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Sample records for stable flow limited

  1. Flow-through SIP - A novel stable isotope probing approach limiting cross-feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooshammer, Maria; Kitzinger, Katharina; Schintlmeister, Arno; Kjedal, Henrik; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per; Wagner, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a widely applied tool to link specific microbial populations to metabolic processes in the environment without the prerequisite of cultivation, which has greatly advanced our understanding of the role of microorganisms in biogeochemical cycling. SIP relies on tracing specific isotopically labeled substrates (e.g., 13C, 15N, 18O) into cellular biomarkers, such as DNA, RNA or phospholipid fatty acids, and is considered to be a robust technique to identify microbial populations that assimilate the labeled substrate. However, cross-feeding can occur when labeled metabolites are released from a primary consumer and then used by other microorganisms. This leads to erroneous identification of organisms that are not directly responsible for the process of interest, but are rather connected to primary consumers via a microbial food web. Here, we introduce a new approach that has the potential to eliminate the effect of cross-feeding in SIP studies and can thus also be used to distinguish primary consumers from other members of microbial food webs. In this approach, a monolayer of microbial cells are placed on a filter membrane, and labeled substrates are supplied by a continuous flow. By means of flow-through, labeled metabolites and degradation products are constantly removed, preventing secondary consumption of the substrate. We present results from a proof-of-concept experiment using nitrifiers from activated sludge as model system, in which we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for identification of nitrifiers in combination with nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) for visualization of isotope incorporation at the single-cell level. Our results show that flow-through SIP is a promising approach to significantly reduce cross-feeding and secondary substrate consumption in SIP experiments.

  2. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  3. The effect of statin treatment on the prevention of stent mediated flow limited edge dissections during PCI in patients with stable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksuz, Fatih; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Yayla, Cagrı; Canpolat, Ugur; Murat, Sani Namık; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2016-10-01

    The effect of statin therapy before PCI with direct stenting may reduce the development of flow limited edge dissections (ED) in patients with stable angina. Flow limited ED after PCI is associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events. Statin therapy induces important changes in the plaque composition which have been previously identified as strong predictors of ED. 100 patients complicated with flow limited ED and 100 control patients with successful procedure were enrolled into the study. EDs were described as the 5-mm regions that were immediately adjacent to the stent borders, both distally and proximally on the coronary angiography. Rate of statin use and duration of statin use were significantly higher in patients with non-ED group (63%) versus ED group (25%) (p<0.001). In addition, patients in ED group had significantly higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) at admission (9.9mg/dL (5.89-16.45) vs. 4.40mg/dL (3.5-7.09), respectively, p=0.014). Our findings suggested that maintenance statin treatment before PCI with direct stenting may reduce the development of flow limited ED in patients with stable angina. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Stable microfluidic flow focusing using hydrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnyawali, Vaskar; Saremi, Mohammadali; Kolios, Michael C; Tsai, Scott S H

    2017-05-01

    We present a simple technique to generate stable hydrodynamically focused flows by driving the flow with hydrostatic pressure from liquid columns connected to the inlets of a microfluidic device. Importantly, we compare the focused flows generated by hydrostatic pressure and classical syringe pump driven flows and find that the stability of the hydrostatic pressure driven technique is significantly better than the stability achieved via syringe pumps, providing fluctuation-free focused flows that are suitable for sensitive microfluidic flow cytometry applications. We show that the degree of flow focusing with the hydrostatic method can be accurately controlled by the simple tuning of the liquid column heights. We anticipate that this approach to stable flow focusing will find many applications in microfluidic cytometry technologies.

  5. Stable limits for sums of dependent infinite variance random variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkiewicz, Katarzyna; Jakubowski, Adam; Mikosch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of these results are qualitative in the sense that the parameters of the limit distribution are expressed in terms of some limiting point process. In this paper we will be able to determine the parameters of the limiting stable distribution in terms of some tail characteristics of the underlying stationary...

  6. Highly stable superhydrophobic surfaces under flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Yim, Changyong; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized hydrophobic anodic aluminum oxide nanostructures with pore diameters of 35, 50, 65, and 80 nm directly on quartz crystal microresonators, and the stability of the resulting superhydrophobicity was investigated under flow conditions by measuring changes in the resonance frequency and dissipation factor. When the quartz substrates were immersed in water, their hydrophobic surfaces did not wet due to the presence of an air interlayer. The air interlayer was gradually replaced by water over time, which caused decreases in the resonance frequency (i.e., increases in mass) and increases in the dissipation factor (i.e., increases in viscous damping). Although the water contact angles of the nanostructures increased with increasing pore size, the stability of their superhydrophobicity increased with decreasing pore size under both static conditions (without flow) and dynamic conditions (with flow); this increase can be attributed to an increase in the solid surface area that interacts with the air layer above the nanopores as the pore size decreases. Further, the effects of increasing the flow rate on the stability of the superhydrophobicity were quantitatively determined.

  7. Multiple stable isotope fronts during non-isothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Stable isotope signatures of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements in minerals from hydrothermal veins and metasomatized host rocks are widely used to investigate fluid sources and paths. Previous theoretical studies mostly focused on analyzing stable isotope fronts developing during single-phase, isothermal fluid flow. In this study, numerical simulations were performed to assess how temperature changes, transport phenomena, kinetic vs. equilibrium isotope exchange, and isotopic source signals determine mineral oxygen isotopic compositions during fluid-rock interaction. The simulations focus on one-dimensional scenarios, with non-isothermal single- and two-phase fluid flow, and include the effects of quartz precipitation and dissolution. If isotope exchange between fluid and mineral is fast, a previously unrecognized, significant enrichment in heavy oxygen isotopes of fluids and minerals occurs at the thermal front. The maximum enrichment depends on the initial isotopic composition of fluid and mineral, the fluid-rock ratio and the maximum change in temperature, but is independent of the isotopic composition of the incoming fluid. This thermally induced isotope front propagates faster than the signal related to the initial isotopic composition of the incoming fluid, which forms a trailing front behind the zone of transient heavy oxygen isotope enrichment. Temperature-dependent kinetic rates of isotope exchange between fluid and rock strongly influence the degree of enrichment at the thermal front. In systems where initial isotope values of fluids and rocks are far from equilibrium and isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetics, the temperature increase accelerates the approach of the fluid to equilibrium conditions with the host rock. Consequently, the increase at the thermal front can be less dominant and can even generate fluid values below the initial isotopic composition of the input fluid. As kinetics limit the degree of isotope exchange, a third front may

  8. Diffusion-limited mixing by incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Christopher J.; Doering, Charles R.

    2018-05-01

    Incompressible flows can be effective mixers by appropriately advecting a passive tracer to produce small filamentation length scales. In addition, diffusion is generally perceived as beneficial to mixing due to its ability to homogenize a passive tracer. However we provide numerical evidence that, in cases where advection and diffusion are both actively present, diffusion may produce negative effects by limiting the mixing effectiveness of incompressible optimal flows. This limitation appears to be due to the presence of a limiting length scale given by a generalised Batchelor length (Batchelor 1959 J. Fluid Mech. 5 113–33). This length scale limitation may in turn affect long-term mixing rates. More specifically, we consider local-in-time flow optimisation under energy and enstrophy flow constraints with the objective of maximising the mixing rate. We observe that, for enstrophy-bounded optimal flows, the strength of diffusion may not impact the long-term mixing rate. For energy-constrained optimal flows, however, an increase in the strength of diffusion can decrease the mixing rate. We provide analytical lower bounds on mixing rates and length scales achievable under related constraints (point-wise bounded speed and rate-of-strain) by extending the work of Lin et al (2011 J. Fluid Mech. 675 465–76) and Poon (1996 Commun. PDE 21 521–39).

  9. Derivation of stable Burnett equations for rarefied gas flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra; Jadhav, Ravi Sudam; Agrawal, Amit

    2017-07-01

    A set of constitutive relations for the stress tensor and heat flux vector for the hydrodynamic description of rarefied gas flows is derived in this work. A phase density function consistent with Onsager's reciprocity principle and H theorem is utilized to capture nonequilibrium thermodynamics effects. The phase density function satisfies the linearized Boltzmann equation and the collision invariance property. Our formulation provides the correct value of the Prandtl number as it involves two different relaxation times for momentum and energy transport by diffusion. Generalized three-dimensional constitutive equations for different kinds of molecules are derived using the phase density function. The derived constitutive equations involve cross single derivatives of field variables such as temperature and velocity, with no higher-order derivative in higher-order terms. This is remarkable feature of the equations as the number of boundary conditions required is the same as needed for conventional Navier-Stokes equations. Linear stability analysis of the equations is performed, which shows that the derived equations are unconditionally stable. A comparison of the derived equations with existing Burnett-type equations is presented and salient features of our equations are outlined. The classic internal flow problem, force-driven compressible plane Poiseuille flow, is chosen to verify the stable Burnett equations and the results for equilibrium variables are presented.

  10. Study on the flow reduction of forced flow superconducting magnet and its stable operation condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The forced flow superconducting coil especially made from a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC) is applied for large-scale devices such as fusion magnets and superconducting magnet energy storage (SMES) because it has high mechanical and electrical performance potential. The flow reduction phenomena caused by AC loss generation due to the pulsed operation was found based on the experimental results of three forced flow superconducting coils. And relation between the AC loss generation and flow reduction was defined from viewpoint of the engineering design and operation of the coils. Also the mechanism of flow reduction was investigated and stable operation condition under the flow reduction was clarified for forced flow superconducting coils. First, experiments of three different large-scale superconducting coils were carried out and experimental database of the flow reduction by AC loss generation was established. It was found experimentally that the flow reduction depends on the AC loss generation (W/m{sup 3}) in all of coils. It means the stable operation condition is defined not only the electro magnetism of superconducting coil but also flow condition. Mechanism of the flow reduction was investigated based on the experimental database. Hydraulics was applied to supercritical helium as a coolant. Also performances of the cryogenic pump by which coolant are supplied to the coil and friction of the superconductor as cooling path is considered for hydraulic estimation. The flow reduction of the coil is clarified and predictable by the equations of continuity, momentum and energy balance. Also total mass flow rate of coolant was discussed. The estimation method in the design phase was developed for total mass flow rate which are required under the flow reduction by AC losses. The friction of the superconductor and performance of cryogenic pump should be required for precise prediction of flow reduction. These values were obtained by the experiment data of coil and

  11. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann for Compressible Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Li Yingjun; Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new flux limiter scheme with the splitting technique is successfully incorporated into a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for shacked compressible flows. The proposed flux limiter scheme is efficient in decreasing the artificial oscillations and numerical diffusion around the interface. Due to the kinetic nature, some interface problems being difficult to handle at the macroscopic level can be modeled more naturally through the LB method. Numerical simulations for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability show that with the new model the computed interfaces are smoother and more consistent with physical analysis. The growth rates of bubble and spike present a satisfying agreement with the theoretical predictions and other numerical simulations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Embodied memory: effective and stable perception by combining optic flow and image structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing Samantha; Bingham, Ned; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2013-12-01

    Visual perception studies typically focus either on optic flow structure or image structure, but not on the combination and interaction of these two sources of information. Each offers unique strengths in contrast to the other's weaknesses. Optic flow yields intrinsically powerful information about 3D structure, but is ephemeral. It ceases when motion stops. Image structure is less powerful in specifying 3D structure, but is stable. It remains when motion stops. Optic flow and image structure are intrinsically related in vision because the optic flow carries one image to the next. This relation is especially important in the context of progressive occlusion, in which optic flow provides information about the location of targets hidden in subsequent image structure. In four experiments, we investigated the role of image structure in "embodied memory" in contrast to memory that is only in the head. We found that either optic flow (Experiment 1) or image structure (Experiment 2) alone were relatively ineffective, whereas the combination was effective and, in contrast to conditions requiring reliance on memory-in-the-head, much more stable over extended time (Experiments 2 through 4). Limits well documented for visual short memory (that is, memory-in-the-head) were strongly exceeded by embodied memory. The findings support J. J. Gibson's (1979/1986, The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception, Boston, MA, Houghton Mifflin) insights about progressive occlusion and the embodied nature of perception and memory.

  13. Stable low-dissipation schemes for turbulent compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbareddy, Pramod Kumar V.

    Shock capturing schemes, which are commonly used in compressible flow simulations, introduce excessive amounts of numerical viscosity which smears out small scale flow features. A few low-dissipation methods have been proposed in the recent literature. They are more selective in the sense that they explicitly identify the portion of the numerical flux that is diffusive and damp its effect in 'smooth' regions of the flow. This work employs flux vector splitting methods; the dissipative portions of the Steger-Warming schemes are explicitly identified and various shock detection switches are explored. For high Reynolds number flows, especially when the energetic scales are close to the Nyquist limits of the grids used, aliasing errors become noticeable. These high frequency oscillations that arise due to the nonlinear nature of the Navier-Stokes equations cause solutions to become unstable. When dissipative methods are used, these errors are suppressed; however when using low-dissipation schemes, they can be prominent and need to be addressed by some other means. In this thesis, we focus on methods that enhance stability by enforcing 'secondary conservation' - the fluxes are constrained in such a way that a conservation law for a secondary, positive quantity is also satisified. In particular, we focus on kinetic energy, and a fully discrete (in time and space) 'kinetic energy consistent' scheme is derived and tested. Hybrid RAMS-LES methods such as Detached Eddy Simulations are necessary in order to make simulations of high speed flows with attached boundary layers affordable. A popular DES model is based on the Spalart-Allmaras RANS equation; a minor modification to the length scale makes the model behave in a hybrid manner. The S-A model itself was constructed using mostly empirical arguments by the authors. This model is analyzed and its connection to other turbulence models, in particular, the ksgs equation, is explored. A dynamic version of the model is proposed

  14. Evaporation and abstraction determined from stable isotopes during normal flow on the Gariep River, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Roger E.; Jack, Sam

    2018-04-01

    Changes in the stable isotope composition of water can, with the aid of climatic parameters, be used to calculate the quantity of evaporation from a water body. Previous workers have mostly focused on small, research catchments, with abundant data, but of limited scope. This study aimed to expand such work to a regional or sub-continental scale. The first full length isotope survey of the Gariep River quantifies evaporation on the river and the man-made reservoirs for the first time, and proposes a technique to calculate abstraction from the river. The theoretically determined final isotope composition for an evaporating water body in the given climate lies on the empirically determined local evaporation line, validating the assumptions and inputs to the Craig-Gordon evaporation model that was used. Evaporation from the Gariep River amounts to around 20% of flow, or 40 m3/s, of which about half is due to evaporation from the surface of the Gariep and Vanderkloof Reservoirs, showing the wastefulness of large surface water impoundments. This compares well with previous estimates based on evapotranspiration calculations, and equates to around 1300 GL/a of water, or about the annual water consumption of Johannesburg and Pretoria, where over 10 million people reside. Using similar evaporation calculations and applying existing transpiration estimates to a gauged length of river, the remaining quantity can be attributed to abstraction, amounting to 175 L/s/km in the lower middle reaches of the river. Given that high water demand and climate change are global problems, and with the challenges of maintaining water monitoring networks, stable isotopes are shown to be applicable over regional to national scales for modelling hydrological flows. Stable isotopes provide a complementary method to conventional flow gauging for understanding hydrology and management of large water resources, particularly in arid areas subject to significant evaporation.

  15. Investigations on interactions between the flowing liquid lithium limiter and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, J.; Zuo, G.Z.; Hu, J.S.; Sun, Z.; Li, J.G.; Zakharov, L.E.; Ruzic, D.N.; Xu, W.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Two different designs of flowing liquid lithium limiter were first tested for power exhaust and particle removal in HT-7 in 2012 autumn campaign. During the experiments, the reliability and compatibility of the limiters within Tokamak were experimentally demonstrated, and some positive results were achieved. It was found that the flowing liquid lithium limiter was effective for suppressing H concentration and led to a low ratio of H/(H + D). O impurity was slightly decreased by using limiters as well as when using a Li coating. A significant increase of the wall retention ratio was also observed which resulted from the outstanding D particles pumping ability of flowing liquid lithium limiters. The strong interaction between plasma and lithium surface could cause lithium ejection into plasma and lead to disruptions. The stable plasmas produced by uniform Li flow were in favor of lithium control. While the limiters were applied with a uniform Li flow, the normal plasma was easy to be obtained, and the energy confinement time increased from ∼0.025 s to 0.04 s. Furthermore, it was encouraging to note that the application of flowing liquid lithium limiters could further improve the confinement of plasma by ∼10% on the basis of Li coating. These remarkable results will help for the following design of flowing liquid lithium limiter in EAST to improve the plasma operation.

  16. Estimating Postsecondary Student Flow with Limited Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, David L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented that combines a polynomial lag econometric model with a goal programming model to satisfy the known conditions while making efficient use of limited data. The model is applied to data for a large public university. (Author/MLW)

  17. Pedestrian Flow in the Mean Field Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Haji Ali, Abdul Lateef

    2012-11-01

    We study the mean-field limit of a particle-based system modeling the behavior of many indistinguishable pedestrians as their number increases. The base model is a modified version of Helbing\\'s social force model. In the mean-field limit, the time-dependent density of two-dimensional pedestrians satisfies a four-dimensional integro-differential Fokker-Planck equation. To approximate the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation we use a time-splitting approach and solve the diffusion part using a Crank-Nicholson method. The advection part is solved using a Lax-Wendroff-Leveque method or an upwind Backward Euler method depending on the advection speed. Moreover, we use multilevel Monte Carlo to estimate observables from the particle-based system. We discuss these numerical methods, and present numerical results showing the convergence of observables that were calculated using the particle-based model as the number of pedestrians increases to those calculated using the probability density function satisfying the Fokker-Planck equation.

  18. Counter-current flow limited CHF in thin rectangular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, L.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical expression for counter-current-flow-limitation (CCFL) was used to predict critical heat flux (CHF) for downward flow in thin vertical rectangular channels which are prototypes of coolant channels in test and research nuclear reactors. Top flooding is the mechanism for counter-current flow limited CHF. The CCFL correlation also was used to determine the circulation and flooding-limited CHF. Good agreements were observed between the period the model predictions and data on the CHF for downflow. The minimum CHF for downflow is lower than the flooding-limited CHF and it is predicted to occur at a liquid flow rate higher than that at the flooding limit. 17 refs., 7 figs

  19. On the Stable Limit Cycle of a Weight-Driven Pendulum Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llibre, J; Teixeira, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper (Denny 2002 Eur. J. Phys. 23 449-58), entitled "The pendulum clock: a venerable dynamical system", Denny showed that in a first approximation the steady-state motion of a weight-driven pendulum clock is shown to be a stable limit cycle. He placed the problem in a historical context and obtained an approximate solution using the…

  20. Fractional flow reserve-guided PCI for stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruyne, Bernard; Fearon, William F; Pijls, Nico H J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that in patients with stable coronary artery disease and stenosis, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed on the basis of the fractional flow reserve (FFR) would be superior to medical therapy. METHODS: In 1220 patients with stable coronary artery disease, we...... years was lower in the PCI group than in the medical-therapy group (4.6% vs. 8.0%, P=0.04). Among registry patients, the rate of the primary end point was 9.0% at 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with stable coronary artery disease, FFR-guided PCI, as compared with medical therapy alone, improved...

  1. New methods to enhance cerebral flow maps made by the stable xenon/CT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wist, A.O.; Fatouros, P.P.; Kishore, P.R.S.; Weiss, J.; Cothran, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors developed several new techniques to extract the important information of the high-resolution flow maps as they are being generated by our improved stable Xe/CT technique. First, they adapted a new morphologic filtering technique to separate white, white/gray and gray matter. Second, they generated iso-flow lines using the same filtering technique for easier reading of the values in the flow map. Third, by combining the information in both maps, the authors constructed a new map which shows the areas of high, normal, and low blood flow for the whole brain. When combined with anatomic information, the information in the map can indicate the probable pathologic areas. Fourth, they were able to reduce the calculation time of the flow by almost a factor of 10 by developing a new, faster algorithm for calculating the flow

  2. Numerical study on flow rate limitation of open capillary channel flow through a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristics of slender-column flow in wedge-shaped channel under microgravity condition are investigated in this work. The one-dimensional theoretical model is applied to predict the critical flow rate and surface contour of stable flow. However, the one-dimensional model overestimates the critical flow rate for not considering the extra pressure loss. Then, we develop a three-dimensional simulation method with OpenFOAM, a computational fluid dynamics tool, to simulate various phenomena in wedge channels with different lengths. The numerical results are verified with the capillary channel flow experimental data on the International Space Station. We find that the three-dimensional simulation perfectly predicts the critical flow rates and surface contours under various flow conditions. Meanwhile, the general behaviors in subcritical, critical, and supercritical flow are studied in three-dimensional simulation considering variations of flow rate and open channel length. The numerical techniques for three-dimensional simulation is validated for a wide range of configurations and is hopeful to provide valuable guidance for capillary channel flow experiment and efficient liquid management in space.

  3. Determining the Limiting Current Density of Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yu Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available All-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs are used as energy storage systems for intermittent renewable power sources. The performance of VRFBs depends on materials of key components and operating conditions, such as current density, electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition. Mass transfer overpotential is affected by the electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition, which is related to the limiting current density. In order to investigate the effect of operating conditions on mass transport overpotential, this study established a relationship between the limiting current density and operating conditions. First, electrolyte solutions with different states of charge were prepared and used for a single cell to obtain discharging polarization curves under various operating conditions. The experimental results were then analyzed and are discussed in this paper. Finally, this paper proposes a limiting current density as a function of operating conditions. The result helps predict the effect of operating condition on the cell performance in a mathematical model.

  4. Stable Galerkin versus equal-order Galerkin least-squares elements for the stokes flow problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, L.P.; Frey, S.L.; Sampaio, R.

    1989-11-01

    Numerical experiments are performed for the stokes flow problem employing a stable Galerkin method and a Galerkin/Least-squares method with equal-order elements. Error estimates for the methods tested herein are reviewed. The numerical results presented attest the good stability properties of all methods examined herein. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  5. Modelling of the flow of stable air over a complex region

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholtz, MT

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of stable air over a general region of complex topography and non-uniform surface temperature has been investigated. In order to gain further understanding of the motion of surface air, it was necessary to study the vertical structure...

  6. Evapotranspiration components determined by stable isotope, sap flow and eddy covariance techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, D.G.; Cable, W.; Hultine, K.; Hoedjes, J.C.B.; Yepez, E.A.; Simonneaux, V.; Er-Raki, S.; Boulet, G.; Debruin, H.A.R.; Chehbouni, A.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Timouk, F.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding and modeling water exchange in and and semiarid ecosystems is complicated by the very heterogeneous distribution of vegetation and moisture inputs, and the difficulty of measuring and validating component fluxes at a common scale. We combined eddy covariance (EC), sap flow, and stable

  7. Development of a setup to enable stable and accurate flow conditions for membrane biofouling studies

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2015-07-10

    Systematic laboratory studies on membrane biofouling require experimental conditions that are well defined and representative for practice. Hydrodynamics and flow rate variations affect biofilm formation, morphology, and detachment and impacts on membrane performance parameters such as feed channel pressure drop. There is a suite of available monitors to study biofouling, but systems to operate monitors have not been well designed to achieve an accurate, constant water flow required for a reliable determination of biomass accumulation and feed channel pressure drop increase. Studies were done with membrane fouling simulators operated in parallel with manual and automated flow control, with and without dosage of a biodegradable substrate to the feedwater to enhance biofouling rate. High flow rate variations were observed for the manual water flow system (up to ≈9%) compared to the automatic flow control system (<1%). The flow rate variation in the manual system was strongly increased by biofilm accumulation, while the automatic system maintained an accurate and constant water flow in the monitor. The flow rate influences the biofilm accumulation and the impact of accumulated biofilm on membrane performance. The effect of the same amount of accumulated biomass on the pressure drop increase was related to the linear flow velocity. Stable and accurate feedwater flow rates are essential for biofouling studies in well-defined conditions in membrane systems. © 2015 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  8. The limiting current in a one-dimensional situation: Transition from a space charge limited to magnetically limited flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Raghwendra; Biswas, Debabrata

    2008-01-01

    For a nonrelativistic electron beam propagating in a cylindrical drift tube, it is shown that the limiting current density does not saturate to the electrostatic one-dimensional (1D) estimate with increasing beam radius. Fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation studies show that beyond a critical aspect ratio, the limiting current density is lower than the 1D electrostatic prediction. The lowering in the limiting current density is found to be due to the transition from the space charge limited to magnetically limited flow. An adaptation of Alfven's single particle trajectory method is used to estimate the magnetically limited current as well as the critical radius beyond which the flow is magnetically limited in a drift tube. The predictions are found to be in close agreement with PIC simulations

  9. Correlation of Normal Gravity Mixed Convection Blowoff Limits with Microgravity Forced Flow Blowoff Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Jeremy W.; Olson, Sandra L.; Ferkul, Paul V.

    2016-01-01

    The axisymmetric rod geometry in upward axial stagnation flow provides a simple way to measure normal gravity blowoff limits to compare with microgravity Burning and Suppression of Solids - II (BASS-II) results recently obtained aboard the International Space Station. This testing utilized the same BASS-II concurrent rod geometry, but with the addition of normal gravity buoyant flow. Cast polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rods of diameters ranging from 0.635 cm to 3.81 cm were burned at oxygen concentrations ranging from 14 to 18% by volume. The forced flow velocity where blowoff occurred was determined for each rod size and oxygen concentration. These blowoff limits compare favorably with the BASS-II results when the buoyant stretch is included and the flow is corrected by considering the blockage factor of the fuel. From these results, the normal gravity blowoff boundary for this axisymmetric rod geometry is determined to be linear, with oxygen concentration directly proportional to flow speed. We describe a new normal gravity 'upward flame spread test' method which extrapolates the linear blowoff boundary to the zero stretch limit in order to resolve microgravity flammability limits-something current methods cannot do. This new test method can improve spacecraft fire safety for future exploration missions by providing a tractable way to obtain good estimates of material flammability in low gravity.

  10. Weighted Polynomial Approximation for Automated Detection of Inspiratory Flow Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Cheng Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspiratory flow limitation (IFL is a critical symptom of sleep breathing disorders. A characteristic flattened flow-time curve indicates the presence of highest resistance flow limitation. This study involved investigating a real-time algorithm for detecting IFL during sleep. Three categories of inspiratory flow shape were collected from previous studies for use as a development set. Of these, 16 cases were labeled as non-IFL and 78 as IFL which were further categorized into minor level (20 cases and severe level (58 cases of obstruction. In this study, algorithms using polynomial functions were proposed for extracting the features of IFL. Methods using first- to third-order polynomial approximations were applied to calculate the fitting curve to obtain the mean absolute error. The proposed algorithm is described by the weighted third-order (w.3rd-order polynomial function. For validation, a total of 1,093 inspiratory breaths were acquired as a test set. The accuracy levels of the classifications produced by the presented feature detection methods were analyzed, and the performance levels were compared using a misclassification cobweb. According to the results, the algorithm using the w.3rd-order polynomial approximation achieved an accuracy of 94.14% for IFL classification. We concluded that this algorithm achieved effective automatic IFL detection during sleep.

  11. Solute dispersion for stable density-driven flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Oca, Aronne; Riva, Monica; Carrera, Jesus; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the processes underpinning the reduced longitudinal spreading documented in stable variable density flows, as opposed to constant density settings, within heterogeneous porous media. We do so by decomposing velocity and pressure in terms of stationary and dynamic components. The former corresponds to the solution of the constant density flow problem, while the latter accounts for the effects induced by density variability. We focus on a stable flow configuration and analyze the longitudinal spread of saltwater injected from the bottom of a column formed by a heterogeneous porous medium initially fully saturated by freshwater. We adopt a perturbation expansion approach and derive the equations satisfied by section-averaged concentrations and their ensemble mean values. These formulations are respectively characterized by a single realization and an ensemble dispersive flux, which we determine through appropriate closure equations. The latter are solved via semi-analytical and numerical approaches. Our formulations and associated results enable us to discriminate the relative impact on the density-driven solute displacement of (a) covariance of the permeability of the porous medium, (b) cross-covariance between permeability and concentration, which is in turn linked to the coupling of flow and transport problems, and (c) cross-covariance between the dynamic and stationary velocities.

  12. Calculation of Wind Power Limit adjusting the Continuation Power Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Fuentefria, Ariel; Castro Fernández, Miguel; Martínez García, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The wind power insertion in the power system is an important issue and can create some instability problems in voltage and system frequency due to stochastic origin of wind. Know the Wind Power Limit is a very important matter. Existing in bibliography a few methods for calculation of wind power limit. The calculation is based in static constrains, dynamic constraints or both. In this paper is developed a method for the calculation of wind power limit using some adjust in the continuation power flow, and having into account the static constrains. The method is complemented with Minimal Power Production Criterion. The method is proved in the Isla de la Juventud Electric System. The software used in the simulations was the Power System Analysis Toolbox (PSAT). (author)

  13. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Koulouris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD often exhale along the same flow–volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFLT. Therefore, EFLT, namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFLT leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFLT occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage, in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFLT are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  14. Stable xenon CT measurement of cerebral blood flow in cardiac transplantation candidates: Correlation with cognitive function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bello, J.A.; Fink, M.E.; Hilal, S.K.; Rose, E.A.; Reemtsma, K.

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen consecutive unselected patients with NYHA class 4 cardiac failure referred for cardiac transplantation underwent neurologic examination and cerebral blood flow measurement (rCBF) using the stable xenon enhanced CT method on a GE9800 system. Eleven men and two women were studied (mean age = 43.8 +- 6.1). On neurological examination, six of the patients demonstrated normal mental function; the remaining seven patients demonstrated memory, language, or learning impairment. There was no difference in mean cardiac output between the groups (4.9 L/min +- 1.68 vs. 4.2L/min +- 1.57). rCBF was significantly reduced in the impaired group. Cognitive impairment in patients with cardiac failure can be correlated with cerebral ischemia. Stable xenon CT measurement of rCBF in transplant candidates may help identify patients requiring more rapid transplantation to prevent permanent cerebral injury

  15. Fractional flow reserve is not associated with inflammatory markers in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem E M Sels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition and increased blood levels of inflammatory biomarkers have been observed in acute coronary syndromes. In addition, high expression of inflammatory markers is associated with worse prognosis of coronary artery disease. The presence and extent of inducible ischemia in patients with stable angina has previously been shown to have strong prognostic value. We hypothesized that evidence of inducible myocardial ischemia by local lesions, as measured by fractional flow reserve (FFR, is associated with increased levels of blood based inflammatory biomarkers. METHODS: Whole blood samples of 89 patients with stable angina pectoris and 16 healthy controls were analyzed. The patients with stable angina pectoris underwent coronary angiography and FFR of all coronary lesions. We analyzed plasma levels of cytokines IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and membrane expression of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4, CD11b, CD62L and CD14 on monocytes and granulocytes as markers of inflammation. Furthermore, we quantified the severity of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease by calculating Functional Syntax Score (FSS, an extension of the Syntax Score. RESULTS: For the majority of biomarkers, we observed lower levels in the healthy control group compared with patients with stable angina who underwent coronary catheterization. We found no difference for any of the selected biomarkers between patients with a positive FFR (≤ 0.75 and negative FFR (>0.80. We observed no relationship between the investigated biomarkers and FSS. CONCLUSION: The presence of local atherosclerotic lesions that result in inducible myocardial ischemia as measured by FFR in patients with stable coronary artery disease is not associated with increased plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α or increased expression of TLR2 and TLR4, CD11b, CD62L and CD14 on circulating leukocytes.

  16. Stability limits of superhydrophobic longitudinal microgrooves in high Reynolds number turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegari, Amirreza; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2017-11-01

    The stability of the liquid/gas interfaces on SuperHydrophobic (SH) Longitudinal MicroGrooves (LMGs) in high Reynolds number turbulent flows of practical interest is investigated by analytical extrapolation of DNS results in turbulent channel flow at Reτ0 222 and 442 with SH LMGs at protrusion angle of θ = -30o . Given that the magnitude of pressure fluctuations in turbulent channel flow scales as prms+ √{ ln(Reτ) } , it is found that the stability limits of SH LMGs diminishes by factors of 4 when the Reynolds number of the base flow increases from Reτ0 200 of DNS to Reτ0 105 -106 of practical applications. For SH LMGs operating at Weber numbers of We+0 ≡ μuτ0 / σ 3 ×10-3 - 1.5 ×10-2 , corresponding to friction velocities of uτ0 0.2 - 1 m/s, this limits the size of stable LMGs to g+0 5 - 30 at Reτ0 105 and g+0 4 - 20 at Reτ0 106 , and the maximum drag reductions to DRmax 20 - 30 % at Reτ0 105 and DRmax 10 - 20 % at Reτ0 106 .

  17. Stable and sensitive flow-through monitoring of phenol using a carbon nanotube based screen printed biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, G; Guix, M; Ambrosi, A; Merkoci, A [Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Ramirez Silva, M T [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico); Palomar Pardave, M E, E-mail: arben.merkoci.icn@uab.es [Departamento de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Azcapotzalco, 02200 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2010-06-18

    A stable and sensitive biosensor for phenol detection based on a screen printed electrode modified with tyrosinase, multiwall carbon nanotubes and glutaraldehyde is designed and applied in a flow injection analytical system. The proposed carbon nanotube matrix is easy to prepare and ensures a very good entrapment environment for the enzyme, being simpler and cheaper than other reported strategies. In addition, the proposed matrix allows for a very fast operation of the enzyme, that leads to a response time of 15 s. Several parameters such as the working potential, pH of the measuring solution, biosensor response time, detection limit, linear range of response and sensitivity are studied. The obtained detection limit for phenol was 0.14 x 10{sup -6} M. The biosensor keeps its activity during continuous FIA measurements at room temperature, showing a stable response (RSD 5%) within a two week working period at room temperature. The developed biosensor is being applied for phenol detection in seawater samples and seems to be a promising alternative for automatic control of seawater contamination. The developed detection system can be extended to other enzyme biosensors with interest for several other applications.

  18. SPH modelling of depth‐limited turbulent open channel flows over rough boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Ehsan; Nichols, Andrew; Tait, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Summary A numerical model based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is developed to simulate depth‐limited turbulent open channel flows over hydraulically rough beds. The 2D Lagrangian form of the Navier–Stokes equations is solved, in which a drag‐based formulation is used based on an effective roughness zone near the bed to account for the roughness effect of bed spheres and an improved sub‐particle‐scale model is applied to account for the effect of turbulence. The sub‐particle‐scale model is constructed based on the mixing‐length assumption rather than the standard Smagorinsky approach to compute the eddy‐viscosity. A robust in/out‐flow boundary technique is also proposed to achieve stable uniform flow conditions at the inlet and outlet boundaries where the flow characteristics are unknown. The model is applied to simulate uniform open channel flows over a rough bed composed of regular spheres and validated by experimental velocity data. To investigate the influence of the bed roughness on different flow conditions, data from 12 experimental tests with different bed slopes and uniform water depths are simulated, and a good agreement has been observed between the model and experimental results of the streamwise velocity and turbulent shear stress. This shows that both the roughness effect and flow turbulence should be addressed in order to simulate the correct mechanisms of turbulent flow over a rough bed boundary and that the presented smoothed particle hydrodynamics model accomplishes this successfully. © 2016 The Authors International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:28066121

  19. Peak-counts blood flow model-errors and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Marani, S.K.; Ekas, R.D.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    The peak-counts model has several advantages, but its use may be limited due to the condition that the venous egress may not be negligible at the time of peak-counts. Consequently, blood flow measurements by the peak-counts model will depend on the bolus size, bolus duration, and the minimum transit time of the bolus through the region of interest. The effect of bolus size on the measurement of extraction fraction and blood flow was evaluated by injecting 1 to 30ml of rubidium chloride in the femoral vein of a dog and measuring the myocardial activity with a beta probe over the heart. Regional blood flow measurements were not found to vary with bolus sizes up to 30ml. The effect of bolus duration was studied by injecting a 10cc bolus of tracer at different speeds in the femoral vein of a dog. All intravenous injections undergo a broadening of the bolus duration due to the transit time of the tracer through the lungs and the heart. This transit time was found to range from 4-6 second FWHM and dominates the duration of the bolus to the myocardium for up to 3 second injections. A computer simulation has been carried out in which the different parameters of delay time, extraction fraction, and bolus duration can be changed to assess the errors in the peak-counts model. The results of the simulations show that the error will be greatest for short transit time delays and for low extraction fractions

  20. Assessment and monitoring of flow limitation and other parameters from flow/volume loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueck, R

    2000-01-01

    Flow/volume (F/V) spirometry is routinely used for assessing the type and severity of lung disease. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and timed vital capacity (FEV1) provide the best estimates of airflow obstruction in patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema. Computerized spirometers are now available for early home recognition of asthma exacerbation in high risk patients with severe persistent disease, and for recognition of either infection or rejection in lung transplant patients. Patients with severe COPD may exhibit expiratory flow limitation (EFL) on tidal volume (VT) expiratory F/V (VTF/V) curves, either with or without applying negative expiratory pressure (NEP). EFL results in dynamic hyperinflation and persistently raised alveolar pressure or intrinsic PEEP (PEEPi). Hyperinflation and raised PEEPi greatly enhance dyspnea with exertion through the added work of the threshold load needed to overcome raised pleural pressure. Esophageal (pleural) pressure monitoring may be added to VTF/V loops for assessing the severity of PEEPi: 1) to optimize assisted ventilation by mask or via endotracheal tube with high inspiratory flow rates to lower I:E ratio, and 2) to assess the efficacy of either pressure support ventilation (PSV) or low level extrinsic PEEP in reducing the threshold load of PEEPi. Intraoperative tidal volume F/V loops can also be used to document the efficacy of emphysema lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) via disappearance of EFL. Finally, the mechanism of ventilatory constraint can be identified with the use of exercise tidal volume F/V loops referenced to maximum F/V loops and static lung volumes. Patients with severe COPD show inspiratory F/V loops approaching 95% of total lung capacity, and flow limitation over the entire expiratory F/V curve during light levels of exercise. Surprisingly, patients with a history of congestive heart failure may lower lung volume towards residual volume during exercise

  1. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment: A Prelude to an α-Ω Dynamo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy; Ferrel, Regnar; Li, Hui; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John

    2011-01-01

    The Ω phase of the liquid sodium α-Ω dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field B φ that is ≅8xB r , where B r is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm≅120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of (δv/v) 2 ∼10 -3 .

