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Sample records for stable iodine xenon

  1. Effectiveness and risks of stable iodine prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waight, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The factors upon which the efficacy of stable iodine prophylaxis depends are reviewed, with particular reference to the dose of stable iodine, the timing of the dose, the influence of dietary iodine and the impact of the other prospective actions. The risks of stable iodine ingestion are estimated, and their application to the principle of Justification in outlined. (Author)

  2. Study of the short-lived fission products. Separation of iodine and xenon fission radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.; Villar, M. A.

    1965-01-01

    The separation by distillation in a sulfuric acid or phosphoric acid-hydrogen peroxide medium of the iodine isotopes (8 day iodine-131, 2,3 hour iodine-132 21 hour iodine-133, 53 minute iodine-134 and 6,7 hour iodine-135) present in a uranium sample after different irradiation and cooling times is here described. It is also reported the use of active charcoal columns for the retention of xenon isotopes (5,27 days xenon-133 and 9,2 hours xenon-135) either released during the dissolution of the uranium irradiated samples or generated along the fission isobaric chains in the solutions of distillated iodine. In both cases the radiochemical purity of the separated products is established by gamma spectrometry. (Author) 15 refs

  3. Analysis of reactivity worth for xenon poisoning during restart-up of reactor in iodine pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xaofeng; Chen Wenzhen; Zhu Qian; Xu Guojun

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity worth of xenon poisoning and the densities of 135 I and 135 Xe were derived when the reactor was restarted up in iodine pit. Through the expressions obtained we can find the physics characteristics of reactor restarted up in iodine pit comprehensively and essentially. The results were analyzed and discussed. The reactor power before shutdown, the start-up power, the position where the reactor starts up in iodine pit, and so on, all have effect on the reactivity worth of xenon poisoning, and the different conditions can lead to totally different physics characteristics. In addition, the time when the reactor starts up in iodine pit is a very important factor for nuclear reactors safety. The conclusions are very important to the maneuverability and operation safety of ship nuclear reactors. (authors)

  4. Experimental and analytical studies of iodine mass transfer from xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to liquid sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, S.; Sagawa, N.; Shimoyama, K.

    1996-01-01

    In the fuel pin failure accident of a liquid metal fast reactor, volatile fission products play an important role in the assessment of radiological consequences. Especially the radioisotopes of elemental iodine are important because of their high volatility and of the low permissible dose to human thyroid. The released iodines are known to be retained in the coolant sodium as sodium iodide due to the chemical affinity between alkali metals and halogens. However, the xenon and krypton released with iodines into the sodium pool as bubbles may influence the reaction rate of iodine with sodium during the bubble rising. So far, the only few experimental results have been available concerning the decontamination factor (DF: the ratio of the initial iodine mass in the mixed gas bubble to the released mass into the cover gas) of iodine in this phenomenon. Therefore, experimental and analytical studies were carried out to study the mass transfer of iodine from a xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to the liquid sodium pool. In the experiments, the bubble was generated in the sodium pool by cracking a quartz ball which contains the xenon-iodine mixed gas and then, the mixed gas released into the argon cover gas was collected to determine the transferred iodine mass into the pool. A rising velocity of the bubble was measured by Chen-type void sensors arranged vertically in the pool. From the measured rising velocity and another observation of bubble behavior in simulated water experiments, it is found that the generated bubble breaks up into several smaller bubbles of spherical cap type during the rising period. Transferred iodine mass per unit initial bubble volume from the bubble to the sodium pool shows increases with increasing time and the initial iodine concentration. A mass transfer rate obtained by differentiating the transferred iodine mass with respect to the time indicates a rapid decrease just after the bubble generation and a slow decrease for the successive period

  5. Production of fusion radionuclides: Molybdenum-99/ Iodine - 131 and Xenon-133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.; Carrillo, D.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents a new radiochemical method for industrial production of the radionuclides: molybdenum-99, iodine-131 and xenon-133. The above mentioned method based on the alkaline metathesis reaction of irradiated uranium (IV) fluoride, presents the best characteristics for the proposed objective. The study deals with the analysis of that reaction and the separation and purification processes. (Author) 71 refs

  6. Comparison of iodine, krypton, and xenon retention efficiencies for various silver loaded adsorption media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huchton, R.L.; Tkachyk, J.W.; Taylor, J.T.; Motes, B.G.

    1985-03-01

    A comparison was made among various silver impregnated adsorption media to determine their iodine, krypton, and xenon retention efficiencies. The program consisted of three components. First, laboratory measurements of the noble gas retention efficiencies of commercially available adsorption media were determined as a function of relative humidity, sample duration, test cartridge geometry, and ambient air purge. Second, a literature survey was performed to evaluate the iodine species retention efficiencies of the selected media. Third, data associated with a media previously proposed for an emergency response air sampler were incorporated to enlarge the data base. 41 refs., 6 figs., 14 tabs

  7. A model to secure a stable iodine concentration in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisken Trøan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dairy products account for approximately 60% of the iodine intake in the Norwegian population. The iodine concentration in cow's milk varies considerably, depending on feeding practices, season, and amount of iodine and rapeseed products in cow fodder. The variation in iodine in milk affects the risk of iodine deficiency or excess in the population. Objective: The first goal of this study was to develop a model to predict the iodine concentration in milk based on the concentration of iodine and rapeseed or glucosinolate in feed, as a tool to securing stable iodine concentration in milk. A second aim was to estimate the impact of different iodine levels in milk on iodine nutrition in the Norwegian population. Design: Two models were developed on the basis of results from eight published and two unpublished studies from the past 20 years. The models were based on different iodine concentrations in the fodder combined with either glucosinolate (Model 1 or rapeseed cake/meal (Model 2. To illustrate the impact of different iodine concentrations in milk on iodine intake, we simulated the iodine contribution from dairy products in different population groups based on food intake data in the most recent dietary surveys in Norway. Results: The models developed could predict iodine concentration in milk. Cross-validation showed good fit and confirmed the explanatory power of the models. Our calculations showed that dairy products with current iodine level in milk (200 µg/kg cover 68, 49, 108 and 56% of the daily iodine requirements for men, women, 2-year-old children, and pregnant women, respectively. Conclusions: Securing a stable level of iodine in milk by adjusting iodine concentration in different cow feeds is thus important for preventing excess intake in small children and iodine deficiency in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

  8. Production of fusion radionuclides: Molybdenum-99/ Iodine - 131 and Xenon-133; Produccion de los radionucleidos de fision: Molibdeno-99, Yodo-131 y Xenon-133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina, M; Carrillo, D

    1982-07-01

    This report presents a new radiochemical method for industrial production of the radionuclides: molybdenum-99, iodine-131 and xenon-133. The above mentioned method based on the alkaline metathesis reaction of irradiated uranium (IV) fluoride, presents the best characteristics for the proposed objective. The study deals with the analysis of that reaction and the separation and purification processes. (Author) 71 refs.

  9. Clinical and Biochemical Uses of Stable Iodine Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutras, D. A. [Thyroid Section, Alexandra Hospital, Athens (Greece)

    1970-07-01

    Iodine and thyroid function are closely linked, since the only known role of iodine is its participation in the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Iodine metabolism may be represented as a metabolic cycle consisting of three main pools: the Plasma Inorganic Iodine (PIl) pool into which dietary iodine goes and from where it is either taken up by the thyroid or excreted by the kidneys, the intrathyroidal iodine pool, where. thyroid hormone synthesis occurs, and finally the peripheral pool of thyroid hormones, of which about 80% are deiodinated and 20% excreted with the faeces. Endemic goitre is usually due to iodine deficiency. There is no renal homeostatic mechanism to keep the PII level constant, and so adaptation to iodine deficiency occurs by increasing the thyroidal iodide clearance rate. Stable iodine measurements are necessary for a complete study of iodine metabolism. Estimates of the serum Protein-Bound Iodine (PBl) are the best index of thyroid function, estimates of the PII and of the urinary iodine are the best indices of iodine nutrition. (author)

  10. Study of the short-lived fission products. Separation of iodine and xenon fission radionuclides; Estudio de los productos de fision de periodo corto. Separacion de los radionuclidos de fision del yodo y del xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina, M; Villar, M A

    1965-07-01

    The separation by distillation in a sulfuric acid or phosphoric acid-hydrogen peroxide medium of the iodine isotopes (8 day iodine-131, 2,3 hour iodine-132 21 hour iodine-133, 53 minute iodine-134 and 6,7 hour iodine-135) present in a uranium sample after different irradiation and cooling times is here described. It is also reported the use of active charcoal columns for the retention of xenon isotopes (5,27 days xenon-133 and 9,2 hours xenon-135) either released during the dissolution of the uranium irradiated samples or generated along the fission isobaric chains in the solutions of distillated iodine. In both cases the radiochemical purity of the separated products is established by gamma spectrometry. (Author) 15 refs.

  11. Study on adsorption performance of coal based activated carbon to radioactive iodine and stable iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Junbo; Hao, Shan; Gao, Liping; Zhang, Youchen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The impregnated coal-based activated carbons as adsorbent for removing methyl iodide. • The coal-based activated carbons to remove stable iodine. • Iodine residues are under 0.5 μg/ml after adsorption treatment. • The decontamination factor is much higher than 1000. - Abstract: Nuclear power plant, nuclear reactors and nuclear powered ship exhaust contains a large amount of gaseous radioactive iodine, and can damage to the workplace and the surrounding environment. The quantitative test to remove methyl iodide and the qualitative test for removing stable iodine were investigated using the impregnated coal-based activated carbons and coal-based activated carbons as adsorbents. The research conducted in this work shows that iodine residues were under 0.5 μg/ml after adsorption treatment and the decontamination factor of the coal-based activated carbon for removing the stable iodine was more than 1000, which can achieve the purpose of removing harmful iodine, and satisfy the requirement of gaseous waste treatment of nuclear powered vessel and other nuclear plants

  12. Iodine kinetics and effectiveness of stable iodine prophylaxis after intake of radioiodine: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geoffroy, B.; Verger, P.; Le Guen, B.

    2000-01-01

    Ingestion of stable iodine (potassium iodide) offers an efficient protection against the irradiation of the thyroid when an accidental exposure to radioiodine occurs. This prophylaxis aims at obtaining a rapid and maximum thyroid protection without antithyroid effects. This article reviews studies on iodine kinetics in the human and on stable iodine effectiveness to protect the thyroid. In adults with a normal thyroid function, ingestion of 100 mg of iodide just before exposure to radioiodine allows a percentage of thyroid averted dose equal or greater than 95%. If the exposure persists after iodide ingestion (100 mg), the percentage of averted dose may decrease significantly. Repeated ingestion of daily amounts of 15 mg of stable iodine would then allow to maintain a 90% effectiveness. Iodide effectiveness and antithyroid effects also depend on external and individual factors such as iodine amounts in the diet, thyroid function and age. It is recommended to adapt the amount of ingested stable iodine according to age at the time of exposure. (author)

  13. Stable xenon CT measurement of cerebral blood flow in cardiac transplantation candidates: Correlation with cognitive function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bello, J.A.; Fink, M.E.; Hilal, S.K.; Rose, E.A.; Reemtsma, K.

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen consecutive unselected patients with NYHA class 4 cardiac failure referred for cardiac transplantation underwent neurologic examination and cerebral blood flow measurement (rCBF) using the stable xenon enhanced CT method on a GE9800 system. Eleven men and two women were studied (mean age = 43.8 +- 6.1). On neurological examination, six of the patients demonstrated normal mental function; the remaining seven patients demonstrated memory, language, or learning impairment. There was no difference in mean cardiac output between the groups (4.9 L/min +- 1.68 vs. 4.2L/min +- 1.57). rCBF was significantly reduced in the impaired group. Cognitive impairment in patients with cardiac failure can be correlated with cerebral ischemia. Stable xenon CT measurement of rCBF in transplant candidates may help identify patients requiring more rapid transplantation to prevent permanent cerebral injury

  14. Policy on stable iodine prophylaxis following nuclear reactor accidents (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This policy considers the alleviation of possible hazards that may arise from any radioiodines inhaled from a plume of fission products emanating from a nuclear reactor accident. Such a nuclear reactor may be land or ship-based. In any accident that releases radioiodines to the environment, one countermeasure that may need to be considered to reduce the effect of inhalation of radioiodines by persons downwind of the point of release is to provide those persons with tablets containing stable iodine. Both potassium iodide (KI) and potassium iodate (KIO 3 ) are recommended as effective prophylactics tablets for this purpose in Australia. Action levels, doses and contraindicatories are briefly outlined

  15. Investigation on efficiency of stable iodine distribution around Golfech nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payoux, P.; Simon, J.; Campana Briault, H.; Fenolland, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Background. In order to prevent thyroid cancer radio induced during civil nuclear accident french regulations plan stable iodine distribution for populations living near nuclear power stations. We evaluate availability of stable iodine and understanding of such measure with investigation around Golfech nuclear power station. Methods. In 2001, 1148 families living in a 10 km perimeter around power station were questioned through their schooled child. Our anonymous questionnaire (22 questions, 91 items) was linked with stable iodine availability, organ protection, most exposed persons, dosage and time of stable iodine ingestion. Results. 72,1 % families replied. Among them, 60,8% could easily and quickly find stable iodine in case of emergency, 87,8% know that such measure is to protect thyroid, 80,5% know that children and pregnant women (62,7%) are the most exposed people, 82,3% know that such ingestion is allowed by Prefect order. Conclusion. Answer rate and stable iodine prophylaxis knowledge are satisfactory. On the other hand, in case of necessity about 40% of the concerned families don't have a rapid access to stable iodine, which will forced authorities to distribute as a matter of urgency supplementary stable iodine. Statistical analysis of the answers demonstrate that the most iodine prophylaxis ignorant people are the most refractory to this approach. (author)

  16. Reducing the transfer of radioiodine to milk in cows by adding stable iodine to the forage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, P.; Voigt, G.

    1999-05-01

    The publication reports the activities for the study and explains the measured results achieved. The usefulness of stable iodine administration to cows for reducing radioiodine transfer to the milk is explained. It was found that enhanced stable radioiodine doses have an effect on the iodine metabolism of dairy cows that has to be taken into account. Initially, a literature study was carried out, which then served as a basis for defining subsequent study objectives and experiments. The evaluation of the results yields information about the effects of stable iodine on the radioiodine transfer, as well as the metabolic pathways of iodine in dairy cows. In order to achieve a clear transfer reducing effect (by a factor of 2), doses of 1g/d have to be fed to a cow. This dose will lead to a stable iodine concentration in the milk of about 10 mg/kg. The WHO recommends a daily maximum dose of 0.5 mg of stable iodine in order to safely prevent adverse health effects in man. Ingestion of more than 2 mg/d may induce in man thyroid disorders and other metabolic disorders. In some countries, the reference level for dairy milk accepted is 0.5 mg of iodine/kg of milk. (orig./CB) [de

  17. Mapping local cerebral blood flow by means of computerized tomography with a short inhalation of low-dose stable xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawara, Jyoji; Karasawa, Jun; Tasawa, Toshiaki; Touho, Hajime; Nakauchi, Mikio; Kagawa, Masa-aki; Asai, Masa-aki; Kuriyama, Yoshihiro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1986-01-01

    A non-invasive technique has been developed for mapping the local blood-brain partition coefficient (λi), the local build-up rate constant (κi), and the local cerebral blood flow (l-CBF) by means of xenon-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) using a YMS CT 9000 scanner. After denitrogenation for 10 minutes, a 30 % xenon/oxygen mixture is inhaled for 4 - 8 minutes through a rubber face-mask and a delivery system of stable xenon. The time course of local cerebral CT enhancement is utilized in order to calculate, the λi, κi, and l-CBF values. The CT enhancement data during the washin-washout phase are fitted to the mathematical functions, based on Kety's formula, using least-squares curve-fitting analysis. Several case studies of patients with cerebral vascular accidents are presented to demonstrate the characterization of the λi and l-CBF patterns in various tissues; the results are of sufficient quality for the management of patients. The theoretical assumptions underlying stable xenon CT CBF measurements are discussed. (author)

  18. Addition computed tomography with stable xenon; Special reference to ischemic cerebrovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Yamada, Keisuke; Shibamoto, Keiji [Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan)

    1990-09-01

    Stable xenon (Xe{sup s}) is used as a contrast agent because it freely diffuses to cerebral tissues through the blood-brain barrier. In this study, 2 axial levels for Xe{sup s} enhancement analysis were selected from a baseline series of computed tomographic (CT) scans and 6 serial CT scans were obtained every 20 seconds for each scan level during the 240 seconds inhalation period of 30% Xe{sup s} in 10 volunteer controls and in 52 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (ICVD). The serial CT scans were added and averaged in each pixel. This was used to make a new CT picture (addition CT scans). The CT scans before the Xe{sup s} inhalation, the scan at the end of the Xe{sup s} inhalation, and the addition CT scan were compared to see whether gray matter and ischemic areas could be differentiated from white matter. The addition CT scans could differentiate the three structures very well in both the acute and chronic stages of ICVD. This technique is thought to be a very simple and useful method to detect the small infarcted areas and low perfusion areas that cannot be visualized on precontrast CT scans. (author).

  19. Cerebral blood flow measurement using stable xenon CT with very short inhalation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Yamada, Keisuke; Shibamoto, Keiji [Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan)

    1991-02-01

    A noninvasive, simplified method using inhalation of stable xenon (Xe{sup s}) and computed tomographic (CT) scanning to estimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional partition coefficient (r{lambda}) is described. Twenty-four patients with cerebrovascular occlusive disease and six volunteer controls inhaled 30% Xe{sup s} and 70% oxygen for 180 seconds and exhaled for 144 seconds during serial CT scanning without denitrogenation. The end-tidal Xe{sup s} concentration was continuously monitored with a thermoconductivity analyzer to determine the build-up range (A value) and build-up rate constant (K value) for arteries with the curve fitting method. The time-CT number (Hounsfield unit) curve for cerebral tissue during the Xe{sup s} washin and washout phases was used to calculate r{lambda} and rCBF using least squares curve fitting analysis. The resultant r{lambda} and rCBF map demonstrated a reliable distribution between the gray and white matter, and infarcted areas. rCBF was high in gray matter, low in white matter, and much lower in infarcted areas than in white matter. r{lambda} was high in white matter, low in gray matter, and much lower in infarcted areas. Xe{sup s} CT-CBF studies with very short inhalation of 180 seconds is a clinically useful method for evaluation of rCBF in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. (author).

  20. Iodine, krypton and xenon retention efficiencies of silver impregnated silica gel media with different silver loadings and under different test conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motes, B G; Fernandez, S J; Tkachyk, J W

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of an independent study conducted by Exxon Nuclear Idaho, Co. (ENICO) was to evaluate a silver impregnated silica gel adsorption medium associated with a radioiodine air sampler developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Specifically, ENICO's responsibility was to evaluate the iodine and noble gas retention efficiencies of the adsorption medium. The evaluation was comprised of a four-phase program: 1) test assemblies capable of challenging the silver silica gel filled adsorber canister with radioiodine species or noble gases at flow rates up to 10 scfm and relative humidities up to 83% were constructed; 2) more than 45 kgs of the 4 and 8% silver impregnated silica gel were prepared and characterized for particle size distribution, bulk silver content, bulk density, and silver content by particle size; 3) iodine species retention efficiencies of the silver silica gel were determined; and 4 krypton and xenon retention efficiencies were measured. The iodine species retention efficiencies were greater than 90% under most conditions. A combination of flow rates >5 scfm and 4% silver loaded silica gel reduced the methyl iodide retention efficiency to less than 90%. The retention efficiencies for both krypton and xenon were on the order of 8 x 10{sup -2}% and were not affected greatly by any test variable except test duration. A reduced retention efficiency with increased test durations indicates adsorption equilibrium may be established within five minutes. (author)

  1. Iodine, krypton and xenon retention efficiencies of silver impregnated silica gel media with different silver loadings and under different test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motes, B.G.; Fernandez, S.J.; Tkachyk, J.W.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of an independent study conducted by Exxon Nuclear Idaho, Co. (ENICO) was to evaluate a silver impregnated silica gel adsorption medium associated with a radioiodine air sampler developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Specifically, ENICO's responsibility was to evaluate the iodine and noble gas retention efficiencies of the adsorption medium. The evaluation was comprised of a four-phase program: 1) test assemblies capable of challenging the silver silica gel filled adsorber canister with radioiodine species or noble gases at flow rates up to 10 scfm and relative humidities up to 83% were constructed; 2) more than 45 kgs of the 4 and 8% silver impregnated silica gel were prepared and characterized for particle size distribution, bulk silver content, bulk density, and silver content by particle size; 3) iodine species retention efficiencies of the silver silica gel were determined; and 4 krypton and xenon retention efficiencies were measured. The iodine species retention efficiencies were greater than 90% under most conditions. A combination of flow rates >5 scfm and 4% silver loaded silica gel reduced the methyl iodide retention efficiency to less than 90%. The retention efficiencies for both krypton and xenon were on the order of 8 x 10 -2 % and were not affected greatly by any test variable except test duration. A reduced retention efficiency with increased test durations indicates adsorption equilibrium may be established within five minutes. (author)

  2. Stable iodine contents in human milk related to dietary algae consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1983-01-01

    Studies were carried out to investigate iodine contents in human milk with relation to dietary algae consumption by nursing women and to estimate stable iodine intake by breast-fed babies. The iodine contents in human milk collected from the Tokai-mura area showed a fairly wide variation ranging from 80 to 7,000 μg/l, though the highest frequency was around 150 μg/l. It was observed that high contents were closely related to the intake of tangle (Konbu), Laminariaceae, specifically tangle stock and/or tangle shavings (Tororokonbu) as soup. The temporal increase was followed by the rapid decrease when the mothers stopped taking the tangle stock and/or tangle shavings soup. It was observed that water-extractability of iodine from tangle was much higher than that from the other algae, and the water-extractable iodine was absorbable to the human body. (author)

  3. Guidelines on the use of stable iodine as a prophylactic measure during nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Among the fission products that may be released in a power reactor accident the radio iodines are unique in that the dose received by persons exposed by inhalation of radio iodines in the gaseous plume may be substantially reduced. GMA-9 provides guidance on the medical aspects of the use of stable iodine compounds as a prophylactic measure in the event of a nuclear accident. A review of the physiologic basis for the use of stable iodine as a prophylactic measure and the effects of radiation on the thyroid gland are provided. Logistic factors that must be considered to provide the optimum level of radiological protection and medical safety are also addressed. 71 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Guidelines on the use of stable iodine as a prophylactic measure during nuclear emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Among the fission products that may be released in a power reactor accident the radio iodines are unique in that the dose received by persons exposed by inhalation of radio iodines in the gaseous plume may be substantially reduced. GMA-9 provides guidance on the medical aspects of the use of stable iodine compounds as a prophylactic measure in the event of a nuclear accident. A review of the physiologic basis for the use of stable iodine as a prophylactic measure and the effects of radiation on the thyroid gland are provided. Logistic factors that must be considered to provide the optimum level of radiological protection and medical safety are also addressed. 71 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. The evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with intracranial tumors by stable xenon CT; The effect of glycerol administration on regional cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoda, Masami; Kawamata, Fumio; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Hidaka, Mitsuru; Oda, Shinri; Shibuya, Naoki; Yamamoto, Isao; Sato, Osamu (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-04-01

    In evaluating cerebral regional blood flow (rCBF), stable xenon-enhanced tomography (XeCT) study associated with simultaneous blood sampling was applied in 15 cases of intracranial neoplasms. The effect of intravenous glycerol infusion on rCBF was also investigated. The results indicated that intratumoral rCBF values were not only variable and unrelated to their histological types and grades, but also were not correlated with the vascularity of the lesion as demonstrated by angiography. When a tumor mass was enhanced after the injection of iodinated contrast media, it proved to be useful in distinguishing tumor mass and its associated edema that the rCBF of the peritumoral edematous region was predominantly low (10{plus minus}5 ml/100 g/min). The regional cerebral blood flow in remote areas, both ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion, was low in value, and there was no statistical significance between affected and sound sides. Following glycerol administration, rCBF was increased in the whole intracranial region, but not inside of the neoplasm, particularly when the intracranial pressure (ICP) was increased. It was assumed that the elevated rCBF after glycerol administration was due to the increase in the cerebral perfusion pressure resulting from the ICP reduction, the hemodilution effect, cerebral vessel dilatation after metabolic acidosis, and/or mechanically rectified microcirculation after edema reduction. (author).

  6. Clinical application of stable xenon CT-CBF studies without denitrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Yamada, Keisuke [Osaka Neurological Institute, Toyonaka (Japan)

    1990-08-01

    Noninvasive and simplified methods for estimating regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and regional partition coefficient ({lambda}) using the inhalation of stable xenon (Xe{sup s}) and computed tomographic (CT) scanning are described. Thirty percent Xe{sup s} in 70% oxygen was inhaled for 240 seconds and exhaled for 160 seconds during serial CT scanning without denitrogenation in 26 patients with cerebrovascular diseases and four volunteer controls. During the investigation, the end-tidal Xe{sup s} concentration was continuously monitored with a thermoconductivity analyzer to determine the build-up range (A value) and build-up rate constant (K value) of the artery by the curve fitting method. Calculated A and K values were corrected by the following formulae reported previously: for patients aged 0-20 years, A{sub e} = 0.75A{sub a} + 2.15, K{sub e} = 0.67K{sub a} + 0.69; 21-40 years, A{sub e} = 0.56A{sub a} + 3.24, K{sub e} = 0.38K{sub a} + 1.12; 41-60 years, A{sub e} = 0.91A{sub a} + 1.95, K{sub e} = 0.38K{sub a} + 1.32; over 61 years, A{sub e} = 0.52A{sub a} + 3.81, K{sub e} = 0.31K{sub a} + 1.55 (A{sub e} and K{sub e} were calculated with end-tidal Xe{sup s} concentration, A{sub a} and K{sub a} were calculated by direct sampling of arterial blood). A CBF map (f map) and {lambda} map made with corrected A and K values demonstrated reliable distribution. The CBF was high in the gray matter, low in the white matter, and much lower in the infarcted area. {lambda} was high in the white matter, low in the gray matter, and much lower in the infarcted area. Eight patients were examined with and without denitrogenation. Both the f map and {lambda} map with denitrogenation were compatible with those without denitrogenation. Xe{sup s} CT-CBF studies without denitrogenation are useful in clinical neurosurgery and outpatients for estimating regional cerebral circulation. (author).

  7. Cerebral blood flow mapping using stable xenon-enhanced CT in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numaguchi, Y.; Robinson, A.E.; Carey, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The cerebral blood flow (CBF) of 25 patients with sickle cell cerebrovascular disease (SCCVD) was examined using a xenon-CT flow mapping method. Brain CT and MR findings were correlated with those of the xenon-CT flow studies. CBF defects on xenon-CT correlated reasonably well with the areas of cortical infarctions on the MR images, but in 27% of the cases, flow defects were slightly larger than the areas of infarctions on the MR images. In deep watershed or basal ganglia infarctions, abnormal CBF was noted about the cerebral cortex near infarctions in 72% of the patients, regardless of infarction sizes on the MR images. However, decreased CBF was recognized in 4 of the 9 children whose MR images were virtually normal. Thus, the extent of flow depletion cannot be predicted accurately by MR imaging alone. Xenon-CT flow mapping proved a safe and reliable procedure for evaluation of the CBF of patients with SCCVD. Although this study is preliminary, it may have a potential in selecting patients for hypertransfusion therapy, as a noninvasive test and for following children with SCCVD during their therapy. Careful correlation of results of CBF with those of MR imaging or of CT is important for objective interpretations of flow mapping images. (orig.)

  8. Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Supplement Fact Sheets Frequently Asked Questions Making Decisions What you Need To Know About Supplements Dietary ... mild iodine deficiency and of iodine supplements on cognitive ... breasts. It mainly affects women of reproductive age but can also occur ...

  9. Maintenance of thyroidal radiological protection with stable iodine in adults in case of prolonged exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, P.; Piechowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    Ingestion of stable iodine (potassium iodide) offers an efficient protection against the irradiation of the thyroid when an accidental exposure to radioiodine occurs. This prophylaxis aims at obtaining a rapid and maximum thyroid protection without anti thyroid effects. The recommended posology is 100 mg of iodine in one time ( that is to say a tablet of 130 mg potassium iodide). After this single dose of iodine, the percentage of avoided radiation dose after 48 hours is near 75%, then decreases until 50% at 72 hours. It is possible to keep an efficient thyroid protection by taking a stable tablet of iodine on the first day, then a fourth of tablet the following days. This approach is an optimization allowing an efficient protection while reducing the eventual side effects linked to an excess of iodine. This protocol can be applied to adults, fifteen years or more adolescents, young adults and pregnant women. For children and babies there are not data to confirm the thyroid protection. The children constitute the most sensitize age group and this question should deserve to be thoroughly discussed. (N.C.)

  10. When the dust settles: stable xenon isotope constraints on the formation of nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassata, W.S.; Prussin, S.G.; Knight, K.B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Isselhardt, B.H.; Renne, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear weapons represent one of the most immediate threats of mass destruction. In the event that a procured or developed nuclear weapon is detonated in a populated metropolitan area, timely and accurate nuclear forensic analysis and fallout modeling would be needed to support attribution efforts and hazard assessments. Here we demonstrate that fissiogenic xenon isotopes retained in radioactive fallout generated by a nuclear explosion provide unique constraints on (1) the timescale of fallout formation, (2) chemical fractionation that occurs when fission products and nuclear fuel are incorporated into fallout, and (3) the speciation of fission products in the fireball. Our data suggest that, in near surface nuclear tests, the presence of a significant quantity of metal in a device assembly, combined with a short time allowed for mixing with the ambient atmosphere (seconds), may prevent complete oxidation of fission products prior to their incorporation into fallout. Xenon isotopes thus provide a window into the chemical composition of the fireball in the seconds that follow a nuclear explosion, thereby improving our understanding of the physical and thermo-chemical conditions under which fallout forms. - Highlights: • Radioactive fallout generated by nuclear explosions contains fissiogenic xenon isotopes. • Xe isotopes provide constraints on timescales of fallout formation and the speciation of fission products in the fireball. • Our data indicate that macroscopic fallout forms rapidly (<3 s). • Chemical fractionation trends suggest that fission products may not have been fully oxidized prior to incorporation

  11. The true absorption of 131I, and its transfer to milk in cows given different stable iodine diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.M.; Van Hees, M.; Hardeman, F.; Voigt, G.; Howard, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of the stable iodine content in the diet on the absorption of radioiodine and its transfer to cow's milk was investigated for cows at different stages of lactation. Three different rates of stable iodine: a low intake rate of 4 mg d -1 , a moderate intake of 35 mg d -1 and a high rate of 75 mg d -1 were fed to two groups of three lactating cows in mid- and late-lactation. The transfer to milk of a single oral administration of radioiodine was measured for the three different intake rates. The lactation phase had no significant effect on iodine transfer to milk; therefore, the data from the two lactation groups were pooled for further statistical analyses. The mean transfer coefficient values for oral radioiodine to milk increased from 0.020 d l -1 for the low treatment to 0.024 d l -1 for the moderate stable iodine rate. There was a statistically significant decrease in the transfer to milk for the high stable dietary iodine intake rate (mean transfer coefficient=0.018 d l -1 ) compared with the moderate treatment. These differences were not due to effects on absorption since true absorption was complete for all three stable iodine treatments, but rather to differential affinities and saturation levels of the thyroid and milk pathways competing for the available iodine. The same behaviour and comparable values of transfer coefficients (range 0.015-0.020 d l -1 ) were observed for stable iodine

  12. Iodine kinetics and effectiveness of stable iodine prophylaxis after intake of radioiodine: a review; Pharmacocinetique de l'iode: revue des connaissances utiles en radioprotection accidentelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffroy, B.; Verger, P.; Le Guen, B. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPSN, 92 (France)

    2000-06-01

    Ingestion of stable iodine (potassium iodide) offers an efficient protection against the irradiation of the thyroid when an accidental exposure to radioiodine occurs. This prophylaxis aims at obtaining a rapid and maximum thyroid protection without antithyroid effects. This article reviews studies on iodine kinetics in the human and on stable iodine effectiveness to protect the thyroid. In adults with a normal thyroid function, ingestion of 100 mg of iodide just before exposure to radioiodine allows a percentage of thyroid averted dose equal or greater than 95%. If the exposure persists after iodide ingestion (100 mg), the percentage of averted dose may decrease significantly. Repeated ingestion of daily amounts of 15 mg of stable iodine would then allow to maintain a 90% effectiveness. Iodide effectiveness and antithyroid effects also depend on external and individual factors such as iodine amounts in the diet, thyroid function and age. It is recommended to adapt the amount of ingested stable iodine according to age at the time of exposure. (author)

  13. Guidelines on the use of stable iodine as a prophylactic measure during nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Among the fission products that may be released in a power reactor accident the radioiodines are unique in that the dose received by persons exposed by inhalation of radioiodines in the gaseous plume may be substantially reduced. GMA-9 provides guidance on the medical aspects of the use of stable iodine compounds as a prophylactic measure in the event of a nuclear accident. A review of the physiologic basis for the use of stable iodine as a prophylatic measure and the effects of radiation on the thyroid gland are provided. Logistic factors that must be considered to provide the optimum level of radiological protection and medical safety are also addressed. Due to the delay in publishing the French version of this report, some sections of this report have been updated to reflect current practices.71 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs

  14. Study into the effects of stable iodine diets for reducing the transfer of radioiodine to cow milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, P.; Voigt, G.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a literature study were taken as a basis for the experimental planning approach. The experimental results and their evaluation yielded new insight into the usefulness of stable iodine diets with respect to the iodine metabolism and the radioiodine transfer in dairy cows. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leg ulcers and reduce the chance of a future infection. Conjunctivitis (pinkeye). Research suggests that using eye ... National Institute of Medicine has set Adequate Intake (AI) of iodine for infants: 0 to 6 months, ...

  16. First Successful Pre-Distribution of Stable Iodine Tablets Under Japan's New Policy After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojino, Mayo; Yoshida, Sumito; Nagata, Takashi; Ishii, Masami; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Stable iodine tablets are effective in reducing internal exposure to radioactive iodine, which poses a risk for thyroid cancer and other conditions. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the Japanese government shifted its policy on stable iodine tablet distribution from "after-the-fact" to "before-the-fact" and instructed local governments to pre-distribute stable iodine tablets to residents living within a 5-km radius of nuclear facilities. The nation's first pre-distribution of stable iodine tablets was carried out in June and July of 2014 in Kagoshima Prefecture. Health surveys were conducted so that the medication would not be handed out to people with the possibility of side effects. Of the 4715 inhabitants in the area, 132 were found to require a physician's judgment, mostly to exclude risks of side effects. This was considered important to prevent the misuse of the tablets in the event of a disaster. The importance of collective and individualized risk communication between physicians and inhabitants at the community health level was apparent through this study. Involvement of physicians through the regional Sendai City Medical Association was an important component of the pre-distribution. Physicians of the Sendai City Medical Association were successfully educated by using the Guidebook on Distributing and Administering Stable Iodine Tablets prepared by the Japan Medical Association and Japan Medical Association Research Institute with the collaboration of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and the Japanese government. Thus, the physicians managed to make decisions on the dispensing of stable iodine tablets according to the health conditions of the inhabitants. All physicians nationwide should be provided continuing medical education on stable iodine tablets. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:365-369).

  17. Study on the tomographic cerebral blood flow measurement with stable xenon inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kazumoto; Ueda, Yasuichi; Nagai, Masakatsu; Segawa, Hiromu.

    1983-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain quantitative values of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by serial CT scanning during non radioactive xenon (Xe) inhalation. The present study provided not only rCBF map but build up rate (k) map and partition coefficient (lambda) map both in normal and pathological brain tissues. The lambda map can not be readily obtained by radioisotope (RI) or positron emission CT method. These maps provided high resolution enough to identify white matter, gray matter and even deep structure of the brain such as caudate nucles, thalums and internal capsule, and were directly compared with CT image. Resolution of each map permited visualization of small area as much as 1-3 mm in diameter. Blood flow for gray matter was 82+-11 and that for white matter was 24+-5 ml/100 g/min in seven normal subjects. The inhalation time of Xe gas and the scanning interval influenced the k, lambda, and rCBF map, respectively. In order to visualize the distribution of white matter on lambda map, it required more than 20 min inhalation of the gas. The scanning interval for good map was every 3 min in the first 9 min and every 5 min in the later period. (author)

  18. Balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery with stable xenon/CT cerebral blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erba, S.M.; Horton, J.A.; Latchaw, R.E.; Yonas, H.; Sekhar, L.; Schramm, V.; Pentheny, S.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a technique to predict preoperatively the safety of permanently occluding an internal carotid artery. The method was performed by imaging stable xenon cerebral blood flow (CBF) with the internal carotid artery both open and temporarily occluded with a nondetachable balloon on a double lumen Swan-Ganz catheter. Patients were those in whom we planned to sacrifice the internal carotid artery (those with giant or inaccessible aneurysms) or those in whom such a sacrifice was at least likely (those with skull base tumors). Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of a comparison of occluded and nonoccluded CBF values. Group-I patients had no significant change in CBF with internal carotid artery occlusion; group-II patients showed a symmetric decrease in CBF; and group-III patients had an asymmetric decrease in CBF, always greater on the occluded side. A fourth group clinically failed to tolerate even brief carotid occlusion. The internal carotid artery in one patients from group III was sacrificed at surgery: the size and shape of his postoperative infarct corresponded almost exactly to the area of asymmetrically decreased CBF on his occluded study. The data suggest that if surgery is likely to result in permanent occlusion of the internal carotid artery, then patients who are at risk for delayed neurologic injury due to a compromised cerebral blood flow should have arterial bypass grafts before such surgery is performed

  19. Control aid for xenon vibration in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekawa, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    In the present invention, the control operation for suppressing xenon vibrations in a reactor is aided for saving forecasting analysis and operator's skills. That is, parameters to be controlled for the suppression of xenon vibrations are power distribution, iodine distribution and xenon distribution. But what can be observed by operaters by the conventional fast overtone method is only the output distribution. In the present invention, the output level of the reactor core is always observed. Then, mathematical processings are conducted for the iodine distribution, the xenon distribution and the power distribution in the reactor core based on the histeresis of the parameters obtained by the measurement using physical constants and reactor design data. The xenon vibration control is aided by displaying the change with time of the distortion in axial direction. Accordingly, operators can always recognize the axial distortion of the power distribution, the iodine distribution and the xenon distribution. (I.S.)

  20. An estimation of the risk for the use of stable iodine in radiation protection in an iodine deficient population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloebel, B.; Gloebel, H.; Muth, H.; Andres, C.

    1982-01-01

    The radiation risk of the thyroid is estimated by use of data from the literature and our investigations. Comparing these results with the statistical incidence of radiation evoked diseases the risk of a patient to develop thyroid carcinoma receiving 50 μCi 131 I for thyroid diagnostics is about tenfold compared to the spontaneous risk with a twofold risk to develop hypothyroidism. Using sup(99m)Tc or 123 I these risks are minimized to a small percentage. For technicians in the RIA lab or during labelling of proteins the thyroid's radiation risk can be diminished by ingestion of inactive iodine, however, this procedure includes new risks of iodine side-effects. Comparing the pharmacological risks of iodine intake and the radiation risk it seems to be useful to suggest iodine prophylaxis when the expected radiation dose exceeds 10 rad in the thyroid. (author)

  1. New methods to enhance cerebral flow maps made by the stable xenon/CT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wist, A.O.; Fatouros, P.P.; Kishore, P.R.S.; Weiss, J.; Cothran, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors developed several new techniques to extract the important information of the high-resolution flow maps as they are being generated by our improved stable Xe/CT technique. First, they adapted a new morphologic filtering technique to separate white, white/gray and gray matter. Second, they generated iso-flow lines using the same filtering technique for easier reading of the values in the flow map. Third, by combining the information in both maps, the authors constructed a new map which shows the areas of high, normal, and low blood flow for the whole brain. When combined with anatomic information, the information in the map can indicate the probable pathologic areas. Fourth, they were able to reduce the calculation time of the flow by almost a factor of 10 by developing a new, faster algorithm for calculating the flow

  2. An ultra-stable iodine-based frequency reference for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus; Doeringshoff, Klaus; Keetman, Anja; Reggentin, Matthias; Kovalchuk, Evgeny; Peters, Achim

    2012-07-01

    Future space missions require for ultra-stable optical frequency references. Examples are the gravitational wave detector LISA/eLISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna), the SpaceTime Asymmetry Research (STAR) program, the aperture-synthesis telescope Darwin and the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) follow on mission exploring Earth's gravity. As high long-term frequency stability is required, lasers stabilized to atomic or molecular transitions are preferred, also offering an absolute frequency reference. Frequency stabilities in the 10 ^{-15} domains at longer integration times (up to several hours) are demonstrated in laboratory experiments using setups based on Doppler-free spectroscopy. Such setups with a frequency stability comparable to the hydrogen maser in the microwave domain, have the potential to be developed space compatible on a relatively short time scale. Here, we present the development of ultra-stable optical frequency references based on modulation-transfer spectroscopy of molecular iodine. Noise levels of 2\\cdot10 ^{-14} at an integration time of 1 s and below 3\\cdot10 ^{-15} at integration times between 100 s and 1000 s are demonstrated with a laboratory setup using an 80 cm long iodine cell in single-pass configuration in combination with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and standard optical components and optomechanic mounts. The frequency stability at longer integration times is (amongst other things) limited by the dimensional stability of the optical setup, i.e. by th pointing stability of the two counter-propagating beams overlapped in the iodine cell. With the goal of a future space compatible setup, a compact frequency standard on EBB (elegant breadboard) level was realized. The spectroscopy unit utilizes a baseplate made of Clearceram-HS, a glass ceramics with an ultra-low coefficient of thermal expansion of 2\\cdot10 ^{-8} K ^{-1}. The optical components are joint to the baseplate using adhesive bonding technology

  3. Dutch distribution zones of stable iodine tablets based on atmospheric dispersion modelling of accidental releases from nuclear power plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok-Palma, Y.S.; Leenders, M.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid administration of stable iodine is essential for the saturation and subsequent protection of the thyroid gland against the potential harm caused by radioiodines. This paper proposes the Dutch risk analysis that uses an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate the size of the zones around

  4. A review of available countermeasures to reduce radioiodine transfer to milk. With special regard to the use of stable iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.

    1993-03-01

    Contamination of milk by 131 I constitutes an important potential component of the collective dose to the population after a nuclear accident, and a relatively large dose saving can be gained by applying suitable countermeasures. Stable iodine prophylaxis is recommended for humans to prevent or reduce by the thyroid of inhaled radioiodine but controls on food are more appropriate to reduce radioiodine intakes from ingestion. Therefore it is important to have effective, practical countermeasures available to prevent radioiodine contamination of milk. This review evaluates currently available countermeasures which can be used to reduce radioiodine contamination of milk. In particular, it critically assesses available data on the effectiveness of stable iodine administration. The simplest and most effective countermeasure is to provide dairy animals with uncontaminated feed, this countermeasure has the added advantage that it will be effective for other radionuclides which may be present in the fallout. Alternatively, another effective response is to process the milk into storable dairy products for an appropriate length of time to allow for physical decay. The use of additives given to ruminants to reduce radioiodine in milk should be viewed as an alternative countermeasure which could be effective, but would not be the preferred option. However, it should be considered, particularly if difficulties are anticipated with the first two options. Stable iodine administration is a practical, and feasible option which has the potential to reduce radioiodine levels in milk, by at most a factor of three and the radiation dose to the animals thyroid. However, the stable iodine supplementation at low doses, and after the ingestion of radioiodine, may lead to increases in radioiodine levels in milk. Similarly, if ruminants are already receiving high iodine intakes, stable iodine is unlikely to be effective. Currently available data is inadequate to recommend a suitable dose

  5. The use of stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic studies of cerebral blood flow to define changes in cerebral carbon dioxide vasoresponsivity caused by a severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, D W; Bouma, G J

    1991-12-01

    Previous studies using the xenon-133 cerebral blood flow (CBF) method have documented the impairment of CO2 vasoresponsivity after a severe head injury, but only global values can be obtained reliably with this technique. We studied CO2 vasoresponsivity using the stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic CBF method, which provided information about well-defined cortical regions and deep brain structures not available with the xenon-133 method. In 17 patients with admission Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 8 or less, hemispheric CO2 vasoresponsivity ranged from 1.3 to 8.5% per mm Hg change in partial CO2 pressure. Lobar, cerebellar, basal ganglia, and brain stem CO2 vasoresponsivity frequently varied from the mean global value by more than 25%. In all but one patient, local CO2 vasoresponsivity in one or more of these areas differed from the mean global value by more than 50%. The greatest variability occurred in patients with acute subdural hematomas and diffuse (bihemispheric) injuries. This variability in CO2 vasoresponsivity has important implications for the effective and safe management of intracranial hypertension that frequently accompanies severe head injury.

  6. Effect of Dietary Intake of Stable Iodine on Dose-per-unit-intake Factors for 99Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    It is well-known that the human thyroid concentrates iodine more than 100 times the concentration in plasma. Also well-known is the fact that large amounts of stable iodine in the diet can limit thyroid uptake of total iodine; this is the basis for administering potassium iodide following a release of radioiodine from a nuclear reactor accident or nuclear weapon detonation. Many researchers have shown enhanced concentrations of both organic and inorganic iodine in saliva and breast milk. Technetium-99 is a long-lived (231,000 year half-life) radionuclide of concern in the management of high-level radioactive waste. There is no doubt that 99Tc, if it is in groundwater, will be found in the chemical form of pertechnetate, 99TcO4?. Pertechnetate is a large anion, almost identical in size to iodide, I?. The nuclear medicine literature shows that pertechnetate concentrates in the thyroid, salivary glands, and lactating breast in addition to the stomach, liver, and alimentary tract as currently recognized by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The fact that large intakes of stable iodine (127I) in the diet limit uptake of iodine by the thyroid leads one to generalize that stable iodine in the diet may also limit thyroid uptake of pertechnetate. While there is at least one report that iodine in the diet blocks uptake of 99mTcO4? by the thyroid and salivary glands (which have the same Na/I symporter, the biochemical concentration mechanism), the level of protective effect seen for blocking radioactive iodine is not expected for 99TcO4? because pertechnetate does not become organically bound in the thyroid and thus is not retained for months the way iodide is. While it does account for Tc concentration in the thyroid, the existing ICRP biokinetic model for technetium does not take enhanced concentrations in salivary gland and breast tissue into account. From the survey of the nuclear medicine literature, it is not possible to compute the effect

  7. Effect of Dietary Intake of Stable Iodine on Dose-per-unit-intake Factors for 99Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    It is well-known that the human thyroid concentrates iodine more than 100 times the concentration in plasma. Also well-known is the fact that large amounts of stable iodine in the diet can limit thyroid uptake of total iodine; this is the basis for administering potassium iodide following a release of radioiodine from a nuclear reactor accident or nuclear weapon detonation. Many researchers have shown enhanced concentrations of both organic and inorganic iodine in saliva and breast milk. Technetium-99 is a long-lived (231,000 year half-life) radionuclide of concern in the management of high-level radioactive waste. There is no doubt that 99Tc, if it is in groundwater, will be found in the chemical form of pertechnetate, 99TcO4?. Pertechnetate is a large anion, almost identical in size to iodide, I?. The nuclear medicine literature shows that pertechnetate concentrates in the thyroid, salivary glands, and lactating breast in addition to the stomach, liver, and alimentary tract as currently recognized by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The fact that large intakes of stable iodine (127I) in the diet limit uptake of iodine by the thyroid leads one to generalize that stable iodine in the diet may also limit thyroid uptake of pertechnetate. While there is at least one report that iodine in the diet blocks uptake of 99mTcO4? by the thyroid and salivary glands (which have the same Na/I symporter, the biochemical concentration mechanism), the level of protective effect seen for blocking radioactive iodine is not expected for 99TcO4? because pertechnetate does not become organically bound in the thyroid and thus is not retained for months the way iodide is. While it does account for Tc concentration in the thyroid, the existing ICRP biokinetic model for technetium does not take enhanced concentrations in salivary gland and breast tissue into account. From the survey of the nuclear medicine literature, it is not possible to compute the effect

  8. Standard for administration of stable iodine pilulae. Standard of the nuclear safety commission, action for accident in TEPCO Fukushima-1 and recent European trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Preventive taking of stable-iodine tablets is effective to avoid thyroid gland disorder due to internal exposure to the radioactive iodine if radioactive iodine is released outside by any nuclear accident. In Japan, the Nuclear Safety Commission proposed the standard of the preventive taking in 2002, and, at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the head of the local task force instructed to take on the recommendation from the Commission. Author described the action principle of stable-iodine tablets, present concept for the preventive taking, recent change of the concept in Europe for the preventive taking, and some precepts which have shown in past Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. (J.P.N.)

  9. Comparison of the ENIGMA code with experimental data on thermal performance, stable fission gas and iodine release at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killeen, J C [Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The predictions of the ENIGMA code have been compared with data from high burn-up fuel experiments from the Halden and RISO reactors. The experiments modelled were IFA-504 and IFA-558 from Halden and the test II-5 from the RISO power burnup test series. The code has well modelled the fuel thermal performance and has provided a good measure of iodine release from pre-interlinked fuel. After interlinkage the iodine predictions remain a good fit for one experiment, but there is significant overprediction for a second experiment (IFA-558). Stable fission gas release is also well modelled and the predictions are within the expected uncertainly band throughout the burn-up range. This report presents code predictions for stable fission gas release to 40GWd/tU, iodine release measurements to 50GWd/tU and thermal performance (fuel centre temperature) to 55GWd/tU. Fuel ratings of up to 38kW/m were modelled at the high burn-up levels. The code is shown to accurately or conservatively predict all these parameters. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs.

  10. Post-accident action for radiation protection: Reducing the transfer of radioiodine to milk in cows by adding stable iodine to the forage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, P.; Voigt, G.

    1999-01-01

    The publication summarizes the activities for the study and reports the measured results achieved. The usefulness of stable iodine administration to cows for reducing the radioiodine transfer to the milk is explained. It was found that enhanced stable radioiodine doses have an effect on the metabolism of dairy cows that has to be taken into account. Initially, a literature study was carried out, which then served as a basis for defining subsequent studies and experiments. The evaluation of the results yields information about the effects of stable iodine on the radioiodine transfer as well as the metabolic pathways of iodine in dairy cows. In order to achieve a clear transfer-reducing effect (by a factor of 2), doses of 1g/d have to be administered to a cow. This dose will lead to a stable iodine concentration in the milk of about 10 mg/kg. The WHO recommends a daily maximum of 0.5 mg of stable iodine in order to safely prevent adverse health effects in man. Ingestion of more than 2 mg/d may induce in man thyroid disorders and other metabolic disorders. In some countries, the reference level for dairy milk accepted is 0.5 mg of iodine/kg of milk. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Hemodynamic evaluation in patients with superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis; Stable xenon CT-CBF study and acetazolamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Morisako, Toshitaka; Yamada, Keisuke; Shibamoto, Keiji [Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan)

    1990-12-01

    Sixteen patients with minor completed stroke in the chronic stage underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis. The acetazolamide-activated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured 20 minutes after the injection using inhalation of stable xenon and computed tomographic scanning (Xe{sup s} CT-CBF study) pre- and postoperatively. Eleven patients (Group 1) showed immediate improvement in neurological state within a few days of the operation, while five (Group 2) showed no improvements. Preoperative rCBF in the ischemic areas without infarction was 30.8+-3.0 ml/100 gm/min in Group 1 and 53.0+-5.2 ml/100 gm/min in Group 2. Preoperative vasodilatory capacity with acetazolamide in Group 1 was 5.7+-8.6 and significantly increased to 19.8+-4.9 after surgery. In Group 2, pre- and postoperative vasodilatory capacity was 12.7+-3.1 and 14.9+-2.9, respectively, and there was no significant change. These results suggested that minor stroke patients with moderate decrease of affected side rCBF (less than 40 ml/100 gm/min) and with hemodynamic impairment may have the surgical indication for STA-MCA anastomosis. (author).

  12. Iodine intake in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.M.; Noehr, S.B.; Laurberg, P.

    1997-01-01

    Iodine deficiency with a high frequency of goitre and, in severely affected areas, cretinism is common in some areas of the world. In Denmark the iodine intake as evaluated by urinary iodine excretion has been at a stable low level for many years, except for the part of the population now taking iodine supplementation as part of vitamin/mineral preparations. The iodine intake is lowest in the western part to the country where an epidemiological study of elderly subjects has demonstrated a high frequency of goitre and hyperthyroidism in women. This supports the suggestion of a controlled moderate increase in iodine intake via an iodine supplementation program. (au) 40 refs

  13. Optimising Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Stearin For Its Crude Stearic Acid Iodine Value To Provide The Stable Specification Of Blended Stearic Acid Distillate Iodine Value

    OpenAIRE

    Ritonga, Muhammad Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    On the commercial scale, the quality standard of Blended Stearic Acid Distilled (BSAD) couldn’t be achieved by normal distillation. BSAD iodine value is mostly higher than maximum quality standard (0.2 mg/100 g), with the same iodine value (0.80 g/100 g) of feed Hydrogenated Splitted RBDPS Fatty Acid or HSRBDPSFA, feed capacity 5.5 ton/hour with bottom flash distiller temperature reaching 213oC. The separation and reduction of chemical impurities (so sensitive to oxidation/temperature/heat ch...

  14. Iodine Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  15. Xenon-Xenon collision events in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Mc Cauley, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    One of the first-ever xenon-xenon collision events recorded by CMS during the LHC’s one-day-only heavy-ion run with xenon nuclei. The large number of tracks emerging from the centre of the detector show the many simultaneous nucleon-nucleon interactions that take place when two xenon nuclei, each with 54 protons and 75 neutrons, collide inside CMS.

