boron, carbon, titanium, chromium and tantalum, and beam energies range from 50 to 200 keV. Since most components are three dimensional, it must be possible to rotate and tilt them in the beam, and control beam position over a large area. Examples of industrial applications are: - surface treatment of prostheses (hip and knee joints) to reduce wear of the moving parts, using biocompatible materials; - ion implantation into high speed ball bearings to protect against the aqueous corrosion in jet engines (important for service helicopters on oil rigs); - hardening of metal forming and cutting tools; - reduction of corrosive wear of plastic moulding tools, which are expensive to produce

  19. The rechargeable aluminum-ion battery

    KAUST Repository

    Jayaprakash, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report a novel aluminium-ion rechargeable battery comprised of an electrolyte containing AlCl3 in the ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, and a V2O5 nano-wire cathode against an aluminium metal anode. The battery delivered a discharge capacity of 305 mAh g-1 in the first cycle and 273 mAh g-1 after 20 cycles, with very stable electrochemical behaviour. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  20. Lipid Extraction and the Fugacity of Stable Isotope Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, V.; Causey, D.; Wolf, N.; Welker, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis of blood, feathers, and other tissues are often used to infer migration patterns, diet composition and trophic status of seabirds. Tissues contain variable amounts of lipids that are depleted in the heavy carbon isotope (13C) and may introduce a bias in these values. There is evidence that lipid extraction may affect other stable isotope ratios, such as δ15N. Consequently, correction factors need to be applied to appropriately interpret δ13C and δ15N values for individual species and tissue type. In this study, we collected seven species of seabirds from the Near Islands, the western most group of islands in the Aleutian Island archipelago. We sampled kidney, liver, heart and muscle samples from each bird and after freeze drying, individual tissue samples were divided into two subsamples. We left one subsample unaltered and extracted lipids from the other subsample using a 2:1 chloroform-methanol solution. We found that the change in δ13C values after lipid extraction (Δδ13C) varied widely among categories (eg., species, tissue type) from 0 - 4 ‰, while Δδ15N values ranged from 0 to 2‰. Notably, within category variation was nonsignificant and the Δδ values were linear against the covariant C:N ratio of the isotopic data, which allows us to use arithmetic corrections for categorical values. Our data strongly indicate that the effects of lipid extraction on stable isotopic values, while linear within category, vary widely by species, tissue, geographic area, year of collection, and isotope. Fugacity is usually employed as a thermodynamic quantity related to the chemical potential or activity that characterizes the escaping tendency from a phase (eg. Mackay & Paterson 1982). Here we use fugacity in the earlier, broader sense of fleeting, transitory, or instable states (eg., S. Johnson 1751), and its measure may be approximated by the higher order variance of Δδ13C and Δδ15N among data categories. Clearly, understanding the

  1. Electrochemical performance and interfacial investigation on Si composite anode for lithium ion batteries in full cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobukawa, Hitoshi; Alvarado, Judith; Yang, Yangyuchen; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2017-08-01

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) containing silicon (Si) as a negative electrode have gained much attention recently because they deliver high energy density. However, the commercialization of LIBs with Si anode is limited due to the unstable electrochemical performance associated with expansion and contraction during electrochemical cycling. This study investigates the electrochemical performance and degradation mechanism of a full cell containing Si composite anode and LiFePO4 (lithium iron phosphate (LFP)) cathode. Enhanced electrochemical cycling performance is observed when the full cell is cycled with fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive compared to the standard electrolyte. To understand the improvement in the electrochemical performance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used. Based on the electrochemical behavior, FEC improves the reversibility of lithium ion diffusion into the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the Si composite anode. Moreover, XPS analysis demonstrates that the SEI composition generated from the addition of FEC consists of a large amount of LiF and less carbonate species, which leads to better capacity retention over 40 cycles. The effective SEI successively yields more stable capacity retention and enhances the reversibility of lithium ion diffusion through the interphase of the Si anode, even at higher discharge rate. This study contributes to a basic comprehension of electrochemical performance and SEI formation of LIB full cells with a high loading Si composite anode.