  2. Linearly decoupled energy-stable numerical methods for multi-component two-phase compressible flow

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-12-06

    In this paper, for the first time we propose two linear, decoupled, energy-stable numerical schemes for multi-component two-phase compressible flow with a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). The methods are constructed based on the scalar auxiliary variable (SAV) approaches for Helmholtz free energy and the intermediate velocities that are designed to decouple the tight relationship between velocity and molar densities. The intermediate velocities are also involved in the discrete momentum equation to ensure a consistency relationship with the mass balance equations. Moreover, we propose a component-wise SAV approach for a multi-component fluid, which requires solving a sequence of linear, separate mass balance equations. We prove that the methods have the unconditional energy-dissipation feature. Numerical results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  3. Numerically stable fluid–structure interactions between compressible flow and solid structures

    KAUST Repository

    Grétarsson, Jón Tómas

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel method to implicitly two-way couple Eulerian compressible flow to volumetric Lagrangian solids. The method works for both deformable and rigid solids and for arbitrary equations of state. The method exploits the formulation of [11] which solves compressible fluid in a semi-implicit manner, solving for the advection part explicitly and then correcting the intermediate state to time tn+1 using an implicit pressure, obtained by solving a modified Poisson system. Similar to previous fluid-structure interaction methods, we apply pressure forces to the solid and enforce a velocity boundary condition on the fluid in order to satisfy a no-slip constraint. Unlike previous methods, however, we apply these coupled interactions implicitly by adding the constraint to the pressure system and combining it with any implicit solid forces in order to obtain a strongly coupled, symmetric indefinite system (similar to [17], which only handles incompressible flow). We also show that, under a few reasonable assumptions, this system can be made symmetric positive-definite by following the methodology of [16]. Because our method handles the fluid-structure interactions implicitly, we avoid introducing any new time step restrictions and obtain stable results even for high density-to-mass ratios, where explicit methods struggle or fail. We exactly conserve momentum and kinetic energy (thermal fluid-structure interactions are not considered) at the fluid-structure interface, and hence naturally handle highly non-linear phenomenon such as shocks, contacts and rarefactions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  4. A simple and highly stable free-flow electrophoresis device with thermoelectric cooling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Guo, Cheng-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Shen, Qiao-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Zhang; Li, Jun; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Jin, Xin-Qiao

    2013-12-20

    Complex assembly, inconvenient operations, poor control of Joule heating and leakage of solution are still fundamental issues greatly hindering application of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) for preparative purpose in bio-separation. To address these issues, a novel FFE device was developed based on our previous work. Firstly, a new mechanical structure was designed for compact assembly of separation chamber, fast removal of air bubble, and good anti-leakage performance. Secondly, a highly efficient thermoelectric cooling system was used for dispersing Joule heating for the first time. The systemic experiments revealed the three merits: (i) 3min assembly without any liquid leakage, 80 times faster than pervious FFE device designed by us or commercial device (4h); (ii) 5s removing of air bubble in chamber, 1000-fold faster than a normal one (2h or more) and (iii) good control of Joule heating by the cooling system. These merits endowed the device high stable thermo- and hydro-dynamic flow for long-term separation even under high electric field of 63V/cm. Finally, the developed device was used for up to 8h continuous separation of 5mg/mL fuchsin acid and purification of three model proteins of phycocyanin, myoglobin and cytochrome C, demonstrating the applicability of FFE. The developed FFE device has evident significance to the studies on stem cell, cell or organelle proteomics, and protein complex as well as micro- or nano-particles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SOME LIMIT THEORY FOR THE SELF-NORMALIZED PERIODOGRAM OF STABLE PROCESSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLUPPELBERG, C; MIKOSCH, T

    1994-01-01

    Let X(t) = Sigma(j)(infinity) = (-infinity) psi(j)Z(t-j) be a discrete moving average process based on i.i.d. random variables (Z(t),)(t epsilon Z) with common distribution function from the domain of normal attraction of a p-stable law (0

  6. A stable partitioned FSI algorithm for rigid bodies and incompressible flow. Part II: General formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, J. W.; Henshaw, W. D.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Tang, Qi

    2017-08-01

    A stable partitioned algorithm is developed for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving viscous incompressible flow and rigid bodies. This added-mass partitioned (AMP) algorithm remains stable, without sub-iterations, for light and even zero mass rigid bodies when added-mass and viscous added-damping effects are large. The scheme is based on a generalized Robin interface condition for the fluid pressure that includes terms involving the linear acceleration and angular acceleration of the rigid body. Added mass effects are handled in the Robin condition by inclusion of a boundary integral term that depends on the pressure. Added-damping effects due to the viscous shear forces on the body are treated by inclusion of added-damping tensors that are derived through a linearization of the integrals defining the force and torque. Added-damping effects may be important at low Reynolds number, or, for example, in the case of a rotating cylinder or rotating sphere when the rotational moments of inertia are small. In this second part of a two-part series, the general formulation of the AMP scheme is presented including the form of the AMP interface conditions and added-damping tensors for general geometries. A fully second-order accurate implementation of the AMP scheme is developed in two dimensions based on a fractional-step method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using finite difference methods and overlapping grids to handle the moving geometry. The numerical scheme is verified on a number of difficult benchmark problems.

  7. A stable partitioned FSI algorithm for rigid bodies and incompressible flow. Part I: Model problem analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, J. W.; Henshaw, W. D.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Tang, Qi

    2017-08-01

    A stable partitioned algorithm is developed for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving viscous incompressible flow and rigid bodies. This added-mass partitioned (AMP) algorithm remains stable, without sub-iterations, for light and even zero mass rigid bodies when added-mass and viscous added-damping effects are large. The scheme is based on a generalized Robin interface condition for the fluid pressure that includes terms involving the linear acceleration and angular acceleration of the rigid body. Added-mass effects are handled in the Robin condition by inclusion of a boundary integral term that depends on the pressure. Added-damping effects due to the viscous shear forces on the body are treated by inclusion of added-damping tensors that are derived through a linearization of the integrals defining the force and torque. Added-damping effects may be important at low Reynolds number, or, for example, in the case of a rotating cylinder or rotating sphere when the rotational moments of inertia are small. In this first part of a two-part series, the properties of the AMP scheme are motivated and evaluated through the development and analysis of some model problems. The analysis shows when and why the traditional partitioned scheme becomes unstable due to either added-mass or added-damping effects. The analysis also identifies the proper form of the added-damping which depends on the discrete time-step and the grid-spacing normal to the rigid body. The results of the analysis are confirmed with numerical simulations that also demonstrate a second-order accurate implementation of the AMP scheme.

  8. High-Resolution Modeling of Flow Partitioning: Tracer Comparison Between Water Stable Isotopes and Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, C.; Mosquera, G.; Crespo, P.

    2017-12-01

    The identification of water sources contributing to runoff is critical to understand the relation between water and biogeochemical cycles. During rainstorm events runoff can be composed of fractions of event and pre-event water. Tracers in two-component end member mixing analysis are commonly used to investigate these relative contributions to total runoff. However, tracer data are often only available at low temporal resolution, leading to high uncertainties in the estimation of flow components. Here, we present TraSPAN a new numerical tracer based streamflow-partitioning model that simulates both the tracer mass balance and the water flux response at the event scale. TraSPAN has four different structures representing different internal catchment hydrologic characteristics. We used high-resolution (0.25-5 hours) hydrometric and tracer (water stable isotopes (WSI) and electrical conductivity (EC)) data to simulate flow partitioning and compare the results between tracers for a storm in a forest headwater catchment at the western Oregon Cascades. Our results show that flow partitioning and transit time functions (TTFs) of event and pre-event water are well defined using either EC or WSI. The same model structure provided the best fit in both cases (Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency > 0.9). This structure includes 2 reservoirs in parallel to route the event and pre-event water fractions following independent TTFs and allows a time-variant fraction of precipitation routed as event water over the course of the storm. The level of agreement between the results attained with EC and WSI is remarkable in terms of parameter values and TTFs. Given the high cost and effort associated to the collection and analysis of WSI at high temporal resolution, our results provide great promise for the use of EC as a tracer in high-resolution flow partitioning modeling. The use of such an inexpensive tracer could allow for detailed investigation of the relative importance of internal (e

  9. A stable partitioned FSI algorithm for incompressible flow and deforming beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.; Henshaw, W.D.; Banks, J.W.; Schwendeman, D.W.; Main, A.

    2016-01-01

    An added-mass partitioned (AMP) algorithm is described for solving fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems coupling incompressible flows with thin elastic structures undergoing finite deformations. The new AMP scheme is fully second-order accurate and stable, without sub-time-step iterations, even for very light structures when added-mass effects are strong. The fluid, governed by the incompressible Navier–Stokes equations, is solved in velocity-pressure form using a fractional-step method; large deformations are treated with a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian approach on deforming composite grids. The motion of the thin structure is governed by a generalized Euler–Bernoulli beam model, and these equations are solved in a Lagrangian frame using two approaches, one based on finite differences and the other on finite elements. The key AMP interface condition is a generalized Robin (mixed) condition on the fluid pressure. This condition, which is derived at a continuous level, has no adjustable parameters and is applied at the discrete level to couple the partitioned domain solvers. Special treatment of the AMP condition is required to couple the finite-element beam solver with the finite-difference-based fluid solver, and two coupling approaches are described. A normal-mode stability analysis is performed for a linearized model problem involving a beam separating two fluid domains, and it is shown that the AMP scheme is stable independent of the ratio of the mass of the fluid to that of the structure. A traditional partitioned (TP) scheme using a Dirichlet–Neumann coupling for the same model problem is shown to be unconditionally unstable if the added mass of the fluid is too large. A series of benchmark problems of increasing complexity are considered to illustrate the behavior of the AMP algorithm, and to compare the behavior with that of the TP scheme. The results of all these benchmark problems verify the stability and accuracy of the AMP scheme. Results for

  10. Limited evidence of HCV transmission in stable heterosexual couples from Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Bessa

    Full Text Available HCV infected patients frequently ask their physician about the risk of transmission to their partners. Although it is easy to answer that the risk does exist, it is difficult to quantify. We studied the transmission of HCV infection in stable heterosexual couples: anti-HCV positive patients in hemodialytic therapy and their partners. Thirty-four couples were tested by third generation ELISA and RIBA. Blood samples of anti-HCV positive patients were evaluated by RT-PCR and detected sequences were genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Concordance of infection was observed in only one couple in which both subjects were in dialytic therapy. One other partner had two positive ELISA tests and an indeterminate RIBA, with negative RT-PCR, which may suggest a false positive or a previous resolved infection. Either sexual relations, sharing of personal items and history of parenteral exposure (hemodialysis, blood transfusion could explain transmission in the only couple with concordant infection. We observed, in accordance with previous reports, that this risk is minimal or negligible in stable heterosexual couples.

  11. Principles and limitations of stable isotopes in differentiating organic and conventional foodstuffs: 2. Animal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Caio T; Chalk, Phillip M

    2017-01-02

    In this review, we examine the variation in stable isotope signatures of the lighter elements (δ 2 H, δ 13 C, δ 15 N, δ 18 O, and δ 34 S) of tissues and excreta of domesticated animals, the factors affecting the isotopic composition of animal tissues, and whether stable isotopes may be used to differentiate organic and conventional modes of animal husbandry. The main factors affecting the δ 13 C signatures of livestock are the C3/C4 composition of the diet, the relative digestibility of the diet components, metabolic turnover, tissue and compound specificity, growth rate, and animal age. δ 15 N signatures of sheep and cattle products have been related mainly to diet signatures, which are quite variable among farms and between years. Although few data exist, a minor influence in δ 15 N signatures of animal products was attributed to N losses at the farm level, whereas stocking rate showed divergent findings. Correlations between mode of production and δ 2 H and δ 18 O have not been established, and only in one case of an animal product was δ 34 S a satisfactory marker for mode of production. While many data exist on diet-tissue isotopic discrimination values among domesticated animals, there is a paucity of data that allow a direct and statistically verifiable comparison of the differences in the isotopic signatures of organically and conventionally grown animal products. The few comparisons are confined to beef, milk, and egg yolk, with no data for swine or lamb products. δ 13 C appears to be the most promising isotopic marker to differentiate organic and conventional production systems when maize (C4) is present in the conventional animal diet. However, δ 13 C may be unsuitable under tropical conditions, where C4 grasses are abundant, and where grass-based husbandry is predominant in both conventional and organic systems. Presently, there is no universal analytical method that can be applied to differentiate organic and conventional animal products.

  12. Tracing carbon flow through coral reef food webs using a compound-specific stable isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kelton W; Thorrold, Simon R; Houghton, Leah A; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Coral reefs support spectacularly productive and diverse communities in tropical and sub-tropical waters throughout the world's oceans. Debate continues, however, on the degree to which reef biomass is supported by new water column production, benthic primary production, and recycled detrital carbon (C). We coupled compound-specific stable C isotope ratio (δ(13)C) analyses with Bayesian mixing models to quantify C flow from primary producers to coral reef fishes across multiple feeding guilds and trophic positions in the Red Sea. Analyses of reef fishes with putative diets composed primarily of zooplankton (Amblyglyphidodon indicus), benthic macroalgae (Stegastes nigricans), reef-associated detritus (Ctenochaetus striatus), and coral tissue (Chaetodon trifascialis) confirmed that δ(13)C values of essential amino acids from all baseline C sources were both isotopically diagnostic and accurately recorded in consumer tissues. While all four source end-members contributed to the production of coral reef fishes in our study, a single-source end-member often dominated dietary C assimilation of a given species, even for highly mobile, generalist top predators. Microbially reworked detritus was an important secondary C source for most species. Seascape configuration played an important role in structuring resource utilization patterns. For instance, Lutjanus ehrenbergii showed a significant shift from a benthic macroalgal food web on shelf reefs (71 ± 13 % of dietary C) to a phytoplankton-based food web (72 ± 11 %) on oceanic reefs. Our work provides insights into the roles that diverse C sources play in the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems and illustrates a powerful fingerprinting method to develop and test nutritional frameworks for understanding resource utilization.

  13. Tracing carbon flow through coral reef food webs using a compound-specific stable isotope approach

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Kelton

    2015-11-21

    Coral reefs support spectacularly productive and diverse communities in tropical and sub-tropical waters throughout the world’s oceans. Debate continues, however, on the degree to which reef biomass is supported by new water column production, benthic primary production, and recycled detrital carbon (C). We coupled compound-specific stable C isotope ratio (δ13C) analyses with Bayesian mixing models to quantify C flow from primary producers to coral reef fishes across multiple feeding guilds and trophic positions in the Red Sea. Analyses of reef fishes with putative diets composed primarily of zooplankton (Amblyglyphidodon indicus), benthic macroalgae (Stegastes nigricans), reef-associated detritus (Ctenochaetus striatus), and coral tissue (Chaetodon trifascialis) confirmed that δ13C values of essential amino acids from all baseline C sources were both isotopically diagnostic and accurately recorded in consumer tissues. While all four source end-members contributed to the production of coral reef fishes in our study, a single-source end-member often dominated dietary C assimilation of a given species, even for highly mobile, generalist top predators. Microbially reworked detritus was an important secondary C source for most species. Seascape configuration played an important role in structuring resource utilization patterns. For instance, Lutjanus ehrenbergii showed a significant shift from a benthic macroalgal food web on shelf reefs (71 ± 13 % of dietary C) to a phytoplankton-based food web (72 ± 11 %) on oceanic reefs. Our work provides insights into the roles that diverse C sources play in the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems and illustrates a powerful fingerprinting method to develop and test nutritional frameworks for understanding resource utilization.

  14. The role of heater thermal response in reactor thermal limits during oscillartory two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, A.E.; Brown, N.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Vasil`ev, A.D. [Nuclear Safety Institute, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Wendel, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analytical and numerical investigations of critical heat flux (CHF) and reactor thermal limits are conducted for oscillatory two-phase flows often associated with natural circulation conditions. It is shown that the CHF and associated thermal limits depend on the amplitude of the flow oscillations, the period of the flow oscillations, and the thermal properties and dimensions of the heater. The value of the thermal limit can be much lower in unsteady flow situations than would be expected using time average flow conditions. It is also shown that the properties of the heater strongly influence the thermal limit value in unsteady flow situations, which is very important to the design of experiments to evaluate thermal limits for reactor fuel systems.

  15. Principles and limitations of stable isotopes in differentiating organic and conventional foodstuffs: 1. Plant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Caio Teves; Chalk, Phillip Michael; Magalhães, Alberto M T

    2015-01-01

    Among the lighter elements having two or more stable isotopes (H, C, N, O, S), δ(15)N appears to be the most promising isotopic marker to differentiate plant products from conventional and organic farms. Organic plant products vary within a range of δ(15)N values of +0.3 to +14.6%, while conventional plant products range from negative to positive values, i.e. -4.0 to +8.7%. The main factors affecting δ(15)N signatures of plants are N fertilizers, biological N2 fixation, plant organs and plant age. Correlations between mode of production and δ(13)C (except greenhouse tomatoes warmed with natural gas) or δ(34)S signatures have not been established, and δ(2)H and δ(18)O are unsuitable markers due to the overriding effect of climate on the isotopic composition of plant-available water. Because there is potential overlap between the δ(15)N signatures of organic and conventionally produced plant products, δ(15)N has seldom been used successfully as the sole criterion for differentiation, but when combined with complementary analytical techniques and appropriate statistical tools, the probability of a correct identification increases. The use of organic fertilizers by conventional farmers or the marketing of organic produce as conventional due to market pressures are additional factors confounding correct identification. The robustness of using δ(15)N to differentiate mode of production will depend on the establishment of databases that have been verified for individual plant products.

  16. Fractionation, concentration and flow: A model coupling stable isotope ratios to fluid travel time and chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2014-12-01

    From the point of infiltration to the point of discharge, the chemical signature imparted to fluid flowing through catchments represents the weathering flux from the landscape. The magnitude of this flux is linked to both the time water spends in the system and the time required for reactions to influence fluid chemistry. The ratio of these characteristic times is often represented as a Damköhler number (Da), which links the parameters governing reactivity and flow. Stable isotope ratios are now commonly applied to identify and even quantify the processes and rates of primary mineral weathering, secondary mineral formation and biogeochemical cycling within catchments. Here, we derive a series of fractionation-discharge relationships for a variety of governing chemical rate laws utilizing Da coefficients. These equations can be used to isolate and quantify the effects of (1) fluid travel time distributions and (2) chemical weathering efficiency on observed stable isotope ratios. The analytical solutions are verified against multi-component reactive transport simulations of stable isotope fractionation in homogeneous and spatially correlated heterogeneous flow fields using the CrunchTope code and evaluated against field observations. We demonstrate that for an irreversible reaction, the relationship between stable isotope enrichment and reactant concentration obeys a Rayleigh-type model across a wide range of reaction rates. However, this relationship is violated when a heterogeneous travel time distribution is considered. This observation highlights an important discrepancy in the commonly assumed relationship between fractionation and concentration for irreversible reactions. We further extend our derivation to consider isotope fractionation associated with a reversible reaction (i.e. a kinetically controlled approach to equilibrium) in a steady-state flow field. Due to the dependence of the observed isotope ratio on the flow rate, kinetic enrichment and

  17. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  18. Endocannabinoids control platelet activation and limit aggregate formation under flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina De Angelis

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function.Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo.We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa.Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function may prove beneficial in the search

  19. Endocannabinoids control platelet activation and limit aggregate formation under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function may prove beneficial in the search for new

  20. Self-similar decay to the marginally stable ground state in a model for film flow over inclined wavy bottoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Hacker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The integral boundary layer system (IBL with spatially periodic coefficients arises as a long wave approximation for the flow of a viscous incompressible fluid down a wavy inclined plane. The Nusselt-like stationary solution of the IBL is linearly at best marginally stable; i.e., it has essential spectrum at least up to the imaginary axis. Nevertheless, in this stable case we show that localized perturbations of the ground state decay in a self-similar way. The proof uses the renormalization group method in Bloch variables and the fact that in the stable case the Burgers equation is the amplitude equation for long waves of small amplitude in the IBL. It is the first time that such a proof is given for a quasilinear PDE with spatially periodic coefficients.

  1. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Jui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pariev, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beckley, Howard [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH; Si, Jiahe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Martinic, Joe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westpfahl, David [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Slutz, James [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westrom, Zeb [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Klein, Brianna [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  2. Klystron - Space-charge limited flow, guns, Perveance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper treats Thermionic emission, Cathode as an e - emitter, Space-charge limited effect and 3/2 power law, Perveance, Beam spread due to space charge, Pierce guns, Magnetically immersed guns, Method of gun design including simulations, and Examples, mainly treating E3786, which attendees will operate above 1 MW-CW in a practical exercise course at KEK. (author). 74 refs

  3. Regularized semiclassical limits: Linear flows with infinite Lyapunov exponents

    KAUST Repository

    Athanassoulis, Agissilaos

    2016-08-30

    Semiclassical asymptotics for Schrödinger equations with non-smooth potentials give rise to ill-posed formal semiclassical limits. These problems have attracted a lot of attention in the last few years, as a proxy for the treatment of eigenvalue crossings, i.e. general systems. It has recently been shown that the semiclassical limit for conical singularities is in fact well-posed, as long as the Wigner measure (WM) stays away from singular saddle points. In this work we develop a family of refined semiclassical estimates, and use them to derive regularized transport equations for saddle points with infinite Lyapunov exponents, extending the aforementioned recent results. In the process we answer a related question posed by P.L. Lions and T. Paul in 1993. If we consider more singular potentials, our rigorous estimates break down. To investigate whether conical saddle points, such as -|x|, admit a regularized transport asymptotic approximation, we employ a numerical solver based on posteriori error control. Thus rigorous upper bounds for the asymptotic error in concrete problems are generated. In particular, specific phenomena which render invalid any regularized transport for -|x| are identified and quantified. In that sense our rigorous results are sharp. Finally, we use our findings to formulate a precise conjecture for the condition under which conical saddle points admit a regularized transport solution for the WM. © 2016 International Press.

  4. High frequency components of tracheal sound are emphasized during prolonged flow limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenhunen, M; Huupponen, E; Saastamoinen, A; Kulkas, A; Himanen, S-L; Rauhala, E

    2009-01-01

    A nasal pressure transducer, which is used to study nocturnal airflow, also provides information about the inspiratory flow waveform. A round flow shape is presented during normal breathing. A flattened, non-round shape is found during hypopneas and it can also appear in prolonged episodes. The significance of this prolonged flow limitation is still not established. A tracheal sound spectrum has been analyzed further in order to achieve additional information about breathing during sleep. Increased sound frequencies over 500 Hz have been connected to obstruction of the upper airway. The aim of the present study was to examine the tracheal sound signal content of prolonged flow limitation and to find out whether prolonged flow limitation would consist of abundant high frequency activity. Sleep recordings of 36 consecutive patients were examined. The tracheal sound spectral analysis was performed on 10 min episodes of prolonged flow limitation, normal breathing and periodic apnea-hypopnea breathing. The highest total spectral amplitude, implicating loudest sounds, occurred during flow-limited breathing which also presented loudest sounds in all frequency bands above 100 Hz. In addition, the tracheal sound signal during flow-limited breathing constituted proportionally more high frequency activities compared to normal breathing and even periodic apnea-hypopnea breathing

  5. Producing High-Performance, Stable, Sheared-Flow Z-Pinches in the FuZE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.,; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Forbes, E. G.; Stepanov, A. D.; Weber, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Tummel, K. K.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A. E.; University of Washington (UW) Collaboration; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The Fusion Z-Pinch Experiment (FuZE) has made significant strides towards generating high-performance, stable Z-pinch plasmas with goals of ne = 1018 cm-3 and T =1 keV. The Z-pinch plasmas are stabilized with a sheared axial flow that is driven by a coaxial accelerator. The new FuZE device has been constructed and reproduces the major scientific achievements the ZaP project at the University of Washington; ne = 1016 cm-3,T = 100 eV, r20 μs. These parameters are measured with an array of magnetic field probes, spectroscopy, and fast framing cameras. The plasma parameters are achieved using a small fraction of the maximum energy storage and gas injection capability of the FuZE device. Higher density, ne = 5×1017 cm-3, and temperature, T = 500 eV, Z-pinch plasmas are formed by increasing the pinch current. At the higher voltages and currents, the ionization rates in the accelerator increase. By modifying the neutral gas profile in the accelerator, the plasma flow from the accelerator is maintained, driving the flow shear. Formation and sustainment of the sheared-flow Z-pinch plasma will be discussed. Experimental data demonstrating high performance plasmas in a stable Z-pinches will be shown. This work is supported by an award from US ARPA-E.

  6. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and 'flooding' phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the 'surge line' and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008

  7. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  8. Limits to ductility set by plastic flow localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needleman, A.; Rice, J.R.

    1977-11-01

    The theory of strain localization is reviewed with reference both to local necking in sheet metal forming processes and to more general three dimensional shear band localizations that sometimes mark the onset of ductile rupture. Both bifurcation behavior and the growth of initial imperfections are considered. In addition to analyses based on classical Mises-like constitutive laws, approaches to localization based on constitutive models that may more accurately model processes of slip and progressive rupturing on the microscale in structural alloys are discussed. Among these non-classical constitutive features are the destabilizing roles of yield surface vertices and of non-normality effects, arising, for example, from slight pressure sensitivity of yield. Analyses based on a constitutive model of a progressively cavitating dilational plastic material which is intended to model the process of ductile void growth in metals are also discussed. A variety of numerical results are presented. In the context of the three dimensional theory of localization, it is shown that a simple vertex model predicts ratios of ductility in plane strain tension to ductility in axisymmetric tension qualitatively consistent with experiment, and the destabilizing influence of a hydrostatic stress dependent void nucleation criterion is illustrated. In the sheet necking context, and focussing on positive biaxial stretching, it is shown that forming limit curves based on a simple vertex model and those based on a simple void growth model are qualitatively in accord, although attributing instability to very different physical mechanisms. These forming limit curves are compared with those obtained from the Mises material model and employing various material and geometric imperfections

  9. Melt Flow and Energy Limitation of Laser Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Hudeček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser technology is a convertible technology for plenty of parts in most materials. Laser material processing for industrial manufacturing applications is today a widespread procedure for welding, cutting, marking and micro machining of metal and plastic parts and components. Involvement and support this huge mass-production industry of laser cutting, new technology and dry-process using lasers were and are being actively developed. Fundamentally, industrial laser cutting or other applications on industry should satisfy the four key practical application issues including “Quality or Performance”, “Throughput or Speed”, “Cost or Total Ownership Cost”, and “Reliability”. Laser requires for examples several complicated physical factors to be resolved including die strength to be enable good wire-bonding and survival of severe cycling test, clean cutting wall surface, good cutting of direct attach film, and proper speed of cutting for achieving economy of throughput. Some example of maximum cutting rate, wherewith is normally limited laser energy, cutting speed is depend on type laser, different of cutting with one laser beam and beam pattern and applied laser power/material thickness will be introduced in this paper.

  10. Methods for Assessing Expiratory Flow Limitation during Tidal Breathing in COPD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolaos G. Koulouris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe COPD often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quite breathing as during forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as indicating expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFLT. Therefore, EFLT, namely, attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFLT leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFLT occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in GOLD III and IV stage in whom the latter symptoms are common. The existing up-to-date physiological methods for assessing expiratory flow limitation (EFLT are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure (NEP has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, non invasive, most practical, and accurate new technique.

  11. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT angiography in stable coronary disease: a new standard in non-invasive testing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard, B.L.; Jensen, J.M. [Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus N (Denmark); Leipsic, J. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Department Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for lesion-specific decisions on coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Current guidelines recommend non-invasive functional or anatomic testing as a gatekeeper to the catheterization laboratory. However, the ''holy grail'' in non-invasive testing of CAD is to establish a single test that quantifies both coronary lesion severity and the associated ischemia. Most evidence to date of such a test is based on the addition of computational analysis of FFR to the anatomic information obtained from standard-acquired coronary CTA data sets at rest (FFR{sub CT}). This review summarizes the clinical evidence for the use of FFR{sub CT} in stable CAD in context to the diagnostic performance of other non-invasive testing modalities. (orig.)

  12. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT angiography in stable coronary disease: a new standard in non-invasive testing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noergaard, B.L.; Jensen, J.M.; Leipsic, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for lesion-specific decisions on coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Current guidelines recommend non-invasive functional or anatomic testing as a gatekeeper to the catheterization laboratory. However, the ''holy grail'' in non-invasive testing of CAD is to establish a single test that quantifies both coronary lesion severity and the associated ischemia. Most evidence to date of such a test is based on the addition of computational analysis of FFR to the anatomic information obtained from standard-acquired coronary CTA data sets at rest (FFR CT ). This review summarizes the clinical evidence for the use of FFR CT in stable CAD in context to the diagnostic performance of other non-invasive testing modalities. (orig.)

  13. Cerebral blood flow determination within the first 8 hours of cerebral infarction using stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.L.; Yonas, H.; Gur, D.; Latchaw, R.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow mapping with stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe/CT) was performed in conjunction with conventional computed tomography (CT) within the first 8 hours after the onset of symptoms in seven patients with cerebral infarction. Six patients had hemispheric infarctions, and one had a progressive brainstem infarction. Three patients with very low (less than 10 ml/100 g/min) blood flow in an anatomic area appropriate for the neurologic deficit had no clinical improvement by the time of discharge from the hospital; follow-up CT scans of these three patients confirmed infarction in the area of very low blood flow. Three patients with moderate blood flow reductions (15-45 ml/100 g/min) in the appropriate anatomic area had significant clinical improvement from their initial deficits and had normal follow-up CT scans. One patient studied 8 hours after stroke had increased blood flow (hyperemia) in the appropriate anatomic area and made no clinical recovery.

  14. Transport in Rayleigh-stable experimental Taylor-Couette flow and granular electrification in a shaking experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordsiek, Freja

    This dissertation consists of two projects: Rayleigh-stable Taylor-Couette flow and granular electrification. Taylor-Couette flow is the fluid flow in the gap between two cylinders rotating at different rates. Azimuthal velocity profiles, dye visualization, and inner cylinder torques were measured on two geometrically similar Taylor-Couettes with axial boundaries attached to the outer cylinder, the Maryland and Twente T3C experiments. This was done in the Rayleigh stable regime, where the specific angular momentum increases radially, which is relevant to astrophysical and geophysical flows and in particular, stellar and planetary accretion disks. The flow substantially deviates from laminar Taylor-Couette flow beginning at moderate Reynolds number. Angular momentum is primarily transported to the axial boundaries instead of the outer cylinder due to Ekman pumping when the inner cylinder is rotating faster than the outer cylinder. A phase diagram was constructed from the transitions identified from torque measurements taken over four decades of the Reynolds number. Flow angular velocities larger and smaller than both cylinders were found. Together, these results indicate that experimental Taylor-Couette with axial boundaries attached to the outer cylinder is an imperfect model for accretion disk flows. Thunderstorms, thunder-snow, volcanic ash clouds, and dust storms all display lightning, which results from electrification of droplets and particles in the atmosphere. While lightning is fairly well understood (plasma discharge), the mechanisms that result in million-volt differences across the storm are not. A novel granular electrification experiment was upgraded and used to study some of these mechanisms in the lab. The relative importance of collective interactions between particles versus particle properties (material, size, etc.) on collisional electrification was investigated. While particle properties have an order of magnitude effect on the strength of

  15. Normal Myocardial Flow Reserve in HIV-Infected Patients on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Christensen, Thomas E; Ghotbi, Adam Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have found HIV-infected patients to be at increased risk of myocardial infarction, which may be caused by coronary microvascular dysfunction. For the first time among HIV-infected patients, we assessed the myocardial flow reserve (MFR) by Rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography (PET......), which can quantify the coronary microvascular function. MFR has proved highly predictive of future coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events in the general population.In a prospective cross-sectional study, HIV-infected patients all receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with full viral...... suppression and HIV-uninfected controls were scanned using 82Rb PET/computed tomography at rest and adenosine-induced stress, thereby obtaining the MFR (stress flow/rest flow), stratified into low ≤1.5, borderline >1.5 to 2.0, or normal >2.0.Fifty-six HIV-infected patients and 25 controls were included...

  16. Experimental Study of Stable Surfaces for Anti-Slug Control in Multi-phase Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    -phase flow dynamics, the slug can be avoided or eliminated by proper facility design and control of operational conditions. Based on a testing facility which can emulate a pipeline-riser or a gas-lifted production well in a scaled-down manner, this paper experimentally studies the correlations of key...

  17. Numerical study on modeling of liquid film flow under countercurrent flow limitation in volume of fluid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Taro, E-mail: watanabe_t@qe.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-7895 (Japan); Takata, Takashi, E-mail: takata.takashi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-chou, Oarai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 331-1393 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Akira, E-mail: yamaguchi@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Thin liquid film flow under CCFL was modeled and coupled with the VOF method. • The difference of the liquid flow rate in experiments of CCFL was evaluated. • The proposed VOF method can quantitatively predict CCFL with low computational cost. - Abstract: Countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL) in a heat transfer tube at a steam generator (SG) of pressurized water reactor (PWR) is one of the important issues on the core cooling under a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In order to improve the prediction accuracy of the CCFL characteristics in numerical simulations using the volume of fluid (VOF) method with less computational cost, a thin liquid film flow in a countercurrent flow is modeled independently and is coupled with the VOF method. The CCFL characteristics is evaluated analytically in condition of a maximizing down-flow rate as a function of a void fraction or a liquid film thickness considering a critical thickness. Then, we have carried out numerical simulations of a countercurrent flow in a vertical tube so as to investigate the CCFL characteristics and compare them with the previous experimental results. As a result, it has been concluded that the effect of liquid film entrainment by upward gas flux will cause the difference in the experiments.

  18. Construction of second order accurate monotone and stable residual distribution schemes for unsteady flow problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abgrall, Remi; Mezine, Mohamed

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to construct upwind residual distribution schemes for the time accurate solution of hyperbolic conservation laws. To do so, we evaluate a space-time fluctuation based on a space-time approximation of the solution and develop new residual distribution schemes which are extensions of classical steady upwind residual distribution schemes. This method has been applied to the solution of scalar advection equation and to the solution of the compressible Euler equations both in two space dimensions. The first version of the scheme is shown to be, at least in its first order version, unconditionally energy stable and possibly conditionally monotonicity preserving. Using an idea of Csik et al. [Space-time residual distribution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws, 15th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, Anahein, CA, USA, AIAA 2001-2617, June 2001], we modify the formulation to end up with a scheme that is unconditionally energy stable and unconditionally monotonicity preserving. Several numerical examples are shown to demonstrate the stability and accuracy of the method

  19. Barriers to the Flow of Technical Information: Limitation Statements - Legal Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Currie S.

    The new "Freedom of Information Act" and the more important reasons for limitations on the flow of information are discussed. The legal basis for these limitations can be found in the almost 100 statutory provisions which prohibit, exempt, or otherwise protect certain types of information from disclosure. The Export Control Acts of the Department…

  20. Effect of tube size and obstacles on explosion limits in flowing gases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolk, Jeroen W.; Bolk, J.W.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    In a large pilot plant the upper explosion limit of ethene-air-nitrogen mixtures was experimented in 3.0-m-long and 21-, 50-, and 100-mm-dia. tubes at different flow rates, pressures, and temperatures. The upper explosion limit, influenced by the gas velocity, becomes smaller and shifts to higher

  1. Electrochemical flow injection analysis of hydrazine in an excess of an active pharmaceutical ingredient: achieving pharmaceutical detection limits electrochemically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Robert B; Joseph, Maxim B; Bitziou, Eleni; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew D; Macpherson, Julie V

    2015-10-06

    The quantification of genotoxic impurities (GIs) such as hydrazine (HZ) is of critical importance in the pharmaceutical industry in order to uphold drug safety. HZ is a particularly intractable GI and its detection represents a significant technical challenge. Here, we present, for the first time, the use of electrochemical analysis to achieve the required detection limits by the pharmaceutical industry for the detection of HZ in the presence of a large excess of a common active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), acetaminophen (ACM) which itself is redox active, typical of many APIs. A flow injection analysis approach with electrochemical detection (FIA-EC) is utilized, in conjunction with a coplanar boron doped diamond (BDD) microband electrode, insulated in an insulating diamond platform for durability and integrated into a two piece flow cell. In order to separate the electrochemical signature for HZ such that it is not obscured by that of the ACM (present in excess), the BDD electrode is functionalized with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) to significantly shift the half wave potential for HZ oxidation to less positive potentials. Microstereolithography was used to fabricate flow cells with defined hydrodynamics which minimize dispersion of the analyte and optimize detection sensitivity. Importantly, the Pt NPs were shown to be stable under flow, and a limit of detection of 64.5 nM or 0.274 ppm for HZ with respect to the ACM, present in excess, was achieved. This represents the first electrochemical approach which surpasses the required detection limits set by the pharmaceutical industry for HZ detection in the presence of an API and paves the wave for online analysis and application to other GI and API systems.

  2. Practical Strategies for Stable Operation of HFF-QCM in Continuous Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried R. Waldvogel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are a few fields of application using quartz crystal microbalances (QCM. Because of environmental conditions and insufficient resolution of the microbalance, chemical sensing of volatile organic compounds in an open system was as yet not possible. In this study we present strategies on how to use 195 MHz fundamental quartz resonators for a mobile sensor platform to detect airborne analytes. Commonly the use of devices with a resonant frequency of about 10 MHz is standard. By increasing the frequency to 195 MHz the frequency shift increases by a factor of almost 400. Unfortunately, such kinds of quartz crystals tend to exhibit some challenges to obtain a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. It was possible to reduce the noise in frequency in a continuous air flow of 7.5 m/s to 0.4 Hz [i.e., σ(τ = 2 × 10−9] by elucidating the major source of noise. The air flow in the vicinity of the quartz was analyzed to reduce turbulences. Furthermore, we found a dependency between the acceleration sensitivity and mechanical stress induced by an internal thermal gradient. By reducing this gradient, we achieved reduction of the sensitivity to acceleration by more than one decade. Hence, the resulting sensor is more robust to environmental conditions such as temperature, acceleration and air flow.

  3. Constraining recharge and groundwater flow processes in hard-rock aquifers in temperate maritime climate using stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilatova, Katarina; Ofterdinger, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Recharge estimates and in understanding flow process in hard rock aquifers pose significant challenges. These arise from structural complexities of the hardrock aquifers and are further complicated by variability of the superficial cover. A comparative study of three metamorphic catchments situated in the North of Ireland is presented in this study, each with contrasting geology, glaciation history and consequently superficial cover. The presented study focusses on two main strains. Firstly, due to lack of existing records, stable water isotopes in precipitation (δ18O and δ2H) were monitored at the research sites and their temporal and spatial variability was examined. Secondly, flow processes and dynamics of groundwater recharge based on continuous records of stable isotopes in groundwater, collected along catchment transects from various depths, and its variability in relation to the acquired precipitation signal were studied. Each precipitation station exhibited distinct isotopic signatures, where weather effect and proximity to coastline are the main controlling factors governing the isotope signatures. Moreover, in each of the stations the isotopic signature varied seasonally and thus stable isotopes proved a useful tool for assessing the dynamics of groundwater recharge. The analysis of isotope signatures in precipitation and groundwater from various depths within the hard rock aquifers allowed to evaluate the timescale of recharge, with rapid responses varying from few days up to several months. In general, the recharge appeared continuous over the hydrological year within wetter catchments with higher annual precipitation amounts purging the hardrock aquifers throughout the year. However, within comparatively dryer catchments recharge has a more seasonal character, predominantly taking place during the winter half of the year. Spatially, the recharge is highly localised within the elevated catchment areas, where superficial deposits are scarce and the

  4. Effect of liraglutide on myocardial glucose uptake and blood flow in stable chronic heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Roni; Jorsal, Anders; Iversen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glucagon-like peptide-1 analog liraglutide increases heart rate and may be associated with more cardiac events in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. We studied whether this could be ascribed to effects on myocardial glucose uptake (MGU), myocardial blood flow (MBF) and MBF...... reserve (MFR). METHODS AND RESULTS: CHF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤45% and without type 2 diabetes were randomized to liraglutide (N = 18) 1.8 mg once daily or placebo (N = 18) for 24 weeks in a double-blinded design. Changes in MGU during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT...