  16. Iodine Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    Iodine enables dramatic mass and cost savings for lunar and Mars cargo missions, including Earth escape and near-Earth space maneuvers. The demonstrated throttling ability of iodine is important for a singular thruster that might be called upon to propel a spacecraft from Earth to Mars or Venus. The ability to throttle efficiently is even more important for missions beyond Mars. In the Phase I project, Busek Company, Inc., tested an existing Hall thruster, the BHT-8000, on iodine propellant. The thruster was fed by a high-flow iodine feed system and supported by an existing Busek hollow cathode flowing xenon gas. The Phase I propellant feed system was evolved from a previously demonstrated laboratory feed system. Throttling of the thruster between 2 and 11 kW at 200 to 600 V was demonstrated. Testing showed that the efficiency of iodine fueled BHT-8000 is the same as with xenon, with iodine delivering a slightly higher thrust-to-power (T/P) ratio. In Phase II, a complete iodine-fueled system was developed, including the thruster, hollow cathode, and iodine propellant feed system. The nominal power of the Phase II system is 8 kW; however, it can be deeply throttled as well as clustered to much higher power levels. The technology also can be scaled to greater than 100 kW per thruster to support megawatt-class missions. The target thruster efficiency for the full-scale system is 65 percent at high specific impulse (Isp) (approximately 3,000 s) and 60 percent at high thrust (Isp approximately 2,000 s).

  17. Molecular environment of stable iodine and radioiodine (129I) in natural organic matter: Evidence inferred from NMR and binding experiments at environmentally relevant concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Zhong, Junyan; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Zhang, Saijin; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathleen A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Brinkmeyer, Robin; Yeager, Chris M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2012-11-01

    129I is a major by-product of nuclear fission and had become one of the major radiation risk drivers at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 129I is present at elevated levels in the surface soils of the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area and was found to be bound predominantly to soil organic matter (SOM). Naturally bound 127I and 129I to sequentially extracted humic acids (HAs), fulvic acids (FAs) and a water extractable colloid (WEC) were measured in a 129I-contaminated wetland surface soil located on the SRS. WEC is a predominantly colloidal organic fraction obtained from soil re-suspension experiments to mimic the fraction that may be released during groundwater exfiltration, storm water or surface runoff events. For the first time, NMR techniques were applied to infer the molecular environment of naturally occurring stable iodine and radioiodine binding to SOM. Iodine uptake partitioning coefficients (Kd) by these SOM samples at ambient iodine concentrations were also measured and related to quantitative structural analyses by 13C DPMAS NMR and solution state 1H NMR on the eight humic acid fractions. By assessing the molecular environment of iodine, it was found that it was closely associated with the aromatic regions containing esterified products of phenolic and formic acids or other aliphatic carboxylic acids, amide functionalities, quinone-like structures activated by electron-donating groups (e.g., NH2), or a hemicellulose-lignin-like complex with phenyl-glycosidic linkages. However, FAs and WEC contained much greater concentrations of 127I or 129I than HAs. The contrasting radioiodine contents among the three different types of SOM (HAs, FAs and WEC) suggest that the iodine binding environment cannot be explained solely by the difference in the amount of their reactive binding sites. Instead, indirect evidence indicates that the macro-molecular conformation, such as the hydrophobic aliphatic periphery hindering the active aromatic cores and the hydrophilic

  18. Xenon spatial oscillation in nuclear power reactors:an analytical approach through non linear modal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2005-01-01

    It was proponed recently to apply an extension of Lyapunov's first method to the non-linear regime, known as non-linear modal analysis (NMA), to the study of space-time problems in nuclear reactor kinetics, nuclear power plant dynamics and nuclear power plant instrumentation and control(1). The present communication shows how to apply NMA to the study of Xenon spatial oscillations in large nuclear reactors. The set of non-linear modal equations derived by J. Lewins(2) for neutron flux, Xenon concentration and Iodine concentration are discussed, and a modified version of these equations is taken as a starting point. Using the methods of singular perturbation theory a slow manifold is constructed in the space of mode amplitudes. This allows the reduction of the original high dimensional dynamics to a low dimensional one. It is shown how the amplitudes of the first mode for neutron flux field, temperature field and concentrations of Xenon and Iodine fields can have a stable steady state value while the corresponding amplitudes of the second mode oscillates in a stable limit cycle. The extrapolated dimensions of the reactor's core are used as bifurcation parameters. Approximate analytical formulae are obtained for the critical values of this parameters( below which the onset of oscillations is produced), for the period and for the amplitudes of the above mentioned oscillations. These results are applied to the discussion of neutron flux and temperature excursions in critical locations of the reactor's core. The results of NMA can be validated from the results obtained applying suitable computer codes, using homogenization theory(3) to link the complex heterogeneous model of the codes with the simplified mathematical model used for NMA

  19. Study of Iodine Prophylaxis Following Nuclear Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Widayati; Tedjasari, R. S.; Elfida

    2007-01-01

    Study of iodine prophylaxis following nuclear accidents has been done. Giving stable iodine to a population exposed by I-131 is one of preventive action from internal radiation to the thyroid gland. Stable iodine could be given as Kl tablet in a range of dose of 30 mg/day to 130 mg/day. Improper giving of stable iodine could cause side effect to health, so then some factors should be considered i. e. dose estimation, age, dose of stable iodine to be given, duration of stable iodine prophylaxis and risk of health. (author)

  20. Radioactive iodine intake through foodstuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omomo, Yoichiro

    1974-01-01

    The transition of radioactive iodine to human bodies is affected by the amount of coexisting stable iodine. The intake of stable iodine through foodstuffs was studied from the stand point of I) discussion of the literature which states the approximate amounts of stable iodine contained in environmental materials, and II) the authors' research on the consumption of foodstuffs. For example, the amounts of iodine intake of fishermen living in Kuji-cho (Ibaragi Prefecture) was estimated from I and II, and was revealed as 2704p. The national average iodine intake was about 800p indicating that the former estimated value was remarkably high. Eighty Four per cent of the 2.7 mg iodine intake was taken from marine products, indicating that marine products are important sources of iodine supply. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  1. Modeling an Iodine Hall Thruster Plume in the Iodine Satellite (ISAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An iodine-operated 200-W Hall thruster plume has been simulated using a hybrid-PIC model to predict the spacecraft surface-plume interaction for spacecraft integration purposes. For validation of the model, the plasma potential, electron temperature, ion current flux, and ion number density of xenon propellant were compared with available measurement data at the nominal operating condition. To simulate iodine plasma, various collision cross sections were found and used in the model. While time-varying atomic iodine species (i.e., I, I+, I2+) information is provided by HPHall simulation at the discharge channel exit, the molecular iodine species (i.e., I2, I2+) are introduced as Maxwellian particles at the channel exit. Simulation results show that xenon and iodine plasma plumes appear to be very similar under the assumptions of the model. Assuming a sticking coefficient of unity, iodine deposition rate is estimated.

  2. Extensive Evaluation of a Diffusion Denuder Technique for the Quantification of Atmospheric Stable and Radioactive Molecular Iodine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Ru-Jin; Hou, Xiaolin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the evaluation and optimization of a new approach for the quantification of gaseous molecular iodine (I2) for laboratory- and field-based studies and its novel application for the measurement of radioactive molecular iodine. α-Cyclodextrin (α-CD) in combination with 129I......, and condition of release and derivatization of iodine, is extensively evaluated and optimized. The collection efficiency is larger than 98% and the limit of detection (LOD) obtained is 0.17 parts-per-trillion-by-volume (pptv) for a sampling duration of 30 min at 500 mL min−1. Furthermore, the potential use...... of this protocol for the determination of radioactive I2 at ultra trace level is also demonstrated when 129I− used in the coating is replaced by 127I− and a multiple denuder system is used. Using the present method we observed 25.7−108.6 pptv 127I2 at Mweenish Bay, Ireland and 108 molecule m−3 129I2 at Mainz...

  3. Optimal control of xenon concentration by observer design under reactor model uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam Z.; Yang, Chae Y.; Woo, Hae S.

    1989-01-01

    The state feedback in control theory enjoys many advantages, such as stabilization and improved transient response, which could be beneficially used for control of the xenon oscillation in a power reactor. It is, however, not possible in nuclear reactors to measure the state variables, such as xenon and iodine concentrations. For implementation of the optimal state feedback control law, it is thus necessary to estimate the unmeasurable state variables. This paper uses the Luenberger observer to estimate the xenon and iodine concentrations to be used in a linear quadratic problem with state feedback. To overcome the stiffness problem in reactor kinetics, a singular perturbation method is used

  4. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Iodine Deficiency Leer en Español Iodine Deficiency Iodine is an element that is needed ... world’s population remains at risk for iodine deficiency. Iodine Deficiency FAQs WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND? The ...

  5. Strength function of xenon 127 and cross section of 127I(νe, e-)127Xe reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutostanskij, Yu.S.; Shul'gina, N.B.

    1989-01-01

    The strenght functions S β (E) and the cross section of the reaction ν e + 127 I → e - + 127 Xe were calculated in the framework of the theory of finite Fermi-systems. The results obtained are used to estimate the possibility of using an iodine-xenon detector in the experiments with solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos. The advantages of the iodine-xenon detector over the chlorine-argon one are shown. 13 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. Volatilization of iodine from vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.D.; Johnston, F.L.

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous emissions of iodine were measured from bean plant foliage. A gamma-emitting iodine tracer, Na 125 I, was taken up by the plants from a hydroponic growth medium and released to a cuvette atmosphere. The dynamics of the flux were studied using a flow-through gamma detector. The relationship between leaf radioactive tracer activity and growth-medium activity was linear, as was the relationship between the iodine flux and both leaf and growth-medium activity. Iodine flux and leaf conductance to water responded similarly to changes in light levels, suggesting that the stomata may partially control the flux. The flux was inhibited by aeration of the hydroponic growth media, and we postulate that methylation causes the iodine flux. Iodine emissions from living vegetation probably contribute < 0.1% to the stable iodine concentration in the atmosphere above terrestrial areas. However, this pathway may be a direct route for radioactive iodine transport from contaminated soils to the atmosphere. (author)

  7. Iodine volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this program is to couple experimental aqueous iodine volatilities to a fission product release model. Iodine partition coefficients, for inorganic iodine, have been measured during hydrolysis and radiolysis. The hydrolysis experiments have illustrated the importance of reaction time on iodine volatility. However, radiolysis effects can override hydrolysis in determining iodine volatility. In addition, silver metal in radiolysis samples can react to form silver iodide accompanied by a decrease in iodine volatility. Experimental data are now being coupled to an iodine transport and release model that was developed in the Federal Republic of Germany

  8. Liquid xenon detector engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, E.; Chen, M.; Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Montgomery, D.B.; Pelly, J.D.; Shotkin, S.; Sullivan, J.D.; Sumorok, K.; Yan, X.; Zhang, X.; Lebedenko, V.

    1991-01-01

    The design, engineering constraints and R and D status of a 15 m 3 precision liquid xenon, electromagnetic calorimeter for the Superconducting Super Collider are discussed in this paper. Several prototype liquid xenon detectors have been built, and preliminary results are described. The design of a conical 7 cell by 7 cell detector capable of measuring fully contained high energy electron showers is described in detail

  9. Chemisorption of organic iodine compounds forming from fission isotopes of radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tot, G.; Galina, F.; Zel'd, E.

    1977-01-01

    Studied is ethyl iodine adsorption, labelled by iodine 131, on palladium black and on aluminium oxide activized by palladium. The desorption of adsorbed iodine in the temperature range of 20-600 deg C by the mass spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric methods was investigated. At the ethyl iodine and palladium interaction the bond between carbon and iodine in the ethyl iodine molecule breaks down and extracting iodine reacts with palladium, forming a stable compound at high temperatures. Desorption of adsorbed iodine is insignificant up to the temperatures of 250-300 deg C. Thus, sorbents, containing palladium, may be successfully applied for iodine absorption from the organic iodine compounds. These compounds spontaneously appear from the iodine fragment ratio isotopes during their interaction with some environmental organic impurities

  10. An approach to stability analysis of spatial xenon oscillations in WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parhizkari, H.; Aghaie, M.; Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The multipoint methodology is developed for xenon oscillation in the BNPP. • The axial, radial and azimuthal offsets are calculated in the BOC and EOC. • It is shown that the all of oscillation modes are safe in the BOC. • The axial oscillation is not safe in the EOC and needs governor control system. • The multipoint kinetics show good agreement for spatial oscillations. - Abstract: Spatial power oscillations due to spatial distribution of xenon transient are well known as xenon oscillation in large reactors. Xenon-induced spatial power oscillations occur as a result of rapid perturbations to power distribution that cause the xenon and iodine distribution to be out of phase with the perturbed power distribution. This results in a shift in xenon and iodine distributions that causes the power distribution to change in an opposite direction from the initial perturbation. In this paper xenon-induced power oscillation is described by a system of differential equations with non-linearity between xenon and flux distributions; the dynamics of process is described by a discrete distributed parameter model, with the neutron flux, the delayed neutrons, the core temperature and the xenon and iodine concentrations as the “states” of the system. It is shown that it is possible to describe the discrete distributed-parameter as a set of coupled point-reactor models. It is also shown that using this scheme it is possible to analyze the control aspects of a multi-section large core reactor by treating only two adjacent sections of the core. To illustrate the capability and efficiency of the proposed scheme Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant, BNPP, which is a WWER-1000 reactor, is chosen to show the performance of the methodology. The axial, azimuthal and radial power oscillation at the beginning of cycle, BOC, and the end of cycle, EOC, for BNPP are investigated; the results are in good agreement with safety analysis report of the reference plant

  11. Sensitivity and related factors in iodine-123-β-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid myocardial scintigraphy to detect stable effort angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Yumi; Takechi, Norikazu; Suzuki, Kenji; Nishibori, Yoshiharu; Matsuo, Akiko; Inoue, Keiji; Fujita, Hiroshi; Inoue, Naoto

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the sensitivity and the related factors in iodine-123-β-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) scintigraphy to detect stable angina. The subjects were 198 patients with stable angina who underwent BMIPP before percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary bypass graft surgery. Patients with unstable angina, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy and vasospastic angina were excluded. After investigation of the sensitivity of BMIPP, the patients with single-vessel disease without collateral flow were classified into the normal 12 3 I-BMIPP uptake group (normal group) or decreased 123 I-BMIPP uptake group (decreased group), and various factors were compared between the two groups. Sensitivity was 61% overall, 58% in single-vessel disease, 69% in double-vessel disease, 53% in triple-vessel disease, 43% in only left main vessel disease, and 89% in left main and other vessel disease (NS). In single-vessel disease, the sensitivity was 40% in 75% coronary artery stenosis, 58% in 90% stenosis, 89% in 99% stenosis, and 69% in total occlusion (p=0.003). Comparing the decreased and normal groups, diabetes mellitus was more frequent in the normal group (14.6% vs 39.5%), minimal lumen diameter was smaller (0.75±0.37 vs 0.98±0.49 mm) and lesion length was longer in the decreased group (15.4±4.9 vs 11.6±5.5 mm). Logistic multivariate analysis showed that the independent factors were diabetes mellitus [odds ratio 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.87, p=0.03], minimal lumen diameter (odds ratio 0.10, 95% CI 0.02-0.48, p=0.003) and lesion length (odds ratio 1.12, 95% CI 1.00-1.25, p=0.03). BMIPP is useful in stable angina patients because of the acceptable sensitivity. Diabetes mellitus, minimal lumen diameter and lesion length were independent factors associated with decreased BMIPP uptake. (author)

  12. Separation and purification of xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlea, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    Xenon is separated from a mixture of xenon and krypton by extractive distillation using carbon tetrafluoride as the partitioning agent. Krypton is flushed out of the distillation column with CF 4 in the gaseous overhead stream while purified xenon is recovered from the liquid bottoms. The distillation is conducted at about atmospheric pressure or at subatmospheric pressure

  13. Xenon oscillation control in large PWR using a characteristic ellipse trajectory drawn by three axial offsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoichiro, Shimazu

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed a very simple xenon oscillation control procedure based on a characteristic trajectory. The trajectory is drawn by three offsets of power distributions, namely, AOp, AOi and AOx. They are defined as the offset of axial power distribution, the offset of the power distribution under which the current iodine distribution is obtained as the equilibrium and that for xenon distribution, respectively. When these offsets are plotted on X-Y plane for (AOp-AOx, AOi-AOx) the trajectory shows a quite characteristic ellipse (or an elliptic spiral). It shows characteristics such that the center of the ellipse is at the origin, the gradient of the major axis is constant, direction of the trajectory progress is always anti-clock wise, plot goes around the ellipse during a cycle of the xenon oscillation and so on. This characteristic does not change even if the control rods are moved. When the plot is at the origin of the X-Y plane, no xenon oscillation exists. Using the characteristics of the ellipse the xenon oscillation can be eliminated by guiding the plot to the origin with control rod operation. This concept can be applied not only to the axial xenon oscillation but also to the radial xenon oscillation control. Conventionally, the trajectory is drawn based on the xenon dynamics using reactor parameters such as core averaged macroscopic fission cross section, xenon micro absorption cross section, fission yields of iodine and xenon, and so on together with the neutron flux signals. The accuracy is expected to be better. (authors)

  14. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  15. Radionuclide Basics: Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Radionuclide Basics: Iodine Iodine (chemical symbol I) is a chemical element. ... in the environment Iodine sources Iodine and health Iodine in the Environment All 37 isotopes of iodine ...

  16. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  17. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ely, James H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Harper, Warren W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heimbigner, Tom R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, Charles W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Humble, Paul H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Madison, Jill C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Panisko, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ripplinger, Mike D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stewart, Timothy L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  18. Testing Iodine as a New Fuel for Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glad, Harley; Branam, Richard; Rogers, Jim; Warren, Matthew; Burleson, Connor; Siy, Grace

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the viability of using iodine as an alternative space propulsion propellant. The demonstration requires the testing of a cathode with xenon and then the desired element iodine. Currently, cathodes run on noble gases such as xenon which must be stored in high pressure canisters and is very expensive. These shortcomings have led to researching possible substitutes. Iodine was decided as a suitable candidate because it's cheaper, can be stored as a solid, and has similar mass properties as xenon. In this research, cathodes will be placed in a vacuum chamber and operated on both gases to observe their performance, allowing us to gain a better understanding of iodine's behavior. Several planned projects depend on the knowledge gained from this project, such as larger scaled tests and iodine fed hall thrusters. The tasks of this project included protecting the stainless-steel vacuum chamber by gold plating and Teflon® coating, building a stand to hold the cathode, creating an anode resistant to iodine, and testing the cathode once setup was complete. The successful operation of the cathode was demonstrated. However, the experimental setup proved ineffective at controlling the iodine flow. Current efforts are focused on this problem. REU Site: Fluid Mechanics with Analysis using Computations and Experiments NSF Grant EEC 1659710.

  19. Mission and System Advantages of Iodine Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Szabo, James; Pote, Bruce; Oleson, Steve; Kamhawi, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of alternative propellants for Hall thrusters continues to be of interest to the community. Investments have been made and continue for the maturation of iodine based Hall thrusters. Iodine testing has shown comparable performance to xenon. However, iodine has a higher storage density and resulting higher ?V capability for volume constrained systems. Iodine's vapor pressure is low enough to permit low-pressure storage, but high enough to minimize potential adverse spacecraft-thruster interactions. The low vapor pressure also means that iodine does not condense inside the thruster at ordinary operating temperatures. Iodine is safe, it stores at sub-atmospheric pressure, and can be stored unregulated for years on end; whether on the ground or on orbit. Iodine fills a niche for both low power (10kW) electric propulsion regimes. A range of missions have been evaluated for direct comparison of Iodine and Xenon options. The results show advantages of iodine Hall systems for both small and microsatellite application and for very large exploration class missions.

  20. Gross xenon stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewins, J.D.; Wilson, P.P.H.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of xenon in thermal reactors on steady operation is generally destabilizing. Illustrating this involves the study of appropriate transfer functions, which may be conveniently displayed in three ways: as Bode, Nyquist, and root-locus diagrams. The three forms allow different aspects to be highlighted. These are illustrated for the effect of xenon with allowance not only for the stabilizing effect of the direct yield in fission but also to show the consequences of neglecting the time dependence due to the thermal capacity of the reactor. With careful interpretation, all these forms give an interpretation of stability that is consistent with direct evaluation and promote the understanding of the onset of gross oscillations in power

  1. Autoionization in xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.D.; Wang, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied both even- and odd-parity autoionizing levels in xenon. These levels lie between the Xe/sup +/ /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ and /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ ionization limits. Their technique is laser spectroscopy of a thermal metastable atomic beam of xenon. One-photon laser spectroscopy from the 6s'[1/2]/sub 0/ level has been used to study the np'[1/2]/sub 1/ and np'[3/2]/sub 1/ autoionization doublets, n = 7-20. These had previously been observed only for n = 7,8. The authors are using a MQDT analysis of both discrete and autoionizing even-parity J = 1 levels (five channels) to understand the autoionization line profiles. They have also used two-photon laser spectroscopy from the 6s[3/2]/sub 2/ metastable level via various J = 1,2 6p' levels to observe the odd-parity ns'[1/2]/sub 0 1/, nd'[3/2]/sub 1 2/, and nd'[5/2]/sub 2 3/ autoionizing levels to n > 50. This is the first observation of J not equal to 1 odd-parity autoionization in xenon. The most striking feature of these spectra is the complete absence of the very intense, very broad transitions to nd'[3/2]/sub 1/, which dominate the photoabsorption spectrum from the xenon J = 0 ground state. The other nd' levels (J = 2.3) and ns'[1/2]/sub 0/ are all comparable in width to the previously observed ns'[1/2]/sub 1/ levels. The authors present the results of position and width measurements for these levels

  2. Control of spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors via the Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.; Lin, Y.J.

    1994-01-01

    A direct control method is developed to control the spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors. The xenon and iodine concentration difference between the top and bottom halves of the core is estimated by using the extended Kalman filter (EKF), which is a closed-loop estimation method. The measurement equation used in the observer is the axial offset measurement equation, which reflects the xenon unbalanced effect on the axial offset. Meanwhile, some of the coefficients of the observer are estimated on-line to reduce estimation error resulting from model error, i.e., simplified xenon and iodine dynamics. Therefore, the estimation can be guaranteed to be accurate, and the success of the estimation does not greatly depend on the accuracy of the observer model. The predicted one-step ahead xenon concentration, by using the EKF, was used to calculate the possible axial offset variation, and then the control rod motion was calculated to compensate for it. The simulation results show that the proposed method successfully controls the xenon oscillations

  3. Pathophysiologic effects of stable iodine used as a thyroidal blocking agent to reduce thyroid radiation exposure. Final progress report, November 1, 1976--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    In order to determine whether acute administration of iodide leads to any undesirable effects in the general population, we studied a group of patients who received iodinated radiographic contrast medium in the course of routine x-ray diagnostic procedures. We were particularly interested in investigating the possibility that administration of iodine could damage thyroid follicular cells leading to release of intrathyroidal antigens such as thyroglobulin into the blood. An increase in serum thyroglobulin might, in turn, either initiate or exacerbate thyroid autoimmunity in susceptible individuals, leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. We looked for undesirable effects due to the administration of iodide in 3 ways: a possible acute toxic effect on thyroid follicular cells was investigated by determining serum thyroglobulin immediately prior to and 24 hours after injection of iodinated contrast medium; an effect on thyroid autoimmunity was investigated by determining thyroid autoantibodies immediately prior to and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinated contrast medium; and acute and chronic effects on thyroid function were investigated by performing thyroid function tests immediately prior to, 24 hours after and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinateed contrast medium.

  4. Pathophysiologic effects of stable iodine used as a thyroidal blocking agent to reduce thyroid radiation exposure. Final progress report, November 1, 1976--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    In order to determine whether acute administration of iodide leads to any undesirable effects in the general population, we studied a group of patients who received iodinated radiographic contrast medium in the course of routine x-ray diagnostic procedures. We were particularly interested in investigating the possibility that administration of iodine could damage thyroid follicular cells leading to release of intrathyroidal antigens such as thyroglobulin into the blood. An increase in serum thyroglobulin might, in turn, either initiate or exacerbate thyroid autoimmunity in susceptible individuals, leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. We looked for undesirable effects due to the administration of iodide in 3 ways: a possible acute toxic effect on thyroid follicular cells was investigated by determining serum thyroglobulin immediately prior to and 24 hours after injection of iodinated contrast medium; an effect on thyroid autoimmunity was investigated by determining thyroid autoantibodies immediately prior to and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinated contrast medium; and acute and chronic effects on thyroid function were investigated by performing thyroid function tests immediately prior to, 24 hours after and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinateed contrast medium

  5. Iodine removing means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshima, Masaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To employ exhaust gas from an incinerator to effect regeneration of an adsorbent such as active carbon which has adsorbed a radioactive gas such as iodine contained in the ventilating system exhaust gas of a boiling water reactor power plant. Structure: Radioactive exhaust gas such as iodine, xenon and krypton is led to an active carbon adsorbing means for removal through adsorption. When the adsorbing function of the active carbon adsorption means is reduced, the exhaust gas discharged from the incinerator is cooled down to 300 0 C and then caused to flow into the active carbon layer, and after depriving it of sulfur dioxide gas, oxides of nitrogen, daughter nuclides resulting from attenuation of radioactive gas and so forth, these being adsorbed by the carbon active layer, it is led again to the incinerator, whereby the radioactivity accompanying the regenerated gas is sealed as ash within the incinerator. Further, similarly accompanying fine active carbon particles and the like are utilized as a heat source for the incinerator. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Iodinated bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunghi, F.; Riva, P.; Assone, F.; Villa, M.; Plassic, G.

    1978-01-01

    Bleomycin was labelled with iodine-131 by the iodine monochloride method. Iodination did not alter the chemical and chromatographic features and ''in vitro'' stability studies on freeze-dried 131 I-Bleomycin having a specific activity of 1 mCi/mg, stored at different temperatures, showed no appreciable variation of the free-iodine content. Tissue distribution of 131 I-Bleomycin has been evaluated in tumor bearing rats. Patients have been injected with 0.5-1.0 mCi of 131 I-Bleomycin corresponding to a maximum of 1.5 mg. No adverse reactions have been observed. Total body scans have been performed at 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours after injection. The iodinated Bleomycin was rapidly distributed and cleared from the body and showed an early uptake in the neoplastic tissue. A diagnostic accuracy of 90% has been observed in malignant deseases, while no false positive results have been, at the moment, recorded. (author)

  7. ATLAS Event Display: First Xenon-Xenon Run 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Event display from the xenon-xenon collision run of 12-13 October 2017. Curved cyan lines show the trajectories of charged particles in the tracking systems. The bottom right plot shows the distribution of energy deposited in the calorimeters, demonstrating the high particle multiplicity of the event. Two muon candidates are reconstructed at high pseudorapidity, as seen in the bottom left plot

  8. Quantitative method for determination of body inorganic iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filatov, A.A.; Tatsievskij, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    An original method of quantitation of body inorganic iodine, based upon a simultaneous administration of a known dose of stable and radioactive iodine with subsequent radiometry of the thyroid was proposed. The calculation is based upon the principle of the dilution of radiactive iodine in human inorganic iodine space. The method permits quantitation of the amount of inorganic iodine with regard to individual features of inorganic space. The method is characterized by simplicity and is not invasive for a patient

  9. Iodine-129 Dose in LLW Disposal Facility Performance Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    Iodine-129 has the lowest Performance Assessment derived inventory limit in SRS disposal facilities. Because iodine is concentrated in the body to one organ, the thyroid, it has been thought that dilution with stable iodine would reduce the dose effects of 129I.Examination of the dose model used to establish the Dose conversion factor for 129I shows that, at the levels considered in performance assessments of low-level waste disposal facilities, the calculated 129I dose already accounts for ingestion of stable iodine. At higher than normal iodine ingestion rates, the uptake of iodine by the thyroid itself decrease, which effectively cancels out the isotopic dilution effect

  10. Labeling of indocyanine green with carrier-free iodine-123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.N.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Redvanly, C.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    The method is described for labeling indocyanine green (ICG) with carrier-free iodine-123 by condensing xenon-123 on crystals of ICG followed by permitting decay of the 123 Xe a sufficient length of time to produce 123 I-electronically excited ions and atoms which subsequently label ICG. 4 claims, no drawings

  11. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129 Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131 Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen

  12. Volatilization of iodine from vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiro, B D; Johnston, F L [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous emissions of iodine were measured from bean plant foliage. A gamma-emitting iodine tracer, Na {sup 125}I, was taken up by the plants from a hydroponic growth medium and released to a cuvette atmosphere. The dynamics of the flux were studied using a flow-through gamma detector. The relationship between leaf radioactive tracer activity and growth-medium activity was linear, as was the relationship between the iodine flux and both leaf and growth-medium activity. Iodine flux and leaf conductance to water responded similarly to changes in light levels, suggesting that the stomata may partially control the flux. The flux was inhibited by aeration of the hydroponic growth media, and we postulate that methylation causes the iodine flux. Iodine emissions from living vegetation probably contribute < 0.1% to the stable iodine concentration in the atmosphere above terrestrial areas. However, this pathway may be a direct route for radioactive iodine transport from contaminated soils to the atmosphere. (author).

  13. Iodine isotopes and radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styro, B.; Nedvekajte, T.; Filistovich, V.

    1992-01-01

    Methods of concentration determination of stable and radioactive iodine isotopes in the Earth's different geospheres are described. Iodine isotopes concentration data, chemical forms and transformations as well as their exchange among separate geospheres of their global biochemical circulation (ocean, atmosphere, lithosphere and biosphere) are presented. Information on iodine isotopes as after-effects of nuclear installations accident (in particular, the Chernobyl accident) is generalized. The book is intended for scientists and practical workers in ecology and radioactivity protection and for a students of physics. 442 refs.; 82 figs.; 36 tabs

  14. Iodine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Iodine is also used during the production of methamphetamine. Note: This list may not be all inclusive. ... breathing machine (ventilator) Blood and urine tests Chest x-ray EKG (electrocardiogram, or heart tracing) Fluids through a ...

  15. Prophylactic iodine treatment in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhausen, E.

    1980-01-01

    Prophylactic iodine treatment is to prevent accumulation of radioactive iodine in the thyroid. This is done by administering a large amount of stable iodine before uptake of radioactive iodine so that further accummulation of iodine in the thyroid will be impossible. This blocking effect should be as complete as possible. This is achieved by administering an initial dose of 200 mg potassium iodide. As the release of radioactive iodine may last several hours or even days; for this reason, maintenance doses of 100 mg potassium iodide should be administered in 8-hour intervals. The risk of prophylactiv iodine treatment is rather low; however, provocation of latent hyperthyreoses must be expected in, at the most, 0.2% of the exposed population. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Iodine in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - iodine ... Many months of iodine deficiency in a person's diet may cause goiter or hypothyroidism . Without enough iodine, ... and older children. Getting enough iodine in the diet may prevent a form of physical and intellectual ...

  17. Performance of an iodine-fueled radio-frequency ion-thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holste, Kristof; Gärtner, Waldemar; Zschätzsch, Daniel; Scharmann, Steffen; Köhler, Peter; Dietz, Patrick; Klar, Peter J.

    2018-01-01

    Two sets of performance data of the same radio-frequency ion-thruster (RIT) have been recorded using iodine and xenon, respectively, as propellant. To characterize the thruster's performance, we have recorded the radio-frequency DC-power, required for yielding preset values of the extracted ion-beam currents, as a function of mass flow. For that purpose, an iodine mass flow system had to be developed, calibrated, and integrated into a newly-built test facility for studying corrosive propellants. The performance mappings for iodine and xenon differ significantly despite comparable operation conditions. At low mass flows, iodine exhibits the better performance. The situation changes at higher mass flows where the performance of iodine is significantly poorer than that of xenon. The reason is very likely related to the molecular nature of iodine. Our results show that iodine as propellant is compatible with RIT technology. Furthermore, it is a viable alternative as propellant for dedicated space missions. In particular, when taking into account additional benefits such as possible storage as a solid and its low price the use of iodine as propellant in ion thrusters is competitive.

  18. Xenon migration in UO{sub 2} under irradiation studied by SIMS profilometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, B. [Université de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Lyon 1, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); AREVA, AREVA NP, 10 rue Juliette Récamier, F-69456 Lyon (France); Moncoffre, N. [Université de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Lyon 1, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Lyon 1, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, IUT Lyon 1, 43 bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69 622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Bérerd, N. [Université de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Lyon 1, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, IUT Lyon 1, 43 bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69 622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Garnier, C. [AREVA, AREVA NP, 10 rue Juliette Récamier, F-69456 Lyon (France); Raimbault, L. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Géosciences, 35 rue Saint Honoré, F-77305 Fontainebleau cedex (France); Sainsot, P. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, LaMCoS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5259, F-69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); and others

    2013-09-15

    During Pressurized Water Reactor operation, around 25% of the created Fission Products (FP) are Xenon and Krypton. They have a low solubility in the nuclear fuel and can either (i) agglomerate into bubbles which induce mechanical stress in the fuel pellets or (ii) be released from the pellets, increasing the pressure within the cladding and decreasing the thermal conductivity of the gap between pellets and cladding. After fifty years of studies on the nuclear fuel, all mechanisms of Fission Gas Release (FGR) are still not fully understood. This paper aims at studying the FGR mechanisms by decoupling thermal and irradiation effects and by assessing the Xenon behavior for the first time by profilometry. Samples are first implanted with {sup 136}Xe at 800 keV corresponding to a projected range of 140 nm. They are then either annealed in the temperature range 1400–1600 °C, or irradiated with heavy energy ions (182 MeV Iodine) at Room Temperature (RT), 600 °C or 1000 °C. Depth profiles of implanted Xenon in UO{sub 2} are determined by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). It is shown that Xenon is mobile during irradiation at 1000 °C. In contrast, thermal treatments do not induce any Xenon migration process: these results are correlated to the formation of Xenon bubbles observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  19. Pathophysiologic effects of stable iodine used as a thyroidal blocking agent to reduce thyroid radiation exposure. Progress report, November 1, 1975--October 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    In an effort to determine whether iodide administration in man can induce injury to thyroid follicular cells similar to that demonstrated in lower animals, this study measures thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine and thyroid autoantibodies in the serum before and after administration of iodine in a variety of patients. In the last eight months primary efforts have been devoted to the development of a high specificity and sensitivity radioimmunoassay of thyroglobulin and its preliminary clinical application. Human thyroglobulin obtained from operative specimens was purified and its identity and purity established. Rabbits were injected with thyroglobulin for 30 weeks with the appearance of significant titres of antibodies within 6 weeks. The antibody developed was examined for immunological purity and used in a radioimmunoassay system with thyroglobulin labeled in this Laboratory with 125 I

  20. The importance of prevention with iodine after nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornealo, Elena; Chirca, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    Medical negative consequences of the disastrous accident from the Chernobyl are tangible till present and the thyroid pathology has a special place among them. It is caused by the actions of radioactive iodine and can be greatly minimized by the implementation of prophylaxis with stable iodine. The basic principles, benefits and risks of iodine prophylaxis are reported in this article. (authors)

  1. Molecular environment of iodine in naturally iodinated humic substances: Insight from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Michel L.; Mercier-Bion, Florence; Barre, Nicole; Reiller, Pascal; Moulin, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    The molecular environment of iodine in reference inorganic and organic compounds, and in dry humic and fulvic acids (HAs and FAs) extracted from subsurface and deep aquifers was probed by iodine L-3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of iodine spectra from HAs and FAs resembled those of organic references and displayed structural features consistent with iodine forming covalent bonds with organic molecules. Simulation of XANES spectra by linear combination of reference spectra suggested the predominance of iodine forming covalent bonds to aromatic rings (aromatic-bound iodine). Comparison of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of reference and samples further showed that iodine was surrounded by carbon shells at distances comparable to those for references containing aromatic-bound iodine. Quantitative analysis of EXAFS spectra indicated that iodine was bound to about one carbon at a distance d(I-C) of 2.01(4)-2.04(9) angstrom, which was comparable to the distances observed for aromatic-bound iodine in references (1.99(1)-2.07(6) angstrom), and significantly shorter than that observed for aliphatic-bound iodine (2.15(2)-2.16(2) angstrom). These results are in agreement with previous conclusions from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and from electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. These results collectively suggest that the aromatic-bound iodine is stable in the various aquifers of this study. (authors)

  2. Iodine-129 in thyroids of grazing animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballad, R.V.; Holman, D.W.; Hennecke, E.W.; Johnson, J.E.; Manuel, O.K.; Nicholson, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    A combination of neutron activation and mass spectrometry has been used to determine the concentrations of fissiogenic 129 I and stable 127 I in thyroids of grazing animals and in mineral iodine. The 129 I/ 127 I ratios are lowest in mineral iodine and in a given area lower in cow thyroids than in deer thyroids. Near saturation levels of mineral iodine in commercial feeds and salt licks may account for differences in the 129 I levels of cows and deer. Values of the 129 I/ 127 I ratio in deer appear to vary inversely with the iodine concentration of the thyroid. (author)

  3. Iodine and creatinine testing in urine dried on filter paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zava, Theodore T., E-mail: ttzava@zrtlab.com [ZRT Laboratory, 8605 SW Creekside Place, Beaverton, OR 97008 (United States); Kapur, Sonia, E-mail: soniak@zrtlab.com [ZRT Laboratory, 8605 SW Creekside Place, Beaverton, OR 97008 (United States); Zava, David T., E-mail: dzava@zrtlab.com [ZRT Laboratory, 8605 SW Creekside Place, Beaverton, OR 97008 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Highlights: ► Dried urine iodine and creatinine extract quantitatively correlates well with liquid urine. ► Filter paper strips can be easily shipped and stored. ► Urine iodine and creatinine are stable at ambient temperature when dried on filter paper. ► Dried urine iodine and creatinine are run using a 96-well format. -- Abstract: Iodine deficiency is a world-wide health problem. A simple, convenient, and inexpensive method to monitor urine iodine levels would have enormous benefit in determining an individual's recent iodine intake or in identifying populations at risk for iodine deficiency or excess. Current methods used to monitor iodine levels require collection of a large volume of urine and its transport to a testing laboratory, both of which are inconvenient and impractical in parts of the world lacking refrigerated storage and transportation. To circumvent these limitations we developed and validated methods to collect and measure iodine and creatinine in urine dried on filter paper strips. We tested liquid urine and liquid-extracted dried urine for iodine and creatinine in a 96-well format using Sandell–Kolthoff and Jaffe reactions, respectively. Our modified dried urine iodine and creatinine assays correlated well with established liquid urine methods (iodine: R{sup 2} = 0.9483; creatinine: R{sup 2} = 0.9782). Results demonstrate that the dried urine iodine and creatinine assays are ideal for testing the iodine status of individuals and for wide scale application in iodine screening programs.

  4. Iodine and creatinine testing in urine dried on filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zava, Theodore T.; Kapur, Sonia; Zava, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dried urine iodine and creatinine extract quantitatively correlates well with liquid urine. ► Filter paper strips can be easily shipped and stored. ► Urine iodine and creatinine are stable at ambient temperature when dried on filter paper. ► Dried urine iodine and creatinine are run using a 96-well format. -- Abstract: Iodine deficiency is a world-wide health problem. A simple, convenient, and inexpensive method to monitor urine iodine levels would have enormous benefit in determining an individual's recent iodine intake or in identifying populations at risk for iodine deficiency or excess. Current methods used to monitor iodine levels require collection of a large volume of urine and its transport to a testing laboratory, both of which are inconvenient and impractical in parts of the world lacking refrigerated storage and transportation. To circumvent these limitations we developed and validated methods to collect and measure iodine and creatinine in urine dried on filter paper strips. We tested liquid urine and liquid-extracted dried urine for iodine and creatinine in a 96-well format using Sandell–Kolthoff and Jaffe reactions, respectively. Our modified dried urine iodine and creatinine assays correlated well with established liquid urine methods (iodine: R 2 = 0.9483; creatinine: R 2 = 0.9782). Results demonstrate that the dried urine iodine and creatinine assays are ideal for testing the iodine status of individuals and for wide scale application in iodine screening programs

  5. Production of Xenon Compounds by the Beta Decay of Iodine in Iodine Compounds; Production de Composes du Xenon par Desintegration Beta de l'Iode dans les Composes Iodes; 041f 0420 041e 0418 0417 0412 041e 0414 0421 0422 0412 041e 0421 041e 0415 0414 0418 041d 0415 041d 0418 0419 041a 0421 0415 041d 041e 041d 0410 041f 041e 0421 0420 0415 0414 0421 0422 0412 041e 041c 0411 0415 0422 0410 - 0420 0410 0421 041f 0410 0414 0410 0419 041e 0414 0410 0412 0419 041e 0414 0418 0421 0422 042b 0425 0421 041e 0415 0414 0418 041d 0415 041d 0418 042f 0425 ; Produccion de Compuestos de Xenon por Desintegracion Beta del Yodo de Compuestos Yodados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlow, G. J.; Perlow, M. R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1965-04-15

    It is known that most beta decays cause no change in the electron number of the atom containing the decaying nucleus. In the beta decay I{sup 129} -Xe{sup 129} in an iodine compound the electronic structure and geometry are often appropriate for formation of a xenon compound with the same ligands. This process has been discovered and studied by use of the Moessbauer effect in Xe{sup 129}. The first-excited state in Xe{sup 129} has J{sup {pi}} = 3+/2, T{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 10{sup -9} * s, and lies 40 keV above the Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half {sup +} ground state. It is populated by decay from 1,6 x 10{sup 6} y. I{sup 129}. The Moessbauer effect of the 40-keV gamma ray may readily be observed with a variety of sources and absorbers in experiments done at 4.2 Degree-Sign K. The electric quadrupole splitting of the excited state results in two absorption lines when the Doppler shift is used to scan the spectrum. The separation between lines characterizes the electronic configuration on the xenon and often unequivocally identifies the structure. In the first experiments a source of Nal{sup 129} was used with absorbers of hydroquinone clathrate, Na{sub 4}XeO{sub 6}, XeF{sub 4}, and XeF{sub 2}. Single-line spectra were observed for the clathrate and pexenate, and two-line spectra for the fluorides. The single line indicates that in the source I{sup -} -{yields} Xe{sup 0}, its iso-electronic daughter. When Na{sub 3}H{sub 2}IO{sub 6} was used as source, with clathrate absorber, the recoil-less fraction increased by a factor of 3, implying stronger bonding. KIO{sub 4} also gave a single but somewhat less intense line. With NalO{sub 3} as source and clathrate absorber, splitting was observed suggesting that IO{sub 3}{sup -} -{yields} XeO{sub 6}. This was verified by the observation of identical splitting in an XeO{sub 3} absorber used with KIO{sub 4} source. An experiment with KIC1{sub 4} * H{sub 2}O as source and clathrate absorber showed splitting somewhat smaller

  6. Time dependent analysis of Xenon spatial oscillations in small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decco, Claudia Cristina Ghirardello

    1997-01-01

    This work presents time dependent analysis of xenon spatial oscillations studying the influence of the power density distribution, type of reactivity perturbation, power level and core size, using the one-dimensional and three-dimensional analysis with the MID2 and citation codes, respectively. It is concluded that small pressurized water reactors with height smaller than 1.5 m are stable and do not have xenon spatial oscillations. (author)

  7. WHO's new recommendations about iodine prophylaxis at nuclear catastrophes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paile, Wendla

    1999-01-01

    WHO has prepared new advice about using stable iodine as protection against emission of radioactive iodine from nuclear catastrophes. The experiences from Chernobyl show that the risk for thyroid gland cancer after emission of radio-iodine is significant. The risk of serious side effects of stable iodine as single dose is stated to be minimal. Stable iodine is a safe, effective remedy for protecting the thyroid gland against radioactive iodine. It is recommended to adjust different criteria for iodine prophylaxis for new-born, children, young people and adults older than 40 years. For children of the age up to 18 years iodine prophylaxis should be considered at 10 mGy thyroid gland doses, and for young adults at 100 mGy. For adults of 40 years or more the cancer risk of radioactive iodine is very low and iodine prophylaxis is unnecessary provided that the expected does not exceed 5 Gy. The new information about risk and advantage must be considered in planning for distribution and storage of stable iodine. WHO also commends that everybody has the possibility to buy it in a pharmacy. (EHS)

  8. Recalculation of thyroid doses after the Chernobyl accident in a iodine deficient area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olko, P.; Niewiadomski, T.; Budzanowski, M.; Szybinski, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The thyroid doses were estimated in Poland shortly after the Chernobyl accident with assumption of stable iodine consumption for the reference man and areas with ''standard'' stable iodine consumption. These estimates are not representative for southern part of Poland which is known as the iodine deficient area. Therefore the thyroid doses were recalculated based on the real and differentiated stable iodine intakes for people groups of different age without and with thyroid blockade after the accident. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs, 3 tabs

  9. Recalculation of thyroid doses after the Chernobyl accident in a iodine deficient area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olko, P; Niewiadomski, T; Budzanowski, M [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Szybinski, Z [Jagiellonian Univ., Cracow (Poland). Dept. of Endocrinology

    1996-08-01

    The thyroid doses were estimated in Poland shortly after the Chernobyl accident with assumption of stable iodine consumption for the reference man and areas with ``standard`` stable iodine consumption. These estimates are not representative for southern part of Poland which is known as the iodine deficient area. Therefore the thyroid doses were recalculated based on the real and differentiated stable iodine intakes for people groups of different age without and with thyroid blockade after the accident. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs, 3 tabs.

  10. Radioactive iodine absorbing properties of tetrathiafulvalene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Tomiyasu; Nakamura, Asao (Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). Central Research Labs.); Nogawa, Norio; Oohashi, Kunio; Morikawa, Naotake

    1989-05-01

    For the purpose of searching some effective absorbents of gaseous radioactive iodine, 16 substances considered as having an affinity for iodine were investigated with regular iodine and /sup 125/I. In a preliminary survey, only tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) was found to have satisfactory absorbing properties comparable to activated charcoal. A further detailed comparison of the properties between TTF and activated charcoal led us to the conclusion that the former has more preferable properties as absorbent of radioactive iodine than the latter in all points studied. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The absorption of iodine on TTF in atmosphere was about twice as much as that on activated charcoal. Desorption of iodine from saturatedly absorbed iodine on TTF was practically negligible except trace amount of initial desorption, while that on activated charcoal was considerable (3%/50h) even in the air at room temperature. (2) Absorbed amount of iodine on activated charcoal decreased with increasing gaseous iodine concentration, air flow rate, on humidity of flowing-air. On the other hand, those factors scarcely affected that on TTF. Under an air flow rate of 1m/s, activated charcoal absorbs only 80% of iodine, while TTF absorbs more than 99%. (3) In flowing-air saturated with water vapor, iodine absorbed on activated charcoal was gradually liberated although by small amount (0.08%/100h), while that on TTF was much more stable for a long period (0.004%/100h). As a conclusion, TTF is considered to be useful as a quite effective radioactive iodine absorbent, especially in the case where protection from radioactive iodine should be serious, though it is expensive now. (author).

  11. Radioactive iodine absorbing properties of tetrathiafulvalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tomiyasu; Nakamura, Asao; Nogawa, Norio; Oohashi, Kunio; Morikawa, Naotake.

    1989-01-01

    For the purpose of searching some effective absorbents of gaseous radioactive iodine, 16 substances considered as having an affinity for iodine were investigated with regular iodine and 125 I. In a preliminary survey, only tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) was found to have satisfactory absorbing properties comparable to activated charcoal. A further detailed comparison of the properties between TTF and activated charcoal led us to the conclusion that the former has more preferable properties as absorbent of radioactive iodine than the latter in all points studied. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The absorption of iodine on TTF in atmosphere was about twice as much as that on activated charcoal. Desorption of iodine from saturatedly absorbed iodine on TTF was practically negligible except trace amount of initial desorption, while that on activated charcoal was considerable (3%/50h) even in the air at room temperature. (2) Absorbed amount of iodine on activated charcoal decreased with increasing gaseous iodine concentration, air flow rate, on humidity of flowing-air. On the other hand, those factors scarcely affected that on TTF. Under an air flow rate of 1m/s, activated charcoal absorbs only 80% of iodine, while TTF absorbs more than 99%. (3) In flowing-air saturated with water vapor, iodine absorbed on activated charcoal was gradually liberated although by small amount (0.08%/100h), while that on TTF was much more stable for a long period (0.004%/100h). As a conclusion, TTF is considered to be useful as a quite effective radioactive iodine absorbent, especially in the case where protection from radioactive iodine should be serious, though it is expensive now. (author)

  12. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Moran, J.E.; Blackwood, V.

    2007-01-01

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic 129 I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils

  13. Production of high specific activity 123I for protein iodination for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legoux, Y.; Cieur, M.; Crouzel, C.; Syrota, A.

    1985-01-01

    Iodine-123 is produced via xenon-133 by irradiation of a sodium iodide target with 108 MeV deuterons from the synchrocyclotron of IPN. The on-line production method is described. The specific activity of the iodine is determined by neutron activation analysis and by a radioimmunological method. The conditions labelling different proteins (insulin, angiotensin) are given and also the purification method to obtain a product ready for injection to patients. (author)

  14. Production of high specific activity /sup 123/I for protein iodination for medical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legoux, Y; Cieur, M [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Goutheraud, R; Drouet, J [Centre National de Transfusion Sanguine, 75 - Paris (France); Crouzel, C; Syrota, A [CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot

    1985-01-01

    Iodine-123 is produced via xenon-133 by irradiation of a sodium iodide target with 108 MeV deuterons from the synchrocyclotron of IPN. The on-line production method is described. The specific activity of the iodine is determined by neutron activation analysis and by a radioimmunological method. The conditions labelling different proteins (insulin, angiotensin) are given and also the purification method to obtain a product ready for injection to patients.

  15. Evaluation of soil-plant transfer factors of iodine. Estimation of annual ingestion for iodine from the diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, Arsene.

    1980-11-01

    The author presents the iodine middle contents of the soils and vegetables. A synthesis on the iodine evolution in the soils and vegetables allows to conclude that the vegetable absorption of this isotope is correlated with the isotopiquely exchangeable iodine of the soil. The soil-plant transfer-factors are calculated for the vegetables, cereals, fruits from the stable iodine quantitative analysis. The annual iodine ingestion has been estimated from the dietary of the European Communites areas. This one is a little different of the quantity estimated by CRESTA-LACOURLY-R 2979, yet the contribution by consummation unity is different [fr

  16. Iodine and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yarrington, Christina; Pearce, Elizabeth N.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine is a necessary element for the production of thyroid hormone. We will review the impact of dietary iodine status on thyroid function in pregnancy. We will discuss iodine metabolism, homeostasis, and nutritional recommendations for pregnancy. We will also discuss the possible effects of environmental contaminants on iodine utilization in pregnant women.

  17. Iodine Prophylaxis and Nuclear Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Iodine is a highly volatile element therefore being very mobile in the environment. It enters the metabolism of living organisms and is selectively taken up and concentrated in the thyroid gland. The plume (cloud-like formation) of radioactive material that might be released in the environment in the case of a serious nuclear accident, primarily consists of the radioactive isotopes of iodine. Among those, due to its decay properties, is the most important 131 I. The effective means of protecting the thyroid gland against exposure to radioactive iodine is an intake of stable iodine. Therefore, one of the central issues in the emergency planning is to determine whether and at which projected thyroid radiation dose stable iodine should be given to the population. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) set the generic optimized intervention value for iodine prophylaxis to 100 mGy of avertable committed dose to a thyroid.The prophylaxis is implemented by utilizing the pills of pills of potassium iodine (KI). The efficacy of KI in protecting the thyroid gland depends upon the time of intake relative to the start of exposure to radioactive iodine. The best results are obtained if KI is taken 1-2 hours before or immediately after the start of exposure. The recommended dosage, based upon the study performed by Il'in et.al. is 130 mg/day. KI should be taken at least three days after the acute exposure to radioiodine, to prevent accumulation in a thyroid gland of radioiodine excreted from the other compartments of the body. The largest epidemiological study on the effects of KI prophylaxis ever performed was the one in Poland after the Chernobyl accident. Stable iodine was given as single dose of KI solution to 10.5 million of children and 7 millions of adults. Among children no serious side effects were seen while only two adults (with previously recorded iodine sensitivity) had severe respiratory distresses. Polish experiences showed that rapid response to such

  18. Iodine intake in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.P.A.; Hetherton, A.M.; O'Carroll, D.; Smith, D.F.; O'Halloran, M.J.; O'Donovan, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    A study of urinary iodine excretion and thyroid gland uptake of radioactive iodine 131 I was undertaken in the Dublin area with a view to providing data on the current iodine status in Ireland. A mean urinary iodine excretion of 118±82μg/gram creatinine (Median 96) obtained from 821 subjects attending general hospital outpatient clinics in the Dublin area in 1987, while excluding severe iodine deficiency in this particular cohort, obscured the fact that 250 (30%) had iodine excretion values ≤70 μ/g creatinine, a value approximating to the minimum daily iodine requirement. The results provide sufficient evidence of sporadic iodine deficiency to justify a more widespread study of the iodine status of the Irish population with a view to making recommendations on the possible need for iodine prophylaxis

  19. A new approach for treatment of xenon problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailescu, Nicolae

    1999-01-01

    It is known that the fission product xenon 135, with a half life of 9.17 hours, has a very large absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. A small fraction of this nuclear species is formed directly in fission, but the major part results from the decay of iodine 135 with a half life of 6.59 hours. In this paper we shall present the 'fundamental' theory of an 'adiabatic' approach which appears to be promising both in cutting down computational time and in giving additional physical insight into the combined spatial-temporal variations. An adiabatic motivation is implicit in early work on reactor kinetics in which the reactor flux is separated into a product of a time dependent function and a function of all the other relevant variables, including the time; if the latter factor is slowly varying in time the approach is 'adiabatic'. (author)

  20. RESULTS FROM THE XENON100 EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rino Persiani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The XENON program consists in operating and developing double-phase time projection chambers using liquid xenon as the target material. It aims to directly detect dark matter in the form of WIMPs via their elastic scattering off xenon nuclei. The current phase is XENON100, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS, with a 62 kg liquid xenon target. We present the 100.9 live days of data, acquired between January and June 2010, with no evidence of dark matter, as well as the new results of the last scientific run, with about 225 live days. The next phase, XENON1T, will increase the sensitivity by two orders of magnitude.