  2. Low energy ion induced desorption on technical surfaces at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Hulla, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The ion-induced pressure instability is a hard limitation for the maximum intensity, and hence the ultimate luminosity achievable in a proton accelerator. This instability is due to the interaction of high intensity proton beams with the residual gas generating positive ions. These ions, accelerated by the beam space charge, impact on the vaccuum chamber wall and lead to the desorption of gaseous species like $H_{2}, CH_{4}, C_{2}H_{4}, C_{2}H_{6}, CO$ and $CO_{2}$. These gases can in turn be ionized by the circulating beam, and initiate a pressure run-away process causing the loss of the stored beam. This phenomenon was first registered right at the beginning of operation of the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) at CERN in 1970. Later on, a long term evolution of the pressure was recorded for a stable stored beam current where a change of the residual gas composition was measured. In order to adapt the pumping speed and the surface treatments to the desired circulating beam currents, mathematical tools (e.g. ...

  3. ERC sources for the production of highly charged ions (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyneis, C.M.; Antaya, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) using rf between 5 and 16 GHz have been developed into stable, reliable sources of highly charged ions produced from a wide range of elements. These devices are currently used as ion sources for cyclotrons, synchrotrons, and heavy-ion linacs for nuclear and relativistic heavy-ion physics. They also serve the atomic physics community as a source of low energy multiply charged ions. In order to improve their performance both with respect to maximum charge state and beam intensity, ECRIS builders are now designing and constructing sources which will operate at frequencies up to 30 GHz. In this article we review the present status of operating ECRIS, review recent experimental measurements on plasma parameters, and look at the technology and potential of sources operating at frequencies up to 30 GHz

  4. Copper stable isotopes to trace copper behavior in wetland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2014-05-20

    Wetlands are reactive zones of the landscape that can sequester metals released by industrial and agricultural activities. Copper (Cu) stable isotope ratios (δ(65)Cu) have recently been used as tracers of transport and transformation processes in polluted environments. Here, we used Cu stable isotopes to trace the behavior of Cu in a stormwater wetland receiving runoff from a vineyard catchment (Alsace, France). The Cu loads and stable isotope ratios were determined in the dissolved phase, suspended particulate matter (SPM), wetland sediments, and vegetation. The wetland retained >68% of the dissolved Cu and >92% of the SPM-bound Cu, which represented 84.4% of the total Cu in the runoff. The dissolved Cu became depleted in (65)Cu when passing through the wetland (Δ(65)Cuinlet-outlet from 0.03‰ to 0.77‰), which reflects Cu adsorption to aluminum minerals and organic matter. The δ(65)Cu values varied little in the wetland sediments (0.04 ± 0.10‰), which stored >96% of the total Cu mass within the wetland. During high-flow conditions, the Cu flowing out of the wetland became isotopically lighter, indicating the mobilization of reduced Cu(I) species from the sediments and Cu reduction within the sediments. Our results demonstrate that the Cu stable isotope ratios may help trace Cu behavior in redox-dynamic environments such as wetlands.

  5. Effect of ion implantation on B. mucilaginosus KNP414 and screening for mutants with higher release of phosphate and potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiufang; Gao Yuanyuan; Fang Qionglou; Wu Jinguang; Chen Jishuang

    2008-01-01

    Effect of ion implantation on strain KNP414 of Bacillus mucilaginosus was investigated. Survival ratio of isolate KNP414 was independent of the tested ions species and energy, but was highly dependent on their doses and the presence of bacterial capsule. 14 phytate-degradation mutants were obtained from the spores implanted with N + (20 keV, 5 x 10 15 -5 x 10 16 ions cm -2 ), and their phytate-degradation capacities were 15%-35%. Amongst, 3 mutants (KNP414-04, KNP414- 05, KNP414-12) with higher solubilizing capacities of mineral phosphate and potassium were identified. Their solubilizing capacities of the two minerals increased by 14.7%-27.5% and 16.2%-26.4%, respectively. Mutant KNP414-12 was found to be able to dissolve 57.3% phytate in the optimized medium and the degradation ratio was comparatively stable in seven continuous generations and during the storage process. In conclusion, ion implantation was an effective mutagenic source for isolate KNP414, since it increased the abilities to solubilize phosphate and potassium as well as to degradate phytate. Meanwhile the screening method used in this study has been proved to be successful for rapid selection of phytate-degradation mutants. (authors)