  5. Overcoming Information Limitations for the Prescription of an Environmental Flow Regime for a Central American River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Esselman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydropower dam construction is expanding rapidly in Central America because of the increasing demand for electricity. Although hydropower can provide a low-carbon source of energy, dams can also degrade socially valued riverine and riparian ecosystems and the services they provide. Such degradation can be partially mitigated by the release of environmental flows below dams. However, environmental flows have been applied infrequently to dams in Central America, partly because of the lack of information on the ecological, social, and economic aspects of rivers. This paper presents a case study of how resource and information limitations were addressed in the development of environmental flow recommendations for the Patuca River in Honduras below a proposed hydroelectric dam. To develop flow recommendations, we applied a multistep process that included hydrological analysis and modeling, the collection of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK during field trips, expert consultation, and environmental flow workshops for scientists, water managers, and community members. The final environmental flow recommendation specifies flow ranges for different components of river hydrology, including low flows for each month, high-flow pulses, and floods, in dry, normal, and wet years. The TEK collected from local and indigenous riverine communities was particularly important for forming hypotheses about flow-dependent ecological and social factors that may be vulnerable to disruption from dam-modified river flows. We show that our recommended environmental flows would have a minimal impact on the dam's potential to generate electricity. In light of rapid hydropower development in Central America, we suggest that environmental flows are important at the local scale, but that an integrated landscape perspective is ultimately needed to pursue hydropower development in a manner that is as ecologically sustainable as possible.

  6. Flow motifs reveal limitations of the static framework to represent human interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-04-01

    Networks are commonly used to define underlying interaction structures where infections, information, or other quantities may spread. Although the standard approach has been to aggregate all links into a static structure, some studies have shown that the time order in which the links are established may alter the dynamics of spreading. In this paper, we study the impact of the time ordering in the limits of flow on various empirical temporal networks. By using a random walk dynamics, we estimate the flow on links and convert the original undirected network (temporal and static) into a directed flow network. We then introduce the concept of flow motifs and quantify the divergence in the representativity of motifs when using the temporal and static frameworks. We find that the regularity of contacts and persistence of vertices (common in email communication and face-to-face interactions) result on little differences in the limits of flow for both frameworks. On the other hand, in the case of communication within a dating site and of a sexual network, the flow between vertices changes significantly in the temporal framework such that the static approximation poorly represents the structure of contacts. We have also observed that cliques with 3 and 4 vertices containing only low-flow links are more represented than the same cliques with all high-flow links. The representativity of these low-flow cliques is higher in the temporal framework. Our results suggest that the flow between vertices connected in cliques depend on the topological context in which they are placed and in the time sequence in which the links are established. The structure of the clique alone does not completely characterize the potential of flow between the vertices.

  7. Study on the tomographic cerebral blood flow measurement with stable xenon inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kazumoto; Ueda, Yasuichi; Nagai, Masakatsu; Segawa, Hiromu.

    1983-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain quantitative values of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by serial CT scanning during non radioactive xenon (Xe) inhalation. The present study provided not only rCBF map but build up rate (k) map and partition coefficient (lambda) map both in normal and pathological brain tissues. The lambda map can not be readily obtained by radioisotope (RI) or positron emission CT method. These maps provided high resolution enough to identify white matter, gray matter and even deep structure of the brain such as caudate nucles, thalums and internal capsule, and were directly compared with CT image. Resolution of each map permited visualization of small area as much as 1-3 mm in diameter. Blood flow for gray matter was 82+-11 and that for white matter was 24+-5 ml/100 g/min in seven normal subjects. The inhalation time of Xe gas and the scanning interval influenced the k, lambda, and rCBF map, respectively. In order to visualize the distribution of white matter on lambda map, it required more than 20 min inhalation of the gas. The scanning interval for good map was every 3 min in the first 9 min and every 5 min in the later period. (author)

  8. The evolution of sensory divergence in the context of limited gene flow in the bumblebee bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Gouilh, Meriadeg Ar; Piyapan, Piyathip; Yokubol, Medhi; Mie, Khin Mie; Bates, Paul J; Satasook, Chutamas; Nwe, Tin; Bu, Si Si Hla; Mackie, Iain J; Petit, Eric J; Teeling, Emma C

    2011-12-06

    The sensory drive theory of speciation predicts that populations of the same species inhabiting different environments can differ in sensory traits, and that this sensory difference can ultimately drive speciation. However, even in the best-known examples of sensory ecology driven speciation, it is uncertain whether the variation in sensory traits is the cause or the consequence of a reduction in levels of gene flow. Here we show strong genetic differentiation, no gene flow and large echolocation differences between the allopatric Myanmar and Thai populations of the world's smallest mammal, Craseonycteris thonglongyai, and suggest that geographic isolation most likely preceded sensory divergence. Within the geographically continuous Thai population, we show that geographic distance has a primary role in limiting gene flow rather than echolocation divergence. In line with sensory-driven speciation models, we suggest that in C. thonglongyai, limited gene flow creates the suitable conditions that favour the evolution of sensory divergence via local adaptation.

  9. 15 N- and 2 H proteomic stable isotope probing links nitrogen flow to archaeal heterotrophic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justice, Nicholas B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Zhou [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wang, Yingfeng [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Spaulding, Susan E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mosier, Annika C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hettich, Robert L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Pan, Chongle [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Banfield, Jillian F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Understanding how individual species contribute to nutrient transformations in a microbial community is critical to prediction of overall ecosystem function. We conducted microcosm experiments in which floating acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial biofilms were submerged recapitulating the final stage in a natural biofilm life cycle. Biofilms were amended with either 15NH4 + or deuterium oxide (2H2O) and proteomic stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to track the extent to which different members of the community used these molecules in protein synthesis across anaerobic iron-reducing, aerobic iron-reducing and aerobic iron-oxidizing environments. Sulfobacillus spp. synthesized 15N-enriched protein almost exclusively under iron-reducing conditions whereas the Leptospirillum spp. synthesized 15N-enriched protein in all conditions. There were relatively few 15Nenriched archaeal proteins, and all showed low atom% enrichment, consistent with Archaea synthesizing protein using the predominantly 14N biomass derived from recycled biomolecules. In parallel experiments using 2H2O, extensive archaeal protein synthesis was detected in all conditions. In contrast, the bacterial species showed little protein synthesis using 2H2O. The nearly exclusive ability of Archaea to synthesize proteins using 2H2O may be due to archaeal heterotrophy, whereby Archaea off set deleterious effects of 2H by accessing 1H generated byrespiration of organic compounds.

  10. Evaluation and limitations of standard wall functions in channel and step flow configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković, B.; Stojanović, A.; Sijerčić, M.; Belošević, S.; Čantrak, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews and investigates the implementation, evaluation and limitations of conventional wall functions, based on law of the wall, in combination with linear k   turbulence model in simple (fully developed channel) and complex (backward facing step) flow configurations. The near-wall viscosity-affected layer of a turbulent fluid flow poses a number of challenges, from both modeling and numerical viewpoints. Over this thin wall-adjacent region turbulence properties change orders of...

  11. The limit of the Yang-Mills-Higgs flow on Higgs bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiayu; Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the gradient flow of the Yang-Mills-Higgs functional for Higgs pairs on a Hermitian vector bundle $(E, H_{0})$ over a compact K\\"ahler manifold $(M, \\omega )$. We study the asymptotic behavior of the Yang-Mills-Higgs flow for Higgs pairs at infinity, and show that the limiting Higgs sheaf is isomorphic to the double dual of the graded Higgs sheaves associated to the Harder-Narasimhan-Seshadri filtration of the initial Higgs bundle.

  12. A general correlation inequality and the Almost Sure Local Limit Theorem for random sequences in the domain of attraction of a stable law

    OpenAIRE

    Giuliano, Rita; Szewczak, Zbigniew S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper we obtain a new correlation inequality and use it for the purpose of extending the theory of the Almost Sure Local Limit Theorem to the case of lattice random sequences in the domain of attraction of a stable law. In particular, we prove ASLLT in the case of the normal domain of attraction of $\\alpha$--stable law, $\\alpha\\in(1,2)$.

  13. Potential hazard of the Neopuff T-piece resuscitator in the absence of flow limitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, C P

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: (1) To assess peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and maximum pressure relief (P(max)) at different rates of gas flow, when the Neopuff had been set to function at 5 l\\/min. (2) To assess maximum PIP and PEEP at a flow rate of 10 l\\/min with a simulated air leak of 50%. DESIGN: 5 Neopuffs were set to a PIP of 20, PEEP of 5 and P(max) of 30 cm H(2)O at a gas flow of 5 l\\/min. PIP, PEEP and P(max) were recorded at flow rates of 10, 15 l\\/min and maximum flow. Maximum achievable pressures at 10 l\\/min gas flow, with a 50% air leak, were measured. RESULTS: At gas flow of 15 l\\/min, mean PEEP increased to 20 (95% CI 20 to 21), PIP to 28 (95% CI 28 to 29) and the P(max) to 40 cm H(2)O (95% CI 38 to 42). At maximum flow (85 l\\/min) a PEEP of 71 (95% CI 51 to 91) and PIP of 92 cm H(2)O (95% CI 69 to 115) were generated. At 10 l\\/min flow, with an air leak of 50%, the maximum PEEP and PIP were 21 (95% CI 19 to 23) and 69 cm H(2)O (95% CI 66 to 71). CONCLUSIONS: The maximum pressure relief valve is overridden by increasing the rate of gas flow and potentially harmful PIP and PEEP can be generated. Even in the presence of a 50% gas leak, more than adequate pressures can be provided at 10 l\\/min gas flow. We recommend the limitation of gas flow to a rate of 10 l\\/min as an added safety mechanism for this device.

  14. Formation of stable direct current microhollow cathode discharge by venturi gas flow system for remote plasma source in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Wan; Lee, Tae Il; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Noh, Joo Hyon; Baik, Hong Koo; Song, Kie Moon

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a microhollow cathode configuration with venturi gas flow to ambient air in order to obtain glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. Stable microhollow cathode discharge was formed in a 200 μm diameter at 9 mA and the optimum value of gas velocityxdiameter for hollow cathode effect was obtained in our system. In order to confirm hollow cathode effect, we measured the enhancement of E/N strength for 200 μm (0.31 m 2 /s) and 500 μm (0.78 m 2 /s) air discharge at 8 mA under the velocity of 156 m/s. As a result, an increase of 46.7% in E/N strength of the discharge of 200 μm hole was obtained compare to that of 500 μm

  15. Mapping local cerebral blood flow by means of computerized tomography with a short inhalation of low-dose stable xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawara, Jyoji; Karasawa, Jun; Tasawa, Toshiaki; Touho, Hajime; Nakauchi, Mikio; Kagawa, Masa-aki; Asai, Masa-aki; Kuriyama, Yoshihiro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1986-01-01

    A non-invasive technique has been developed for mapping the local blood-brain partition coefficient (λi), the local build-up rate constant (κi), and the local cerebral blood flow (l-CBF) by means of xenon-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) using a YMS CT 9000 scanner. After denitrogenation for 10 minutes, a 30 % xenon/oxygen mixture is inhaled for 4 - 8 minutes through a rubber face-mask and a delivery system of stable xenon. The time course of local cerebral CT enhancement is utilized in order to calculate, the λi, κi, and l-CBF values. The CT enhancement data during the washin-washout phase are fitted to the mathematical functions, based on Kety's formula, using least-squares curve-fitting analysis. Several case studies of patients with cerebral vascular accidents are presented to demonstrate the characterization of the λi and l-CBF patterns in various tissues; the results are of sufficient quality for the management of patients. The theoretical assumptions underlying stable xenon CT CBF measurements are discussed. (author)

  16. The ω-limit sets of a flow and periodic orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoxia; Blackmore, Denis; Wang Chengwen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the ω-limit sets of a flow using the Conley theory, chain recurrence and Morse decompositions. Our results generalize and improve the related result in [Schropp J. A reduction principle for ω-limit sets. Z Angew Math Meth 1996;76(6):349-56], and we also show how they can be used as a basis for some new criteria for the existence of periodic orbits.

  17. Reduced 123I-BMIPP uptake implies decreased myocardial flow reserve in patients with chronic stable angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Mabuchi, Megumi; Tamaki, Nagara; Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Noriyasu, Kazuyuki; Naya, Masanao; Kawai, Yuko

    2006-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) is the main energy source for normal myocardium at rest, but in ischemic myocardium, the main energy substrate shifts from LCFA to glucose. 123 I-BMIPP is a radiolabeled LCFA analog. In chronic stable angina without previous infarction, we suppose that reduced 123 I-BMIPP uptake is related to the substrate shift in myocardium with decreased myocardial flow reserve (MFR). The purpose of this study was to relate 123 I-BMIPP uptake to rest myocardial blood flow (MBF), hyperemic MBF, and MFR assessed with 15 O-water positron emission tomography (PET). We enrolled 21 patients with chronic stable angina without previous infarction, all of whom underwent 123 I-BMIPP single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 15 O-water PET. The left ventricle was divided into 13 segments. In each segment, rest MBF and hyperemic MBF were measured by PET. 123 I-BMIPP uptake was evaluated as follows: score 0=normal, 1=slightly decreased uptake, 2=moderately decreased uptake, 3=severely decreased uptake, and 4=complete defect. 123 I-BMIPP uptake was compared with rest MBF, hyperemic MBF, and MFR. The numbers of segments with 123 I-BMIPP scores 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 178, 40, 25, 24, and 0, respectively. The rest MBFs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 0.93±0.25, 0.86±0.21, 0.97±0.30, and 0.99±0.37 ml/min/g, respectively. The hyperemic MBFs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 2.76±1.29, 1.84±0.74, 1.37±0.39, and 1.08±0.40 ml/min/g, respectively. The MFRs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 3.01±1.38, 2.20±0.95, 1.44±0.22, and 1.10±0.26, respectively. As 123 I-BMIPP uptake declined, hyperemic MBF and MFR decreased. In chronic stable angina without previous infarction, reduced 123 I-BMIPP uptake implies decreased MFR. (orig.)

  18. Reduced 123I-BMIPP uptake implies decreased myocardial flow reserve in patients with chronic stable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Noriyasu, Kazuyuki; Mabuchi, Megumi; Naya, Masanao; Kawai, Yuko; Tamaki, Nagara

    2006-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) is the main energy source for normal myocardium at rest, but in ischemic myocardium, the main energy substrate shifts from LCFA to glucose. 123I-BMIPP is a radiolabeled LCFA analog. In chronic stable angina without previous infarction, we suppose that reduced 123I-BMIPP uptake is related to the substrate shift in myocardium with decreased myocardial flow reserve (MFR). The purpose of this study was to relate 123I-BMIPP uptake to rest myocardial blood flow (MBF), hyperemic MBF, and MFR assessed with 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET). We enrolled 21 patients with chronic stable angina without previous infarction, all of whom underwent 123I-BMIPP single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 15O-water PET. The left ventricle was divided into 13 segments. In each segment, rest MBF and hyperemic MBF were measured by PET. 123I-BMIPP uptake was evaluated as follows: score 0=normal, 1=slightly decreased uptake, 2=moderately decreased uptake, 3=severely decreased uptake, and 4=complete defect. 123I-BMIPP uptake was compared with rest MBF, hyperemic MBF, and MFR. The numbers of segments with 123I-BMIPP scores 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 178, 40, 25, 24, and 0, respectively. The rest MBFs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 0.93+/-0.25, 0.86+/-0.21, 0.97+/-0.30, and 0.99+/-0.37 ml/min/g, respectively. The hyperemic MBFs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 2.76+/-1.29, 1.84+/-0.74, 1.37+/-0.39, and 1.08+/-0.40 ml/min/g, respectively. The MFRs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 3.01+/-1.38, 2.20+/-0.95, 1.44+/-0.22, and 1.10+/-0.26, respectively. As 123I-BMIPP uptake declined, hyperemic MBF and MFR decreased. In chronic stable angina without previous infarction, reduced 123I-BMIPP uptake implies decreased MFR.

  19. Reduced {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake implies decreased myocardial flow reserve in patients with chronic stable angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Mabuchi, Megumi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Noriyasu, Kazuyuki; Naya, Masanao [Hokkaido University, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kawai, Yuko [Hokko Memorial Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2006-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) is the main energy source for normal myocardium at rest, but in ischemic myocardium, the main energy substrate shifts from LCFA to glucose. {sup 123}I-BMIPP is a radiolabeled LCFA analog. In chronic stable angina without previous infarction, we suppose that reduced {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake is related to the substrate shift in myocardium with decreased myocardial flow reserve (MFR). The purpose of this study was to relate {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake to rest myocardial blood flow (MBF), hyperemic MBF, and MFR assessed with {sup 15}O-water positron emission tomography (PET). We enrolled 21 patients with chronic stable angina without previous infarction, all of whom underwent {sup 123}I-BMIPP single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and {sup 15}O-water PET. The left ventricle was divided into 13 segments. In each segment, rest MBF and hyperemic MBF were measured by PET. {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake was evaluated as follows: score 0=normal, 1=slightly decreased uptake, 2=moderately decreased uptake, 3=severely decreased uptake, and 4=complete defect. {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake was compared with rest MBF, hyperemic MBF, and MFR. The numbers of segments with {sup 123}I-BMIPP scores 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 178, 40, 25, 24, and 0, respectively. The rest MBFs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 0.93{+-}0.25, 0.86{+-}0.21, 0.97{+-}0.30, and 0.99{+-}0.37 ml/min/g, respectively. The hyperemic MBFs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 2.76{+-}1.29, 1.84{+-}0.74, 1.37{+-}0.39, and 1.08{+-}0.40 ml/min/g, respectively. The MFRs for scores 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 3.01{+-}1.38, 2.20{+-}0.95, 1.44{+-}0.22, and 1.10{+-}0.26, respectively. As {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake declined, hyperemic MBF and MFR decreased. In chronic stable angina without previous infarction, reduced {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake implies decreased MFR. (orig.)

  20. Improved methodologies for continuous-flow analysis of stable water isotopes in ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tyler R.; White, James W. C.; Steig, Eric J.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; Morris, Valerie; Gkinis, Vasileios; Markle, Bradley R.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.

    2017-02-01

    Water isotopes in ice cores are used as a climate proxy for local temperature and regional atmospheric circulation as well as evaporative conditions in moisture source regions. Traditional measurements of water isotopes have been achieved using magnetic sector isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, a number of recent studies have shown that laser absorption spectrometry (LAS) performs as well or better than IRMS. The new LAS technology has been combined with continuous-flow analysis (CFA) to improve data density and sample throughput in numerous prior ice coring projects. Here, we present a comparable semi-automated LAS-CFA system for measuring high-resolution water isotopes of ice cores. We outline new methods for partitioning both system precision and mixing length into liquid and vapor components - useful measures for defining and improving the overall performance of the system. Critically, these methods take into account the uncertainty of depth registration that is not present in IRMS nor fully accounted for in other CFA studies. These analyses are achieved using samples from a South Pole firn core, a Greenland ice core, and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. The measurement system utilizes a 16-position carousel contained in a freezer to consecutively deliver ˜ 1 m × 1.3 cm2 ice sticks to a temperature-controlled melt head, where the ice is converted to a continuous liquid stream and eventually vaporized using a concentric nebulizer for isotopic analysis. An integrated delivery system for water isotope standards is used for calibration to the Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) scale, and depth registration is achieved using a precise overhead laser distance device with an uncertainty of ±0.2 mm. As an added check on the system, we perform inter-lab LAS comparisons using WAIS Divide ice samples, a corroboratory step not taken in prior CFA studies. The overall results are important for substantiating data obtained from LAS

  1. Stable isotopes and amphibole chemistry on hydrothermally altered granitoids in the North Chilean Precordillera: a limited role for meteoric water?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agemar, T.; Wörner, G.; Heumann, A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole rock and mineral stable isotope and microprobe analyses are presented from granitoids of the North Chilean Precordillera. The Cretaceous to Tertiary plutonic rocks contain important ore deposits and frequently display compositional and textural evidence of hydrothermal alteration even in

  2. Amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprints support limited gene flow among social spider populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Deborah; van Rijn, Sander; Henschel, Joh; Bilde, Trine; Lubin, Yael

    We used DNA fingerprints to determine whether the population structure and colony composition of the cooperative social spider Stegodyphus dumicola are compatible with requirements of interdemic ('group') selection: differential proliferation of demes or groups and limited gene flow among groups. To

  3. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius in the extra-low permeability reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junhui; Yin, Daiyin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is given. The capillary pressure curve is divided into linear type and concave type. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 spectrum is divided into 3 types: the left peak is greater than the right peak, the left peak is equal to the right one, and the left peak is smaller than the right one. The method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius is, first, converting the nuclear magnetic resonance T2 spectrum to the capillary pressure curve calculated, then fitting the capillary pressure curves measured by the constant speed mercury injection experiment and the capillary pressure curve calculated. After finding the relevant parameters, converting the horizontal axis of the NMR T2 spectra from relaxation time to pore throat radius, and the pore throat radius corresponding to the T2 cutoff value is the lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability Fuyang Oil Reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is about 0.68μm

  4. How to identify the speed limiting factor of a TCP flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This thesis develops a method for identifying the speed limiting factor of a TCP flow. Five factors are considered: the receive window, the send buffer, the network and two kinds of application layer factors. Criteria for recognizing each factor based on TCP header information are put forward. These

  5. On singular limits arising in the scale analysis of stratified fluid flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Klein, R.; Novotný, A.; Zatorska, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2016), s. 419-443 ISSN 0218-2025 Grant - others:European Research Council(XE) MATHEF(320078) Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : isentropic fluid flow * strong stratification * singular limit * anelastic approximation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.860, year: 2016 http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/10.1142/S021820251650007X

  6. Detection of alloreactive T cells by flow cytometry : A new test compared with limiting dilution assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, A; van der Gun, [No Value; van der Bij, W; de Leij, LFMH; Prop, J

    2002-01-01

    Background. Frequencies of alloreactive T cells determined by limiting dilution assays (LDA) may not adequately reflect the donor-reactive immune status in transplant recipients. To reevaluate LDA frequencies, we developed a flow cytometry test for direct determination of alloreactive T-cell

  7. Balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery with stable xenon/CT cerebral blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erba, S.M.; Horton, J.A.; Latchaw, R.E.; Yonas, H.; Sekhar, L.; Schramm, V.; Pentheny, S.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a technique to predict preoperatively the safety of permanently occluding an internal carotid artery. The method was performed by imaging stable xenon cerebral blood flow (CBF) with the internal carotid artery both open and temporarily occluded with a nondetachable balloon on a double lumen Swan-Ganz catheter. Patients were those in whom we planned to sacrifice the internal carotid artery (those with giant or inaccessible aneurysms) or those in whom such a sacrifice was at least likely (those with skull base tumors). Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of a comparison of occluded and nonoccluded CBF values. Group-I patients had no significant change in CBF with internal carotid artery occlusion; group-II patients showed a symmetric decrease in CBF; and group-III patients had an asymmetric decrease in CBF, always greater on the occluded side. A fourth group clinically failed to tolerate even brief carotid occlusion. The internal carotid artery in one patients from group III was sacrificed at surgery: the size and shape of his postoperative infarct corresponded almost exactly to the area of asymmetrically decreased CBF on his occluded study. The data suggest that if surgery is likely to result in permanent occlusion of the internal carotid artery, then patients who are at risk for delayed neurologic injury due to a compromised cerebral blood flow should have arterial bypass grafts before such surgery is performed

  8. Highly Stable Anion Exchange Membranes for High-Voltage Redox-Flow Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yushan

    2018-02-26

    membrane in the sulfuric acid system was also achieved due to the high acid doping ability of the polymer structure. The cationic 9MeOTTP+-F6PBI PTFE reinforced membrane shows a cerium (IV) permeability that is 27-fold lower than that of Nafion 212. Excellent voltage and energy efficiencies with a 9MeOTTP+-F6PBI PTFE reinforced membrane were demonstrated in an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB).

  9. Transient myocardial ischemia during nifedipine therapy in stable angina pectoris, and its relation to coronary collateral flow and comparison with metoprolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, K; Andersen, P E

    1993-01-01

    There are conflicting results concerning the anti-ischemic effect of nifedipine in patients with chronic stable angina. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess whether the anti-ischemic effect of nifedipine may be related to coronary collateral circulation. Forty-one patients with stable...... of collateral circulation. In 17 patients, angiographically poor or no collateral flow was observed (group 1), and 24 had good collateral flow (group 2). Nifedipine was administered to 20 patients (8 in group 1, and 12 in group 2). In group 1, nifedipine reduced the frequency of total and asymptomatic ischemic...

  10. The ecological limits of hydrologic alteration (ELOHA): A new framework for developing regional environmental flow standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, N.L.; Richter, B.D.; Arthington, A.H.; Bunn, S.E.; Naiman, R.J.; Kendy, E.; Acreman, M.; Apse, C.; Bledsoe, B.P.; Freeman, Mary C.; Henriksen, J.; Jacobson, R.B.; Kennen, J.G.; Merritt, D.M.; O'Keeffe, J. H.; Olden, J.D.; Rogers, K.; Tharme, R.E.; Warner, A.

    2010-01-01

    The flow regime is a primary determinant of the structure and function of aquatic and riparian ecosystems for streams and rivers. Hydrologic alteration has impaired riverine ecosystems on a global scale, and the pace and intensity of human development greatly exceeds the ability of scientists to assess the effects on a river-by-river basis. Current scientific understanding of hydrologic controls on riverine ecosystems and experience gained from individual river studies support development of environmental flow standards at the regional scale. 2. This paper presents a consensus view from a group of international scientists on a new framework for assessing environmental flow needs for many streams and rivers simultaneously to foster development and implementation of environmental flow standards at the regional scale. This framework, the ecological limits of hydrologic alteration (ELOHA), is a synthesis of a number of existing hydrologic techniques and environmental flow methods that are currently being used to various degrees and that can support comprehensive regional flow management. The flexible approach allows scientists, water-resource managers and stakeholders to analyse and synthesise available scientific information into ecologically based and socially acceptable goals and standards for management of environmental flows. 3. The ELOHA framework includes the synthesis of existing hydrologic and ecological databases from many rivers within a user-defined region to develop scientifically defensible and empirically testable relationships between flow alteration and ecological responses. These relationships serve as the basis for the societally driven process of developing regional flow standards. This is to be achieved by first using hydrologic modelling to build a 'hydrologic foundation' of baseline and current hydrographs for stream and river segments throughout the region. Second, using a set of ecologically relevant flow variables, river segments within the

  11. Countercurrent flow-limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    Experiments were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to investigate the counter-current flow limiting characteristics of a Savannah River Plant control rod septifoil assembly. These experiments were unheated, using air and water as the working fluids. Results are presented in terms of the Wallis flooding correlation for several different control rod configurations. Flooding was observed to occur in the vicinity of the inlet slots/holes of the septifoil, rather than within the rod bundle at the location of the minimum flow area. Nearly identical flooding characteristics of the septifoil were observed for configurations with zero, three, and four rods inserted, but significantly different results occurred with 5 rods inserted

  12. The role of flow limitation as an important diagnostic tool and clinical finding in mild sleep-disordered breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevin Arora

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is defined by quantifying apneas and hypopneas along with symptoms suggesting sleep disruption. Subtler forms of sleep-disordered breathing can be missed when this criteria is used. Newer technologies allow for non-invasive detection of flow limitation, however consensus classification is needed. Subjects with flow limitation demonstrate electroencephalogram changes and clinical symptoms indicating sleep fragmentation. Flow limitation may be increased in special populations and treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP has been shown to improve outcomes. Titrating CPAP to eliminate flow limitation may be associated with improved clinical outcomes compared to treating apneas and hypopneas.

  13. The impact of non-stationary flows on the surface stress in the weak-wind stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field based upon field observations. Extensive sonic anemometer measurements from horizontal networks and vertical towers ranging from 12 to 20 m height and innovative fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing observations were collected from three field programs in moderately sloped terrain with a varying degree of surface heterogeneity, namely the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) and the Flow Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) II experiments in Colorado (USA), and the Advanced Canopy Resolution Experiment (ARCFLO) in Oregon (USA). The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions is studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso-scale motions. Consequently, the roles of the wind speed and stratification are not adequately accommodated by a single non-dimensional combination, such as the bulk Richardson number. However, cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The latter may be significant in explaining the small-scale weak turbulence during stable stratification and deviations from conventional flux-profile relationships. Contrary to expectations, the vertical coherence was strongest for weakest winds and declined fast with increasing velocities, which suggests that submeso-scale motions are much deeper than previously thought.

  14. Edge shear flows and particle transport near the density limit of the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, R.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.; Nie, L.; Guo, D.; Long, T.; Ke, R.; Wu, Y.; Yuan, B.; Xu, M.; The HL-2A Team

    2018-01-01

    Edge shear flow and its effect on regulating turbulent transport have long been suspected to play an important role in plasmas operating near the Greenwald density limit n G. In this study, equilibrium profiles as well as the turbulent particle flux and Reynolds stress across the separatrix in the HL-2A tokamak are examined as nG is approached in ohmic L-mode discharges. As the normalized line-averaged density \\bar{n}_e/nG is raised, the shearing rate of the mean poloidal flow ω_sh drops, and the turbulent drive for the low-frequency zonal flow (the Reynolds power P_Re ) collapses. Correspondingly, the turbulent particle transport increases drastically with increasing collision rates. The geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) gain more energy from the ambient turbulence at higher densities, but have smaller shearing rate than low-frequency zonal flows. The increased density also introduces decreased adiabaticity which not only enhances the particle transport but is also related to reduction in the eddy-tilting and the Reynolds power. Both effects may lead to cooling of edge plasmas and therefore the onset of MHD instabilities that limit the plasma density.

  15. A probabilistic method for determining effluent temperature limits for flow instability for SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, B.J.; White, A.M.

    1990-06-01

    This manual describes the uncertainty analysis used to determine the effluent temperature limits for a Mark 22 charge in the Savannah River Site production reactors. The postulated accident scenario is a DEGB/LOCA resulting from a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet accompanied by the safety rod failure described in the previous chapter. The analysis described in this manual is used to calculate the limits for the flow instability phase of the accident. For this phase of the accident, the limits criterion is that the Stanton number does not exceed 0.00455 [1]. The limits are determined for a specified 84% probability that the Stanton number will not exceed 0.00455 in any assembly in the core

  16. Possibilities and Limitations of CFD Simulation for Flashing Flow Scenarios in Nuclear Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Yixiang; Lucas, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The flashing phenomenon is relevant to nuclear safety analysis, for example by a loss of coolant accident and safety release scenarios. It has been studied intensively by means of experiments and simulations with system codes, but computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation is still at the embryonic stage. Rapid increasing computer speed makes it possible to apply the CFD technology in such complex flow situations. Nevertheless, a thorough evaluation on the limitations and restrictions is s...

  17. The Economic Role and Limitations of Cooperatives: An Investment Cash Flow Derivation

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, H. Christopher

    1992-01-01

    The economic role and limitations of cooperatives are derived using an approach based on investment cash flows and net present value. Cooperatives are viewed as an option for member investment as well as an option for member patronage. The investment approach yields results similar to the traditional paradigms that focus on patronage. In addition, the approach makes more explicit the impact of member investment on cooperative existence, valuation, performance measurement, and strategy options.

  18. Flutter-Limited Reconfiguration of a Flat Plate Bending in a Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Frederick; Sansas, Fabien; Prakash, Aviral; Bhati, Awan; Laurendeau, Eric

    Plants rely on their flexibility to change form and reduce their drag when subjected to fluid flow. Flexibility allows plants to reconfigure and reduce their drag, however it is well known that flexibility can also lead to a loss of stability and thus increased dynamical loads. Fluttering flags are a good example. In the present work, we consider the limitation to reconfiguration brought by a dynamic loss of stability in constant uniform flow. To understand the trade-off that flexibility brings to real plants in terms of drag reduction and loss of stability, we study an idealised two-dimensional system: a beam clamped at its centre and subjected to a normal flow. We combine wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations to study how the beam bends in the flow statically when the flow velocity is increased until a critical value is reached and the beam starts fluttering. We observe the competition between reconfiguration and flutter in flat plates in a wind tunnel. We also adopt a computational approach coupling an ALE finite volume aerodynamics code to a finite difference solution of the large deformation beam equation. We find that for a lighter structure in a heavier fluid, the critical velocity is higher and more reconfiguration is possible without reaching an instability. NSERC.

  19. Stable isotope switching (SIS): a new stable isotope probing (SIP) approach to determine carbon flow in the soil food web and dynamics in organic matter pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxfield, P J; Dildar, N; Hornibrook, E R C; Stott, A W; Evershed, R P

    2012-04-30

    Recent advances in stable isotope probing (SIP) have allowed direct linkage of microbial population structure and function. This paper details a new development of SIP, Stable Isotope Switching (SIS), which allows the simultaneous assessment of carbon (C) uptake, turnover and decay, and the elucidation of soil food webs within complex soils or sedimentary matrices. SIS utilises a stable isotope labelling approach whereby the (13)C-labelled substrate is switched part way through the incubation to a natural abundance substrate. A (13)CH(4) SIS study of landfill cover soils from Odcombe (Somerset, UK) was conducted. Carbon assimilation and dissimilation processes were monitored through bulk elemental analysis isotope ratio mass spectrometry and compound-specific gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry, targeting a wide range of biomolecular components including: lipids, proteins and carbohydrates. Carbon assimilation by primary consumers (methanotrophs) and sequential assimilation into secondary (Gram-negative and -positive bacteria) and tertiary consumers (Eukaryotes) was observed. Up to 45% of the bacterial membrane lipid C was determined to be directly derived from CH(4) and at the conclusion of the experiment ca. 50% of the bulk soil C derived directly from CH(4) was retained within the soil. This is the first estimate of soil organic carbon derived from CH(4) and it is comparable with levels observed in lakes that have high levels of benthic methanogenesis. SIS opens the way for a new generation of SIP studies aimed at elucidating total C dynamics (incorporation, turnover and decay) at the molecular level in a wide range of complex environmental and biological matrices. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Estimation of the sources and flow system of groundwater in Fuji-Gotenba area by stable isotopic analysis and groundwater flow simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyama, Shingo; Miyaike, Shusaku; Ii, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Ryota; Ito, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the source and chemical character of the groundwater provides an important strategy for the quality management of mineral water and food materials. In order to identify a source and the flow paths of groundwater used for mineral water, the water quality and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen of well water in Gotenba city were studied. The electrical conductivity and chemical character of sampled water are similar to those of well water and spring water discharged elsewhere around Mt. Fuji. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios of water samples indicate their origin to be solely meteoric and the oxygen isotopic ratios suggest that the groundwater mainly originated from the mountain-side of Mt. Fuji at altitudes of from 1500 m to 2300 m. A subsequent simulation of groundwater showed that the distribution of the total head and the Darcy velocity are down streamlines from mountain-sides toward the study area in Gotenba city. The altitudes of discharge obtained by the simulation are above 2000 m, and these correspond well with altitudes estimated from δ 18 O values of the samples. (author)

  1. Coronal Rain in Magnetic Arcades: Rebound Shocks, Limit Cycles, and Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-07-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer (>6 hr) time span. We quantify how blob-like condensations forming in situ grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence-corona transition-region-like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy, and temperature while blobs descend, impact, and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a result, there are plenty of shear flows generated with relative velocity difference around 80 km s-1 in our simulations. These shear flows are siphon flows set up by multiple blob dynamics and they in turn affect the deformation of the falling blobs. In particular, we show how shear flows can break apart blobs into smaller fragments, within minutes.

  2. Genetic differentiation of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae across Nigeria suggests that selection limits gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyabe, D Y; Conn, J E

    2001-12-01

    Gene flow was investigated in Anopheles gambiae from eight localities that span the ecological zones of Nigeria (arid savanna zones in the north gradually turn into humid forest zones in the south). Genetic differentiation was measured over 10 microsatellite loci and, to determine any effects of selection, five loci were located within chromosome inversions and the other five were outside inversions. Over all loci, the largest estimates of differentiation were in comparisons between localities in the savanna vs. forest zones (range FST 0.024-0.087, Nm 2.6-10.1; RST 0.014-0.100, Nm 2.2-16.4). However, three loci located within inversions on chromosome II, whose frequencies varied clinically from north to south, were responsible for virtually all of the differentiation. When the three loci were removed, genetic distances across the remaining seven loci were markedly reduced even between localities in the forest and savanna zones (range FST 0.001-0.019, Nm 12.7-226.1) or no longer significant (P > 0.05) in the case of RST. Although tests of isolation by distance gave seemingly equivocal results, geographical distance does not appear to limit gene flow. These observations suggest that gene flow is extensive across the country but that selection on genes located within some inversions on chromosome II counters the homogenizing effects of gene flow.

  3. Reaching for the limits in continuous-flow dielectrophoretic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täuber, Sarah; Kunze, Lena; Grauberger, Oleg; Grundmann, Armin; Viefhues, Martina

    2017-12-04

    The efficient purification and analysis of topological DNA variants is mandatory for many state-of-the-art molecular medicine technologies, like gene- and cancer-therapy as well as plasmid vaccination. In this work, we exploit dielectrophoresis (DEP) for a fast and efficient continuous-flow separation and analysis that goes beyond the standard methods of gel electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis. The aim of this work was to reach for the limits in dielectrophoretic analysis of DNA regarding the size resolution and the topological conformation. A continuous-flow analytical separation of analyte mixtures of small linear DNA-fragments (10.0 kbp, 8.0 kbp, 6.0 kbp, and 5.0 kbp) and topological DNA variants (linear and supercoiled conformation) was investigated. We present a world record in the minimal size difference of 16.7% of DNA samples that can be resolved in a dielectrophoretic continuous-flow separation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time a microfluidic continuous-flow separation of DNA molecules based on their topological conformation. Since dielectrophoresis is virtually label-free, it offers a fast in-process quality control with low consumption, e.g. for the production of gene vaccines.

  4. Variable speed limit strategies analysis with mesoscopic traffic flow model based on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Bin; Cao, Dan-Ni; Dang, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Lin

    As a new cross-discipline, the complexity science has penetrated into every field of economy and society. With the arrival of big data, the research of the complexity science has reached its summit again. In recent years, it offers a new perspective for traffic control by using complex networks theory. The interaction course of various kinds of information in traffic system forms a huge complex system. A new mesoscopic traffic flow model is improved with variable speed limit (VSL), and the simulation process is designed, which is based on the complex networks theory combined with the proposed model. This paper studies effect of VSL on the dynamic traffic flow, and then analyzes the optimal control strategy of VSL in different network topologies. The conclusion of this research is meaningful to put forward some reasonable transportation plan and develop effective traffic management and control measures to help the department of traffic management.

  5. A state of the art on the flooding phenomena and countercurrent flow limiting modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young Jong; Chang, Won Pyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    Countercurrent flow limiting phenomenon and its modeling for vertical and nearly horizontal pipes has been reviewed in two phase flow. A number of analytical and empirical model have been developed for flooding in the vertical pipes and annulars. These may be classified as stability theory, envelope theory, static equilibrium theory, slug formation theory, Wallis correlation, and Kutateladze correlation. The theories and empirical correlations are reviewed and comparison with the various experimental data. The scatter of the experimental data is large because of the different flooding condition and because of the influence of the experimental conditions. Application of flooding for PWR best estimate system codes is reviewed. The codes provide the user options to implement CCFL correlation for the specific geometry. The codes can accommodate generally Wallis, Kutateladze, or Bankoff correlation. 4 tabs., 36 figs., 52 refs. (Author).