  1. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  2. Latest results from XENON100 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotto Lavina, L.

    2014-01-01

    XENON100 is the current phase of the XENON dark matter program, which aims for the direct detection of WIMPs with liquid xenon time-projection chambers. We present the status of the experiment after 224.6 live days taken in 2011 and 2012 during which the detector successfully improved in terms of more calibration data, higher xenon purity, lower threshold and better background removal. The analysis has yielded no evidence for dark matter interactions. The status of the next generation XENON1T detector will be briefly described. The goal of XENON1T is to increase the fiducial volume by a factor 10 and reduce the background noise by a factor 100

  3. Xenon changes under power-burst conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Under ordinary operating conditions the xenon concentration in a reactor core can change significantly in times on the order of hours. Core transients of safety significance are much more rapid and hence calculations are done with xenon concentration held constant. However, in certain transients (such as reactivity initiated accidents) there is a very large power surge and the question arises as to whether under these circumstances the xenon concentration could change. This would be particularly important if the xenon were reduced thereby tending to make the accident autocatalytic. The objective of the present study is to quantify this effect to see if it could be important

  4. The XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Antunes, B.; Arneodo, F.; Balata, M.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breskin, A.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Chiarini, A.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Corrieri, R.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Gangi, P. Di; Giovanni, A. Di; Diglio, S.; Disdier, J.-M.; Doets, M.; Duchovni, E.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Front, D.; Fulgione, W.; Rosso, A. Gallo; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Giboni, K.-L.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grandi, L.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Huhmann, C.; Itay, R.; James, A.; Kaminsky, B.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lombardi, F.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Maier, R.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Molinario, A.; Morå, K.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orlandi, D.; Othegraven, R.; Pakarha, P.; Parlati, S.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; García, D. Ramírez; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Santos, J. M. F. dos; Saldanha, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Shockley, E.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stern, M.; Stein, A.; Tatananni, D.; Tatananni, L.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Vargas, M.; Wack, O.; Walet, R.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The XENON1T experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is the first WIMP dark matter detector operating with a liquid xenon target mass above the ton-scale. Out of its 3.2 t liquid xenon inventory, 2.0 t constitute the active target of the dual-phase time projection chamber. The scintillation and ionization signals from particle interactions are detected with low-background photomultipliers. This article describes the XENON1T instrument and its subsystems as well as strategies to achieve an unprecedented low background level. First results on the detector response and the performance of the subsystems are also presented.

  5. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  6. The XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Giboni, K.L.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Stern, M.; Tatananni, D.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Doets, M.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A.; Walet, R. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Othegraven, R.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Antunes, B.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Balata, M.; Bruno, G.; Corrieri, R.; Disdier, J.M.; Rosso, A.G.; Molinario, A.; Orlandi, D.; Parlati, S.; Tatananni, L.; Wang, Z. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; James, A.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Maier, R.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B.; Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Moraa, K.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Breskin, A.; Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Front, D.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.; Wack, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Sivers, M. von [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Chiarini, A.; Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, IMT Atlantique, Nantes (France); Fei, J.; Lombardi, F.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Huhmann, C.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Vargas, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Messina, M. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Pienaar, J. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Garcia, D.R. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Reichard, S. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lavina, L.S. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Wei, Y. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is the first WIMP dark matter detector operating with a liquid xenon target mass above the ton-scale. Out of its 3.2 t liquid xenon inventory, 2.0 t constitute the active target of the dual-phase time projection chamber. The scintillation and ionization signals from particle interactions are detected with low-background photomultipliers. This article describes the XENON1T instrument and its subsystems as well as strategies to achieve an unprecedented low background level. First results on the detector response and the performance of the subsystems are also presented. (orig.)

  7. The XENON1T dark matter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Giboni, K.L.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Stern, M.; Tatananni, D.; Zhang, Y.; Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Doets, M.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A.; Walet, R.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Othegraven, R.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Amaro, F.D.; Antunes, B.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M.; Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I.; Balata, M.; Bruno, G.; Corrieri, R.; Disdier, J.M.; Rosso, A.G.; Molinario, A.; Orlandi, D.; Parlati, S.; Tatananni, L.; Wang, Z.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; James, A.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Maier, R.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wulf, J.; Bauermeister, B.; Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Moraa, K.; Pelssers, B.; Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C.; Breskin, A.; Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Front, D.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N.; Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.; Wack, O.; Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. von; Chiarini, A.; Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M.; Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D.; Fei, J.; Lombardi, F.; Ni, K.; Ye, J.; Fieguth, A.; Huhmann, C.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Vargas, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C.; Fulgione, W.; Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Lindemann, S.; Messina, M.; Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P.; Pienaar, J.; Garcia, D.R.; Reichard, S.; Lavina, L.S.; Stein, A.; Wang, H.; Trinchero, G.; Wei, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The XENON1T experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is the first WIMP dark matter detector operating with a liquid xenon target mass above the ton-scale. Out of its 3.2 t liquid xenon inventory, 2.0 t constitute the active target of the dual-phase time projection chamber. The scintillation and ionization signals from particle interactions are detected with low-background photomultipliers. This article describes the XENON1T instrument and its subsystems as well as strategies to achieve an unprecedented low background level. First results on the detector response and the performance of the subsystems are also presented. (orig.)

  8. Xenon-induced axial power oscillations in the 400 MW PBMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strydom, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    The redistribution of the spatial xenon concentration in the 400 MW Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) core has a non-linear, time-dependent feedback effect on the spatial power density during several types of operational transient events. Due to the inherent weak coupling that exists between the iodine and xenon formation and destruction rates, as well as the complicating effect of spatial variance in the thermal flux field, reactor cores have been analyzed for a number of decades for the occurrence and severity of xenon-induced axial power oscillations. Of specific importance is the degree of oscillation damping exhibited by the core during transients, which involves axial variations in the local power density. In this paper the TINTE reactor dynamics code is used to assess the stability of the current 400 MW PBMR core design with regard to axial xenon oscillations. The focus is mainly on the determination of the inherent xenon and power oscillation damping properties by utilizing a set of hypothetical control rod insertion transients at various power levels. The oscillation damping properties of two 100%-50%-100% load-follow transients, one of which includes the de-stabilizing axial effects of moving control rods, are also discussed in some detail. The study shows that, although first axial mode oscillations do occur in the 400 MW PBMR core, the inherent damping of these oscillations is high, and that none of the investigated load-follow transients resulted in diverging oscillations. It is also shown that the PBMR core exhibits no radial oscillation components for these xenon-induced axial power oscillations

  9. Measurement of vascular flow in the brain with the xenon/CT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wist, A.O.; Cothran, A.; Fatouros, P.P.; Kishore, P.R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are proposing a modification of the xenon/CT method that allows measurement of the flow in the different brain vessels. Based on an improved stable xenon/CT method, they developed several additional algorithms to differentiate the vessel flow from tissue flow and from artifacts and noise, which are based on the height, steepness, and other parameters of the detected flow values. The vessel flow maps, together with the tissue flow maps and new composite flow maps of recent patients, demonstrate that the stable xenon/CT technique can be extended to quantify vascular flow in the brain. The diagnostic capability of this method can be further improved by removing the vessel flow from the flow maps

  10. Aged anthropogenic iodine in a boreal peat bog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillant, S.; Sheppard, M.I.; Denys, S.; Leclerc Cessac, E.

    2004-01-01

    Iodine-129 is a radionuclide of major concern in the international safety assessments for deep geological storage and disposal of nuclear waste because it migrates quickly through the geosphere to the biosphere and then from the soil to humans through the food-chain. However, in organic soils the 129 I may be immobilized over a long time period, and so these soils represent a potential accumulation point in the biosphere. Effects of long residence times of iodine in soils are scarce. The present paper gives some insight on the aging of stable iodine, under natural conditions. Stable iodine was introduced as KI in 1987 at the base of a small natural sphagnum bog to simulate arrival of iodine via a groundwater discharge from the geosphere. Previous data revealed the spread of the iodine outwards spatially from the basal spike and also recorded its rise towards the bog surface. Fifteen years later, the groundwater, the soil and the vegetation have been sampled and analyzed for iodine. The results we will present give insight on the mobility of 'aged' iodine with time, the retention properties of the peat, and provide iodine transfer factors for native boreal plant species. The data show iodine: - continues to slowly spread from the spike after 15 years, - is more strongly retained on the solid phase at the surface than at depth, - the chemical structure of the peat may influence the retention of iodine as shown by NMR analysis, - iodine retention has become greater with time, and - herbaceous species are the greatest accumulators. This study demonstrates bogs present good sinks for iodine and limit the transfer of iodine to some of the 'wildlife' food-chains. (author)

  11. Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism Fact Sheet Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism April, 2012 Download PDFs English Zulu ... prepare for RAI or surgery. How does radioactive iodine treatment work? Iodine is important for making thyroid ...

  12. Iodine and thyroid function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Rim Chung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe iodine deficiency causes hypothyroidism that results in impaired somatic growth and motor development in children. Mild and moderate iodine deficiencies cause multifocal autonomous growth of thyroid, which results in thyrotoxicosis. On the other hand, iodine excess is associated with the development of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. In areas of iodine deficiency, a sudden increase in iodine intake is associated with transient hyperthyroidism. Recent studies demonstrated that long-term thyroid function of subjects who experienced both iodine deficiency and iodine excess during childhood tended to be abnormal despite optimization of their current iodine intake. Iodine status in the Korean Peninsula is very unique because people in the Republic of Korea have been shown to have predominantly excessive iodine levels, whereas the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is known to be an iodine-deficient area. Further research is warranted to verify the optimal ranges of iodine intake and to clarify the effects of iodine intake on thyroid disorders in the Korean Peninsula.

  13. Dark matter search with XENON1T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, J.

    2018-01-01

    Most matter in the universe consists of 'dark matter' unknown to particle physics. Deep underground detectors such as XENON1T attempt to detect rare collisions of dark matter with ordinary atoms. This thesis describes the first dark matter search of XENON1T, how dark matter signals would appear in

  14. Sensitivity of gaseous xenon ionisation chambers (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhl, C.

    1960-01-01

    It seems advantageous to fill an ionization chamber with xenon gas when this chamber is used for measuring a low intensity and high energy electron or positron beam, or monitoring a gamma beam. In the study of 5 to 50 MeV electrons, xenon allows for the ionization chamber yield, an improvement of a factor 4,5. (author) [fr

  15. Xenon lighting adjusted to plant requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koefferlein, M.; Doehring, T.; Payer, H.D.; Seidlitz, H.K. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The high luminous flux and spectral properties of xenon lamps would provide an ideal luminary for plant lighting if not excess IR radiation poses several problems for an application: the required filter systems reduce the irradiance at spectral regions of particular importance for plant development. Most of the economical drawbacks of xenon lamps are related to the difficult handling of that excess IR energy. Furthermore, the temporal variation of the xenon output depending on the oscillations of the applied AC voltage has to be considered for the plant development. However, xenon lamps outperform other lighting systems with respect to spectral stability, immediate response, and maximum luminance. Therefore, despite considerable competition by other lighting techniques, xenon lamps provide a very useful tool for special purposes. In plant lighting however, they seem to play a less important role as other lamp and lighting developments can meet these particular requirements at lower costs.

  16. Mechanism for transient migration of xenon in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.-Y.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Andersson, D. A.; Stanek, C. R.; Sickafus, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, we report recent work on atomistic modeling of diffusion migration events of the fission gas product xenon in UO 2 nuclear fuel. Under nonequilibrium conditions, Xe atoms can occupy the octahedral interstitial site, in contrast to the thermodynamically most stable uranium substitutional site. A transient migration mechanism involving Xe and two oxygen atoms is identified using basin constrained molecular dynamics employing a Buckingham type interatomic potential. This mechanism is then validated using density functional theory calculations using the nudged elastic band method. An overall reduction in the migration barrier of 1.6-2.7 eV is obtained compared to vacancy-mediated diffusion on the uranium sublattice.

  17. The atmosphere of Mars - Detection of krypton and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.; Biller, J. E.; Lafleur, A. L.; Rushneck, D. R.; Howarth, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Krypton and xenon have been discovered in the Martian atmosphere with the mass spectrometer on the second Viking lander. Krypton is more abundant than xenon. The relative abundances of the krypton isotopes appear normal, but the ratio of xenon-129 to xenon-132 is enhanced on Mars relative to the terrestrial value for this ratio. Some possible implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Iodination of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.V.; Feldthus, A.; Carlsen, L.

    1990-01-01

    Phenol is iodinated in aqueous solution at pH 5 (acetate buffer) by elemental iodine or, if the iodine is present as iodide, enzymatically controlled by peroxidases. Generally mono-, di- and triiodophenols are obtained, the overall product composition being virtually identical for the two iodination modes. However, there is a tendency to a higher para to ortho ratio for the enzymatically controlled reaction. The mutual ratios of the single iodophenols depends on the initial concentration ratio between phenol and the iodinating species. The first step in the iodination leads preferentially to substitution in the ortho position rather than in the para position in contract to e.g. the corresponding bromination. The relative rates of the competive reactions in the combined iodination scheme has been derived. (author) 2 tabs., 3 ills., 15 refs

  19. Radon screening for XENON1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Sebastian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Radon with its isotope {sup 222}Rn is one of the dominant sources of internal background in liquid xenon detectors searching for low energetic rare events like WIMP-nucleon scattering. In my talk I briefly review the problem posed by {sup 222}Rn and motivate the screening strategy followed by XENON1T. I introduce the radon emanation technique making use of ultra low background proportional counters and present selected results obtained during the design and construction phases of XENON1T. Finally, I sketch advances in radon emanation assay techniques and give a short outlook on upcoming measurements.

  20. Stable xenon CT CBF measurements in prevalent cerebrovascular disorders (stroke)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Tachibana, H.; Okabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local tissue: blood partition coefficient (L lambda) values were measured for small volumes of gray or white matter by CT CBF. Single compartment analysis was used but fitted to infinity in normal volunteers aged between 20 to 100 years (N . 20). Hemispheric LCBF and L lambda values were compared to those of 61 age matched patients with transient ischemic attacks (TIAs, N . 10), reversible ischemic neurologic deficits (RINDS, N . 10), acute and chronic cerebral infarctions associated with emboli from atherosclerotic plaques or complete occlusion of internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries (n . 9) or of cardiac origin (N . 3), cerebral hemorrhage (N . 1), multi-infarct dementia (MID) (N . 11) and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) (N . 17). In normal aging, L lambda s were normal, but LCBF showed diffuse age-related declines. Symptomatic cerebrovascular disease was characterized by accentuation of age-related LCBF declines. TIAs with unilateral ICA occlusion showed bilateral reductions of LCBF more evident in ischemic hemispheres. TIAs due to fibrino-platelet emboli from ulcerated, non-occlusive ICA plaques were characterized by transient unilateral, localized LCBF reductions. All TIAs showed normal L lambda values. RINDS showed both LCBF and L lambda reductions. Larger embolic infarctions of ICA origin, whether acute or chronic, showed zones of zero flow with surrounding reductions of LCBF and L lambda values. Recent cerebral embolism of cardiac origin likewise exhibited zones of zero flow surrounded by reduced LCBF and L lambda values; but in chronic stages LCBF and L lambda values adjacent to zero flow zones were normal. MID was characterized by patchy reductions of LCBF and L lambda values throughout both hemispheres. Brain tissues surrounding AVM showed normal L lambda values but LCBF values were reduced due to steal

  1. Scintillating liquid xenon calorimeter for precise electron/photon/jet physics at high energy high luminosity hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.; Luckey, D.; Pelly, D.; Shotkin, S.; Sumorok, K.; Wadsworth, B.; Yan, X.J.; You, C.; Zhang, X.; Chen, E.G.; Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Montgomery, D.B.; Sullivan, J.D.; Bolozdynya, A.; Chernyshev, V.; Goritchev, P.; Khovansky, V.; Kouchenkov, A.; Kovalenko, A.; Lebedenko, V.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Epstein, V.; Zeldovich, S.; Krasnokutsky, R.; Shuvalov, R.; Aprile, E.; Mukherjee, R.; Suzuki, M.; Moulsen, M.; Sugimoto, S.; Okada, K.; Fujino, T.; Matsuda, T.; Miyajima, M.; Doke, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Hitachi, A.; Kashiwagi, T.; Nagasawa, Y.; Ichinose, H.; Ishida, N.; Nakasugi, T.; Ito, T.; Masuda, K.; Shibamura, E.; Wallraff, W.; Vivargent, M.; Mutterer, M.; Chen, H.S.; Tang, H.W.; Tung, K.L.; Ding, H.L.; Takahashi, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors use αs well as e, π, p, d and heavy ion beams to test prototype scintillating liquid xenon detectors, with large UV photodiodes and fast amplifiers submersed directly in liquid xenon. The data show very large photoelectron yields (10 7 /GeV) and high energy resolution (σ(E)/E 1.6 GeV). The α spectra are stable over long term and can be used to calibrate the detectors. Full size liquid xenon detectors have been constructed, to study cosmic μ's and heavy ions. The authors report the progress on the design and construction of the 5 x 5 and 11 x 11 cell liquid xenon detectors which will be tested in high energy beams to determine the e/π ratio. The authors describe the design and the unique properties of the proposed scintillating LXe calorimeter for the SSC

  2. Radiation protection in nuclear emergencies, including thyroid blockage with iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Government of the Federal Republic of Germany has set emergency reference levels of radiation doses at which countermeasures such as sheltering, evacuation, iodine prophylaxis and resettlement should be considered in case of severe accidents in nuclear installations. Emergency facilities are to be set up for a range of meausres to protect the public, such as assessment of contamination and subsequent decontamination. Recommendations as to further therapeutic measures will be made by medical personnel. The administration of stable iodine can block or reduce the accumulation of radioiodine in the thyroid gland. Stable potassium iodine tablets (100 mg each) will be distributed by the local authorities. Since iodine deficiency is still prevalent in large parts of the Federal Republic of Germany, iodine prophylaxis will be recommended only when relatively high radiation doses to the thyroid gland are to be expected. Resettlement of the population must be considered if an excessive dose is expected in the affected area over a long period. (orig.) [de

  3. Xenon as an adjunct in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.E.; Radue, E.W.; Zilkha, E.; Loh, L.

    1979-01-01

    Nonradioactive xenon was used for enhancement in computed tomography in a series of 18 patients requiring general anesthesia. The method and results are described. The properties of xenon are radically different from those of intravenous iodides, and the enhancement patterns demonstrate different aspects of both normal and abnormal tissues. In our limited experience, it has been of value in those isodense and low attenuation lesions that have not enhanced after intravenous Conray. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de

  4. Transportable Xenon Laboratory (TXL-1) Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Robert C.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Willett, Jesse A.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-03-07

    The Transportable Xenon Laboratory Operations Manual is a guide to set up and shut down TXL, a fully contained laboratory made up of instruments to identify and measure concentrations of the radioactive isotopes of xenon by taking air samples and analyzing them. The TXL is housed in a standard-sized shipping container. TXL can be shipped to and function in any country in the world.

  5. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-01-01

    A modification of a common commercial Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilatory rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration

  6. Xenon-computed tomography of kidney transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutze, S.; Reichmuth, B.; Suess, C.; Lippert, J.; Ewert, R.

    1994-01-01

    Xenon-CT is an established method for determining cerebral perfusion, while applications in other organs are rare. We evaluated the diagnostic potential of measuring the regional Renal Blood Flow (rRBF) in 10 patients with transplanted kidneys by xenon-CT. We found significant differences in the rRBF between the renal medulla and the cortex. There were no differences between normal renal transplants and transplants with chronic rejection. (orig.) [de

  7. Weird muonium diffusion in solid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, V.G.; Kirillov, B.F.; Pirogov, A.V.

    1992-09-01

    Muon and muonium spin rotation and relaxation parameters were studied in liquid and solid xenon. The small diamagnetic fraction (∼ 10%) observed in condensed xenon is believed to be Xeμ + . The muonium hyperfine frequency was measured for the first time in liquid Xe and was found to be in agreement with the vacuum value. A nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the muonium relaxation rate probably indicates that muonium diffusion in solid Xe is of quantum nature. 16 refs., 3 figs

  8. Iodine deficiency and iodine excess in Jiangsu Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords:
    iodine deficiency, iodine excess, endemic goiter, drinking water, iodine intake, thyroid function, thyroid size, iodized salt, iodized oil, IQ, physical development, hearing capacity, epidemiology, meta-analysis, IDD, randomized trial, intervention, USA, Bangladesh,

  9. Xenon recovery from molybdenum-99 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubin, R.T.; Paviet, P.D.; Bresee, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors research and development on the recycle of used commercial nuclear fuel as an option for future nuclear fuel cycles that offers increased use of uranium and thorium resources and a possible reduction in the overall cost of nuclear waste management. The two alternatives, direct disposal of used fuel and fuel recycle, are broadly referred to as open and closed fuel cycles. One requirement of a closed fuel cycle is the safe management of radioactive off-gases, which includes 14 C, radioiodine and the noble gases, including radio-xenon. The longest lived relevant radio-xenon isotope is 127 Xe; with a half-life of just 36.35 days it is feasible to trap and hold the radio-xenon to allow for decay to safe environmental levels. However, the very weak chemical bonds of noble gases, in this case xenon, make them difficult to trap, which led to an extensive DOE-NE study of noble gas adsorption on various molecular sieves as an alternative to costly cryogenics processes. Preliminary results indicate that xenon adsorption at near room temperature on molecular sieves, both synthetic and natural, may have both cost and efficiency advantages over cryogenic processes. These results appear to have direct application in helping achieve the United Nations Security Council goal of reducing xenon emissions from medical isotope producers

  10. Xenon recovery from molybdenum-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN, 37931 (United States); Paviet, P.D.; Bresee, J.C. [U.S. Department of Energy,1000 Independence Ave, S.W., Washington DC, 20585-1290 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors research and development on the recycle of used commercial nuclear fuel as an option for future nuclear fuel cycles that offers increased use of uranium and thorium resources and a possible reduction in the overall cost of nuclear waste management. The two alternatives, direct disposal of used fuel and fuel recycle, are broadly referred to as open and closed fuel cycles. One requirement of a closed fuel cycle is the safe management of radioactive off-gases, which includes {sup 14}C, radioiodine and the noble gases, including radio-xenon. The longest lived relevant radio-xenon isotope is {sup 127}Xe; with a half-life of just 36.35 days it is feasible to trap and hold the radio-xenon to allow for decay to safe environmental levels. However, the very weak chemical bonds of noble gases, in this case xenon, make them difficult to trap, which led to an extensive DOE-NE study of noble gas adsorption on various molecular sieves as an alternative to costly cryogenics processes. Preliminary results indicate that xenon adsorption at near room temperature on molecular sieves, both synthetic and natural, may have both cost and efficiency advantages over cryogenic processes. These results appear to have direct application in helping achieve the United Nations Security Council goal of reducing xenon emissions from medical isotope producers.

  11. Iodine deficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S M [Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1994-12-31

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.).

  12. A solar simulator-pumped atomic iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Weaver, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar-pumped gas laser, was excited with a 4-kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator. Continuous lasing at 1.315 micron for over 10 ms was obtained for static filling of n-C3F7I vapor. By momentarily flowing the lasant, a 30-Hz pulsed output was obtained for about 200 ms. The peak laser power observed was 4 W for which the system efficiency reached 0.1%. These results indicate that direct solar pumping of a gas laser for power conversion in space is indeed feasible.

  13. Considerations regarding iodine prophylaxis in radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M.R.; Gisone, P.; Rojo, A.M.; Dubner, D.; Bruno, H.

    1995-01-01

    The indication for the blockade of thyroid gland by the administration of stable iodide is the main countermeasure for diminishing the thyroid uptake of radioiodine following radiological accidents with potential release of radioiodine into the environment in order to avoid deterministic effects and to decrease the probability of stochastic effects. Iodine prophylaxis should be considered along with other countermeasures like sheltering indoors, evacuation and control on contaminated foods. In this communication different factors related to accidental situations regarding iodine prophylaxis are evaluated. A therapeutical scheme is proposed in order to be applied in countries of this region. (author). 4 refs

  14. In Situ Measurement of Atmospheric Krypton and Xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratorys Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking missions krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

  15. Modification of the axial offsets trajectory method to control xenon oscillation during load following operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro

    1996-01-01

    A new method which can give continuous guidance for controlling axial xenon oscillations in large PWRs has been presented. The method is based on two additional newly defined axial offsets, A Oi and A Ox together with the conventional axial offset of power distribution A Op. A Oi and A Ox are the axial offsets of power distributions which would give the current iodine and xenon distributions under equilibrium conditions, respectively. The information from A Oi, A Ox and A Op are used to display the trajectory of (A Op - A Ox, A Oi - A Ox) in the X-Y plane. The trajectory shows a very characteristic behavior. With the characteristics in mind the xenon oscillation can be controlled quite easily to lead the plot to the origin where three A Os are identical. The method has been proved with the power level constant. However, it is necessary to modify the definition of A Ox so as to apply this method to load following operations. A reasonable way of the modification is described and the results are presented. (author)

  16. Control of xenon spatial oscillations during load follow of nuclear reactor via robust servo systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Hiroyuki; Yada, Yukihiro; Iwazumi, Tetsuo; Morita, Yoshifumi.

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the control problem of xenon spatial oscillations in the axial direction during load following operations of a nuclear reactor. The system model is described by a one-group diffusion equation with xenon and power feedbacks and iodine-xenon dynamic equations and controlled by full-length and part-length control rods. In order to achieve the control purpose we formulate the control model as the design problem of robust servo systems for distributed parameter reactor systems. Hence the total thermal power and the axial offset are chosen as outputs to be controlled. The control law is designed based upon finite-dimensional systems which are constructed by linearizing around steady states, approximating by the Galerkin approximate method and reducing dimensions via the singular perturbation method. From a computational point of view a simple computational algorithm to obtain an approximate solution of the steady state neutron balance is developed via the perturbation method. Some results of numerical simulations are represented to show effectiveness of the theory developed in this paper. Particularly it is shown that the designed servo systems are robust against model errors with the linearization and the model truncation. (author)

  17. Preventive distribution of steady iodine in France: presentation of the public information campaign; La distribution preventive d'iode stable en france: presentation de la campagne d'information des populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This report briefly comments the lessons learned from the last iodine distribution campaign which started in June 2009, and concerned about 500.000 people living or working within 10 kilometres around the 19 French nuclear power stations. It briefly describes the adopted communication plan, how a willing behaviour of citizens was looked for. It briefly explains the different behaviours observed during this campaign: only one citizen out of two retrieved its pills in chemist's shops

  18. Immobilization of fission iodine by reaction with insoluble natural organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, S.M.; Schmett, G.T.; Kimble, G.; Emerson, D.W.; Turner, M.F.; Rudin, M.

    2008-01-01

    Iodine-129 is a fission product and highly mobile in the environment. Along with other stable isotopes of iodine, 129 I is released during reprocessing of nuclear fuel and must be trapped to prevent the release of radioactivity to the environment. Past studies have provided evidence that iodine can become associated with natural organic matter (NOM). This research explores the use of NOM (sphagnum peat and humic acid) to sequester iodine from the vapor and aqueous phases. NOM-associated iodine may be stable for geological storage. NOM-sequestered iodine can be recovered by pyrolysis to prepare target materials for transmutation. The nature of the NOM-iodine association has been explored. (author)

  19. Marine geochemistry of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, H.; Elderfield, H.

    1985-01-01

    Iodine has long been classified as a biophilic element with analyses showing that iodine is strongly enriched, relative to seawater concentrations in both plankton and particulate matter and that the concentration of iodine found in surface sediments is still further enriched relative to that found in the sedimenting particulate matter. The extent of enrichment of iodine relative to carbon in deep sea surface sediments has been shown to depend on the carbon accumulation rate. Iodine decomposition rates have been calculated and are shown to vary with the sedimentation rate in the same manner as has been shown for organic carbon. Vertical profiles of total dissolved iodine, iodate and iodide in interstitial waters of sediments from the north east Atlantic are characterised by three zones of reaction as identified by changes in the concentration of iodate and iodide. These reaction zones represent (i) iodide production (ii) iodide oxidation and (iii) iodate reduction. Pore water and solid phase iodine profiles from cores containing turbidite units have shown that iodine, released to pore waters as iodide during the oxidation of the organic matter, has been scavenged after diffusing upwards into a less reducing region of the sediment. (author)

  20. The iodine reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The iodine is an important element because it has long life isotopes (such as iodine 129) and a great mobility in natural media. Iodine presents a complex chemistry because of its volatility and its strong redox reactivity. The S.E.C.R. works to better understand the reactivity of this element in different natural, industrial or biological environments. It plays a part in thermochemical sites as a possible way of hydrogen formation. This seminar gives some aspects relative to the chemical reactivity of iodine, since its thermochemistry in the I/S cycles to produce hydrogen to its reactivity in the natural medium and its potential radiological impact. This document includes 4 presentations transparencies) dealing with: the 129 I cycle rejected in the low radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents of the La Hague reprocessing plant (C. Frechou); a bibliographic review of iodine retention in soils (F. Bazer-Bachi); the hydrogen production and the iodine/sulfur thermochemical cycle (role of iodine in the process); and the direct characterization by electro-spray ionization mass spectroscopy of iodine fixation by fulvic acids (P. Reiller, B. Amekraz, C. Moulin, V. Moulin)

  1. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  2. Tracing the Iodine-129 fallout in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Niello, Jorge; Negri, Agustin; Arazi, Andres [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. TANDAR; Wallner, Anton [The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Niello, Jorge Fernandez [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Campus Miguelete, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Long-lived {sup 129}I (half-life=15.6 Ma) is produced naturally by irradiation of atmospheric xenon by cosmic neutrons and in the sub-surface by spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U, from which the natural inventory of {sup 129}I has been estimated to be around 50,000 kg, only 140 kg of them corresponds to the hydrospheric inventory. Nuclear tests and accidents have added between 45-130 kg. Apart from a global atmospheric fallout component, {sup 129}I has been released from several nuclear fuel reprocessing plants located in the Northern Hemisphere (ca. 6000 kg) which serve as localized sources in oceanographic-tracer experiments. In this presentation, we report results from a study exploring the presence of {sup 129}I in the Southern Hemisphere by determining {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I isotopic ratios in water samples (rivers, lakes and shallow sea-water) taken at different latitudes in Argentina including Antarctica. The iodine-127 and iodine-129 concentrations were measured via ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), respectively. Distribution of both isotopes can be understood considering tropospheric circulation patterns, possible sources and regional precipitation patterns. Natural and anthropogenic sources for the Southern Hemisphere and their inventories are discussed. Similar contribution came from natural sources and nuclear tests. Contribution from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants placed in the Northern hemisphere can be neglected. (author)

  3. Iodine mineral waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iluta Alexandru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Iodine mineral waters are found especially in sub-Carpathian region, also in regions with Salif deposits. Waters are currently used iodine in drinking cure for chaps and Basedow. Are also indicated in balneology. Iodine water containing at least 1 mg L, there is pure iodine is usually given the nature of other types of mineral waters further: sodium chlorinated water (Bazna (50-70 mg iodine / l, Baile Govora (50 - 70 mg / l, Bălţăteşti (4-5 mg / l, salted Monteoru (30 mg / l, mine water mixed alkaline chlorination, sulphate, which are indicated for crenoterapie (hypo or isotonic to the bathrooms Olăneşti or Călimăneşti-Căciulata.

  4. Solubility of xenon in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veleckis, E.; Cafasso, F.A.; Feder, H.M.

    1976-01-01

    The solubility of xenon in liquid sodium was measured as a function of pressure (2-8 atm) and temperature (350-600 0 C). Henry's law was obeyed with the value of the Henry's law constant, K/sub H/ = N/sub Xe//P, ranging from 1.38 x 10 -10 atm -1 at 350C, to 1.59 x 10 -8 atm -1 at 600 0 C where N/sub Xe/ and P are the atom fraction and the partial pressure of xenon, respectively. The temperature dependence of solubility may be represented by log 10 lambda = (0.663 +- 0.01) - (4500 +- 73) T -1 , where lambda is the Ostwald coefficient (the volume of xenon dissolved per unit volume of sodium at the temperature of the experiment). The heat of solution of xenon in sodium was 20.6 +- 0.7 kcal/mole, where the standard state of xenon is defined as that of 1 mole of an ideal gas, confined to a volume equal to the molar volume of sodium

  5. Cosmogenic activation of xenon and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Laura; Kish, Alexander; Piastra, Francesco [University of Zuerich, Department of Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schumann, Marc [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Rare event search experiments using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultra-low background levels to fully exploit their physics potential. Cosmic ray induced activation of the detector components and, even more importantly, of the xenon itself during production, transportation and storage at the Earth's surface, might result in the production of radioactive isotopes with long half-lives, with a possible impact on the expected background. We present the first dedicated study on the cosmogenic activation of xenon after 345 days of exposure to cosmic rays at the Jungfraujoch research station at 3470 m above sea level, complemented by a study of copper which has been activated simultaneously. We have directly observed the production of {sup 7}Be, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 126}I and {sup 127}Xe in xenon, out of which only {sup 125}Sb could potentially lead to background for a multi-ton scale dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight studied radioactive isotopes in copper are in agreement with the only existing dedicated activation measurement, while we observe lower rates for the remaining ones. The specific saturation activities for both samples are also compared to predictions obtained with commonly used software packages, where we observe some underpredictions, especially for xenon activation. (orig.)

  6. The influence of xenon poisoning in high-flux reactors on the choice of control rod speeds (1961); Influence de l'empoisonnement xenon dans les piles a haut flux sur le choix de la vitesse des barres de controle (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    - The general laws are restated concerning the changes in xenon and iodine concentrations in thermal neutron reactors, assuming an uniform neutron flux distribution in the core. It is shown how the evolution in the xenon poisoning influences the selection of the control rod speed, at start-up. Certain simple methods of calculation are developed making it possible to resolve the problem of the choice of this speed in the case where the xenon poisoning is taken into account. (author) [French] - On rappelle les lois generales relatives aux evolutions de concentration xenon et iode dans les piles atomiques a neutrons thermiques lorsqu'on suppose une repartition uniforme du flux de neutrons dans le coeur. On montre comment l'evolution de l'empoisonnement xenon influe sur le choix de la vitesse des barres de controle en periode de demarrage. On developpe certaines methodes de calculs simples permettant de resoudre le probleme du choix de la vitesse des barres de controle, dans le cas ou l'on tient compte de l'empoisonnement xenon. (auteur)

  7. Eco-friendly Oxidative Iodination of Various Arenes with Sodium Percarbonate as the Oxidantâ€

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Skulski

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six easy laboratory procedures are presented for the oxidative iodination ofvarious aromatics, mostly arenes, with either molecular iodine or potassium iodide (usedas the sources of iodinating species, I or I3 , in the presence of sodium percarbonate(SPC, a stable, cheap, easy to handle, and eco-friendly commercial oxidant.

  8. Properties of excited xenon atoms in a plasma display panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Byoung H.; Oh, Phil Y.; Choi, Eun H.

    2009-01-01

    The luminance efficiency of a plasma display panel is directly related to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light that is emitted from excited xenon (Xe) atoms and molecules. It is therefore necessary to investigate the properties of excited xenon atoms. This study presents experimental data associated with the behavior of excited xenon atoms in a PDP discharge cell and compares the data with the theoretical results obtained using an analytical model. The properties of excited xenon atoms in the discharge cells of a plasma display panel are investigated by measuring the excited atom density through the use of laser absorption spectroscopy. The density of the excited xenon atoms increases from zero, reaches its peak, and decreases with time in the discharge cells. The profile of the excited xenon atoms is also studied in terms of the xenon mole fraction. The typical density of the excited xenon atoms in the metastable state is on the order of 10 13 atoms per cubic cm.

  9. Iodine leaflets in chapter D5 'Distribution of iodine pills'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Jodine leaflet A will be distributed together with iodine pills in a nuclear disaster. Iodine leaflet B is suitable for informing the public in advance. Iodine leaflet C informs physicians in a scientific way on the benefits and risk of iodine pills. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Time dependent analysis of Xenon spatial oscillations in small power reactors; Analise temporal das oscilacoes espaciais de Xenonio em reatores de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decco, Claudia Cristina Ghirardello

    1997-07-01

    This work presents time dependent analysis of xenon spatial oscillations studying the influence of the power density distribution, type of reactivity perturbation, power level and core size, using the one-dimensional and three-dimensional analysis with the MID2 and citation codes, respectively. It is concluded that small pressurized water reactors with height smaller than 1.5 m are stable and do not have xenon spatial oscillations. (author)

  11. Iodine generator for reclaimed water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynveen, R. A.; Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The system disclosed is for controlling the iodine level in a water supply in a spacecraft. It includes an iodine accumulator which stores crystalline iodine, an electrochemical valve to control the input of iodine to the drinking water and an iodine dispenser. A pump dispenses fluid through the iodine dispenser and an iodine sensor to a potable water tank storage. The iodine sensor electronically detects the iodine level in the water, and through electronic means, produces a correction current control. The correction current control operates the electro-chemical iodine valve to release iodine from the iodine accumulator into the iodine dispenser.

  12. Spatial xenon oscillation control with expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alten, S.; Danofsky, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spatial power oscillations were attributed to the xenon transients in a reactor core in 1958 by Randall and St. John. These transients are usually initiated by a local reactivity insertion and lead to divergent axial flux oscillations in the core at constant power. Several heuristic manual control strategies and automatic control methods were developed to damp the xenon oscillations at constant power operations. However, after the load-follow operation of the reactors became a necessity of life, a need for better control strategies arose. Even though various advanced control strategies were applied to solve the xenon oscillation control problem for the load-follow operation, the complexity of the system created difficulties in modeling. The strong nonlinearity of the problem requires highly sophisticated analytical approaches that are quite inept for numerical solutions. On the other hand, the complexity of a system and heuristic nature of the solutions are the basic reasons for using artificial intelligence techniques such as expert systems

  13. Is placental iodine content related to dietary iodine intake?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burns, R

    2011-08-01

    Delivery of iodine to the foetus depends not only on maternal dietary iodine intake but also on the presence of a functioning placental transport system. A role for the placenta as an iodine storage organ has been suggested, and this study compares the iodine content of placentas from women giving birth at term in Ireland and Iran, areas with median urinary iodine of 79 and 206 μg\\/l respectively.

  14. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with the Xenon-133 inhalation procedure in patients with cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, A.

    1985-10-01

    Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with inhalation of Xenon-133 and recording of regional clearance curves by stationary external detectors permits repeated estimation of bilateral cortical blood flow in resting position and after different activating procedures. Measurements can be performed on an outpatient basis, measurements in critical ill patients are possible as well. Compared to Xenon-133 single photon emission computerized tomography smaller doses can be used. Compared to Iodine-123 amphetamie SPECT actual flow calculation without arterial puncture is possible. Drawbacks of the technique are the two-dimensional imaging, unsufficient indication of the look through phenomenon and non-perfused tissue with zero-flow. However, measurement of rCBF with this technique are helpful in individual diagnosis of the following diseases: transient ischemic attacks with prolonged ischemia, communicating hydrocephalus with normal intracranial pressure, follow up studies in hemodilution, evaluation of patients with polyarterial vascular disease in respect to neurosurgical or vasculosurgical intervention, subarachnoid hemorrhage and head trauma. (orig.).

  15. Iodine in meat in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, Bogdan; Gonev, Mihajlo; Tadzher, Isak

    2000-01-01

    Iodine deficiency in Macedonia still persists in a mild form. In 1999 the iodination of salt rose to 20 m gr iodine in Kg salt. The consumption of salt diminished after the last war from 20-30 gr salt per day to 10-20 gr salt daily. This shows that the problem of the elimination of iodine deficiency is being vigorously tackled. Since 1956 the iodine in salt in Macedonia rose to 10 m gr KI/Kg salt. The content of iodine in the Macedonian diet seems to be important. The amount of iodine in milk, eggs and bread is low as found by the investigation of MANU. The content of iodine in meat is low, compared to British meat is 10 times lower. The average iodine content in Macedonian meat is 95.15 micro gr per Kg, whereas in British meat it is 850-1510 micro gr iodine per k gr meat. (Original)

  16. Controversies in urinary iodine determinations

    OpenAIRE

    Soldin, Offie Porat

    2002-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) is associated with increased prevalence of goiter, increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, and is the world’s leading cause of intellectual deficits. Iodine nutritional status of a population is assessed by measurements of urinary iodine concentrations which are also used to define, indicate, survey and monitor iodine deficiency and consequently its treatment. Several methods are available for urinary iodine determination. Discussed here are some of the limitat...

  17. The XENON project for dark matter direct detection at LNGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinario, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    The XENON project at INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy, aims at dark matter direct detection with liquid xenon dual-phase time projection chambers. Latest results of XENON100 detector exclude various models of leptophilic dark matter. A search for low mass weakly interacting massive particles was also performed, lowering the energy threshold for detection to 0.7 keV for nuclear recoils. The multi-ton XENON1T detector is fully installed and operating. It is expected to reach a sensitivity a factor 100 better than XENON100 with a 2 ton·year exposure.

  18. Electrochemistry of iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaraliev, Ya.A. (AN Azerbajdzhanskoj SSR, Baku. Inst. Neorganicheskoj i Fizicheskoj Khimii)

    1982-06-01

    The review is devoted to investigations into oxidation-reduction processes in different systems including iodine. The data on adsorption of iodine on metals are discussed; the connection between the nature of iodine adsorption and the mechanism of its electrode reactions is considered. The metals studied can be placed in the following series taking into account the degree of I sorption on them: Cd approximately Tl < Sn approximately Pb < Ga < Bi < Hg < Co approximately Ni < Fe < Ag approximately Rh approximately Pd approximately Ir < Pt. The data are given of standard and equilibrium potentials in iodine systems. Electric oxidation and electric reduction of iodide ions is investigated using the methods of Faraday impedance and rectification, methods of voltamperometry and oscillopolarography, rotating disc electrode, chronopotentiometry. Anode and cathode processes of oxidation-reduction reactions in I/sup -//IO/sub 3//sup -/, I/sub 2//IO/sub 3//sup -/ and I/sub 2//I/sup +/ systems are analyzed.

  19. Pathophysiologic effects of stable iodine used as a thyroidal blocking agent to reduce thyroid radiation exposure. Progress report, November 1, 1975--October 31, 1976. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    In an effort to determine whether iodide administration in man can induce injury to thyroid follicular cells similar to that demonstrated in lower animals, this study measures thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine and thyroid autoantibodies in the serum before and after administration of iodine in a variety of patients. In the last eight months primary efforts have been devoted to the development of a high specificity and sensitivity radioimmunoassay of thyroglobulin and its preliminary clinical application. Human thyroglobulin obtained from operative specimens was purified and its identity and purity established. Rabbits were injected with thyroglobulin for 30 weeks with the appearance of significant titres of antibodies within 6 weeks. The antibody developed was examined for immunological purity and used in a radioimmunoassay system with thyroglobulin labeled in this Laboratory with /sup 125/I.

  20. Iodine deficiency and thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-04-01

    Iodine deficiency early in life impairs cognition and growth, but iodine status is also a key determinant of thyroid disorders in adults. Severe iodine deficiency causes goitre and hypothyroidism because, despite an increase in thyroid activity to maximise iodine uptake and recycling in this setting, iodine concentrations are still too low to enable production of thyroid hormone. In mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency, increased thyroid activity can compensate for low iodine intake and maintain euthyroidism in most individuals, but at a price: chronic thyroid stimulation results in an increase in the prevalence of toxic nodular goitre and hyperthyroidism in populations. This high prevalence of nodular autonomy usually results in a further increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism if iodine intake is subsequently increased by salt iodisation. However, this increase is transient because iodine sufficiency normalises thyroid activity which, in the long term, reduces nodular autonomy. Increased iodine intake in an iodine-deficient population is associated with a small increase in the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity; whether these increases are also transient is unclear. Variations in population iodine intake do not affect risk for Graves' disease or thyroid cancer, but correction of iodine deficiency might shift thyroid cancer subtypes toward less malignant forms. Thus, optimisation of population iodine intake is an important component of preventive health care to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phase behavior of mixed submonolayer films of krypton and xenon on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrykiejew, A; Sokołowski, S

    2012-04-14

    Using the results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles, we discuss the phase behavior of mixed submonolayer films of krypton and xenon adsorbed on the graphite basal plane. The calculations have been performed using two- and three-dimensional models of the systems studied. It has been demonstrated that out-of-plane motion does not affect the properties of the films as long as the total density is well below the monolayer completion and at moderate temperatures. For the total densities close to the monolayer completion, the promotion of particles to the second layer considerably affects the film properties. Our results are in a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. The melting point of submonolayer films has been shown to exhibit non-monotonous changes with the film composition, and reaches minimum for the xenon concentration of about 50%. At the temperatures below the melting point, the structure of solid phases depends upon the film composition and the temperature; one can also distinguish commensurate and incommensurate phases. Two-dimensional calculations have demonstrated that for the xenon concentration between about 15% and 65% the adsorbed film exhibits the formation of a superstructure, in which each Xe atom is surrounded by six Kr atoms. This superstructure is stable only at very low temperatures and transforms into the mixed commensurate (√3×√3)R30° phase upon the increase of temperature. Such a superstructure does not appear when a three-dimensional model is used. Grand canonical ensemble calculations allowed us to show that for the xenon concentration of about 3% the phase diagram topology of monolayer films changes from the krypton-like (with incipient triple point) to the xenon-like (with ordinary triple point).

  2. The Iodine Satellite (iSAT) Hall Thruster Demonstration Mission Concept and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Calvert, Derek; Kamhawi, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The use of iodine propellant for Hall thrusters has been studied and proposed by multiple organizations due to the potential mission benefits over xenon. In 2013, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center competitively selected a project for the maturation of an iodine flight operational feed system through the Technology Investment Program. Multiple partnerships and collaborations have allowed the team to expand the scope to include additional mission concept development and risk reduction to support a flight system demonstration, the iodine Satellite (iSAT). The iSAT project was initiated and is progressing towards a technology demonstration mission preliminary design review. The current status of the mission concept development and risk reduction efforts in support of this project is presented.

  3. Immobilisation of fission iodine by reaction with insoluble natural organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmett, G.T.; Kimble, G.M.; Steinberg, S.M.; Emerson, D.W.; Cerefice, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants produce Iodine-129 ( 129 I) as a fission by-product. Iodine-129, along with other stable isotopes of iodine, is released during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Silver-impregnated activated carbon, activated carbon, cinnabar and chalcocite have been used in the past to remove iodide and iodine from waste streams. There is environmental and geological evidence that iodine can become associated with natural organic matter (NOM). For example, a number of previous studies have shown that iodine (including 129 I) can be strongly retained in organic-rich surface soils and humic material. This research explores the use of NOM (sphagnum peat) to sequester iodine from acid vapour and aqueous solution. NOM may be stable for geological storage or the sequestered iodine can be recovered to prepare target materials for transmutation. The nature of the sphagnum iodine association has been explored as well as method that can be used to concentrate and recover sequestered iodine from the peat moss. (authors)

  4. Generation of atomic iodine via fluorine for chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirasek, Vit; Spalek, Otomar; Censky, Miroslav; Pickova, Irena; Kodymova, Jarmila; Jakubec, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    A method of the chemical generation of atomic iodine for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) using atomic fluorine as a reaction intermediate was studied experimentally. This method is based on the reaction between F 2 and NO providing F atoms, and the reaction of F with HI resulting in iodine atoms generation. Atomic iodine was produced with efficiency exceeding 40% relative to initial F 2 flow rate. This efficiency was nearly independent on pressure and total gas flow rate. The F atoms were stable in the reactor up to 2 ms. An optimum ratio of the reactants flow rates was F 2 :NO:HI = 1:1:1. A rate constant of the reaction of F 2 with HI was determined. The numerical modelling showed that remaining HI and IF were probably consumed in their mutual reaction. The reaction system was found suitable for employing in a generator of atomic iodine with its subsequent injection into a supersonic nozzle of a COIL

  5. Iodine supply in diet in various european regions and risks of iodine prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The main risk of low level irradiation of the thyroid is the induction of thyroid neoplasia. In the case of nuclear accidents this risk depends on the level of radioiodine uptake and half life in the thyroid, on the size of the gland and on the relative biological efficiency of the emitted radiation especially at low doses. The level of radioiodine uptake is inversely related to stable iodine supply in the diet. In this study it was proposed to: 1. systematically survey iodine supply in the diet, radioiodine uptake and thyroid kinetics in various European regions. Most of these data are readily available. Taken together with presently accepted estimates of relative biological efficiency, the radiation doses at various contamination levels and risks could be computed and tabulated as an easy-to-use basis for decision guidelines. 2. to obtain in vitro from human autopsy material, radioiodine kinetics data in fetal thyroid to complement data in vivo in a model animal close to man (the chimpanzee) at various dietary iodine levels. Urinary iodine excretions vary in Europe from one region to another from 16 to 250 ug/day. The full spectrum from severe iodine deficiency to normal dietary intake exists in Europe. It is therefore quite to be expected that 24h thyroid radioiodine uptakes vary from 19 to 83%. Therefore for a similar radioiodide contamination the thyroid exposure will vary from one region to another by a factor of 4

  6. Direct evaluation of thyroid 127I and iodine overload: in vivo study by X-ray fluorescence and in vitro by SIMS microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briancon, C.; Jeusset, J.; Halpern, S.; Fragu, P.

    1992-01-01

    This review describes the two methods which allow direct estimation of stable iodine ( 127 I) within thyroid gland either in vivo by X-ray fluorescence or in vitro by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) microscopy on tissue section. Although the measurement of thyroid iodine content (TIC) by X-ray fluorescence has little relevance for routine explorations of thyroid function, this is a valuable method for understanding complex pathophysiological conditions such as the thyroid adaptation to iodine overload. On the other hand, SIMS microscopy which is able to characterize the functional activity of thyroid tissue by measuring 127 I concentration within the thyroid follicles, can be used to determine the extent to which exogeneous iodine affects the regulation of iodine within the thyroid follicles. Both methods were used to evaluate the quantitative changes in thyroid 127 I induced by amiodarone iodine overload. TIC measurements shows that hyperthyroidism occured only in patients who increased their iodine stores, while the patients who developed hypothyroidism has low iodine stores. The SIMS microscopy data obtained in mice demonstrated that the thyroid response to amiodarone is related to dietary iodine intake leading to an increase in local iodine concentration in iodine deficient mice and to a decrease in iodine supplemented mice. This response is specific and different from that induced by an iodine overload. These results could explain that hyperthyroidism with high thyroid iodine content occured in areas with low thyroid iodine content in areas with a supplemented iodine diet

  7. Propulsion System Development for the Iodine Satellite (iSAT) Demonstration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Peeples, Stephen R.; Seixal, Joao F.; Mauro, Stephanie L.; Lewis, Brandon L.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Calvert, Derek H.; Dankanich, John; Kamhawi, Hani; Hickman, Tyler A.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The development and testing of a 200-W iodine-fed Hall thruster propulsion system that will be flown on a 12-U CubeSat is described. The switch in propellant from more traditional xenon gas to solid iodine yields the advantage of high density, low pressure propellant storage but introduces new requirements that must be addressed in the design and operation of the propulsion system. The thruster materials have been modified from a previously-flown xenon Hall thruster to make it compatible with iodine vapor. The cathode incorporated into this design additionally requires little or no heating to initiate the discharge, reducing the power needed to start the thruster. The feed system produces iodine vapor in the propellant reservoir through sublimation and then controls the flow to the anode and cathode of the thruster using a pair of proportional flow control valves. The propellant feeding process is controlled by the power processing unit, with feedback control on the anode flow rate provided through a measure of the thruster discharge current. Thermal modeling indicates that it may be difficult to sufficiently heat the iodine if it loses contact with the propellant reservoir walls, serving to motivate future testing of that scenario to verify the modeling result and develop potential mitigation strategies. Preliminary, short-duration materials testing has thus-far indicated that several materials may be acceptable for prolonged contact with iodine vapor, motivating longer-duration testing. A propellant loading procedure is presented that aims to minimize the contaminants in the feed system and propellant reservoir. Finally, an 80-hour duration test being performed to gain experience operating the thruster over long durations and multiple restarts is discussed.

  8. Studies on 129I in bovine thyroid glands and investigations on revolatilization of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glubrecht, H.; Kiselnic, L.; Handl, J.; Kuehn, W.

    1979-01-01

    In order to study fall out effect, deposition and revolatilization of iodine in the field and 129 I activity in bovine thyroid glands were studied. Deposition velocity of I 2 was 0.15 to 7 cm/sec, which was 100 times higher than that of CH 3 I. Biological half-life of iodine was 7.5 +- 0.5 d. In the contaminated plants, indifferent to the environmental conditions. However, the decrease of iodine concentration was not observed when the plants were cut off immediately after deposition of iodine. A sample of soil with or without plants was contaminated with iodine and re-emitted iodine was trapped by a charcoal filter. Iodine concentration was determined by I-specific electrodes after 1, 2, 4, and 8 hrs. In any case, I 2 was re-emitted immediately after the contamination. Bovine thyroid glands were dried by deep freezing and ground after the addition of KOH. Organic compounds were decomposed by stepwise heating up to 600 0 C. Then iodine was extracted by concentrated H 2 SO 4 and heated at 110 0 C. Evaporating iodine was adsorbed by a pure charcoal filter. By neutron activation analysis of the filter the activity of 129 I was 1.2 pCi/g iodine, which would be about 5 times higher than that measured in animals living far from nuclear installations. The distribution of stable iodine in thyroid gland was inhomogeneous. (Nakanishi, T.)