  6. Negative ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion sources have been originally developed at the request of tandem electrostatic accelerators, and hundreds of nA to several μA negative ion current has been obtained so far for various elements. Recently, the development of large current hydrogen negative ion sources has been demanded from the standpoint of the heating by neutral particle beam injection in nuclear fusion reactors. On the other hand, the physical properties of negative ions are interesting in the thin film formation using ions. Anyway, it is the present status that the mechanism of negative ion action has not been so fully investigated as positive ions because the history of negative ion sources is short. In this report, the many mechanisms about the generation of negative ions proposed so far are described about negative ion generating mechanism, negative ion source plasma, and negative ion generation on metal surfaces. As a result, negative ion sources are roughly divided into two schemes, plasma extraction and secondary ion extraction, and the former is further classified into the PIG ion source and its variation and Duoplasmatron and its variation; while the latter into reflecting and sputtering types. In the second half of the report, the practical negative ion sources of each scheme are described. If the mechanism of negative ion generation will be investigated more in detail and the development will be continued under the unified know-how as negative ion sources in future, the development of negative ion sources with which large current can be obtained for any element is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Inter- and intraspecific variation of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in freshwater bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Novais, Adriana; Dias, Ester; Sousa, Ronaldo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater bivalves provide important ecosystem functions and services, yet many of their ecological traits such as feeding mechanisms and resource use are largely ignored. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential overlap in resource use by bivalve species living in sympatry in European freshwater ecosystems. This was accomplished by analyzing the stable isotope ratios of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) values of six bivalve species (five native species plus th...

  8. Search for hydrogen-helium molecular species in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicler, E.; Parisel, O.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Maillard, J.-P.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Helium, the second most abundant element in the Universe, with a relative abundance of He/H 1/10, has never been observed in any other form than that of a neutral atom (He) or an ion (He+) in the interstellar medium. Since He is a noble gas its non-observation as part of neutral molecular systems is understandable, but it is very surprising for a positively charged species such as HeH+ that is a stable diatomic ion whose spectral signatures are well known in the laboratory. Aims: This non-observation, even in hydrogen rich regions, could imply that HeH+ is not a proper target and that alternatives have to be considered, such as small HeH clusters. The present study aims at finding whether the leading term HeH fulfills the conditions required. Methods: We addressed the question with state-of-the-art numerical simulations. We determined a two-dimension ab initio potential energy surface (PES) of the HeH cluster along the He...H and HeH+...H2 reaction coordinates. The calculations rely on complete active space configuration interaction followed by a second order perturbation treatment (CAS-PT2). This surface was used for the evaluation of the two radiative associations rate constants by means of a quantum treatment of the collision between the interacting fragments. Results: These calculations show unambiguously that HeH is the most stable point on the corresponding global PES. Then, we determined the rate constants of the radiative associations HeH+ + H2 and He + H leading to HeH. Conclusions: Significative values were obtained that reach up to 2 × 10-18 cm3 s-1, which should stimulate new tentatives to detect molecular helium in astrophysical objects.

  9. Two Contemporary Problems in Magnetized Plasmas: the ion-ion hybrid resonator and MHD stability in a snowflake divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, William Anthony [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The rst part of the dissertation investigates the e ects of multiple-ions on the propagation of shear Alfv en waves. It is shown that the presence of a second ion-species allows for the formation of an ion-ion hybrid resonator in the presence of a magnetic well. A fullwave description is shown to explain the measured eigenfrequencies and spatial form of the resonator modes identi ed in experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. However, it is determined that neither electron collisions or radial convection of the mode due to coupling to either the compressional or ion-Bernstein wave can explain the observed dissipation.