  6. Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  7. Filamentous sieve element proteins are able to limit phloem mass flow, but not phytoplasma spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari, Laura; Buoso, Sara; Santi, Simonetta; Furch, Alexandra C U; Martini, Marta; Degola, Francesca; Loschi, Alberto; van Bel, Aart J E; Musetti, Rita

    2017-06-15

    In Fabaceae, dispersion of forisomes-highly ordered aggregates of sieve element proteins-in response to phytoplasma infection was proposed to limit phloem mass flow and, hence, prevent pathogen spread. In this study, the involvement of filamentous sieve element proteins in the containment of phytoplasmas was investigated in non-Fabaceae plants. Healthy and infected Arabidopsis plants lacking one or two genes related to sieve element filament formation-AtSEOR1 (At3g01680), AtSEOR2 (At3g01670), and AtPP2-A1 (At4g19840)-were analysed. TEM images revealed that phytoplasma infection induces phloem protein filament formation in both the wild-type and mutant lines. This result suggests that, in contrast to previous hypotheses, sieve element filaments can be produced independently of AtSEOR1 and AtSEOR2 genes. Filament presence was accompanied by a compensatory overexpression of sieve element protein genes in infected mutant lines in comparison with wild-type lines. No correlation was found between phloem mass flow limitation and phytoplasma titre, which suggests that sieve element proteins are involved in defence mechanisms other than mechanical limitation of the pathogen. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Upper-airway flow limitation and transcutaneous carbon dioxide during sleep in normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpilä, Ville; Jernman, Riina; Lassila, Katariina; Uotila, Jukka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäenpää, Johanna; Polo, Olli

    2017-08-01

    Sleep during pregnancy involves a physiological challenge to provide sufficient gas exchange to the fetus. Enhanced ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia may protect from deficient gas exchange, but sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may predispose to adverse events. The aim of this study was to analyze sleep and breathing in healthy pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls, with a focus on CO 2 changes and upper-airway flow limitation. Healthy women in the third trimester and healthy non-pregnant women with normal body mass index (BMI) were recruited for polysomnography. Conventional analysis of sleep and breathing was performed. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcCO 2 ) was determined for each sleep stage. Flow-limitation was analyzed using the flattening index and TcCO 2 values were recorded for every inspiration. Eighteen pregnant women and 12 controls were studied. Pregnancy was associated with shorter sleep duration and more superficial sleep. Apnea-hypopnea index, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation, flow-limitation, snoring or periodic leg movements were similar in the two groups. Mean SaO 2 and minimum SaO 2 were lower and average heart rate was higher in the pregnant group. TcCO 2 levels did not differ between groups but variance of TcCO 2 was smaller in pregnant women during non-rapid eye movement (NREM). TcCO 2 profiles showed transient TcCO 2 peaks, which seem specific to pregnancy. Healthy pregnancy does not predispose to SDB. Enhanced ventilatory control manifests as narrowing threshold of TcCO 2 between wakefulness and sleep. Pregnant women have a tendency for rapid CO 2 increases during sleep which might have harmful consequences if not properly compensated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Johnson-Segalman -- Saint-Venant equations for viscoelastic shallow flows in the elastic limit

    OpenAIRE

    Boyaval, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The shallow-water equations of Saint-Venant, often used to model the long-wave dynamics of free-surface flows driven by inertia and hydrostatic pressure, can be generalized to account for the elongational rheology of non-Newtonian fluids too. We consider here the $4 \\times 4$ shallow-water equations generalized to viscoelastic fluids using the Johnson-Segalman model in the elastic limit (i.e. at infinitely-large Deborah number, when source terms vanish). The system of nonlinear first-order eq...

  10. Partial analysis of wind power limit in an electric micro system using continuation power flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiallo Guerrero, Jandry; Santos Fuentefria, Ariel; Castro Fernández, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The wind power insertion in the power system is an important issue and can create some instability problems in voltage and system frequency due to stochastic origin of wind. Know the Wind Power Limit that can insert in an electric grid without losing stability is a very important matter. Existing in bibliography a few methods for calculation of wind power limit, some of them are based in static constrains, an example is a method based in a continuation power flow analysis. In the present work the method is applied in an electric micro system formed when the system is disconnected of the man grid, the main goal was prove the method in a weak and island network. The software used in the simulations was the Power System Analysis Toolbox (PSAT). (author)

  11. Expiratory flow limitation and operating lung volumes during exercise in older and younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Meskimen, Kayla; Harms, Craig A

    2017-06-01

    We determined the effect of aging on expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and operating lung volumes when matched for lung size. We hypothesized that older adults will exhibit greater EFL and increases in EELV during exercise compared to younger controls. Ten older (5M/5W; >60years old) and nineteen height-matched young adults (10M/9W) were recruited. Young adults were matched for%predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) (Y-matched%Pred FVC; n=10) and absolute FVC (Y-matched FVC; n=10). Tidal flow-volume loops were recorded during the incremental exercise test with maximal flow-volume loops measured pre- and post-exercise. Compared to younger controls, older adults exhibited more EFL at ventilations of 26, 35, 51, and 80L/min. The older group had higher end-inspiratory lung volume compared to Y-matched%Pred FVC group during submaximal ventilations. The older group increased EELV during exercise, while EELV stayed below resting in the Y-matched%Pred FVC group. These data suggest older adults exhibit more EFL and increase EELV earlier during exercise compared to younger adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Lactate delivery (not oxygen) limits hepatic gluconeogenesis when blood flow is reduced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Ken D; Urdiales, Jerry H; Donovan, Casey M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, using the isolated liver perfusion technique, whether the limiting factor for hepatic gluconeogenesis (GNG) from lactate was precursor delivery or oxygen availability during reduced flow rates of 0.85 or 0.60 ml.min(-1).g liver(-1). After a 24-h fast, three different experimental protocols were employed. Protocol 1 examined the impact on GNG when reservoir lactate concentration was maintained but oxygen delivery was elevated via increases in hematocrit (Hct). Elevating the Hct from 22.5+/- 0.8% to 30.9+/- 0.4% at a blood flow of 0.89+/- 0.01 ml.min(-1).g liver(-1) increased the oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) but did not augment GNG. Similarly, when the Hct was elevated from 22.5+/- 0.8% to 41.5+/- 0.7% at 0.59+/- 0.04 ml.min(-1).g liver(-1), Vo(2) was increased, but GNG was unaffected. Protocol 2 examined the impact on GNG when Hct was maintained but precursor delivery was elevated via increases in reservoir lactate concentration ([LA]). Specifically, elevating the [LA] from 2.31+/- 0.07 to 3.61+/- 0.33 mM at a flow rate of 0.82+/- 0.04 ml.min(-1).g liver(-1) significantly increased GNG. Similarly, elevating the [LA] from 2.31+/- 0.07 to 4.24+/- 0.37 mM at a flow rate of 0.58+/- 0.02 ml.min(-1).g liver(-1) increased GNG. Finally, we examined the impact of increasing both the oxygen and lactate delivery (Protocol 3). Again, Vo(2) was elevated with increased oxygen delivery, but GNG was not augmented beyond that observed with elevations in lactate delivery alone, i.e., Protocol 2. The results indicate that, during decrements in blood flow, GNG is limited primarily by precursor delivery, not oxygen availability.

  13. Circulatory effects of expiratory flow-limited exercise, dynamic hyperinflation and expiratory muscle pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Macklem

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research in normal subjects exercising with and without expiratory flow limitation at 1 L·s–1 imposed by a Starling resistor in the expiratory line, and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, using optoelectronic plethysmography to measure respiratory kinematics, combined with mouth, pleural and abdominal pressure measurements, to assess work of breathing and respiratory muscle performance. In normal subjects, flow-limited exercise resulted in the following: 1 Impaired exercise performance due to intolerable dyspnoea; 2 hypercapnia; 3 excessive respiratory muscle recruitment; 4 blood shifts from trunk to extremities; 5 a 10% reduction in cardiac output and a 5% reduction in arterial oxygen saturation, decreasing energy supplies to working respiratory and locomotor muscles. In both normal subjects and in COPD patients, dynamic hyperinflation did not always occur. Those patients that hyperinflated had worse lung function and less work of breathing, but better exercise performance than the others, in whom expiratory muscle recruitment prevented dynamic hyperinflation at the cost of increased work of breathing and excessive oxygen cost of breathing. This established an early competition between respiratory and locomotor muscles for available energy supplies. Dynamic hyperinflation is a better exercise strategy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than expiratory muscle recruitment, but the benefit it confers is small.

  14. Upgraded flowing liquid lithium limiter for improving Li coverage uniformity and erosion resistance in EAST device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Maingi, R.; Yang, Q. X.; Sun, Z.; Huang, M.; Chen, Y.; Yuan, X. L.; Meng, X. C.; Xu, W.; Gentile, C.; Carpe, A.; Diallo, A.; Lunsford, R.; Mansfield, D.; Osborne, T.; Tritz, K.; Li, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    We report on design and technology improvements for a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter inserted into auxiliary heated discharges in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak device. In order to enhance Li coverage uniformity and erosion resistance, a new liquid Li distributor with homogenous channels was implemented. In addition, two independent electromagnetic pumps and a new horizontal capillary structure contributed to an improvement in the observed Li flow uniformity (from 30% in the previous FLiLi design to >80% in this FLiLi design). To improve limiter surface erosion resistance, hot isostatic press technology was applied, which improved the thermal contact between thin stainless steel protective layers covering the Cu heat sink. The thickness of the stainless steel layer was increased from 0.1 mm to 0.5 mm, which also helped macroscopic erosion resilience. Despite the high auxiliary heating power up to 4.5 MW, no Li bursts were recorded from FLiLi, underscoring the improved performance of this new design.

  15. L^1 singular limit for relaxation and viscosity approximations of extended traffic flow models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Klingenberg

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the Cauchy problem for an extended traffic flow model with $L^1$-bounded initial data. A solution of the corresponding equilibrium equation with $L^1$-bounded initial data is given by the limit of solutions of viscous approximations of the original system as the dissipation parameter $epsilon$ tends to zero more slowly than the response time $au$. The proof of convergence is obtained by applying the Young measure to solutions introduced by DiPerna and, based on the estimate $$ | ho(t,x| leq sqrt {| ho_0(x|_1/(ct} $$ derived from one of Lax's results and Diller's idea, the limit function $ ho(t,x$ is shown to be a $L^1$-entropy week solution. A direct byproduct is that we can get the existence of $L^1$-entropy solutions for the Cauchy problem of the scalar conservation law with $L^1$-bounded initial data without any restriction on the growth exponent of the flux function provided that the flux function is strictly convex. Our result shows that, unlike the weak solutions of the incompressible fluid flow equations studied by DiPerna and Majda in [6], for convex scalar conservation laws with $L^1$-bounded initial data, the concentration phenomenon will never occur in its global entropy solutions.

  16. Space-charge-limited ion flow through an ionizing neutral layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvall, R.E.; Litwin, C.; Maron, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Space-charge-limited ion flow through an ionizing layer of neutral atoms is studied. The ion flow is between two parallel conducting plates (anode and cathode) with an externally applied voltage between them. An expanding layer of neutral atoms is adjacent to the anode surface, extending a finite distance into the anode--cathode gap. All ions originate either from the anode surface or from the ionization of neutrals; electrons originate only from ionization. Electrons are strongly magnetized by an externally applied, time-independent direct current (dc) magnetic field directed across the ion flow. The ions are unmagnetized, all motion being perpendicular to the conducting plates. Two different models of the anode layer were used to analyze this problem: a multifluid steady-state model and a single fluid time-dependent model. From both models it was found that the anode surface becomes shielded after the ion flux from the ionizing layer becomes larger than the space-charge-limited flux of the reduced gap between the neutral layer and cathode. Comparison was made between the time-dependent model and results from magnetically insulated ion beam diode (MID) experiments. Using an initial areal density of neutral hydrogen and carbon equal to the final observed electron areal density, comparison was made between calculated plasma shielding times and upper bounds on the shielding time observed in experiments. It was found that a layer of neutral hydrogen must contain a minimum of 15% carbon (by number density) to explain the rapid electric field screening observed in experiments

  17. Limited range of interspecific vital effects in coccolith stable isotopic records during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather M.

    2005-03-01

    Small but significant differences exist among stable carbon and oxygen isotopic excursions measured in coccolith-dominated bulk carbonate and planktic foraminifera during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). One hypothesis suggests that the bulk carbonate isotopic record is compromised by changing nannofossil assemblages, since modern nannofossils show a large (5 permil) range of interspecific vital effects. New techniques are employed here to separate different size fractions of coccoliths from PETM sediments at ODP Site 690 for isotopic analysis, removing a major portion of the variation in nannofossil assemblages. Isotopic compositions of coarse and fine coccolith fractions dominated by coccoliths of genus Chiasmolithus and Toweius, respectively, differ by less than 0.5 permil for both oxygen and carbon. The near-monogeneric Toweius record closely parallels the main trends in the bulk carbonate isotope records, including multiple steps in the negative carbon isotopic excursion, suggesting that the trends in the bulk carbonate record are not artifacts of changing species assemblages. Because both coccolithophorids and symbiont-bearing foraminifera like Acarinina must inhabit the photic zone, it is unlikely that the 103 year lags in isotope event onset between coccoliths and Acarinina reflect true time-transgressive invasion of isotopically depleted CO2 into the water column. The small range of vital effects among Paleocene coccoliths is unlikely to result from diagenetic homogenization, and instead may reflect more similar carbon acquisition strategies of Paleocene coccolithophorid algae due to larger and/or more similar cell sizes and higher atmospheric carbon dioxide. The small range of vital effects suggests that bulk carbonate records are likely reliable for other early and pre-Cenozoic sediments where foraminifera are often scarce.

  18. Faecal Metaproteomic Analysis Reveals a Personalized and Stable Functional Microbiome and Limited Effects of a Probiotic Intervention in Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin A Kolmeder

    Full Text Available Recent metagenomic studies have demonstrated that the overall functional potential of the intestinal microbiome is rather conserved between healthy individuals. Here we assessed the biological processes undertaken in-vivo by microbes and the host in the intestinal tract by conducting a metaproteome analysis from a total of 48 faecal samples of 16 healthy adults participating in a placebo-controlled probiotic intervention trial. Half of the subjects received placebo and the other half consumed Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG for three weeks (1010 cfu per day. Faecal samples were collected just before and at the end of the consumption phase as well as after a three-week follow-up period, and were processed for microbial composition and metaproteome analysis. A common core of shared microbial protein functions could be identified in all subjects. Furthermore, we observed marked differences in expressed proteins between subjects that resulted in the definition of a stable and personalized microbiome both at the mass-spectrometry-based proteome level and the functional level based on the KEGG pathway analysis. No significant changes in the metaproteome were attributable to the probiotic intervention. A detailed taxonomic assignment of peptides and comparison to phylogenetic microarray data made it possible to evaluate the activity of the main phyla as well as key species, including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Several correlations were identified between human and bacterial proteins. Proteins of the human host accounted for approximately 14% of the identified metaproteome and displayed variations both between and within individuals. The individually different human intestinal proteomes point to personalized host-microbiota interactions. Our findings indicate that analysis of the intestinal metaproteome can complement gene-based analysis and contributes to a thorough understanding of the activities of the microbiome and the relevant pathways in health and

  19. Trophic flow within the microbial and mesozooplankton foodweb in the North Atlantic: processes indicated by analyses of stable isotopes and biovolume spectra.

    OpenAIRE

    Basedow, S.; da Silva, N.L.; Bode, A. (Antonio)

    2015-01-01

    The trophic flow from primary producers through the microbial and mesozooplankton food web makes sun energy available in particulate form for higher trophic levels. Pathways through the lower trophic levels are highly variable and determine productivity of the marine pelagic food webs. We analysed spatial variability in food web structure across the North Atlantic by means of stable isotope analyses (SIA) and biovolume spectrum theories (BST). At 7 stations in the Iceland Basin, ...

  20. Application of stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) composition of mollusc shells in palaeolimnological studies - possibilities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolinarska, Karina; Pełechaty, Mariusz; Kossler, Annette; Pronin, Eugeniusz; Noskowiak, Daria

    2017-04-01

    Carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) stable isotope analyses are among the standard methods applied in the studies of past environment, including climate. In lacustrine sediments, δ13C and δ18O values can be measured in fine carbonate fraction (carbonate mud), in charophyte encrustations, ostracod carapaces and mollusc shells. Application of the stable isotope record of each of the above-mentioned components of the lake sediment requires knowledge about possibilities and limitations of the method. The present research discusses the most important results of the studies carried out between 2011 and 2013, concentrated on the stable isotope composition of snail shells, primarily, the species commonly preserved in central European Quaternary lacustrine sediments. The stable isotope studies involved also, the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha), one of the most invasive freshwater species in the world. The research involved shell isotope studies of both recent (Apolinarska, 2013; Apolinarska et al., 2016; Apolinarska and Pełechaty, in press) and fossil molluscs derived from the Holocene sediments (Apolinarska et al., 2015a, b). Shell δ13C values were species-specific and among the gastropods studied the same order of species from the most to the least 13C-depleted was observed at all sites sampled. Shell δ18O values were more uniform. The wide range of δ13C and δ18O values were observed in population and subpopulation, i.e. when live snails were sampled live from restricted area within the lake littoral zone. Carbon and oxygen stable isotope values of the mono-specific shells sampled from 1 cm thick sediment samples were highly variable. Those intra-specific differences (n=20) were as large as several permill. Such significant variability in δ13C and δ18O values indicates that stable isotope composition of single shells is unlikely to be representative of the sediment sample. In conclusion, samples of freshwater molluscs for stable isotope analyses should be

  1. Enhanced Dissipation, Hypoellipticity, and Anomalous Small Noise Inviscid Limits in Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrossian, Jacob; Coti Zelati, Michele

    2017-06-01

    We analyze the decay and instant regularization properties of the evolution semigroups generated by two-dimensional drift-diffusion equations in which the scalar is advected by a shear flow and dissipated by full or partial diffusion. We consider both the space-periodic T^2 setting and the case of a bounded channel T × [0,1] with no-flux boundary conditions. In the infinite Péclet number limit (diffusivity {ν\\to 0}), our work quantifies the enhanced dissipation effect due to the shear. We also obtain hypoelliptic regularization, showing that solutions are instantly Gevrey regular even with only partial diffusion. The proofs rely on localized spectral gap inequalities and ideas from hypocoercivity with an augmented energy functional with weights replaced by pseudo-differential operators (of a rather simple form). As an application, we study small noise inviscid limits of invariant measures of stochastic perturbations of passive scalars, and show that the classical Freidlin scaling between noise and diffusion can be modified. In particular, although statistically stationary solutions blow up in {H^1} in the limit {ν \\to 0}, we show that viscous invariant measures still converge to a unique inviscid measure.

  2. Numerical simulation study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morghi, Youssef; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: ssfmorghi@gmail.com, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Puente, Jesus, E-mail: jpuente720@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educaçao Tecnologica Celso Suckowda Fonseca (CEFET), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil); Baliza, Ana R., E-mail: baliza@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Eletronuclear Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    After a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the temperature of the fuel elements cladding increases dramatically due to the heat produced by the fission products decay, which is not adequately removed by the vapor contained in the core. In order to avoid this sharp rise in temperature and consequent melting of the core, the Emergency Core Cooling System is activated. This system initially injects borated water from accumulator tanks of the reactor through the inlet pipe (cold leg) and the outlet pipe (hot leg), or through the cold leg only, depending on the plant manufacturer. Some manufacturers add to this, direct injection into the upper plenum of the reactor. The penetration of water into the reactor core is a complex thermo fluid dynamic process because it involves the mixing of water with the vapor contained in the reactor, added to that generated in the contact of the water with the still hot surfaces in various geometries. In some critical locations, the vapor flowing in the opposite direction of the water can control the penetration of this into the core. This phenomenon is known as Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) or Flooding, and it is characterized by the control that a gas exerts in the liquid flow in the opposite direction. This work presents a proposal to use a CFD to simulate the CCFL phenomenon. Numerical computing can provide important information and data that is difficult or expensive to measure or test experimentally. Given the importance of computational science today, it can be considered a third and independent branch of science on an equal footing with the theoretical and experimental sciences. (author)

  3. Combined micro and macro geodynamic modelling of mantle flow: methods, potentialities and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenda, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last few years, geodynamic simulations aiming at reconstructing the Earth's internal dynamics have increasingly attempted to link processes occurring at the micro (i.e., strain-induced lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of crystal aggregates) and macro scale (2D/3D mantle convection). As a major outcome, such a combined approach results in the prediction of the modelled region's elastic properties that, in turn, can be used to perform seismological synthetic experiments. By comparison with observables, the geodynamic simulations can then be considered as a good numerical analogue of specific tectonic settings, constraining their deep structure and recent tectonic evolution. In this contribution, I will discuss the recent methodologies, potentialities and current limits of combined micro- and macro-flow simulations, with particular attention to convergent margins whose dynamics and deep structure is still the object of extensive studies.

  4. Externally Phase-Locked Flux Flow Oscillator for Submm Integrated Receivers; Achievements and Limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Dmitriev, P. N.

    2003-01-01

    A Josephson Flux Flow Oscillator (FFO) is the most developed superconducting local oscillator for integration with an SIS mixer in a single-chip submm-wave receiver. Recently, using a new FFO design, a free-running linewidth less than or equal to10 MHz has been measured in the frequency range up...... to 712 GHz, limited only by the gap frequency of Nb. This enabled us to phase lock the FFO in the frequency range 500-712 GHz where continuous frequency tuning is possible; resulting in an absolute FFO phase noise as low as -80 dBc at 707 GHz. Comprehensive measurements of the FFO radiation linewidth...... have been performed using an integrated SIS harmonic mixer. The influence of FFO parameters on radiation linewidth, particularly the effect of the differential resistances associated both with the bias current and the applied magnetic field has been studied in order to further optimize the FFO design...

  5. Flow-Through Stream Modeling with MODFLOW and MT3D: Certainties and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Simon, Rose; Bernard, Stéphane; Meurville, Charles; Rebour, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to assess MODFLOW and MT3D capabilities for simulating the spread of contaminants from a river exhibiting an unusual relationship with an alluvial aquifer, with the groundwater head higher than the river head on one side and lower on the other (flow-through stream). A series of simulation tests is conducted using a simple hypothetical model so as to characterize and quantify these limitations. Simulation results show that the expected contaminant spread could be achieved with a specific configuration composed of two sets of parameters: (1) modeled object parameters (hydraulic groundwater gradient, hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer and streambed), and (2) modeling parameters (vertical discretization of aquifer, horizontal refinement of stream modeled with River [RIV] package). The influence of these various parameters on simulation results is investigated, and potential complications and errors are identified. Contaminant spread from stream to aquifer is not always reproduced by MT3D due to the RIV package's inability to simulate lateral exchange fluxes between stream and aquifer. This paper identifies the need for a MODFLOW streamflow package allowing lateral stream-aquifer interactions and streamflow routine calculations. Such developments could be of particular interest for modeling contaminated flow-through streams. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  6. Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in a cross flow at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-22

    The blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in cross flows were studied, especially concerning the effect of ambient pressure, by conducting experiments at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures. The combined effects of air flow and pressure were investigated by a series of experiments conducted in an especially built wind tunnel in Lhasa, a city on the Tibetan plateau where the altitude is 3650 m and the atmospheric pressure condition is naturally low (64 kPa). These results were compared with results obtained from a wind tunnel at standard atmospheric pressure (100 kPa) in Hefei city (altitude 50 m). The size of the fuel nozzles used in the experiments ranged from 3 to 8 mm in diameter and propane was used as the fuel. It was found that the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow first increased (“cross flow dominant” regime) and then decreased (“fuel jet dominant” regime) as the fuel jet velocity increased in both pressures; however, the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow was much lower at sub-atmospheric pressure than that at standard atmospheric pressure whereas the domain of the blow-out limit curve (in a plot of the air speed of the cross flow versus the fuel jet velocity) shrank as the pressure decreased. A theoretical model was developed to characterize the blow-out limit of nonpremixed jet flames in a cross flow based on a Damköhler number, defined as the ratio between the mixing time and the characteristic reaction time. A satisfactory correlation was obtained at relative strong cross flow conditions (“cross flow dominant” regime) that included the effects of the air speed of the cross flow, fuel jet velocity, nozzle diameter and pressure.

  7. The effect of water temperature and flow on respiration in barnacles: patterns of mass transfer versus kinetic limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Michael T; Carrington, Emily

    2014-06-15

    In aquatic systems, physiological processes such as respiration, photosynthesis and calcification are potentially limited by the exchange of dissolved materials between organisms and their environment. The nature and extent of physiological limitation is, therefore, likely to be dependent on environmental conditions. Here, we assessed the metabolic sensitivity of barnacles under a range of water temperatures and velocities, two factors that influence their distribution. Respiration rates increased in response to changes in temperature and flow, with an interaction where flow had less influence on respiration at low temperatures, and a much larger effect at high temperatures. Model analysis suggested that respiration is mass transfer limited under conditions of low velocity (temperature (20-25°C). In contrast, limitation by uptake reaction kinetics, when the biotic capacity of barnacles to absorb and process oxygen is slower than its physical delivery by mass transport, prevailed at high flows (40-150 cm s(-1)) and low temperatures (5-15°C). Moreover, there are intermediate flow-temperature conditions where both mass transfer and kinetic limitation are important. Behavioral monitoring revealed that barnacles fully extend their cirral appendages at low flows and display abbreviated 'testing' behaviors at high flows, suggesting some form of mechanical limitation. In low flow-high temperature treatments, however, barnacles displayed distinct 'pumping' behaviors that may serve to increase ventilation. Our results suggest that in slow-moving waters, respiration may become mass transfer limited as temperatures rise, whereas faster flows may serve to ameliorate the effects of elevated temperatures. Moreover, these results underscore the necessity for approaches that evaluate the combined effects of multiple environmental factors when examining physiological and behavioral performance. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Possibilities and Limitations of CFD Simulation for Flashing Flow Scenarios in Nuclear Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiang Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The flashing phenomenon is relevant to nuclear safety analysis, for example by a loss of coolant accident and safety release scenarios. It has been studied intensively by means of experiments and simulations with system codes, but computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation is still at the embryonic stage. Rapid increasing computer speed makes it possible to apply the CFD technology in such complex flow situations. Nevertheless, a thorough evaluation on the limitations and restrictions is still missing, which is however indispensable for reliable application, as well as further development. In the present work, the commonly-used two-fluid model with different mono-disperse assumptions is used to simulate various flashing scenarios. With the help of available experimental data, the results are evaluated, and the limitations are discussed. A poly-disperse method is found necessary for a reliable prediction of mean bubble size and phase distribution. The first attempts to trace the evolution of the bubble size distribution by means of poly-disperse simulations are made.

  9. ELM Suppression and performance improvement with a flowing liquid lithium limiter in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Maingi, R.; Sun, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J. G.; Diallo, A.; Lunsford, R.; Osborne, T.; Tritz, K.; EAST Team

    2017-10-01

    Improvements in plasma performance were observed using a second-generation flowing liquid lithium limiter (FLiLi) in EAST. Compared to the H mode discharges without FLiLi, ELM frequency and amplitude were both lower with FLiLi. Also, ELM frequency and amplitude gradually decreased discharge-by-discharge with FLiLi, similar to the gradual ELM mitigation by real-time Li aerosol injection in successive discharges. Moreover, transient ELM-free H-modes with a strong increase of WMHD and H98 were observed for the first time with FLiLi. During the ELM-free phases, MHD activity interpreted from high frequency Mirnov probes differed from activity in the ELMy phases. In addition to the typical low-frequency 50 kHz edge coherent MHD mode (ECM), a second mode 220-240 kHz also was observed in the ELM-free phase. By computing the Li efflux from the FLiLi limiter surface, it was found that the Li efflux from sputtering during discharges and evaporation between discharges was comparable to the typical mass delivery rates used for Li powder injection rate during plasma operation in EAST. Therefore, gradual accumulation of Li in EAST via real time Li efflux from the FLiLi surface produces similar effects to aerosol injection, i.e. reduced recycling, enhanced fluctuations, and ELM mitigation.

  10. New insights on ecosystem mercury cycling revealed by stable isotopes of mercury in water flowing from a headwater peatland catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn E. Woerndle; Martin Tsz-Ki Tsui; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Joel D. Blum; Xiangping Nie; Randall K. Kolka

    2018-01-01

    Stable isotope compositions of mercury (Hg) were measured in the outlet stream and in soil cores at different landscape positions in a 9.7-ha boreal upland-peatland catchment. An acidic permanganate/persulfate digestion procedure was validated for water samples with high dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations through Hg spike addition analysis. We report a...

  11. Enhancement of the detection limit for lateral flow immunoassays: evaluation and comparison of bioconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Elisângela M; Kubota, Lauro T; Michaelis, Jens; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2012-01-31

    There is an increasing demand for convenient and accurate point-of-care tools that can detect and diagnose different stages of a disease in remote or impoverished settings. In recent years, lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA) have been indicated as a suitable medical diagnostic tool for these environments because they require little or no sample preparation, provide rapid and reliable results with no electronic components and thus can be manufactured at low costs and operated by unskilled personnel. However, even though they have been successfully applied to acute and chronic disease detection, LFIA based on gold nanoparticles, the standard marker, show serious limitations when high sensitivity is needed, such as early stage disease detection. Moreover, based on the lack of comparative information for label performance, significant optimization of the systems that are currently in use might be possible. To this end, in the presented work, we compare the detection limit between the four most used labels: colloidal-gold, silver enhanced gold, blue latex bead and carbon black nanoparticles. Preliminary results were obtained by using the biotin-streptavidin coupling as a model system and showed that carbon black had a remarkably low detection limit of 0.01 μg/mL in comparison to 0.1 μg/mL, 1 μg/mL and 1mg/mL for silver-coated gold nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles and polystyrene beads, respectively. Therefore, as a proof of concept, carbon black was used in a detection system for Dengue fever. This was achieved by immobilizing monoclonal antibodies for the nonstructural glycoprotein (NS1) of the Dengue virus to carbon black. We found that the colorimetric detection limit of 57 ng/mL for carbon black was ten times lower than the 575 ng/mL observed for standard gold nanoparticles; which makes it sensitive enough to diagnose a patient on the first days of infection. We therefore conclude that, careful screening of detection labels should be performed as a necessary step

  12. Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor Discharge-Flow Overexpansion and Limit-Loading Condition, Part I: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2017-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) investigation is conducted over a two-dimensional axial-flow turbine rotor blade row to study the phenomena of turbine rotor discharge flow overexpansion at subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. Quantitative data of the mean-flow Mach numbers, mean-flow angles, the tangential blade pressure forces, the mean-flow mass flux, and the flow-path total pressure loss coefficients, averaged or integrated across the two-dimensional computational domain encompassing two blade-passages, are obtained over a series of 14 inlet-total to exit-static pressure ratios, from 1.5 (un-choked; subcritical condition) to 10.0 (supercritical with excessively high pressure ratio.) Detailed flow features over the full domain-of-computation, such as the streamline patterns, Mach contours, pressure contours, blade surface pressure distributions, etc. are collected and displayed in this paper. A formal, quantitative definition of the limit loading condition based on the channel flow theory is proposed and explained. Contrary to the comments made in the historical works performed on this subject, about the deficiency of the theoretical methods applied in analyzing this phenomena, using modern CFD method for the study of this subject appears to be quite adequate and successful. This paper describes the CFD work and its findings.

  13. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High Alpha Flow Visualization. Part 1: Discussion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1998-01-01

    ...) at low alpha conditions typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  14. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High ALPHA Flow Visualization. Part 2 Stationary Model Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1998-01-01

    ...) at low alpha conditions typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  15. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High Alpha Flow Visualization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1997-01-01

    ...) at low alpha condition typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  16. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation/Transonic High ALPHA Flow Visualization. Part 3 Oscillating Model Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Atlee M

    1998-01-01

    ...) at low alpha conditions typical of transonic LCO flows with and without tip stores. Laser light sheet/water vapor techniques were used to illuminate the flows, and video recording was used to obtain the data...

  17. Axial annular flow of power-law fluids - applicability of the limiting cases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Petr; David, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2007), s. 365-371 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/1033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Concentric annuli * Poiseuile flow * annular flow * power- law fluids * flow rate * pressure drop Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  18. The Upper Limit of Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation Is Decreased with Elevations in Intracranial Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesek, Matthew; Kibler, Kathleen; Easley, R Blaine; Mytar, Jennifer; Rhee, Christopher; Andropolous, Dean; Brady, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The upper limit of cerebrovascular pressure autoregulation (ULA) is inadequately characterized. We sought to delineate the ULA in a neonatal swine model. Neonatal piglets with sham surgery (n = 9), interventricular fluid infusion (INF; n = 10), controlled cortical impact (CCI; n = 10), or impact + infusion (CCI + INF; n = 11) had intracranial pressure monitoring and bilateral cortical laser-Doppler flux recordings during arterial hypertension until lethality. An increase in red cell flux as a function of cerebral perfusion pressure was determined by piecewise linear regression and static rates of autoregulation (SRoRs) were determined above and below this inflection. When identified, the ULA (median [interquartile range]) was as follows: sham group: 102 mmHg (97-109), INF group: 75 mmHg (52-84), CCI group: 81 mmHg (69-101), and CCI + INF group: 61 mmHg (52-57; p = 0.01). Both groups with interventricular infusion had significantly lower ULA compared with the sham group. Neonatal piglets without intracranial pathological conditions tolerated acute hypertension, with minimal perturbation of cerebral blood flow. Piglets with acutely elevated intracranial pressure, with or without trauma, demonstrated loss of autoregulation when subjected to arterial hypertension.

  19. Systemic vascular function, measured with forearm flow mediated dilatation, in acute and stable cerebrovascular disease: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blacker David

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute ischaemic stroke is associated with alteration in systemic markers of vascular function. We measured forearm vascular function (using forearm flow mediated dilatation to clarify whether recent acute ischaemic stroke/TIA is associated with impaired systemic vascular function. Methods Prospective case control study enrolling 17 patients with recent acute ischaemic stroke/TIA and 17 sex matched controls with stroke more than two years previously. Forearm vascular function was measured using flow medicated dilatation (FMD. Results Flow mediated dilatation was 6.0 ± 1.1% in acute stroke/TIA patients and 4.7 ± 1.0% among control subjects (p = 0.18. The mean paired difference in FMD between subjects with recent acute stroke and controls was 1.25% (95% CI -0.65, 3.14; p = 0.18. Endothelium independent dilatation was measured in six pairs of participants and was similar in acute stroke/TIA patients (22.6 ± 4.3% and control subjects (19.1 ± 2.6%; p = 0.43. Conclusions Despite the small size of this study, these data indicate that recent acute stroke is not necessarily associated with a clinically important reduction in FMD.

  20. Study, using stable isotopes, of flow distribution, surface-groundwater relations and evapotranspiration in the Okavango Swamp, Botswana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dincer, T.; Hutton, L.G.; Kupee, B.B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Stable isotope data collected in the Okavango Delta have confirmed that the central distributary system is more active at present than the peripheral systems. The data also show that there is no groundwater outflow at the western and southern margins of the delta. A salinity-isotope model of the deltaic swamp has been developed to study the relation between the salinity and isotopic composition of the swamp waters. An attempt has been made to separate the atmospheric losses from the swamp into its evapotranspiration components. The results indicate that in winter, when high water levels prevail, these losses are almost entirely due to evaporation whilst in summer, when the water levels are low, evaporation and transpiration contribute almost equally to the total atmospheric losses. (author)

  1. Spatiotemporal patterns of stable isotopes and hydrochemistry in springs and river flow of the upper Karkheh River Basin, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osati, Khaled; Koeniger, Paul; Salajegheh, Ali; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Chapi, Kamran; Malekian, Arash

    2014-06-01

    Karst springs of the Zagros Mountains contribute a significant amount to agricultural and human water demands of western and south-western Iran. For an adequate management of available water resources in semi-arid and arid regions, sufficient hydrological monitoring is needed, and hydro-chemical and isotope hydrological data provide important additional information. About 350 water samples were collected from precipitation, river water, and karst springs of the upper part of the Karkheh River Basin (20,895 km(2)) located between 33°35(') and 34°55(') North and 46°22(') and 49°10(') East with elevations ranging from 928 to 3563 m above sea level. Sampling was conducted in monthly time resolution from August 2011 to July 2012. All samples were analysed for hydro-chemical parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, and major ions) and stable isotopes (deuterium, oxygen-18). Isotope values of precipitation indicate a local meteoric water line (Zagros MWL δ(2)H=6.8 δ(18)O+10.1; R(2)=0.99) situated between the Mediterranean MWL and Global MWL. Spring and river water isotope values vary between-7.1 and-4.1 ‰, and-38 and-25 ‰ for δ(18)O and δ(2)H, respectively, responding to winter snowmelt and evaporation. This work implements stable isotopes and hydro-chemical information of springs and river water to understand hydrological and hydro-geological interrelations in karstic semi-arid areas and helps to improve the current water resources management practices of western Iran.

  2. MOLECULAR METHODS USED TO ASSESS THE RISKS OF TRANSGENE FLOW; BENEFITS AND LIMITATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA WED has initiated a gene flow project to characterize ecological risks of gene flow from GM plants to native species. Development of molecular assays for risk characterization down to gene expression level is of high interest to the EPA. Phylogenetic analyses of ampl...

  3. Effect of Flow Direction on the Extinction Limit for Flame Spread over Wire Insulation in Microgravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagachi, Masashi; Mitsui, Fumiya; Citerne, Jean-Marie

    and polyethylene insulated Nickel-Chrome (NiCr) wires with inner core diameter of 0.50 mm and insulation thickness of 0.30 mm were examined with external flow velocities ranging from 50mm/s to 200mm/s. The results for the Copper wires show that with increasing external flow velocity, the LOC monotonically...

  4. Pollination of pima pineapple cactus (Coryphantha sheeri var. robustispina): does pollen flow limit abundance of this endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. McDonald; Guy R. McPherson

    2005-01-01

    Pima pineapple cactus (PPC) (Coryphantha sheeri var. robustispina), a federally listed endangered species, occurs throughout southeastern Arizona and has relatively low population densities. To determine whether pollination limits reproduction of PPC we used florescent dye to quantify pollen flow between individuals in a PPC...