  9. Iodine excretion during stimulation with rhTSH in differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, M.; Weckesser, M.; Franzius, C.; Kies, P.; Schober, O.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Elevated iodine intake is a serious problem in the diagnostic and therapeutic application of 131 iodine in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Therefore, iodine avoidance is necessary 3 months in advance. Additionally, endogenous stimulation requires withdrawal of thyroid hormone substitution for 4 weeks. Exogenous stimulation using recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) enables the continuous substitution of levothyroxine, which contains 65.4% of its molecular weight in iodine. Thus, a substantial source of iodine intake is maintained during exogenous stimulation. Although this amount of stable iodine is comparable to the iodine intake in regions of normal iodine supply, it may reduce the accumulation of radioiodine in thyroid carcinoma tissue. The aim of this study was to assess the iodine excretion depending on different ways of stimulation. Methods: Iodine excretion was measured in 146 patients in the long term follow up after differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Patients were separated into 2 groups, those on hormone withdrawal (G I) and rhTSH-stimulated patients on hormone substitution (G II). Results: Iodine excretion was significantly lower in hypothyroid patients (G I, median 50 μg/l, range: 25-600 μg/l) than in those under levothyroxine medication (G II, median 75 μg/l, 25-600 μg/l, p [de

  10. Iodine Hall Thruster Propellant Feed System for a CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2014-01-01

    There has been significant work recently in the development of iodine-fed Hall thrusters for in-space propulsion applications.1 The use of iodine as a propellant provides many advantages over present xenon-gas-fed Hall thruster systems. Iodine is a solid at ambient temperature (no pressurization required) and has no special handling requirements, making it safe for secondary flight opportunities. It has exceptionally high ?I sp (density times specific impulse), making it an enabling technology for small satellite near-term applications and providing system level advantages over mid-term high power electric propulsion options. Iodine provides thrust and efficiency that are comparable to xenonfed Hall thrusters while operating in the same discharge current and voltage regime, making it possible to leverage the development of flight-qualified xenon Hall thruster power processing units for the iodine application. Work at MSFC is presently aimed at designing, integrating, and demonstrating a flight-like iodine feed system suitable for the Hall thruster application. This effort represents a significant advancement in state-of-the-art. Though Iodine thrusters have demonstrated high performance with mission enabling potential, a flight-like feed system has never been demonstrated and iodine compatible components do not yet exist. Presented in this paper is the end-to-end integrated feed system demonstration. The system includes a propellant tank with active feedback-control heating, fill and drain interfaces, latching and proportional flow control valves (PFCV), flow resistors, and flight-like CubeSat power and control electronics. Hardware is integrated into a CubeSat-sized structure, calibrated and tested under vacuum conditions, and operated under under hot-fire conditions using a Busek BHT-200 thruster designed for iodine. Performance of the system is evaluated thorugh accurate measurement of thrust and a calibrated of mass flow rate measurement, which is a function of

  11. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerib, D.S.; Bai, X.; Bedikian, S.; Bernard, E.; Bernstein, A.; Bolozdynya, A.; Bradley, A.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S.B.; Camp, C.; Carmona-Benitez, M.C.; Carr, D.; Chapman, J.J.; Chiller, A.; Chiller, C.; Clark, K.; Classen, T.; Coffey, T.; Curioni, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) collaboration has designed and constructed a dual-phase xenon detector, in order to conduct a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. The goal of the LUX detector is to clearly detect (or exclude) WIMPS with a spin independent cross-section per nucleon of 2×10 −46 cm 2 , equivalent to ∼1event/100kg/month in the inner 100-kg fiducial volume (FV) of the 370-kg detector. The overall background goals are set to have <1 background events characterized as possible WIMPs in the FV in 300 days of running. This paper describes the design and construction of the LUX detector

  12. Modeling Pulse Characteristics in Xenon with NEST

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Jeremy; Barry, Nichole; Kazkaz, Kareem; Szydagis, Matthew; Tripathi, Mani; Uvarov, Sergey; Woods, Michael; Walsh, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive model for describing the characteristics of pulsed signals, generated by particle interactions in xenon detectors, is presented. An emphasis is laid on two-phase time projection chambers, but the models presented are also applicable to single phase detectors. In order to simulate the pulse shape due to primary scintillation light, the effects of the ratio of singlet and triplet dimer state populations, as well as their corresponding decay times, and the recombination time are ...

  13. Site of iodination in hyperplastic thyroid glands deduced from autoradiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollman, S.H.; Ekholm, R.

    1981-01-01

    We have tried to ascertain the site of iodination in the chronically stimulated, hyperplastic thyroid gland of rats. Rats were fed propylthiouracil in a commercial rat diet for 10 days. Then the diet was changed to a low iodine diet for 5 days. To label the gland, 10 mCi of 125I-iodide was injected into the left heart ventricle. Ten seconds later the animal was perfused through the left ventricle with a fixative solution containing a goitrogen to block further iodination, and stable iodide to help extract uncombined radioiodide. Electron microscopic autoradiographs prepared from the fixed thyroids show strong labeling over the lumen of the follicle and no consistent labeling of any other site or organelle. We conclude that the site of iodination in the chronically stimulated, hyperplastic thyroid is the follicular lumen, i.e. the same as that in the normal gland

  14. Chemical thermodynamics of iodine species in the HTGR fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemer, T.B.

    1982-09-01

    The iodine-containing species in an intact fuel particle in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) have been calculated. Assumptions include: (1) attainment of chemical thermodynamic equilibrium among all species in the open porosity of the particle, primarily in the buffer layer; and (2) fission-product concentrations in proportion to their yields. The primary gaseous species is calculated to be cesium iodide; in carbide-containing fuels, gaseous barium iodide may exhibit equivalent pressures. The condensed iodine-containing phase is usually cesium iodide, but in carbide-containing fuels, barium iodide may be stable instead. Absorption of elemental iodine on the carbon in the particle appears to be less than or equal to 10 -4 μg I/g C. The fission-product-spectra excess of cesium over iodine would generally be adsorbed on the carbon, but may form Cs 2 MoO 4 under some circumstances

  15. Optimization of Xenon Biosensors for Detection of Protein Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, Thomas J.; Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Ruiz, E.Janette; Wu, Tom; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; King, David S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Pines, Alex; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-08-01

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR can detect the presence of specific low-concentration biomolecular analytes by means of the xenon biosensor, which consists of a water-soluble, targeted cryptophane-A cage that encapsulates xenon. In this work we use the prototypical biotinylated xenon biosensor to determine the relationship between the molecular composition of the xenon biosensor and the characteristics of protein-bound resonances. The effects of diastereomer overlap, dipole-dipole coupling, chemical shift anisotropy, xenon exchange, and biosensor conformational exchange on protein-bound biosensor signal were assessed. It was found that optimal protein-bound biosensor signal can be obtained by minimizing the number of biosensor diastereomers and using a flexible linker of appropriate length. Both the linewidth and sensitivity of chemical shift to protein binding of the xenon biosensor were found to be inversely proportional to linker length

  16. Chromatographic separation of radioactive noble gases from xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bramante, R.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Coffey, T.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Pech, K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2018-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment operates at the Sanford Underground Research Facility to detect nuclear recoils from the hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on a liquid xenon target. Liquid xenon typically contains trace amounts of the noble radioactive isotopes 85Kr and 39Ar that are not removed by the in situ gas purification system. The decays of these isotopes at concentrations typical of research-grade xenon would be a dominant background for a WIMP search experiment. To remove these impurities from the liquid xenon, a chromatographic separation system based on adsorption on activated charcoal was built. 400 kg of xenon was processed, reducing the average concentration of krypton from 130 ppb to 3.5 ppt as measured by a cold-trap assisted mass spectroscopy system. A 50 kg batch spiked to 0.001 g/g of krypton was processed twice and reduced to an upper limit of 0.2 ppt.

  17. Mock iodine-125 radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    An intimate mixture of americium-241 and iodine-129 provides an energy spectrum that reliably simulates the spectrum of iodine-125 in a well-type detector. As such, it may be used as a long-lived standard to calibrate instruments such as well scintillation spectrometers in which measurements are to be made involving iodine-125

  18. HEMODYNAMIC EFFECTS OF XENON ANESTHESIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Bykov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at hemodynamic effects of xenon on operative interventions in children. Patients and methods: the study involved 30 5-17-year-old children – 10 (33.3% girls and 20 (66.7% boys with ASA score 1-3 admitted for surgical treatment. The children underwent endotracheal anesthesia with xenon-oxygen mixture (Xe:O2 = 60-65:30% and fentanyl (2.5‑3.5  mcg/kg per hour for the following operations: appendectomy – 10 (33.3% patients, herniotomy – 8 (26.7% patients, Ivanissevich procedure – 6 (20.0% patients, plastic surgery of posttraumatic defects of skin and soft tissues – 4 (13.3% patients, abdominal adhesiotomy – 2 (6.7% patients. Central hemodynamics was studied echocardiographically (Philips HD 11, the Netherlands using the Teichholz technique along the cephalocaudal axis (parasternal access. Results: the anesthesia was notable for hemodynamic stability during the operation: as a result, a statistically significant (p < 0.05 increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure by 10, 18 and 17%, respectively, was observed. Conclusion: the analysis demonstrated that xenon anesthesia improves lusitropic myocardial function statistically significantly increasing cardiac output by 12% by way of increasing stroke volume by 30%. 

  19. SmallSats, Iodine Propulsion Technology, Applications to Low-Cost Lunar Missions, and the Iodine Satellite (iSAT) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Closing Remarks: ?(1) SmallSats hold significant potential for future low cost high value missions; (2) Propulsion remains a key limiting capability for SmallSats that Iodine can address: High ISP * Density for volume constrained spacecraft; Indefinite quiescence, unpressurized and non-hazardous as a secondary payload; (3) Iodine enables MicroSat and SmallSat maneuverability: Enables transfer into high value orbits, constellation deployment and deorbit; (4) Iodine may enable a new class of planetary and exploration class missions: Enables GTO launched secondary spacecraft to transit to the moon, asteroids, and other interplanetary destinations for approximately 150 million dollars full life cycle cost including the launch; (5) ESPA based OTVs are also volume constrained and a shift from xenon to iodine can significantly increase the transfer vehicle change in volume capability including transfers from GTO to a range of Lunar Orbits; (6) The iSAT project is a fast pace high value iodine Hall technology demonstration mission: Partnership with NASA GRC and NASA MSFC with industry partner - Busek; (7) The iSAT mission is an approved project with PDR in November of 2014 and is targeting a flight opportunity in FY17.

  20. Facility for the separation of krypton and recuperation of xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boell-Djoa, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    A facility is described by means of which the fission inert gases krypton 85 and xenon from spent fuel particles can be separated by fractionated freezing-out and subsequent distillation to such an extent that the xenon contains less than 1 ppb krypton 85. Then, in accordance with the stringent regulations, the krypton can be conveyed to definitive storage in special bottles, whereas the xenon can be released for industrial uses. (orig.) [de

  1. Investigations on a highly luminous condensed xenon scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansiart, Alain; Seigneur, Alain; Morucci, J.-P.

    1976-12-01

    The means of creating a maximal amount of light by absorption of gamma radiation in condensed xenon were investigated. One of the methods relies on the light production around wires in liquid xenon when several kilovolts are applied to them. Another method uses the saturating vapor present over solid xenon; the electric field pulls out electrons from the solid and accelerates them in the gas phase where they produce light through inelastic collisions [fr

  2. Control of xenon oscillations in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor via two-stage decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munje, R.K.; Parkhe, J.G.; Patre, B.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Singularly perturbed model of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is explored. • Composite controller is designed using slow subsystem alone, which achieves asymptotic stability. • Nonlinear simulations are carried out under different transient conditions. • Performance of the controller is found to be satisfactory. - Abstract: Xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in large nuclear reactors, like Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) need to be controlled for safe operation. Otherwise, a serious situation may arise in which different regions of the core may undergo variations in neutron flux in opposite phase. If these oscillations are left uncontrolled, the power density and rate of change of power at some locations in the reactor core may exceed their respective thermal limits, resulting in fuel failure. In this paper, a state feedback based control strategy is investigated for spatial control of AHWR. The nonlinear model of AHWR including xenon and iodine dynamics is characterized by 90 states, 5 inputs and 18 outputs. The linear model of AHWR, obtained by linearizing the nonlinear equations is found to be highly ill-conditioned. This higher order model of AHWR is first decomposed into two comparatively lower order subsystems, namely, 73rd order ‘slow’ subsystem and 17th order ‘fast’ subsystem using two-stage decomposition. Composite control law is then derived from individual subsystem feedback controls and applied to the vectorized nonlinear model of AHWR. Through the dynamic simulations it is observed that the controller is able to suppress xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in AHWR and the overall performance is found to be satisfactory

  3. The total release of xenon-133 from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohl, Andreas; Seibert, Petra; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FD-NPP) on 11 March 2011 released large amounts of radioactivity into the atmosphere. We determine the total emission of the noble gas xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) using global atmospheric concentration measurements. For estimating the emissions, we used three different methods: (i) using a purely observation-based multi-box model, (ii) comparisons of dispersion model results driven with GFS meteorological data with the observation data, and (iii) such comparisons with the dispersion model driven by ECMWF data. From these three methods, we have obtained total 133 Xe releases from FD-NPP of (i) 16.7 ± 1.9 EBq, (ii) 14.2 ± 0.8 EBq, and (iii) 19.0 ± 3.4 EBq, respectively. These values are substantially larger than the entire 133 Xe inventory of FD-NPP of about 12.2 EBq derived from calculations of nuclear fuel burn-up. Complete release of the entire 133 Xe inventory of FD-NPP and additional release of 133 Xe due to the decay of iodine-133 ( 133 I), which can add another 2 EBq to the 133 Xe FD-NPP inventory, is required to explain the atmospheric observations. Two of our three methods indicate even higher emissions, but this may not be a robust finding given the differences between our estimates. - Highlights: ► We determine the total release of xenon-133 from the Fukushima nuclear accident. ► We used global measurements and a box model, as well as dispersion model estimates. ► Total 133 Xe release is about 14.2-19 EBq, more than Fukushima 133 Xe inventory. ► Additional release of iodine-133 and decay into 133 Xe needed to explain results.

  4. Iodine-129 in thyroids and tellurium isotopes in meteorites by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballad, R.V.

    1978-06-01

    A combination of neutron activation and mass spectrometry has been used to determine the concentration of fissiogenic 129 I and the value of the 129 I/ 127 I ratio in thyroids of man, cow, and deer from Missouri. Deer thyroids show an average value of 129 I/ 127 I = 1.8 x 10 -8 and an average concentration of 3 x 10 -3 pCi 129 I per gram of thyroid (wet weight). Thyroids of cows and humans show successively lower values for the 129 I/ 127 I ratio and the 129 I content because their diets dilute fission-produced 129 I in the natural iodine cycle with mineral iodine. The results of analyses on a few thyroids from other geographic areas are also reported. The isotopic compositions of tellurium, krypton, and xenon were determined in acid-resistant residues of the Allende meteorite. Neutron activation and γ-counting were used to determine the relative abundances of six tellurium isotopes, and mass spectrometry was used to determine the isotopic compositions of krypton and xenon in aliquots of the same residues. Nucleogenetic anomalies were observed in the isotopic compositions of these three elements. The presence of isotopically distinct components of tellurium, krypton, and xenon in these residues provides strong support for the suggestion that our solar system formed directly from the debris of a supernova

  5. Xenon-based Penning mixtures for proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, B.D.; Agrawal, P.C.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL

    1989-01-01

    The choice of quench gas can have a significant effect on the gas gain and energy resolution of gas-filed proportional counters. Details are given on the performance obtained with a variety of quench additives of varying ionization potentials for use in xenon-filled systems. It is confirmed that optimum performance is obtained when the ionization potential is closely matched to the first metastable level of xenon (8.3 eV) as is the case with xenon + trimethylamine and xenon + dimethylamine. For these mixtures the Penning effect is at its strongest. (orig.)

  6. A new approach to control of xenon spatial oscillation during load follow operation via robust servo systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Hiroyuki; Iwazumi, Tetsuo

    1994-01-01

    The control problem of xenon-induced spatial oscillations of PWR in the axial direction during a load following operation is investigated. The system models are described by a one-group diffusion equation with xenon and temperature feed-backs, iodine and xenon dynamic equations, and heat conductions processes. Control is implemented by the full-length and the part-length control rods and the boron concentration. In order to achieve the control purpose, control models are formulated as the design problem of robust servo systems for distributed parameter reactor systems. The total thermal power and the axial offset are chosen as outputs to be controlled. The control systems consist of servo compensators and stabilizing compensators. They are designed based on the finite-dimensional systems which are constructed by linearizing around steady states, approximately by the Galerkin method, and reducing dimensions via the singular perturbation method. A new and simple computational algorithm to obtain an approximate solution of a steady-state neutron balance is developed via the perturbation method. Some results of numerical simulations are shown in order to discuss the effectiveness of the theory developed in this paper. In particular, it is shown that the designed servo systems are robust against model errors with linearization and modal truncation

  7. Iodine in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Karl Johan

    2000-12-01

    A literature study of the migration and the appearance of iodine isotopes in the bio-sphere particularly in soil is presented. Some important papers in the field of iodine appearance in soil and the appearance of 129 I in the surroundings of reprocessing plants are discussed. The most important conclusions are: 1. Iodine binds to organic matter in the soil and also to some oxides of aluminium and iron. 2. If the iodine is not bound to the soil a large fraction of added 129 I is volatilized after a rather short period. 3. The binding and also the volatilisation seems to be due to biological activity in the soil. It may take place within living microorganisms or by external enzymes excreted from microorganisms. 4. Due to variations in the composition of soil there may be a large variation in the distribution of 129 I in the vertical profile of soil - usually most of the 129 I in the upper layer - which also results in large variations in the 129 I uptake to plants

  8. Iodine in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanson, Karl Johan [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    2000-12-01

    A literature study of the migration and the appearance of iodine isotopes in the bio-sphere particularly in soil is presented. Some important papers in the field of iodine appearance in soil and the appearance of {sup 129}I in the surroundings of reprocessing plants are discussed. The most important conclusions are: 1. Iodine binds to organic matter in the soil and also to some oxides of aluminium and iron. 2. If the iodine is not bound to the soil a large fraction of added {sup 129}I is volatilized after a rather short period. 3. The binding and also the volatilisation seems to be due to biological activity in the soil. It may take place within living microorganisms or by external enzymes excreted from microorganisms. 4. Due to variations in the composition of soil there may be a large variation in the distribution of {sup 129}I in the vertical profile of soil - usually most of the {sup 129}I in the upper layer - which also results in large variations in the {sup 129}I uptake to plants.

  9. Iodine filters in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The present report discusses the significance for environmental exposure of the iodine released with the gaseous effluents of nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants in relation to releases of other airborne radionuclides. Iodine filtration processes are described. The release pathways and the composition of airborne fission product iodine mixtures and their bearing on environmental exposure are discussed on the basis of measured fission product iodine emissions. The sorbents which can be used for iodine filtration, their removal efficiencies and range of applications are dealt with in detail. The particular conditions governing iodine removal, which are determined by the various gaseous iodine species, are illustrated on the basis of experimentally determined retention profiles. Particular attention is given to the limitations imposed by temperature, humidity, radiation and filter poisoning. The types of filter normally used are described, their advantages and drawbacks discussed, the principles underlying their design are outlined and the sources of error indicated. The methods normally applied to test the efficiency of various iodine sorbents are described and assessed. Operating experience with iodine filters, gathered from surveillance periods of many years, is supplemented by a large number of test results and the findings of extensive experiments. Possible ways of prolonging the permissible service lives of iodine filters are discussed and information is given on protective measures. The various iodine removal processes applied in reprocessing plants are described and compared with reference to efficiency and cost. The latest developments in filter technology in reprocessing plants are briefly outlined

  10. Sliding Mode Control for Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactors in load following operations with bounded xenon oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansarifar, G.R.; Saadatzi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present SMC which is a robust nonlinear controller to control the PWR power. • Xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. • The stability analysis has been based on Lyapunov approach. • Simulation results indicate the high performance of this new control. - Abstract: One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. In this paper, sliding mode control (SMC) which is a robust nonlinear controller is designed to control the Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor (PWR) power for the load-following operation problem that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO) strategy to maintain xenon oscillations to be bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for load-following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model and one delayed neutron group. The stability analysis is given by means Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the sliding mode control exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load-following operation is sufficiently effective so that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the considered region

  11. Perchlorate, iodine supplements, iodized salt and breast milk iodine content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Andrea B. [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Sciences Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Kroll, Martina; Dyke, Jason V.; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dias, Rukshan A.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 700 Planetarium Place, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    This study was undertaken to determine if increasing maternal iodine intake through single dose tablets will decrease breast milk concentrations of the iodine-uptake inhibitor, perchlorate, through competitive inhibition. We also sought to determine if the timing of supplementation influences the fraction of iodine excreted in milk versus urine and to compare the effectiveness of iodized salt as a means of providing iodine to breastfed infants. Thirteen women who did not use supplements, seven of whom used iodized salt and six of whom used non-iodized salt, submitted four milk samples and a 24-h urine collection daily for three days. Women repeated the sampling protocol for three more days during which {approx} 150 {mu}g of iodine were taken in the evening and again for three days with morning supplementation. Samples were analyzed using isotope-dilution inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for iodine and isotope-dilution ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for perchlorate. No statistically significant differences were observed in milk iodine or perchlorate concentrations during the two treatment periods. Estimated perchlorate intake was above the U.S. National Academy of Sciences suggested reference dose for most infants. Single daily dose iodine supplementation was not effective in decreasing milk perchlorate concentrations. Users of iodized salt had significantly higher iodine levels in milk than non-users. Iodized salt may be a more effective means of iodine supplementation than tablets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated infant exposures to perchlorate were, on a {mu}g/kg basis, {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign higher than those of mothers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daily supplements are less effective than iodized salt in providing iodine to lactating women. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low iodine and high perchlorate in milk may place infants at risk of iodine deficiency.

  12. CFD Analyses of Re-Evolved Iodine from an In-containment Water Pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Woo Sung; Jung, Ji Hwan [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A good understanding of the behavior of iodine is required to evaluate the safety and emergency procedures after a LOCA. The quantity of re-evolved iodine is related to pH level, temperature, and iodine concentration of water pool. In the calculation of pH for water pool, sequence calculations must consider this variable if any aqueous iodine is present, even if it is initially present in stable forms. The present study consists of two parts: the pH evaluation and the evaluation of the iodine re-evolution. The current paper focuses on the pH evaluation method, the development of a user-defined function (UDF) and the iodine re-evolution from the water pool. CFD that incorporates the UDF was used in this study to calculate the local pH level in the transient condition. The amount of re-evolved iodine was calculated based on the iodine concentration, temperature, and pH. The transportation and resulting distribution of the iodine concentration, temperature, and pH were calculated using transient analyses with CFD. The quantity of reevolved iodine was obtained with several assumptions. The quantitative evaluation of re-evolved iodine during a LOCA in a commercial nuclear power plants is done in two stages. The first stage is to calculate the pH in the water pool, and the second stage is to calculate the quantity of re-evolved iodine. Evaporated iodine, from the water pool water to the containment atmosphere, can be estimated from characteristic iodine behaviors and pH calculations. The 3D CFD analysis results show that the pH reached 7.0 after 149.5 minutes. Near the spillway, the change in averaged pH was faster than the change in wholevolume averaged pH. Evaluating the amount of reevolved iodine were examined using four different methods. As a result of our evaluation of iodine reevolution, the initial molecular iodine concentration of a water pool has a significant impact on the amount of gaseous iodine, more so than the pH or temperature, due to the locally similar

  13. CFD Analyses of Re-Evolved Iodine from an In-containment Water Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Yoon, Woo Sung; Jung, Ji Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A good understanding of the behavior of iodine is required to evaluate the safety and emergency procedures after a LOCA. The quantity of re-evolved iodine is related to pH level, temperature, and iodine concentration of water pool. In the calculation of pH for water pool, sequence calculations must consider this variable if any aqueous iodine is present, even if it is initially present in stable forms. The present study consists of two parts: the pH evaluation and the evaluation of the iodine re-evolution. The current paper focuses on the pH evaluation method, the development of a user-defined function (UDF) and the iodine re-evolution from the water pool. CFD that incorporates the UDF was used in this study to calculate the local pH level in the transient condition. The amount of re-evolved iodine was calculated based on the iodine concentration, temperature, and pH. The transportation and resulting distribution of the iodine concentration, temperature, and pH were calculated using transient analyses with CFD. The quantity of reevolved iodine was obtained with several assumptions. The quantitative evaluation of re-evolved iodine during a LOCA in a commercial nuclear power plants is done in two stages. The first stage is to calculate the pH in the water pool, and the second stage is to calculate the quantity of re-evolved iodine. Evaporated iodine, from the water pool water to the containment atmosphere, can be estimated from characteristic iodine behaviors and pH calculations. The 3D CFD analysis results show that the pH reached 7.0 after 149.5 minutes. Near the spillway, the change in averaged pH was faster than the change in wholevolume averaged pH. Evaluating the amount of reevolved iodine were examined using four different methods. As a result of our evaluation of iodine reevolution, the initial molecular iodine concentration of a water pool has a significant impact on the amount of gaseous iodine, more so than the pH or temperature, due to the locally similar

  14. p-process xenon isotope anomalies in stardust grains from meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, U.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: In measurements on 'bulk' samples of meteorites isotopic variations due to the p-process usually have taken a backseat compared to such in s- or r-isotopes, and, in the best case, can be qualitatively attributed to the p-process, with little to no inferences concerning detailed isotopic yields. The situation is different for grains of stardust that survived in primitive meteorites. In fact, isotopically strange xenon was the key feature that led to the first identification of a stardust mineral, nanodiamonds containing xenon with overabundances of up to a factor of ∼2 in both the r-only (≡H-Xe) and p-only (≡L-Xe) isotopes. Relative excesses of the two r-only isotopes ( 134 Xe, 136 Xe) as well as of the two p-only isotopes ( 124 Xe, 126 Xe) are not equal, hence the processes responsible for HL-xenon must differ from the 'average' r- and p-processes as reflected in solar system abundances. However, while considerable effort has been put into explaining H-Xe, there has been little work on the p-side (L-Xe). Relying on scarce nuclear data, Heymann and Dziczkaniec have studied photodisintegration reactions of Xe and Ba seeds in intermediate zones of supernovae and found that the relative production of the p-Xe isotopes depends sensitively on the yield of the (γ, α) reaction on 128 Ba. Another suggestion - applicable to both the r- and p-anomalies in diamond xenon - is that of a 'rapid separation' between stable Xe isotopes and radioactive precursors produced in the 'standard' p- (as well as r-) process. For the p-isotopes to work, this would require the bulk (87%) of 126 Xe to be produced via the 126 Ba precursor, with a half live of ∼100 minutes, in order to explain the high 124 Xe/ 126 Xe. In contrast to diamond xenon, xenon in silicon carbide contains - besides the component from the s-process in their parent AGB stars - 'almost normal' Xe, with indications for 124 Xe/ 126 Xe being few (∼8)% lower than in solar Xe.

  15. Radioactive iodine and environmental and sanitary effects - bibliographic study and quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetat, Ph.; Armand, P.; Monfort, M.; Fritsch, P.; Flury Herard, A.; Menetrier, F.; Bion, L.; Schoech, C.; Masset, S.

    2004-01-01

    This document is intended to a large public. It reviews the different parameters needed to evaluate the potential act o radioactive releases from the emission to public. Its objectives are to evaluate the importance of different exposure pathways and to assess efficiency of the possible interventions for large public. The main conclusions are summarised hereafter: The radioactive decay chains have to be taken into account to evaluate the iodine source term in the nuclear plants in the case of fission accidents. The physico-chemical forms of iodine are important in order to determine the released activity and deposited activity on the soil. The isotopes to be taken into account are mainly iodine 131 for radiological assessments and also iodine 133 for the nuclear reactor accidents, and the chain Tellurium-Iodine 132 when no particulate filtration exists. Iodine 129 in French reprocessing plant cannot lead to significant accidents. The dominant exposure pathways are related to the consumption of contaminated food products (vegetable, milk) for the inorganic iodine. The iodine transfer to goat and sheep milk is greater than the one to cow milk. The meat production of herbivores at field is the most sensitive. The interest to remove rapidly herbivore from pasture appears relatively clearly. The banning of consumption of local contaminated food products (vegetables and meats) may reduce by about a factor of thirteen the impact due to iodine 131. The youngest the population is, the greatest are the thyroid radiosensitivity and variability within the population. Oral administration of stable iodine limits transfers to maternal milk and foetal thyroid. Ingestion of stable iodine is complementary to consumption banning of local contaminated food products. The earliest the ingestion is, the greatest is the efficiency. 0,1 TBq of 131 iodine released at a low height involves only limited and local actions whereas the release of 10 TBq involves direct and immediate protection

  16. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S. H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-04-15

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile (3H, 129 +131I) and gaseous (85Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 deg K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 deg K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 deg K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85krypton-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, e.g., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1/3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW(e) HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant.

  17. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S.H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile ( 3 H, 129+131 I) and gaseous ( 85 Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 0 K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 0 K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 0 K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85 Kr-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, i.e., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1 / 3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m 3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW/sub e/ HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant

  18. Iodine Status in Pregnant & Breastfeeding Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Linding

    Iodine is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which are crucial regulator of early brain development. The source of iodine in the fetus and the breastfed infant is maternal iodine, and adequate iodine intake in pregnant and breastfeeding is of major concern. Severe iodine deficiency can...... cause irreversible brain damage, whereas the consequences of mild to moderate iodine deficiency are less clear. Denmark was previously iodine deficient with regional differences (mild iodine deficiency in East Denmark and moderate iodine deficiency in West Denmark), and also pregnant and breastfeeding...... women suffered from iodine deficiency. A mandatory iodine fortification of household salt and salt used for commercial production of bread was introduced in Denmark in the year 2000. The PhD thesis investigates intake of iodine supplements and urinary iodine status in Danish pregnant and breastfeeding...

  19. Appropriate xenon-inhalation speed in xenon-enhanced CT using the end-tidal gas-sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Sadao; Toya, Shigeo; Kawase, Takeshi; Koyama, Hideki; Shiga, Hayao

    1986-01-01

    This report describes some problems when end-tidal xenon gas is substituted for the arterial xenon concentration in xenon-enhanced CT. The authors used a newly developed xenon inhalator with a xenon-gas-concentration analyzer and performed xenon-enhanced CT by means of the ''arterio-venous shunt'' method and the ''end-tidal gas-sampling'' method simultaneously. By the former method, the arterial build-up rate (K) was obtained directly from the CT slices of a blood circuit passing through the phantom. By the latter method, it was calculated from the xenon concentration of end-tidal gas sampled from the mask. The speed of xenon supply was varied between 0.6 - 1.2 L/min. in 11 patients with or without a cerebral lesion. The results revealed that rapid xenon inhalation caused a discrepancy in the arterial K between the ''shunt'' method and the ''end-tidal'' method. This discrepancy may be responsible for the mixing of inhalated gas and expired gas in respiratory dead space, such as the nasal cavity or the mask. The cerebral blood flow was underestimated because of the higher arterial K in the latter method. Too much slow inhalation, however, was timewasting, and it increased the body motion in the subanesthetic state. Therefore, an inhalation speed of the arterial K of as much as 0.2 was ideal to represent the end-tidal xenon concentration for the arterial K in the ''end-tidal gas-sampling'' method. When attention is given to this point, this method may offer a reliable absolute value in xenon-enhanced CT. (author)

  20. Performance test of SAUNA xenon mobile sampling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dan; Yang Bin; Yang Weigeng; Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Li Qi; Zhao Yungang; Fan Yuanqing; Chen Zhanying; Chang Yinzhong; Liu Shujiang; Zhang Xinjun; Wang Jun

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the structure and basic functions of SAUNA noble gas xenon mobile sampling system are introduced. The sampling capability of this system is about 2.2 mL per day, as a result from a 684-h operation. The system can be transported to designated locations conveniently to collect xenon sample for routine or emergency environment monitoring. (authors)

  1. A pulse generator for xenon lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Janata, E

    2002-01-01

    A pulse generator is described, which enhances the analyzing light emitted from a xenon lamp as used in kinetic photospectrometry experiments. The lamp current is increased to 600 A for a duration of 3 ms; the current is constant within +-0.2% during a time interval of 2 ms. Because of instabilities of the lamp arc during pulsing, the use of the enhanced light source is limited to measuring times up to 500 mu s. The enhancement in light intensity depends on the wavelength and amounts to more than 400-fold in the UV-region.

  2. Research and Development on Coatings for Retaining Fission Product Iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genco, J. M.; Berry, D. A.; Rosenberg, H. S.; Cremeans, G. E.; Morrison, D. L. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Laboratories, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1968-12-15

    It is well known that elemental iodine has the propensity for forming charge-transfer complexes with amines. These complexes are stable at ambient temperatures and retain much of this stability at elevated temperatures. Amines also react with methyl iodide and hydrogen iodide to form the quaternary ammonium salts and amine salts, respectively. These chemical properties of amines provide the basis for the development of retentive coatings for fission product iodine. Various amine-containing polymers were studied in steam-air environments at elevated temperatures using dilute quantities of tagged iodine. Both non-condensing and condensing steam conditions were investigated. Several of the polymers showed sorption rates and capacities that would be adequate for the chemical removal of accident-released fission-product iodine and were several times more effective than commercial protective coatings currently being used. The removal capabilities for amine polymers also could be enhanced by impregnating the reactant on a matrix material such as asbestos mat, presumably because the impregnation technique leads to enhanced surface area and porosity. The two most promising coating systems found were 1:10-phenanthroline impregnated upon asbestos and a three component composite film of the co-polymer of Genamid 2000 and Epon 828 as a reactive binder with 1,10-phenanthroline as a reactive filler. The use of a reactive coating as a passive safety system should reduce appreciably the airborne iodine half-life and the hazards associated with iodine release during a nuclear reactor accident. (author)

  3. The speciation of iodine in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The speciation of iodine in the environment is discussed under the following topics: (i) sea surface to atmosphere, (ii) chemistry in bulk seawater, (iii) iodine in rocks, (iv) iodine in soils, (v) iodine in plants and (vi) iodine in solidified wastes. (author)

  4. Physiological basis of iodine prophylaxis in case of a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gembicki, M [University School of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland). Dept. of Endocrinology

    1996-08-01

    The uptake of radioactive iodine may be prevented in nearly 100% if the stable iodine will be in sufficiently large quantity before the release radioactive isotopes to the atmosphere. It may also, at least partially reduce the thyroid uptake of radioactive isotopes even if given later. The quantity of stable iodine recommended differs, however most of the data indicate that the doses of 100 mg given to the adult persons might nearly totally block the thyroid iodine uptake. The prophylactic action carried out in Poland after the Chernobyl disaster when about 12 million children and 6 million adults received the stable iodine allowed to collect well documented data in this matter. It was stated that 70 mg of stable iodine is blocking the thyroid uptake with the mean of 82% after 24 hours, 39% after 48 hours and only 26% after 72 hours. Therefore it seems that the blocking doses (which may be even less than 70 mg) should be given every 24 hours for a few days hoping that the most serious danger of contamination with radioactive iodine will pass. 14 refs, 4 figs.

  5. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W.F.

    2015-01-01

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Therefore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon

  6. Disposal of Iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, M.T.; Moore, J.G.; Devaney, H.E.; Rogers, G.C.; Williams, C.; Newman, E.

    1978-01-01

    One of the problems to be solved in the nuclear waste management field is the disposal of radioactive iodine-129, which is one of the more volatile and long-lived fission products. Studies have shown that fission products can be fixed in concrete for permanent disposal. Current studies have demonstrated that practical cementitious grouts may contain up to 18% iodine as barium iodate. The waste disposal criterion is based on the fact that harmful effects to present or future generations can be avoided by isolation and/or dilution. Long-term isolation is effective in deep, dry repositories; however, since penetration by water is possible, although unlikely, release was calculated based on leach rates into water. Further considerations have indicated that sea disposal on or in the ocean floor may be a more acceptable alternative

  7. Atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, G.A.; Gusinow, M.A.; Hays, A.K.; Padrick, T.D.; Palmer, R.E.; Rice, J.K.; Truby, F.K.; Riley, M.E.

    1978-05-01

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program

  8. Hyperthyroidism and radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corstens, F.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    The study details the results of treatment of patients with hyperthyroidism using a combination of fractionated low doses radioactive iodine and anthithyroid drug therapy. The patients studied were treated according to this regimen after August 1968 and all reached euthyroidism before March 1979. None of the patients had been treated with radioactive iodine prior to the start of the protocol. A subgroup of the patients had received an unsuccessfull course with antithyroid drug therapy and, or, surgical therapy before the start of the protocol. Patients who had never been treated for hyperthyroidism were given antithyroid drug therapy for at least 6 months in an attempt to reach euthryroidism without the use of 131 I therapy. Therefore, all patients had experienced a course of unsuccessfull therapy prior to the start of the treatment protocol using combined fractionated low doses of 131 I and antithyroid drug therapy. (Auth.)

  9. Effects of temperature and irradiation on the mobility of Xenon in UO2: Profilometric and microstructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, B.

    2012-01-01

    In France, electricity is mainly produced (78%) through the operation of 58 PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors). During reactor operation, many fission products (FP) are generated in the fuel which is, in most cases, UO 2 enriched to about 4% in 235 U. Among FPs, gaseous fission products as Xenon and Krypton, are abundantly produced (around 15% stable fission products). Because of their chemical nature, those two gases have a very low solubility in the fuel and therefore tend to form bubbles (to minimize surface tension) and can cause pellets swelling. The formed gas can also be released out of the pellet, and lead to a substantial increase in the pressure within the fuel cladding, thereby limiting the energy production. However, migration mechanisms, traditionally studied indirectly by measuring the amount of gas released after irradiation, are not yet fully understood. It is frequently assumed that atomic diffusion is the only mechanism that can lead to a migration of xenon. The objective of this thesis is to provide direct evidence of the different mechanisms controlling the behavior of Xenon during thermal annealing and irradiation. Therefore, we used ion implantation to introduce Xenon in uranium dioxide samples. After implantation, the Xenon distribution follows a quasi-Gaussian concentration profile (variation of the concentration regard to the depth) located in the first 300 nanometers of the sample. We have performed post-implantation annealing at 1400 C and 1600 C in order to study the impact of the temperature, and irradiation with ions to simulate the impact of fission products in the fuel. Subsequently, concentration depth profiles were measured by ion microprobe (SIMS). Although the feasibility of Xenon measurement has been demonstrated in several articles, no concentration profile had so far been presented in the literature because a classical data processing of SIMS data is not suitable in uranium dioxide. Therefore a new data processing software has

  10. Iodine immobilization in apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audubert, F.; Lartigue, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    In the context of a scientific program on long-lived radionuclide conditioning, a matrix for iodine 129 immobilization has been studied. A lead vanado-phosphate apatite was prepared from the melt of lead vanado-phosphate Pb 3 (VO 4 ) 1.6 (PO 4 ) 0.4 and lead iodide PbI 2 in stoichiometric proportions by calcination at 700 deg. C during 3 hours. Natural sintering of this apatite is not possible because the product decomposition occurs at 400 deg. C. Reactive sintering is the solution. The principle depends on the coating of lead iodide with lead vanado-phosphate. Lead vanado-phosphate coating is used as iodo-apatite reactant and as dense covering to confine iodine during synthesis. So the best condition to immobilize iodine during iodo-apatite synthesis is a reactive sintering at 700 deg. C under 25 MPa. We obtained an iodo-apatite surrounded with dense lead vanadate. Leaching behaviour of the matrix synthesized by solid-solid reaction is under progress in order to determine chemical durability, basic mechanisms of the iodo-apatite alteration and kinetic rate law. Iodo-apatite dissolution rates were pH and temperature dependent. We obtained a rate of 2.5 10 -3 g.m -2 .d -1 at 90 deg. C in initially de-ionised water. (authors)

  11. Separation and retention of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    Caustic and mercuric nitrate scrubbers have been used for iodine recovery from process offgas, but they exhibit low decontamination factors for organic iodide removal and produce liquid wastes that are unsuitable for final storage. The Iodox process gives high decontamination factors for both organic iodides and elemental iodine. The liquid waste can be evaporated to a solid or concentrated and fixed in cement. Efficient separation and retention of gaseous iodine species can be obtained with silver-loaded adsorbents. The waste is a dry solid easily handled and stored. Adsorbents containing cheaper metals appear to have lower iodine-loading capacities and may be unsuitable for bulk iodine removal from process offgas because of the large amounts of solid waste that would be generated. A potential method for regenerationg and recycling silver-loaded adsorbents is being evaluated. In conjunction with the regeneration, lead-exchanged zeolite is used as a secondary adsorbent for the final fixation and storage of the iodine

  12. Thyroid measurements of Iodine-125 workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.; Peggie, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The accumulation of 125 I in the thyroid presents real hazards to workers who use this radionuclide. Recent assessments of the maximum permissible thyroid burden for 125 I have tended to be lower than those previously adopted. Workers using 125 I may receive small doses to a film badge monitor from external radiation while accumulating significant doses to the thyroid from internal contamination. It is therefore necessary to perform some form of thyroid monitoring on such workers. In the past two years the Australian Radiation Laboratory has monitored 125 I workers from six different institutations in the Melbourne area to determine the activity of 125 I in their thyroids. Most of the levels monitored were less than one tenth of the most recently recommended thyroid burden of 400 nanocurie. The highest levels were measured in workers who actually perform iodinations. Workers who handle the iodinate generally had lower levels than those performing the iodinations. Only a very small number of the workers measured were below the detectable limit of the system indicating that even when low activities of 125 I are handled in relatively stable forms it is still possible to accumulate 125 I in the thyroid

  13. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.E.; Thompson, C.T.

    1977-01-01

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3 to 20 wt percent iodine as Ba(IO 3 ) 2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO 3 ) 2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. 10 claims, 2 figures

  14. Iodine neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kazi Fariduddin

    A new technique, Iodine Neutron Capture Therapy (INCT) is proposed to treat hyperthyroidism in people. Present thyroid therapies, surgical removal and 131I treatment, result in hypothyroidism and, for 131I, involve protracted treatment times and excessive whole-body radiation doses. The new technique involves using a low energy neutron beam to convert a fraction of the natural iodine stored in the thyroid to radioactive 128I, which has a 24-minute half-life and decays by emitting 2.12-MeV beta particles. The beta particles are absorbed in and damage some thyroid tissue cells and consequently reduce the production and release of thyroid hormones to the blood stream. Treatment times and whole-body radiation doses are thus reduced substantially. This dissertation addresses the first of the several steps needed to obtain medical profession acceptance and regulatory approval to implement this therapy. As with other such programs, initial feasibility is established by performing experiments on suitable small mammals. Laboratory rats were used and their thyroids were exposed to the beta particles coming from small encapsulated amounts of 128I. Masses of 89.0 mg reagent-grade elemental iodine crystals have been activated in the ISU AGN-201 reactor to provide 0.033 mBq of 128I. This activity delivers 0.2 Gy to the thyroid gland of 300-g male rats having fresh thyroid tissue masses of ˜20 mg. Larger iodine masses are used to provide greater doses. The activated iodine is encapsulated to form a thin (0.16 cm 2/mg) patch that is then applied directly to the surgically exposed thyroid of an anesthetized rat. Direct neutron irradiation of a rat's thyroid was not possible due to its small size. Direct in-vivo exposure of the thyroid of the rat to the emitted radiation from 128I is allowed to continue for 2.5 hours (6 half-lives). Pre- and post-exposure blood samples are taken to quantify thyroid hormone levels. The serum T4 concentration is measured by radioimmunoassay at

  15. Chemical generation of iodine atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, Kevin B. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States)]. E-mail: kevin.hewett@kirtland.af.mil; Hager, Gordon D. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States); Crowell, Peter G. [Northrup Grumman Information Technology, Science and Technology Operating Unit, Advanced Technology Division, P.O. Box 9377, Albuquerque, NM 87119-9377 (United States)

    2005-01-10

    The chemical generation of atomic iodine using a chemical combustor to generate the atomic fluorine intermediate, from the reaction of F{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, followed by the production of atomic iodine, from the reaction of F + HI, was investigated. The maximum conversion efficiency of HI into atomic iodine was observed to be approximately 75%, which is in good agreement with the theoretical model. The conversion efficiency is limited by the formation of iodine monofluoride at the walls of the combustor where the gas phase temperature is insufficient to dissociate the IF.

  16. Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy for Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Radioiodine therapy is a nuclear ... thyroid cancer. When a small dose of radioactive iodine I-131 (an isotope of iodine that emits ...

  17. Adsorption of iodine from COIL waste gas on soaked coal-based activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junbo; Hao, Shan; Gao, Liping

    2014-04-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) has wide application prospects in military, industrial and medical treatment fields as a second generation gas chemical laser to follow the first HF/DF chemical laser. However, a COIL releases large amounts of gas, such as helium, oxygen, chlorine and iodine. Chlorides have a serious corrosive effect on the system, especially iodine vapor crystallization, which seriously endangers the normal use of vacuum systems, and radioactive methyl iodide, which is hazardous to operators and pollutes the environment. The use of soaked coal-based activated carbon as an adsorbent for removing methyl iodine is proposed, while it is proposed that coal-based activated carbon is an effective adsorbent for removing stable iodine. The research conducted in this work shows that iodine residues are less than 0.5 μg ml-1 after the adsorption treatment and the decontamination factor of the coal-based activated carbon for removing stable iodine is more than 1000. Using this method can achieve the purpose of removing harmful iodine, satisfy the requirements for engineering applications, and also be applied to other nuclear power plant flue gas treatments.

  18. Iodine removal from a gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikis, A. Ch.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine, e.g. radioactive iodine, present as one or more organic iodides, optionally with elemental iodine, in a gas phase (e.g. air) are removed by photochemically decomposing the organic iodides to elemental iodine, reacting the iodine produced, and any initially present with excess ozone, preferably photochemically produced in situ in the gas phase to produce solid iodine oxides, and removing the solid oxides from the gas phase. (author)

  19. Iodine removal from a gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikis, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Iodine, e.g. radioactive iodine, present as one or more organic iodides, optionally with elemental iodine, in a gas phase (e.g. air) are removed by photochemically decomposing the organic iodides to elemental iodine, reacting the iodine produced, and any initially present with excess ozone, preferably photochemically produced in situ in the gas phase to produce solid iodine oxides, and removing the solid oxides from the gas phase

  20. The Status of Iodine Nutrition and Iodine Deficiency Disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iodine deficiency disorders are serious public health problems in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence and severity of iodine deficiency disorders among school children in Metekel Zone. Methods: A cross-sectional school based descriptive study was conducted between February 2011 ...

  1. Reliability and error analysis on xenon/CT CBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.

    2000-01-01

    This article provides a quantitative error analysis of a simulation model of xenon/CT CBF in order to investigate the behavior and effect of different types of errors such as CT noise, motion artifacts, lower percentage of xenon supply, lower tissue enhancements, etc. A mathematical model is built to simulate these errors. By adjusting the initial parameters of the simulation model, we can scale the Gaussian noise, control the percentage of xenon supply, and change the tissue enhancement with different kVp settings. The motion artifact will be treated separately by geometrically shifting the sequential CT images. The input function is chosen from an end-tidal xenon curve of a practical study. Four kinds of cerebral blood flow, 10, 20, 50, and 80 cc/100 g/min, are examined under different error environments and the corresponding CT images are generated following the currently popular timing protocol. The simulated studies will be fed to a regular xenon/CT CBF system for calculation and evaluation. A quantitative comparison is given to reveal the behavior and effect of individual error resources. Mixed error testing is also provided to inspect the combination effect of errors. The experiment shows that CT noise is still a major error resource. The motion artifact affects the CBF results more geometrically than quantitatively. Lower xenon supply has a lesser effect on the results, but will reduce the signal/noise ratio. The lower xenon enhancement will lower the flow values in all areas of brain. (author)

  2. Modelling the chemistry of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquette, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have assembled a kinetic model, based on elementary chemical reactions, that describes the chemical behaviour of iodine in aqueous solution as a function of time and various parameters such as pH, concentration and radiation field. The model is conceptually divided into six section: aqueous iodine chemistry, aqueous organic iodide chemistry, water radiolysis, radiolysis of iodine solutions, radiolysis of organic iodide solutions and mass transfer. The model indicates that, in the absence of a radiation field, the rate of production of volatile iodine species is controlled by the rate of oxidation of the iodide ion. The volatile iodine species are dominated by organic iodides if organic impurities are present. The single most important parameter controlling iodine volatility is the pH of the solution; high pH values tend to minimize iodine volatility. In the presence of a radiation field, the volatility of iodine is controlled by the radiation-induced oxidation of the iodide ion. Again, iodine volatility is dominated by organic iodides if organic impurities are present. High pH values minimize iodine volatility. A sensitivity analysis has been performed on some sections of the model to identify reactions to which the volatility of iodine is most sensitive. In the absence of a radiation field, the volatility is most sensitive, first, to the rate of oxidation of the iodide ion, and, second, to the rate of mass transfer of volatile species between the aqueous and the gaseous phases. This approach should be useful in identifying reactions for which accurate rate constants are required and in decreasing the complexity of the model. 37 refs

  3. [Repeated cross-sectional studies on urinary iodine and iodine content of salt among school-aged children from 2012 to 2014 in Yuhuan County, Zhejiang Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Meifang; Wang, Congyun; Li, Songtao; Ying, Xuhua; Zhao, Qi; Fu, Chaowei; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the iodine status and its change among school-aged children in their morning urine and eating salt from 2012 to 2014 in Yuhuan County, Zhejiang Province, China. Three repeated cross-sectional studies were carried out at a same primary school in 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively. Three classes were randomly selected from each of 3 to 5 grade by the cluster-stratified sampling every year. Totally, 1343 out of 1350 eligible children aged 8 to 10 years old were involved into this study. Their morning urine and salt eating at home were collected and tested. The overall median of urine iodine was 116.0 μg/L, and no significant change was found over year. The overall proportions of subjects with urine iodine iodine from 1343 salt samples was 0.0 mg/kg and no year difference was statistically observed. The proportions of subjects consumed iodized salt significantly decreased from 25.1% in 2012 to 21.8% in 2013 and to 14.2% in 2014. There was a significant difference in urine iodine between subjects taken iodized salt or not and also a weak positive correlation between salt iodine and urine iodine. The nutritional status of iodine is overall stable, proper and safety in recent 3 years among school children in Yuhuan County. The coverage rate of iodized salt is very low.

  4. The potential for large scale uses for fission product xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrmann, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Of all fission products in spent, low enrichment, uranium, power reactor fuels xenon is produced in the highest yield - nearly one cubic meter, STP, per metric ton. In aged fuels which may be considered for processing in the U.S. radioactive xenon isotopes approach the lowest limits of detection. The separation from accompanying radioactive 85 Kr is the essential problem; however, this is state of the art technology which has been demonstrated on the pilot scale to yield xenon with pico-curie levels of 85 Kr contamination. If needed for special applications, such levels could be further reduced. Environmental considerations require the isolation of essentially all fission product krypton during fuel processing. Economic restraints assure that the bulk of this krypton will need to be separated from the much more voluminous xenon fraction of the total amount of fission gas. Xenon may thus be discarded or made available for uses at probably very low cost. In contrast with many other fission products which have unique radioactive characteristics which make them useful as sources of heat, gamma and x-rays and luminescence as well as for medicinal diagnostics and therapeutics fission product xenon differs from naturally occurring xenon only in its isotopic composition which gives it a slightly higher atomic weight, because of the much higher concentrations of the 134 X and 136 Xe isotopes. Therefore, fission product xenon can most likely find uses in applications which already exist but which can not be exploited most beneficially because of the high cost and scarcity of natural xenon. Unique uses would probably include applications in improved incandescent light illumination in place of krypton and in human anesthesia

  5. A comparative study of transfer coefficient of Iodine from grass to cow milk under equilibrium and postulated accidental scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geetha, P.V.; Karunakara, N.; Prabhu, Ujwal; Yashodhara, I.; Ravi, P.M.; Dileep, B.N.; Karpe, Rupali

    2014-01-01

    Extensive studies on transfer of 131 I through grass-cow-milk pathway after the Chernobyl accident were reported. But, under nor mal operational conditions of a power reactor, 131 I is not present in measurable concentration in environmental matrices around a nuclear power generating station. Hence, database on 131 I transfer coefficients for grass-cow-milk pathway in equilibrium conditions in the environment of a nuclear power plant are sparse. One of method to estimate the equilibrium transfer coefficient is to use stable iodine, which is present naturally in very low levels in the environmental matrices. By measuring the concentration of stable iodine concentration in grass and cow milk, the grass-to-milk transfer coefficient of iodine can be estimated. Since the metabolism of stable and radioiodine is same, the data obtained for transfer coefficient of stable iodine could be used for predicting the transfer for radioiodine to cow milk. The measurement of stable iodine in the environmental sample is very challenging because of its extremely low concentration. Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) can be used to estimate stable iodine in the environment matrices after suitably optimizing the condition to minimize interferences. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on the transfer coefficients for grass-cow milk pathway of iodine in normal (equilibrium) situations as well as for a postulated (simulated) emergency condition in Kaiga region

  6. A dual-phase xenon TPC for scintillation and ionisation yield measurements in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudis, Laura; Biondi, Yanina; Capelli, Chiara; Galloway, Michelle; Kazama, Shingo; Kish, Alexander; Pakarha, Payam; Piastra, Francesco; Wulf, Julien

    2018-05-01

    A small-scale, two-phase (liquid/gas) xenon time projection chamber ( Xurich II) was designed, constructed and is under operation at the University of Zürich. Its main purpose is to investigate the microphysics of particle interactions in liquid xenon at energies below 50 keV, which are relevant for rare event searches using xenon as target material. Here we describe in detail the detector, its associated infrastructure, and the signal identification algorithm developed for processing and analysing the data. We present the first characterisation of the new instrument with calibration data from an internal ^83{m} Kr source. The zero-field light yield is 15.0 and 14.0 photoelectrons/keV at 9.4 and 32.1 keV, respectively, and the corresponding values at an electron drift field of 1 kV/cm are 10.8 and 7.9 photoelectrons/keV. The charge yields at these energies are 28 and 31 electrons/keV, with the proportional scintillation yield of 24 photoelectrons per one electron extracted into the gas phase, and an electron lifetime of 200 μ s. The relative energy resolution, σ /E, is 11.9 and 5.8% at 9.4 and 32.1 keV, respectively using a linear combination of the scintillation and ionisation signals. We conclude with measurements of the electron drift velocity at various electric fields, and compare these to literature values.