  10. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  11. Development of a simple, sensitive and inexpensive ion-pairing cloud point extraction approach for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in spring water, beverage and rice samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkan, Ramazan; Kır, Ufuk; Altunay, Nail

    2015-08-01

    The determination of inorganic arsenic species in water, beverages and foods become crucial in recent years, because arsenic species are considered carcinogenic and found at high concentrations in the samples. This communication describes a new cloud-point extraction (CPE) method for the determination of low quantity of arsenic species in the samples, purchased from the local market by UV-Visible Spectrophotometer (UV-Vis). The method is based on selective ternary complex of As(V) with acridine orange (AOH(+)) being a versatile fluorescence cationic dye in presence of tartaric acid and polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114) at pH 5.0. Under the optimized conditions, a preconcentration factor of 65 and detection limit (3S blank/m) of 1.14 μg L(-1) was obtained from the calibration curve constructed in the range of 4-450 μg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9932 for As(V). The method is validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Miniature Lightweight Ion Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.

    2010-01-01

    This design offers a larger surface area for pumping of active gases and reduces the mass of the pump by eliminating the additional vacuum enclosure. There are three main components to this ion pump: the cathode and anode pumping elements assembly, the vacuum enclosure (made completely of titanium and used as the cathode and maintained at ground potential) containing the assembly, and the external magnet. These components are generally put in a noble diode (or differential) configuration of the ion pump technology. In the present state of the art, there are two cathodes, one made of titanium and the other of tantalum. The anodes are made up of an array of stainless steel cylinders positioned between the two cathodes. All the elements of the pump are in a vacuum enclosure. After the reduction of pressure in this enclosure to a few microns, a voltage is applied between the cathode and the anode elements. Electrons generated by the ionization are accelerated toward the anodes that are confined in the anode space by the axial magnetic field. For the generation of the axial field along the anode elements, the magnet is designed in a C-configuration and is fabricated from rare earth magnetic materials (Nd-B-Fe or Sm-Co) possessing high energy product values, and the yoke is fabricated from the high permeability material (Hiperco-50A composed of Fe-Co-V). The electrons in this region collide with the gas molecules and generate their positive ions. These ions are accelerated into the cathode and eject cathode material (Ti). The neutral atoms deposit on the anode surfaces. Because of the chemical activity of Ti, the atoms combine with chemically active gas molecules (e.g. N2, O2, etc.) and remove them. New layers of Ti are continually deposited, and the pumping of active gases is thus accomplished. Pumping of the inert gases is accomplished by their burial several atomic layers deep into the cathode. However, they tend to re-emit if the entrapping lattice atoms are

  13. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Strašík

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., ^{238}U^{92+} and partially stripped (e.g., ^{238}U^{28+} ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers. Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad–x.

  14. Population Games, Stable Games, and Passivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Fox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The class of “stable games”, introduced by Hofbauer and Sandholm in 2009, has the attractive property of admitting global convergence to equilibria under many evolutionary dynamics. We show that stable games can be identified as a special case of the feedback-system-theoretic notion of a “passive” dynamical system. Motivated by this observation, we develop a notion of passivity for evolutionary dynamics that complements the definition of the class of stable games. Since interconnections of passive dynamical systems exhibit stable behavior, we can make conclusions about passive evolutionary dynamics coupled with stable games. We show how established evolutionary dynamics qualify as passive dynamical systems. Moreover, we exploit the flexibility of the definition of passive dynamical systems to analyze generalizations of stable games and evolutionary dynamics that include forecasting heuristics as well as certain games with memory.