  5. Stable-isotope and solute-chemistry approaches to flow characterization in a forested tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Martha A.; Shanley, James B.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Willenbring, Jane K; Occhi, Marcie; González, Grizelle

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of changing climate has led to uncertainty about the resilience of forested mountain watersheds in the tropics. In watersheds where frequent, high rainfall provides ample runoff, we often lack understanding of how the system will respond under conditions of decreased rainfall or drought. Factors that govern water supply, such as recharge rates and groundwater storage capacity, may be poorly quantified. This paper describes 8-year data sets of water stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) of precipitation (4 sites) and a stream (1 site), and four contemporaneous stream sample sets of solute chemistry and isotopes, used to investigate watershed response to precipitation inputs in the 1780-ha Río Mameyes basin in the Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico. Extreme δ2H and δ18O values from low-pressure storm systems and the deuterium excess (d-excess) were useful tracers of watershed response in this tropical system. A hydrograph separation experiment performed in June 2011 yielded different but complementary information from stable isotope and solute chemistry data. The hydrograph separation results indicated that 36% of the storm rain that reached the soil surface left the watershed in a very short time as runoff. Weathering-derived solutes indicated near-stream groundwater was displaced into the stream at the beginning of the event, followed by significant dilution. The more biologically active solutes exhibited a net flushing behavior. The d-excess analysis suggested that streamflow typically has a recent rainfall component (∼25%) with transit time less than the sampling resolution of 7 days, and a more well-mixed groundwater component (∼75%). The contemporaneous stream sample sets showed an overall increase in dissolved solute concentrations with decreasing elevation that may be related to groundwater inputs, different geology, and slope position. A considerable amount of water from rain events runs off as quickflow and bypasses

  6. Biosorption of stable cesium by chemically modified biomass of Sargassum glaucescens and Cystoseira indica in a continuous flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, R; Ebrahimi, M; Aflaki, F; Ghafourian, H; Sahafipour, M H

    2008-11-30

    Pretreatment of biosorbents have been suggested to modify the surface characteristics which could improve biosorption process. Stable cesium biosorption was studied in continuous fixed-bed column by chemically modified biosorbents. Two kinds of brown algae (Sargassum glaucescens and Cystoseira indica) were treated with chemical agents including formaldehyde (FA), glutaraldehyde (GA), potassium hexacyanoferrate (HCF), FA and HCF, and GA and HCF. The highest biosorption capacity (BC) was obtained from C. indica treated with FA (63.5 mg Cs/g biomass) and S. glaucescens treated with FA and HCF (62 mg Cs/g biomass). To study the effect of the best treatments on the BC, the concentration of each treatment agent was decreased. With decreasing FA agent for C. indica treatment, the BC dropped. Treatment of 1g S. glaucescens biomass with 2.2g FA and then 0.18 g HCF resulted in the highest BC (73.08 mg Cs/g dry biomass) which was 35.8 times higher than intact S. glaucescens.

  7. Biosorption of stable cesium by chemically modified biomass of Sargassum glaucescens and Cystoseira indica in a continuous flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabbagh, R. [Nuclear Science Research School, Nuclear Science Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rdabagh@yahoo.com; Ebrahimi, M.; Aflaki, F.; Ghafourian, H.; Sahafipour, M.H. [Nuclear Science Research School, Nuclear Science Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-11-30

    Pretreatment of biosorbents have been suggested to modify the surface characteristics which could improve biosorption process. Stable cesium biosorption was studied in continuous fixed-bed column by chemically modified biosorbents. Two kinds of brown algae (Sargassum glaucescens and Cystoseira indica) were treated with chemical agents including formaldehyde (FA), glutaraldehyde (GA), potassium hexacyanoferrate (HCF), FA and HCF, and GA and HCF. The highest biosorption capacity (BC) was obtained from C. indica treated with FA (63.5 mg Cs/g biomass) and S. glaucescens treated with FA and HCF (62 mg Cs/g biomass). To study the effect of the best treatments on the BC, the concentration of each treatment agent was decreased. With decreasing FA agent for C. indica treatment, the BC dropped. Treatment of 1 g S. glaucescens biomass with 2.2 g FA and then 0.18 g HCF resulted in the highest BC (73.08 mg Cs/g dry biomass) which was 35.8 times higher than intact S. glaucescens.

  8. Can a numerically stable subgrid-scale model for turbulent flow computation be ideally accurate?: a preliminary theoretical study for the Gaussian filtered Navier-Stokes equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Masato; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2003-09-01

    This paper introduces a candidate for the origin of the numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation repeatedly observed in academic and practical industrial flow computations. Without resorting to any subgrid-scale modeling, but based on a simple assumption regarding the streamwise component of flow velocity, it is shown theoretically that in a channel-flow computation, the application of the Gaussian filtering to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations yields a numerically unstable term, a cross-derivative term, which is similar to one appearing in the Gaussian filtered Vlasov equation derived by Klimas [J. Comput. Phys. 68, 202 (1987)] and also to one derived recently by Kobayashi and Shimomura [Phys. Fluids 15, L29 (2003)] from the tensor-diffusivity subgrid-scale term in a dynamic mixed model. The present result predicts that not only the numerical methods and the subgrid-scale models employed but also only the applied filtering process can be a seed of this numerical instability. An investigation concerning the relationship between the turbulent energy scattering and the unstable term shows that the instability of the term does not necessarily represent the backscatter of kinetic energy which has been considered a possible origin of numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation. The present findings raise the question whether a numerically stable subgrid-scale model can be ideally accurate.

  9. Granular flows at recurring slope lineae on Mars indicate a limited role for liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Chojnacki, Matthew; Milazzo, Moses P.; Byrne, Shane; McElwaine, Jim N.; Urso, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Recent liquid water flow on Mars has been proposed based on geomorphological features, such as gullies. Recurring slope lineae — seasonal flows that are darker than their surroundings — are candidate locations for seeping liquid water on Mars today, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. Topographical analysis shows that the terminal slopes of recurring slope lineae match the stopping angle for granular flows of cohesionless sand in active Martian aeolian dunes. In Eos Chasma, linea lengths vary widely and are longer where there are more extensive angle-of-repose slopes, inconsistent with models for water sources. These observations suggest that recurring slope lineae are granular flows. The preference for warm seasons and the detection of hydrated salts are consistent with some role for water in their initiation. However, liquid water volumes may be small or zero, alleviating planetary protection concerns about habitable environments.

  10. Scaling up ecohydrological processes: role of surface water flow in water-limited landscapes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popp, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available microscale processes like ecohydrological feedback mechanisms and spatial exchange like surface water flow, the authors derive transition probabilities from a fine-scale simulation model. They applied two versions of the landscape model, one that includes...

  11. A Conditionally Stable Scheme for a Transient Flow of a Non-Newtonian Fluid Saturating a Porous Medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-06-02

    The problem of thermal dispersion effects on unsteady free convection from an isothermal horizontal circular cylinder to a non-Newtonian fluid saturating a porous medium is examined numerically. The Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model is employed to describe the flow field. The thermal diffusivity coefficient has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The simultaneous development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers are obtained by using finite difference method. The stability conditions are determined for each difference equation. Using an explicit finite difference scheme, solutions at each time-step have been found and then stepped forward in time until reaching steady state solution. Velocity and temperature profiles are shown graphically. It is found that as time approaches infinity, the values of friction factor and heat transfer coefficient approach the steady state values.

  12. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-15

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  13. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-01

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  14. The evolution of sensory divergence in the context of limited gene flow in the bumblebee bat

    OpenAIRE

    Puechmaille, S?bastien J.; Gouilh, Meriadeg Ar; Piyapan, Piyathip; Yokubol, Medhi; Mie, Khin Mie; Bates, Paul J.; Satasook, Chutamas; Nwe, Tin; Bu, Si Si Hla; Mackie, Iain J.; Petit, Eric J.; Teeling, Emma C.

    2011-01-01

    The sensory drive theory of speciation predicts that populations of the same species inhabiting different environments can differ in sensory traits, and that this sensory difference can ultimately drive speciation. However, even in the best-known examples of sensory ecology driven speciation, it is uncertain whether the variation in sensory traits is the cause or the consequence of a reduction in levels of gene flow. Here we show strong genetic differentiation, no gene flow and large echoloca...

  15. Measurement of the Flow Over Two Parallel Mountain Ridges in the Nighttime Stable Boundary Layer With Scanning Lidar Systems at the Perdigão 2017 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildmann, N.; Kigle, S.; Gerz, T.; Bell, T.; Klein, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    For onshore wind energy production, the highest wind potential is often found on exposed spots like hilltops, mountain ridges or escarpments with heterogeneous land cover. The understanding of the flow field in such complex terrain in the relevant heights where wind power is generated is an ongoing field of research. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) contributed to the NEWA (New European Wind Atlas) experiment in the province of Perdigão (Portugal) with three long-range Doppler wind lidar of type Leosphere Windcube-200S from May to June 2017. In the experiment, a single wind energy converter (WEC) of type Enercon E82 is situated on a forested mountain ridge. In main wind direction, which is from South-West and almost perpendicular to the ridge, a valley and then a second mountain ridge in a distance of approximately 1.4 km follow. Two of the DLR lidar instruments are placed downstream and in line with the main wind direction and the WEC. One of these instruments is placed in the valley, and the other one on the distant mountain ridge. This line-up allows coplanar scanning of the flow in the valley and over the ridge tops and thus the determination of horizontal and vertical wind components. The third DLR system, placed on the WEC ridge, and an additional scanning lidar from the University of Oklahoma, placed in the valley, are used to determine the cross-wind component of the flow. Regular flow features that were observed with this lidar setup in the six weeks of the intensive operation period are jet-like layers of high wind speeds that occur during the night from a North-Easterly direction. These jets are found to have wind speeds up to 13 m s-1 and are very variable with regards to their maximum speed, height and broadness. Depending on the Froude number of the flow, waves are forming over the two mountain ridges with either a stable wavelength that equals the mountain ridge distance, or more dynamic higher frequency oscillations. All of these flow features are

  16. Ivabradine and Bisoprolol on Doppler-derived Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Beyond the Heart Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliamonte, Ercole; Cirillo, Teresa; Rigo, Fausto; Astarita, Costantino; Coppola, Antonino; Romano, Carlo; Capuano, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) is an important prognostic marker in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Beta-blockers and ivabradine have been shown to improve CFVR in patients with stable CAD, but their effects were never compared. The aim of the current study was to compare the effects of bisoprolol and ivabradine on CFVR in patients with stable CAD. Patients in sinus rhythm with stable CAD were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind trial. Patients had to be in a stable condition for at least 15 days before enrollment, on their usual therapy. Patients who were receiving beta-blockers or ivabradine entered a 2-week washout period from these drugs before randomization. Transthoracic Doppler-derived CFVR was assessed in left anterior descending coronary artery, and was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline diastolic coronary flow velocity (CFV). Hyperemic CFV was obtained using dipyridamole administration using standard protocols. After CFVR assessment, patients were randomized to ivabradine or bisoprolol and entered an up-titration phase, and CFVR was assessed again 1 month after the end of the up-titration phase. Fifty-nine patients (38 male, 21 female; mean age 69 ± 9 years) were enrolled. Transthoracic Doppler-derived assessment of CFV and CFVR was successfully performed in all patients. Baseline characteristics were similar between the bisoprolol and ivabradine groups. No patient dropped out during the study. At baseline, rest and hyperemic peak CFV as well as CFVR was not significantly different in the ivabradine and bisoprolol groups. After the therapy, resting peak CFV significantly decreased in both the ivabradine and bisoprolol groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups (ivabradine group 20.7 ± 4.6 vs. 22.8 ± 5.2, P < 0.001; bisoprolol group 20.1 ± 4.1 vs. 22.1 ± 4.3, P < 0.001). However, hyperemic peak CFV significantly increased in both groups, but to a

  17. Non-Newtonian versus numerical rheology: Practical impact of shear-thinning on the prediction of stable and unstable flows in intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M O; Steinman, D A; Valen-Sendstad, K

    2017-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) shows promise for informing treatment planning and rupture risk assessment for intracranial aneurysms. Much attention has been paid to the impact on predicted hemodynamics of various modelling assumptions and uncertainties, including the need for modelling the non-Newtonian, shear-thinning rheology of blood, with equivocal results. Our study clarifies this issue by contextualizing the impact of rheology model against the recently demonstrated impact of CFD solution strategy on the prediction of aneurysm flow instabilities. Three aneurysm cases were considered, spanning a range of stable to unstable flows. Simulations were performed using a high-resolution/accuracy solution strategy with Newtonian and modified-Cross rheology models and compared against results from a so-called normal-resolution strategy. Time-averaged and instantaneous wall shear stress (WSS) distributions, as well as frequency content of flow instabilities and dome-averaged WSS metrics, were minimally affected by the rheology model, whereas numerical solution strategy had a demonstrably more marked impact when the rheology model was fixed. We show that point-wise normalization of non-Newtonian by Newtonian WSS values tended to artificially amplify small differences in WSS of questionable physiological relevance in already-low WSS regions, which might help to explain the disparity of opinions in the aneurysm CFD literature regarding the impact of non-Newtonian rheology. Toward the goal of more patient-specific aneurysm CFD, we conclude that attention seems better spent on solution strategy and other likely "first-order" effects (eg, lumen segmentation and choice of flow rates), as opposed to "second-order" effects such as rheology. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Entropy stable modeling of non-isothermal multi-component diffuse-interface two-phase flows with realistic equations of state

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2018-02-25

    In this paper, we consider mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of non-isothermal compressible multi-component diffuse-interface two-phase flows with realistic equations of state. A general model with general reference velocity is derived rigorously through thermodynamical laws and Onsager\\'s reciprocal principle, and it is capable of characterizing compressibility and partial miscibility between multiple fluids. We prove a novel relation among the pressure, temperature and chemical potentials, which results in a new formulation of the momentum conservation equation indicating that the gradients of chemical potentials and temperature become the primary driving force of the fluid motion except for the external forces. A key challenge in numerical simulation is to develop entropy stable numerical schemes preserving the laws of thermodynamics. Based on the convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density with respect to molar densities and temperature, we propose an entropy stable numerical method, which solves the total energy balance equation directly, and thus, naturally satisfies the first law of thermodynamics. Unconditional entropy stability (the second law of thermodynamics) of the proposed method is proved by estimating the variations of Helmholtz free energy and kinetic energy with time steps. Numerical results validate the proposed method.

  19. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.C.; Seitz, R.R.

    1991-07-01

    Concrete barriers will play a critical role in the long-term isolation of low-level radioactive wastes. Over time the barriers will degrade, and in many cases, the fundamental processes controlling performance of the barriers will be different for intact and degraded conditions. This document examines factors controlling fluid flow through intact and degraded concrete disposal facilities. Simplified models are presented fro predicting build up of fluid above a vault; fluid flow through and around intact vaults, through flaws in coatings/liners applied to a vault, and through cracks in a concrete vault; and the influence of different backfill materials around the outside of the vault. Example calculations are presented to illustrate the parameters and processes that influence fluid flow. 46 refs., 49 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Stable isotope and groundwater flow dynamics of agricultural irrigation recharge into groundwater resources of the Central Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Intensive agricultural irrigation and overdraft of groundwater in the Central Valley of California profoundly affect the regional quality and availability of shallow groundwater resources. In the natural state, the δ 18 O values of groundwater were relatively homogeneous (mostly -7.0 ± 0.5 per-thousand), reflecting local meteoric recharge that slowly (1-3m/yr) flowed toward the valley axis. Today, on the west side of the valley, the isotope distribution is dominated by high 18 O enclosures formed by recharge of evaporated irrigation waters, while the east side has bands of low 18 O groundwater indicating induced recharge from rivers draining the Sierra Nevada mountains. Changes in δ 18 O values caused by the agricultural recharge strongly correlate with elevated nitrate concentrations (5 to >100 mg/L) that form pervasive, non-point source pollutants. Small, west-side cities dependent solely on groundwater resources have experienced increases of >1.0 mg/L per year of nitrate for 10-30 years. The resultant high nitrates threaten the economical use of the groundwater for domestic purposes, and have forced some well shut-downs. Furthermore, since >80% of modern recharge is now derived from agricultural irrigation, and because modern recharge rates are ∼10 times those of the natural state, agricultural land retirement by urbanization will severely curtail the current safe-yields and promote overdraft pumping. Such overdrafting has occurred in the Sacramento metropolitan area for ∼40 years, creating cones of depression ∼25m deep. Today, groundwater withdrawal in Sacramento is approximately matched by infiltration of low 18 O water (-11.0 per-thousand) away from the Sacramento and American Rivers, which is estimated to occur at 100-300m/year from the sharp 18 O gradients in our groundwater isotope map

  1. Distribution of stable isotopes in arid storms . II. A double-component model of kinematic wave flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakirevich, Alexander; Dody, Avraham; Adar, Eilon M.; Borisov, Viacheslav; Geyh, Mebus

    A new mathematical method based on a double-component model of kinematic wave flow and approach assesses the dynamic isotopic distribution in arid rain storms and runoff. This model describes the transport and δ18O evolution of rainfall to overland flow and runoff in an arid rocky watershed with uniformly distributed shallow depression storage. The problem was solved numerically. The model was calibrated using a set of temporal discharge and δ18O distribution data for rainfall and runoff collected on a small rocky watershed at the Sede Boker Experimental Site, Israel. Simulation of a reliable result with respect to observation was obtained after parameter adjustment by trial and error. Sensitivity analysis and model application were performed. The model is sensitive to changes in parameters characterizing the depression storage zones. The model reflects the effect of the isotopic memory in the water within the depression storage between sequential rain spells. The use of the double-component model of kinematic wave flow and transport provides an appropriate qualitative and quantitative fitting between computed and observed δ18O distribution in runoff. RésuméUne nouvelle méthode mathématique basée sur un modèle à double composante d'écoulement et de transport par une onde cinématique a été développée pour évaluer la distribution dynamique en isotopes dans les précipitations et dans l'écoulement en région aride. Ce modèle décrit le transport et les variations des δ18O de la pluie vers le ruissellement et l'écoulement de surface dans un bassin aride rocheux où le stockage se fait dans des dépressions peu profondes uniformément réparties. Le problème a été résolu numériquement. Le modèle a été calibré au moyen d'une chronique de débits et d'une distribution des δ18O dans la pluie et dans l'écoulement de surface sur un petit bassin versant rocheux du site expérimental de Sede Boker (Israël). La simulation d'un résultat cr

  2. Limited bronchoconstriction to methacholine using partial flow-volume curves in nonasthmatic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, P. J.; Daniel, E. E.; Zamel, N.; Hargreave, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated whether the plateau of the dose-response to nonsensitizing stimuli, such as methacholine, could be explained by the airway dilation that follows lung inflation in nonasthmatics. We used maximal expiratory partial flow-volume curves to measure the response of the airways to doubling

  3. Upper limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in experimental renovascular hypertension in the baboon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgaard, S; Jones, J V; MacKenzie, E T

    1975-01-01

    The effect of arterial hypertension on cerebral blood flow was studied by the intracarotid 133Xe clearance method in baboons. The arterial blood pressure was raised in gradual steps with angiotensin. Baboons with renal hypertension of 8-12 weeks duration were studied along with normotensive baboo...

  4. Limitations to upscaling of groundwater flow models dominated by surface water interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, P.T.M.; Te Stroet, C.B.M.; Heemink, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Different upscaling methods for groundwater flow models are investigated. A suite of different upscaling methods is applied to several synthetic cases with structured and unstructured porous media. Although each of the methods applies best to one of the synthetic cases, no performance differences

  5. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of...... of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.......The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P

  6. Low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5 minute one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24+/-1 (+/-S.D.) W) without (CON) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of i....... Additionally, prostanoids and/or NO appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise. Key words: Oxygen delivery, oxygen extraction, nitric oxide, prostanoids.......The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5 minute one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24+/-1 (+/-S.D.) W) without (CON) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; L-NMMA) and cyclooxygenase (COX; indomethacin) in order to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids, respectively.. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50 % lower (P

  7. A tool to estimate bar patterns and flow conditions in estuaries when limited data is available

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuven, J.; Verhoeve, S.; Bruijns, A. J.; Selakovic, S.; van Dijk, W. M.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    The effects of human interventions, natural evolution of estuaries and rising sea-level on food security and flood safety are largely unknown. In addition, ecologists require quantified habitat area to study future evolution of estuaries, but they lack predictive capability of bathymetry and hydrodynamics. For example, crucial input required for ecological models are values of intertidal area, inundation time, peak flow velocities and salinity. While numerical models can reproduce these spatial patterns, their computational times are long and for each case a new model must be developed. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive set of relations that accurately predict the hydrodynamics and the patterns of channels and bars, using a combination of the empirical relations derived from approximately 50 estuaries and theory for bars and estuaries. The first step is to predict local tidal prisms, which is the tidal prism that flows through a given cross-section. Second, the channel geometry is predicted from tidal prism and hydraulic geometry relations. Subsequently, typical flow velocities can be estimated from the channel geometry and tidal prism. Then, an ideal estuary shape is fitted to the measured planform: the deviation from the ideal shape, which is defined as the excess width, gives a measure of the locations where tidal bars form and their summed width (Leuven et al., 2017). From excess width, typical hypsometries can be predicted per cross-section. In the last step, flow velocities are calculated for the full range of occurring depths and salinity is calculated based on the estuary shape. Here, we will present a prototype tool that predicts equilibrium bar patterns and typical flow conditions. The tool is easy to use because the only input required is the estuary outline and tidal amplitude. Therefore it can be used by policy makers and researchers from multiple disciplines, such as ecologists, geologists and hydrologists, for example for paleogeographic

  8. Overcoming the acoustic diffraction limit in photoacoustic imaging by the localization of flowing absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilov, Sergey; Arnal, Bastien; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    The resolution of photoacoustic imaging deep inside scattering media is limited by the acoustic diffraction limit. In this Letter, taking inspiration from super-resolution imaging techniques developed to beat the optical diffraction limit, we demonstrate that the localization of individual optical absorbers can provide super-resolution photoacoustic imaging well beyond the acoustic diffraction limit. As a proof-of-principle experiment, photoacoustic cross-sectional images of microfluidic channels were obtained with a 15 MHz linear capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array, while absorbing beads were flown through the channels. The localization of individual absorbers allowed us to obtain a super-resolved cross-sectional image of the channels by reconstructing both the channel width and position with an accuracy better than λ/10. Given the discrete nature of endogenous absorbers such as red blood cells, or that of exogenous particular contrast agents, localization is a promising approach to push the current resolution limits of photoacoustic imaging.

  9. Stable T-bet+GATA-3+ Th1/Th2 Hybrid Cells Arise In Vivo, Can Develop Directly from Naive Precursors, and Limit Immunopathologic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peine, Michael; Fröhlich, Anja; Hegazy, Ahmed N.; Kühl, Anja A.; Grevelding, Christoph G.; Höfer, Thomas; Hartmann, Susanne; Löhning, Max

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated T helper (Th) cell lineages are thought to emerge from alternative cell fate decisions. However, recent studies indicated that differentiated Th cells can adopt mixed phenotypes during secondary immunological challenges. Here we show that natural primary immune responses against parasites generate bifunctional Th1 and Th2 hybrid cells that co-express the lineage-specifying transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 and co-produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The integration of Th1-promoting interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-12 signals together with Th2-favoring IL-4 signals commits naive Th cells directly and homogeneously to the hybrid Th1/2 phenotype. Specifically, IFN-γ signals are essential for T-bet+GATA-3+ cells to develop in vitro and in vivo by breaking the dominance of IL-4 over IL-12 signals. The hybrid Th1/2 phenotype is stably maintained in memory cells in vivo for months. It resists reprogramming into classic Th1 or Th2 cells by Th1- or Th2-promoting stimuli, which rather induce quantitative modulations of the combined Th1 and Th2 programs without abolishing either. The hybrid phenotype is associated with intermediate manifestations of both Th1 and Th2 cell properties. Consistently, hybrid Th1/2 cells support inflammatory type-1 and type-2 immune responses but cause less immunopathology than Th1 and Th2 cells, respectively. Thus, we propose the self-limitation of effector T cells based on the stable cell-intrinsic balance of two opposing differentiation programs as a novel concept of how the immune system can prevent excessive inflammation. PMID:23976880

  10. Stable T-bet(+GATA-3(+ Th1/Th2 hybrid cells arise in vivo, can develop directly from naive precursors, and limit immunopathologic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Peine

    Full Text Available Differentiated T helper (Th cell lineages are thought to emerge from alternative cell fate decisions. However, recent studies indicated that differentiated Th cells can adopt mixed phenotypes during secondary immunological challenges. Here we show that natural primary immune responses against parasites generate bifunctional Th1 and Th2 hybrid cells that co-express the lineage-specifying transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 and co-produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The integration of Th1-promoting interferon (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-12 signals together with Th2-favoring IL-4 signals commits naive Th cells directly and homogeneously to the hybrid Th1/2 phenotype. Specifically, IFN-γ signals are essential for T-bet(+GATA-3(+ cells to develop in vitro and in vivo by breaking the dominance of IL-4 over IL-12 signals. The hybrid Th1/2 phenotype is stably maintained in memory cells in vivo for months. It resists reprogramming into classic Th1 or Th2 cells by Th1- or Th2-promoting stimuli, which rather induce quantitative modulations of the combined Th1 and Th2 programs without abolishing either. The hybrid phenotype is associated with intermediate manifestations of both Th1 and Th2 cell properties. Consistently, hybrid Th1/2 cells support inflammatory type-1 and type-2 immune responses but cause less immunopathology than Th1 and Th2 cells, respectively. Thus, we propose the self-limitation of effector T cells based on the stable cell-intrinsic balance of two opposing differentiation programs as a novel concept of how the immune system can prevent excessive inflammation.

  11. Tracheal sound parameters of respiratory cycle phases show differences between flow-limited and normal breathing during sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkas, A; Huupponen, E; Virkkala, J; Saastamoinen, A; Rauhala, E; Tenhunen, M; Himanen, S-L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop new computational parameters to examine the characteristics of respiratory cycle phases from the tracheal breathing sound signal during sleep. Tracheal sound data from 14 patients (10 males and 4 females) were examined. From each patient, a 10 min long section of normal and a 10 min section of flow-limited breathing during sleep were analysed. The computationally determined proportional durations of the respiratory phases were first investigated. Moreover, the phase durations and breathing sound amplitude levels were used to calculate the area under the breathing sound envelope signal during inspiration and expiration phases. An inspiratory sound index was then developed to provide the percentage of this type of area during the inspiratory phase with respect to the combined area of inspiratory and expiratory phases. The proportional duration of the inspiratory phase showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing and inspiratory pause displayed an opposite difference. The inspiratory sound index showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing. The presented novel computational parameters could contribute to the examination of sleep-disordered breathing or as a screening tool

  12. Blood flow and vascular reactivity during attacks of classic migraine--limitations of the Xe-133 intraarterial technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyhoj Olsen, T.; Lassen, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    The present study reports cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in 11 patients during attacks of classic migraine (CM)--migraine with aura. In 6 and 7 patients, respectively, cerebral vascular reactivity to increased blood pressure and to hypocapnia was also investigated during the CM attacks. The Xenon-133 intraarterial injection technique was used to measure CBF. In this study, based in part on previously published data, methodological limitations, in particular caused by scattered radiation (Compton scatter), are critically analysed. Based on this analysis and the results of the CBF studies it is concluded: During CM attacks CBF appears to decrease focally in the posterior part of the brain to a level around 20 ml/100 g/min which is consistent with a mild degree of ischemia. Changes of CBF in focal low flow areas are difficult to evaluate accurately with the Xe-133 technique. In most cases true CBF may change 50% or more in the low flow areas without giving rise to significantly measurable changes of CBF. This analysis suggests that the autoregulation response cannot be evaluated in the low flow areas with the technique used while the observations are compatible with the concept that a vasoconstrictive state, unresponsive to hypocapnia, prevails in the low flow areas during CM attacks. The gradual increase in size of the low flow area seen in several cases may be interpreted in two different ways. A spreading process may actually exist. However, due to Compton scatter, a gradual decrease of CBF in a territory that does not increase in size will also appear as a gradually spreading low flow area when studied with the Xe-133 intracarotid technique

  13. Limitations to upscaling of groundwater flow models dominated by surface water interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, P.T.M.; Te Stroet, C.B.M.; Heemink, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Different upscaling methods for groundwater flow models are investigated. A suite of different upscaling methods is applied to several synthetic cases with structured and unstructured porous media. Although each of the methods applies best to one of the synthetic cases, no performance differences are formed if the methods were applied to a real three-dimensional case. Furthermore, we focus on boundary conditions, such as Dirichlet, Neumann, and Cauchy conditions, that characterize the interac...

  14. Empirical analysis of gross vehicle weight and free flow speed and consideration on its relation with differential speed limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifizul, Ahmad Abdullah; Yamanaka, Hideo; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2011-05-01

    Most highly motorized countries in the world have implemented different speed limits for light weight and heavy weight vehicles. The heavy vehicle speed limit is usually chosen to be lower than that of passenger cars due to the difficulty for the drivers to safely maneuver the heavy vehicle at high speed and greater impact during a crash. However, in many cases, the speed limit for heavy vehicle is set by only considering the vehicle size or category, mostly due to simplicity in enforcement. In this study, traffic and vehicular data for all vehicle types were collected using a weigh-in-motion system installed at Federal Route 54 in Malaysia. The first finding from the data showed that the weight variation for each vehicle category is considerable. Therefore, the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) and category of heavy vehicle on free flow speed and their interaction were analyzed using statistical techniques. Empirical analysis results showed that statistically for each type of heavy vehicle, there was a significant relationship between free flow speed of a heavy vehicle and GVW. Specifically, the results suggest that the mean and variance of free flow speed decrease with an increase GVW by the amount unrelated to size and shape for all GVW range. Then, based on the 85th percentile principle, the study proposed a new concept for setting the speed limit for heavy vehicle by incorporating GVW where a different speed limit is imposed to the heavy vehicle, not only based on vehicle classification, but also according to its GVW. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The high Andes, gene flow and a stable hybrid zone shape the genetic structure of a wide-ranging South American parrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer H Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the gene flow in some organisms is strongly affected by physical barriers and geographical distance, other highly mobile species are able to overcome such constraints. In southern South America, the Andes (here up to 6,900 m may constitute a formidable barrier to dispersal. In addition, this region was affected by cycles of intercalating arid/moist periods during the Upper/Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These factors may have been crucial in driving the phylogeographic structure of the vertebrate fauna of the region. Here we test these hypotheses in the burrowing parrot Cyanoliseus patagonus (Aves, Psittaciformes across its wide distributional range in Chile and Argentina. Results Our data show a Chilean origin for this species, with a single migration event across the Andes during the Upper/Late Pleistocene, which gave rise to all extant Argentinean mitochondrial lineages. Analyses suggest a complex population structure for burrowing parrots in Argentina, which includes a hybrid zone that has remained stable for several thousand years. Within this zone, introgression by expanding haplotypes has resulted in the evolution of an intermediate phenotype. Multivariate regressions show that present day climatic variables have a strong influence on the distribution of genetic heterogeneity, accounting for almost half of the variation in the data. Conclusions Here we show how huge barriers like the Andes and the regional environmental conditions imposed constraints on the ability of a parrot species to colonise new habitats, affecting the way in which populations diverged and thus, genetic structure. When contact between divergent populations was re-established, a stable hybrid zone was formed, functioning as a channel for genetic exchange between populations.

  16. Use of flow cytometry and stable isotope analysis to determine phytoplankton uptake of wastewater derived ammonium in a nutrient-rich river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Schmidt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic alteration of the form and concentration of nitrogen (N in aquatic ecosystems is widespread. Understanding availability and uptake of different N sources at the base of aquatic food webs is critical to establishment of effective nutrient management programs. Stable isotopes of N (14N, 15N are often used to trace the sources of N fueling aquatic primary production, but effective use of this approach requires obtaining a reliable isotopic ratio for phytoplankton. In this study, we tested the use of flow cytometry to isolate phytoplankton from bulk particulate organic matter (POM in a portion of the Sacramento River, California, during river-scale nutrient manipulation experiments that involved halting wastewater discharges high in ammonium (NH4+. Field samples were collected using a Lagrangian approach, allowing us to measure changes in phytoplankton N source in the presence and absence of wastewater-derived NH4+. Comparison of δ15N-POM and δ15N-phytoplankton (δ15N-PHY revealed that their δ15N values followed broadly similar trends. However, after 3 days of downstream travel in the presence of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluent, δ15N-POM and δ15N-PHY in the Sacramento River differed by as much as 7 ‰. Using a stable isotope mixing model approach, we estimated that in the presence of effluent between 40 and 90 % of phytoplankton N was derived from NH4+ after 3 days of downstream transport. An apparent gradual increase over time in the proportion of NH4+ in the phytoplankton N pool suggests that either very low phytoplankton growth rates resulted in an N turnover time that exceeded the travel time sampled during this study, or a portion of the phytoplankton community continued to access nitrate even in the presence of elevated NH4+ concentrations.

  17. Use of flow cytometry and stable isotope analysis to determine phytoplankton uptake of wastewater derived ammonium in a nutrient-rich river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Calla M.; Kraus, Tamara; Young, Megan B.; Kendall, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the form and concentration of nitrogen (N) in aquatic ecosystems is widespread. Understanding availability and uptake of different N sources at the base of aquatic food webs is critical to establishment of effective nutrient management programs. Stable isotopes of N (14N, 15N) are often used to trace the sources of N fueling aquatic primary production, but effective use of this approach requires obtaining a reliable isotopic ratio for phytoplankton. In this study, we tested the use of flow cytometry to isolate phytoplankton from bulk particulate organic matter (POM) in a portion of the Sacramento River, California, during river-scale nutrient manipulation experiments that involved halting wastewater discharges high in ammonium (NH4+). Field samples were collected using a Lagrangian approach, allowing us to measure changes in phytoplankton N source in the presence and absence of wastewater-derived NH4+. Comparison of δ15N-POM and δ15N-phytoplankton (δ15N-PHY) revealed that their δ15N values followed broadly similar trends. However, after 3 days of downstream travel in the presence of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, δ15N-POM and δ15N-PHY in the Sacramento River differed by as much as 7 ‰. Using a stable isotope mixing model approach, we estimated that in the presence of effluent between 40 and 90 % of phytoplankton N was derived from NH4+ after 3 days of downstream transport. An apparent gradual increase over time in the proportion of NH4+ in the phytoplankton N pool suggests that either very low phytoplankton growth rates resulted in an N turnover time that exceeded the travel time sampled during this study, or a portion of the phytoplankton community continued to access nitrate even in the presence of elevated NH4+ concentrations.

  18. Groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, flow of water in unsaturated soil, and stable isotope water sourcing in areas of sparse vegetation, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreo, Michael T.; Andraski, Brian J.; Garcia, C. Amanda

    2017-08-29

    This report documents methodology and results of a study to evaluate groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (GWET) in sparsely vegetated areas of Amargosa Desert and improve understanding of hydrologic-continuum processes controlling groundwater discharge. Evapotranspiration and GWET rates were computed and characterized at three sites over 2 years using a combination of micrometeorological, unsaturated zone, and stable-isotope measurements. One site (Amargosa Flat Shallow [AFS]) was in a sparse and isolated area of saltgrass (Distichlis spicata) where the depth to groundwater was 3.8 meters (m). The second site (Amargosa Flat Deep [AFD]) was in a sparse cover of predominantly shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) where the depth to groundwater was 5.3 m. The third site (Amargosa Desert Research Site [ADRS]), selected as a control site where GWET is assumed to be zero, was located in sparse vegetation dominated by creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) where the depth to groundwater was 110 m.Results indicated that capillary rise brought groundwater to within 0.9 m (at AFS) and 3 m (at AFD) of land surface, and that GWET rates were largely controlled by the slow but relatively persistent upward flow of water through the unsaturated zone in response to atmospheric-evaporative demands. Greater GWET at AFS (50 ± 20 millimeters per year [mm/yr]) than at AFD (16 ± 15 mm/yr) corresponded with its shallower depth to the capillary fringe and constantly higher soil-water content. The stable-isotope dataset for hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) illustrated a broad range of plant-water-uptake scenarios. The AFS saltgrass and AFD shadscale responded to changing environmental conditions and their opportunistic water use included the time- and depth-variable uptake of unsaturated-zone water derived from a combination of groundwater and precipitation. These results can be used to estimate GWET in other areas of Amargosa Desert where hydrologic conditions are similar.

  19. Use of flow cytometry and stable isotope analysis to determine phytoplankton uptake of wastewater derived ammonium in a nutrient-rich river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Calla M.; Kraus, Tamara E. C.; Young, Megan B.; Kendall, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the form and concentration of nitrogen (N) in aquatic ecosystems is widespread. Understanding availability and uptake of different N sources at the base of aquatic food webs is critical to establishment of effective nutrient management programs. Stable isotopes of N (14N, 15N) are often used to trace the sources of N fueling aquatic primary production, but effective use of this approach requires obtaining a reliable isotopic ratio for phytoplankton. In this study, we tested the use of flow cytometry to isolate phytoplankton from bulk particulate organic matter (POM) in a portion of the Sacramento River, California, during river-scale nutrient manipulation experiments that involved halting wastewater discharges high in ammonium (NH4+). Field samples were collected using a Lagrangian approach, allowing us to measure changes in phytoplankton N source in the presence and absence of wastewater-derived NH4+. Comparison of δ15N-POM and δ15N-phytoplankton (δ15N-PHY) revealed that their δ15N values followed broadly similar trends. However, after 3 days of downstream travel in the presence of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, δ15N-POM and δ15N-PHY in the Sacramento River differed by as much as 7 ‰. Using a stable isotope mixing model approach, we estimated that in the presence of effluent between 40 and 90 % of phytoplankton N was derived from NH4+ after 3 days of downstream transport. An apparent gradual increase over time in the proportion of NH4+ in the phytoplankton N pool suggests that either very low phytoplankton growth rates resulted in an N turnover time that exceeded the travel time sampled during this study, or a portion of the phytoplankton community continued to access nitrate even in the presence of elevated NH4+ concentrations.

  20. Radial space-charge-limited electron flow in semi-insulating GaN:Fe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Jiří J.; Hubík, Pavel; Krištofik, Jozef; Prušáková, Lucie; Uxa, Štěpán; Paskova, T.; Evans, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 1 (2011), 013723/1-013723/6 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0212 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : gallium nitride * semi-insulator * space-charge-limited current Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2011

  1. Electronic cleansing for 24-h limited bowel preparation CT colonography using principal curvature flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravesteijn, Vincent F.; Boellaard, Thierry N.; van der Paardt, Marije P.; Serlie, Iwo W. O.; de Haan, Margriet C.; Stoker, Jaap; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Vos, Frans M.

    2013-01-01

    CT colonography (CTC) is one of the recommended methods for colorectal cancer screening. The subject's preparation is one of the most burdensome aspects of CTC with a cathartic bowel preparation. Tagging of the bowel content with an oral contrast medium facilitates CTC with limited bowel

  2. Model predictive control for power flows in networks with limited capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2012-01-01

    We consider an interconnected network of consumers powered through an electrical grid of limited capacity. A subset of the consumers are intelligent consumers and have the ability to store energy in a controllable fashion; they can be filled and emptied as desired under power and capacity...... ensuring high performance....