  7. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, J., E-mail: jrenner@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gehman, V.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Shuman, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Álvarez, V. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Borges, F.I.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Cárcel, S. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Castel, J.; Cebrián, S. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Calle Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cervera, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Conde, C.A.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); and others

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  8. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  9. Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  10. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, M. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

  11. Iodine metabolism and food needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, R.

    1992-01-01

    Iodine is an element that is necessary for the growth and mental development of a child and for the maintenance of the activity of all cells at all ages. In this article, the author recalls the iodine sources, its metabolism and the food needs and contributions

  12. Modeling pulse characteristics in Xenon with NEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, J; Stolp, D; Szydagis, M; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Woods, M; Walsh, N; Barry, N; Kazkaz, K

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive model for describing the characteristics of pulsed signals, generated by particle interactions in xenon detectors, is presented. An emphasis is laid on two-phase time projection chambers, but the models presented are also applicable to single phase detectors. In order to simulate the pulse shape due to primary scintillation light, the effects of the ratio of singlet and triplet dimer state populations, as well as their corresponding decay times, and the recombination time are incorporated into the model. In a two phase time projection chamber, when simulating the pulse caused by electroluminescence light, the ionization electron mean free path in gas, the drift velocity, singlet and triplet decay times, diffusion constants, and the electron trapping time, have been implemented. This modeling has been incorporated into a complete software package, which realistically simulates the expected pulse shapes for these types of detectors

  13. Xenon plasma with caesium as additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojilkovic, S.M.; Novakovic, N.V.; Zivkovic, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration dependence of xenon plasma with cesium as additive in the temperature range of 2000 K to 20,000 K is analyzed. Plasma is considered as weakly nonideal in complete local thermodynamic equilibrium and the interaction between plasma and vessel walls is not taken into account. The values of some of the parameters for nonideality of plasma with 1% of cesium (γ=0.01010) and 10% of cesium (γ=0.11111) are computed, for an initial pressure in plasma of p 0 =13,000 Pa and initial temperature T 0 =1000 K. The ratio of electric conductivity of plasma computed by Lorentz's formula and electric conductivity computed by Spitzer's formula in the same temperature interval is also analyzed. (author) 5 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs

  14. Xenon plasma with caesium as additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojilkovic, S M; Novakovic, N V; Zivkovic, L M

    1986-01-01

    The concentration dependence of xenon plasma with cesium as additive in the temperature range of 2000 K to 20,000 K is analyzed. Plasma is considered as weakly nonideal in complete local thermodynamic equilibrium and the interaction between plasma and vessel walls is not taken into account. The values of some of the parameters for nonideality of plasma with 1% of cesium (..gamma..=0.01010) and 10% of cesium (..gamma..=0.11111) are computed, for an initial pressure in plasma of p/sub 0/=13,000 Pa and initial temperature T/sub 0/=1000 K. The ratio of electric conductivity of plasma computed by Lorentz's formula and electric conductivity computed by Spitzer's formula in the same temperature interval is also analyzed. (author) 5 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs.

  15. Appropriate xenon-inhalation time in xenon-enhanced CT using the end-tidal gas-sampling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Hideo; Furuhata, Shigeru; Onozuka, Satoshi; Uchida, Koichi; Fujii, Koji; Suga, Sadao; Kawase, Takeshi; Toya, Shigeo; Shiga, Hayao

    1988-12-01

    For the end-tidal gas-sampling method of xenon-enhanced CT (Xe-CT), the respective functional images of K, lambda, and the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied and compared using the data at 7-, 10-, 15- and 25-minute inhalations. The most appropriate inhalation time of xenon gas was evaluated in 14 clinical cases. An end-tidal xenon curve which represents the arterial xenon concentration was monitored with a xenon analyzer; the xenon concentration was gradually increased to a level of 50% by using a xenon inhalator with a closed circuit to prevent the overestimation of the xenon concentration sampled from the mask. Serial CT scans were taken over a period of 25 minutes of inhalation. The functional images of K, lambda, and rCBF were calculated for serial CT scans for 7, 10, 15 and 25 minutes using Fick's equation. Those various images and absolute values were then compared. The rCBF value of a 15-minute inhalation was approximately 15% greater than that of 25 minutes, while the values of K, lambda, rCBF from a 15-minute inhalation were significantly correlated to those from 25 minutes. The regression line made it possible to estimate 25-minute inhalation values from those of 15 minutes. In imaging, the rCBF mapping of the 15-minute inhalation was found to be more reliable than that of 25 minutes. This study suggests that the minimal time of xenon inhalation is 15 minutes for the end-tidal gas-sampling method. A longer inhalation may be necessary for the estimation of rCBF in the low-flow area, such as the white matter or the pathological region.

  16. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant iodine nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Fereidoun; Smyth, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this review is to explore information available regarding iodine secretion in milk, both mothers and infants iodine nutrition during breastfeeding and to make recommendations for appropriate iodine supplementation during lactation. MEDLINE was queried for studies between 1960 and 2007 that included lactation and breastfeeding with iodine and iodine deficiency. Studies were selected if they studied (i) Secretion of iodine in breast milk; (ii) breastfeeding and iodine nutrition; (iii) factors affecting maternal iodine metabolism and (iv) recommendations for iodine supplementation during breastfeeding. Thirty-six articles met the selection criteria. The iodine content of breast milk varies with dietary iodine intake, being lowest in areas of iodine deficiency with high prevalence of goitre. Milk iodine levels are correspondingly higher when programs of iodine prophylaxis such as salt iodization or administration of iodized oil have been introduced. The small iodine pool of the neonatal thyroid turns over very rapidly and is highly sensitive to variations in dietary iodine intake. Expression of the sodium iodide symporter is up-regulated in the lactating mammary gland which results in preferential uptake of iodide. In areas of iodine sufficiency breast milk iodine concentration should be in the range of 100-150 microg/dl. Studies from France, Germany, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, Italy, Denmark, Thailand and Zaire have shown breast milk concentrations of nutrition. The current WHO/ICCIDD/UNICEF recommendation for daily iodine intake (250 microg for lactating mothers) has been selected to ensure that iodine deficiency dose not occur in the postpartum period and that the iodine content of the milk is sufficient for the infant's iodine requirement.

  17. Determination of iodine in biological samples by neutron activation analysis (NAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geetha, P.V.; Karunakara, N.; Prabhu, Ujwal; Yashodhara, I.; Ravi, P.M.; Sudhakar, J.; Ajith, Nicy; Swain, K.K.; Verma, R.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Acharya, R.

    2010-01-01

    During normal operating conditions of a nuclear reactor, the release of radionuclides to the environment will be extremely low and well within the limits. Radioiodine ( 131 I) is one of the radionuclides likely to get released into the atmosphere in case of a reactor accident. During the short initial phase of release of radioactivity, 131 I is rapidly transferred to milk, leading to significant thyroid dose to those consuming milk, especially infant and children. Hence, studies on Iodine transfer through grass-cow-milk is very important. Extensive studies on transfer for 131 I through grass-cow-milk pathway after Chernobyl accident has been reported. But, under normal operational conditions of the power reactor, 131 I is not present in measurable concentration in environmental matrices of a nuclear power generating station. Stable iodine is present in all environmental samples and from the concentration of stable iodine in grass and milk, one can estimate the transfer factor. The measurement of stable iodine in environmental sample is very challenging because of its extremely low concentration. Neutron activation analysis can be used for estimation of stable iodine in the environment after suitably optimizing the condition to minimize interferences. A method has been developed based on thermal neutron activation analysis (NAA) to estimate the iodine concentration present in grass and cow milk

  18. Radon depletion in xenon boil-off gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Lindemann, S.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    An important background in detectors using liquid xenon for rare event searches arises from the decays of radon and its daughters. We report for the first time a reduction of {sup 222}Rn in the gas phase above a liquid xenon reservoir. We show a reduction factor of >or similar 4 for the {sup 222}Rn concentration in boil-off xenon gas compared to the radon enriched liquid phase. A semiconductor-based α-detector and miniaturized proportional counters are used to detect the radon. As the radon depletion in the boil-off gas is understood as a single-stage distillation process, this result establishes the suitability of cryogenic distillation to separate radon from xenon down to the 10{sup -15} mol/mol level. (orig.)

  19. Matrix of response functions for xenon gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shustov, A.E.; Vlasik, K.F.; Grachev, V.M.; Dmitrenko, V.V.; Novikov, A.S.; P'ya, S.N.; Ulin, S.E.; Uteshev, Z.M.; Chernysheva, I.V.

    2014-01-01

    An approach of creation of response matrix using simulation GEANT4 gamma-ray Monte-Carlo method has been described for gamma-ray spectrometer based on high pressure xenon impulse ionization chamber with a shielding grid [ru

  20. XAS characterisation of xenon bubbles in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: martinp@drncad.cea.fr; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Valot, C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Nassif, V. [CEA Grenoble, DSM/DRFMC/SP2M/NRS, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Proux, O. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, UMR CNRS/Universite Joseph Fourier, 1381 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, 38400 Saint-Martin-D' Heres (France); Hazemann, J.-L. [Institut Neel, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-06-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were performed on a set of uranium dioxide samples implanted with 10{sup 17} xenon cm{sup -2} at 800 keV (8 at.% at 140 nm). EXAFS measurements performed at 12 K showed that during implantation the gas forms highly pressurised nanometre size inclusions. Bubble pressures were estimated at 2.8 {+-} 0.3 GPa at low temperature. Following the low energy xenon implantation, samples were annealed between 1073 and 1773 K for several hours. Stability of nanometre size highly pressurized xenon aggregates in UO{sub 2} is demonstrated up to 1073 K as for this temperature almost no modification of the xenon environment was observed. Above this temperature, bubbles will trap migrating vacancies and their inner pressure is seen to decrease substantially.

  1. Distribution of xenon between gaseous and liquid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackley, R.D.; Notz, K.J.

    1976-10-01

    The distribution of xenon at low concentrations between gaseous and liquid CO 2 was measured over essentially the entire liquid range of CO 2 . These measurements involved using a collimated radiation-detection cell to determine the relative quantities of 133 Xe-traced xenon in the separate phases contained in a vertical cylinder under isothermal conditions. The results are expressed in terms of a distribution ratio (mole fraction of xenon in the gaseous phase divided by mole fraction of xenon in the liquid phase) which decreased from 7.53 at -54.8 0 C to 1.10 at 30.5 0 C. These data were used to calculate various other solubility-related quantities

  2. Review of xenon-133 production and related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.; Ropero, M.

    1980-01-01

    A literature survey is given on the production methods of fission xenon-133 and related problems, such as purification, metrological and dosimetric aspects, preparation of isotopic solutions, recycling, etc. 127 references are included. (Author) 127 refs

  3. The unbearable lightness of being: CDMS versus XENON

    CERN Document Server

    Frandsen, Mads T; McCabe, Christopher; Sarkar, Subir; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The CDMS-II collaboration has reported 3 events in a Si detector, which are consistent with being nuclear recoils due to scattering of Galactic dark matter particles with a mass of about 8.6 GeV and a cross-section on neutrons of about 2 x 10^-41 cm^2. While a previous result from the XENON10 experiment has supposedly ruled out such particles as dark matter, we find by reanalysing the XENON10 data that this is not the case. Some tension remains however with the upper limit placed by the XENON100 experiment, independently of astrophysical uncertainties concerning the Galactic dark matter distribution. We explore possible ways of ameliorating this tension by altering the properties of dark matter interactions. Nevertheless, even with standard couplings, light dark matter is consistent with both CDMS and XENON10/100.

  4. A new liquid xenon scintillation detector for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepel, V.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    A new positron-sensitive detector of annihilation photons filled with liquid xenon is proposed for positron emission tomography. Simultaneous detection of both liquid xenon scintillation and ionization current produces a time resolution of < 1 ns and a position resolution in the tangential direction of the tomograph ring is ∼ 1 mm and in the radial direction is ∼ 5 mm. The advantages of a tomograph with new detectors are discussed. New algorithms of Compton scattering can be used. (author)

  5. Study of regional lung ventilation and perfusion by xenon 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    The present work consists of a regional lung exploration after injection of xenon 133, dissolved in physiological serum, followed a few minutes later by that of 99m Tc-labelled serumalbumin microspheres. The aim is three fold: first of all to study perfusion and ventilation by xenon 133, next to compare the results obtained after xenon 133 and 99 m Tc-labelled microsphere injection, lastly to establish the value of the technique and its routine application. This examination has not solved all problems of lung exploration by xenon 133. For example we deliberately kept to intraveinous injection of the gas dissolved in physiological serum, leaving aside the breathing test. Xenon 133 scintigraphy in our opinion will not tend to replace 99m Tc-labelled microsphere scintigraphy, which has irreplaceable morphological qualities, but will serve as an excellent complement. The basic advantage of xenon 133 is the regional ventilation estimate it provides allowing any anomaly of the lung parenchyma to be located immediately or conversely the functional value of the healthy lung to be established with a view to a surgical removal of a diseased zone [fr

  6. Exposure mode study to xenon-133 in a reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perier, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the external and internal dose assessment to xenon-133. During the nuclear reactor operation, fission products and radioactive inert gases, as 133 Xe, are generated and might be responsible for the exposure of workers in case of clad defect. Particle Monte Carlo transport code is adapted in radioprotection to quantify dosimetric quantities. The study of exposure to xenon-133 is conducted by using Monte-Carlo simulations based on GEANT4, an anthropomorphic phantom, a realistic geometry of the reactor building, and compartmental models. The external exposure inside a reactor building is conducted with a realistic and conservative exposure scenario. The effective dose rate and the eye lens equivalent dose rate are determined by Monte-Carlo simulations. Due to the particular emission spectrum of xenon-133, the equivalent dose rate to the lens of eyes is discussed in the light of expected new eye dose limits. The internal exposure occurs while xenon-133 is inhaled. The lungs are firstly exposed by inhalation, and their equivalent dose rate is obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations. A biokinetic model is used to evaluate the internal exposure to xenon-133. This thesis gives us a better understanding to the dosimetric quantities related to external and internal exposure to xenon-133. Moreover the impacts of the dosimetric changes are studied on the current and future dosimetric limits. The dosimetric quantities are lower than the current and future dosimetric limits. (author)

  7. Iodine in the environment revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.V.; Carlsen, L.

    1989-05-01

    The report gives an overview of the environmental cycle of iodine, especially focusing on the possible reactions being responsible for the retention of iodine in the terrestrial environment. During the last two decades evidence for the presence of iodine in soil as organically bound has been presented. The major part of inorganic iodine in the terrestrial environment will, under physical and chemical conditions normally prevailing, exist as iodide. No evidence for a direct reaction between iodide and organic material has been presented, whereas strong support for the engagement of microbial activity in the formation of organic iodine compounds in soil has been obtained. Incorporation of iodine in humic substances as a result of enzymatic catalysis, involving an enzyme of the perozidase group apperas reasonable. It is concluded that microbiological activity involving extracellular enzymes most probably is responsible for the possible retention of iodine in the terrestrial environment. It is suggested that these reactions in detail should be studied experimentally. (author) 3 tabs., 2 ills., 51 refs

  8. On-line measurement of gaseous iodine species during a PWR severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykal, I.; Doizi, D. [CEA, DEN, Departement de Physico-chimie, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, (France); Perrin, A. [CNRS-University of Paris Est and Paris 7, Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, 94010 Creteil, (France); Vincent, B. [University of Burgundy, Laboratoire de physique, CNRS UMR 5027, 9, Avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex, (France); Manceron, L. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, St-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, (France); Mejean, G. [University of Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique-CNRS UMR 5588, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres, (France); Ducros, G. [CEA Cadarache, CEA, DEN, Departement d' Etudes des Combustibles, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance cedex, (France)

    2015-07-01

    A long-range remote sensing of severe accidents in nuclear power plants can be obtained by monitoring the online emission of volatile fission products such as xenon, krypton, caesium and iodine. The nuclear accident in Fukushima was ranked at level 7 of the International Nuclear Event Scale by the NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency) according to the importance of the radionuclide release and the off-site impact. Among volatile fission products, iodine species are of high concern, since they can be released under aerosols as well as gaseous forms. Four years after the Fukushima accident, the aerosol/gaseous partition is still not clear. Since the iodine gaseous forms are less efficiently trapped by the Filtered Containment Venting Systems than aerosol forms, it is of crucial importance to monitor them on-line during a nuclear accident, in order to improve the source term assessment in such a situation. Therefore, we propose to detect and quantify these iodine gaseous forms by the use of highly sensitive optical methods. (authors)

  9. Review of xenon-133 production and related problems; Estudio bibliografico de la produccion de xenon-133 y problemas afines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina, M; Ropero, M

    1980-07-01

    A literature survey is given on the production methods of fission xenon-133 and related problems, such as purification, metrological and dosimetric aspects, preparation of isotopic solutions, recycling, etc. 127 references are included. (Author) 127 refs.

  10. Sensitivity of gaseous xenon ionisation chambers (1961); Sensibilite des chambres d'ionisation a xenon gazeux (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhl, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    It seems advantageous to fill an ionization chamber with xenon gas when this chamber is used for measuring a low intensity and high energy electron or positron beam, or monitoring a gamma beam. In the study of 5 to 50 MeV electrons, xenon allows for the ionization chamber yield, an improvement of a factor 4,5. (author) [French] Il apparait interessant d'utiliser du xenon comme gaz dans une chambre d'ionisation destinee a mesurer un faisceau d'electrons ou de positons de faible intensite et de grande energie ou pour monitorer un faisceau de gamma. Dans les etudes des electrons de 5 a 50 MeV, le xenon permet de gagner un facteur 4,5 sur l'air pour la sensibilite d'une chambre d'ionisation. (auteur)

  11. Iodine metabolism in leprosy patients (examination with a method of whole-body radiometry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balybin, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    A method of whole-body radiometry was used to study iodine metabolism in 47 patients with lepromatous leprosy. Disorders were found in 1/3 of the cases. The level of organic iodine in the body was the most informative of all iodine metabolism indices. In the active stage of leprosy it was twice as low, on an average, as the normal one, in the stage of incomplete and stable regression it rose not reaching, however, the values of healthy persons. The content of iodine in the thyroid of leprosy patients showed a tendency to a rise starting from the active stage, however it was only in the stages of incomplete and stable regression that it significantly exceeded the normal level. The data obtained should be considered during therapy of lepers to predict and control an unfavorable complication like specific polyneuritis

  12. Iodine deficiency and nutrition in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manousou, Sofia; Dahl, Lisbeth; Heinsbaek Thuesen, Betina

    2017-01-01

    Iodine nutrition is a result of geological conditions, iodine fortification and monitoring strategies within a country together with the dietary habits of the population. This review summarizes the basis for the current iodine situation in the Scandinavian countries in order to identify gaps...... strategies have been used in Scandinavia to improve iodine nutrition. The major source of iodine is iodized salt in Sweden and from milk and dairy products in Norway. In Denmark, drinking water, milk, dairy products and iodized salt used in commercial production of bread are the important sources of iodine....... The current iodine status in Scandinavia is not optimal and action is ongoing to increase iodination in Denmark, where there is mild iodine deficiency in the general population. Data from all three countries indicate insufficient iodine nutrition during pregnancy and there is a need for data from children...

  13. Iodine excretion in school children in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone B.; Kirkegaard-Klitbo, Ditte Marie; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Studies of dietary habits show a high iodine intake in children in Denmark. Iodine excretion in children has not previously been assessed. Iodine excretion in adults is below the recommended threshold, and it is therefore being discussed to increase the fortification level. The main...... objective of this study was to assess iodine excretion in children living in Copenhagen to establish whether a moderate increase in iodine fortification would lead to excess iodine intake in this group. METHODS: Children in first and fifth grade were recruited through schools in Copenhagen. In total, 244...... children de-ivered a urine sample. Urine samples were analysed for iodine and creatinine, and the results were expressed as urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and as estimated 24-h iodine excretion. Iodine excretion in children was also compared with that of adults living in the same area, investigated...

  14. Krypton and xenon in Apollo 14 samples - Fission and neutron capture effects in gas-rich samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C.; Morgan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Gas-rich Apollo 14 breccias and trench soil are examined for fission xenon from the decay of the extinct isotopes Pu-244 and I-129, and some samples have been found to have an excess fission component which apparently was incorporated after decay elsewhere and was not produced by in situ decay. Two samples have excess Xe-129 resulting from the decay of I-129. The excess is correlated at low temperatures with excess Xe-128 resulting from neutron capture on I-127. This neutron capture effect is accompanied by related low-temperature excesses of Kr-80 and Kr-82 from neutron capture on the bromine isotopes. Surface correlated concentrations of iodine and bromine are calculated from the neutron capture excesses.

  15. Radiochemistry of iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, M.; Kleinberg, J.

    1977-09-01

    The preparation of isotopes of the element, with selected procedures for its determination in or separation from various media is described along with the separating of iodine species from each other. Each part of the introductory section is referenced separately from the remainder of the monograph. For the preparative and analytical sections there is an extensive, indexed bibliography which was developed from the indexes of Volumes 19 to 30 inclusive (1965-1974) of Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA). From these indexes the NSA abstracts of possible pertinent references were selected for examination and a choice was made of those references which were to be included in the bibliography. The bibliography has both primary and secondary references. Although the monograph does not cover hot atom chemistry, the kinetics of exchange reactions, decay schemes, or physiological applications, papers in these areas were examined as possible sources of useful preparative and analytical procedures. (JRD)

  16. Radiochemistry of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, M.; Kleinberg, J.

    1977-09-01

    The preparation of isotopes of the element, with selected procedures for its determination in or separation from various media is described along with the separating of iodine species from each other. Each part of the introductory section is referenced separately from the remainder of the monograph. For the preparative and analytical sections there is an extensive, indexed bibliography which was developed from the indexes of Volumes 19 to 30 inclusive (1965-1974) of Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA). From these indexes the NSA abstracts of possible pertinent references were selected for examination and a choice was made of those references which were to be included in the bibliography. The bibliography has both primary and secondary references. Although the monograph does not cover hot atom chemistry, the kinetics of exchange reactions, decay schemes, or physiological applications, papers in these areas were examined as possible sources of useful preparative and analytical procedures

  17. Current iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacul, F.

    2001-01-01

    The number of scientific papers on iodinated contrast media is declining. Indeed, comparative trials between high-osmolality and low-osmolality agents largely showed the higher safety and tolerability of the latter, and this is no longer a matter of discussion. Only financial constraints could prevent a total conversion to low-osmolality agents. Research comparing low-osmolality (nonionic monomers, ionic dimer) and iso-osmolality contrast media (nonionic dimers) are still ongoing. Both classes of nonionic compounds proved safer than the ionic dimer. The relative merits of nonionic monomers and nonionic dimers are a matter for debate, and criteria for a selective use of different agents for different procedures could be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Roles of microbial activities on the distribution and speciation of iodine in the soil environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Amachi, Seigo

    2000-01-01

    The chemical species of iodine in the environment are expected to be influenced by the activities of microorganisms. In this paper, the roles of microbial activities in the accumulation and loss of iodine in soils were studied. Concentrations of stable iodine in several types of soils were determined by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy). High iodine concentrations were found in upland soils, particularly in Andosol, while the concentrations in lowland soils were considerably lower. Accumulation of iodine in soils was explained by the effects of microorganisms and/or their products (e.g. enzymes). Iodine was observed to be desorbed from the flooded soils due to the reducing conditions (low Eh) created by the microbial activities. From the soil-rice plant system biogenesis methyliodide was found to be evaporated into the atmosphere. In order to study the mechanisms of volatile iodine production from the soil environment, a reliable method using 125 I tracer was established. Soil solution and bacterial cell suspension were incubated using this method, and it was found that volatile organic iodine was produced due to microbial activities (including bacterial activities). (author)

  19. Bonding of xenon to oxygen in magmas at depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Clémence; Sanloup, Chrystèle; Bureau, Hélène; Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Raepsaet, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    The field of noble gases chemistry has witnessed amazing advances in the last decade with over 100 compounds reported including Xe oxides and Xe-Fe alloys stable at the pressure-temperature conditions of planetary interiors. The chemistry of Xe with planetary materials is nonetheless still mostly ignored, while Xe isotopes are used to trace a variety of key planetary processes from atmosphere formation to underground nuclear tests. It is indeed difficult to incorporate the possibility of Xe reactivity at depth in isotopic geochemical models without a precise knowledge of its chemical environment. The structure of Xe doped hydrous silica-rich melts is investigated by in situ high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction using resistive heating diamond anvil cells. Obtained pair distribution functions reveal the oxidation of Xe between 0.2 GPa and 4 GPa at high T up to 1000 K. In addition to the usual interatomic distances, a contribution at 2.05 ± 0.05 Å is observed. This contribution is not observed in the undoped melt, and is interpreted as the Xe-O bond, with a coordination number of about 12 consistent with Xe insertion in rings of the melt structure. Xe solubility measurements by electron microprobe and particle induced X-rays emission analysis confirm that Xe and Ar have similar solubility values in wt% in silicate melts. These values are nonetheless an order of magnitude higher than those theoretically calculated for Xe. The formation of Xe-O bonds explains the enhanced solubility of Xe in deep continental crust magmas, revealing a mechanism that could store Xe and fractionate its isotopes. Xenon is indeed atypical among noble gases, the atmosphere being notably depleted in elemental Xe, and very strongly depleted in Xe light isotopes. These observations are known as the 'missing' Xe paradox, and could be solved by the present findings.

  20. Improvements in or relating to trapping and reuse of radioactive xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolmsjoe, M.S.; Persson, B.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described suitable for recovering, from a mixture of gases contaning radioactive xenon, a mixture of gases containing an increased concentration of radioactive xenon, which method comprises the steps of passing xenon-containing gas through a bed of activated charcoal to adsorb the xenon therein, thereafter heating the charcoal bed to a temperature within the range of from 200 to 400 0 C, passing a moisture-free sweep gas through the bed when heated to said temperature to desorb xenon therefrom and then collecting the xenon-containing gas thus formed. (author)

  1. Dynamic model of the global iodine cycle for the estimation of dose to the world population from releases of iodine-129 to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1979-11-01

    A dynamic linear compartment model of the global iodine cycle has been developed for the purpose of estimating long-term doses and dose commitments to the world population from releases of 129 I to the environment. The environmental compartments assumed in the model comprise the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and terrestrial biosphere. The global transport of iodine is described by means of time-invariant fractional transfer rates between the environmental compartments. The fractional transfer rates for 129 I are determined primarily from available data on compartment inventories and fluxes for naturally occurring stable iodine and from data on the global hydrologic cycle. The dose to the world population is estimated from the calculated compartment inventories of 129 I, the known compartment inventories of stable iodine, a pathway analysis of the intake of iodine by a reference individual, dose conversion factors for inhalation and ingestion, and an estimate of the world population. For an assumed constant population of 12.21 billion beyond the year 2075, the estimated population dose commitment is 2 x 10 5 man-rem/Ci. The sensitivity of the calculated doses to variations in some of the parameters in the model for the global iodine cycle is investigated. A computer code written to calculate global compartment inventories and dose rates and population doses is described and documented

  2. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  3. Model of iodine transport and reaction kinetics in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.

    1977-05-01

    A model is presented to describe the time-dependent flow and retention of stable iodine isotopes and the decay of 131 I in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The plant consists of 16 units of equipment such as a voloxidizer or graphite burner, fuel dissolver, solvent extractors, storage tanks, vaporizers, primary iodine sorbers, and silver zeolite. The rate of accumulation of bulk and radioactive iodine in these units and in the environment is described using 19 differential equations. Reasonable time-dependence of iodine retention factors (RFs) by the plant were calculated. RFs for a new plant in excess of 10 6 for stable iodine and 129 I decrease to the range of 10 3 to 10 2 as plant operating times exceed 50 to 100 days. The RFs for 131 I also decrease initially, for a period of approximately 10 days, but then increase by several orders of magnitude due to radioactive decay and isotopic exchange. Generally, the RFs for 131 I exceed those for stable iodine by factors of 10 4 or more. 19 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  4. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Optimization of Xenon Difluoride Vapor Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, Joseph; Marganski, Paul; Kaim, Robert; Wodjenski, Mike; Gregg, John; Yedave, Sharad; Sergi, Steve; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Zou Peng

    2008-01-01

    Xenon difluoride (XeF 2 ) has been shown to provide many process benefits when used as a daily maintenance recipe for ion implant. Regularly flowing XeF 2 into the ion source cleans the deposits generated by ion source operation. As a result, significant increases in productivity have been demonstrated. However, XeF 2 is a toxic oxidizer that must be handled appropriately. Furthermore, it is a low vapor pressure solid under standard conditions (∼4.5 torr at 25 deg. C). These aspects present unique challenges for designing a package for delivering the chemistry to an ion implanter. To address these challenges, ATMI designed a high-performance, re-usable cylinder for dispensing XeF 2 in an efficient and reliable manner. Data are presented showing specific attributes of the cylinder, such as the importance of internal heat transfer media and the cylinder valve size. The impact of mass flow controller (MFC) selection and ion source tube design on the flow rate of XeF 2 are also discussed. Finally, cylinder release rate data are provided.

  6. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  7. Milk Iodine Content in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Paulíková

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to map actual iodine status and its seasonal differences in raw milk of dairy cows, sheep, and goats in various regions of Slovakia. Iodine concentrations were determined in 457 samples of raw milk from dairy cows, 78 samples of sheep, and 16 samples of goat milk collected in various regions of Slovakia from 2002 to 2007. Among all the 457 samples of bovine milk, iodine content below 50 μg l-1 was recorded in 114 samples (24.94%; 294 samples (64.33% ranged between 50 and 200 μg l-1; 19 samples (4.16% from 200 to 500 μg l-1; 17 samples (3.72% between 500 and 1 000 μg l-1, and 13 samples (2.85% showed iodine concentrations over 1 000 μg l-1. regional concentrations showed the highest values in the Western, then Middle and Eastern Slovakia, and the lowest values in Northern Slovakia (p p -1 in 49 sheep (62.8% and in 6 goats below 60 μg l-1 (37.5%, which are indicative of iodine deficiency. When comparing seasonal differences, sheep and goat milk had higher iodine content during the winter feeding period, however, in dairy cows we recorded the opposite ratio. Except for goat milk (p < 0.01 the seasonal differences were not significant.

  8. Iodine filters in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1977-04-01

    On the basis of calculated and recorded release rates of nuclear power plants, the significance of iodine releases in the invironmental impact relative to other nuclides is discussed. The release pathways for iodine in LWR-type reactors and the efficiency of various methods to lower the activity release are given. The airborne species of iodine are discussed with regard to their removal in iodine sorption filters and environmental impact. The technical status of iodine removal by means of iodine sorption filters is studied for normal operation and accident conditions in nuclear power stations on the basis of the data given in the relevant literature for the efficiency of a number of iodine sorption materials. The applicability of concepts for ventilation and containment and their influence on iodine filter systems are discussed. Design, structure, and testing of iodine sorption filters are treated in detail; recommendations for design are given, and failure sources are mentioned. (orig.) [de

  9. Iodine status in neonates in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, S B; Laurberg, Peter; Børlum, K G

    1994-01-01

    Iodine status of 147 neonates born in five different regions of Denmark was evaluated in relation to the iodine content of breast milk and iodine supplementation taken by the mother. Approximately two-thirds of the women had not received iodine supplementation. They had low iodine concentrations...... in breast milk and urinary iodine concentrations of the neonates at day 5 were low. The median values (milk/urine) were 33.6/31.7 micrograms/l (Randers 22/26, Ringkøbing 29/16, Aalborg 36/31. Arhus 54/41 and Copenhagen 55/59 micrograms/l). Higher values were found in the group where tablets containing...... iodine had been taken (milk/urine: 57.0/61.0 micrograms/l). In general, the values are low compared with internationally recommended levels. We suggest that mothers without autoimmune thyroid disease should receive iodine supplementation in the form of vitamin/mineral tablets containing iodine (150...

  10. Heterogeneous equilibrium in mplybdenum-iodine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkova, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Heterogeneous equilibrium in the Mo-J system is studied to reveal regions of existence of molybdenum iodides, is studied. The investigation is performed for atomic ratio I/Mo=0.02-7.5 in the temperature range of 300-1370 K using methods of thermographic, X-ray phase, chemical and optical analyses of phases quenched after isothermal annealing. It is shown that higher molybdenum iodides (Mo1 4 , MoJ 5 , MoJ 6 ) are thermally unstable compounds and exist in the Mo-J system at low temperatures (360-490 K). Above 470 K higher iodides dissociate up to molybdenum triiodide. MoJ 3 under the pressure of iodine vapors is stable up to 970 K. Molybdenum diiodide is the product of triiodide decomposition and forms in the Mo-J system in the 700-1270 K range. At the J/Mo>>3 ratio the product of triiodide decomposition is MoJsub(2.87) which is thermally unstable up to 570 K, while in iodine atmosphere - up to 1170 K

  11. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  12. Signal yields, energy resolution, and recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks in the dark-matter-search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector. Liquid xenon charge and light yields for electronic recoil energies between 5.2 and 661.7 keV are measured, as well as the energy resolution for the LUX detector at those same energies. Additionally, there is an interpretation of existing measurements and descriptions of electron-ion recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon as limiting cases of a more general liquid xenon recombination fluctuation model. Measurements of the standard deviation of these fluctuations at monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks exhibit a linear dependence on the number of ions for energy deposits up to 661.7 keV, consistent with previous LUX measurements between 2 and 16 keV with 3H. We highlight similarities in liquid xenon recombination for electronic and nuclear recoils with a comparison of recombination fluctuations measured with low-energy calibration data.

  13. Output power characteristics of the neutral xenon long laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

    1994-12-31

    Lasers which oscillate within inhomogeneously broadened gain media exhibit spectral hole burning and concomitant reduction in output power compared with equivalent homogeneously-broadened laser gain media. By increasing the cavity length, it may be possible to demonstrate at least a partial transition from an inhomogeneous laser cavity mode spectrum to a homogeneous spectrum. There are a number of high gain laser lines which are inhomogeneously-broadened transitions in electric discharges of neutral xenon. In neutral xenon lasers, as in the cases of many other gas lasers, the inhomogeneous spectral broadening mechanism arises from Doppler shifts, {Delta}{nu}{sub D}, of individual atoms in thermal motion within the electric discharge comprising the laser gain medium. Optical transitions corresponding to these noble gas atoms have natural linewidths, {Delta}{nu}{sub n}{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub D}. Simulations of the output power characteristics of the xenon laser were carried out as a function of laser cavity parameters, including the cavity length, L. These calculations showed that when the intracavity mode spacing frequency, c/2L{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub n}, the inhomogeneously broadened xenon mode spectrum converted to a homogeneously broadened oscillation spectrum with an increase in output power. These simulations are compared with experimental results obtained for the long laser oscillation characteristics of the (5d[5/2]{degree}{sub 2}{r_arrow}6p[3/2]{sub 1}) transition corresponding to the strong, high-gain 3.508 {mu} line in xenon.

  14. Modeling Xenon Purification Systems in a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ann; Gentile, Charles

    2011-10-01

    A Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) is a proposed method to employ fusion energy to produce electricity for consumers. However, before it can be built and used as such, each aspect of a LIFE power plant must first be meticulously planned. We are in the process of developing and perfecting models for an exhaust processing and fuel recovery system. Such a system is especially essential because it must be able to recapture and purify expensive materials involved in the reaction so they may be reused. One such material is xenon, which is to be used as an intervention gas in the target chamber. Using Aspen HYSYS, we have modeled several subsystems for exhaust processing, including a subsystem for xenon recovery and purification. After removing hydrogen isotopes using lithium bubblers, we propose to use cryogenic distillation to purify the xenon from remaining contaminants. Aspen HYSYS allows us to analyze predicted flow rates, temperatures, pressures, and compositions within almost all areas of the xenon purification system. Through use of Aspen models, we hope to establish that we can use xenon in LIFE efficiently and in a practical manner.

  15. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy probed heterogeneous xenon/neon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokapanich, Wandared; Björneholm, Olle; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Binary rare gas clusters; xenon and neon which have a significant contrariety between sizes, produced by a co-expansion set up and have been studied using synchrotron radiation based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concentration ratios of the heterogeneous clusters; 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% were controlled. The core level spectra were used to determine structure of the mixed cluster and analyzed by considering screening mechanisms. Furthermore, electron binding energy shift calculations demonstrated cluster aggregation models which may occur in such process. The results showed that in the case of low mixing ratios of 3% and 5% of xenon in neon, the geometric structures exhibit xenon in the center and xenon/neon interfaced in the outer shells. However, neon cluster vanished when the concentration of xenon was increased to 10%. - Highlights: • Co-expansion setup is suitable for producing binary Xe/Ne clusters. • Appropriate temperature, pressure, and mixing ratios should be strictly controlled. • Low mixing ratio, Xe formed in the core and Xe/Ne interfacing in the outer shell. • High mixing ratio, only pure Xe clusters were detected.

  16. Converging xenon shock waves driven by megagauss magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.; Steinberg, D.J.

    1986-07-01

    We attempted to implode a conducting metal linear at high velocity, and our failure to do so led to switching, or rapidly transferring the field from pushing an aluminum conductor to snow-plowing a half-atmosphere of xenon gas. We successfully initiated convergent xenon gas shocks with the use of a magnetohydrodynamic switch and coaxial high-explosive, flux-compression generators. Principal diagnostics used to study the imploding xenon gas were 133 Xe radioactive tracers, continuous x-ray absorption, and neutron output. We compressed the xenon gas about five to sixfold at a velocity of 10 cm/μs at a radius of 4 cm. The snowplow efficiency was good; going from 13- to 4-cm radius, we lost only about 20% of the mass. The temperature of the imploded sheath was determined by mixing deuterium with the xenon and measuring the neutron output. Using reasonable assumptions about the amount, density, and uniformity of the compressed gas, we estimate that we reached temperatures as high as 155 eV. Energy-loss mechanisms that we encountered included wall ablation and Taylor instabilities of the back surface

  17. Muonium formation in xenon and argon up to 60 atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempton, J.R.; Senba, M.; Arseneau, D.J.; Gonzalez, A.C.; Pan, J.J.; Tempelmann, A.; Garner, D.M.; Fleming, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    Results of muon polarization studies in xenon and argon up to 60 atm are reported. In argon for pressures up to 10 atm, the muon polarization is best explained by an epithermalcharge exchange model. Above this pressure, the decrease in P D and increase in P L are ascribed to charge neutralization and spin exchange reactions, respectively, in the radiolysis track. Measurements with Xe/He mixtures with a xenon pressure of 1 atm indicate that the lost polarization in the pure xenon at this pressure is due to inefficient moderation of the muon. As the pressure in pure xenon is increased above 10 atm, we find that P L remains roughly constant and P D begins to increase. The lost fraction may be due to the formation of a XeMu Van der Waals type complex, while P D is ascribed to XeMu + formation. This suggests that spur processes appear to be less important in xenon that in argon. (orig.)

  18. Hugoniot measurements of double-shocked precompressed dense xenon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Chen, Q. F.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Z. Y.

    2012-12-01

    The current partially ionized plasmas models for xenon show substantial differences since the description of pressure and thermal ionization region becomes a formidable task, prompting the need for an improved understanding of dense xenon plasmas behavior at above 100 GPa. We performed double-shock compression experiments on dense xenon to determine accurately the Hugoniot up to 172 GPa using a time-resolved optical radiation method. The planar strong shock wave was produced using a flyer plate impactor accelerated up to ˜6 km/s with a two-stage light-gas gun. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were acquired by using a multiwavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Shock velocity was measured and mass velocity was determined by the impedance-matching methods. The experimental equation of state of dense xenon plasmas are compared with the self-consistent fluid variational calculations of dense xenon in the region of partial ionization over a wide range of pressures and temperatures.

  19. The radiotoxicology of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty radioisotopes of iodine are known but only those with mass numbers from 123 to 135 are of major radiotoxicological interest. Exposure of animals or man to inorganic 131 I or 125 I may result in the induction of benign or malignant thyroid tumors or depression of thyroid function; Bq for Bq 125 I is less toxic than 131 I. However, the shorter lived radioiodines 132 I, 133 I, and 135 I appear to be 10 to 100 times more toxic than 131 I alone. Little information is available about the toxicity of radioiodine containing organic compounds. The DNA precursor, iododeoxyuridine when labelled with 125 I becomes incorporated into the cell nucleus and produces severe and often irreparable damage due to the emission of Auger electrons. The risk estimate for the induction of thyroid carcinoma or adenoma by inorganic 131 I is considered to be 10 to 20x10 -6 persons Gy -1 y -1 , but may be up to 100 times larger for persons exposed to mixtures of short-lived radioiodines. (author)

  20. Dense xenon nanoplasmas in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilse, P.; Moll, M.; Schlanges, M.; Bornath, Th.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. One reason for the on-going interest in laser-cluster interactions is the efficient absorption of the radiation energy of near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses by clusters. Consequently, in laser-cluster experiments the emission of highly charged ions, very energetic electrons, higher harmonics, fast fragments as well at strong x-rays in the multi-keV range is observed. The cluster response is highly nonlinear. Different theoretical models and simulations indicate that resonant collective absorption plays a central role. The rapid expansion of irradiated clusters is essential as, at a certain time, the cluster reaches the density fulfilling the resonance condition. This can occur during a single pulse. A better control can be achieved by dual-pulse laser excitation with varying time delay between two pulses. A further optimization is possible by pulse shaping which is a modern tool in laser experiments. With pulse shaping, the dynamics of the system determined by heating, ionization and expansion can be specifically affected. For an understanding of the underlying physical processes in the dynamics of laser-cluster interaction, a theoretical description is presented using a genetic algorithm and basing on the relatively simple nanoplasma model. Recently, experiments as well as calculations were performed for silver clusters. Highly charged silver ions could be produced very efficiently with a pulse structure consisting of a smaller pre-pulse followed by a larger main pulse. The focus of the present contribution is on xenon clusters and their different behavior compared to metallic clusters as silver. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via SFB 652.

  1. Cryogenic separation of krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Heidendael, M.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.

    1976-03-15

    Although the release of fission product noble gas Kr-85 has not posed a health problem to date, a process is being developed for the removal and storage of fission product noble gases from dissolution process stream of fuel reprocessing. The separation process described for noble gas in air being proved in semi-technical scale includes cryogenic distillation and consists of the following steps: (1) removal of 129 +131iodine on silver-coated silica gel; (2) deposition of particulate materials by HEPA-filters; (3) elimination of O2 and NOx by catalytic conversion with H2/ to N2 and H2O; (4) drying of the gas stream with molecular sieve; (5) deposition of xenon in solid form at about 80 K, while the remaining gas components are liquified; (6) enrichment of Kr by low temperature distillation of liquid-gas mixture; (7) withdrawal of the highly enriched Kr-fraction at the bottom of the still to be bottled in pressurized steel cylinders for final disposal; and (8) purification of Kr-85 contaminated Xe for further industrial reuse by batch distillation.

  2. Kinetics of the processes, plasma parameters, and output characteristics of a UV emitter operating on XeI molecules and iodine molecules and atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Grabovaya, I. A.; Minya, A. I.; Homoki, Z. T. [Uzhgorod National University (Ukraine); Kalyuzhnaya, A. G.; Shchedrin, A. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15

    A kinetic model of the processes occurring in the plasma of a high-power low-pressure gas-discharge lamp is presented, and the output characteristics of the lamp are described. The lamp is excited by a longitudinal glow discharge and emits the I{sub 2}(D Prime -A Prime ) 342-nm and XeI(B-X) 253-nm bands and the 206.2-nm spectral line of atomic iodine. When the emitter operates in a sealed-off mode on the p(He): p(Xe): p(I{sub 2}) = 400: 120: (100-200) Pa mixture, the fractions of the UV radiation power of iodine atoms, exciplex molecules of xenon iodide, and iodine molecules comprise 55, 10, and 35%, respectively. At the optimal partial pressure, the maximum total radiation power of the lamp reaches 37 W, the energy efficiency being about 15%.

  3. Memory Effects Study of Measuring Radioactive Xenon Isotopes With β-γ Coincidence Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Wang Jun; Li Qi; Zhao Yungang; Fan Yuanqing; Zhang Xinjun

    2010-01-01

    The β-γ coincidence technique is a kind of the key important method to detect radioactive xenon isotopes for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). This paper describes noble gases memory effects of β-γ coincidence detector. Xenon memory effects were measured and its influence on detector's minimum detectable activity (MDA) was evaluated. The methods of reducing xenon memory effects were studied. In conclusion, aluminium coated plastic scintillator and YAP scintillator can remarkably decrease xenon memory effects. (authors)

  4. Infrared matrix isolation and ab initio studies on isothiocyanic acid HNCS and its complexes with nitrogen and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzejewska, Maria; Wieczorek, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The isothiocyanic acid HNCS (DNCS) and its complexes with nitrogen and xenon have been studied experimentally by FTIR matrix isolation technique and computationally with the use of ab initio calculations at the MP2 level. The spectra show that HNCS (DNCS) interacts specifically with nitrogen forming 1:1 hydrogen bonded complex in argon matrix while non-hydrogen bonded structure is probably formed in solid xenon. Two stable minima were localized on the potential energy surface. One of them involves an almost linear hydrogen bond from NH group of the acid molecule to nitrogen molecule lone pair (structure I) and has an interaction energy ΔE CP equal to -6.85 kJ/mol. The second structure (II) where the nitrogen molecule interacts with the sulfur atom of the HNCS was found to be weaker bound and is characterized by ΔE CP =-1.99 kJ/mol. A low energetic barrier of 5.86 kJ/mol between the structures I and II was found. Both experimental and theoretical results obtained for the Xe···HNCS system point to a structure with the NH group interacting with the xenon atom. An interaction energy ΔE CP for this complex is equal to -3.64 kJ/mol

  5. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  6. Occupational exposure to xenon-133 among hospital workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschamps, M.

    1984-11-01

    During procedures for pulmonary ventilation studies on patients in hospitals, xenon-133 may escape into ambient air. Measurements of air concentrations were required to permit an evaluation of the exposure to which hospital workers are subjected. Two complementary methods of in situ measurements of air concentrations were employed: a commercial air monitor and evacuated blood sampling tubes. Personal dosimeters (TLDs) were exposed simultaneously with the commercial air monitor, and the results were compared. This report presents the results of the measurements of air concentrations during studies on patients. Substantial leakage of xenon-133 was noted, but workers received less than the maximum permissible dose. Personal dosimeters do not permit accurate evaluation of the skin doses resulting from exposure to xenon-133; measurements of air concentrations are required for such evaluation. A number of procedures are recommended to minimize leakage and personnel exposure

  7. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are

  8. Iodine behaviour in severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, L M.C.; Grindon, E; Handy, B J; Sutherland, L [NNC Ltd., Knutsford (United Kingdom); Bruns, W G; Sims, H E [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Dickinson, S [AEA Technology, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Hueber, C; Jacquemain, D [IPSN/CEA, Cadarache, Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    1996-12-01

    A description is given of analyses which identify which aspects of the modelling and data are most important in evaluating the release of radioactive iodine to the environment following a potential severe accident at a PWR and which identify the major uncertainties which affect that release. Three iodine codes are used namely INSPECT, IODE and IMPAIR, and their predictions are compared with those of the PSA code MAAP. INSPECT is a mechanistic code which models iodine behaviour in the aqueous aerosol, spray water and sump water, and the partitioning of volatile species between the aqueous phases and containment gas space. Organic iodine is not modelled. IODE and IMPAIR are semi-empirical codes which do not model iodine behaviour in the aqueous aerosol, but model organic iodine. The fault sequences addressed are based on analyses for the Sizewell `B` design. Two types of sequence have been analysed.: (a) those in which a major release of fission products from the primary circuit to the containment occur, e.g. a large LOCAS, (b) those where the release by-passes the containment, e.g. a leak into the auxiliary building. In the analysis of the LOCA sequences where the pH of the sump is controlled to be a value of 8 or greater, all three codes predict that the oxidation of iodine to produce gas phase species does not make a significant contribution to the source term due to leakage from the reactor building and that the latter is dominated by iodide in the aerosol. In the case where the pH of the sump is not controlled, it is found that the proportion of gas phase iodine increases significantly, although the cumulative leakage predicted by all three codes is not significantly different from that predicted by MAAP. The radiolytic production of nitric acid could be a major factor in determining the pH, and if the pH were reduced, the codes predict an increase in gas phase iodine species leaked from the containment. (author) 4 figs., 7 tabs., 13 refs.

  9. The high pressure xenon lamp as a source of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerdt, J.A. ter.

    1979-01-01

    An account is given of an investigation into the radiation properties of a commercially available high pressure xenon lamp (type XBO 900 W) in the spectral range 0.3 to 3 μm. The purpose of the study was to find out whether such a lamp can serve as a (secondary) standard of radiation in spectroscopic and radiometric measurements. The main advantades of the xenon lamp over other secondary standards such as the tungsten strip lamp and the anode of a carbon arc lamp are the high temperature of its discharge and the resulting strong radiation over a broad spectral range. (Auth.)

  10. Dual display of flow/lambda results in xenon CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, W.W.; Gruenaver, L.M.; Dinewitz, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of cortical blood flow has always been limited by the unavoidable inclusion of white matter and sulcal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in selected regions of interest. Xenon CT gives clear separation of anatomy, but precise ROI tracing is time consuming. CSF and gray and white matter have differing xenon solubilities (lambda), however, so the authors produce two-dimensional histograms of flow/lambda values within an ROI encompassing the desired anatomy and select lambda subregions for tissue-specific quantitative flow/lambda means and deviations. They report how this display is dynamic, allowing the physician to roam around the anatomy at will, with 1-second statistical updating

  11. Electric dipole moment searches using the isotope 129-xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchler, Florian

    2014-11-13

    Two new complementary experiments searching for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of 129-xenon are presented. Besides demonstration of a sensitivity improvement by employing established methods and a highly sensitive SQUID detection system the progress towards a novel measurement approach is discussed. The new method introduces time-varying electric fields and a liquid hyper-polarized xenon sample with a potential improvement in sensitivity of three orders of magnitude. The search for EDMs is motivated by their symmetry-breaking nature. A non-zero EDM provides a new source of CP violation to solve the mystery of the huge excess of matter over anti-matter in our Universe.

  12. [Assessment of dietary iodine intake of population in non-high-iodine areas in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyu; Li, Fengqin; Liu, Zhaoping; He, Yuna; Sui, Haixia; Mao, Weifeng; Liu, Sana; Yan, Weixing; Li, Ning; Chen, Junshi

    2011-03-01

    To assess the potential risk of dietary iodine insufficiency of population in non-high-iodine areas (water iodine China. The dietary iodine intake of 13 age-sex population groups were estimated by combining the data of iodine intake from food, table salt and drinking water. Two conditions were considered: consuming iodized salt or non-iodized salt. The data of food and table salt consumption were derived from the Chinese National Nutrition and Health Survey in 2002. Water consumption was calculated as the recommended water intake. Iodine contents of food, table salt and water were calculated from China Food Composition Table and iodine surveillance data. Under the condition of consuming iodized salt, the average iodine intake of all population groups was higher than the Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI), while the iodine intakes of individuals above Upper Limits (UL) and below RNI were 5.8% and 13.4% respectively, and the iodine intake of individuals lower than the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) was 9.4% in adults above 18 years of age (including pregnant and lactating women). If non-iodized salt was consumed, the average iodine intake of most sex-age population groups was higher than RNI, but the iodine intake of 97.6% of individuals would be lower than RNI, while the iodine intake of 97.4% of adults would be lower than EAR. The contribution of iodine from table salt was much higher than that from drinking water and food in the condition of consuming iodized salt, while food was the predominant contributor of dietary iodine in the condition of consuming non-iodized salt. The health risk of iodine deficiency was higher than that of iodine excess in areas where water iodine was China, and the risk of iodine insufficiency was much higher if non-iodized salt was consumed. Iodized salt should be the main sources of dietary iodine intake for population in areas where water iodine was China.

  13. Urinary Iodine Concentrations Indicate Iodine Deficiency in Pregnant Thai Women but Iodine Sufficiency in Their School-Aged Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gowachirapant, S.; Winichagoon, P.; Wyss, L.; Tong, B.; Baumgartner, J.; Boonstra, A.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    The median urinary iodine concentration (UI) in school-aged children is recommended for assessment of iodine nutrition in populations. If the median UI is adequate in school-aged children, it is usually assumed iodine intakes are also adequate in the remaining population, including pregnant women.