  15. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2015-10-20

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model\\'s predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  16. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  17. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  18. Microfluidic ion-sensing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R Daniel; Gavalas, Vasilis G; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G

    2008-04-14

    Quantitative determinations of ions in a variety of media have been performed traditionally via one of three approaches: optical instrumental methods (e.g., atomic absorption, and inductively-coupled plasma-optical emission or mass spectrometry), "wet" methods, or ion-selective sensors. Each of the approaches, though, possesses limitations including: power/reagent consumption and lack of portability for instrumental techniques; laborious sample-treatment steps for wet methods; and lack of selectivity and sensitivity with sensors when employed with complex samples. Microfluidic device have emerged as a solution to some of these challenges associated with ion analysis. Such systems can integrate multiple sample handling, calibration, and detection steps ("lab-on-a-chip" concept) into a footprint amenable to portability, while requiring small amounts of sample and power. Furthermore, devices can be constructed for multi-analyte detection, either through multiple parallel fluidic architectures or by using arrays of detection elements. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of total-analysis systems for ionic species. Fabrication techniques and various fluid-handling operations are discussed briefly, followed by a number of more mature strategies for microfluidic ion analysis. A variety of approaches expected to comprise the next generation of devices are also presented.

  19. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Qing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O2+, BF2+, P+ etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF2+, over 90% of O2+ and P+ have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He+ beam is as high as 440 A/cm2 • Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O2+ ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O2+ ions with the dose of 1015 cm-2. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The

  20. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O 2 + , BF 2 + , P + etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF 2 + , over 90% of O 2 + and P + have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He + beam is as high as 440 A/cm 2 · Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O 2 + ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O 2 + ions with the dose of 10 15 cm -2 . The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P

  1. Radioactive Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Stora, T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic requirements for ion sources designed and operated in radioactive ion beam facilities. The facilities where these sources are operated exploit the isotope separation online (ISOL) technique, in which a target is combined with an ion source to maximize the secondary beam intensity and chemical element selectivity. Three main classes of sources are operated, namely surface-type ion sources, arc discharge-type ion sources, and finally radio-frequency-heated plasma-type ion sources.

  2. Ions and light

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 3: Ions and Light discusses how ions are formed by electron impact, ion-molecule reactions, or electrical discharge. This book discusses the use of light emitted by excited molecules to characterize either the chemistry that formed the excited ion, the structure of the excited ion, or both.Organized into 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the extension of the classical flowing afterglow technique to include infrared and chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescence detection. This text then examines the experiments involving molecules that ar

  3. Lithium ion batteries based on nanoporous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sarah H.; Nemanick, Eric J.; Kang, Chris Byung-Hwa

    2015-09-22

    A lithium ion battery that incorporates an anode formed from a Group IV semiconductor material such as porous silicon is disclosed. The battery includes a cathode, and an anode comprising porous silicon. In some embodiments, the anode is present in the form of a nanowire, a film, or a powder, the porous silicon having a pore diameters within the range between 2 nm and 100 nm and an average wall thickness of within the range between 1 nm and 100 nm. The lithium ion battery further includes, in some embodiments, a non-aqueous lithium containing electrolyte. Lithium ion batteries incorporating a porous silicon anode demonstrate have high, stable lithium alloying capacity over many cycles.

  4. One-millipound mercury ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, J., Jr.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Kami, S.; Williamson, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    A mercury ion thruster has been developed for efficient operation at the nominal 1-mlb thrust level with a specific impulse of about 3,000 sec and a total power consumption of about 120 W. At a beam voltage of 1,200 V and beam current of 72 mA, the discharge chamber operates with a propellant efficiency of 93.8% at an ion-generation energy of 276 eV/ion. The 8-cm diameter thruster advances proven component technology to assure the capability for thruster operation over an accumulated beam-on time in excess of 20,000 hours with a capability for 10,000 on-off duty cycles. Discharge chamber optimization has combined stable current-voltage characteristics with high performance efficiency by careful placement of the discharge cathode near the location of a magnetic-field zero just upstream of the thruster endplate.