  3. A single photon emission computed tomograph based on a limited dumber of detectors for fluid flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legoupil, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present in this work a method for fluid flow visualization in a system using radioactive tracers. The method is based on single photon emission computed tomography techniques, applied to a limited number of discrete detectors. We propose in this work a method for the estimation of the transport matrix of photons, associated to the acquisition system. This method is based on the modelization of profiles acquired for a set of point sources located in the imaged volume. Monte Carlo simulations allow to separate scattered photons from those directly collected by the system. The influence of the energy tracer is exposed. The reconstruction method is based on the maximum likelihood - expectation maximization algorithm. An experimental device, based on 36 detectors was realised for the visualization of water circulation in a vessel. A video monitoring allows to visualize the dye water tracer. Dye and radioactive tracers are injected simultaneously in a water flow circulating in the vessel. Reconstructed and video images are compared. Quantitative and qualitative analysis show that fluid flow visualization is feasible with a limited number of detectors. This method can be applied for system involving circulations of fluids. (author)

  4. Discrete particle swarm optimization to solve multi-objective limited-wait hybrid flow shop scheduling problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, B.; Siswanto, N.; Fiqihesa

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a discrete Particle Swam Optimization (PSO) to solve limited-wait hybrid flowshop scheduing problem with multi objectives. Flow shop schedulimg represents the condition when several machines are arranged in series and each job must be processed at each machine with same sequence. The objective functions are minimizing completion time (makespan), total tardiness time, and total machine idle time. Flow shop scheduling model always grows to cope with the real production system accurately. Since flow shop scheduling is a NP-Hard problem then the most suitable method to solve is metaheuristics. One of metaheuristics algorithm is Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), an algorithm which is based on the behavior of a swarm. Originally, PSO was intended to solve continuous optimization problems. Since flow shop scheduling is a discrete optimization problem, then, we need to modify PSO to fit the problem. The modification is done by using probability transition matrix mechanism. While to handle multi objectives problem, we use Pareto Optimal (MPSO). The results of MPSO is better than the PSO because the MPSO solution set produced higher probability to find the optimal solution. Besides the MPSO solution set is closer to the optimal solution

  5. Flowing liquid lithium plasma-facing components – Physics, technology and system analysis of the LiMIT system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Ruzic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of low atomic number liquid metals has been shown to have the potential to solve many of the prevalent problems like erosion and radiation losses associated with the interaction of fusion plasma with the plasma facing component (PFC structures in tokamaks. Since the first evidence of lithium increasing plasma performance in TFTR [1], the benefits of using lithium in fusion environments have been seen in many devices, including CDX-U [2], NSTX [3], LTX [4], and DIII-D [5]. While both fast flow and slow flow concepts have been studied with regards to liquid lithium first wall alternatives, this report will focus on efforts placed on fast flow research and will mainly focus on advancements in the LiMIT device that help to eliminate concerns over the broad use of liquid lithium. Due to the promising TFTR results along with results obtained at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign [6], suitably designed trench structures holding liquid lithium could be an appropriate fast flow candidate for PFC modules in future fusion devices. There are four potential shortcomings of this approach: (1 Droplet ejection, (2 Wetting control, (3 Tritium retention, and (4 Limited heat flux handling. Droplet ejection is discussed in a companion publication [7], while this paper addresses the topics of wetting control and heat flux handling. Limitations in wetting and prevention of lithium creep (i.e. getting and keeping the lithium only where it should be have been solved by laser-texturing the base material with extreme short laser pulses (pico – femto second of high power (several 10s of W. Micro- and nano-structuring results indicate that the textured substrates displayed significant change in their wetting properties, increasing the temperature needed to wet from 310 °C to 390 °C. Lastly, initial designs for the Lithium Metal Infused Trenches (LiMIT [6] showed dryout above 3 MW/m2, but new designs of the trench shaping show potential to be

  6. Flow protection trip limits operational charge-discharge facility -- C Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wormer, F.W.

    1958-09-19

    Because of wide variations in the venturi throat pressure, well beyond the panellit gage trip range, that occur during the sequence of operational charge-discharge, the panellit gage cannot be included in the scram safety circuit during the period of time that charge- discharge operations are being performed. In its stead, the function of the panellit gage is replaced in an overlapping manner by a tube inlet pressure monitor that is equipped with high and low pressure trip mechanisms that may be included in the scram safety circuit during the time that the panellit gage must be by-passed. The tube inlet pressure monitor is then used to provide the protection from unstable flow that is normally obtained with the panellit gage. This memorandum describes the manner in which the tube inlet pressure monitor trip points are to be determined and used.

  7. A continuous-flow periphyton bioassay: tests of nutrient limitation in a tundra stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, B.J.; Hobbie, J.E.; Corliss, T.L.; Kriet, K.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of added nutrients on the periphyton of a tundra stream was tested during July and August. Flow-through systems consisting of a bank of clear plastic tubes containing racks of microscope slides were suspended from floats in the stream. Nutrients were enriched in the experimental tubes by siphoning concentrated nutrient solutions from Mariotte bottles into the upstream end of each tube. Slides from each tube were assayed at 2-6 day intervals for chlorophyll content and photosynthetic 14 CO 2 uptake. Levels of chlorophyll and CO 2 uptake were significantly higher than the controls both in the tubes with 10μg PO 4 -P>liter -1 of stream water and in those with P plus 100 μg NH 4 NO 3 -N.liter. Nitrogen alone gave no stimulation

  8. Possible complication regarding phosphorus removal with a continuous flow biofilm system: Diffusion limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, C.M.; Arnz, P.; Henze, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion limitation of phosphate possibly constitutes a serious problem regarding the use of a biofilm reactor for enhanced biological phosphorus removal. A lab-scale reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated in a continuous alternating mode of operation. For a steady......-state operation with excess amounts of carbon source (acetate) during the anaerobic phase, the same amount of phosphate was released during the anaerobic phase as was taken up during the anoxic phase. The measured phosphorus content of the biomass that detached during backwash after an anoxic phase was low, 2.......4 ± 0.4% (equal to 24 ± 4 mg P/g TS). A simplified computer model indicated the reason to be phosphate diffusion limitation and the model revealed a delicate balance between the obtainable phosphorus contents of the biomass and operating parameters, such as backwash interval, biofilm thickness after...

  9. A note on 'A simple approach to search for all d-MCs of a limited-flow network'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi Fathabadi, H.; Forghani-elahabadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Many real-world systems are multi-state systems composed of multi-state components in which the reliability can be computed in terms of the lower bound points of level d, called d-Mincuts (d-MCs). Such systems (electric power, transportation, etc.) may be considered as network flows whose arcs have independent and discrete random capacities. In this comment, we investigate the algorithm proposed by Yeh [A simple approach to search for all d-MCs of a limited-flow network. Reliability Engineering and System Safety 2001;71(1):15-19]. We show that the algorithm misses some real d-MCs, and then pinpoint the algorithm's failure and suggest the correcting point.

  10. Coronal rain in magnetic arcades: Rebound shocks, Limit cycles, and Shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-01-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer ($>6$ hour) timespan. We quantify how in-situ forming blob-like condensations grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the...

  11. On the low Mach number limit of compressible flows in exterior moving domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Kreml, Ondřej; Mácha, Václav; Nečasová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2016), s. 705-722 ISSN 1424-3199 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier - Stokes system * incompressible limit * moving domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.038, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00028-016-0338-2

  12. Tracing Carbon Flow Through Food Webs on Isolated Coral Reefs in the Central Pacific Ocean Using a Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorrold, S.; McMahon, K.; Braun, C.; Berumen, M. L.; Houghton, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs support spectacularly productive and diverse communities in tropical and sub-tropical waters throughout the world's oceans. Debate continues, however, on the degree to which reef biomass is supported by new water column or benthic primary production and recycled detrital carbon. We coupled analyses of stable carbon isotopes in essential amino acids with Bayesian mixing models to quantify carbon flow from pelagic primary producers, benthic macroalgae and autotrophic symbionts in corals, along with detrital carbon, to coral reef fishes across several feeding guilds and trophic positions, including apex predators (gray reef and black tip reef sharks), on reefs in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area. Excellent separation in multivariate isotope space among end-members at the base of the food web allowed us to quantify the relative proportion of carbon produced by each of the end-members that is assimilated by focal reef fish species. Low local human impacts on the study reefs provided the opportunity to examine carbon fluxs in fully functioning reef food webs, thereby providing an important baseline for examingn human impacts in food webs on stressed reefs in more populated regions in the tropics. Moreover the study reefs are located along a significant gradient in dissolved N concentrations, allowing us to test if end-member proportions vary as a function of pelagic primary productivity levels. Our work provides insights into the roles that diverse carbon sources may play in the structure, function and resilience of coral reef ecosystems.

  13. Drag reduction by microbubbles in turbulent flows: the limit of minute bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, Victor S; Pomyalov, Anna; Procaccia, Itamar; Tiberkevich, Vasil

    2005-05-06

    Drag reduction by microbubbles is a promising engineering method for improving ship performance. A fundamental theory of the phenomenon is lacking, however, making actual design quite haphazard. We offer here a theory of drag reduction by microbubbles in the limit of very small bubbles, when the effect of the bubbles is mainly to normalize the density and the viscosity of the carrier fluid. The theory culminates with a prediction of the degree of drag reduction given the concentration profile of the bubbles. Comparisons with experiments are discussed and the road ahead is sketched.

  14. Linking skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism to the limits of human performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushel, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, Bengt Saltin's contributions to our understanding of physiology of the circulation, the matching of the circulation to muscle metabolism, and the underlying mechanisms that set the limits for exercise performance were enormous. His research addressed the key questions in the field using sophisticated experimental methods including field expeditions. From the Dallas Bedrest Study to the 1-leg knee model to the physiology of lifelong training, his prodigious body of work was foundational in the field of exercise physiology and his leadership propelled integrative human physiology into the mainstream of biological sciences.

  15. Externally Phase-Locked Flux Flow Oscillator for Submm Integrated Receivers; Achievements and Limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Dmitriev, P. N.

    2003-01-01

    to 712 GHz, limited only by the gap frequency of Nb. This enabled us to phase lock the FFO in the frequency range 500-712 GHz where continuous frequency tuning is possible; resulting in an absolute FFO phase noise as low as -80 dBc at 707 GHz. Comprehensive measurements of the FFO radiation linewidth...... have been performed using an integrated SIS harmonic mixer. The influence of FFO parameters on radiation linewidth, particularly the effect of the differential resistances associated both with the bias current and the applied magnetic field has been studied in order to further optimize the FFO design...

  16. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  17. Natural history of optical coherence tomography-detected non-flow-limiting edge dissections following drug-eluting stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radu, Maria D; Räber, Lorenz; Heo, Jungho

    2014-01-01

    history and clinical implications remain unclear. The objectives of the present study were to assess the morphology, healing response, and clinical outcomes of OCT-detected edge dissections using serial OCT imaging at baseline and at one year following drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. METHODS......, and clinical outcomes were assessed. Sixty-three lesions (57 patients) were studied with OCT at baseline and one-year follow-up. Twenty-two non-flow-limiting edge dissections in 21 lesions (20 patients) were identified by OCT; only two (9%) were angiographically visible. Flaps were found in 96% of cases...

  18. The limited and localized flow of fresh groundwater to the world's oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijendijk, E.; Gleeson, T. P.; Moosdorf, N.

    2017-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge, the flow of fresh or saline groundwater to oceans [Burnett et al., 2003], may be a significant contributor to the water and chemical budgets of the world's oceans [Taniguchi et al., 2002] potentially buffering ocean acidification with groundwater alkalinity and is arguably the most uncertain component of the global groundwater budget [Alley et al., 2002]. The fresh component of submarine groundwater discharge is critical due to its high solute and nutrient load, and has been quantified locally and but only roughly estimated globally using significant assumptions. Here we show that that fresh submarine groundwater discharge is an insignificant water contributor to global oceans (0.05% of the total input) but that the freshwater discharge may still be an important chemical and nutrient contributor especially around distinct hotspots. The first spatially-explicit, physically-based global estimate of fresh submarine groundwater discharge was derived by combining density-dependent numerical groundwater models and a geospatial analysis of global coastal watersheds to robustly simulate the partitioning of onshore and offshore groundwater discharge. Although fresh submarine groundwater discharge is an insignificant part of fresh coastal groundwater discharge, results are consistent with previous estimates of significant recirculated seawater discharging as groundwater as well as quantifying the significant near-shore terrestrial discharge, a flux that has so far been overlooked in global hydrological studies and that affects coastal water budgets, evapotranspiration and ecosystems.

  19. Peering below the diffraction limit: robust and specific sorting of viruses with flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Shea T; Sukovich, David J; Stedman, Kenneth M; Abate, Adam R

    2016-12-01

    Viruses are incredibly diverse organisms and impact all forms of life on Earth; however, individual virions are challenging to study due to their small size and mass, precluding almost all direct imaging or molecular analysis. Moreover, like microbes, the overwhelming majority of viruses cannot be cultured, impeding isolation, replication, and study of interesting new species. Here, we introduce PCR-activated virus sorting, a method to isolate specific viruses from a heterogeneous population. Specific sorting opens new avenues in the study of uncultivable viruses, including recovering the full genomes of viruses based on genetic fragments in metagenomes, or identifying the hosts of viruses. PAVS enables specific sorting of viruses with flow cytometry. A sample containing a virus population is processed through a microfluidic device to encapsulate it into droplets, such that the droplets contain different viruses from the sample. TaqMan PCR reagents are also included targeting specific virus species such that, upon thermal cycling, droplets containing the species become fluorescent. The target viruses are then recovered via droplet sorting. The recovered virus genomes can then be analyzed with qPCR and next generation sequencing. We describe the PAVS workflow and demonstrate its specificity for identifying target viruses in a heterogeneous population. In addition, we demonstrate recovery of the target viruses via droplet sorting and analysis of their nucleic acids with qPCR.

  20. An Assessment of Counter-current Flow Limitation Phenomena Using MARS Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huong, Phan Thi [Korea Institute Advance Science and Tehnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Joon; Cho, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Wallis and Kutateladze who studied counter current of liquid-gas flow in vertically channel found the inversely proportional relationship of the liquid and gas velocity. There are a number of experimental models conducted over the years for flooding, or CCFL, that base on the different viewpoints on the initiation and the basic mechanism of flooding. However, according to development of computational technology, analysis is more convenient by using computational analysis, such as TRACE code. MARS code was developed by KAERI based on RELAP5/MOD3 and RELAP5 code adopted the simple CCFL model. Some studies had been performed to assess CCFL phenomenon using MARS. However, the CCFL assessments have not been extensively performed. In this paper, simple CCFL phenomena occurrences were investigated and further studies were suggested. The results of this paper show that MARS code can predict well the onset of CCFL: small pipe for Wallis correlation; large pipe for Kutateladze correlation at low pressure environment. However, to analysis CCFL phenomenon in real reactor geometry, further researches need be conducted at varied pressures to ensure that the MARS code predicts well the onset of CCFL in the high pressure - the actual condition of the reactor.

  1. Power flow analysis and optimal locations of resistive type superconducting fault current limiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuchang; Ruiz, Harold S; Geng, Jianzhao; Shen, Boyang; Fu, Lin; Zhang, Heng; Coombs, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Based on conventional approaches for the integration of resistive-type superconducting fault current limiters (SFCLs) on electric distribution networks, SFCL models largely rely on the insertion of a step or exponential resistance that is determined by a predefined quenching time. In this paper, we expand the scope of the aforementioned models by considering the actual behaviour of an SFCL in terms of the temperature dynamic power-law dependence between the electrical field and the current density, characteristic of high temperature superconductors. Our results are compared to the step-resistance models for the sake of discussion and clarity of the conclusions. Both SFCL models were integrated into a power system model built based on the UK power standard, to study the impact of these protection strategies on the performance of the overall electricity network. As a representative renewable energy source, a 90 MVA wind farm was considered for the simulations. Three fault conditions were simulated, and the figures for the fault current reduction predicted by both fault current limiting models have been compared in terms of multiple current measuring points and allocation strategies. Consequently, we have shown that the incorporation of the E - J characteristics and thermal properties of the superconductor at the simulation level of electric power systems, is crucial for estimations of reliability and determining the optimal locations of resistive type SFCLs in distributed power networks. Our results may help decision making by distribution network operators regarding investment and promotion of SFCL technologies, as it is possible to determine the maximum number of SFCLs necessary to protect against different fault conditions at multiple locations.

  2. Reduced-order aeroelastic model for limit-cycle oscillations in vortex-dominated unsteady airfoil flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Babu, Arun Vishnu; Ramesh, Kiran; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2017-11-01

    In previous research, Ramesh et al. (JFM,2014) developed a low-order discrete vortex method for modeling unsteady airfoil flows with intermittent leading edge vortex (LEV) shedding using a leading edge suction parameter (LESP). LEV shedding is initiated using discrete vortices (DVs) whenever the Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) exceeds a critical value. In subsequent research, the method was successfully employed by Ramesh et al. (JFS, 2015) to predict aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations in airfoil flows dominated by intermittent LEV shedding. When applied to flows that require large number of time steps, the computational cost increases due to the increasing vortex count. In this research, we apply an amalgamation strategy to actively control the DV count, and thereby reduce simulation time. A pair each of LEVs and TEVs are amalgamated at every time step. The ideal pairs for amalgamation are identified based on the requirement that the flowfield in the vicinity of the airfoil is least affected (Spalart, 1988). Instead of placing the amalgamated vortex at the centroid, we place it at an optimal location to ensure that the leading-edge suction and the airfoil bound circulation are conserved. Results of the initial study are promising.

  3. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann Scheme Approach to Compressible Flows with Flexible Specific-Heat Ratio and Prandtl Number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Yanbiao; Li Yingjun; Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai

    2011-01-01

    We further develop the lattice Boltzmann (LB) model [Physica A 382 (2007) 502] for compressible flows from two aspects. Firstly, we modify the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision term in the LB equation, which makes the model suitable for simulating flows with different Prandtl numbers. Secondly, the flux limiter finite difference (FLFD) scheme is employed to calculate the convection term of the LB equation, which makes the unphysical oscillations at discontinuities be effectively suppressed and the numerical dissipations be significantly diminished. The proposed model is validated by recovering results of some well-known benchmarks, including (i) The thermal Couette flow; (ii) One- and two-dimensional Riemann problems. Good agreements are obtained between LB results and the exact ones or previously reported solutions. The flexibility, together with the high accuracy of the new model, endows the proposed model considerable potential for tracking some long-standing problems and for investigating nonlinear nonequilibrium complex systems. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Level-set reconstruction algorithm for ultrafast limited-angle X-ray computed tomography of two-phase flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieberle, M; Hampel, U

    2015-06-13

    Tomographic image reconstruction is based on recovering an object distribution from its projections, which have been acquired from all angular views around the object. If the angular range is limited to less than 180° of parallel projections, typical reconstruction artefacts arise when using standard algorithms. To compensate for this, specialized algorithms using a priori information about the object need to be applied. The application behind this work is ultrafast limited-angle X-ray computed tomography of two-phase flows. Here, only a binary distribution of the two phases needs to be reconstructed, which reduces the complexity of the inverse problem. To solve it, a new reconstruction algorithm (LSR) based on the level-set method is proposed. It includes one force function term accounting for matching the projection data and one incorporating a curvature-dependent smoothing of the phase boundary. The algorithm has been validated using simulated as well as measured projections of known structures, and its performance has been compared to the algebraic reconstruction technique and a binary derivative of it. The validation as well as the application of the level-set reconstruction on a dynamic two-phase flow demonstrated its applicability and its advantages over other reconstruction algorithms. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of nitrogen and phosphorus flows in agricultural and urban systems in a small island under limited data availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmansyah, I; Spiller, M; de Ruijter, F J; Carsjens, G J; Zeeman, G

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are two essential macronutrients required in agricultural production. The major share of this production relies on chemical fertilizer that requires energy and relies on limited resources (P). Since these nutrients are lost to the environment, there is a need to shift from this linear urban metabolism to a circular metabolism in which N and P from domestic waste and wastewater are reused in agriculture. A first step to facilitate a transition to more circular urban N and P management is to understand the flows of these resources in a coupled urban-agricultural system. For the first time this paper presents a Substance Flow Analysis (SFA) approach for the assessment of the coupled agricultural and urban systems under limited data availability in a small island. The developed SFA approach is used to identify intervention points that can provide N and P stocks for agricultural production. The island of St. Eustatius, a small island in the Caribbean, was used as a case study. The model developed in this study consists of eight sub-systems: agricultural and natural lands, urban lands, crop production, animal production, market, household consumption, soakage pit and open-dump landfill. A total of 26 flows were identified and quantified for a period of one year (2013). The results showed that the agricultural system is a significant source for N and P loss because of erosion/run-off and leaching. Moreover, urban sanitation systems contribute to deterioration of the island's ecosystem through N and P losses from domestic waste and wastewater by leaching and atmospheric emission. Proposed interventions are the treatment of blackwater and greywater for the recovery of N and P. In conclusion, this study allows for identification of potential N and P losses and proposes mitigation measures to improve nutrient management in a small island context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Current Flow and Pair Creation at Low Altitude in Rotation-Powered Pulsars' Force-Free Magnetospheres: Space Charge Limited Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhin, A. N.; Arons, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of particle acceleration and electron-positron plasma generation at low altitude in the polar magnetic flux tubes of rotation-powered pulsars, when the stellar surface is free to emit whatever charges and currents are demanded by the force-free magnetosphere. We apply a new 1D hybrid plasma simulation code to the dynamical problem, using Particle-in-Cell methods for the dynamics of the charged particles, including a determination of the collective electrostatic fluctuations in the plasma, combined with a Monte Carlo treatment of the high-energy gamma-rays that mediate the formation of the electron-positron pairs.We assume the electric current flowing through the pair creation zone is fixed by the much higher inductance magnetosphere, and adopt the results of force-free magnetosphere models to provide the currents which must be carried by the accelerator. The models are spatially one dimensional, and designed to explore the physics, although of practical relevance to young, high-voltage pulsars. We observe novel behaviour (a) When the current density j is less than the Goldreich-Julian value (0 current carrying beam is mild, with the full Goldreich-Julian charge density comprising the charge densities of the beam and a cloud of electrically trapped particles with the same sign of charge as the beam. The voltage drops are of the order of mc(sup 2)/e, and pair creation is absent. (b) When the current density exceeds the Goldreich-Julian value (j/j(sub GJ) > 1), the system develops high voltage drops (TV or greater), causing emission of curvature gamma-rays and intense bursts of pair creation. The bursts exhibit limit cycle behaviour, with characteristic time-scales somewhat longer than the relativistic fly-by time over distances comparable to the polar cap diameter (microseconds). (c) In return current regions, where j/j(sub GJ) currents and adjust the charge density and average electric field to force-free conditions. We also

  7. Dynamical attraction to stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Albert M.; Talet, Marina

    2012-01-01

    We apply dynamical ideas within probability theory, proving an almost-sure invariance principle in log density for stable processes. The familiar scaling property (self-similarity) of the stable process has a stronger expression, that the scaling flow on Skorokhod path space is a Bernoulli flow. We prove that typical paths of a random walk with i.i.d. increments in the domain of attraction of a stable law can be paired with paths of a stable process so that, after applying a non-random regula...

  8. A stable isotope ( δ13C, δ15N) model for the North Water food web: implications for evaluating trophodynamics and the flow of energy and contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Keith A.; Fisk, Aaron; Karnovsky, Nina; Holst, Meike; Gagnon, Jean-Marc; Fortier, Martin

    fundamentally in transferring energy and carbon flux to higher trophic-level seabirds and marine mammals. We measured PCB 153 among selected organisms to investigate the behavior of bioaccumulating contaminants within the food web. Our isotopic model confirmed the trophic magnification of PCB 153 in this high-Arctic food web due to a strong correlation between contaminant concentration and organism δ15N values, demonstrating the utility of combining isotopic and contaminant approaches to food-web studies. Stable-carbon isotope analysis confirmed an enrichment in 13C between POM and ice algae (-22.3 vs. -17.7‰). Benthic organisms were generally enriched in 13C compared to pelagic species. We discuss individual species isotopic data and the general utility of our stable isotope model for defining carbon flux and contaminant flow through the North Water food web.

  9. Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoop, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    FLOW. Orden i hovedet på den fede måde Oplevelsesmæssigt er flow-tilstanden kendetegnet ved at man er fuldstændig involveret, fokuseret og koncentreret; at man oplever stor indre klarhed ved at vide hvad der skal gøres, og i hvilket omfang det lykkes; at man ved at det er muligt at løse opgaven...

  10. Does attenuated skin blood flow lower sweat rate and the critical environmental limit for heat balance during severe heat exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Matthew N; Gagnon, Daniel; Crandall, Craig G; Jay, Ollie

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does attenuated skin blood flow diminish sweating and reduce the critical environmental limit for heat balance, which indicates maximal heat loss potential, during severe heat stress? What is the main finding and its importance? Isosmotic hypovolaemia attenuated skin blood flow by ∼20% but did not result in different sweating rates, mean skin temperatures or critical environmental limits for heat balance compared with control and volume-infusion treatments, suggesting that the lower levels of skin blood flow commonly observed in aged and diseased populations may not diminish maximal whole-body heat dissipation. Attenuated skin blood flow (SkBF) is often assumed to impair core temperature (T c ) regulation. Profound pharmacologically induced reductions in SkBF (∼85%) lead to impaired sweating, but whether the smaller attenuations in SkBF (∼20%) more often associated with ageing and certain diseases lead to decrements in sweating and maximal heat loss potential is unknown. Seven healthy men (28 ± 4 years old) completed a 30 min equilibration period at 41°C and a vapour pressure (P a ) of 2.57 kPa followed by incremental steps in P a of 0.17 kPa every 6 min to 5.95 kPa. Differences in heat loss potential were assessed by identifying the critical vapour pressure (P crit ) at which an upward inflection in T c occurred. The following three separate treatments elicited changes in plasma volume to achieve three distinct levels of SkBF: control (CON); diuretic-induced isosmotic dehydration to lower SkBF (DEH); and continuous saline infusion to maintain SkBF (SAL). The T c , mean skin temperature (T sk ), heart rate, mean laser-Doppler flux (forearm and thigh; LDF mean ), mean local sweat rate (forearm and thigh; LSR mean ) and metabolic rate were measured. In DEH, a 14.2 ± 5.7% lower plasma volume resulted in a ∼20% lower LDF mean in perfusion units (PU) (DEH, 139 ± 23 PU; CON, 176 ± 22 PU; and SAL

  11. Detection of nanoplastics in food by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering: possibilities, challenges and analytical limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Correia, Manuel; Löschner, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    We tested the suitability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for detection of nanoplastics in fish. A homogenized fish sample was spiked with 100 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) (1.3 mg/g fish). Two sample preparation strategies w...

  12. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  13. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  14. Oxygen and carbon stable isotope systematics in Porites coral near its latitudinal limit: The coral response to low-thermal temperature stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Tamano; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Nojima, Satoshi; Minoshima, Kayo; Hata, Akiko

    2006-08-01

    We investigated oxygen and carbon isotopes ( δ18O and δ13C, respectively) along the growth axis of a Porites coral living near the northern limit of hermatypic corals, off Ushibuka, Japan, where winter temperatures fall below the minimum required by most hermatypic corals. The coral's seasonal δ18O cycle depended mainly on seawater temperature, and the slope of the regression line between δ18O and sea-surface temperature for this coral was within reported values. The coral's growth was inhibited in 1968, and at around this time the annual growth rate was reduced. This growth inhibition began in winter 1967/1968, a period of extraordinarily low seawater temperature. Moreover, the amplitude of the annual δ18O fluctuation was small from winter 1967/1968 to winter 1969/1970. Although δ18O and δ13C fluctuations were out of phase most years, they were in phase some years. The in-phase fluctuations of δ18O and δ13C indicate that kinetic isotope effects may have been more important than metabolic isotope effects during those years. Sclerochronologic records thus reveal the coral response to low-temperature stress.

  15. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  16. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary.We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats.This method provides stable and continuous measurements of cortical tissue oxygen tension (PO2) for more than 2 weeks and can reproducibly detect acute changes in cortical oxygenation.Exogenous angiotensin‐II reduced renal cortical tissue PO2 more than equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine, probably because it reduced renal oxygen delivery more than did phenylephrine.Activation of the endogenous renin–angiotensin system in transgenic Cyp1a1Ren2 rats reduced cortical tissue PO2; in this model renal hypoxia precedes the development of structural pathology and can be reversed acutely by an angiotensin‐II receptor type 1 antagonist.Angiotensin‐II promotes renal hypoxia, which may in turn contribute to its pathological effects during development of chronic kidney disease. Abstract We hypothesised that both exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II (AngII) can decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in the renal cortex of unrestrained rats, which might in turn contribute to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rats were instrumented with telemeters equipped with a carbon paste electrode for continuous measurement of renal cortical tissue PO2. The method reproducibly detected acute changes in cortical oxygenation induced by systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia. In conscious rats, renal cortical PO2 was dose‐dependently reduced by intravenous AngII. Reductions in PO2 were significantly greater than those induced by equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine. In anaesthetised rats, renal oxygen consumption was not affected, and filtration fraction was increased only in the AngII infused animals. Oxygen delivery decreased by 50% after infusion of AngII and renal blood flow (RBF) fell by 3.3 ml min−1

  17. Detection of T and B cells specific complement-fixing alloantibodies using flow cytometry: A diagnostic approach for a resource limited laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra Jain

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: We postulate that this method incorporates most of the features of all the available modalities (i.e., National Institute of Health-complement dependent lymphocytotoxicity, FCXM, cytotoxic FCXM and C4d-flowPRA yet cost-effective and best suited for resource-limited laboratory/ies which is a common scenario in developing countries.

  18. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin-II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T. Paul; Koeners, Maarten P.

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary. We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats. This method provides stable and continuous

  19. Chemical Safety Alert: Emergency Isolation for Hazardous Material Fluid Transfer Systems - Application and Limitations of Excess Flow Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    While excess flow valves (EFV) are in extensive service and have prevented numerous pipe or hose breaks from becoming much more serious incidents, experience shows that in some cases the EFV did not perform as intended, usually because of misapplication.

  20. An Enhanced Discrete Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm to Minimize the Total Flow Time in Permutation Flow Shop Scheduling with Limited Buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanlong Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an enhanced discrete artificial bee colony algorithm for minimizing the total flow time in the flow shop scheduling problem with buffer capacity. First, the solution in the algorithm is represented as discrete job permutation to directly convert to active schedule. Then, we present a simple and effective scheme called best insertion for the employed bee and onlooker bee and introduce a combined local search exploring both insertion and swap neighborhood. To validate the performance of the presented algorithm, a computational campaign is carried out on the Taillard benchmark instances, and computations and comparisons show that the proposed algorithm is not only capable of solving the benchmark set better than the existing discrete differential evolution algorithm and iterated greedy algorithm, but also capable of performing better than two recently proposed discrete artificial bee colony algorithms.

  1. The effect of direct and counter-current flow-through delignification on enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw, and flow limits due to compressibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlajaniemi, Ville; Sipponen, Mika Henrikki; Pastinen, Ossi; Nyyssölä, Antti; Laakso, Simo

    2016-12-01

    This article compares the processes for wheat straw lignocellulose fractionation by percolation, counter-current progressing batch percolation and batch reaction at low NaOH-loadings (3-6% of DM). The flow-through processes were found to improve delignification and subsequent enzymatic saccharification, reduce NaOH-consumption and allow reduction of thermal severity, whereas hemicellulose dissolution was unaffected. However, contrary to previous expectations, a counter-current process did not provide additional benefits to regular percolation. The compressibility and flow properties of a straw bed were determined and used for simulation of the packing density profile and dynamic pressure in an industrial scale column. After dissolution of 30% of the straw DM by delignification, a pressure drop above 100 kPa m -1 led to clogging of the flow due to compaction of straw. Accordingly, the maximum applicable feed pressure and volumetric straw throughput was determined as a function of column height, indicating that a 10 m column can be operated at a maximum feed pressure of 530 kPa, corresponding to an operation time of 50 min and a throughput of 163 kg m -3  h -1 . Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2605-2613. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Comprehensive Prediction Model of Hydraulic Extended-Reach Limit Considering the Allowable Range of Drilling Fluid Flow Rate in Horizontal Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Gao, Deli; Chen, Xuyue

    2017-06-08

    Hydraulic extended-reach limit (HERL) model of horizontal extended-reach well (ERW) can predict the maximum measured depth (MMD) of the horizontal ERW. The HERL refers to the well's MMD when drilling fluid cannot be normally circulated by drilling pump. Previous model analyzed the following two constraint conditions, drilling pump rated pressure and rated power. However, effects of the allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate (Q min  ≤ Q ≤ Q max ) were not considered. In this study, three cases of HERL model are proposed according to the relationship between allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate and rated flow rate of drilling pump (Q r ). A horizontal ERW is analyzed to predict its HERL, especially its horizontal-section limit (L h ). Results show that when Q min  ≤ Q r  ≤ Q max (Case I), L h depends both on horizontal-section limit based on rated pump pressure (L h1 ) and horizontal-section limit based on rated pump power (L h2 ); when Q min  < Q max  < Q r (Case II), L h is exclusively controlled by L h1 ; while L h is only determined by L h2 when Q r  < Q min  < Q max (Case III). Furthermore, L h1 first increases and then decreases with the increase in drilling fluid flow rate, while L h2 keeps decreasing as the drilling fluid flow rate increases. The comprehensive model provides a more accurate prediction on HERL.

  3. Controls of evaporative irrigation return flows in comparison to seawater intrusion in coastal karstic aquifers in northern Sri Lanka: Evidence from solutes and stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrajith, Rohana, E-mail: rohanac@pdn.ac.lk [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Diyabalanage, Saranga [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Premathilake, K.M. [Water Supply and Drainage Board, Telewala Road, Ratmalana (Sri Lanka); Hanke, Christian; Geldern, Robert van; Barth, Johannes A.C. [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater in Miocene karstic aquifers in the Jaffna Peninsula of Sri Lanka is an important resource since no other fresh water sources are available in the region. The subsurface is characterized by highly productive limestone aquifers that are used for drinking and agriculture purposes. A comprehensive hydrogeochemical study was carried out to reveal the processes affecting the groundwater quality in this region. Major and trace element composition and environmental isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen (δ{sup 18}O{sub H2O} and δ{sup 2}H{sub H2O}) were determined in 35 groundwater samples for this investigation. The ion abundance of groundwater in the region was characterized by an anion sequence order with HCO{sub 3}¯ > Cl¯ > SO{sub 4}¯ > NO{sub 3}¯. For cations, average Na{sup +}+K{sup +} contents in groundwater exceeded those of Ca{sup 2+} + Mg{sup 2+} in most cases. Ionic relationships of major solutes indicated open system calcite dissolution while seawater intrusions are also evident but only close to the coast. The solute contents are enriched by agricultural irrigation returns and associated evaporation. This was confirmed by the stable isotope composition of groundwater that deviated from the local meteoric water line (LMWL) and formed its own regression line denoted as the local evaporation line (LEL). The latter can be described by δ{sup 2}H{sub H2O} = 5.8 × δ{sup 18}O{sub H2O-–} 2.9. Increased contents of nitrate-N (up to 5 mg/L), sulfate (up to 430 mg/L) and fluoride (up to 1.5 mg/L) provided evidences for anthropogenic inputs of solutes, most likely from agriculture activities. Among trace elements Ba, Sr, As and Se levels in the Jaffna groundwater were higher compared to that of the dry zone metamorphic aquifers in Sri Lanka. Solute geochemistry and stable isotope evidences from the region indicates that groundwater in the area is mainly derived from local modern precipitation but modified heavily by progressive evaporative

  4. Blood flow and vascular reactivity during attacks of classic migraine--limitations of the Xe-133 intraarterial technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyhøj Olsen, T; Lassen, N A

    1989-01-01

    The present study reports cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in 11 patients during attacks of classic migraine (CM)--migraine with aura. In 6 and 7 patients, respectively, cerebral vascular reactivity to increased blood pressure and to hypocapnia was also investigated during the CM attacks. T...

  5. Limitation of parallel flow in double diffusive convection: Two- and three-dimensional transitions in a horizontal porous domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimouni, N.; Chikh, S.; Rahli, O. [Laboratoire LTPMP, Fac GMGP, USTHB, BP 32, Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Bennacer, R., E-mail: Rachid.Bennacer@ens-cachan.fr [LMT-ENS Cachan, 61 av. du président Wilson F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of double diffusion natural convection in an elongated enclosure filled with a binary fluid saturating a porous medium are carried out in the present work. The Boussinesq approximation is made in the formulation of the problem, and Neumann boundary conditions for temperature and concentration are adopted, respectively, on vertical and horizontal walls of the cavity. The used numerical method is based on the control volume approach, with the third order quadratic upstream interpolation scheme in approximating the advection terms. A semi implicit method algorithm is used to handle the velocity-pressure coupling. To avoid the excessively high computer time inherent to the solution of 3D natural convection problems, full approximation storage with full multigrid method is used to solve the problem. A wide range of the controlling parameters (Rayleigh-Darcy number Ra, lateral aspect ratio Ay, Lewis number Le, and the buoyancy ration N) is investigated. We clearly show that increasing the depth of the cavity (i.e., the lateral aspect ratio) has an important effect on the flow patterns. The 2D perfect parallel flows obtained for small lateral aspect ratio are drastically destabilized by increasing the cavity lateral dimension. This yields a 3D fluid motion with a much more complex flow pattern and the usually considered 2D parallel flow model cannot be applied.

  6. Experimental observation and modelling of roughness variation due to supply-limited sediment transport in uni-directional flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijnder, Arjan; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the relationship between supply-limited bedform formation and the hydraulic roughness of the riverbed. The results of several new sets of flume experiments with supply-limited or partial transport conditions with bimodal sediment are presented. The results show that

  7. Invasive mussels alter the littoral food web of a large lake: stable isotopes reveal drastic shifts in sources and flow of energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Ozersky

    Full Text Available We investigated how establishment of invasive dreissenid mussels impacted the structure and energy sources of the littoral benthic food web of a large temperate lake. We combined information about pre- and postdreissenid abundance, biomass, and secondary production of the littoral benthos with results of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of archival (predreissenid and recent (postdreissenid samples of all common benthic taxa. This approach enabled us to determine the importance of benthic and sestonic carbon to the littoral food web before, and more than a decade after dreissenid establishment. Long term dreissenid presence was associated with a 32-fold increase in abundance, 6-fold increase in biomass, and 14-fold increase in secondary production of the littoral benthos. Dreissenids comprised a large portion of the post-invasion benthos, making up 13, 38, and 56% of total abundance, biomass, and secondary production, respectively. The predreissenid food web was supported primarily by benthic primary production, while sestonic material was relatively more important to the postdreissenid food web. The absolute importance of both sestonic material and benthic primary production to the littoral benthos increased considerably following dreissenid establishment. Our results show drastic alterations to food web structure and suggest that dreissenid mussels redirect energy and material from the water column to the littoral benthos both through biodeposition of sestonic material as well as stimulation of benthic primary production.

  8. Significant, but limited collateral blood flow increases occur with prolonged training in rats with femoral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, B M; Ren, J; Terjung, R L; Yang, H T

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the capacity of collateral dependent blood flow induced by a prolonged treadmill training program, as compared to a low collateral resistance model created by femoral artery to vein (A-V) shunt. Sprague-Dawley rats, with bilateral femoral artery occlusion were confined to cage activity (Sed, n=9) or trained by daily treadmill exercise (Tr, n=15; up to ≈350 min/d) for 15 weeks. Another set of animals received a femoral A-V anastomosis in one limb and treated with (n=4) or without VEGF(165) (n=9) infusion for 2 weeks. The contralateral side was used as control. Blood flow (BF) was measured with isotope labeled microspheres. Maximal calf muscle BF increased by 15 week training (up to 100±5.0 ml x min(-1) x 100g(-1) (ptraining programs used previously. In contrast, femoral A-V shunt with VEGF(165) increased calf muscle conductance to 1.70±0.3 ml x min(-1) x 100 g(-1) x mmHg(-1) that is similar to blood flows observed in non-occluded rats during maximal running. Our data indicate that the collateral circuit development is related to the driving stimulus and that exercise training, does not provide a maximal stimulus for adaptation that is possible. Nonetheless, exercise training results in profound increases in exercise capacity associated with this enhanced collateral blood flow. Our results illustrate that vascular adaptations can be much greater when physiologically induced stimuli are enhanced at the time of therapeutic angiogenesis.