  14. Iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the late seventies, iodinated contrast agents (ICA) were considered to be a major cause of acute iatrogenic renal failure. Over the last decade new contrast agents have been synthesized, nonionic and less hyperosmolar. The incidence of acute renal failure due to ICAs, varies from 3.7 to 70% of cases according to the series, with an average figure of 10.2%. The pathophysiology of ICA nephrotoxicity was mainly studied in laboratory animal models. Three main factors are involved in an inducing ICA-mediated decrease in glomerular filtration rate: reduction of the renal plasma flow, a direct cytotoxic effect on renal tubular cells and erythrocyte alteration leading to intra-renal sludge. Excluding dysglobulinemias with urinary excretion of immunoglobulin light chains, which represent a special case of maximum nephrotoxicity, 4 main risk factors of renal toxicity have been identified in nondiabetic subjects: previous renal failure with serum creatinine levels greater than 140 μmol per liter, extracellular dehydration, age over 60 and use of high doses of ICA and/or repeated ICA injections before serum creatinine levels return to baseline. Preventive measures for avoiding ICA nephrotoxicity are threefold: maintain or restore adequate hydration with saline infusion, stop NSAID treatment several days before ICA administration, and allow a 5 day interval before repeating contrast media injections. New, nonionic and moderately hyperosmolar contrast agents appear to be much less nephrotoxic than conventional ICAs in laboratory animals and in high-risk patients. It is advisable to select such contrast media for investigating high-risk patients. This approach was recently substantiated in well designed, randomized clinical studies which included more than 2 000 patients. (author)

  15. Silver iodide reduction in aqueous solution: application to iodine enhanced separation during spent nuclear fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badie, Jerome

    2002-01-01

    Silver iodide is a key-compound in nuclear chemistry either in accidental conditions or during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In that case, the major part of iodine is released in molecular form into the gaseous phase at the time of dissolution in nitric acid. In French reprocessing plants, iodine is trapped in the dissolver off-gas treatment unit by two successive steps: the first consists in absorption by scrubbing with a caustic soda solution and in the second, residual iodine is removed from the gaseous stream before the stack by chemisorption on mineral porous traps made up of beds of amorphous silica or alumina porous balls impregnated with silver nitrate. Reactions of iodine species with the impregnant are assumed to lead to silver iodide and silver iodate. Enhanced separation policy would make necessary to recover iodine from the filters by silver iodide dissolution during a reducing treatment. After a brief silver-iodine chemical bibliographic review, the possible reagents listed in the literature were studied. The choice has been made to use ascorbic acid and hydroxylamine. An experimental work on silver iodide reduction by this two compounds allowed us to determinate reaction products, stoichiometry and kinetics parameters. Finally, the process has been initiated on stable iodine loaded filters samples. (author) [fr

  16. Glass composite waste forms for iodine confined in bismuth-embedded SBA-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Yim, Man-Sung

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to stabilize bismuth-embedded SBA-15 that captured iodine gas by fabrication of monolithic waste forms. The iodine containing waste was mixed with Bi2O3 (a stabilizing additive) and low-temperature sintering glass followed by pelletizing and the sintering process to produce glass composite materials. Iodine volatility during the sintering process was significantly affected by the ratio of Bi2O3 and the glass composition. It was confirmed that BiI3, the main iodine phase within bismuth-embedded SBA-15, was effectively transformed to the mixed phases of Bi5O7I and BiOI. The initial leaching rates of iodine from the glass composite waste forms ranged 10-3-10-2 g/m2 day, showing the stability of the iodine phases encapsulated by the glassy networks. It was also observed that common groundwater anions (e.g., chloride, carbonate, sulfite, and fluoride) elevated the iodine leaching rate by anion exchange reactions. The present results suggest that the glass composite waste form of bismuth-embedded SBA-15 could be a candidate material for stable storage of 129I.

  17. Experimental reproduction of iodine deficiency in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, M A; Smyth, J A; Ellis, W A; Arthur, J R; Kennedy, D G

    1997-11-22

    The role of iodine deficiency in stillbirth/perinatal weak calf syndrome was investigated in pregnant heifers. Five heifers were fed an iodine deficient diet (mean [sd] iodine concentration 0.06 [0.01] mg/kg dry matter [DM]) and six received an iodine sufficient diet (mean [sd] iodine concentration 1.45 [0.27] mg/kg DM). The diets consisted of wheat and soyabean meal with added minerals and vitamins (with or without iodine) and were fed to the heifers over the final four to five months of pregnancy. The iodine deficient diet produced clinicopathological changes and pathological changes in the thyroid glands of both the heifers and their offspring. However, all the calves in the iodine deficient group were born clinically normal.

  18. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M

    2000-01-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...... deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency...

  19. Effect of iodine solutions on polyaniline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, M.M.; Amer, W.A.; Stejskal, J.

    2009-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) emeraldine-base films have been exposed to iodine solutions. The interaction between the films and the iodine solution was studied using the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique and the UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The iodine-treated film of emeraldine base was subjected to dedoping process using 0.1 M ammonia solution. The resulting film was exposed again to the previously used iodine solution. Iodine was found to play multiple roles: the ring-iodination of PANI film, the oxidation of PANI to pernigraniline base, and iodine doping to PANI salt. A sensor based on PANI-coated electrode of QCM was developed to monitor the presence of iodine in solution.

  20. Glass composite waste forms for iodine confined in bismuth-embedded SBA-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Hwan [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Man-Sung, E-mail: msyim@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to stabilize bismuth-embedded SBA-15 that captured iodine gas by fabrication of monolithic waste forms. The iodine containing waste was mixed with Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} (a stabilizing additive) and low-temperature sintering glass followed by pelletizing and the sintering process to produce glass composite materials. Iodine volatility during the sintering process was significantly affected by the ratio of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the glass composition. It was confirmed that BiI{sub 3}, the main iodine phase within bismuth-embedded SBA-15, was effectively transformed to the mixed phases of Bi{sub 5}O{sub 7}I and BiOI. The initial leaching rates of iodine from the glass composite waste forms ranged 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2} day, showing the stability of the iodine phases encapsulated by the glassy networks. It was also observed that common groundwater anions (e.g., chloride, carbonate, sulfite, and fluoride) elevated the iodine leaching rate by anion exchange reactions. The present results suggest that the glass composite waste form of bismuth-embedded SBA-15 could be a candidate material for stable storage of {sup 129}I. - Highlights: • Glass composite waste forms were developed to stabilize iodine confined in Bi-embedded SBA-15. • BiI{sub 3} within Bi-embedded SBA-15 was transformed to BiOI and Bi{sub 5}O{sub 7}I during sintering process. • Iodine volatility was significantly affected by glass composition and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive. • Iodine leaching rates were 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2} day due to the stable iodine phases encapsulated by glassy networks. • Glass composite waste form of Bi-embedded SBA-15 is expected to be a candidate material for stable storage of {sup 129}I.

  1. Contrast induced hyperthyroidism due to iodine excess

    OpenAIRE

    Mushtaq, Usman; Price, Timothy; Laddipeerla, Narsing; Townsend, Amanda; Broadbridge, Vy

    2009-01-01

    Iodine induced hyperthyroidism is a thyrotoxic condition caused by exposure to excessive iodine. Historically this type of hyperthyroidism has been described in areas of iodine deficiency. With advances in medicine, iodine induced hyperthyroidism has been observed following the use of drugs containing iodine—for example, amiodarone, and contrast agents used in radiological imaging. In elderly patients it is frequently difficult to diagnose and control contrast related hyperthyroidism, as most...

  2. Formation and behaviour of organic iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilliacus, R.; Koukkar, P.; Karjunen, T.; Sjoevall, H.

    2002-01-01

    The report presents experimental studies on the formation of organic iodine in severe reactor accidents. The analyses were performed to evaluate the amount of alkaline chemical needed for effective pH control of containment water during the accidents. The formation of organic iodine in solutions used in the filtered venting system and the absorption of iodine compounds in the solutions were studied. Experiments for the formation of organic iodine on painted surfaces were also performed. (au)

  3. Mineral resource of the month: iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Désirée E.

    2009-01-01

    The article focuses on iodine, its benefits and adverse effects, and its production and consumption. It states that iodine is essential to humans for it produces thyroid hormones to nourish thyroid glands but excessive intake could cause goiter, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. U.S. laws require salt iodization to help prevent diseases. Chile and Japan are the world's leading iodine producer while in the U.S. iodine is mined from deep well brines in northern Oklahoma.

  4. Management modes for iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, I.F.; Smith, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    This study completes a two-stage programme, supported by the Commission of the European Communities, on management modes for iodine-129. The models for the radiological assessment of iodine-129 management modes have been reviewed and, where necessary, revised, and a generic radiological assessment has been carried out using these models. Cost benefit analysis has been demonstrated for a variety of iodine-129 management modes; for a wide range of assumptions, the costs of abatement of atmospheric discharges would be outweighed by the radiological benefits. The cost benefit analysis thus complements and confirms the preliminary conclusion of the previous study: iodine-129 should be trapped to a large extent from the off-gases of a large reprocessing plant and disposed of by other suitable means, in order to ensure that all exposures from this radionuclide are as low as reasonably achievable. Once the major fraction of the iodine-129 throughput of a reprocessing plant has been trapped from the dissolver off-gases, there are unlikely to be strong radiation protection incentives either for further trapping from the dissolver off-gases or for trapping from the vessel off-gases. In a generic study it is not possible to state an optimum choice of process(es) for abatement of atmospheric discharges of iodine-129. This choice must be determined by assessments in the specific context of a particular reprocessing plant, its site, the waste disposal routes that are actually available, and also in the wider context of the management plans for all radioactive wastes at the plant in question

  5. The importance of iodine nutrition during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinoer, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    To examine the importance of iodine nutrition during pregnancy. Review of existing literature of iodine in pregnancy. Population surveys and metabolic studies. Pregnant women. The main changes in thyroid function associated with pregnancy are due to an increase in hormone requirements that begin in the first trimester of gestation. This increase can only be met by a proportional increase in hormone production, something that depends directly upon the availability of iodine. When dietary iodine is lacking, an adequate physiological adaptation is difficult to achieve and is progressively replaced by pathological alterations that occur in parallel with the degree and duration of iodine deprivation. Iodine prophylaxis should be given systematically to women during pregnancy. In most public health programmes dealing with the correction of iodine deficiency disorders, iodised salt has been used as the preferred means to deliver iodine to households. Iodised salt, however, is not the ideal means of delivering iodine in the specific instances of pregnancy, breast-feeding and complementary feeding because of the need to limit salt intake during these periods. In European countries, presently it is proposed that iodine is given to pregnant women and breast-feeding mothers by systematically administering multivitamin tablets containing iodine in order to reach the recommended dietary allowance of 250 microg iodine day-1.

  6. Iodine in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Crill, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) has multiple adverse effects on growth and development due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Methods for assessment of iodine nutrition in individuals include the urinary iodine concentration (UI), thyroid size and thyroid function tests. The UI measured in several

  7. Industrial system for producing iodine-123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brantley, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    An industrial system to produce iodine-123 required a complex set of steps involving new approaches by the Food and Drug Administration, difficult distribution procedures, and evidence from potential users that either very pure iodine-123 or inexpensive iodine-123 is needed. Industry has shown its willingness to invest in new radionuclides but needs strong evidence as to product potential to justify those investments

  8. Iodine excretion in school children in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone B; Kirkegaard-Klitbo, Ditte Marie; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Studies of dietary habits show a high iodine intake in children in Denmark. Iodine excretion in children has not previously been assessed. Iodine excretion in adults is below the recommended threshold, and it is therefore being discussed to increase the fortification level. The main...

  9. MARGINAL IODINE DEFICIENCY EXACERBATES PERCHLORATE THYROID TOXICITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The environmental contaminant perchlorate disrupts thyroid homeostasis via inhibition of iodine uptake into the thyroid. This work tested whether iodine deficiency exacerbates the effects of perchlorate. Female 27 day-old LE rats were fed a custom iodine deficient diet with 0, 50...

  10. High-intensity xenon plasma discharge lamp for bulk-sensitive high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souma, S; Sato, T; Takahashi, T; Baltzer, P

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a highly brilliant xenon (Xe) discharge lamp operated by microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) for ultrahigh-resolution bulk-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy (PES). We observed at least eight strong radiation lines from neutral or singly ionized Xe atoms in the energy region of 8.4-10.7 eV. The photon flux of the strongest Xe I resonance line at 8.437 eV is comparable to that of the He Ialpha line (21.218 eV) from the He-ECR discharge lamp. Stable operation for more than 300 h is achieved by efficient air-cooling of a ceramic tube in the resonance cavity. The high bulk sensitivity and high-energy resolution of PES using the Xe lines are demonstrated for some typical materials.

  11. Cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy correlated by xenon contrast CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Meyer, J.S.; Tanahashi, N.; Rogers, R.L.; Tachibana, H.; Kandula, P.; Dowell, R.E.; Mortel, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured during stable xenon contrast CT scanning and standard CT indices of brain atrophy were investigated in the patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type, multi-infarct dementia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Compared to age-matched normal volunteers, significant correlations were found in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease between cortical and subcortical gray matter blood flow and brain atrophy estimated by the ventricular body ratio, and mild to moderate brain atrophy were correlated with stepwise CBF reductions. However, in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia, brain atrophy was not associated with stepwise CBF reductions. Overall correlations between brain atrophy and reduced CBF were weak. Mild degrees of brain atrophy are not always associated with reduced CBF

  12. Photon-mediated electron multiplication in liquid xenon doped with trimethylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Toshio; Ashikaga, Kinya; Doke, Tadayoshi; Hitachi, Akira; Kikuchi, Jun; Masuda, Kimiaki; Okumura, Yasuaki

    1989-01-01

    Electron multiplication mediated by photons has been observed in liquid xenon doped with trimethylamine in concentrations of 0, 9.3, 43, 118 and 400 ppm. The effect was observed by irradiating a single wire counter with 1 MeV electrons and gamma rays from 207 Bi sources. The multiplication factor was observed to increase from a value of 23 at a concentration of 9.3 ppm to a value of 45 at a concentration of 118 ppm. Over the same range of concentrations, the threshold anode voltage for photon-mediated electron multiplication (PMEM) decreased from 2.5 to 1.4 kV and the PMEM results in a deterioration of energy resolution. At a concentration of 400 ppm, the resulting electron multiplication was neither stable nor reproducible. (orig.)

  13. Chemical species of iodine in some seaweeds. Pt. 2. Iodine-bound biological macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaolin Hou; Chifang Chai; Xiaojun Yan

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of iodine in various biological macromolecules in Sargassum kjellmanianum was studied using neutron activation analysis combined with chemical and biochemical separation techniques. The results indicate that iodine is mainly bound with protein, part of iodine with pigment and polyphenol, and little with polysaccharides, such as algin, fucoidan and cellulose. This result is significant for the mechanism of enriching iodine of algae and utilization of alga iodine. (author)

  14. Xenon-induced power oscillations in a generic small modular reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitcher, Evans Damenortey

    As world demand for energy continues to grow at unprecedented rates, the world energy portfolio of the future will inevitably include a nuclear energy contribution. It has been suggested that the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) could play a significant role in the spread of civilian nuclear technology to nations previously without nuclear energy. As part of the design process, the SMR design must be assessed for the threat to operations posed by xenon-induced power oscillations. In this research, a generic SMR design was analyzed with respect to just such a threat. In order to do so, a multi-physics coupling routine was developed with MCNP/MCNPX as the neutronics solver. Thermal hydraulic assessments were performed using a single channel analysis tool developed in Python. Fuel and coolant temperature profiles were implemented in the form of temperature dependent fuel cross sections generated using the SIGACE code and reactor core coolant densities. The Power Axial Offset (PAO) and Xenon Axial Offset (XAO) parameters were chosen to quantify any oscillatory behavior observed. The methodology was benchmarked against results from literature of startup tests performed at a four-loop PWR in Korea. The developed benchmark model replicated the pertinent features of the reactor within ten percent of the literature values. The results of the benchmark demonstrated that the developed methodology captured the desired phenomena accurately. Subsequently, a high fidelity SMR core model was developed and assessed. Results of the analysis revealed an inherently stable SMR design at beginning of core life and end of core life under full-power and half-power conditions. The effect of axial discretization, stochastic noise and convergence of the Monte Carlo tallies in the calculations of the PAO and XAO parameters was investigated. All were found to be quite small and the inherently stable nature of the core design with respect to xenon-induced power oscillations was confirmed. Finally, a

  15. Sensitive determination of iodine species, including organo-iodine, for freshwater and seawater samples using high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometric detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwehr, Kathleen A.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2003-01-01

    In order to more effectively use iodine isotope ratios, 129 I/ 127 I, as hydrological and geochemical tracers in aquatic systems, a new high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of iodine speciation. The dissolved iodine species that dominate natural water systems are iodide, iodate, and organic iodine. Using this new method, iodide was determined directly by combining anion exchange chromatography and spectrophotometry. Iodate and the total of organic iodine species are determined as iodide, with minimal sample preparation, compared to existing methods. The method has been applied to quantitatively determine iodide, iodate as the difference of total inorganic iodide and iodide after reduction of the sample by NaHSO 3 , and organic iodine as the difference of total iodide (after organic decomposition by dehydrohalogenation and reduction by NaHSO 3 ) and total inorganic iodide. Analytical accuracy was tested: (1) against certified reference material, SRM 1549, powdered milk (NIST); (2) through the method of standard additions; and (3) by comparison to values of environmental waters measured independently by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method has been successfully applied to measure the concentrations of iodide species in rain, surface and ground water, estuarine and seawater samples. The detection limit was ∼1 nM (0.2 ppb), with less than 3% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for samples determined by standard additions to an iodide solution of 20 nM in 0.1 M NaCl. This technique is one of the few methods sensitive enough to accurately quantify stable iodine species at nanomolar concentrations in aquatic systems across a range of matrices, and to quantitatively measure organic iodine. Additionally, this method makes use of a very dilute mobile phase, and may be applied to small sample volumes without pre-column concentration or post-column reactions

  16. Process for removing a mixture containing iodine and alkyl iodine compounds from a gas phase or aqueous solution with ion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, H; Mizuuchi, A; Yokoyama, F

    1968-10-04

    Iodine and alkyl iodine compounds are removed from a gas phase or aqueous solution containing salts, iodine and iodine compounds, such as the ambient gas in a reactor, if an accident should occur. The process comprises contacting the phase or solution: (a) with a hydrogen type strongly acidic cationic exchange resin, (b) with an anionic exchange resin containing quarternary ammonium and (c) with an anionic exchange resin containing free basic type tertiary amine, in this order or by reversing the order of the two anionic exchange resins. Although no problems arise in the liquid phase reaction, the ion-exchange resins in the gas phase reaction are desired in the moist state in order to stable maintain the migration speed of the materials to be removed regardless of the relative humidity of the amibent gas. In example I, Amberlite IRA-900 of 200 mm thickness as the lowermost bed, Amberlite IRA93 of 200 mm thickness as the middle bed and Amberlite 200 of 200 mm thickness as the uppermost bed were filled respectively, in a methacrylate resin cylinder with an inner diameter of 25 mm. A solution containing 15.9 mg/1 of iodine, 41.2 mg/1 of methyl iodide and 550 mg/1 of sodium carbonate flows at a rate of 15 liter/hr downward through the beds. As a result of testing, no iodine, iodine ions, iodic acid ions and methyl iodine were detected. The amount of water the beds could treat was 60 times the total quantity of the filled resins.

  17. Transition from linear to nonlinear sputtering of solid xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Self-sputtering of solid xenon has been studied with molecular dynamics simulations as a model system for the transition from dominantly linear to strongly nonlinear effects. The simulation covered the projectile energy range from 20 to 750 eV. Within a relatively narrow range from 30 to 250 e...

  18. Supernova Neutrino Physics with Xenon Dark Matter Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichard, S.; Lang, R.F.; McCabe, C.; Selvi, M.; Tamborra, I.

    2017-01-01

    The dark matter experiment XENON1T is operational and sensitive to all flavors of neutrinos emitted from a supernova. We show that the proportional scintillation signal (S2) allows for a clear observation of the neutrino signal and guarantees a particularly low energy threshold, while the

  19. On the spin-dependent sensitivity of XENON100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-11-15

    The latest XENON100 data severely constrains dark matter elastic scattering off nuclei, leading to impressive upper limits on the spin-independent cross-section. The main goal of this paper is to stress that the same data set has also an excellent spin-dependent sensitivity, which is of utmost importance in probing dark matter models. We show in particular that the constraints set by XENON100 on the spin-dependent neutron cross-section are by far the best at present, whereas the corresponding spin-dependent proton limits lag behind other direct detection results. The effect of nuclear uncertainties on the structure functions of xenon isotopes is analysed in detail and found to lessen the robustness of the constraints, especially for spin-dependent proton couplings. Notwith-standing, the spin-dependent neutron prospects for XENON1T and DARWIN are very encouraging. We apply our constraints to well-motivated dark matter models and demonstrate that in both mass-degenerate scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric standard model the spin-dependent neutron limits can actually override the spin-independent limits. This opens the possibility of probing additional unexplored regions of the dark matter parameter space with the next generation of ton-scale direct detection experiments.

  20. On the spin-dependent sensitivity of XENON100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    The latest XENON100 data severely constrains dark matter elastic scattering off nuclei, leading to impressive upper limits on the spin-independent cross-section. The main goal of this paper is to stress that the same data set has also an excellent spin-dependent sensitivity, which is of utmost importance in probing dark matter models. We show in particular that the constraints set by XENON100 on the spin-dependent neutron cross-section are by far the best at present, whereas the corresponding spin-dependent proton limits lag behind other direct detection results. The effect of nuclear uncertainties on the structure functions of xenon isotopes is analysed in detail and found to lessen the robustness of the constraints, especially for spin-dependent proton couplings. Notwith-standing, the spin-dependent neutron prospects for XENON1T and DARWIN are very encouraging. We apply our constraints to well-motivated dark matter models and demonstrate that in both mass-degenerate scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric standard model the spin-dependent neutron limits can actually override the spin-independent limits. This opens the possibility of probing additional unexplored regions of the dark matter parameter space with the next generation of ton-scale direct detection experiments.

  1. Improved Fluid Perturbation Theory: Equation of state for Fluid Xenon

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiong; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Gong-Mu; Zhao, Yan-Hong; Tian, Ming-Feng; Song, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The traditional fluid perturbation theory is improved by taking electronic excitations and ionizations into account, in the framework of average ion spheres. It is applied to calculate the equation of state for fluid Xenon, which turns out in good agreement with the available shock data.

  2. Xenon tissue/blood partition coefficient for pig urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Bülow, J; Nielsen, S L

    1990-01-01

    In four landrace pigs the tissue/blood partition coefficient (lambda) for xenon (Xe) for the urinary bladder was calculated after chemical analysis for lipid, water and protein content and determination of the haematocrit. The coefficients varied from bladder to bladder owing to small differences...

  3. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Liu, J.; Martens, K. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); and others

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity v{sub Rn} of radon and v{sub Xe} of xenon in the trap with v{sub Rn}/v{sub Xe}=(0.96{+-}0.10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} at -85 Degree-Sign C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  4. Electric field measurements in a xenon discharge using Spark spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaars, E.; Bowden, M.D.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of electric field distributions in a low-pressure xenon discharge are presented. The measurement technique is based on Stark spectroscopy, using a 2 + 1 excitation scheme with fluorescence dip detection. Electric fields can be measured by detecting Stark shifts of high-lying Rydberg

  5. Damage of copper by low energy xenon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babad-Zakhryapin, A.A.; Popenko, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the copper crystal structure bombarded by xenon ions with 30-150 eV energy are studied. Foils of MOb copper mark, 10 mm in diameter and 100 μm thickness, are irradiated. The initial specimens are annealed in vacuum during 1 h at 900 K temperature. The specimens are bombarded by xenon ions in a water-cooled holder. A TE-O type accelerator serves as a xenon ion source. The ion energy varies within 30 to 150 eV range. The ion flux density is 8x10 16 ion/(cm 2 xs). It is shown that crystal structure variations at deep depths are observed not only at high (>1 keV), but at low ion energies down to several dozens of electronvolt as well. The crystal structure variation on copper irradiation by xenon ions with 30-150 eV energy is followed by formation of defects like dislocation loops, point defects in the irradiated target bulk

  6. Charge States of Krypton and Xenon in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsler, Peter; Fludra, Andrzej; Giunta, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    We calculate charge state distributions of Kr and Xe in a model for two different types of solar wind using the effective ionization and recombination rates provided from the OPEN_ADAS data base. The charge states of heavy elements in the solar wind are essential for estimating the efficiency of Coulomb drag in the inner corona. We find that xenon ions experience particularly low Coulomb drag from protons in the inner corona, comparable to the notoriously weak drag of protons on helium ions. It has been found long ago that helium in the solar wind can be strongly depleted near interplanetary current sheets, whereas coronal mass ejecta are sometimes strongly enriched in helium. We argue that if the extraordinary variability of the helium abundance in the solar wind is due to inefficient Coulomb drag, the xenon abundance must vary strongly. In fact, a secular decrease of the solar wind xenon abundance relative to the other heavier noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) has been postulated based on a comparison of noble gases in recently irradiated and ancient samples of ilmenite in the lunar regolith. We conclude that decreasing solar activity and decreasing frequency of coronal mass ejections over the solar lifetime might be responsible for a secularly decreasing abundance of xenon in the solar wind.

  7. Commissioning of the XENON1T liquid level measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geis, Christopher [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Two-phase xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) have been operated very successfully in direct detection experiments for dark matter. This kind of detector uses liquid xenon as the sensitive target and is operated in two-phase (liquid/gas) mode, where the liquid level needs to be monitored and controlled with sub-millimeter precision. We present the installation, commissioning and first measurement data of two kinds of level meters operated in the XENON1T TPC: short level meters are three-plated capacitors measuring the level of the liquid-gas interface with a measurement range h∼5 mm and a resolution of ΔC/h∼1 pF/mm. The long level meters are cylindrical double-walled capacitors, measuring the overall filling level of the XENON1T TPC at a measurement range of h=1.4 m and a resolution of ΔC/h∼0.1 pF/mm. Further, we present the design and programming of the readout electronic based on the UTI chip by Smartec, which allows to read all six levelmeters simultaneously.

  8. Removing krypton from xenon by cryogenic distillation to the ppq level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Di Gangi, P.; Di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Duchovni, E.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grandi, L.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Huhmann, C.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Calloch, M. Le; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Piro, M.-C.; Pizzella, V.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Saldanha, R.; Santos, J. M. F. dos; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Shockley, E.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Wang, H.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Cristescu, I.

    2017-05-01

    The XENON1T experiment aims for the direct detection of dark matter in a detector filled with 3.3 tons of liquid xenon. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the background induced by radioactive decays inside the detector has to be sufficiently low. One major contributor is the β -emitter ^{85}Kr which is present in the xenon. For XENON1T a concentration of natural krypton in xenon ^{nat}Kr/Xe McCabe-Thiele approach is described. The system demonstrated a krypton reduction factor of 6.4\\cdot 10^5 with thermodynamic stability at process speeds above 3 kg/h. The resulting concentration of ^{nat}Kr/Xe<26 ppq is the lowest ever achieved, almost one order of magnitude below the requirements for XENON1T and even sufficient for future dark matter experiments using liquid xenon, such as XENONnT and DARWIN.

  9. Transfer of gaseous iodine to Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Ohmomo, Yoichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Transfer rates of gaseous elemental iodine and methyliodide from atmosphere to Tradescantia were investigated in relation to supposed genetic mutation due to radioactive iodine released from nuclear facilities. The estimated transfer rate of elemental iodine to the young buds of Tradescantia, which was given as the ratio of iodine uptake rate per unit weight of the plant to the concentration of the element in the air, was approximately 7 x 10 -2 cm 3 /g.sec, about 30 to 40 times higher than that of methyliodide. The contribution of direct deposition of elemental iodine was suggested to be significant, although methyliodide was mainly absorbed by respiration through stomata of the plant. (author)

  10. Determination of chemical form of iodine with IC-ICP-MS system and its application to the environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Katou, S.; Sekimoto, H.; Muramatsu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Iodine-129 is one of the important radionuclides possibly released into the environment from nuclear weapons testing and from the nuclear facilities such as nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Because of its long half-life (1.57 x 10 7 y), knowing its long-term behavior in the environment is a major concern. As I-129 is expected to act together with stable iodine (I-127) in the environment after long time, the biogeochemical cycling of stable iodine in the environment can be used for the reliable safety assessment of I-129. Chemical form is the one of the important factors controlling the 'iodine behavior in the environment. Iodide (I - ) and iodate (IO 3 - ) are known to be the major chemical form in the aqueous solution. However, the information on the chemical form of iodine in the environmental sample is limited because of lack of reliable analytical technique for trace level of iodine in the environment. In this study, the analytical system by using ion chromatograph (IC) followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the separate determination of I - and IO 3 - in the aqueous solution. The IC with anion exchange column (EXCELPAK ICS-A23) was used for the separation of I - and IO 3 - with 30 mM (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 as eluent. Separated iodine was determined with ICP-MS on line. with the detection limit 0.1 - 1 μg/L. The total iodine concentration was also measured by the direct determination with ICP-MS. The iodine in the several environmental samples such as irrigation water in paddy field was successfully determined with information of chemical form. In incubation experiment with flooded soil, the change of the chemical form of iodine in the soil solution with change of Eh was observed. Detailed data will be discussed in the presentation.

  11. Dietary flavonoids and iodine Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elst, van der J.P.; Smit, J.W.A.; Romijn, H.A.; Heide, van der D.

    2003-01-01

    Flavonoids have inhibiting effects on the proliferation of cancer cells, including thyroidal ones. In the treatment of thyroid cancer the uptake of iodide is essential. Flavonoids are known to interfere with iodide organification ill vitro, and to cause goiter. The influence of flavonoids on iodine

  12. Iodine-129 and Iodine-127 speciation in groundwater at the Hanford Site, U.S.: iodate incorporation into calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Saijin; Yeager, Chris; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    The Hanford Site, the most contaminated nuclear site in the United States, has large radioactive waste plumes containing high 129I levels. The geochemical transport and fate of radioiodine depends largely on its chemical speciation that is greatly affected by environmental factors. This study reports, for the first time, the speciation of stable and radioactive iodine in the groundwater from the Hanford Site. Iodate was the dominant species and accounts for up to 84%, followed by organo-iodine and minimal levels of iodide. The relatively high pH and oxidizing environment may have prevented iodate reduction. Our results identified that calcite precipitation caused by degassing of CO2 during deep groundwater sampling incorporated between 7 to 40% of dissolved iodine (including 127I and 129I) that was originally in the groundwater, transforming dissolved to particulate iodate during sampling. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying iodine incorporation by calcite, laboratory experiments were carried out to replicate this iodine sequestering processes. Two methods were utilized in this study, 1) addition of sodium carbonate; 2) addition of calcium chloride followed by sodium carbonate where the pH was well controlled at ~8.2, which is close to the average pH of Hanford Site groundwater. It was demonstrated that iodate was the main species incorporated into calcite and this incorporation process could be impeded by elevated pH and decreasing ionic strength in groundwater. This study provides critical information for predicting the long-term fate and transport of 129I at the Hanford Site and reveals a potential means for improved remediation strategies of 129I

  13. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M; Hreidarsson, A B; Andersen, S; Bülow Pedersen, I; Knudsen, N; Perrild, H; Jørgensen, T; Ovesen, L

    2000-11-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency disorders are avoided but not higher. Iodine supplementation programs should aim at relatively uniform iodine intake, avoiding deficient or excessive iodine intake in subpopulations. To adopt such a strategy, surveillance programs are needed.

  14. Iodine tablets and a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paile, W.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is one of the major substances released during severe nuclear accidents. Radioactive iodine is easily gasified, and if present in fallout it can enter the lungs, and thereby the circulatory system, with the inhalation of air. Once in a body, radioactive iodine accumulates in the thyroid and may result in tumours in the thyroid and, in extreme cases, impaired thyroid function. Accumulation of radioactive iodine can be prevented by taking non-radioactive, 'cold' iodine as tablets. Iodine tablets dilute the radioactive iodine that has entered the body. A dose of iodine also paralyses the thyroid temporarily by saturating its iodine-carrying capacity. To be useful iodine tablets should be taken immediately when a radioactive emission has occurred. If the tablets are taken too early or too late, they give little protection. Iodine tablets should not be taken just to be on the safe side, since their use may involve harmful side effects. Dosing instructions should also be followed with care. (orig.)

  15. Arguments and experience feed back for the distribution of iodine tablets in the vicinity of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Gonin, M.; Hemidy, P.Y.; Bailloeuil, C.; Van Boxsom, D.; Renier, S.; Garcier, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Arguments and experience feed back for the distribution of iodine tablets in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. In the event of a nuclear accident, radioactive isotopes of iodine including 131 I can be released into the atmosphere. In 1997, as a safety measure, the French government decided to begin the distribution of stable iodine tablets (KI) to those living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants, to avoid having to do so in an emergency. The tablets were previously stored by Electricite de France (EDF) which held them at the disposal of the government authorities. Since the tablets distributed in 1997 are approaching their use-by date, EDF has started a new distribution campaign within a ten-kilometer radius of its twenty sites with a total of 58 nuclear reactors. During the public information meetings, the discussion focused on the effectiveness of this protective measure and the nature and frequency of the possible side effects while measuring the duration of its action under the conditions in which it was administered. A bibliographic study of the kinetics of iodine in the human body has enabled the indications and the means of use to be determined. The degree of effectiveness with which incorporation of radioactive iodine into the thyroid is prevented and the onset of thyroid dysfunction depend on both external and individual factors: uptake of iodine from food, functional condition of the thyroid, age, etc. In cases of prolonged exposure to radioactive iodine over several days, consideration needs to be given to taking stable iodine a second time, to maintain maximum protection. This presentation covers the impact of the 1997 and 2000 information campaigns, the effect of making stable iodine available to the public, the extent to which the public feels involved, and the reactions of health professionals. (author)

  16. Iodine removing method in organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Sakurai, Manabu

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively remove iodine in an organic solvent to thereby remove iodine in the solvent that can be re-used or put to purning treatment. Method: Organic solvent formed from wastes of nuclear facilities is mixed with basic lead acetate, or silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with such a compound to adsorb iodine in the organic solvent to the basic lead acetate. Then, iodine in the organic solvent is removed by separating to eliminate the basic lead acetate adsorbing iodine from the organic solvent or by passing the organic solvent through a tower or column charged or pre-coated with silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with lead acetate. By using basic lead acetate as the adsorbents, iodine can effective by adsorbed and eliminated. Thus, the possibility of circumstantial release of iodine can be reduced upon reusing or burning treatment of the organic solvent. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Iodine status in neonates in Denmark: regional variations and dependency on maternal iodine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, S B; Laurberg, P; Børlum, K G

    1994-01-01

    Iodine status of 147 neonates born in five different regions of Denmark was evaluated in relation to the iodine content of breast milk and iodine supplementation taken by the mother. Approximately two-thirds of the women had not received iodine supplementation. They had low iodine concentrations...... in breast milk and urinary iodine concentrations of the neonates at day 5 were low. The median values (milk/urine) were 33.6/31.7 micrograms/l (Randers 22/26, Ringkøbing 29/16, Aalborg 36/31. Arhus 54/41 and Copenhagen 55/59 micrograms/l). Higher values were found in the group where tablets containing...... iodine had been taken (milk/urine: 57.0/61.0 micrograms/l). In general, the values are low compared with internationally recommended levels. We suggest that mothers without autoimmune thyroid disease should receive iodine supplementation in the form of vitamin/mineral tablets containing iodine (150...

  18. Speciation of iodine (I-127) in the natural environment around Canadian CANDU sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.J.; Kotzer, T.G.; Chant, L.A

    2001-06-01

    In Canada, very little data is available regarding the concentrations and chemical speciation of iodine in the environment proximal and distal to CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations (NPGS). In the immediate vicinity of CANDU reactors, the short-lived iodine isotope {sup 131}I (t{sub 1/2} = 8.04 d), which is produced from fission reactions, is generally below detection and yields little information about the environmental cycling of iodine. Conversely, the fission product {sup 129}I has a long half-life (t{sub 1/2} = 1.57x10{sup 7} y) and has had other anthropogenic inputs (weapons testing, nuclear fuel reprocessing) other than CANDU over the past 50 years. As a result, the concentrations of stable iodine ({sup 127}I) have been used as a proxy. In this study, a sampling system was developed and tested at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to collect and measure the particulate and gaseous inorganic and organic fractions of stable iodine ({sup 127}I) in air and associated organic and inorganic reservoirs. Air, vegetation and soil samples were collected at CRL, and at Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations (NPGS) at OPG's (Ontario Power Generation) Pickering (PNGS) and Darlington NPGS (DNGS) in Ontario, as well as at NB Power's Pt. Lepreau NPGS in New Brunswick. The concentrations of particulate and inorganic iodine in air at CRL were extremely low, and were often found to be below detection. The concentrations are believed to be at this level because the sediments in the CRL area are glacial fluvial and devoid of marine ionic species, and the local atmospheric conditions at the sampling site are very humid. Concentrations of a gaseous organic species were comparable to worldwide levels. The concentrations of particulate and inorganic iodine in air were also found to be low at PNGS and DNGS, which may be attributed to reservoir effects of the large freshwater lakes in southern Ontario, which might serve to dilute the atmospheric iodine

  19. Speciation of iodine (I-127) in the natural environment around Canadian CANDU sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.J.; Kotzer, T.G.; Chant, L.A.

    2001-06-01

    In Canada, very little data is available regarding the concentrations and chemical speciation of iodine in the environment proximal and distal to CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations (NPGS). In the immediate vicinity of CANDU reactors, the short-lived iodine isotope 131 I (t 1/2 = 8.04 d), which is produced from fission reactions, is generally below detection and yields little information about the environmental cycling of iodine. Conversely, the fission product 129 I has a long half-life (t 1/2 = 1.57x10 7 y) and has had other anthropogenic inputs (weapons testing, nuclear fuel reprocessing) other than CANDU over the past 50 years. As a result, the concentrations of stable iodine ( 127 I) have been used as a proxy. In this study, a sampling system was developed and tested at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to collect and measure the particulate and gaseous inorganic and organic fractions of stable iodine ( 127 I) in air and associated organic and inorganic reservoirs. Air, vegetation and soil samples were collected at CRL, and at Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations (NPGS) at OPG's (Ontario Power Generation) Pickering (PNGS) and Darlington NPGS (DNGS) in Ontario, as well as at NB Power's Pt. Lepreau NPGS in New Brunswick. The concentrations of particulate and inorganic iodine in air at CRL were extremely low, and were often found to be below detection. The concentrations are believed to be at this level because the sediments in the CRL area are glacial fluvial and devoid of marine ionic species, and the local atmospheric conditions at the sampling site are very humid. Concentrations of a gaseous organic species were comparable to worldwide levels. The concentrations of particulate and inorganic iodine in air were also found to be low at PNGS and DNGS, which may be attributed to reservoir effects of the large freshwater lakes in southern Ontario, which might serve to dilute the atmospheric iodine concentrations. The concentrations of

  20. Search for double beta decay processes of {sup 124}Xe with XENON100 and XENON1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieguth, Alexander [IKP, Westfaelische-Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Driven by the search for dark matter particles the XENON dark matter project recently installed its next stage multi-ton experiment XENON1T at the LNGS, which will probe the spin-indpendent-WIMP-Nucleon cross section down to 2.10{sup -47} cm{sup 2}. Besides its main purpose different particle physics topics can be addressed by the taken data. One example are the double beta decay processes of natural isotope {sup 124}Xe. This isotope is expected to decay via two-neutrino double electron capture (2νECEC) and due to its high Q-value of 2864 keV additionally through 2νβ{sup +}β{sup +}. Since these processes have not been detected so far, there is only a lower limit the respective half-life (e.g. > 4.7.10{sup 21} yr for 2νECEC). A detection of the 2νECEC is possible using XENON1T data by looking for its clear signature of secondary X-rays or Auger electrons and at least new lower half-life limits for all other decay channels can be obtained. While these processes are expected from standard model physics, a detection of a decay without neutrinos (e.g 0νECEC) would hint towards beyond the standard model physics and could derive conclusions on the neutrino mass. Until XENON1T is taking data, the search for all processes can be tested in the recorded data of its predecessor XENON100.

  1. Unpredictably Stable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Failla, Virgilio; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    2014-01-01

    Is entrepreneurship a more stable career choice for high employment turnover individuals? We find that a transition to entrepreneurship induces a shift towards stayer behavior and identify job matching, job satisfaction and lock-in effects as main drivers. These findings have major implications...

  2. A Spectroscopic Method for Determining Free Iodine in Iodinated Fatty-Acid Esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyubin, V. V.; Klyubina, K. A.; Makovetskaya, K. N.

    2018-01-01

    It is shown that the concentration of free iodine in samples of iodinated fatty-acid esters can be measured using the electronic absorption spectra of their solutions in ethanol. The method proposed is rather simple in use and highly sensitive, allowing detection of presence of less than 10 ppm of free iodine in iodinated compounds. It is shown using the example of Lipiodol that this makes it possible to easily detect small amounts of free iodine in samples containing bound iodine in concentrations down to 40 wt %.

  3. Separation of iodine-131 from water using isotopic exchange with iodine-starch compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, V.P.; Kolomejtseva, I.V.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions of iodine isotopic exchange with iodine-starch compound (ISC) were studied with the aim of compound utilizatoin for radioactive iodine separation from solution. It is shown that in pH range from 2 to 7 the degree of iodine extraction and coefficient of its distribution practically do not depend on pH, at pH>7 ISC destruction (decolorizing) starts and iodine extraction decreases. Rapid method of iodine separation from solution is suggested. The method can be used in radiochemical techniques. The degree of extraction equals 80 %, a higher degree of extraction can not be achieved owing to ISC formation peculiarities

  4. Radioactive iodine and environmental and sanitary effects - bibliographic study and quantification; Iodes radioactifs et impacts environnemental et sanitaire - etude bibliographique et quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guetat, Ph.; Armand, P.; Monfort, M.; Fritsch, P. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France); Flury Herard, A. [CEA, Dir. des Sciences du Vivant, 75 - Paris (France); Menetrier, F. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dir. des Sciences du Vivant, 92 (France); Bion, L. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Schoech, C.; Masset, S. [Societe EX-IN - Expertise et Ingenierie, 92 - Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    2004-07-01

    This document is intended to a large public. It reviews the different parameters needed to evaluate the potential act o radioactive releases from the emission to public. Its objectives are to evaluate the importance of different exposure pathways and to assess efficiency of the possible interventions for large public. The main conclusions are summarised hereafter: The radioactive decay chains have to be taken into account to evaluate the iodine source term in the nuclear plants in the case of fission accidents. The physico-chemical forms of iodine are important in order to determine the released activity and deposited activity on the soil. The isotopes to be taken into account are mainly iodine 131 for radiological assessments and also iodine 133 for the nuclear reactor accidents, and the chain Tellurium-Iodine 132 when no particulate filtration exists. Iodine 129 in French reprocessing plant cannot lead to significant accidents. The dominant exposure pathways are related to the consumption of contaminated food products (vegetable, milk) for the inorganic iodine. The iodine transfer to goat and sheep milk is greater than the one to cow milk. The meat production of herbivores at field is the most sensitive. The interest to remove rapidly herbivore from pasture appears relatively clearly. The banning of consumption of local contaminated food products (vegetables and meats) may reduce by about a factor of thirteen the impact due to iodine 131. The youngest the population is, the greatest are the thyroid radiosensitivity and variability within the population. Oral administration of stable iodine limits transfers to maternal milk and foetal thyroid. Ingestion of stable iodine is complementary to consumption banning of local contaminated food products. The earliest the ingestion is, the greatest is the efficiency. 0,1 TBq of 131 iodine released at a low height involves only limited and local actions whereas the release of 10 TBq involves direct and immediate protection

  5. Iodine capture by Hofmann-type clathrate Ni(II)(pz)[Ni(II)(CN)_4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massasso, Giovanni; Long, Jerome; Haines, Julien; Devautour-Vinot, Sabine; Maurin, Guillaume; Larionova, Joulia; Guerin, Christian; Guari, Yannick; Grandjean, Agnes; Onida, Barbara; Donnadieu, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The thermally stable Hofmann-type clathrate framework Ni(II)(pz)[Ni(II)(CN)_4] (pz = pyrazine) was investigated for the efficient and reversible sorption of iodine (I_2) in the gaseous phase and in solution with a maximum adsorption capacity of 1 mol of I_2 per 1 mol of Ni(II)pz)[Ni(II)(CN)_4] in solution. (authors)

  6. Controlling Solid–Liquid Conversion Reactions for a Highly Reversible Aqueous Zinc–Iodine Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Huilin; Li, Bin; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Guosheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Han, Kee Sung; Muller, Karl T.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2017-10-30

    Aqueous rechargeable batteries are desirable for many energy storage applications due to their low cost and high safety. However, low capacity and short cycle life are the significant obstacles to their practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a highly reversible aqueous zinc-iodine battery using encapsulated iodine in microporous active carbon fibers (ACFs) as cathode materials through the rational control of solid-liquid conversion reactions. The experiments and density function theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the effects of solvents and properties of carbon hosts, e.g. pore size, surface chemistries, on the adsorption of iodine species. The rational manipulation of the competition between the adsorption in carbon and solvation in electrolytes for iodine species is responsible for the high reversibility and cycling stability. The zinc-iodine batteries deliver a high capacity of 180 mAh g-1 at 1C and a stable cycle life over 3000 cycles with ~90% capacity retention as well as negligible self-discharge. We believe the principles for stabilizing the zinc-iodine system could provide new insight into conversion systems such as Li-S systems.

  7. Recovery of iodine as iodine-125 from biological materials prior to assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.B.; Belling, G.B.; Buckley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    In biological tissues iodine is usually present as iodoamino acids or iodoproteins. The organic material must be oxidised and the iodine converted into iodate prior to the final spectrophotometric determination. At parts per billion (10 9 ) levels, recoveries of added iodine are difficult to measure precisely as iodine can easily be lost from the sample and added inorganic iodine may not be recovered in the same proportions as the naturally occurring iodine. Iodine-125 provides a much more sensitive, specific and accurate means of testing the recovery of nanogram amounts of iodine from biological tissues and it can be incorporated into tissues in the naturally occurring compounds. Plants can be grown in a solution culture containing iodine-125 and animals can be injected with iodine-125 to provide tissues where naturally occurring iodine compounds are labelled with radioactive iodine. These tissues can be used to examine the recovery of iodine after oven drying, freeze drying, alkali ashing and acid digestion of the samples. Experimental details are given for spinach, tobacco, oats, cauliflower and thyroid. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  8. Technical meeting of project counterparts on 'Cyclotron production of Iodine-123'. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Several cyclotron laboratory facilities are very much interested in the production of Iodine-123 for medical applications in view of its optimal physical and chemical properties. Some of these countries have in the past used the solid target technology based on utilization of enriched Tellurium targets and are currently involved in the development of enriched Xenon-124 gas targets to improved radionuclidic purity as required by the needs of modern nuclear medicine. With the purpose of discussing the advances in the later route of production and to foster mutual co-operation among the developing countries interested in this technology, a meeting was convened with the participation of scientists from Argentina, Brazil, Iran, Korea and Syria. A scientist from the United States was also invited as an expert to provide advise on particular aspects of the technology. This publication contains as an annex technical reports from the participating institutions. All of these reports have been separately indexed and provided with abstracts

  9. Fission gas and iodine release measured up to 15 GWd/t UO2 burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is presented of the measured release of xenon, krypton and iodine up to 15 GWd/t UO 2 burnup for fuel centerline temperatures ranging from 950 to 1800 K, at average linear heat ratings of 15 to 35 kW/m. The IFA-430 is composed of four 1.28-m-long fuel rods containing 10% enriched UO 2 pellet fuel. Two of the fuel rods are connected, top and bottom, to a gas flow system that permits the fission gases released from the fuel pellets to be swept out of the rods during irradiation and measured via gamma spectrometry. The release/burnup increased significantly between 10 and 15 GWd/t burnup. Fuel temperature did not change. Increased releases were due to physical changes in the fuel-surface area. Changes appeared to be due to higher power operation and burnup

  10. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  11. Estimates of naturally occurring pools of thorium, uranium and iodine in boreal forests of southeast Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loefgren, A.; Kautsky, U.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution patterns of naturally occurring radionuclides or their stable isotopes have been used to study the long-term behaviour of the radionuclides that may originate from nuclear waste. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is performing investigations at two potential sites for nuclear waste disposal in southern Sweden. Here is the distribution and total content of the three naturally occurring radionuclides/stable isotopes, thorium, uranium and iodine, described for six forest localities at those sites. (LN)

  12. Reduced radioiodine uptake at increased iodine intake and {sup 131}I-induced release of ''cold'' iodine stored in the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, B.; Haase, A.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Seyfarth, M. [Inst. of Clinical Chemistry, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Wenzel, B.E. [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Aim: the extent of urinary iodine excretion (UIE) provides information about iodine supply and release. In the present study we investigated correlations between UIE and radioiodine uptake (RIU) as well as effects of radioiodine therapy on UIE in patients with autonomous goitre. Patients, methods: In 197 consecutive patients with thyroid autonomy, UIE was measured twice during radioiodine test (RITe) and correlated with RIU. In 98 of these patients, thyroglobulin and thyroid volume (V) were determined prior to therapy. Individual changes in urinary iodine excretion ({delta}UIE) and TG ({delta}TG) could be investigated four weeks (4W) and six months (6M) after radioiodine therapy. Additionally, {delta}V was determined 6M after therapy. {delta}UIE, {delta}TG and {delta}V were correlated with target dose and target volume. Results: patients with higher iodine excretion exhibited significantly lower thyroidal radioiodine uptake values. Twofold increased UIE prior to therapy decreased radioiodine uptake by 25%. Compared with pretherapeutic values, UIE and TG were significantly increased four weeks after radioiodine therapy (p < 0.001). Median values of both parameters were found to be doubled. The product of target dose and target volume was not only correlated with a decrease of thyroid volume 6M after therapy, but also with an increase of UIE and TG in the early phase after therapy. Conclusions: it was confirmed that UIE during RITe is a measure for iodine intake and can be used to investigate the competition between stable iodine and radioiodine. The increase of UIE and TG four weeks after therapeutic administration of radioiodine can be explained by disintegrated thyroid follicles. The therapy-induced iodine release may be one important cause for the development of hyperthyroidism in some patients during the first weeks after radioiodine therapy. It may contribute to the known decrease of radioiodine uptake after preapplications of {sup 131}I in various thyroid

  13. Two-photon resonant, stimulated processes in krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.C.

    1988-11-01

    Both on-axis and conical emissions have been observed following two-photon pumping of the 5p states of krypton and the 6p', 7p, 8p, and 4f states of xenon. In the former case, coherent emissions from the 5p states to the 5s are observed, and in the latter case, many p→s, d→p, and f→d cascade emissions are observed. By analogy to the well-studied alkali and alkaline earth examples, the emissions are discussed in terms of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), stimulated hyper-Raman scattering, and parametric four-wave mixing. The physical processes responsible for the conical emission and for intensity anomalies in the xenon p→s emissions are not understood at present. Interference effects due to coherent cancellation between competing excitation pathways may be occurring. 4 refs., 3 figs

  14. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores.

  15. Ionization yield from electron tracks in liquid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronova, T.Ya.; Kipsanov, M.A.; Kruglov, A.A.; Obodovskij, I.M.; Pokachalov, S.G.; Shilov, V.A.; Khristich, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for calculating coefficients K β , characterizing ionization yield from electron track in liquid xenon are considered. K β calculation is conducted on the base of experimental data on K parameter characterizing ionization yield from a certain combination of photo-, Compton-and Auger electron tracks. K parameter measurements are conducted in liquid xenon at 170 K temperature within 10-30 keV gamma- and X radiation energy ranges. Calculated dependence of K β and K coefficients on the energy in a wide (5-500 keV) range is presented. K β values obtained can be applied for calculating the energy resolution of a gamma-spectrometer and linearity of its calibration characteristics if the electric field intensity in the spectrometer does not exceed some kV/cm

  16. Modal analysis of temperature feedback in oscillations induced by xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, E.M. dos.

    1976-01-01

    The flux oscillations induced by Xenon distribution in homogeneous thermal reactors are studied treating the space dependence through the modal expansion technique and the stability limits against power oscillations and spatial oscillations are determined. The effect of the feedbacks due to Xenon and temperature coefficient on the linear stability of the free system is investigated employing several number of terms in the transient expansion, considering the various sizes of the reactor. The heat transfer model considered includes one term due to cooling proportional to the temperature. A PWR model reactor is utilized for numerical calculations. It is found that a slightly higher temperature feedback coefficient is necessary for stability against power oscillations when larger number of terms in the transient modal expansion is maintained. (author)

  17. Search for magnetic inelastic dark matter with XENON100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, 1098XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F.; Bruno, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Alfonsi, M. [Institut für Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D. [LIBPhys, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L. [Physik-Institut, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B.; Calvén, J. [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Stockholm SE-10691 (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Bruenner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Budnik, R. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001 (Israel); Bütikofer, L., E-mail: lukas.buetikofer@lhep.unibe.ch, E-mail: xenon@lngs.infn.it [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); and others

    2017-10-01

    We present the first search for dark matter-induced delayed coincidence signals in a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber, using the 224.6 live days of the XENON100 science run II. This very distinct signature is predicted in the framework of magnetic inelastic dark matter which has been proposed to reconcile the modulation signal reported by the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration with the null results from other direct detection experiments. No candidate event has been found in the region of interest and upper limits on the WIMP's magnetic dipole moment are derived. The scenarios proposed to explain the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal by magnetic inelastic dark matter interactions of WIMPs with masses of 58.0 GeV/c{sup 2} and 122.7 GeV/c{sup 2} are excluded at 3.3 σ and 9.3 σ, respectively.