  5. The production and destruction of negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    During the present grant period we are continuing our measurements of cross sections and asymmetry parameters for single photon-single electron detachment from atomic negative ions. In this period we have studied the stable ions B - and Li - . As a by product of these measurements we have investigated a new technique for measuring electron affinities. As in our previous work, we have made energy- and angle-resolved spectroscopic measurements of the yields and angular distributions of photoelectrons ejected at the intersection of perpendicularly crossed laser and negative ion beams. A combination of measurements of photoelectron yields, which are proportional to differential cross sections, and angular distributions allow us to determine angle-integrated cross sections for the photodetachment process. Cross sections for the inverse process of radiative attachment can be obtained from the photodetachment data by applying the principle of detailed balance

  6. Modelling of advanced three-ion ICRF heating and fast ion generation scheme for tokamaks and stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustin, J. M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Lanthaler, S.; Villard, L.; Pfefferlé, D.; Geiger, J.; Kazakov, Ye O.; Van Eester, D.

    2017-08-01

    Absorption of ion-cyclotron range of frequencies waves at the fundamental resonance is an efficient source of plasma heating and fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. This heating method is planned to be exploited as a fast ion source in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator. The work presented here assesses the possibility of using the newly developed three-ion species scheme (Kazakov et al (2015) Nucl. Fusion 55 032001) in tokamak and stellarator plasmas, which could offer the capability of generating more energetic ions than the traditional minority heating scheme with moderate input power. Using the SCENIC code, it is found that fast ions in the MeV range of energy can be produced in JET-like plasmas. The RF-induced particle pinch is seen to strongly impact the fast ion pressure profile in particular. Our results show that in typical high-density W7-X plasmas, the three-ion species scheme generates more energetic ions than the more traditional minority heating scheme, which makes three-ion scenario promising for fast-ion confinement studies in W7-X.

  7. The energy landscape of uranyl-peroxide species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiferet, Eitan [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Laboratory, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Be' er-Sheva (Israel); Gil, Adria; Bo, Carles [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), Tarragona (Spain); Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Universitat Rovira i Virgil, Tarragona (Spain); Shvareva, Tatiana Y.; Navrotsky, Alexandra [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Laboratory, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Nyman, May [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Nanoscale uranyl peroxide clusters containing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} groups bonded through peroxide bridges to form polynuclear molecular species (polyoxometalates) exist both in solution and in the solid state. There is an extensive family of clusters containing 28 uranium atoms (U{sub 28} clusters), with an encapsulated anion in the center, for example, [UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3-x}(OH){sub x}{sup 4-}], [Nb(O{sub 2}){sub 4}{sup 3-}], or [Ta(O{sub 2}){sub 4}{sup 3-}]. The negative charge of these clusters is balanced by alkali ions, both encapsulated, and located exterior to the cluster. The present study reports measurement of enthalpy of formation for two such U{sub 28} compounds, one of which is uranyl centered and the other is peroxotantalate centered. The [Ta(O{sub 2}){sub 4}]-centered U{sub 28} capsule is energetically more stable than the [(UO{sub 2})(O{sub 2}){sub 3}]-centered capsule. These data, along with our prior studies on other uranyl-peroxide solids, are used to explore the energy landscape and define thermochemical trends in alkali-uranyl-peroxide systems. It was suggested that the energetic role of charge-balancing alkali ions and their electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged uranyl-peroxide species is the dominant factor in defining energetic stability. These experimental data were supported by DFT calculations, which agree that the [Ta(O{sub 2}){sub 4}]-centered U{sub 28} capsule is more stable than the uranyl-centered capsule. Moreover, the relative stability is controlled by the interactions of the encapsulated alkalis with the encapsulated anion. Thus, the role of alkali-anion interactions was shown to be important at all length scales of uranyl-peroxide species: in both comparing clusters to clusters; and clusters to monomers or extended solids. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Observations of Heavy Ions in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    There are two sources for the hot ions in the magnetosphere: the solar wind and the ionosphere. The solar wind is predominantly protons, with about 4% He++ and less than 1% other high charge state heavy ions. The ionospheric outflow is also predominantly H+, but can contain a significant fraction of heavy ions including O+, N+, He+, O++, and molecular ions (NO+, N2+, O2+). The ionospheric outflow composition varies significantly both with geomagnetic activity and with solar EUV. The variability in the contribution of the two sources, the variability in the ionospheric source itself, and the transport paths of the different species are all important in determining the ion composition at a given location in the magnetosphere. In addition to the source variations, loss processes within the magnetosphere can be mass dependent, changing the composition. In particular, charge exchange is strongly species dependent, and can lead to heavy ion dominance at some energies in the inner magnetosphere. In this talk we will review the current state of our understanding of the composition of the magnetosphere and the processes that determine it.