  9. Study of counter current flow limitation model of MARS-KS and SPACE codes under Dukler's air/water flooding test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Woong; Kim, Min Gil; Lee, Jeong Ik; Bang, Young Seok

    2015-01-01

    In particular, CCFL(the counter current flow limitation) occurs in components such as hot leg, downcomer annulus and steam generator inlet plenum during LOCA which is possible to have flows in two opposite directions. Therefore, CCFL is one of the thermal-hydraulic models which has significant effect on the reactor safety analysis code performance. In this study, the CCFL model will be evaluated with MARS-KS based on two-phase two-field governing equations and SPACE code based on two-phase three-field governing equations. This study will be conducted by comparing MARS-KS code which is being used for evaluating the safety of a Korean Nuclear Power Plant and SPACE code which is currently under assessment for evaluating the safety of the designed nuclear power plant. In this study, comparison of the results of liquid upflow and liquid downflow rate for different gas flow rate from two code to the famous Dukler's CCFL experimental data are presented. This study will be helpful to understand the difference between system analysis codes with different governing equations, models and correlations, and further improving the accuracy of system analysis codes. In the nuclear reactor system, CCFL is an important phenomenon for evaluating the safety of nuclear reactors. This is because CCFL phenomenon can limit injection of ECCS water when CCFL occurs in components such as hot leg, downcomer annulus or steam generator inlet plenum during LOCA which is possible to flow in two opposite directions. Therefore, CCFL is one of the thermal-hydraulic models which has significant effect on the reactor safety analysis code performance. In this study, the CCFL model was evaluated with MARS-KS and SPACE codes for studying the difference between system analysis codes with different governing equations, models and correlations. This study was conducted by comparing MARS-KS and SPACE code results of liquid upflow and liquid downflow rate for different gas flow rate to the famous Dukler

  10. Diagnosing coronary artery disease by sound analysis from coronary stenosis induced turbulent blood flow: diagnostic performance in patients with stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Simon; Schmidt, Samuel Emil; Holm, Niels Ramsing; Toft, Egon; Struijk, Johannes Jan; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Bøttcher, Morten

    2016-02-01

    Optimizing risk assessment may reduce use of advanced diagnostic testing in patients with symptoms suggestive of stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Detection of diastolic murmurs from post-stenotic coronary turbulence with an acoustic sensor placed on the chest wall can serve as an easy, safe, and low-cost supplement to assist in the diagnosis of CAD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an acoustic test (CAD-score) to detect CAD and compare it to clinical risk stratification and coronary artery calcium score (CACS). We prospectively enrolled patients with symptoms of CAD referred to either coronary computed tomography or invasive coronary angiography (ICA). All patients were tested with the CAD-score system. Obstructive CAD was defined as more than 50 % diameter stenosis diagnosed by quantitative analysis of the ICA. In total, 255 patients were included and obstructive CAD was diagnosed in 63 patients (28 %). Diagnostic accuracy evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curves was 72 % for the CAD-score, which was similar to the Diamond-Forrester clinical risk stratification score, 79 % (p = 0.12), but lower than CACS, 86 % (p < 0.01). Combining the CAD-score and Diamond-Forrester score, AUC increased to 82 %, which was significantly higher than the standalone CAD-score (p < 0.01) and Diamond-Forrester score (p < 0.05). Addition of the CAD-score to the Diamond-Forrester score increased correct reclassification, categorical net-reclassification index = 0.31 (p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the potential use of an acoustic system to identify CAD. The combination of clinical risk scores and an acoustic test seems to optimize patient selection for diagnostic investigation.

  11. Stable isotopes dissect aquatic food webs from the top to the bottom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079665373

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been used extensively to study food-web functioning, that is, the flow of energy and matter among organisms. Traditional food-web studies are based on the natural variability of isotopes and are limited to larger organisms that can be physically separated from their environment.

  12. Longitudinal pressure-driven flows between superhydrophobic grooved surfaces: Large effective slip in the narrow-channel limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2017-07-01

    The gross amplification of the fluid velocity in pressure-driven flows due to the introduction of superhydrophobic walls is commonly quantified by an effective slip length. The canonical duct-flow geometry involves a periodic structure of longitudinal shear-free stripes at either one or both of the bounding walls, corresponding to flat-meniscus gas bubbles trapped within a periodic array of grooves. This grating configuration is characterized by two geometric parameters, namely the ratio κ of channel width to microstructure period and the areal fraction Δ of the shear-free stripes. For wide channels, κ ≫1 , this geometry is known to possess an approximate solution where the dimensionless slip length λ , normalized by the duct semiwidth, is small, indicating a weak superhydrophobic effect. We here address the other extreme of narrow channels, κ ≪1 , identifying large O (κ-2) values of λ for the symmetric configuration, where both bounding walls are superhydrophobic. This velocity enhancement is associated with an unconventional Poiseuille-like flow profile where the parabolic velocity variation takes place in a direction parallel (rather than perpendicular) to the boundaries. Use of matched asymptotic expansions and conformal-mapping techniques provides λ up to O (κ-1) , establishing the approximationλ ˜κ-2Δ/33 +κ-1Δ/2π ln4 +⋯, which is in excellent agreement with a semianalytic solution of the dual equations governing the respective coefficients of a Fourier-series representation of the fluid velocity. No similar singularity occurs in the corresponding asymmetric configuration, involving a single superhydrophobic wall; in that geometry, a Hele-Shaw approximation shows that λ =O (1 ) .

  13. Pressure Drop Versus Flow Rate Analysis of the Limited Streamer Tube Gas System of the BaBar Muon Detector Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been proposed that Limited Streamer Tubes (LST) be used in the current upgrade of the muon detector in the BaBar detector. An LST consists of a thin silver plated wire centered in a graphite-coated cell. One standard LST tube consists of eight such cells, and two or three such tubes form an LST module. Under operation, the cells are filled with a gas mixture of CO 2 , argon and isobutane. During normal operation of the detector, the gas will be flushed out of the system at a constant low rate of one volume change per day. During times such as installation, however, it is often desired to flush and change the LST gas volumes very rapidly, leading to higher than normal pressure which may damage the modules. This project studied this pressure as a function of flow rate and the number of modules that are put in series in search of the maximal safe flow rate at which to flush the modules. Measurements of pressure drop versus flow rate were taken using a flow meter and a pressure transducer on configurations of one to five modules put in series. Minimal Poly-Flo tubing was used for all connections between test equipment and modules. They contributed less than 25% to all measurements. A ratio of 0.00022 ± 0.00001 mmHg per Standard Cubic Centimeter per Minute (SCCM) per module was found, which was a slight overestimate since it included the contributions from the tubing connections. However, for the purpose of finding a flow rate at which the modules can be safely flushed, this overestimate acts as a safety cushion. For a standard module with a volume of 16 liters and a known safe overpressure of 2 inches of water, the ratio translates into a flow rate of 17000 ± 1000SCCM and a time requirement of 56 ± 5 seconds to flush an entire module

  14. Focal cerebral ischemia measured by the intra-arterial 133xenon method. Limitations of 2-dimensional blood flow measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyhøj Olsen, T; Larsen, B; Bech Skriver, E

    1981-01-01

    The limitations of 2-dimensional isotope techniques in the study of focal cerebral ischemia were investigated using the intra-carotid 133 xenon injection method and a 254 multidetector scintillation camera. To make sure that the detectors "look" directly on infarcted areas, only patients with inf...

  15. The tempered one-sided stable density: a universal model for hydrological transport?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    A generalized distribution for the water residence time in hydrological transport is proposed in the form of the tempered one-sided stable (TOSS) density. It is shown that limiting cases of the TOSS distribution recover virtually all distributions that have been considered in the literature for hydrological transport, from plug flow to flow reactor, the advection-dispersion model, and the gamma and Levy densities. The stable property of TOSS is particularly important, enabling a seamless transition between a time-domain random walk, and the Lagrangian (trajectory) approach along hydrological transport pathways.

  16. FLAVODIIRON2 and FLAVODIIRON4 Proteins Mediate an Oxygen-Dependent Alternative Electron Flow in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under CO2-Limited Conditions1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Nishi, Akiko; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism of an alternative electron flow (AEF) functioning under suppressed (CO2-limited) photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Photosynthetic linear electron flow, evaluated as the quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)], reaches a maximum shortly after the onset of actinic illumination. Thereafter, Y(II) transiently decreases concomitantly with a decrease in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate and then recovers to a rate that is close to the initial maximum. These results show that CO2 limitation suppresses photosynthesis and induces AEF. In contrast to the wild type, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON2 (FLV2) and FLV4 proteins show no recovery of Y(II) after prolonged illumination. However, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in genes encoding proteins functioning in photorespiration show AEF activity similar to the wild type. In contrast to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has no FLV proteins with high homology to FLV2 and FLV4 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This lack of FLV2/4 may explain why AEF is not induced under CO2-limited photosynthesis in S. elongatus PCC 7942. As the glutathione S-transferase fusion protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli exhibits NADH-dependent oxygen reduction to water, we suggest that FLV2 and FLV4 mediate oxygen-dependent AEF in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 when electron acceptors such as CO2 are not available. PMID:25540330

  17. Tritium, stable istopes, and nitrogen in flow from selected springs that discharge to the Snake River, Twin Falls-Hagerman area, Idaho, 1990-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, L.J.; Low, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    In 1990-93, tritium concentrations in water from 19 springs along the north side of the Snake River near Twin Falls and Hagerman ranged from 9.2±0.6 to 78.4±5.1 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). The springs were placed into three categories on the basis of their locations and tritium concentrations: Category I springs are the farthest upstream and contained from 52.8±3.2 to 78.4±5.1 pCi/L of tritium; Category II springs are downstream from those in Category I and contained from 9.2±0.6 to 18.5±1.2 pCi/L; and Category III springs are the farthest downstream and contained from 28.3±1.9 to 47.7±3.2 pCi/L. Differences in tritium concentrations in Category I, II, and III springs are a function of the ground-water flow regimes and land uses in and hydraulically upgradient from each category of springs. A comparatively large part of the water from the Category I springs is from excess applied-irrigation water which has been diverted from the Snake River. A large part of the recharge for Category II springs originates as many as 140 miles upgradient from the springs. Tritium concentrations in Category III springs indicate that the proportion of recharge from excess applied-irrigation water is intermediate to proportions for Category I and II springs. Tritium concentrations in precipitation and in the Snake River were relatively large in the 1950's and 1960's owing to atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. Conversely, tritium concentrations in ground water with a residence time of several tens to a few hundred years, as occurs in the Snake River Plain aquifer hydraulically upgradient from the Category II springs, are comparatively small because of the 12.4-year half-life of tritium. The conclusion that recharge from excess applied-irrigation water from the Snake River has affected tritium in the Snake River Plain aquifer is supported by differences in the deuterium ( 2 H) and oxygen-18 ( 18 O) ratios of water. These ratios indicate that water discharged by the springs

  18. Water Saturation Relations and Their Diffusion-Limited Equilibration in Gas Shale: Implications for Gas Flow in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Shen, Weijun; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhang, Yingqi; Finsterle, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of water are used for hydraulic fracturing of low permeability shale reservoirs to stimulate gas production, with most of the water remaining unrecovered and distributed in a poorly understood manner within stimulated regions. Because water partitioning into shale pores controls gas release, we measured the water saturation dependence on relative humidity (rh) and capillary pressure (Pc) for imbibition (adsorption) as well as drainage (desorption) on samples of Woodford Shale. Experiments and modeling of water vapor adsorption into shale laminae at rh = 0.31 demonstrated that long times are needed to characterize equilibrium in larger (5 mm thick) pieces of shales, and yielded effective diffusion coefficients from 9 × 10-9 to 3 × 10-8 m2 s-1, similar in magnitude to the literature values for typical low porosity and low permeability rocks. Most of the experiments, conducted at 50°C on crushed shale grains in order to facilitate rapid equilibration, showed significant saturation hysteresis, and that very large Pc (˜1 MPa) are required to drain the shales. These results quantify the severity of the water blocking problem, and suggest that gas production from unconventional reservoirs is largely associated with stimulated regions that have had little or no exposure to injected water. Gravity drainage of water from fractures residing above horizontal wells reconciles gas production in the presence of largely unrecovered injected water, and is discussed in the broader context of unsaturated flow in fractures.

  19. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  20. FLAVODIIRON2 and FLAVODIIRON4 proteins mediate an oxygen-dependent alternative electron flow in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under CO2-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Nishi, Akiko; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism of an alternative electron flow (AEF) functioning under suppressed (CO2-limited) photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Photosynthetic linear electron flow, evaluated as the quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)], reaches a maximum shortly after the onset of actinic illumination. Thereafter, Y(II) transiently decreases concomitantly with a decrease in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate and then recovers to a rate that is close to the initial maximum. These results show that CO2 limitation suppresses photosynthesis and induces AEF. In contrast to the wild type, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON2 (FLV2) and FLV4 proteins show no recovery of Y(II) after prolonged illumination. However, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in genes encoding proteins functioning in photorespiration show AEF activity similar to the wild type. In contrast to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has no FLV proteins with high homology to FLV2 and FLV4 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This lack of FLV2/4 may explain why AEF is not induced under CO2-limited photosynthesis in S. elongatus PCC 7942. As the glutathione S-transferase fusion protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli exhibits NADH-dependent oxygen reduction to water, we suggest that FLV2 and FLV4 mediate oxygen-dependent AEF in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 when electron acceptors such as CO2 are not available. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Constraints on flow regimes in wide-aperture fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2004-02-28

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the complex flow processes in individual fractures, aided by flow visualization experiments and conceptual modeling efforts. These advances have led to the recognition of several flow regimes in individual fractures subjected to different initial and boundary conditions. Of these, the most important regimes are film flow, rivulet flow, and sliding of droplets. The existence of such significantly dissimilar flow regimes has been a major hindrance in the development of self-consistent conceptual models of flow for single fractures that encompass all the flow regimes. The objective of this study is to delineate the existence of the different flow regimes in individual fractures. For steady-state flow conditions, we developed physical constraints on the different flow regimes that satisfy minimum energy configurations, which enabled us to segregate the wide range of fracture transmissivity (volumetric flow rate per fracture width) into several flow regimes. These are, in increasing order of flow rate, flow of adsorbed films, flow of sliding drops, rivulet flow, stable film flow, and unstable (turbulent) film flow. The scope of this study is limited to wide-aperture fractures with the flow on the opposing sides of fracture being independent.

  2. 320-row CT coronary angiography predicts freedom from revascularisation and acts as a gatekeeper to defer invasive angiography in stable coronary artery disease: a fractional flow reserve-correlated study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Brian S.; Wong, Dennis T.L.; Cameron, James D.; Leung, Michael; Meredith, Ian T.; Nerlekar, Nitesh; Antonis, Paul; Harper, Richard; Malaiapan, Yuvaraj; Seneviratne, Sujith K. [Southern Health and Monash University, Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, MonashHEART, Department of Medicine Monash Medical Centre (MMC), Melbourne (Australia); Leong, Darryl P. [University of Adelaide, Discipline of Medicine, Adelaide (Australia); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia); Crossett, Marcus; Troupis, John [Southern Health and Monash University, Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, MonashHEART, Department of Medicine Monash Medical Centre (MMC), Melbourne (Australia); Southern Health and Monash University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, MMC, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    To determine the accuracy of 320-row multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (M320-CCTA) to detect functional stenoses using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard and to predict revascularisation in stable coronary artery disease. One hundred and fifteen patients (230 vessels) underwent M320-CCTA and FFR assessment and were followed for 18 months. Diameter stenosis on invasive angiography (ICA) and M320-CCTA were assessed by consensus by two observers and significant stenosis was defined as ≥50 %. FFR ≤0.8 indicated functionally significant stenoses. M320-CCTA had 94 % sensitivity and 94 % negative predictive value (NPV) for FFR ≤0.8. Overall accuracy was 70 %, specificity 54 % and positive predictive value 65 %. On receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for CCTA to predict FFR ≤0.8 was 0.74 which was comparable with ICA. The absence of a significant stenosis on M320-CCTA was associated with a 6 % revascularisation rate. M320-CCTA predicted revascularisation with an AUC of 0.71 which was comparable with ICA. M320-CCTA has excellent sensitivity and NPV for functional stenoses and therefore may act as an effective gatekeeper to defer ICA and revascularisation. Like ICA, M320-CCTA lacks specificity for functional stenoses and only has moderate accuracy to predict the need for revascularisation. (orig.)

  3. 320-row CT coronary angiography predicts freedom from revascularisation and acts as a gatekeeper to defer invasive angiography in stable coronary artery disease: a fractional flow reserve-correlated study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Brian S.; Wong, Dennis T.L.; Cameron, James D.; Leung, Michael; Meredith, Ian T.; Nerlekar, Nitesh; Antonis, Paul; Harper, Richard; Malaiapan, Yuvaraj; Seneviratne, Sujith K.; Leong, Darryl P.; Crossett, Marcus; Troupis, John

    2014-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of 320-row multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (M320-CCTA) to detect functional stenoses using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard and to predict revascularisation in stable coronary artery disease. One hundred and fifteen patients (230 vessels) underwent M320-CCTA and FFR assessment and were followed for 18 months. Diameter stenosis on invasive angiography (ICA) and M320-CCTA were assessed by consensus by two observers and significant stenosis was defined as ≥50 %. FFR ≤0.8 indicated functionally significant stenoses. M320-CCTA had 94 % sensitivity and 94 % negative predictive value (NPV) for FFR ≤0.8. Overall accuracy was 70 %, specificity 54 % and positive predictive value 65 %. On receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for CCTA to predict FFR ≤0.8 was 0.74 which was comparable with ICA. The absence of a significant stenosis on M320-CCTA was associated with a 6 % revascularisation rate. M320-CCTA predicted revascularisation with an AUC of 0.71 which was comparable with ICA. M320-CCTA has excellent sensitivity and NPV for functional stenoses and therefore may act as an effective gatekeeper to defer ICA and revascularisation. Like ICA, M320-CCTA lacks specificity for functional stenoses and only has moderate accuracy to predict the need for revascularisation. (orig.)

  4. The flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with coflow

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-08-29

    The stability limits, the stabilization mechanism, and the flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed methane flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with air co-flow have been investigated and presented in this work. The stability map of partial premixed flames illustrates that the flames are stable between two extinction limits. A low extinction limit when partial premixed flames approach non-premixed flame conditions, and a high extinction limit, with the partial premixed flames approach fully premixed flame conditions. These two limits showed that the most stable flame conditions are achieved at a certain degree of partial premixed. The stability is improved by adding air co-flow. As the air co-flow velocity increases the most stable flames are those that approach fully premixed. The turbulent flow field of three flames at 0, 5, 10 m/s co-flow velocity are investigated using Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) in order to explore the improvement of the flame stability due to the use of air co-flow. The three flames are all at a jet equivalence ratio (Φj) of 2, fixed level of partial premixing and jet Reynolds number (Rej) of 10,000. The use of co-flow results in the formation of two vortices at the cone exit. These vortices act like stabilization anchors for the flames to the nozzle tip. With these vortices in the flow field, the reaction zone shifts toward the reduced turbulence intensity at the nozzle rim of the cone. Interesting information about the structure of the flow field with and without co-flow are identified and reported in this work.

  5. Temperature and Humidity Control in Livestock Stables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Andersen, Palle; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes temperature and humidity control of a livestock stable. It is important to have a correct air flow pattern in the livestock stable in order to achieve proper temperature and humidity control as well as to avoid draught. In the investigated livestock stable the air flow...... is controlled using wall mounted ventilation flaps. In the paper an algorithm for air flow control is presented meeting the needs for temperature and humidity while taking the air flow pattern in consideration. To obtain simple and realisable controllers a model based control design method is applied....... In the design dynamic models for temperature and humidity are very important elements and effort is put into deriving and testing the models. It turns out that non-linearities are dominating in both models making feedback linearization the natural design method. The air controller as well as the temperature...

  6. On the Bipolar DC Flow Field-Effect-Transistor for Multifunctional Sample Handing in Microfluidics: A Theoretical Analysis under the Debye–Huckel Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyu Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present herein a novel method of bipolar field-effect control on DC electroosmosis (DCEO from a physical point of view, in the context of an intelligent and robust operation tool for stratified laminar streams in microscale systems. In this unique design of the DC flow field-effect-transistor (DC-FFET, a pair of face-to-face external gate terminals are imposed with opposite gate-voltage polarities. Diffuse-charge dynamics induces heteropolar Debye screening charge within the diffuse double layer adjacent to the face-to-face oppositely-polarized gates, respectively. A background electric field is applied across the source-drain terminal and forces the face-to-face counterionic charge of reversed polarities into induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO vortex flow in the lateral direction. The chaotic turbulence of the transverse ICEO whirlpool interacts actively with the conventional plug flow of DCEO, giving rise to twisted streamlines for simultaneous DCEO pumping and ICEO mixing of fluid samples along the channel length direction. A mathematical model in thin-layer approximation and the low-voltage limit is subsequently established to test the feasibility of the bipolar DC-FFET configuration in electrokinetic manipulation of fluids at the micrometer dimension. According to our simulation analysis, an integrated device design with two sets of side-by-side, but upside-down gate electrode pair exhibits outstanding performance in electroconvective pumping and mixing even without any externally-applied pressure difference. Moreover, a paradigm of a microdevice for fully electrokinetics-driven analyte treatment is established with an array of reversed bipolar gate-terminal pairs arranged on top of the dielectric membrane along the channel length direction, from which we can obtain almost a perfect liquid mixture by using a smaller magnitude of gate voltages for causing less detrimental effects at a small Dukhin number. Sustained by theoretical

  7. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  8. Current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  9. Influence of ion effects on a space charge limited field emission flow: from non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M. C.; Chang, P. C.; Lu, P. S.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Influence of ion effects on a space charge limited field emission flow has been studied systematically, by employing both analytical and numerical approaches. In our model, the field emission of electrons is described by the Fowler-Nordheim equation. The cathode plasma and surface properties are considered within the framework of an effective work function approximation. Ionization effects at the anode as well as electron space-charge effects are described by Poisson's equation coupled with the energy conservation equation including the relativistic effects. The calculations are carried out self-consistently to yield the steady states of the bipolar flow. The electric field on the cathode surface is found to be saturated due to space charge effects and is determined by the effective work function approximately. In addition, the upstream ion current bas been treated as a tuning parameter. It is found that the field emission currents in the presence of saturated ion currents can be enhanced to be nearly 1.8, 1.5, and 1.4 times of the cases with no upstream ion current in non-relativistic, intermediate, and ultra-relativistic regimes, respectively. The solutions have also been verified using 1D PIC simulations, as implemented in the OOPD1 code developed by PTSG of UC Berkeley. Work supported by the National Science Council, Taiwan, R.O.C. under Grant No. NSC 96-2112-M-030-004-MY3, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, and National Center for High-Performance Computing, Taiwan, ROC which provides the computing resources.

  10. Feasibility study of respiratory questionnaire and peak flow recordings in autobody shop workers exposed to isocyanate-containing spray paint: observations and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, M R; Redlich, C A; Beckett, W S; Weltmann, B; Sparer, J; Jackson, G; Ruff, T; Rubinstein, E; Holden, W

    1996-06-01

    Diisocyanates, highly reactive monomers which cross-link polyurethane, are the most widely recognized causes of occupational asthma. Many exposed workers are end-users, including autobody spray painters who form a large population at risk. Neither the factors which determine incidence rate nor strategies for control have been adequately studied in this setting. We have conducted a cross-sectional survey of 23 (about one in five) autobody shops in the New Haven area to determine the feasibility of clinical epidemiological studies in this population. Among 102 workers, there was a high rate of airway symptoms consistent with occupational asthma (19.6%). Symptoms were most prevalent among those with the greatest opportunity for exposure (dedicated spray painters) and least among office workers; part-time painters had intermediate rates. Atopy was not associated with risk while smoking seemed to correlate with symptoms. Regular use of air-supplied respirators appeared to be associated with lower risk among workers who painted part- or full-time. We were unable to validate the questionnaire responses with peak expiratory flow record data attempted on a 1/3 sample of the workers. Despite intensive training and effort, subject compliance was limited. Among those who provided adequate data (24 of 38), only two demonstrated unequivocal evidence of labile airways; two others demonstrated lesser changes consistent with an occupational effect on flow rates. There was no clear association between these findings and either questionnaire responses or exposure classification. Overall, the survey suggests that there is a high prevalence of airway symptoms among workers in autobody shops, at least in part due to work-related asthma. However, there is need for both methodological and substantive research in this setting to document rates of occupational asthma and to develop a scientific basis for its effective control.

  11. Microsphere estimates of blood flow: Methodological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Ritter, C.; Hinder, R.A.; Womack, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Fimmel, C.J.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.; Blum, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The microsphere technique is a standard method for measuring blood flow in experimental animals. Sporadic reports have appeared outlining the limitations of this method. In this study the authors have systematically assessed the effect of blood withdrawals for reference sampling, microsphere numbers, and anesthesia on blood flow estimates using radioactive microspheres in dogs. Experiments were performed on 18 conscious and 12 anesthetized dogs. Four blood flow estimates were performed over 120 min using 1 x 10 6 microspheres each time. The effects of excessive numbers of microspheres pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and replacement of volume loss for reference samples with dextran 70 were assessed. In both conscious and anesthetized dogs a progressive decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow and cardiac output was observed over 120 min. This was also observed in the pancreas in conscious dogs. The major factor responsible for these changes was the volume loss due to the reference sample withdrawals. Replacement of the withdrawn blood with dextran 70 led to stable blood flows to all organs. The injection of excessive numbers of microspheres did not modify hemodynamics to a greater extent than did the injection of 4 million microspheres. Anesthesia exerted no influence on blood flow other than raising coronary flow. The authors conclude that although blood flow to the gastric mucosa and the pancreas is sensitive to the minor hemodynamic changes associated with the microsphere technique, replacement of volume loss for reference samples ensures stable blood flow to all organs over a 120-min period

  12. Two stable steady states in the Hodgkin-Huxley axons

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, K.; Matsumoto, G.

    1983-01-01

    Two stable steady states were found in the numerical solution of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations for the intact squid axon bathed in potassium-rich sea water with an externally applied inward current. Under the conditions the two stable steady-states exist, the Hodgkin-Huxley equations have a complex bifurcation structure including, in addition to the two stable steady-states, a stable limit cycle, two unstable equilibrium points, and one asymptotically stable equilibrium point. It was also conc...

  13. Irreversibility of Gas-Condensate Flow in Gas Cycling Projects: Kinetically Stable Saturation Patterns Irréversibilité des écoulements de gaz à condensat dans les projets de recyclage de gaz : profils stationnaires de saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitlin V.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a two-phase multicomponent reservoir system which is approaching the steady-state flow regime are studied. First, the compositional model is analyzed in the linear approximation, for the case of a small initial deviation from the steady-state regime. An analytical expression is obtained for the characteristic relaxation time. Next, numerical simulations are performed for situations where there is a substantial deviation from the steady-state regime. The linear injection of an enriched gas into a gas-condensate reservoir, followed by the extraction regime, is simulated. It is shown that the change in phase compositions and pressure on the way to equilibrium proceeds with characteristic times of the order of the injection time. However, the change in the saturation and overall composition takes approximately 200 times longer than the injection time. Thus, the reservoir system manifests a spatially inhomogeneous saturation distribution for an abnormally long time. Similar kinetically stable patterns have been also discovered in the nonlinear dynamics of phase transitions, plasma, and thin films. The question of the existence of discontinuous steady states for this multicomponent flow is considered. In the case of a binary mixture, it is shown that such solutions do not exist. Cet article présente une étude de la dynamique d'un réservoir biphasique multiconstituant approchant le régime d'écoulement stationnaire. En premier lieu, nous procédons à une approximation linéaire du modèle compositionnel dans le cas des petites fluctuations autour du régime permanent. Une expression analytique est ainsi obtenue pour le temps caractéristique de transition. Des simulations numériques sont ensuite effectuées pour les déviations importantes par rapport au régime permanent. Nous avons ainsi pu étudier le déplacement linéaire d'un mélange gaz/condensat par un gaz enrichi suivi d'un régime de production. On montre alors que le

  14. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  15. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  16. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  17. Using an aqueous two-phase polymer-salt system to rapidly concentrate viruses for improving the detection limit of the lateral-flow immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Erik; Yamanishi, Cameron D; Chiu, Ricky Y T; Wu, Benjamin M; Kamei, Daniel T

    2014-12-01

    The development of point-of-need (PON) diagnostics for viruses has the potential to prevent pandemics and protects against biological warfare threats. Here we discuss the approach of using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to concentrate biomolecules prior to the lateral-flow immunoassay (LFA) for improved viral detection. In this paper, we developed a rapid PON detection assay as an extension to our previous proof-of-concept studies which used a micellar ATPS. We present our investigation of a more rapid polymer-salt ATPS that can drastically improve the assay time, and show that the phase containing the concentrated biomolecule can be extracted prior to macroscopic phase separation equilibrium without affecting the measured biomolecule concentration in that phase. We could therefore significantly decrease the time of the diagnostic assay with an early extraction time of just 30 min. Using this rapid ATPS, the model virus bacteriophage M13 was concentrated between approximately 2 and 10-fold by altering the volume ratio between the two phases. As the extracted virus-rich phase contained a high salt concentration which destabilized the colloidal gold indicator used in LFA, we decorated the gold nanoprobes with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to provide steric stabilization, and used these nanoprobes to demonstrate a 10-fold improvement in the LFA detection limit. Lastly, a MATLAB script was used to quantify the LFA results with and without the pre-concentration step. This approach of combining a rapid ATPS with LFA has great potential for PON applications, especially as greater concentration-fold improvements can be achieved by further varying the volume ratio. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 2499-2507. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  19. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  20. Closed-Loop Control of Vortex Formation in Separated Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonius, Tim; Joe, Won Tae; MacMynowski, Doug; Rowley, Clancy; Taira, Sam; Ahuja, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    In order to phase lock the flow at the desired shedding cycle, particularly at Phi,best, We designed a feedback compensator. (Even though the open-loop forcing at Wf below Wn can lead to phase-locked limit cycles with a high average lift,) This feedback controller resulted in the phase-locked limit cycles that the open-loop control could not achieve for alpha=30 and 40 Particularly for alpha=40, the feedback was able to stabilize the limit cycle that was not stable with any of the open-loop periodic forcing. This results in stable phase-locked limit cycles for a larger range of forcing frequencies than the open-loop control. Also, it was shown that the feedback achieved the high-lift unsteady flow states that open-loop control could not sustain even after the states have been achieved for a long period of time.

  1. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  2. Neutral and Stable Equilibria of Genetic Systems and The Hardy-Weinberg Principle: Limitations of the Chi-Square Test and Advantages of Auto-Correlation Functions of Allele Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A Bosco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the foundations of Population Genetics the notion of genetic equilibrium (in close analogy to Classical Mechanics has been associated with the Hardy-Weinberg (HW Principle and the identification of equilibrium is currently assumed by stating that the HW axioms are valid if appropriate values of Chi-Square (p<0.05 are observed in experiments. Here we show by numerical experiments with the genetic system of one locus/two alleles that considering large ensembles of populations the Chi-Square test is not decisive and may lead to false negatives in random mating populations and false positives in nonrandom mating populations. This result confirms the logical statement that statistical tests cannot be used to deduce if the genetic population is under the HW conditions. Furthermore, we show that under the HW conditions populations of any size evolve in time according to what can be identified as neutral dynamics to which the very notion of equilibrium is unattainable for any practical purpose. Therefore, under the HW conditions the identification of equilibrium properties needs a different approach and the use of more appropriate concepts. We also show that by relaxing the condition of random mating the dynamics acquires all the characteristics of asymptotic stable equilibrium. As a consequence our results show that the question of equilibrium in genetic systems should be approached in close analogy to non-equilibrium statistical physics and its observability should be focused on dynamical quantities like the typical decay properties of the allelic auto correlation function in time. In this perspective one should abandon the classical notion of genetic equilibrium and its relation to the HW proportions and open investigations in the direction of searching for unifying general principles of population genetic transformations capable to take in consideration these systems in their full complexity.

  3. Limiting oxygen concentration for extinction of upward spreading flames over inclined thin polyethylene-insulated NiCr electrical wires with opposed-flow under normal- and micro-gravity

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Longhua

    2016-10-02

    Materials, such as electrical wire, used in spacecraft must pass stringent fire safety standards. Tests for such standards are typically performed under normal gravity conditions and then extended to applications under microgravity conditions. The experiments reported here used polyethylene (PE)-insulated (thickness of 0.15 mm) Nichrome (NiCr)-core (diameter of 0.5 mm) electrical wires. Limiting oxygen concentrations (LOC) at extinction were measured for upward spreading flame at various forced opposed-flow (downward) speeds (0−25 cm/s) at several inclination angles (0−75°) under normal gravity conditions. The differences from those previously obtained under microgravity conditions were quantified and correlated to provide a reference for the development of fire safety test standards for electrical wires to be used in space exploration. It was found that as the opposed-flow speed increased for a specified inclination angle (except the horizontal case), LOC first increased, then decreased and finally increased again. The first local maximum of this LOC variation corresponded to a critical forced flow speed resulted from the change in flame spread pattern from concurrent to counter-current type. This critical forced flow speed correlated well with the buoyancy-induced flow speed component in the wire\\'s direction when the flame base width along the wire was used as a characteristic length scale. LOC was generally higher under the normal gravity than under the microgravity and the difference between the two decreased as the opposed-flow speed increases, following a reasonably linear trend at relatively higher flow speeds (over 10 cm/s). The decrease in the difference in LOC under normal- and microgravity conditions as the opposed-flow speed increases correlated well with the gravity acceleration component in the wire\\'s direction, providing a measure to extend LOC determined by the tests under normal gravity conditions (at various inclination angles and opposed-flow

  4. A Note on Interpolation of Stable Processes | Nassiuma | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interpolation procedures tailored for gaussian processes may not be applied to infinite variance stable processes. Alternative techniques suitable for a limited set of stable case with index α∈(1,2] were initially studied by Pourahmadi (1984) for harmonizable processes. This was later extended to the ARMA stable process ...

  5. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  6. Topographic Constraints on Lava Flow Patterns: the December 2010 Eruption of Piton de La Fournaise (La Réunion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A.; Harris, A. J. L.; Gurioli, L.; Villeneuve, N.; Whittington, A. G.; Rhéty, M.

    2016-12-01

    The December 2010 lava flow of Piton de La Fournaise consists of four separate branches, all fed by the same fissure over about 15 hours, but then flowing in slightly different directions. This provided us a unique chance to address the long-standing question of how pre-existing topography controls lava flow patterns. Each flow branch was mapped and sampled from vent to toe. The morphology of all branches can be described using a combination of three basic cross-section types (perpendicular to flow direction): (1) single, stable channel; (2) unstable, braided channels; and (3) dispersed flow. These flow morphologies depend on pre-existing underlying topography, so that a steep slope results in a stable channel, while a gentle slope results in a braided channel. Downflow slope variations can drive the flow morphology to switch back and forth between a single stable channel and multiple braided channels several times along its length. However, in our volume-limited study case, if slope falls below a critical threshold the flow becomes dispersed and stops shortly thereafter. The exact transition values from stable to braided channel and vice-versa depend on parameters other than topography, such as magma effusion rate, as illustrated by the comparative analyses of the different flow branches. The findings of this study allow us to interpret and explain the observed flow patterns on the basis of pre-existing volcano topography and effusion rates estimates.

  7. Flow Resistance in Open Channels and Limits of Applicability of Manning's Formula; Resistencia al flujo en canales y limites de aplicabilidad de la formula de manning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldama, Alvaro A; R Ocon, Afredo [Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia del Agua, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2002-03-01

    The concepts involved in the estimation of flow resistance in open channels are reviewed. In particular, of expressions for the friction factor that allow the derivation of expressions for the friction factor that appears in Darcy-Weisbach's formula for circular channels flowing full or at a depth equal half the diameter, and for wide channels, conveying hydraulically rough, fully turbulent flow. The results of such analyses show that it is possible to avoid adjustments to the numerical values that appear in Colebrook's formula, in order to reproduce experimental data. They also make it possible to explain the empirical dispersion observed in the values of the parameters of an expression used to estimate the Darcy-Weisbach friction coefficient for wide channels. On the basis of these results, the range of validity for Manning's formula is determined. Finally, additional evidence is provided in the estimation of flow resistance in open channels, being well represented by the hydraulic radius alone. This observation allows to foresees the possibility of developing a universally valid formula for the Darcy-Weisbach friction factor, applicable to flow in open channels. [Spanish] Se revisan los conceptos involucrados en la estimacion de la resistencia al flujo en canales. En particular, se senalan los inconvenientes de la popular formula de Manning. Tambien se presentan analisis teoricos que permiten determinar expresiones para el factor de friccion de la formula de Darcy-Weisbach para canales circulares trabajando llenos a la mitad, y para canales anchos conduciendo flujo hidraulicamente rugoso con turbulencia desarrollada. Se demuestra que los resultados de dichos analisis permiten evitar hacer ajustes en los valores numericos que aparecen en la formula de Colebrook, a fin de reproducir observaciones experimentales. Asimismo, hacen posible explicar la dispersion experimental en los valores de los parametros que aparecen en una expresion para el calculo

  8. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  9. Evidence of Zonal-Flow-Driven Limit-Cycle Oscillations during L-H Transition and at H-mode Pedestal of a New Small-ELM Regime in EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.; Wang, H.; Guo, H.

    Small-amplitude edge localized oscillations have been observed, for the first time, in EAST preceding the L-H transition at marginal input power, which manifest themselves as dithering in the divertor D signals at a frequency under 4 kHz, much lower than the GAM frequency. Detailed measurements...... providing a direct evidence of the zonal flows for the L-H transition at marginal input power. Furthermore, near the transition threshold sawtooth heat pulses appear to periodically enhance the dithering, finally triggering the L-H transition after a big sawtooth crash. The zonal flow induced limit...... link between them. A novel predator-prey model, incorporating the evolution of zonal flows, pressure gradient and turbulences at two different frequency ranges, has been developed and successfully reproduced the key features of this newly observed small-ELM regime....