  18. Depth distribution of martensite in xenon implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Steenstrup, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of stress-induced martensite and its distribution in depth in xenon implanted austenitic stainless steel poly- and single crystals have been measured by Rutherford backscattering and channeling analysis, depth selective conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. In low nickel 17/7, 304 and 316 commercial stainless steels and in 17:13 single crystals the martensitic transformation starts at the surface and develops towards greater depth with increasing xenon fluence. The implanted layer is nearly completely transformed, and the interface between martensite and austenite is rather sharp and well defined. In high nickel 310 commercial stainless steel and 15:19 and 20:19 single crystals, on the other hand, only insignificant amounts of martensite are observed. (orig.)

  19. Dark matter sensitivity of multi-ton liquid xenon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, Marc; Bütikofer, Lukas; Baudis, Laura; Kish, Alexander; Selvi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of multi ton-scale time projection chambers using a liquid xenon target, e.g., the proposed DARWIN instrument, to spin-independent and spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering interactions. Taking into account realistic backgrounds from the detector itself as well as from neutrinos, we examine the impact of exposure, energy threshold, background rejection efficiency and energy resolution on the dark matter sensitivity. With an exposure of 200 t × y and assuming detector parameters which have been already demonstrated experimentally, spin-independent cross sections as low as 2.5 × 10 −49 cm 2 can be probed for WIMP masses around 40 GeV/c 2 . Additional improvements in terms of background rejection and exposure will further increase the sensitivity, while the ultimate WIMP science reach will be limited by neutrinos scattering coherently off the xenon nuclei

  20. Configuration interaction in charge exchange spectra of tin and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, R.; Morris, O.; Ohashi, H.; Suda, S.; Tanuma, H.; Fujioka, S.; Nishimura, H.; Nishihara, K.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, T.; Koike, F.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2011-06-01

    Charge-state-specific extreme ultraviolet spectra from both tin ions and xenon ions have been recorded at Tokyo Metropolitan University. The electron cyclotron resonance source spectra were produced from charge exchange collisions between the ions and rare gas target atoms. To identify unknown spectral lines of tin and xenon, atomic structure calculations were performed for Sn14+-Sn17+ and Xe16+-Xe20+ using the Hartree-Fock configuration interaction code of Cowan (1981 The Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectra (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press)). The energies of the capture states involved in the single-electron process that occurs in these slow collisions were estimated using the classical over-barrier model.

  1. Nighttime atmospheric chemistry of iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Plane, John M. C.; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Mahajan, Anoop S.; Lamarque, Jean-François; Kinnison, Douglas E.

    2016-12-01

    Little attention has so far been paid to the nighttime atmospheric chemistry of iodine species. Current atmospheric models predict a buildup of HOI and I2 during the night that leads to a spike of IO at sunrise, which is not observed by measurements. In this work, electronic structure calculations are used to survey possible reactions that HOI and I2 could undergo at night in the lower troposphere, and hence reduce their nighttime accumulation. The new reaction NO3+ HOI → IO + HNO3 is proposed, with a rate coefficient calculated from statistical rate theory over the temperature range 260-300 K and at a pressure of 1000 hPa to be k(T) = 2.7 × 10-12 (300 K/T)2.66 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. This reaction is included in two atmospheric models, along with the known reaction between I2 and NO3, to explore a new nocturnal iodine radical activation mechanism. The results show that this iodine scheme leads to a considerable reduction of nighttime HOI and I2, which results in the enhancement of more than 25 % of nighttime ocean emissions of HOI + I2 and the removal of the anomalous spike of IO at sunrise. We suggest that active nighttime iodine can also have a considerable, so far unrecognized, impact on the reduction of the NO3 radical levels in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and hence upon the nocturnal oxidizing capacity of the marine atmosphere. The effect of this is exemplified by the indirect effect on dimethyl sulfide (DMS) oxidation.

  2. New iodine filter pack design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackbee, B.A.

    1977-10-01

    To enable Naval Emergency Monitoring Teams to fulfil their role in the field it was necessary to locate or design a replacement filter pack for the collection of radioactive iodine air samples. Collaboration with the Berkeley Laboratories of the Central Electricity Generating Board provided the necessary starting point for a suitable type of package. Further development by NGTE (West Drayton) yielded the improved filter pack which is the subject of this memorandum. (author)

  3. Iodine frequency references for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus; Döringshoff, Klaus; Peters, Achim; Oswald, Markus; Johann, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Optical frequency references are a key element for the realization of future space missions. They are needed for missions related to tests of fundamental physics, gravitational wave detection, Earth observation and navigation and ranging. In missions such as GRACE follow-on or LISA the optical frequency reference is used as light source for high-sensitivity inter-satellite distance metrology. While cavity-based systems are current baseline e.g. for LISA, frequency stabilization on a hyperfine transition in molecular iodine near 532 nm is a promising alternative. Due to its absolute frequency, iodine standards crucially simplify the initial spacecraft acquisition procedures. Current setups fulfill the GRACE-FO and LISA frequency stability requirements and are realized near Engineering Model level. We present the current status of our developments on Elegant Breadboard (EBB) and Engineering Model (EM) level taking into account specific design criteria for space compatibility such as compactness (size iodine spectroscopy EM: 38 × 18 × 10 cm 3 ) and robustness. Both setups achieved similar frequency stabilities of ∼ 1 · 10 −14 at an integration time of 1 s and below 5 · 10 −15 at integration times between 10 s and 1000 s. Furthermore, we present an even more compact design currently developed for a sounding rocket mission with launch in 2017. (paper)

  4. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hrabina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions’ spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches.

  5. Resonant four-wave mixing processes in xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiu, Y.M.; Bonin, K.D.; McIlrath, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    Two-photon resonantly enhanced four-wave mixing processes in xenon involving the intermediate states were utilized to generate coherent VUV radiation at several discrete wavelengths between 125.9 nm and 101.8 nm. Maximum efficiencies of the order of 10-4 were achieved. The use of these processes for producing tunable VUV output with Xe is given and generation of tunable VUV using two-photon resonances in other rare gases is discussed

  6. Quench gases for xenon- (and krypton-)filled proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, B.D.; Agrawal, P.C.

    1988-01-01

    Xenon-filled proportional counters are used extensively in astronomy, particularly in the hard X-ray region. The choice of quench gas can have a significant effect on the operating characteristics of the instrument although the data necessary to make the choice are not easily obtainable. We present results which detail the performance obtained from both cylindrical and parallel field geometries for a wide variety of readily available, ultrahigh or research grade purity, quench gases. (orig.)

  7. Application of xenon difluoride for surface modification of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsamyan, G.B.; Belokonov, K.V.; Vargasova, N.A.; Sokolov, V.B.; Chaivanov, B.B.; Zubov, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical interaction between xenon difluoride (XeF 2 ) and polymeric materials was investigated. It was shown that the reaction occurs on the surface of solid polymer layer and brings to chemical modification of the surface properties of the polymer leaving the bulk properties unchanged. The results of various analysis of the fluorinated samples (IR, FTIR-ATR, ESCA, bulk analysis etc) are presented. The mechanism of reaction is proposed. 12 refs.; 13 figs

  8. Two-dimensional readout in a liquid xenon ionisation chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Solovov, V; Ferreira-Marques, R; Lopes, M I; Pereira, A; Policarpo, Armando

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional readout with metal strips deposited on both sides of a glass plate is investigated aiming to assess the possibility of its use in a liquid xenon ionisation chamber for positron emission tomography. Here, we present results obtained with an alpha-source. It is shown that position resolution of <=1 mm, fwhm, can be achieved for free charge depositions equivalent to those due to gamma-rays with energy from 220 down to 110 keV.

  9. Iodine chemistry in a reactor regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive iodine has always been an important consideration in the regulation of nuclear power reactors to assure the health and safety of the public. Regulators adopted conservatively bounding predictions of iodine behavior in the earliest days of the development of nuclear power because there was so little known about either accidents or the chemistry of iodine. Today there is a flood of new information and understanding of the chemistry of iodine under reactor accident conditions. This paper offers some thoughts on how the community of scientists engaged in the study of iodine chemistry can present the results of their work so that it is more immediately adopted by the regulator. It is suggested that the scientific community consider the concept of consensus standards so effectively used within the engineering community to define the status of the study of radioactive iodine chemistry for reactor safety. (author) 9 refs

  10. Iodine chemistry in a reactor regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D A [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards

    1996-12-01

    Radioactive iodine has always been an important consideration in the regulation of nuclear power reactors to assure the health and safety of the public. Regulators adopted conservatively bounding predictions of iodine behavior in the earliest days of the development of nuclear power because there was so little known about either accidents or the chemistry of iodine. Today there is a flood of new information and understanding of the chemistry of iodine under reactor accident conditions. This paper offers some thoughts on how the community of scientists engaged in the study of iodine chemistry can present the results of their work so that it is more immediately adopted by the regulator. It is suggested that the scientific community consider the concept of consensus standards so effectively used within the engineering community to define the status of the study of radioactive iodine chemistry for reactor safety. (author) 9 refs.

  11. Application of radiopharmaceuticals in iodine disorder studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajurkar, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Iodine is an essential trace element and is of much interest in nutritional research. It is essential for the production of the hormones in the thyroid gland. However, deficiency or excess of iodine can cause disorders, commonly known as iodine disorders. Total quantity of iodine present in the body is 15-20 mg, mostly in thyroid gland and the safe and adequate intake of iodine is in the range of 50-200 μg.d -1 . Most of the iodine taken from food is accumulated in thyroid glands which plays a vital role in the well being as it controls growth and metabolism. In some people gland becomes over active (hyper thyroiditis) and in some people gland becomes sluggish (hypo thyroiditis). However, both the conditions are unhealthy and lead to serious consequences. The condition can be detected and treated with the help of radioiodine

  12. Criteria for safe working with iodine-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.S.

    1977-01-01

    Radio-immunoassay and other saturation assay tests involving the use of iodine-125 are finding wide application for the determination of hormone concentrations in biological fluids. In such tests, iodinations involving concentrations of a milli-curie per micro-litre are common. Iodine-125 presents a problem from the monitoring standpoint because of its low energy photon emission (27 and 35 keV). Iodine is preferentially taken up by the thyroid gland and work involving moderate amounts of radio-iodine may give rise to a significant hazard in an accident situation. The general precautions which should be taken in work with unsealed radioactive substances are briefly summarized, working limits for iodine-125 are identified, and methods of personal protection and monitoring in an emergency situation described. (author)

  13. Measurement of xenon reactivity in the reactor of the nuclear ship 'MUTSU'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Gakuhari, Kazuhiko; Okada, Noboru.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the measurement of reactivity changes caused by the increase and decrease of xenon concentration in the reactor core of the nuclear ship 'MUTSU' after a change from long-term operation at 70 % to zero power. The change in xenon reactivity was compensated by control-rod movements and the compensated reactivity was measured using a digital reactivity meter. The xenon override peak was recognized five and half hours after the start of power reduction. The equilibrium and peak reactivities of xenon were estimated by reading the initial and peak values of a theoretical curve which was fitted to the measured variation in xenon reactivity. The xenon reactivity results obtained by the present method can be considered to be accurate since no control-rod worth data were used and the measured quantity was the reactivity itself. (author)

  14. Observation of a barium xenon exciplex within a large argon cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, M; Gaveau, M-A; Mestdagh, J-M

    2010-07-21

    Spectroscopic measurements provide fluorescence and excitation spectra of a single barium atom codeposited with xenon atoms on argon clusters of average size approximately 2000. The spectra are studied as a function of the number of xenon atoms per cluster. The excitation spectrum with approximately 10 xenon atoms per cluster is qualitatively similar to that observed when no xenon atom is present on the cluster. It consists of two bands located on each side of the 6s6p (1)P-6s(2) (1)S resonance line of the free barium. In contrast, the fluorescence spectrum differs qualitatively since a barium-xenon exciplex is observed, which has no counterpart in xenon free clusters. In particular an emission is observed, which is redshifted by 729 cm(-1) with respect to the Ba(6s6p (1)P-6s(2) (1)S) resonance line.

  15. Molecular MRI based on hyper-polarized xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassali, Nawal

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has a high importance in medicine as it enables the observation of the organs inside the body without the use of radiative or invasive techniques. However it is known to suffer from poor sensitivity. To circumvent this limitation, a key solution resides in the use of hyper-polarized species. Among the entities with which we can drastically increase nuclear polarization, xenon has very specific properties through its interactions with its close environment that lead to a wide chemical shift bandwidth. The goal is thus to use it as a tracer. This PhD thesis focuses on the concept of 129 Xe MRI-based sensors for the detection of biological events. In this approach, hyper-polarized xenon is vectorized to biological targets via functionalized host systems, and then localized thanks to fast dedicated MRI sequences. The conception and set-up of a spin-exchange optical pumping device is first described. Then studies about the interaction of the hyper-polarized noble gas with new cryptophanes susceptible to constitute powerful host molecules are detailed. Also the implementation of recent MRI sequences optimized for the transient character of the hyper-polarization and taking profit of the xenon in-out exchange is described. Applications of this approach for the detection of metallic ions and cellular receptors are studied. Finally, our first in vivo results on a small animal model are presented. (author) [fr

  16. Build up of Radioactive Krypton and Xenon Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. K.; Choi, C. S.; Chung, K. H.; Lee, W.; Cho, Y. H.; Lee, C. W.

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to build up an analysis system to measure the activity of the atmospheric radioactive krypton and xenon in Korea. The work scopes of the project include the purchase and the installation of the analysis system to measure the activity of the radioactive krypton and xenon in air, and the establishment of the operation capability of the system through the training of the operator. The system consists of two air sampling systems, and one radioactivity analysis system, which incorporates the enrichment system, the gas chromatography to purify a mixture gas, and the gas proportional counter to count the activity of pure krypton and xenon gas. As planned originally, the establishment of the analysis system has been completed. At present, one air sampler is successfully being operated at a specific site of the South Korea to measure the background radioactivities of Kr-85 and Xe-133 in air. The other air sampler is being reserved at the KAERI in the Daejeon for a emergency like the second nuclear test of the North Korea. During the normal time, the reserved air sampler will be used to collect the air sample for the performance test of the analysis system and the cross analysis for the calibration of the system. The radioactivity analysis system has been installed at the KAERI, and is being used to measure the activity of Kr-85 and Xe-133 in the air sample from a domestic site

  17. Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, M J; Biegalski, S R; Haas, D A; Jiang, H; Daigle, H; Lowrey, J D

    2018-07-01

    The detection of radioactive noble gases is a primary technology for verifying compliance with the pending Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A fundamental challenge in applying this technology for detecting underground nuclear explosions is estimating the timing and magnitude of the radionuclide signatures. While the primary mechanism for transport is advective transport, either through barometric pumping or thermally driven advection, diffusive transport in the surrounding matrix also plays a secondary role. From the study of primordial noble gas signatures, it is known that xenon has a strong physical adsorption affinity in shale formations. Given the unselective nature of physical adsorption, isotherm measurements reported here show that non-trivial amounts of xenon adsorb on a variety of media, in addition to shale. A dual-porosity model is then discussed demonstrating that sorption amplifies the diffusive uptake of an adsorbing matrix from a fracture. This effect may reduce the radioxenon signature down to approximately one-tenth, similar to primordial xenon isotopic signatures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Process for recovering xenon from radioactive gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Tsuneo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To recover pure xenon economically and efficiently by amply removing radioactive krypton mixed in xenon without changing the rectifying capacity of an xenon rectifying system itself. Method: Xe containing radioactive Kr(Kr-85) is rectified to reduce the concentration of radioactive Kr. Thereafter, non-radioactive Kr or Ar is added to Xe and further the rectification is carried out. The raw material Xe from the Xe adsorption system of, for example, a radioactive gaseous waste disposal system is cooled to about 100 0 C by a heat-exchanger and thereafter supplied to a rectifying tower to carry out normal rectification of Xe thereby to reduce the concentration of Kr contained in Xe at the tower bottom to the rectification limit concentration. Then, non-radioactive Kr is supplied via a precooler to the tower bottom to continue the rectification, thus the Xe fractions at the tower bottom, in which the concentration of radioactive Kr is reduced, being compressed and recovered. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Local radiolytic effectiveness of Auger electrons of iodine-125 in benzene-iodine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenak, P.; Uenak, T.

    1987-01-01

    High radiotoxicity of iodine-125 has been mainly attributed to the local radiolytic effects of Auger electrons on biological systems. In the present study, experimental and theoretical results are compared. The agreement between the experimental and theoretical results explains that the energy absorption of iodine aggregates has an important role in the radiolytic effectiveness of Auger electrons and iodine-125 in benzene-iodine solutions. (author) 18 refs.; 3 figs

  20. Measurement of thyroid volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content by CT and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaji, Shunsuke; Imanishi, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Kyouko; Shinagawa, Toshihito

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Imanishi et al have developed new CT software for quantitative in vivo measurement of thyroid iodine. Using a CT system with the software, we measured volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content of thyroids in 63 controls and 435 patients with various diffuse thyroid diseases and thyroid nodules. In controls, all of them showed no difference between the sexes. Although the iodine concentration of the thyroid showed no difference among children, adults and seniles, the volume and total iodine content of the thyroid appeared smaller in children and seniles than in adults. In addition, although the volume and iodine concentration of the thyroid had two peaks in distribution, the total iodine content had almost normal distribution. Normal range of volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content in adults were 5.2-15.5 cm 3 , 0.28831-0.85919 mg/cm 3 and 2.35-11.69 mg, respectively. In thyroid nodule, there is no significant difference in volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content between benign and malignant nodules. All nodules with iodine concentration of less than 0.00007 mg/cm 3 were benign. No thyroid was higher in iodine concentration than the normal range although the thyroid was lower in 78.7% of patients with diffuse thyroid diseases. In all thyroids with increasing iodine concentration and total iodine content in medication course, thyroidal symptoms and signs were uncontrollable by the medication. In 43.8% of patients with long-period systemic diseases, the thyroid showed abnormality in any of the three. We concluded that quantitative in vivo measurement of thyroid iodine by CT could assist the diagnosis of thyroid diseases and decision of therapeutic methods. (author)

  1. Equine goiter associated with excess dietary iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroksuz, H; Eroksuz, Y; Ozer, H; Ceribasi, A O; Yaman, I; Ilhan, N

    2004-06-01

    Naturally occurring goiter cases are described in 2 newborn Arabian foals whose mares were supplemented with excess iodine during the final 24 w of the pregnancy. Six nursing foals and 2 mares were also affected clinically with thyroid hypertrophy. At least 12 times the maximum tolerable level of iodine supplementation was given, as the daily iodine intake for each mare was 299 mg. The prevalence of goiter cases was 2 and 9% in the mares and foals, respectively.

  2. Salivary gland dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesenfeld, D.; Webster, G.; Cameron, F.; Ferguson, M.M.; MacFadyen, E.E.; MacFarlane, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is used extensively for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid carcinoma. Iodine is actively taken up by the salivary glands and, following its use, salivary dysfunction may result as a consequence of radiation damage. The literature is reviewed and a case is reported in which a patient presented with a significant increase in caries rate attributed to salivary dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy for a thyroid carcinoma

  3. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  4. Stable Tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris [Fermilab

    2018-04-13

    For very heavy quarks, relations derived from heavy-quark symmetry imply novel narrow doubly heavy tetraquark states containing two heavy quarks and two light antiquarks. We predict that double-beauty states will be stable against strong decays, whereas the double-charm states and mixed beauty+charm states will dissociate into pairs of heavy-light mesons. Observing a new double-beauty state through its weak decays would establish the existence of tetraquarks and illuminate the role of heavy color-antitriplet diquarks as hadron constituents.

  5. NMR investigations of surfaces and interfaces using spin-polarized xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaede, H.C.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    129 Xe NMR is potentially useful for the investigation of material surfaces, but has been limited to high surface area samples in which sufficient xenon can be loaded to achieve acceptable signal to noise ratios. In Chapter 2 conventional 129 Xe NMR is used to study a high surface area polymer, a catalyst, and a confined liquid crystal to determine the topology of these systems. Further information about the spatial proximity of different sites of the catalyst and liquid crystal systems is determined through two dimensional exchange NMR in Chapter 3. Lower surface area systems may be investigated with spin-polarized xenon, which may be achieved through optical pumping and spin exchange. Optically polarized xenon can be up to 10 5 times more sensitive than thermally polarized xenon. In Chapter 4 highly polarized xenon is used to examine the surface of poly(acrylonitrile) and the formation of xenon clathrate hydrates. An attractive use of polarized xenon is as a magnetization source in cross polarization experiments. Cross polarization from adsorbed polarized xenon may allow detection of surface nuclei with drastic enhancements. A non-selective low field thermal mixing technique is used to enhance the 13 C signal of CO 2 of xenon occluded in solid CO 2 by a factor of 200. High-field cross polarization from xenon to proton on the surface of high surface area polymers has enabled signal enhancements of ∼1,000. These studies, together with investigations of the efficiency of the cross polarization process from polarized xenon, are discussed in Chapter 5. Another use of polarized xenon is as an imaging contrast agent in systems that are not compatible with traditional contrast agents. The resolution attainable with this method is determined through images of structured phantoms in Chapter 6

  6. Estimation of iodine intake from various urinary iodine measurements in population studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejbjerg, P.; Knudsen, N.; Perrild, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Iodine intake is often measured by a surrogate measure, namely urine iodine excretion as almost all ingested iodine is excreted in the urine. However, the methods for urine collection and the reporting of the results vary. These methods, and their advantages and disadvantages, are con...

  7. 127I Moessbauer study of some oxygen bonded iodine(I) and iodine(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, M.; Birchall, T.; Frampton, C.; Kapoor, P.

    1988-01-01

    127 I Moessbauer spectra have been recorded at 4.2 0 K for a series of oxygen bonded iodine(I) and iodine(III) complexes. The sign of the quadrupole coupling constant is dependant only on the primary arrangement of ligands about the central iodine nucleus whereas the magnitude and the asymmetry parameter are more sensitive to ligand electronegativity and type. (orig.)

  8. Iodine deficiency in pregnancy and the effects of maternal iodine supplementation on the offspring: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recently increased their recommended iodine intake during pregnancy from 200 to 250 µg/d and suggested that a median urinary iodine (UI) concentration of 150-249 µg/L indicates adequate iodine intake in pregnant women. Thyrotropin concentrations in blood collected

  9. Iodine requirements and the risks and benefits of correcting iodine deficiency in populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development due to inadequate thyroid hormone production that are termed the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). IDD remains the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. IDD assessment methods include urinary iodine

  10. Absorption spectrum of Iodine around 5915 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The iodine absorption spectrum around 5915 A is of interest for many authors especially the hyperfine structure of the iodine line. Lodine absorption spectrum was obtained due to the interaction of iodine vapour with dye laser [(R6G) (0.5A) scanning range around 5915 A] which is pumped by(Ar + )laser absorption spectrum. The decrease in the peak of the transmission line around 5915 A shows the signal futher decreased by heating the iodine cell. This analysis has been done using a monochromator

  11. Hygienic assessment of radioactive iodine isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, I.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    Sources of radioactive iodine isotopes and their biological significance depending on the way of intake are discussed. The degree of food contamination by radioactive iodine as well as products, which serve as the source of its intake into the human body, and results of their processing are considered. The danger of radioactive iodine intake by different groups of population as well as thyroid irradiation effects are discussed. Description of activities, directed to the human body protection against radioactive iodine and assessment of these protection measures efficiency is presented

  12. Photochemistry of DNA containing iodinated cytosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, R O; Stafford, R S [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1979-10-01

    Irradiation at 313 nm of compounds containing iodinated cytosine moieties results in the photolysis of iodine. Photolysis occurs with a quantum yield of 0.022-0.024 for 5-iododeoxycytidine and 5-iododeoxycytidine monophosphate, and 0.004-0.008 for iodinated DNA as well as for iodinated polycytidylate. Photodegradation of the cytosine moiety occurs when air is present during irradiation, presumably due to the reaction of oxygen with the cytosyl radical formed when iodine is lost. This oxygen promoted photodegradation destroys the cytosine chromophore and is complete in the monomers but occurs to only a limited extent in the polymers. In the absence of oxygen or in the presence of ethanol, photodegradation is prevented and the loss of iodine leads exclusively to the formation of the cytosine chromophore. In DNA, the loss of iodine is accompanied by the formation of sugar damage and/or chain breaks. As measured by sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients, approximately one break is made for every six iodines lost in denatured DNA. The frequency of chain breakage per iodine photolyzed is reduced 2-fold in renatured DNA. Analysis in neutral gradients suggests that half of the breaks observed in alkali are alkali-labile bonds. Both ethanol and cysteamine reduce the number of chain breaks in alkali by approximately 3-fold.

  13. Iodine: It's Important in Patients that Require Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development because of inadequate thyroid hormone production. Four methods are generally recommended for assessment of iodine nutrition: urinary iodine concentration, thyroid size, and blood concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone

  14. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  15. Lambda-guided calculation method (LGC method) for xenon/CT CBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sase, Shigeru [Anzai Medical Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Honda, Mitsuru; Kushida, Tsuyoshi; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Machida, Keiichi; Shibata, Iekado [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-12-01

    A quantitative CBF calculation method for xenon/CT was developed by logically estimating time-course change rate (rate constant) of arterial xenon concentration from that of end-tidal xenon concentration. A single factor ({gamma}) was introduced to correlate the end-tidal rate constant (Ke) with the arterial rate constant (Ka) in a simplified equation. This factor ({gamma}) is thought to reflect the diffusing capacity of the lung for xenon. When an appropriate value is given to {gamma}, it is possible to calculate the arterial rate constant (Calculated Ka) from Ke. To determine {gamma} for each xenon/CT CBF examination, a procedure was established which utilizes the characteristics of white matter lambda; lambda refers to xenon brain-blood partition coefficient. Xenon/CT studies were performed on four healthy volunteers. Hemispheric CBF values (47.0{+-}9.0 ml/100 g/min) with use of Calculated Ka were close to the reported normative values. For a 27-year-old healthy man, the rate constant for the common carotid artery was successfully measured and nearly equal to Calculated Ka. The authors conclude the method proposed in this work, lambda-guided calculation method, could make xenon/CT CBF substantially reliable and quantitative by effective use of end-tidal xenon. (author)

  16. Lambda-guided calculation method (LGC method) for xenon/CT CBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sase, Shigeru; Honda, Mitsuru; Kushida, Tsuyoshi; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Machida, Keiichi; Shibata, Iekado

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative CBF calculation method for xenon/CT was developed by logically estimating time-course change rate (rate constant) of arterial xenon concentration from that of end-tidal xenon concentration. A single factor (γ) was introduced to correlate the end-tidal rate constant (Ke) with the arterial rate constant (Ka) in a simplified equation. This factor (γ) is thought to reflect the diffusing capacity of the lung for xenon. When an appropriate value is given to γ, it is possible to calculate the arterial rate constant (Calculated Ka) from Ke. To determine γ for each xenon/CT CBF examination, a procedure was established which utilizes the characteristics of white matter lambda; lambda refers to xenon brain-blood partition coefficient. Xenon/CT studies were performed on four healthy volunteers. Hemispheric CBF values (47.0±9.0 ml/100 g/min) with use of Calculated Ka were close to the reported normative values. For a 27-year-old healthy man, the rate constant for the common carotid artery was successfully measured and nearly equal to Calculated Ka. The authors conclude the method proposed in this work, lambda-guided calculation method, could make xenon/CT CBF substantially reliable and quantitative by effective use of end-tidal xenon. (author)

  17. Radioisotope techniques in studies on the metabolism of calcium, iodine and iron in ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengemann, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    A short review is presented of radioisotopic procedures useful in research on calcium, iodine and iron studies with tropical ruminants. The procedures discussed can be useful in determining the availability of the mineral from feedstuffs, the faecal endogenous losses by the animal, detection of deficiency states, and responses to physiological and environmental stress. Methods that entail the use of radioisotopes in the laboratory or the use of stable isotopes in the animal are mentioned as alternatives to the administration of radioisotopes to the animal. While the review focuses on calcium, iodine and iron, the principles of the methods presented can be employed in the study of many other trace minerals. (author)

  18. FDA regulations regarding iodine addition to foods and labeling of foods containing added iodine12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbo, Paula R

    2016-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the addition of iodine to infant formulas, the iodization of salt, and the addition of salt and iodine to foods. The required amount of iodine in infant formulas is based on caloric content, and the label must provide the iodine content per 100 kcal. Cuprous iodide and potassium iodide may be added to table salt as a source of dietary iodine at a maximum amount of 0.01%; if added, the label must indicate that the salt is iodized. Table salt to which iodine has not been added must bear the statement, “This salt does not supply iodide, a necessary nutrient.” If a nutrient is to be appropriately added to a food for the purpose of correcting a dietary insufficiency, there should be sufficient scientific information available to demonstrate a nutritional deficiency and/or identify a public health problem. Furthermore, the population groups that would benefit from the proposed fortification should be identified. If iodine is added to a food, the percent Daily Value of iodine must be listed. There are no FDA regulations governing ingredient standards for dietary supplements. As a result, some dietary supplements include iodine and others do not. If a supplement contains iodine, the Supplement Facts label must list iodine as a nutrient ingredient. If iodine is not listed on the Supplement Facts label, then it has not been added. There are similarities between the FDA, which establishes US food regulations and policies, and the Codex Alimentarius (Codex), which develops international food standards and guidelines under the aegis of the FAO and the WHO. Both the FDA and Codex call for the labeling of table salt to indicate fortification with iodine, voluntary labeling of iodine on foods, and a Daily Value (called a Nutrient Reference Value by Codex) of 150 μg for iodine. PMID:27534626

  19. Serum thyroglobulin and urinary iodine concentration are the most appropriate indicators of iodine status and thyroid function under conditions of increasing iodine supply in schoolchildren in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Briel, T.; West, C. E.; Hautvast, J. G.; Vulsma, T.; de Vijlder, J. J.; Ategbo, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Iodine deficiency control programs have greatly reduced iodine deficiency disorders worldwide. For monitoring changes in iodine status, different indicators may be used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of indicators of iodine status and thyroid function, thyroglobulin (Tg),

  20. Consuming iodine enriched eggs to solve the iodine deficiency endemic for remote areas in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeyapant Punthip

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence showed that the occurrence of iodine deficiency endemic areas has been found in every provinces of Thailand. Thus, a new pilot programme for elimination of iodine deficiency endemic areas at the community level was designed in 2008 by integrating the concept of Sufficient Economic life style with the iodine biofortification of nutrients for community consumption. Methods A model of community hen egg farm was selected at an iodine deficiency endemic area in North Eastern part of Thailand. The process for the preparation of high content iodine enriched hen food was demonstrated to the farm owner with technical transfer in order to ensure the sustainability in the long term for the community. The iodine content of the produced iodine enriched hen eggs were determined and the iodine status of volunteers who consumed the iodine enriched hen eggs were monitored by using urine iodine excretion before and after the implement of iodine enrichment in the model farm. Results The content of iodine in eggs from the model farm were 93.57 μg per egg for the weight of 55 - 60 g egg and 97.76 μg for the weight of 60 - 65 g egg. The biological active iodo-organic compounds in eggs were tested by determination of the base-line urine iodine of the volunteer villagers before and after consuming a hard boiled iodine enriched egg per volunteer at breakfast for five days continuous period in 59 volunteers of Ban Kew village, and 65 volunteers of Ban Nong Nok Kean village. The median base-line urine iodine level of the volunteers in these two villages before consuming eggs were 7.00 and 7.04 μg/dL respectively. After consuming iodine enriched eggs, the median urine iodine were raised to the optimal level at 20.76 μg/dL for Ban Kew and 13.95 μg/dL for Ban Nong Nok Kean. Conclusions The strategic programme for iodine enrichment in the food chain with biological iodo-organic compound from animal origins can be an alternative method to

  1. Experimental study on iodine chemistry (EXSI) - Containment experiments with elemental iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Holm, J.; Ekberg, C.; Glaenneskog, H.

    2009-10-01

    The behaviour of iodine during a severe accident has been studied in several experimental programs, ranging from the large-scale PHEBUS FP tests and intermediate-scale ThAI tests to numerous separate effect studies. Oxidation of iodine in gas phase has been one of the greatest remaining uncertainties in iodine behaviour during a severe accident. In this study the possible formation of iodine oxide aerosol due to radiolytic oxidation of gaseous iodine is experimentally tested and the reaction products are analysed. The experimental facility applied in this study is based on the sampling system built at VTT for ISTP program project CHIP conducted IRSN. The experimental facility and the measuring technology are sophisticated and unique in the area of nuclear research as well as in the field of aerosol science. The results from the experiments show an extensive particle formation when ozone and gaseous iodine react with each other. The formed particles were collected on filters, while gaseous iodine was trapped into bubbles. The particles were iodine oxides and the size of particles was approximately 100 nm. The transport of gaseous iodine through the facility decreased when both gaseous iodine and ozone were fed together into facility. Experimental study on radiolytic oxidation of iodine was conducted in co-operation between VTT and Chalmers University of Technology as a part of the NKS-R programs. (author)

  2. Experimental study on iodine chemistry (EXSI) - Containment experiments with elemental iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)); Holm, J.; Ekberg, C. (Chalmers Univ. of Technology (Sweden)); Glaenneskog, H. (Vattenfall Power Consultant (Sweden))

    2009-10-15

    The behaviour of iodine during a severe accident has been studied in several experimental programs, ranging from the large-scale PHEBUS FP tests and intermediate-scale ThAI tests to numerous separate effect studies. Oxidation of iodine in gas phase has been one of the greatest remaining uncertainties in iodine behaviour during a severe accident. In this study the possible formation of iodine oxide aerosol due to radiolytic oxidation of gaseous iodine is experimentally tested and the reaction products are analysed. The experimental facility applied in this study is based on the sampling system built at VTT for ISTP program project CHIP conducted IRSN. The experimental facility and the measuring technology are sophisticated and unique in the area of nuclear research as well as in the field of aerosol science. The results from the experiments show an extensive particle formation when ozone and gaseous iodine react with each other. The formed particles were collected on filters, while gaseous iodine was trapped into bubbles. The particles were iodine oxides and the size of particles was approximately 100 nm. The transport of gaseous iodine through the facility decreased when both gaseous iodine and ozone were fed together into facility. Experimental study on radiolytic oxidation of iodine was conducted in co-operation between VTT and Chalmers University of Technology as a part of the NKS-R programs. (author)

  3. Altering iodine metabolism in the calf by feeding iodine-binding agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.K.; Swanson, E.W.; Lyke, W.A.; Byrne, W.F.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of feeding cottonseed meal and anion-exchange resin on iodine absorption and excretion by calves were investigated. Each additional amount of resin fed from 0.3 to 3.5 g/kg body weight further increased fecal excretion from single oral iodine-131 and intravenous iodine-125 doses. By feeding 3 to 10 g cottonseed meal/kg body weight, excretion of oral iodine-131 given daily was increased 7 to 94 percent in feces and reduced as much as 35 percent in urine, but plasma iodine-131 was not changed. Introducing 1 g resin/kg body weight daily into the diet increased fecal iodine-131 excretion three to five times that with cottonseed meal alone and reduced both plasma and urinary iodine-131. The same amount of resin fed daily had similar effects on excretion of iodine-131 injected subcutaneously each day. Although iodine depletion by a highly efficient iodine binder (resin) in the gastrointestinal tract is probable, iodine binding by a natural feed constituent (cottonseed meal) was relatively inefficient. (U.S.)

  4. Altering iodine metabolism in the calf by feeding iodine-binding agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.K.; Swanson, E.W.; Lyke, W.A.; Byrne, W.F.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of feeding cottonseed meal and anion-exchange resin on iodine absorption and excretion by calves were investigated. Each additional amount of resin fed from 0.3 to 3.5 g/kg body weight further increased fecal excretion from single oral iodine-131 and intravenous iodine-125 doses. By feeding 3 to 10 g cottonseed meal/kg body weight, excretion of oral iodine-131 given daily was increased 7 to 94 percent in feces and reduced as much as 35 percent in urine, but plasma iodine-131 was not changed. Introducing 1 g resin/kg body weight daily into the diet increased fecal iodine-131 excretion three to five times that with cottonseed meal alone and reduced both plasma and urinary iodine-131. The same amount of resin fed daily had similar effects on excretion of iodine-131 injected subcutaneously each day. Although iodine depletion by a highly efficient iodine binder (resin) in the gastrointestinal tract is probable, iodine binding by a natural feed constituent (cottonseed meal) was relatively inefficient. (auth)

  5. Iodine content in bread and salt in Denmark after iodization and the influence on iodine intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Ovesen, Lars; Christensen, Tue

    2007-01-01

    Objective To measure the iodine content in bread and household salt in Denmark after mandatory iodine fortification was introduced and to estimate the increase in iodine intake due to the fortification. Design The iodine content in rye breads, wheat breads and salt samples was assessed. The incre......, and the current fortification level of salt ( 13 ppm) seems reasonable.......% of the rye breads and 90% of the wheat breads were iodized. The median iodine intake from bread increased by 25 ( 13-43) mu g/day and the total median iodine intake increased by 63 (36-104) mu g/day. Conclusions The fortification of bread and salt has resulted in a desirable increase in iodine intake...

  6. Mitigation of {sup 222}Rn induced background in the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, Stefan A.

    2017-07-05

    {sup 222}Rn is a major source of background in many rare-event experiments such as the XENON1T dark matter search. The noble gas radon is created by radioactive decay inside all detector materials and emanates into the sensitive liquid xenon target disabling any detector shielding. Subsequent beta-decays of radon progenies are the dominant source of background in the XENON1T experiment. In order to mitigate radon induced background the detector's construction materials have been selected according to dedicated {sup 222}Rn emanation measurements. In the first part of this thesis, we summarize the results of the XENON1T radon screening campaign and present the measurement of the integral radon emanation rate of the fully assembled detector. The development of a radon removal system which continuously purifies the liquid xenon target from the emanated radon is the topic of the second part of this thesis. In order to demonstrate the suitability of cryogenic distillation as a technique to separate radon from xenon, we developed an experimental setup to measure the depletion of radon in xenon boil-off gas after a single distillation step. In the last part of the thesis, we demonstrate the operation of a radon removal system for the XENON100 experiment. For this first test employing a running dark matter detector, we integrated a multiple stage, cryogenic distillation column in the XENON100 gas purification loop. From the evolution of the radon concentration in XENON100, we investigate the distillation column's radon removal capability and discuss the design and application of a radon removal system for XENON1T and the upcoming XENONnT experiment.

  7. Method for immobilizing radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babad, H.; Strachan, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive iodine, present as alkali metal iodides or iodates in an aqueous solution, is incorporated into an inert solid material for long-term storage by adding to the solution a stoichiometric amount with respect to the formation of a sodalite (3M2O.3Al2O3. 6SiO2.2MX, where M alkali metal; X I - or IO 3- ) of an alkali metal, alumina and silica, stirring the solution to form a homogeneous mixture, drying the mixture to form a powder, compacting and sintering the compacted powder at 1073 to 1373 K (800 0 to 1100 0 C.) for a time sufficient to form sodalite

  8. Iodine laser for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, B.

    1988-01-01

    The most powerful iodine laser in the world, known as Asterix IV, is being prepared for operation at The Max Plank-Institut fuer Quantenoptik at Garching, near Munich, in West Germany. It is expected to produce 2kJ pulses of 1ns duration. Shorter pulses of about 200 ps duration should be obtainable at power levels of over 5 TW. Pulses of maximum power will be available every 20 minutes; this frequency is expected to be adequate for fusion experiments, although the short rate could be raised if necessary by greater gas circulation and cooling. (Author)

  9. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, M.; Philippe, Ch.; Pham, Minh Tuan; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, O.; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku 17010102. ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18430S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : iodine cells * absorption spectroscopy * laser spectroscopy * laser standards * frequency stability Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.677, year: 2016

  10. Iodine stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, A.H.P. de; Pelloux, R.M.N.

    1983-01-01

    The subcritical growth of iodine-induced cracks in unirradiated Zircaloy plates is investigated as a function of the stress intensity factor K. The testing variables are: crystallographic texture (f-Number), microstructure (grain directionaly), heat treatment (stress relieved vs recrystallized plate), and temperature. The iodine partial pressure is 40Pa. (author) [pt

  11. 21 CFR 558.295 - Iodinated casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iodinated casein. 558.295 Section 558.295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... in Animal Feeds § 558.295 Iodinated casein. (a) Approvals. See 017762 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter...

  12. Sorption of iodine onto Japanese soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Satoshi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki (Japan). Nakaminato Lab. Branch

    1996-04-01

    Soils were collected from various regions of Japan. Iodine concentrations in the soils were quantitatively determined. The adsorption ratio and the distribution coefficients of iodine onto the soils were derived and effects of co-existing ions were studied. (J.P.N.)

  13. Iodine deficiency disorders in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyu, A; Tambi, Z; Ahmad, Y

    1998-12-01

    The state of Sarawak in Malaysia has a high prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). This has been revealed through a review of goitre surveys that were carried out in the State from the early 1970s to the 1990s. The primary cause was low iodine intake. Contributory factors were low iodine content in the soil and water as well as high cassava consumption. Virtual elimination of IDD is one of the nutritional goals of the IDD prevention and control programs. The strategies adopted include the iodination of coarse salt, which is sold in the market by shopkeepers and also provided free from government health clinics; legislation requiring that salt sold in IDD-gazetted areas must be iodised; and the use of iodinators to iodise water supplied by the gravity-feed system to villages and boarding schools in rural areas. The indicators used in the monitoring and evaluation of the program include the availability of iodised salt in the market and households, iodine levels in water supply that had been fitted with iodinators, goitre volume measured by ultrasound, and urinary iodine excretion among school children.

  14. Sorption of iodine onto Japanese soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Satoshi

    1996-01-01

    Soils were collected from various regions of Japan. Iodine concentrations in the soils were quantitatively determined. The adsorption ratio and the distribution coefficients of iodine onto the soils were derived and effects of co-existing ions were studied. (J.P.N.)

  15. Iodine budget in surface waters from Atacama: Natural and anthropogenic iodine sources revealed by halogen geochemistry and iodine-129 isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, Fernanda; Reich, Martin; Snyder, Glen; Pérez-Fodich, Alida; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Daniele, Linda; Fehn, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Iodine enrichment in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile is widespread and varies significantly between reservoirs, including nitrate-rich “caliche” soils, supergene Cu deposits and marine sedimentary rocks. Recent studies have suggested that groundwater has played a key role in the remobilization, transport and deposition of iodine in Atacama over scales of millions-of-years. However, and considering that natural waters are also anomalously enriched in iodine in the region, the relative source contributions of iodine in the waters and its extent of mixing remain unconstrained. In this study we provide new halogen data and isotopic ratios of iodine ("1"2"9I/I) in shallow seawater, rivers, salt lakes, cold and thermal spring water, rainwater and groundwater that help to constrain the relative influence of meteoric, marine and crustal sources in the Atacama waters. Iodine concentrations in surface and ground waters range between 0.35 μM and 26 μM in the Tarapacá region and between 0.25 μM and 48 μM in the Antofagasta region, and show strong enrichment when compared with seawater concentrations (I = ∼0.4 μM). In contrast, no bromine enrichment is detected (1.3–45.7 μM for Tarapacá and 1.7–87.4 μM for Antofagasta) relative to seawater (Br = ∼600 μM). These data, coupled to the high I/Cl and low Br/Cl ratios are indicative of an organic-rich sedimentary source (related with an “initial” fluid) that interacted with meteoric water to produce a mixed fluid, and preclude an exclusively seawater origin for iodine in Atacama natural waters. Iodine isotopic ratios ("1"2"9I/I) are consistent with halogen chemistry and confirm that most of the iodine present in natural waters derives from a deep initial fluid source (i.e., groundwater which has interacted with Jurassic marine basement), with variable influence of at least one atmospheric or meteoric source. Samples with the lowest isotopic ratios ("1"2"9I/I from ∼215 to ∼1000 × 10"

  16. The high-power iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brederlow, G.; Fill, E.; Witte, K. J.

    The book provides a description of the present state of the art concerning the iodine laser, giving particular attention to the design and operation of pulsed high-power iodine lasers. The basic features of the laser are examined, taking into account aspects of spontaneous emission lifetime, hyperfine structure, line broadening and line shifts, stimulated emission cross sections, the influence of magnetic fields, sublevel relaxation, the photodissociation of alkyl iodides, flashlamp technology, excitation in a direct discharge, chemical excitation, and questions regarding the chemical kinetics of the photodissociation iodine laser. The principles of high-power operation are considered along with aspects of beam quality and losses, the design and layout of an iodine laser system, the scalability and prospects of the iodine laser, and the design of the single-beam Asterix III laser.

  17. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    While radioactive iodine is clearly the therapy of choice for Graves' disease (even in younger patients) the use of radioactive iodine for therapy of the toxic multinodular or uninodular goiter presents an entirely different problem. Although these two entities can be treated with radioactive iodine provided there is some suppression of the tissue that is not autonomous, transient release of thyroid hormone may induce symptoms of thyroid storm in the very large multinodular toxic goiter treated with radioiodine therapy. These toxic nodules generally require much larger doses of radioiodine than is commonly used for classical Graves' disease and may either require fractional administration of radioisotopes or concomitant use of antithyroid drugs and iodides. In general, surgery remains the treatment of choice for large toxic multinodular goiters, after proper preparation by medical means including radioactive iodine. Radioactive iodine therapy for hyperthyroidism is contraindicated in pregnancy and generally is not used in children below five years of age. (U.S.)

  18. Iodine in eggs in an iodopenic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, Bogdan; Gonev, Mihail; Tadzher, Isak S.

    1996-01-01

    Macedonia is a region with a recognized precarious iodine balance, due to iodine deficiency in almost all water sources. Five percent iodine intake through eggs in the daily diet of adults is significant in this balance. The content of 40-220 micro g I - /kg eggs is lower than the British one (average 340-370 micro g I - /kg). The amount per egg is 3-6 micro g I' far less than 711 micro g I - in special iodine-enriched eggs designed for treatment of thyroid and metabolic disorders by feeding chickens with kelp additives. The iodine content of our manufacturers, provides substantial part of former Yugoslavia with eggs, is entirely dependent on imported fishmeal in chicken feed. (Author)

  19. Production of high purity iodine-123 from xenon-124 at energies between 15 and 34 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firouzbakht, M.L.; Teng Renrui; Schlyer, D.J.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The production of I-123 from the proton bombardment of isotopically enriched Xe-124 is reported over the energy range of 15 to 34 MeV via the 124 Xe (p,pn) 123 Xe (β + , 2.1 hr) → 123 I and 124 Xe (p,2n) 123 Cs (β + , 6 min) → 123 Xe (β + , 2.1 hr) → 123 I pathways. The thick target yields for this target are tabulated and compared to theoretical cross-section calculations of the nuclear reactions leading to the production of Xe-123. The radiochemical purity of the I-123 is greater than 99.9% and the contamination of I-125 is below detectable limits (< 0.1%) at 6.6 hrs after the end of bombardment. (orig.)

  20. Risk of suboptimal iodine intake in pregnant Norwegian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Abel, Marianne Hope; Haugen, Margaretha; Meltzer, Helle Margrete

    2013-02-06

    Pregnant women and infants are exceptionally vulnerable to iodine deficiency. The aims of the present study were to estimate iodine intake, to investigate sources of iodine, to identify predictors of low or suboptimal iodine intake (defined as intakes below 100 μg/day and 150 μg/day) in a large population of pregnant Norwegian women and to evaluate iodine status in a sub-population. Iodine intake was calculated based on a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. The median iodine intake was 141 μg/day from food and 166 μg/day from food and supplements. Use of iodine-containing supplements was reported by 31.6%. The main source of iodine from food was dairy products, contributing 67% and 43% in non-supplement and iodine-supplement users, respectively. Of 61,904 women, 16.1% had iodine intake below 100 μg/day, 42.0% had iodine intake below 150 μg/day and only 21.7% reached the WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD recommendation of 250 μg/day. Dietary behaviors associated with increased risk of low and suboptimal iodine intake were: no use of iodine-containing supplements and low intake of milk/yogurt, seafood and eggs. The median urinary iodine concentration measured in 119 participants (69 μg/L) confirmed insufficient iodine intake. Public health strategies are needed to improve and secure the iodine status of pregnant women in Norway.

  1. Overview of the ACEX project iodine work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merilo, M

    1996-12-01

    The ACEX project is an internationally sponsored research program that focuses on several aspects of severe accidents. The areas addressed are iodine behavior in containments, pool scrubbing, molten corium concrete interactions, and ex-vessel core debris coolability. These areas all represent extensions to the previous and current ACE and MACE programs respectively. The ACE-Phase B (iodine) project, and other recent research efforts, have clarified the roles of the important phenomena that influence iodine volatility in reactor containments during severe accidents. The ACE Iodine Chemistry Subcommittee concluded that even though enough data has been generated to support reasonably good quantification of the important phenomena, a few important areas remain where quantification is still uncertain. This is due to a lack of agreement on how to utilize the existing database, as well as the possible absence of critical test and/or property data. Technical resolution of the overall iodine behavior issue is therefore not feasible until these uncertainties are fully assessed and practical solutions have been identified, implemented, and verified. The overall objectives of the ACEX iodine research program are to ensure that the iodine database can be used to predict the airborne concentration of iodine, the conditions for iodine reservoir stability, and to provide a mechanistic understanding for these phenomena. The first phase of this work involves a comprehensive review and interpretation of the existing database in order to formulate practical strategies for dealing with significant uncertainties and/or deficiencies. Several projects are underway involving the effects of organic reactions and structural surface interactions. In addition effort is being expended on standardizing the aqueous iodine kinetics database, specifying useful mass transfer models, and defining methodology for pH prediction. (Abstract Truncated)

  2. Content iodine in sauces of type emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bakirov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The scarcity of natural resources arouse a necessity to find additional sources of protein, fat, carbohydrates, and their complexes with scarce mineral compounds. Therefore, a relevant issue is to enrich the diets deficient iodine compounds through research and development of new food products. Materials and methods. Investigation of iodine content in emulsion-type sauces at all stages was performed using Xray -fluorescence analyzer «Elvax». X-ray -fluorescence method consists of the appearance characteristic X-radiation of atoms of a chemical element at infringement they the primary X-ray irradiation. Results and discussion. Investigated for the determination of organic and inorganic forms of iodine in content of food items, and installed the total loss of iodine in sauces after cooking and storage at +5 ... +10 ° C for 30 days. Using iodine-proteinaceous additive from 0.5 ... 2.5% by mass of iodine 0.01% can be achieved from 15 to 50% of the human daily requirement by iodine. The resulting product does not lose its organoleptic, physico - chemical, consumer characteristics and meets the requirements of normative documents. As a result of our research, it was found that the addition of the supplements enriched protein-mineral (SEPM in composition sauces does not adversely affect the physical -chemical characteristics of sauces, but due to the stabilizing effect of additives iodine-proteinaceous increased emulsion stability up to 98 - 100% without additional foo d additives (emulsifiers. This additive has passed a series of tests that indicate on compliance with requirements normative and technical documentation. Conclusions. Used methodical approach allowed us to estimate the level of organic and inorganic iodine, as well as describe in more detail and correctly interpret the chemical composition of foods fortified with iodine and predict their health properties.

  3. Overview of the ACEX project iodine work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merilo, M.

    1996-01-01

    The ACEX project is an internationally sponsored research program that focuses on several aspects of severe accidents. The areas addressed are iodine behavior in containments, pool scrubbing, molten corium concrete interactions, and ex-vessel core debris coolability. These areas all represent extensions to the previous and current ACE and MACE programs respectively. The ACE-Phase B (iodine) project, and other recent research efforts, have clarified the roles of the important phenomena that influence iodine volatility in reactor containments during severe accidents. The ACE Iodine Chemistry Subcommittee concluded that even though enough data has been generated to support reasonably good quantification of the important phenomena, a few important areas remain where quantification is still uncertain. This is due to a lack of agreement on how to utilize the existing database, as well as the possible absence of critical test and/or property data. Technical resolution of the overall iodine behavior issue is therefore not feasible until these uncertainties are fully assessed and practical solutions have been identified, implemented, and verified. The overall objectives of the ACEX iodine research program are to ensure that the iodine database can be used to predict the airborne concentration of iodine, the conditions for iodine reservoir stability, and to provide a mechanistic understanding for these phenomena. The first phase of this work involves a comprehensive review and interpretation of the existing database in order to formulate practical strategies for dealing with significant uncertainties and/or deficiencies. Several projects are underway involving the effects of organic reactions and structural surface interactions. In addition effort is being expended on standardizing the aqueous iodine kinetics database, specifying useful mass transfer models, and defining methodology for pH prediction. The results of this work are expected to identify where additional data

  4. Doping characteristics of iodine on as-grown chemical vapor deposited graphene on Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, HoKwon, E-mail: hknano@gmail.com [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Renault, Olivier [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tyurnina, Anastasia; Guillet, Jean-François; Simonato, Jean-Pierre [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LITEN/DTMN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Rouchon, Denis; Mariolle, Denis; Chevalier, Nicolas [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Dijon, Jean [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LITEN/DTMN, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-15

    Using laboratory X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM), we investigated the doping efficiency and thermal stability of iodine on as-grown graphene on Pt. After iodine adsorption of graphene in saturated vapor of I{sub 2,} monolayer and bilayer graphene exhibited work function of 4.93 eV and 4.87 eV, respectively. Annealing of the doped monolayer graphene at 100 °C led to desorption of hydrocarbons, which increased the work function of monolayer graphene by ~0.2 eV. The composition of the polyiodide complexes evolved upon a step-by-step annealing at temperatures from 100 °C to 300 °C while the work-function non-monotonically changed with decreasing iodine content. The iodine dopant was stable at relatively high temperature as a significant amount of iodine remained up to the annealing temperature of 350 °C. - Highlights: • Laboratory XPEEM demonstrates that iodine can effectively p-dope as-grown graphene on Pt with a work-function value up to 5.1 eV. • On the other hand, residual hydrocarbon contamination decreases the work function by up to ~0.2 eV. • The spontaneous intercalation of as-grown few-layered graphene is not easily feasible. • The iodine dopant was not completely removed up to the annealing temperature of 350 °C. • The I{sub 3}{sup −} and I{sub 5}{sup −} polyiodide content ratio of I-doped Gr/Pt decreases with annealing temperature.