  9. Initial use of the positive-ion injector of ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Billquist, P.J.; Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Den Hartog, P.K.; Munson, F.H. Jr.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    The positive-ion injector of ATLAS consists of an ECR heavy-ion source coupled to a 12-MV superconducting injector linac. The ECR source and a 3-MV version of the partially completed linac have been used to accelerate successfully several species of heavy ions. The operating experience is summarized, with emphasis on the excellent beam quality of beams from the new injector. Two new fast-timing detectors are described. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahng, Jungbae [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob, E-mail: bslee@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-San, E-mail: eskim1@korea.ac.kr [Department of Accelerator Science, Korea University Sejong Campus, Sejong 339-770 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  11. Investigation of helium ion production in constricted direct current plasma ion source with layered-glows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Park, Yeong-Shin; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-01

    Generation of helium ions is experimentally investigated with a constricted direct current (DC) plasma ion source operated at layered-glow mode, in which electrons could be accelerated through multiple potential structures so as to generate helium ions including He2+ by successive ionization collisions in front of an extraction aperture. The helium discharge is sustained with the formation of a couple of stable layers and the plasma ball with high density is created near the extraction aperture at the operational pressure down to 0.6 Torr with concave cathodes. The ion beam current extracted with an extraction voltage of 5 kV is observed to be proportional to the discharge current and inversely proportional to the operating pressure, showing high current density of 130 mA/cm2 and power density of 0.52 mA/cm2/W. He2+ ions, which were predicted to be able to exist due to multiple-layer potential structure, are not observed. Simple calculation on production of He2+ ions inside the plasma ball reveals that reduced operating pressure and increased cathode area will help to generate He2+ ions with the layered-glow DC discharge.

  12. Single Cathode Ion Thruster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Objective is to design an electrostatic ion thruster that is more efficient, simpler, and lower cost than the current gridded ion thruster. Initial objective is to...

  13. Applications of decelerated ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1985-03-01

    Many facilities whose sole purpose had been to accelerate ion beams are now becoming decelerators as well. The development and current status of accel-decel operations is reviewed here. Applications of decelerated ions in atomic physics experiments are discussed

  14. Gas phase thermal diffusion of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of stable isotopes at Mound Facility is reviewed from a historical perspective. The historical development of thermal diffusion from a laboratory process to a separation facility that handles all the noble gases is described. In addition, elementary thermal diffusion theory and elementary cascade theory are presented along with a brief review of the uses of stable isotopes

  15. physico-chemical and stable isotopes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper details the mineralogical, chemical and stable isotope abundances of calcrete in the Letlhakeng fossil valley. The stable isotope abundances (O and C) of calcretes yielded some values which were tested against the nature of the calcretes – pedogenic or groundwater type. The Kgalagadi (Kalahari) is a vast ...

  16. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled:

    Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow

    H.A.M. Sterk

    Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015

    Summary

    The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs

  17. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  18. Stable isotopes and biomarkers in microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of biomarkers in combination with stable isotope analysis is a new approach in microbial ecology and a number of papers on a variety of subjects have appeared. We will first discuss the techniques for analysing stable isotopes in biomarkers, primarily gas chromatography-combustion-isotope

  19. Stable Agrobacterium -mediated transformation of the halophytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the halophytic Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Yan-Lin Sun, Soon-Kwan Hong. Abstract. In this study, an efficient procedure for stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Leymus chinensis (Trin.) was established. Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105, harboring a ...

  20. Ion-acoustic solitons in multispecies spatially inhomogeneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ion-acoustic solitons are investigated in the spatially inhomogeneous plasma having electrons-positrons and ions. The soliton characteristics are described by Korteweg-de Vries equation which has an additional term. The density and temperature of different species play an important role for the amplitude and width of the ...