  5. Calculation of xenon-oscillations in the HPLWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, T.; Feher, S.; Czifrus, Sz.

    2009-01-01

    The European version of the Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is being developed under the name High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). In the most recent design, a three-pass core is foreseen with a heat-up of the coolant (supercritical pressure water) from 280degC to 500degC. Due to the operating pressure of 25 MPa, there is no phase change in the core but the density drop of the coolant can be as high as one order of magnitude. This results in a system which is sensitive to local temperature, power and density oscillations. This attribute is enhanced by the pseudocritical transformation of supercritical pressure water. Due to the relatively large dimensions of the core, xenon-oscillations are probable. The characteristic time of this process is several hours, thus a coupled quasi-stationary neutronics-thermohydraulics (CQNT) code completed with the xenon poisoning differential equations (XPDE) can predict the extent of xenon-oscillations. A program system is being developed at the Budapest University of Technology which is capable to perform full core CQNT calculations including the XPDE. The program system is designed to calculate one-pass (which was the first core proposal for HPLWRs, today called PWR-SC) and three-pass cores. The CQNT code is made up of an MCNP part (neutronics part) and of a thermohydraulics part developed at our Institute. Since full core MCNP calculations are very time consuming, upon symmetry considerations only one eighth of the core is modelled. On the other hand, this approach of modelling momentarily limits the phenomena which can be studied to axial oscillations. (author)

  6. Heat capacity of xenon adsorbed in nanobundle grooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chishko, K.A.; Sokolova, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    A model of one-dimensional real gas under external transverse force field is applied to interpret the experimentally observed thermodynamical properties of xenon deposited into groves on the surface of carbon nanobundles. This non-ideal gas model with pair interaction is not quite adequate to describe the dense adsorbates (especially at low temperature limit), but it makes possible to take into account easily the particle exchange between 1D adsorbate and 3D atmosphere which becomes an essential factor since intermediate (for xenon - of order 35 K) up to high (approx 100 K) temperatures. In this paper we treat the 1D real gas with only Lennard-Jones pair interaction, but at presence of exact equilibrium conditions on the atom numbers between low-dimensional adsorbate and three-dimensional atmosphere of the experimental cell. The low-temperature branch of the heat capacity has been fitted separately within the elastic atomic chain model to get the best agreement between theory and experiment in as wide as possible region just from zero temperature. The gas approximation is introduced from the temperatures where the chain heat capacity tends definitely to 1D equipartition law. In this case the principal parameters for both models can be chosen in such a way that the heat capacity C(T) of the chain goes continuously into the corresponding curve of the gas approximation. So, it seems to be expected that adequate interpretation for temperature dependences of the atomic adsorbate heat capacity can be obtained through a reasonable combination of 1D gas and phonon approaches. The principal parameters of the gas approximation (such a desorption energy) found from the fitting between theory and experiment for xenon heat capacity are in good agreement with corresponding data known in literature.

  7. Determination of atmospheric concentrations of xenon radioisotopes. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, K.H.; Panisko, M.E.; Hensley, W.K.; Bowyer, T.W.; Perkins, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    Determination of radioactive xenon concentrations in the atmosphere over a two year period has been performed as part of a research program to develop real-time measurement capabilities. The initial measurements were made to develop, prove, and validate the authors technical approach, while the longer-term measurements are being undertaken to establish natural background concentrations and variability with time. The results reported were made using noble gas fraction (typically 90% Kr and 10% Xe by weight) gas samples obtained from a commercial air-reduction plant in the northeastern US over a two-year interval beginning in the fall of 1993. The concentrated gas samples were typically obtained during a 6--8 hour interval at the commercial reduction plant and were shipped overnight to their laboratory. Analysis was typically completed approximately 24 hours after sampling. The analytical separation process typically took approximately 6 hours and gamma-ray spectrometric measurements were conducted for intervals ranging from 3 to 16 hours. The technical approach involved removal of potentially interfering radon daughter radionuclides using a molecular sieve at room temperature, followed by cryogenic concentration of noble gases using a chilled (-76 C) activated carbon molecular sieve. During initial measurements both molecular sieve materials were contained in 30 foot x 1/4 inch gas chromatography columns for analytical separations. Krypton was separated from Xenon during the analytical procedure by warming the activated carbon molecular sieve to room temperature after initial noble gas concentration and actively pumping it away. Xenon-133 adsorbed to the activated charcoal molecular sieve was then quantified via its 81 keV gamma-ray using initially a p-type intrinsic germanium detector and later a higher efficiency (64% relative to a 3 inch x 3 inch sodium iodide) n-type intrinsic germanium detector

  8. Effect of capacitor loss on discharging characteristics of xenon flash lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chu; Lin Dejiang; Xu Chunmei; Shen Hongbin; Chen Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    The effect of storage capacitor's loss on the discharging characteristics of the xenon flash lamp was studied, and the xenon flash lamp discharging circuit was analyzed and improved. The capacitor can be equivalent to a series of an ideal capacitor and loss resistance. The improved formula of the xenon lamp discharging characteristics was given when actual capacitance loss is not zero, and the xenon lamp discharging current and discharging power are calculated and analyzed in detail with the increase of the capacitor loss. The results show that the increase of loss will lead to the decrease of xenon lamp discharging current and peak power and the xenon lamp flash time, and influence laser pumping efficiency. The loss will also lead to the capacitor inverse charging in LC discharging circuit; this will influence normal working of the capacitor and decrease the lift of the xenon lamp. The actual energy storage capacitor charging and discharging experiments show that the increase of capacitor loss will lead to the decrease of xenon lamp light-emitting waveform peak, shortening of the flash time and increase of the electrode sputter, thus verity, the reasonableness of theoretical analysis. In addition, the experiments show that environmental factors have very significant impact on the increase of the storage capacitor loss. (authors)

  9. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Dynamic adsorption property of xenon on activated carbon and carbon molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shujuan; Zhou Guoqing; Jin Yuren; Zhou Chongyang

    2010-01-01

    In order to select well adsorptive xenon adsorbent, the dynamic adsorption property of xenon on activated carbon and carbon molecular sieves (CMS) was studied by measuring the xenon dynamic adsorption coefficient as a function velocity of gas, temperature, carrier gas, pressure and concentration of CO 2 . The results show that the highest value of xenon dynamic adsorption coefficient is on CMS1, and the second highest value is on CMS2; when the xenon concentration is less than 10 -5 mol/L or concentration of CO 2 is less than 5 x 10 -5 mol/L, the xenon dynamic adsorption coefficient nearly keeps constant at the specific experimental flow rate. Then the xenon dynamic adsorption coefficient would vary when it was mixed with different kind of carrier gas and become less at more than 5 x 10 -5 mol/L concentration of CO 2 . And the maximal effect factors are temperature and pressure. Therefore, the feasible measures to improve the xenon capability are to cool the adsorbent and increase adsorption pressure. (authors)

  11. XENON-133 IN CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, AND UTAH FROM THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT (JOURNAL VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the USSR introduced numerous radioactive nuclides into the atmosphere, including the noble gas xenon-133. EPA's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV, detected xenon-133 from the Chernobyl accident in air sampl...

  12. Lowering the radioactivity of the photomultiplier tubes for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    The low-background, VUV-sensitive 3-inch diameter photomultiplier tube R11410 has been developed by Hamamatsu for dark matter direct detection experiments using liquid xenon as the target material. We present the results from the joint effort between the XENON collaboration and the Hamamatsu company

  13. Xenon Acquisition Strategies for High-Power Electric Propulsion NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Unfried, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of high-power solar electric propulsion (SEP) for both NASA's human and science exploration missions combined with the technology investment from the Space Technology Mission Directorate have enabled the development of a 50kW-class SEP mission. NASA mission concepts developed, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, and those proposed by contracted efforts for the 30kW-class demonstration have a range of xenon propellant loads from 100's of kg up to 10,000 kg. A xenon propellant load of 10 metric tons represents greater than 10% of the global annual production rate of xenon. A single procurement of this size with short-term delivery can disrupt the xenon market, driving up pricing, making the propellant costs for the mission prohibitive. This paper examines the status of the xenon industry worldwide, including historical xenon supply and pricing. The paper discusses approaches for acquiring on the order of 10 MT of xenon propellant considering realistic programmatic constraints to support potential near-term NASA missions. Finally, the paper will discuss acquisitions strategies for mission campaigns utilizing multiple high-power solar electric propulsion vehicles requiring 100's of metric tons of xenon over an extended period of time where a longer term acquisition approach could be implemented.

  14. Determination of BEACON Coupling Coefficients using data from Xenon transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, M.; Kurincic, B.

    2007-01-01

    NEK uses BEACO TM code (BEACO TM - Westinghouse Best Estimate Analyzer for Core Operating Nuclear) for core monitoring, analysis and core behaviour prediction. Coupling Coefficients determine relationship between core response and excore instrumentation. Measured power distribution using incore moveable detectors during Xenon transient with sufficient power axial offset change is the most important data for further analysis. Classic methodology and BEACO TM Conservative methodology using established Coupling Coefficients are compared on NPP Krsko case. BEACON TM Conservative methodology with predefined Coupling Coefficients is used as a surveillance tool for verification of relationship between core and excore instrumentation during power operation. (author)

  15. Regional study of ventilation with inhaled xenon 133 in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaultier, C.; Mensch, B.; Gerbeaux, J.

    1975-01-01

    A regional exploration of pulmonary ventilation in a population of 104 infants and children by a study of distribution and washout of xenon 133 inhaled with rebreathing is carried out. The results are expressed by photographs (gamma-camera) and time-activity curves. The indications for regional exploration were oriented by the existence on the straight X-ray film of a localised ventilation disorder (a hyperlucent area or an opacity). This study permitted physiopathological analysis and guided endobronchial examinations. The functional results obtained, complete and explain other methods of exploration of lung function by spirography, ventilatory mechanics, transthoracic electrical measurements and study of lung perfusion with technetium 99m [fr

  16. Scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoil in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F; Badertscher, A; Benetti, P; Bernardini, E; Bettini, A; Borio di Tigliole, A A; Brunetti, R; Bueno, A G; Calligarich, E; Campanelli, M; Carpanese, C; Cavalli, D; Cavanna, F; Cennini, P; Centro, Sandro; Cesana, A; Cline, D; De Mitri, I; Dolfini, R; Ferrari, A; Gigli-Berzolari, A; Matthey, C; Mauri, F; Mazza, D; Mazzone, L; Meng, G; Montanari, C; Nurzia, G; Otwinowski, S; Palamara, O; Pascoli, D; Pepato, Adriano; Petrera, S; Periale, L; Piano Mortari, G; Piazzoli, A; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Rancati, T; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Rebuzzi, D; Revol, Jean Pierre Charles; Rico, J; Rossella, M; Rossi, C; Rubbia, André; Rubbia, Carlo; Sala, P; Scannicchio, D A; Sergiampietri, F; Suzuki, S; Terrani, M; Tian, W; Ventura, Sandro; Vignoli, C; Wang, H; Woo, J; Xu, Z

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a test done with a Liquid Xenon (LXe) detector for 'Dark Matter' search, exposed to a neutron beam to produce nuclear recoil events simulating those which would be generated by WIMP's elastic scattering. The aim of the experiment was to measure directly the scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoil. The nuclear recoil considered in the test was in the tens of keV range. The ratio of measured visible energy over the true recoil energy was evaluated to be about 20%, in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  17. Krypton and xenon in the atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, T. M.; Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The paper reports a determination by the Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer of upper limits to the concentration of krypton and xenon along with most of their isotopes in the atmosphere of Venus. The upper limit to the krypton mixing ratio is estimated at 47 ppb, with a very conservative estimate at 69 ppb. The probable upper limit to the sum of the mixing ratios of the isotopes Xe-128, Xe-129, Xe-130, Xe-131, and Xe-132 is 40 ppb by volume, with a very conservative upper limit three times this large.

  18. Study of regional lung function with xenon 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, D.; Wagner, R.; Germain, M.; Chardon, G.

    1975-01-01

    Exploration of regional lung function includes study of the closed circuit perfusion and ventilation respectively by injection and inhalation of xenon 133. The radiation is measured across the chest using 4 fixed scintillation counters, placed opposite the subject's back, 2 per lung field. Theoretical regional values using 15 normal young subjects are determined. Three cases justified the practical interest of this method. The percentage of variation for the parameters studied was about 10%. The method proved very useful for the clinician to whom it provides a numerical assessment of regional ventilation and perfusion [fr

  19. Hyperpolarized Xenon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR of Building Stone Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mauri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated several building stone materials, including minerals and rocks, using continuous flow hyperpolarized xenon (CF-HP NMR spectroscopy to probe the surface composition and porosity. Chemical shift and line width values are consistent with petrographic information. Rare upfield shifts were measured and attributed to the presence of transition metal cations on the surface. The evolution of freshly cleaved rocks exposed to the atmosphere was also characterized. The CF-HP 129Xe NMR technique is non-destructive and it could complement currently used techniques, like porosimetry and microscopy, providing additional information on the chemical nature of the rock surface and its evolution.

  20. The adsorption of argon, krypton and xenon on activated charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    Charcoal adsorption beds are commonly used to remove radioactive noble gases from contaminated gas streams. The design of such beds requires the adsorption coefficient for the noble gas. Here an extension of the Dubinin-Radushkevich theory of adsorption is developed to correlate the effects of temperature, pressure, concentration, and carrier gas on the adsorption coefficients of krypton, xenon, and argon on activated carbon. This model is validated with previously published adsorption measurements. It accurately predicts the equilibrium adsorption coefficient at any temperature and pressure if the potential energies of adsorption, the micropore volume, and the van der Waals constants of the gases are known. 18 refs., 4 figs

  1. Low-level seaweed supplementation improves iodine status in iodine-insufficient women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combet, Emilie; Ma, Zheng Feei; Cousins, Frances; Thompson, Brett; Lean, Michael E J

    2014-09-14

    Iodine insufficiency is now a prominent issue in the UK and other European countries due to low intakes of dairy products and seafood (especially where iodine fortification is not in place). In the present study, we tested a commercially available encapsulated edible seaweed (Napiers Hebridean Seagreens® Ascophyllum nodosum species) for its acceptability to consumers and iodine bioavailability and investigated the impact of a 2-week daily seaweed supplementation on iodine concentrations and thyroid function. Healthy non-pregnant women of childbearing age, self-reporting low dairy product and seafood consumption, with no history of thyroid or gastrointestinal disease were recruited. Seaweed iodine (712 μg, in 1 g seaweed) was modestly bioavailable at 33 (interquartile range (IQR) 28-46) % of the ingested iodine dose compared with 59 (IQR 46-74) % of iodine from the KI supplement (n 22). After supplement ingestion (2 weeks, 0·5 g seaweed daily, n 42), urinary iodine excretion increased from 78 (IQR 39-114) to 140 (IQR 103-195) μg/l (Pseaweed was palatable and acceptable to consumers as a whole food or as a food ingredient and effective as a source of iodine in an iodine-insufficient population. In conclusion, seaweed inclusion in staple foods would serve as an alternative to fortification of salt or other foods with KI.

  2. Urinary Iodine Clearance following Iodinated Contrast Administration: A Comparison of Euthyroid and Postthyroidectomy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice D. Ho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare iodine clearance following iodinated contrast administration in thyroidectomised thyroid cancer patients and euthyroid individuals. Methods. A convenience population (6 thyroidectomised thyroid cancer patients and 7 euthyroid controls was drawn from patients referred for iodinated contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT studies. Subjects had sequential urine samples collected up to 6 months (50 samples from the thyroidectomised and 63 samples from the euthyroid groups. t-tests and generalised estimating equations (GEE were used to test for group differences in urinary iodine creatinine ratios. Results. Groups had similar urinary iodine creatinine ratios at baseline, with a large increase 2 weeks following iodinated contrast (P=0.005. Both groups had a return of urinary iodine creatinine ratios to baseline by 4 weeks, with no significant group differences overall or at any time point. Conclusions. Thyroidectomised patients did not have a significantly different urinary iodine clearance than euthyroid individuals following administration of iodinated contrast. Both had a return of urinary iodine creatinine ratios to baseline within 4 weeks.

  3. Automatic control logics to eliminate xenon oscillation based on Axial Offsets Trajectory Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro

    1996-01-01

    We have proposed Axial Offsets (AO) Trajectory Method for xenon oscillation control in pressurized water reactors. The features of this method are described as such that it can clearly give necessary control operations to eliminate xenon oscillations. It is expected that using the features automatic control logics for xenon oscillations can be simple and be realized easily. We investigated automatic control logics. The AO Trajectory Method could realize a very simple logic only for eliminating xenon oscillations. However it was necessary to give another considerations to eliminate the xenon oscillation with a given axial power distribution. The other control logic based on the modern control theory was also studied for comparison of the control performance of the new control logic. As the results, it is presented that the automatic control logics based on the AO Trajectory Method are very simple and effective. (author)

  4. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  5. Long-lived Radionuclides in the Environment: On the Radioecology of Iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.; Klipsch, K.; Ernst, Th.; Vahlbruch, J.; Jakob, D.; Synal, H.A.; Schnabel, C.; Lopez-Gutierrez, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    the transfer of iodine from the sea into the atmosphere and of its atmospheric transport. Time series for iodine in precipitation show a decade long increase of 129 I fallout until the 1990's and an ongoing constant input of 129 I with deposition densities of ∼15 mBq m -2 per year with significant contributions from both, dry and wet deposition. In surface waters a dilution of the fall-out iodine takes place by stable iodine which is just weakly adsorbed in the soils and a considerable run-off of iodine must be taken into account. The isotopic ratios in soil profiles and ground waters demonstrate a high mobility and an accumulation of 129 I in the water unsaturated soil zones, an efficient migration into the water saturated soil layers and an ongoing transfer of man-made 129 I into the groundwater. The 129 I/ 127 I ratios in human thyroid glands range from 3 10 -8 to 5 x 10 -9 . The transfer of 129 I through the environment to man can only be described taking also its interaction with stable iodine into account. In total, the results allow to establish a radioecological model describing the 129 I exposure of man following a long-term fallout situation. Open questions and the needs for future are discussed. (author)

  6. Iodine tablets - many benefits and few disadvantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paile, W.

    1996-01-01

    The number of thyroid cancers among children has increased steeply around Chernobyl after the nuclear catastrophe. An iodine tablet taken at the right time would have protected the thyroid from the effects of radioiodine. Nuclear fallout may contain large amounts of radioactive iodine. If this enters the body, either through inhalation or ingestion, most of it ends up in the thyroid. As a result, the thyroid may be exposed to a considerable radiation dose. High doses endanger the functioning of the thyroid, and even smaller doses may cause benign or malignant tumours in the thyroid. Sensitivity of the thyroid to radiation depends largely on the person's age. The younger the child, the higher the risk. Adults probably have a low risk. It has not been shown that people over 40 years of age would have any risk of contracting radiation-induced thyroid cancer. Iodine tablets are particularly important for children. Iodine has fewer side effects than had been thought previously. At least for children, the risk of side effects caused by one dose of iodine is so small that it can be ignored when considering whether iodine should be given in a fallout situation. The risk increases with age. It must unconditionally be left for the authorities to decide who should be given iodine tablets and when. (orig.)

  7. Active molecular iodine photochemistry in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raso, Angela R W; Custard, Kyle D; May, Nathaniel W; Tanner, David; Newburn, Matt K; Walker, Lawrence; Moore, Ronald J; Huey, L G; Alexander, Liz; Shepson, Paul B; Pratt, Kerri A

    2017-09-19

    During springtime, the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer undergoes frequent rapid depletions in ozone and gaseous elemental mercury due to reactions with halogen atoms, influencing atmospheric composition and pollutant fate. Although bromine chemistry has been shown to initiate ozone depletion events, and it has long been hypothesized that iodine chemistry may contribute, no previous measurements of molecular iodine (I 2 ) have been reported in the Arctic. Iodine chemistry also contributes to atmospheric new particle formation and therefore cloud properties and radiative forcing. Here we present Arctic atmospheric I 2 and snowpack iodide (I - ) measurements, which were conducted near Utqiaġvik, AK, in February 2014. Using chemical ionization mass spectrometry, I 2 was observed in the atmosphere at mole ratios of 0.3-1.0 ppt, and in the snowpack interstitial air at mole ratios up to 22 ppt under natural sunlit conditions and up to 35 ppt when the snowpack surface was artificially irradiated, suggesting a photochemical production mechanism. Further, snow meltwater I - measurements showed enrichments of up to ∼1,900 times above the seawater ratio of I - /Na + , consistent with iodine activation and recycling. Modeling shows that observed I 2 levels are able to significantly increase ozone depletion rates, while also producing iodine monoxide (IO) at levels recently observed in the Arctic. These results emphasize the significance of iodine chemistry and the role of snowpack photochemistry in Arctic atmospheric composition, and imply that I 2 is likely a dominant source of iodine atoms in the Arctic.

  8. Iodine nutrition and risk of thyroid irradiation from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delange, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to discuss the following aspects of physiopathology of iodine nutrition related to thyroid irradiation by nuclear accidents: (1) The cycle of iodine in nature, the dietary sources of iodine and the recommended dietary allowances for iodine. (2) The anomalies of thyroid metabolism induced by iodine deficiency. The caricatural situation as seen in endemic goitre will be used as mode. (3) The specific paediatric aspects of adaptation to iodine deficiency. (4) The present status of iodine nutrition in Europe. (author)

  9. Present status of iodine research at IPSN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardelay, J [IPSN/DPEA/SEAC (France)

    1996-12-01

    Since several years, IPSN has conducted an effort in order to evaluate the release of radioactive iodine in case of hypothetical severe accident in a realistic manner. This source-term evaluation is performed with IODE code which is a module of the EXCADRE system of codes. This code is validated against: -analytical experiments: in these experiments, IPSN studies radiolytic effects and chemical processes in the sump, organic formation, mass transfer, effect of spray (CARAIDAS experiment), - the CAIMAN semi global experiment; this experiment will allow to study the phenomena linked to iodine behavior under representative containment geometry in the presence of painted surfaces and global irradiation, - the PHEBUS FP program. The paper consists to describe succinctly the current status of IODE and the various experiments for its validation. In case of hypothetical severe accident iodine can induce important perturbations of human organism. The effects are principally radiological, in particular on the thyroid. At short term, radioactive iodine is the most important contributor for the sanitary risk. It represents 55% of effective dose and 92% of thyroid dose at 10 km in case of controlled rejects with current assumptions. This is the reason why it must be actively studied. In France, the safety evaluations are performed with mechanistic codes or lumped parameter codes like EXCADRE which contains a module devoted to iodine studies: IODINE. The objective of the French experimental program on iodine is to understand and quantify important phenomena in order to put kinetic parameters in IODE module. The experiments can be classified in analytical experiments, the semi-global experiment CAIMAN which takes into account different phenomena studied in analytical experiments and the global experiment PHEBUS PF, not only devoted to iodine behavior study. In the following text we will present the needs of IODINE code and these different experiments. (author).

  10. Present status of iodine research at IPSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardelay, J.

    1996-01-01

    Since several years, IPSN has conducted an effort in order to evaluate the release of radioactive iodine in case of hypothetical severe accident in a realistic manner. This source-term evaluation is performed with IODE code which is a module of the EXCADRE system of codes. This code is validated against: -analytical experiments: in these experiments, IPSN studies radiolytic effects and chemical processes in the sump, organic formation, mass transfer, effect of spray (CARAIDAS experiment), - the CAIMAN semi global experiment; this experiment will allow to study the phenomena linked to iodine behavior under representative containment geometry in the presence of painted surfaces and global irradiation, - the PHEBUS FP program. The paper consists to describe succinctly the current status of IODE and the various experiments for its validation. In case of hypothetical severe accident iodine can induce important perturbations of human organism. The effects are principally radiological, in particular on the thyroid. At short term, radioactive iodine is the most important contributor for the sanitary risk. It represents 55% of effective dose and 92% of thyroid dose at 10 km in case of controlled rejects with current assumptions. This is the reason why it must be actively studied. In France, the safety evaluations are performed with mechanistic codes or lumped parameter codes like EXCADRE which contains a module devoted to iodine studies: IODINE. The objective of the French experimental program on iodine is to understand and quantify important phenomena in order to put kinetic parameters in IODE module. The experiments can be classified in analytical experiments, the semi-global experiment CAIMAN which takes into account different phenomena studied in analytical experiments and the global experiment PHEBUS PF, not only devoted to iodine behavior study. In the following text we will present the needs of IODINE code and these different experiments. (author)

  11. Electron momentum spectroscopy of xenon: A detailed analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.P.D.; McCarthy, I.E.; Mitroy, J.; Weigold, E.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the 1000-eV noncoplanar symmetric (e,2e) reaction on xenon are reported. Cross-section calculations are carried out with the use of both the plane-wave and distorted-wave impulse approximations. The distorted-wave impulse approximation accurately describes both the 5p -1 and 5s -1 angular correlations and their relative cross sections. It also describes accurately the 5p/sub 3/2/ -1 :5p/sub 1/2/ -1 branching ratios if Dirac-Fock target wave functions are used. The branching ratios show the inadequacy of Hartree-Fock wave functions for xenon. The plane-wave impulse-approximation overestimates the 5s -1 cross section relative to the 5p -1 and underestimates the cross section at large angles. The 5s -1 spectroscopic factors are assigned up to a separation energy of 45 eV, and the distorted-wave impulse-approximation calculation verifies that all the 5s -1 strength has been found. The spectroscopic factors for the 5s -1 manifold are obtained at 1000 and 1200 eV at a number of angles and are found to be independent of incident energy and ion recoil momentum. The spectroscopic factor for the lowest 5s -1 transition at 23.4 eV is 0.37 +- 0.01, whereas that for the ground-state 5p -1 transition is greater than or equal to 0.98

  12. First Axion Results from the XENON100 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E.; Alfonsi, M.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Auger, M.; Balan, C.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Behrens, A.; Beltrame, P.; Bokeloh, K.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Colijn, A.P.; Contreras, H.; Cussonneau, J.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Duchovni, E.; Fattori, S.; Ferella, A.D.; Fulgione, W.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L.W.; Grignon, C.; Gross, E.; Hampel, W.; Itay, R.; Kaether, F.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R.F.; Calloch, M. Le; Lellouch, D.; Levy, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Lung, K.; Lyashenko, A.; Macmullin, S.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F.V.; Mayani Paras, D.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Pantic, E.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Simgen, H.; Teymourian, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Vitells, O.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2014-09-09

    We present the first results of searches for axions and axion-like-particles with the XENON100 experiment. The axion-electron coupling constant, $g_{Ae}$, has been tested by exploiting the axio-electric effect in liquid xenon. A profile likelihood analysis of 224.6 live days $\\times$ 34 kg exposure has shown no evidence for a signal. By rejecting $g_{Ae}$, larger than $7.7 \\times 10^{-12}$ (90% CL) in the solar axion search, we set the best limit to date on this coupling. In the frame of the DFSZ and KSVZ models, we exclude QCD axions heavier than 0.3 eV/c$^2$ and 80 eV/c$^2$, respectively. For axion-like-particles, under the assumption that they constitute the whole abundance of dark matter in our galaxy, we constrain $g_{Ae}$, to be lower than $1 \\times 10^{-12}$ (90% CL) for masses between 5 and 10 keV/c$^2$.

  13. Theoretical investigation of the secondary ionization in krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffo, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the secondary ionization processes that responsible for the pre-breakdown ionization current growth in a uniform electric field was studied in krypton and xenon gases, especially at low values of E/P 0 which is corresponding to high values of pressure, since there are a number of possible secondary ionization processes. It is interesting to carry out a quantitative analysis for the generalized secondary ionization coefficient obtained previously by many workers in terms of the production of excited states and their diffusion to the cathode and their destruction rate in the gas body. From energy balance equation for the electrons in the discharge, the fractional percentage energy losses of ionization, excitation, and elastic collisions to the total energy gained by the electron from the field has been calculated for krypton and xenon, as a result of such calculations; the conclusion drawn is that at low values of E/P 0 the main energy loss of electrons are in excited collision. Therefore, we are adopting a theoretical calculation for W/α under the assumption that the photo-electron emission at the cathode is the predominated secondary ionization process. 14 tabs.; 12 figs.; 64 refs

  14. Interdiffusion of krypton and xenon in high-pressure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campana, R.J.; Jensen, D.D.; Epstein, B.D.; Hudson, R.G.; Baldwin, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    The interdiffusion of gaseous fission products in high-pressure helium is an important factor in the control of radioactivity in gas-cooled fast breeder reactors (GCFRs). As presently conceived, GCFRs use pressure-equalized and vented fuel in which fission gases released from the solid matrix oxide fuel are transported through the fuel rod interstices and internal fission product traps to the fuel assembly vents, where they are swept away to external traps and storage. Since the predominant transport process under steady-state operating conditions is interdiffusion of gaseous fission products in helium, the diffusion properties of krypton-helium and xenon-helium couples have been measured over the range of GCFR temperature and pressure conditions ( -1 ) and expected temperature dependence to the 1.66 power (Tsup(1.66)) at lower pressures and temperatures. Additional work is in progress to measure the behaviour of the krypton-helium and xenon-helium couples in GCFR fuel rod charcoal delay traps. (author)

  15. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, A. M. F.; Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Neves, P. N. B.; Conde, C. A. N.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Santos, F. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities (K0) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH3)3N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E/N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH3)3N+ (59 u) and (CH3)2CH2N+ (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E/N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (~0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm2V-1s-1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  16. Stability of tetraphenyl butadiene thin films in liquid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguino, P.; Balau, F.; Botelho do Rego, A.M.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) is widely used in particle detectors as a wavelength shifter. In this work we studied the stability of TPB thin films when immersed in liquid xenon (LXe). The thin films were deposited on glass and quartz substrates by thermal evaporation. Morphological and chemical surface properties were monitored before and after immersion into LXe by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No appreciable changes have been detected with these two methods. Grain size and surface chemical composition were found to be identical before and after submersion into LXe. However, the film thickness, measured via optical transmission in the ultraviolet–visible wavelength regions, decreased by 1.6 μg/cm 2 (24%) after immersion in LXe during 20 h. These results suggest the necessity of using a protective thin film over the Tetraphenyl butadiene when used as a wavelength shifter in LXe particle detectors. - Highlights: • Stability of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) thin films immersed in liquid xenon (LXe). • Thermally evaporated TPB thin films were immersed in LXe for 20 h. • Film morphology and chemical surface properties remained unchanged. • Surface density of the films decreased by 1.6 μg/cm 2 (24%) after immersion in LXe. • For using in LXe particle detectors, TPB films should be protected with a coating.

  17. Energy loading effects in the scaling of atomic xenon lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwa, M.; Kushner, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The intrinsic power efficiency of the atomic xenon (5d → 6p) infrared (1.73--3.65 μm) laser is sensitive to the rate of pumping due to electron collision mixing of the laser levels. Long duration pumping at moderate power deposition may therefore result in higher energy efficiencies than pumping at higher powers. In this paper the authors examine the consequences of high energy deposition (100's J/1 atm) during long pumping pulses (100's μs) on the intrinsic power and energy efficiency and optimum power deposition of the atomic xenon laser. The dominant effect of high energy loading, gas heating, causes an increase in the electron density and therefore an increase in the electron collision mixing of the laser levels. The optimum power deposition for a given gas density therefore shifts to lower values with increasing gas temperature. For sufficiently long pumping pulses, nonuniform gas heating results in convection and rarification of highly pumped regions. The optimum power deposition therefore shifts to even lower values as the length of the pumping pulse increases. As a result, laser efficiency depends on the spatial distribution of power deposition as well as its magnitude

  18. Consensus statement on iodine deficiency disorders in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, Betty; Chan, C W; Chan, Fredriech; Chan, K W; Cheng, Anna W F; Cheung, Patrick; Choi, K L; Chow, C B; Chow, Francis C C; Eastman, Creswell; Fok, T F; Fung, L M; Gomes, Cynthia; Huen, K F; Ip, T P; Kung, Annie W C; Lam, Karen S L; Lam, Y Y; Lao, Terence; Lee, C Y; Lee, K F; Leung, Jenny; Leung, N K; Li, Dominic; Li, June; Lo, K W; Lo, Louis; Ng, K L; Siu, S C; Tam, Sidney; Tan, Kathryn C B; Tiu, S C; Tse, H Y; Tse, Winnie; Wong, Gary; Wong, Shell; Wong, William; Yeung, Vincent T F; Young, Rosie; Yu, C M; Yu, Richard

    2003-12-01

    This article reviews the available data on the study of iodine deficiency disorders in Hong Kong and to discuss the approach towards preventing such disorders in Hong Kong. The importance of iodine and iodine deficiency disorders is described, and the available data on the dietary iodine intake and urinary iodine concentration in different populations of Hong Kong are summarised and discussed. Dietary iodine insufficiency among pregnant women in Hong Kong is associated with maternal goitrogenesis and hypothyroxinaemia as well as neonatal hypothyroidism. Borderline iodine deficiency exists in the expectant mothers in Hong Kong. Women of reproductive age, and pregnant and lactating women should be made aware and educated to have an adequate iodine intake, such as iodised salt, as an interim measure. A steering group involving all stakeholders should be formed to advise on the strategy of ensuring adequate iodine intake, including universal iodisation of salt in Hong Kong. Continuous surveillance of iodine status in the Hong Kong population is necessary.

  19. Study on iodine levels in thyroids of iodine-supplemented rats by epithermal neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuefei; Zhang Fang; Xu Qing; Liu Nianqing; Chai Zhifang; Zhao Xueqin; Zuo Aijun

    2003-01-01

    The second generation female Wistar rats that have been treated with iodine-deficient food, after their delivery, are divided into three groups i.e. excessive-iodine (EI), adequate-iodine (AI) and iodine-deficient (ID) according to the KIO 3 concentration in the drinking water (3.0, 0.4, 0 mg/L). In addition, the normal rats with low iodine food and 0.4 mg/L KIO 3 water are used as the control group (C). The iodine content in thyroid and the serum thyroid hormone levels of the third generation rats are measured by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA), and the method of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The results indicate that the total thyroxine (TT 4 ) and the free thyroxine (FT 4 ) of the EI, compared with those of the controls, are significantly decreased (p 3 ) evidently increased (p 4 , FT 4 and goiter

  20. Effect of chronic douching with polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine on iodine absorption and thyroid function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safran, M.; Braverman, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Daily vaginal douching with polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine in 12 euthyroid volunteers for 14 days resulted in a significant increase in serum total iodine concentration and urine iodine excretion. The increase in serum total iodine was associated with a marked decrease in 24-hour 123 I uptake by the thyroid and a small but significant increase in serum thyrotropin (TSH) concentration. However, values for serum TSH never rose above the normal range. No significant changes in serum thyroxine (T4), free T4 index (FTI), or triiodothyronine concentrations were observed, although serum T4 and FTI did decrease slightly during treatment. The findings suggest that iodine is absorbed across the vaginal mucosa and that the subsequent increase in serum total iodine does induce subtle increases in serum TSH concentration. There was no evidence, however, of overt hypothyroidism in these euthyroid women

  1. Iodine in drinking water varies by more than 100-fold in Denmark. Importance for iodine content of infant formulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K M; Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S

    1999-01-01

    The iodine intake level of the population is of major importance for the occurrence of thyroid disorders in an area. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the importance of drinking water iodine content for the known regional differences in iodine intake in Denmark and for the iodine content...

  2. Iodine-123 program at the TRIUMF laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program for the production and utilization of iodine-123 is described. From 1979 to 1982 the spallation of elemental cesium by 500-MeV protons was used to provide 100 mCi/hr at the end of bombardment (EOB). Contaminants were 3% iodine-125 and 0.15% tellurium-121 at EOB + 36 hr. The material from weekly runs was used by remote clinics in Canada for evaluation as a radiochemical and for labeling studies. A new facility at TRIUMF will be operational in 1983 to produce iodine-123 by the (p,5n) reaction

  3. Analysis and Improvement of Liquid Level Fluctuation in Condenser of Krypton-Xenon Enriched Tower%氪氙富集塔冷凝器液位波动原因分析与改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩正祥; 赵刘强; 吴冰; 凌晨

    2017-01-01

    The stability of krypton-xenon enrichment tower in krypton-xenon refining process directly determines the yield and yield of the product.In this paper, the fluctuation of the condenser liquid level in the rare krypton-xenon enrichment tower is analyzed from the aspects of equipment structure.The cause of the fault is analyzed in detail, and the liquid level fluctuation of the condenser in the enrichment tower is solved by improving the operation and reforming the equipment, so as to achieve the stable operation of the krypton xenon purification device.%氪氙精制流程中氪氙富集塔的稳定运行直接决定着产品的合格率及产量.针对稀有氪氙富集塔出现的冷凝器液位波动现象从设备结构、工艺运行等方面,对故障产生的原因进行了详细分析,并通过改进操作、改造设备解决了富集塔冷凝器液位波动问题,达到了氪氙精制装置稳定运行的目的.

  4. Autoradiography for iodine-125 seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, W.; Divoux, S.; Pothmann, B.; Tabor, P.; Hermann, K.P.; Harder, D.

    1993-01-01

    To study the interior design of model 6702 and 6711 iodine-125 seeds, contact autoradiographs were performed using mammography film. Improved resolution was obtained using a pin-hole camera with a hole of 0.1 mm x 0.1 mm. With these techniques, qualitative determination of the relative activity distribution within each seed was possible. The number of the activated resin spheres and the positions of the centers of these spheres can be exactly determined. A model calculation shows that variations in the arrangement of the activated spheres within a seed have a moderate influence on the dose distribution at source distances below 10 mm. Knowing the exact source configuration may be useful when comparing dose calculations with measured data for model 6702 125 I seeds which are currently employed in ophthalmic plaque and implant therapy of other tumors. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Iodine-123 in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaim, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinreich, R.

    1976-08-01

    The major object of this panel was to obtain information on the state of art of Iodine-123 production in Western Europe. Technical, medical and organizational problems were discussed extensively during the one-day meeting and a stimulating exchange of information between the various 123 I-producers and users has been initiated. Some specific examples of medical application were also included in order to get a feeling of the degree of acceptance by the medical community and the demand for this isotope. The meeting clearly demonstrated the great demand for this isotope but it also showed that the present rate of production is well below the demand. In order to fill this gap, not only further technical development is needed but also the organizational question of distribution has to be solved, perhaps within a network of collaborating cyclotrons, a task which is considerably more difficult in Western Europe than in the USA. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Studies in iodine metabolism. Progress report, April 1975-- March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations during the past twelve months have included the following subjects: factors which influence release of radioiodine from thyroid glands; contamination of commercially available low-iodine diets; effects of hypoxia on release of iodine from thyroid glands of rats and mice; development of practical tests for available iodine in low-iodine diets; reproduction and abnormal thyroglobulin of rats maintained on low-iodine diets; observations on radioactivity in animal thyroids; collaboration with other laboratories regarding radium in bovine thyroids

  7. Method of removing iodine and compounds thereof from gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keener, R.L.; Kittle, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including an acrylic backbone formed by the suspension polymerization of a mixture of an acrylic and a crosslinking monomer are useful in the removal of iodine and iodine compounds from gaseous effluents. Removal of radioactive iodine contaminants, particularly alkyl iodine compounds or hydrogen iodine, under extreme conditions, namely temperatures up to 180 0 C and humidities up to 100 percent, from effluents resulting from a major nuclear accident could probably be adsorbed by these resins described herein

  8. Oxidation of iodide and iodine on birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the pH range 4-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Sébastien; von Gunten, Urs; Sahli, Elisabeth; Nicolau, Rudy; Gallard, Hervé

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation of iodide by synthetic birnessite (delta-MnO(2)) was studied in perchlorate media in the pH range 4-8. Iodine (I(2)) was detected as an oxidation product that was subsequently further oxidized to iodate (IO(3)(-)). The third order rate constants, second order on iodide and first order on manganese oxide, determined by extraction of iodine in benzene decreased with increasing pH (6.3-7.5) from 1790 to 3.1M(-2) s(-1). Both iodine and iodate were found to adsorb significantly on birnessite with an adsorption capacity of 12.7 microM/g for iodate at pH 5.7. The rate of iodine oxidation by birnessite decreased with increasing ionic strength, which resulted in a lower rate of iodate formation. The production of iodine in iodide-containing waters in contact with manganese oxides may result in the formation of undesired iodinated organic compounds (taste and odor, toxicity) in natural and technical systems. The probability of the formation of such compounds is highest in the pH range 5-7.5. For pH iodine is quickly oxidized to iodate, a non-toxic and stable sink for iodine. At pH >7.5, iodide is not oxidized to a significant extent.

  9. Analysis of iodine content in seaweed by GC-ECD and estimation of iodine intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Sheng Yeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edible seaweed products have been consumed in many Asian countries. Edible seaweeds accumulate iodine from seawater, and are therefore a good dietary source of iodine. An adequate consumption of seaweed can eliminate iodine deficiency disorders, but excessive iodine intake is not good for health. The recommended dietary reference intake of 0.15 mg/d and 0.14 mg/d for iodine has been established in the United States and Taiwan, respectively. In this study, 30 samples of seaweed were surveyed for iodine content. The samples included 10 nori (Porphyra, 10 wakame (Undaria, and 10 kombu (Laminaria products. The iodine in seaweed was derivatized with 3-pentanone and detected by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD. The method detection limit was 0.5 mg/kg. The iodine content surveyed for nori was 29.3–45.8 mg/kg, for wakame 93.9–185.1 mg/kg, and for kombu 241–4921 mg/kg. Kombu has the highest average iodine content 2523.5 mg/kg, followed by wakame (139.7 mg/kg and nori (36.9 mg/kg. The GC-ECD method developed in this study is a low-cost alternative to inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy for iodine detection in seaweeds. The iodine intake from seaweed in the current survey was calculated and compared with the iodine dietary reference intake of Taiwan. The risk and benefit of seaweed consumption is also discussed.

  10. Iodine binding to humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowley, H E; Young, S D; Ander, E L; Crout, N M J; Watts, M J; Bailey, E H

    2016-08-01

    The rate of reactions between humic acid (HA) and iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) have been investigated in suspensions spiked with (129)I at concentrations of 22, 44 and 88 μg L(-1) and stored at 10 °C. Changes in the speciation of (129)I(-), (129)IO3(-) and mixed ((129)I(-) + (129)IO3(-)) spikes were monitored over 77 days using liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS). In suspensions spiked with (129)I(-) 25% of the added I(-) was transformed into organic iodine (Org-(129)I) within 77 days and there was no evidence of (129)IO3(-) formation. By contrast, rapid loss of (129)IO3(-) and increase in both (129)I(-) and Org-(129)I was observed in (129)IO3(-)-spiked suspensions. However, the rate of Org-(129)I production was greater in mixed systems compared to (129)IO3(-)-spiked suspensions with the same total (129)I concentration, possibly indicating IO3(-)I(-) redox coupling. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) demonstrated that Org-(129)I was present in both high and low molecular weight fractions of the HA although a slight preference to bond with the lower molecular weight fractions was observed indicating that, after 77 days, the spiked isotope had not fully mixed with the native (127)I pool. Iodine transformations were modelled using first order rate equations and fitted rate coefficients determined. However, extrapolation of the model to 250 days indicated that a pseudo-steady state would be attained after ∼200 days but that the proportion of (129)I incorporated into HA was less than that of (127)I indicating the presence of a recalcitrant pool of (127)I that was unavailable for isotopic mixing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TEM study of xenon bubbles evolution in Xe-implanted Cu. Bubbles shape, epitaxial orientation and adsorption phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, J.; Cartraud, M.; Garem, H.; Templier, C.; Desoyer, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    TEM is used to perform a study of xenon clusters changes in Xe-implanted Cu. After implantation, xenon is gathered into f.c.c. crystalline precipitates with a lattice parameter value of 0.580 nm. During annealing at 600 0 C large (110) facetted bubbles appear (2r≅35 nm) which contain fluid xenon. When cooling down to 100 K, xenon solidifies on bubbles facets in form of a thin membrane. The epitaxial orientations between solid xenon and copper are the same as adsorbed Xe on Cu(110) [fr

  12. The retention of iodine by iodine filters in nuclear power plants in the case of fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, V.

    1985-01-01

    Due to the liberation of considerable amounts of gaseous combustion products, fires in nuclear power plants may lead to a deterioration in the retention of radioiodine by iodine filters. The combustion products of the burnable materials, i.e., insulations, lubricants and paints, vary considerably with the development of the fire. Combustion product analyses of these materials have been performed only to a limited extent. The reaction of iodine with combustion products as well as the retention of the resulting iodine reaction products by sorbents have not yet been investigated. The reduction in the removal efficiencies of iodine sorbents due to the presence of combustion products is unknown. (orig.) [de

  13. Iodine deficiency in pregnancy in Denmark. Regional variations and frequency of individual iodine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, S B; Laurberg, P; Børlum, K G

    1993-01-01

    micrograms/g creatinine). These values are far below internationally recommended levels. The consequences remain to be evaluated and no firm recommendations can be given. It seems reasonable, however, to recommend a high intake of food containing iodine (e.g. milk products) during pregnancy and lactation...... containing vitamin/mineral tablets. Approximately one third of the women had received tablets containing iodine. In women who had not received iodine supplementation urinary iodine was low with a median value of 39.7 micrograms/g creatinine (Aalborg 28, Randers 33, Ringkøbing 34, Arhus 43 and Copenhagen 62...

  14. Iodine deficiency in pregnancy in Denmark. Regional variations and frequency of individual iodine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, S B; Laurberg, Peter; Børlum, K G

    1993-01-01

    Iodine requirements are increased during pregnancy and lactation and adequate iodine intake is important for normal brain development of the fetus/newborn child. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which this increase in iodine requirement is met in pregnant women living...... micrograms/g creatinine). These values are far below internationally recommended levels. The consequences remain to be evaluated and no firm recommendations can be given. It seems reasonable, however, to recommend a high intake of food containing iodine (e.g. milk products) during pregnancy and lactation...

  15. Iodination and stability of somatostatin analogues: comparison of iodination techniques. A practical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2012-01-01

    For iodination ((125/127)I) of tyrosine-containing peptides, chloramin-T, Pre-Coated Iodo-Gen(®) tubes and Iodo-Beads(®) (Pierce) are commonly used for in vitro radioligand investigations and there have been reliant vendors hereof for decades. However, commercial availability of these radio-iodinated peptides is decreasing. For continuation of our research in this field we investigated and optimized (radio-)iodination of somatostatin analogues. In literature, radioiodination using here described somatostatin analogues and iodination techniques are described separately. Here we present an overview, including High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) separation and characterisation by mass spectrometry, to obtain mono- and di-iodinated analogues. Reaction kinetics of (125/127)I iodinated somatostatin analogues were investigated as function of reaction time and concentration of reactants, including somatostatin analogues, iodine and oxidizing agent. To our knowledge, for the here described somatostatin analogues, no (127)I iodination and optimization are described. (Radio-)iodinated somatostatin analogues could be preserved with a >90% radiochemical purity for 1 month after reversed phase HPLC-purification.

  16. Suboptimal Iodine Concentration in Breastmilk and Inadequate Iodine Intake among Lactating Women in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henjum, Sigrun; Lilleengen, Anne Marie; Aakre, Inger; Dudareva, Anna; Gjengedal, Elin Lovise Folven; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Brantsæter, Anne Lise

    2017-06-22

    Breastfed infants depend on sufficient maternal iodine intake for optimal growth and neurological development. Despite this, few studies have assessed iodine concentrations in human milk and there is currently no published data on iodine status among lactating women in Norway. The aim of this study was to assess iodine concentrations in breast milk (BMIC) in lactating women and estimate iodine intake. Five Mother and Child Health Centres in Oslo were randomly selected during 2016, and 175 lactating women between 2nd and 28th weeks postpartum participated. Each of the women provided four breastmilk samples which were pooled and analysed for iodine concentrations. Participants also provided information on iodine intake from food and supplements covering the last 24 h and the habitual iodine intake (food frequency questionnaire). The median (p25, p75 percentiles) BMIC was 68 (45, 98) µg/L and 76% had BMIC food (p25, p75) was 121 (82, 162) µg/day and the total intake (food and supplements) was 134 (95, 222) µg/day. The majority of lactating women had suboptimal BMIC and inadequate intake of iodine from food and supplements.

  17. Development of Databases on Iodine in Foods and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershow, Abby G.; Skeaff, Sheila A.; Merkel, Joyce M.; Pehrsson, Pamela R.

    2018-01-01

    Iodine is an essential micronutrient required for normal growth and neurodevelopment; thus, an adequate intake of iodine is particularly important for pregnant and lactating women, and throughout childhood. Low levels of iodine in the soil and groundwater are common in many parts of the world, often leading to diets that are low in iodine. Widespread salt iodization has eradicated severe iodine deficiency, but mild-to-moderate deficiency is still prevalent even in many developed countries. To understand patterns of iodine intake and to develop strategies for improving intake, it is important to characterize all sources of dietary iodine, and national databases on the iodine content of major dietary contributors (including foods, beverages, water, salts, and supplements) provide a key information resource. This paper discusses the importance of well-constructed databases on the iodine content of foods, beverages, and dietary supplements; the availability of iodine databases worldwide; and factors related to variability in iodine content that should be considered when developing such databases. We also describe current efforts in iodine database development in the United States, the use of iodine composition data to develop food fortification policies in New Zealand, and how iodine content databases might be used when considering the iodine intake and status of individuals and populations. PMID:29342090

  18. Numerical study on xenon positive column discharges of mercury-free lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Jiting; He, Feng; Miao, Jinsong; Wang, Jianqi; Hu, Wenbo

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the numerical study has been performed on the xenon positive column discharges of mercury-free fluorescent lamp. The plasma discharge characteristics are analyzed by numerical simulation based on two-dimensional fluid model. The effects of cell geometry, such as the dielectric layer, the electrode width, the electrode gap, and the cell height, and the filling gas including the pressure and the xenon percentage are investigated in terms of discharge current and discharge efficiency. The results show that a long transient positive column will form in the xenon lamp when applying ac sinusoidal power and the lamp can operate in a large range of voltage and frequency. The front dielectric layer of the cell plays an important role in the xenon lamp while the back layer has little effect. The ratio of electrode gap to cell height should be large to achieve a long positive column xenon lamp and higher efficiency. Increase of pressure or xenon concentration results in an increase of discharge efficiency and voltage. The discussions will be helpful for the design of commercial xenon lamp cells

  19. Study of xenon binding in cryptophane-A using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhmer, M.; Goodson, B.M.; Song, Y.Q.; Laws, D.D.; Kaiser, L.; Pines, A.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1999-01-01

    Xenon is chemically inert, yet exhibits NMR parameters that are highly sensitive to its chemical environment. Considerable work has therefore capitalized on the utility of 129 Xe (I = 1/2) as a magnetic resonance probe of molecules, materials, and biological systems. In solution, spin-polarization transfer between laser-polarized xenon and the hydrogen nuclei of nearby molecules leads to signal enhancements in the resolved 1 H NMR spectrum, offering new opportunities for probing the chemical environment of xenon atoms. Following binding of laser-polarized xenon to molecules of cryptophane-A, selective enhancements of the 1 H NMR signals were observed. A theoretical framework for the interpretation of such experimental results is provided, and the spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effects are shown to yield information about the molecular environment of xenon. The observed selective 1 H enhancements allowed xenon-proton internuclear distances to be estimated. These distances reveal structural characteristics of the complex, including the preferred molecular conformations adopted by cryptophane-A upon binding of xenon

  20. Dynamic adsorption properties of xenon on activated carbons and their structure characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Suiqing; Liu Jing; Qian Yuan; Zeng Youshi; Du Lin; Pi Li; Liu Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background: In recent years, adsorption of radioactive xenon by activated carbon has been increasingly applied to the treatment of off-gas in nuclear power project. Though pore structure of activated carbon has a great impact on its dynamic adsorption coefficients for xenon, the concerned research is rare. Purpose: It is very necessary to figure out the relationship between the pore structure and the dynamic adsorption coefficients for the purpose of the selection and development of activated carbon. Methods: In this study, the dynamic adsorption coefficients of xenon on four kinds of activated carbons were measured on a dynamic adsorption platform under the condition of 25℃, OMPa (gauge pressure). And these four kinds of activated carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SEM. Results: The results show that the activated carbon of JH12-16 with the specific surface area of 991.9 m 2 ·g -1 has the largest xenon dynamic adsorption coefficient among these activated carbons. Conclusions: The dynamic adsorption coefficient of xenon on activated carbon doesn't increase with the specific surface area or the pore volume. The mesopore and macropore only play the role of passageway for xenon adsorption. The most suitable pore for xenon adsorption is the pore with the pore size ranged from 0.55 to 0.6 nm. (authors)