  10. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  11. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  12. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  13. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  14. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  15. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  16. Special Course on Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interactions in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows (Interactions entre Ondes de Choc et Couches Limites dans les Ecoulements Supersoniques et Hpersoniques).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Laser Corp.) was used as the flow was well-mixed in the wind tunnel stilling a light source. More recently, a 5-Watt Argon -Ion chamber by capturing...component capability, the ve- scattering mode. For all the tests presented here, the locimeter is equipped with two identical Argon lasers that forward...Directour dui Service des=oe o~us LUXEMBOURG Mmisirede l Ddw NVoireldgique Ottawa, Ontario KIA 0K2 I4ORVEGE DANEMAIU( Norwegia Defence Research

  17. Microwave plasma ion sources for selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry: Optimizing their performance and detection limits for trace gas analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Smith, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 267, 1-3 (2007), s. 117-124 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : microwave plasma ion source * selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * SIFT-MS * breath analysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.411, year: 2007

  18. Angiographic and interventional management of spontaneous coronary artery dissections: When less is more, or "When 'Better' flow is the enemy of good flow".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Malissa J; Drachman, Douglas E

    2017-01-01

    Conservative management of SCAD in clinically stable patients with non-flow limiting lesions in major arteries is associated with favorable outcomes A careful, methodical approach to pursuing PCI in patients with SCAD is warranted Peripartum patients with SCAD appear to be at higher risk for technical complications; interventions in these patients should be performed by highly experienced operators. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  20. Selection criterion of stable dendritic growth at arbitrary Péclet numbers with convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V; Galenko, Peter K

    2013-06-01

    A free dendrite growth under forced fluid flow is analyzed for solidification of a nonisothermal binary system. Using an approach to dendrite growth developed by Bouissou and Pelcé [Phys. Rev. A 40, 6673 (1989)], the analysis is presented for the parabolic dendrite interface with small anisotropy of surface energy growing at arbitrary Péclet numbers. The stable growth mode is obtained from the solvability condition giving the stability criterion for the dendrite tip velocity V and dendrite tip radius ρ as a function of the growth Péclet number, flow Péclet number, and Reynolds number. In limiting cases, the obtained stability criterion presents known criteria for small and high growth Péclet numbers of the solidifying system with and without convective fluid flow.

  1. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  2. Comparative effects of arotinolol, labetalol and propranolol on regional myocardial dysfunction induced by flow-limiting coronary stenosis in anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, K; Kato, T; Kinjo, N; Moromizato, H; Sakanashi, M

    1990-07-01

    Effects of arotinolol, a combined alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent, on regional myocardial dysfunction produced by severe coronary stenosis in anesthetized dogs were examined and compared with those of labetalol and propranolol. Doses of these three antagonists were selected to produce a comparable degree of the negative chrono- and inotropic effect but a different potency of alpha-adrenoceptor blockade (labetalol greater than arotinolol). Regional myocardial function measured as segment shortening (%SS) was decreased to around 2-3% by constriction of the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX), and then drug or saline was administered i.v. The stenosis of LCX was released 30 min after the administration. No significant alteration in hemodynamic and contractility parameters was seen as compared to the predrug value up to at least 30 min after saline i.v. Arotinolol and propranolol both reduced heart rate and peak positive left ventricular dP/dt (LVdP/dt) without a significant change in LCX flow. Concomitantly, %SS distal to a coronary stenosis was significantly improved by arotinolol and propranolol. On the other hand, labetalol significantly reduced LCX flow probably due to systemic hypotension and failed to improve %SS in the ischemic area, although the agent markedly decreased heart rate and LVdP/dt. These results indicate that arotinolol improves impaired regional myocardial function distal to a coronary stenosis in a similar manner with propranolol.

  3. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  4. On the functional limits for partial sums under stable law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonchigdanzan, K.; Kosiński, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    For the partial sums (S,) of independent random variables we define a stochastic process s(n)(t) := (1/d(n)) Sigma(k <=[nt])(S-k/k - mu) and prove that (1/log N) Sigma(n <= N)(1/n)I {S-n(t) <= x} -> G(t)(x) a.s. if and only if (1/log N) Sigma(n <= N)(1/n)P(s(n)(t) <= x) -> G(t)(x), for some sequence

  5. Structure of stable degeneration of K3 surfaces into pairs of rational elliptic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    F-theory/heterotic duality is formulated in the stable degeneration limit of a K3 fibration on the F-theory side. In this note, we analyze the structure of the stable degeneration limit. We discuss whether stable degeneration exists for pairs of rational elliptic surfaces. We demonstrate that, when two rational elliptic surfaces have an identical complex structure, stable degeneration always exists. We provide an equation that systematically describes the stable degeneration of a K3 surface i...

  6. Stable sheath formation in expanding magnetic field to divertor plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; Takamaru, H.; Sato, T.

    2001-01-01

    The stable sheath formation in expanding magnetic field to a divertor plate was studied theoretically by one-dimensional analysis. In fusion devices the magnetic field is expanding in the direction of the plate, i.e. the magnitude of magnetic field is decreasing to the plate. In this configuration ions are accelerated to the plate due to the gradient of the magnetic field strength, so called a mirror force. The bombardment of accelerated ions to the plate may cause several severe problems to fusion plasmas, for example, release of large amount of impurities from the diverter plate. Limited research efforts have been carried out describing magnetic field effects on various potential formation and particle and heat fluxes to the divertor plate. The plasma-wall interaction in an oblique to the plate but uniform magnetic field has been studied by means of 1D-PIC numerical simulation. This analysis shows the formation of a quasi-neutral magnetic pre-sheath preceding the electrostatic Debye sheath, which scales to the ion gyroradius at the sound speed and to the incidence angle of the magnetic field. Sato clarifies this magnetic pre-sheath is attributed to the ion polarisation drift by the two dimensional kinetic analysis. None of effects, however, of non-uniformity of the magnetic field has been taken into account on the stable electrostatic potential and sheath formation. In this paper, we consider a collisionless sheath model between an infinite metal plate and a quasi-neutral plasma in the expanding magnetic field to the plate. One dimensional kinetic analysis leads that a condition for flow velocity of ions at a plasma-sheath boundary is more restricted than that of the uniform magnetic field, which should be larger than the ion sound speed. The difference, however, between both cases is an order of the Debye length to a plasma radius, which is negligible small. The requirement for the ion flow velocity inside the plasma is obtained from the condition of the quasi

  7. Study of the influence of the turbulent boundary conditions of a flow with parietal injection; Etude de l'influence des conditions aux limites turbulentes d'un ecoulement avec injection parietale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouat, B.

    1998-07-01

    Numerical simulations of flows inside a solid propellant rocket engine with parietal injection are performed using the numerical resolution of Navier-Stokes equations in a k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Boundary conditions are defined considering laminar and turbulent fluid injections on the wall. In parallel, a Couette-type model is used to determine the velocity profile near the wall and the wall constraint for a laminar fluid injection. An analysis of simulations shows the influence of boundary conditions on the transition of the flow from the laminar to the turbulent regime, on the velocity profile near the wall, and on the evolution of Reynolds pressures. The average velocity profile is well reproduced but the first-order k-{epsilon} turbulence model shows limitations for the reproduction of turbulent pressure levels. A second-order Reynolds pressure model should be more appropriate. (J.S.)

  8. The hydrochemical identification of groundwater flowing to the Bet She’an-Harod multiaquifer system (Lower Jordan Valley) by rare earth elements, yttrium, stable isotopes (H, O) and Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, Christian; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Möller, Peter; Rödiger, Tino; Meiler, Miki

    2012-01-01

    The Bet She’an and Harod Valleys in Israel are regional recipients and mixing zones for groundwater draining from a multiple aquifer system, which includes carbonate and basalt aquifers and deep-seated pressurized brines. The aquifers drain through two types of outlets, distinct and mixed. The latter type is mainly conditioned by the occurrence of fault-blocks related to the Jordan Rift system, which act as connecting media between the aquifers and facilitate interaquifer flow. Conjoint application of rare earth element distribution and water isotopes enables detection of the local areas replenishment by rainfall infiltration and, in connection with the position of wells or springs, the identification of groundwater flow paths. Once stationary equilibria are established changes of REY composition between REY in groundwater and their surface adsorption, are negligible. In areas with little soil coverage and vegetation even recharge over young Tertiary and diagenetic Cretaceous limestones is distinguishable by their REY distribution patterns. Groundwater recharged over Tertiary limestones show higher REY abundance and more significant Ce anomalies than those derived from the Cretaceous limestones. Weathering of alkali olivine basalts leads to REY patterns in groundwater depleted in the middle REE. The improved knowledge of the hydrological systems is thought to be useful for regional hydrogeological modeling and for designing rational water management schemes.

  9. Turbulent heat flux measurements in thermally stable boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J.; van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable turbulent boundary layers are prevalent in the polar regions and nocturnal atmospheric surface layer but heat and momentum flux measurements in such flow are often difficult. Here, a new method is employed using a nanoscale cold-wire (T-NSTAP) adjacent to a 2D PIV light sheet to measure these fluxes within rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. This method combines the advantages of fast thermal frequency response with measurement of the spatial variation of the velocity field. Resolution is limited solely by the separation of the probe and the light sheet. The new technique is used to examine the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity over a range of Richardson numbers from weak to strongly stable. In addition, the velocity fields are conditionally averaged subject to strong deviations of temperature above and below the local average in an effort to determine the relationship between the coherent turbulent motions and the fluctuating temperature field. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  10. Kinetics of 13N-ammonia uptake in myocardial single cells indicating potential limitations in its applicability as a marker of myocardial blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, B.; Helus, F.; Grunze, M.; Braunwell, E.; Mall, G.; Hasselbach, W.; Kuebler, W.

    1985-01-01

    To study kinetics and principles of cellular uptake of 13 N-ammonia, a marker of coronary perfusion in myocardial scintigraphy, heart muscle cells of adult rats were isolated by perfusion with collagenase and hyaluronidase. Net uptake of 13 N, measured by flow dialysis, reached equilibrium within 20 sec in the presence of sodium bicarbonate and carbon dioxide (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). Total extraction, 80 sec after the reaction start, was 786 +/- 159 mumol/ml cell volume. Cells destroyed by calcium overload were unable to extract 13 N-ammonia. Omission of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide reduced total extraction to 36% of control. 13 N-Ammonia uptake could also be reduced by 50 muM 4,4' diisothiocyanostilbene 2,2' disulfonic acid, by 100 micrograms/ml 1-methionine sulfoximine, and by preincubation with 5 muM free oleic acid. These results indicate that in addition to metabolic trapping by glutamine synthetase, the extraction of 13 N-ammonia by myocardial cells is influenced by cell membrane integrity, intracellular-extracellular pH gradient, and possibly an anion exchange system for bicarbonate. For this reason, the uptake of 13 N-ammonia may not always provide a valid measurement of myocardial perfusion

  11. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  12. A single photon emission computed tomograph based on a limited dumber of detectors for fluid flow visualization; Tomographie d'emission gamma a partir d'un nombre limite de detecteurs appliquee a la visualisation d'ecoulements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legoupil, S

    1999-07-01

    We present in this work a method for fluid flow visualization in a system using radioactive tracers. The method is based on single photon emission computed tomography techniques, applied to a limited number of discrete detectors. We propose in this work a method for the estimation of the transport matrix of photons, associated to the acquisition system.This method is based on the modelization of profiles acquired for a set of point sources located in the imaged volume. Monte Carlo simulations allow to separate scattered photons from those directly collected by the system. The influence of the energy tracer is exposed. The reconstruction method is based on the maximum likelihood - expectation maximization algorithm. An experimental device, based on 36 detectors was realised for the visualization of water circulation in a vessel. A video monitoring allows to visualize the dye water tracer. Dye and radioactive tracers are injected simultaneously in a water flow circulating in the vessel. Reconstructed and video images are compared. Quantitative and qualitative analysis show that fluid flow visualization is feasible with a limited number of detectors. This method can be applied for system involving circulations of fluids. (author)

  13. Turbulence Considerations for Comparing Ecosystem Exchange over Old-Growth and Clear-Cut Stands For Limited Fetch and Complex Canopy Flow Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Paw U, K T; Falk, M; Bible, K

    2009-01-08

    Carbon dioxide, water vapor and energy fluxes were measured using eddy covariance (EC) methodology over three adjacent forests in southern Washington State to identify stand-level age-effects on ecosystem exchange. The sites represent Douglas-fir forest ecosystems at two contrasting successional stages: old-growth (OG) and early seral (ES). Here we present eddy flux and meteorological data from two early seral stands and the Wind River AmeriFlux old-growth forest during the growing season (March-October) in 2006 and 2007. We show an alternative approach to the usual friction velocity (u*) method for determining periods of adequate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) mixing based on the ratio of mean horizontal ({bar u}) and vertical ({bar w}) wind flow to a modified turbulent kinetic energy scale (uTKE). This new parameter in addition to footprint modeling showed that daytime CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE}) in small clear-cuts (< 10 hectares) can be measured accurately with EC if micrometeorological conditions are carefully evaluated. Peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -14.0 to -12.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) at OG were measured in April in both 2006 and 2007 before bud break when air and soil temperatures and vapor pressure deficit were relatively low, and soil moisture and light levels were favorable for photosynthesis. At the early seral stands, peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -11.0 to -8.7 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were measured in June and July while spring-time CO{sub 2} fluxes were much smaller (F{sub NEE} = -3.8 to -3.6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}). Overall, we measured lower evapotranspiration (OG = 230 mm; ES = 297 mm) higher midday F{sub NEE} (OG F{sub NEE} = -9.0 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}; ES F{sub NEE} = -7.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and higher Bowen ratios (OG {beta} = 2.0. ES {beta} = 1.2) at the old-growth forest than at the ES sites during the summer months (May-August). Eddy covariance studies such as ours

  14. Inorganic Phosphate (Pi) Enhancement of Dark Respiration in the Pi-Limited Green Alga Selenastrum minutum (Interactions between H+/Pi Cotransport, the Plasmalemma H+-ATPase, and Dark Respiratory Carbon Flow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, D. A.; Turpin, D. H.

    1994-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) enrichment of the Pi-limited green alga Selenastrum minutum in the dark caused a 2.5-fold increase in the rate of O2 consumption. Alkalization of the media during Pi assimilation was consistent with a H+/Pi cotransport mechanism with a stoichiometry of at least 2 H+ cotransported per Pi. Dark O2 consumption remained enhanced beyond the period of Pi assimilation and did not recover until the medium was reacidified. This result, coupled with an immediate decrease in adenylate energy charge following Pi enrichment, suggested that respiration is regulated by the ATP requirements of a plasmalemma H+-ATPase that is activated to maintain intracellular pH and provide proton motive force to power Pi uptake. Concentrations of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates decreased following Pi enrichment and respiratory CO2 efflux increased, indicating that the tricarboxylic acid cycle was activated to supply reductant to the mitochondrial electron transport chain. These results are consistent with direct inhibition of electron transport by ADP limitation. Enhanced rates of starch breakdown and increases in glycolytic metabolites indicated that respiratory carbon flow was activated to supply reductant to the electron transport chain and to rapidly assimilate Pi into metabolic intermediates. The mechanism that initiates glycolytic carbon flow could not be clearly identified by product:substrate ratios due to the complex nature of Pi assimilation. High levels of triose-P and low levels of phosphoenolpyruvate were the primary regulators of pyruvate kinase and phosphofructokinase, respectively.

  15. Cycle flows and multistability in oscillatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manik, Debsankha; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2017-08-01

    We study multistability in phase locked states in networks of phase oscillators under both Kuramoto dynamics and swing equation dynamics—a popular model for studying coarse-scale dynamics of an electrical AC power grid. We first establish the existence of geometrically frustrated states in such systems—where although a steady state flow pattern exists, no fixed point exists in the dynamical variables of phases due to geometrical constraints. We then describe the stable fixed points of the system with phase differences along each edge not exceeding π/2 in terms of cycle flows—constant flows along each simple cycle—as opposed to phase angles or flows. The cycle flow formalism allows us to compute tight upper and lower bounds to the number of fixed points in ring networks. We show that long elementary cycles, strong edge weights, and spatially homogeneous distribution of natural frequencies (for the Kuramoto model) or power injections (for the oscillator model for power grids) cause such networks to have more fixed points. We generalize some of these bounds to arbitrary planar topologies and derive scaling relations in the limit of large capacity and large cycle lengths, which we show to be quite accurate by numerical computation. Finally, we present an algorithm to compute all phase locked states—both stable and unstable—for planar networks.

  16. Be-limiter experiment on ISX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1984-01-01

    The relevance of this experiment to the JET experiment is described. Data on the following issues are given: (1) thermo-mechanical properties of the Be-limiter; (2) particle flow to limiter; (3) heat flow to the limiter; (4) limiter-plasma-wall interaction; (5) plasma properties/operation; (6) active control of plasma-limiter operation; and (7) fault conditions

  17. Flow regime analysis of non-Newtonian duct flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speetjens, Michel; Rudman, Murray; Metcalfe, Guy

    2006-01-01

    Reoriented duct flows of generalized Newtonian fluids are an idealization of non-Newtonian fluid flow in industrial in-line mixers. Based on scaling analysis and computation we find that non-Newtonian duct flows have several limit behaviors, in the sense that such flows can become (nearly) independent of one or more of the rheological and dynamical control parameters, simplifying the general flow and mixing problem. These limit flows give several levels of modeling complexity to the full problem of non-Newtonian duct flow. We describe the sets of simplified flow models and their corresponding regions of validity. This flow-model decomposition captures the essential rheological and dynamical characteristics of the reoriented duct flows and enables a more efficient and systematic study and design of flow and mixing of non-Newtonian fluids in ducts. Key aspects of the flow-model decomposition are demonstrated via a specific, but representative, duct flow.

  18. High-Order Entropy Stable Formulations for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Fisher, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach is presented for developing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the Navier-Stokes equations. These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities. Entropy stable formulations exist for all diagonal norm, summation-by-parts (SBP) operators, including all centered finite-difference operators, Legendre collocation finite-element operators, and certain finite-volume operators. Examples are presented using various entropy stable formulations that demonstrate the current state-of-the-art of these schemes.

  19. Stable Breathing in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated With Increased Effort but Not Lowered Metabolic Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Camila M; Taranto-Montemurro, Luigi; Butler, James P; White, David P; Loring, Stephen H; Azarbarzin, Ali; Marques, Melania; Berger, Philip J; Wellman, Andrew; Sands, Scott A

    2017-10-01

    In principle, if metabolic rate were to fall during sleep in a patient with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), ventilatory requirements could be met without increased respiratory effort thereby favoring stable breathing. Indeed, most patients achieve periods of stable flow-limited breathing without respiratory events for periods during the night for reasons that are unclear. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that in patients with OSA, periods of stable breathing occur when metabolic rate (VO2) declines. Twelve OSA patients (apnea-hypopnea index >15 events/h) completed overnight polysomnography including measurements of VO2 (using ventilation and intranasal PO2) and respiratory effort (esophageal pressure). Contrary to our hypothesis, VO2 did not differ between stable and unstable breathing periods in non-REM stage 2 (208 ± 20 vs. 213 ± 18 mL/min), despite elevated respiratory effort during stable breathing (26 ± 2 versus 23 ± 2 cmH2O, p = .03). However, VO2 was lowered during deeper sleep (244 to 179 mL/min from non-REM stages 1 to 3, p = .04) in conjunction with more stable breathing. Further analysis revealed that airflow obstruction curtailed metabolism in both stable and unstable periods, since CPAP increased VO2 by 14% in both cases (p = .02, .03, respectively). Patients whose VO2 fell most during sleep avoided an increase in PCO2 and respiratory effort. OSA patients typically convert from unstable to stable breathing without lowering metabolic rate. During sleep, OSA patients labor with increased respiratory effort but fail to satisfy metabolic demand even in the absence of overt respiratory events. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The impact of metabolism on stable isotope dynamics: a theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecquerie, Laure; Nisbet, Roger M.; Fablet, Ronan; Lorrain, Anne; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool used for reconstructing individual life histories, identifying food-web structures and tracking flow of elemental matter through ecosystems. The mechanisms determining isotopic incorporation rates and discrimination factors are, however, poorly understood which hinders a reliable interpretation of field data when no experimental data are available. Here, we extend dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory with a limited set of new assumptions and rules in order to study the impact of metabolism on stable isotope dynamics in a mechanistic way. We calculate fluxes of stable isotopes within an organism by following fluxes of molecules involved in a limited number of macrochemical reactions: assimilation, growth but also structure turnover that is here explicitly treated. Two mechanisms are involved in the discrimination of isotopes: (i) selection of molecules occurs at the partitioning of assimilation, growth and turnover into anabolic and catabolic sub-fluxes and (ii) reshuffling of atoms occurs during transformations. Such a framework allows for isotopic routing which is known as a key, but poorly studied, mechanism. As DEB theory specifies the impact of environmental conditions and individual state on molecule fluxes, we discuss how scenario analysis within this framework could help reveal common mechanisms across taxa. PMID:20921045

  1. Amplified fragment length polymorphism used to investigate genetic variability of the stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) across North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeland, K M; Skoda, S R; Foster, J E

    2013-09-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), is a cosmopolitan pest of livestock and humans. The pestiferous nature and painful bite cause stress to cattle and other animals. The stress and resulting avoidance behaviors manifest as reductions in weight gain or milk production in cattle; estimated annual economic loss in the United States exceeds US$2 billion. Understanding the population genetics of stable flies could provide information on their population dynamics, origins of outbreaks, and geographical patterns of insecticide resistance, resulting in a tactical advantage for developing management strategies. Previous studies, mostly on a local scale, reported a high level of gene flow between locations. Here, we report results wherein amplified fragment length polymorphism was used to determine genetic diversity of stable fly samples consisting of 11-40 individuals from 12 locations representing the United States, Canada, and Panama. The Analysis of Molecular Variance showed that the majority of genetic diversity was within groups; very little was among groups. The F(ST) and G(ST) values were low ( 1.0). The tests of neutrality suggested population expansion, and no genetic differentiation was found between locations. These results show that stable flies have a high level of gene flow on a continental scale, with limited isolation owing to distance or geographical barriers.

  2. Separation of cancer cells using vortical microfluidic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Hamed; Naghsh-Nilchi, Hamed; Di Carlo, Dino

    2018-01-01

    Label-free separation of viable cancer cells using vortical microfluidic flows has been introduced as a feasible cell collection method in oncological studies. Besides the clinical importance, the physics of particle interactions with the vortex that forms in a wall-confined geometry of a microchannel is a relatively new area of fluid dynamics. In our previous work [Haddadi and Di Carlo, J. Fluid. Mech. 811 , 436-467 (2017)], we have introduced distinct aspects of inertial flow of dilute suspensions over cavities in a microchannel such as breakdown of the separatrix and formation of stable limit cycle orbits for finite size polystyrene particles. In this work, we extend our experiments to address the engineering-physics of cancer cell entrapment in microfluidic cavities. We begin by studying the effects of the channel width and device height on the morphology of the vortex, which has not been discussed in our previous work. The stable limit cycle orbits of finite size cancer cells are then presented. We demonstrate effects of the separatrix breakdown and the limit cycle formation on the operation of the cancer cell separation platform. By studying the flow of dilute cell suspensions over the cavities, we further develop the notion of the cavity capacity and the relative rate of cell accumulation as optimization criteria which connect the device geometry with the flow. Finally, we discuss the proper placement of multiple cavities inside a microchannel for improved cell entrapment.

  3. Inductive heating with magnetic materials inside flow reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Sascha; Coutable, Ludovic; Wegner, Jens; Kirschning, Andreas

    2011-02-07

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with silica gel or alternatively steel beads are new fixed-bed materials for flow reactors that efficiently heat reaction mixtures in an inductive field under flow conditions. The scope and limitations of these novel heating materials are investigated in comparison with conventional and microwave heating. The results suggest that inductive heating can be compared to microwave heating with respect to rate acceleration. It is also demonstrated that a very large diversity of different reactions can be performed under flow conditions by using inductively heated flow reactors. These include transfer hydrogenations, heterocyclic condensations, pericyclic reactions, organometallic reactions, multicomponent reactions, reductive cyclizations, homogeneous and heterogeneous transition-metal catalysis. Silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are stable under many chemical conditions and the silica shell could be utilized for further functionalization with Pd nanoparticles, rendering catalytically active heatable iron oxide particles. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A biomimetic redox flow battery based on flavin mononucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Akihiro; Verde, Michael G.; Sakai, Masanori; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-10-01

    The versatility in design of redox flow batteries makes them apt to efficiently store energy in large-scale applications at low cost. The discovery of inexpensive organic electroactive materials for use in aqueous flow battery electrolytes is highly attractive, but is thus far limited. Here we report on a flow battery using an aqueous electrolyte based on the sodium salt of flavin mononucleotide. Flavins are highly versatile electroactive molecules, which catalyse a multitude of redox reactions in biological systems. We use nicotinamide (vitamin B3) as a hydrotropic agent to enhance the water solubility of flavin mononucleotide. A redox flow battery using flavin mononucleotide negative and ferrocyanide positive electrolytes in strong base shows stable cycling performance, with over 99% capacity retention over the course of 100 cycles. We hypothesize that this is enabled due to the oxidized and reduced forms of FMN-Na being stabilized by resonance structures.

  5. Stable isotope analysis of dynamic lipidomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Joost; Bailey, Andrew P; Koster, Grielof; Gould, Alex P; Postle, Anthony D

    2017-08-01

    Metabolic pathway flux is a fundamental element of biological activity, which can be quantified using a variety of mass spectrometric techniques to monitor incorporation of stable isotope-labelled substrates into metabolic products. This article contrasts developments in electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the measurement of lipid metabolism with more established gas chromatography mass spectrometry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodologies. ESI-MS combined with diagnostic tandem MS/MS scans permits the sensitive and specific analysis of stable isotope-labelled substrates into intact lipid molecular species without the requirement for lipid hydrolysis and derivatisation. Such dynamic lipidomic methodologies using non-toxic stable isotopes can be readily applied to quantify lipid metabolic fluxes in clinical and metabolic studies in vivo. However, a significant current limitation is the absence of appropriate software to generate kinetic models of substrate incorporation into multiple products in the time domain. Finally, we discuss the future potential of stable isotope-mass spectrometry imaging to quantify the location as well as the extent of lipid synthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: BBALIP_Lipidomics Opinion Articles edited by Sepp Kohlwein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Current limiter circuit system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witcher, Joseph Brandon; Bredemann, Michael V.

    2017-09-05

    An apparatus comprising a steady state sensing circuit, a switching circuit, and a detection circuit. The steady state sensing circuit is connected to a first, a second and a third node. The first node is connected to a first device, the second node is connected to a second device, and the steady state sensing circuit causes a scaled current to flow at the third node. The scaled current is proportional to a voltage difference between the first and second node. The switching circuit limits an amount of current that flows between the first and second device. The detection circuit is connected to the third node and the switching circuit. The detection circuit monitors the scaled current at the third node and controls the switching circuit to limit the amount of the current that flows between the first and second device when the scaled current is greater than a desired level.

  7. Diversity in photosynthetic electron transport under [CO2]-limitation: the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii drive an O2-dependent alternative electron flow and non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence during CO2-limited photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Akimoto, Seiji; Ueno, Yoshifumi; Wada, Ayumi; Shaku, Keiichiro; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-12-01

    Some cyanobacteria, but not all, experience an induction of alternative electron flow (AEF) during CO 2 -limited photosynthesis. For example, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803) exhibits AEF, but Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942 does not. This difference is due to the presence of flavodiiron 2 and 4 proteins (FLV2/4) in S. 6803, which catalyze electron donation to O 2 . In this study, we observed a low-[CO 2 ] induced AEF in the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 that lacks FLV2/4. The AEF shows high affinity for O 2 , compared with AEF mediated by FLV2/4 in S. 6803, and can proceed under extreme low [O 2 ] (about a few µM O 2 ). Further, the transition from CO 2 -saturated to CO 2 -limited photosynthesis leads a preferential excitation of PSI to PSII and increased non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. We found that the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also has an O 2 -dependent AEF showing the same affinity for O 2 as that in S. 7002. These data represent the diverse molecular mechanisms to drive AEF in cyanobacteria and green algae. In this paper, we further discuss the diversity, the evolution, and the physiological function of strategy to CO 2 -limitation in cyanobacterial and green algal photosynthesis.

  8. Flow Rounding

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Donggu; Payor, James

    2015-01-01

    We consider flow rounding: finding an integral flow from a fractional flow. Costed flow rounding asks that we find an integral flow with no worse cost. Randomized flow rounding requires we randomly find an integral flow such that the expected flow along each edge matches the fractional flow. Both problems are reduced to cycle canceling, for which we develop an $O(m \\log(n^2/m))$ algorithm.

  9. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an MRE? Is an MRE shelf stable? What foods are packaged in retort packages? What is aseptic ... type of package is used for aseptic processing? What foods are packaged in aseptic packages? Can I microwave ...

  10. Quench limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapinski, M.

    2012-01-01

    With thirteen beam induced quenches and numerous Machine Development tests, the current knowledge of LHC magnets quench limits still contains a lot of unknowns. Various approaches to determine the quench limits are reviewed and results of the tests are presented. Attempt to reconstruct a coherent picture emerging from these results is taken. The available methods of computation of the quench levels are presented together with dedicated particle shower simulations which are necessary to understand the tests. The future experiments, needed to reach better understanding of quench limits as well as limits for the machine operation are investigated. The possible strategies to set BLM (Beam Loss Monitor) thresholds are discussed. (author)

  11. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  12. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  13. The Concave Shape of the Forced Expiratory Flow-Volume Curve in 3 Seconds Is a Practical Surrogate of FEV1/FVC for the Diagnosis of Airway Limitation in Inadequate Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Chunhong; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Spirometry is important for the differential diagnosis of dyspnea. However, some patients cannot exhale for ≥6 s to achieve the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the reliability of a new parameter that quantifies the degree of concavity in the first 3 s to define airway limitation as a surrogate for the FEV 1 /FVC. Four hundred spirometry test results were selected through complete random sampling. The new parameter, termed the AUC 3 /AT 3 , was calculated as the area under the descending limb of the expiratory flow-volume curve before the end of the first 3 s (AUC 3 ) divided by the area of the triangle before the end of the first 3 s (AT 3 ). The AUC 3 /AT 3 was compared with the FEV 1 /FVC using Pearson's correlation analysis. The level of agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of airway obstruction was analyzed using the kappa statistic. We also compared the diagnostic accuracy of the new index with that of the FEV 1 /forced expiratory volume in the first 3 s (FEV 3 ). There was a strong correlation (r = 0.88, P < .001) between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC. There was also strong agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of obstruction with kappa indices of 0.72 (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] criterion) and 0.67 (lower limit of normal criterion), and these values were greater than those obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 . The AUC 3 /AT 3 also exhibited acceptable sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. The diagnostic accuracies of the AUC 3 /AT 3 were 86.3% (GOLD criterion) and 83.8% (lower limit of normal criterion), which were greater than the 76.0 and 74.0% obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 , respectively. The AUC 3 /AT 3 can be utilized as a surrogate parameter for the FEV 1 /FVC when patients cannot complete a 6-s expiratory effort. Additionally, the

  14. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  15. Stable sheath formation in expanding magnetic field to divertor plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; Takamaru, H.; Sato, T.

    2002-01-01

    The stable sheath formation and the effects of charge exchange collisions of ions with cold neutrals for the stable presheath formation in an expanding magnetic field towards a divertor plate is studied by a one-dimensional analysis. The requirement for flow velocity of ions at a plasma-sheath boundary is more restricted than that of the uniform magnetic field, which should be greater than the ion sound speed. The difference, however, between both cases is an order of the Debye length to plasma radius, which is negligibly small. The requirement for ion flow velocity inside a quasi-neutral plasma is investigated by taking into account the effects of the charge exchange collisions. Without neutrals in the quasi-neutral plasma, the ion flow velocity at an injection point should be much greater than the ion sound speed. The unisotropic velocity distribution of injected ions with coupling the expanding magnetic field and the charge exchange collisions might mitigate this requirement. (orig.)

  16. Singular diffusionless limits of double-diffusive instabilities in magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Oleg N

    2017-09-01

    We study local instabilities of a differentially rotating viscous flow of electrically conducting incompressible fluid subject to an external azimuthal magnetic field. In the presence of the magnetic field, the hydrodynamically stable flow can demonstrate non-axisymmetric azimuthal magnetorotational instability (AMRI) both in the diffusionless case and in the double-diffusive case with viscous and ohmic dissipation. Performing stability analysis of amplitude transport equations of short-wavelength approximation, we find that the threshold of the diffusionless AMRI via the Hamilton-Hopf bifurcation is a singular limit of the thresholds of the viscous and resistive AMRI corresponding to the dissipative Hopf bifurcation and manifests itself as the Whitney umbrella singular point. A smooth transition between the two types of instabilities is possible only if the magnetic Prandtl number is equal to unity, Pm =1. At a fixed Pm ≠1, the threshold of the double-diffusive AMRI is displaced by finite distance in the parameter space with respect to the diffusionless case even in the zero dissipation limit. The complete neutral stability surface contains three Whitney umbrella singular points and two mutually orthogonal intervals of self-intersection. At these singularities, the double-diffusive system reduces to a marginally stable system which is either Hamiltonian or parity-time-symmetric.

  17. Effect of surface texture and structure on the development of stable fluvial armors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Stephane; Friedrich, Heide

    2018-04-01

    Stable fluvial armors are found in river systems under conditions of partial sediment transport and limited sediment supply, a common occurrence in nature. Stable armoring is also readily recreated in experimental flumes. Initially, this bed stabilizing phenomenon was examined for different flow discharges and solely related to surface coarsening and bedload transport reduction. The models developed suggest a specific armor composition (i.e., texture) dependent on the parent bed material and formative discharge. Following developments in topographic remote sensing, recent research suggests that armor structure is an important control on bed stability and roughness. In this paper, replicated flume runs during which digital elevation models (DEMs) were collected from both exposed and flooded gravel beds are used to interpret armoring manifestations and to assess their replicability. A range of methodologies was used for the analysis, providing information on (i) surface grain size and orientation, (ii) bed-elevation distributions, (iii) the spatial coherence of the elevations at the grain-scale, (iv) surface slope and aspect, (v) grain imbrication and (vi) the spatial variability in DEM properties. The bed-surface topography was found to be more responsive than bed-material size to changes in flow strength. Our experimental results also provide convincing evidence that gravel-beds' response to water-work during parallel degradation is unique (i.e., replicable) given the formative parameters. Based on this finding, relationships between the armors' properties and formative parameters are proposed, and are supported by adding extensive data from previous research.

  18. A Model Describing Stable Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  19. A model describing stable coherent synchrotron radiation in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.; Byrd, J.M.; Loftsdottir, A.; Venturini, M.; Abo-Bakr, M.; Feikes, J.; Holldack, K.; Kuske, P.; Wuestefeld, G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Warnock, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  20. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  1. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  2. The Control of Junction Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Charles

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of spatially-limited (i.e. localized) surface suction on unsteady laminar and turbulent junction flows was performed using hydrogen bubble flow visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV...

  3. Ajuste de las simulaciones de flujos continuados para el cálculo del Límite de Potencia Eólica; Calculation of Wind Power Limit adjusting the Continuation Power Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Santos Fuentefria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available La integración de la energía eólica en los sistemas eléctricos puede provocar problemas de estabilidad ligados fundamentalmente a la variación aleatoria del viento y que se reflejan en la tensión y la frecuencia del sistema. Por lo que conocer el Límite de Potencia Eólica (LPE que puede insertarse en la red sin que esta pierda la estabilidad es un aspecto de extrema importancia, en el cual se han realizando métodos de cálculo para encontrar dicho límite. Estos métodos se desarrollan teniendo en cuenta las restricciones del sistema en estado estacionario, en estado dinámico o ambos. En el siguiente trabajo se desarrolla un método para el cálculo de LPE teniendo en cuenta las restricciones en estado estacionario del sistema. El método propuesto se basa en un análisis de flujo continuado, complementado con el método de Producción Mínima de Potencia Activa, desarrollado en la bibliografía. Se prueba en el sistema eléctrico de la Isla de la Juventud, Cuba y se usa elsoftware libre PSAT para la realización de estos estudios.  The wind power insertion in the power system is an important issue and can create some instability problems in voltage and system frequency due to stochastic origin of wind. Know the Wind Power Limit is a very importantmatter. Existing In bibliography a few methods for calculation of wind power limit. The calculation is based in static constrains, dynamic constraints or both. In this paper is developed a method for the calculation of wind power limit using some adjust in the continuation power flow, and having into account the static constrains. The method is complemented with Minimal Power Production Criterion. The method is proved in the Isla de la Juventud Electric System. The software used in the simulations was the Power System Analysis Toolbox (PSAT.

  4. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in evaluation of human gastric blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, O.C.

    1988-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) for endoscopic mesasurement of gastric blood flow. The study gave the following results: LDF is a reliable method for continuous measurement of gastrointestinal blood perfusion. This technique can be used endoscopically for measurement of gastric blood flow in conscious man. By means of endoscopic technique, relative blood flow changes can be measured in all parts of the stomach. The recorded blood flow values usually represent blood perfusion in all layers in the gastric wall. A slight contact pressure between the measuring probe and the mucosa is necessary to obtain stable recordings. To heavy pressure provokes reduction of flow values. Angulation of the probe and moderate air insufflation do not interfere with a constant flow level. Endoscopic measurements should be performed with a recording band-width of 4 kHz, since this frequency limit reduces the disturbing signals. Within the range of flow levels recorded in patients and healthy subjects, relative blood flow changes are measured with this band-width. Endoscopic LDF is safe and easy to handle. However, peristalsis and uneasy patients may sometime provoke disturbances which render blood flow measurements impossible. Endoscopic LDF is suitable for clinical studies such as investigation of the effect of drugs on gastric blood flow and examination of local blood flow in patients with gastric diseases

  5. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in evaluation of human gastric blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunde, O.C. (Aker Sykehus, Oslo (Norway))

    1988-12-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) for endoscopic mesasurement of gastric blood flow. The study gave the following results: LDF is a reliable method for continuous measurement of gastrointestinal blood perfusion. This technique can be used endoscopically for measurement of gastric blood flow in conscious man. By means of endoscopic technique, relative blood flow changes can be measured in all parts of the stomach. The recorded blood flow values usually represent blood perfusion in all layers in the gastric wall. A slight contact pressure between the measuring probe and the mucosa is necessary to obtain stable recordings. To heavy pressure provokes reduction of flow values. Angulation of the probe and moderate air insufflation do not interfere with a constant flow level. Endoscopic measurements should be performed with a recording band-width of 4 kHz, since this frequency limit reduces the disturbing signals. Within the range of flow levels recorded in patients and healthy subjects, relative blood flow changes are measured with this band-width. Endoscopic LDF is safe and easy to handle. However, peristalsis and uneasy patients may sometime provoke disturbances which render blood flow measurements impossible. Endoscopic LDF is suitable for clinical studies such as investigation of the effect of drugs on gastric blood flow and examination of local blood flow in patients with gastric diseases. 64 refs.

  6. Respiratory depression by stable xenon in goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies with stable xenon have recently become practical. Xenon pharmacology is thus a more than academic interest. The authors studied the respiratory response of three trained goats to a mixture of 70% xenon, 30% oxygen. The relatively high xenon concentration was used because of the animals' resistance to anesthetic effects. Two other goats were treated with equivalent anesthetic concentration of nitrous oxide and halothane. The xenon-treated animals showed respiratory depression, in contrast to the stimulating effects observed with halothane and nitrous oxide. Elevation of PaCO/sub 2/ was significant and would substantially increase cRBF. Their findings emphasize the need to monitor ventilation and respond appropriately if necessary

  7. Numerical simulations and correlations on the coal -conveying gas flow in pipe for fluidized -bed coal gasification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan; Lee, Jin Wook; Kwon, Tae Wan; Kim, Gyoo Tae

    2014-01-01

    CFD modeling and simulation are made on the key flow elements, vertical, horizontal pipes and elbow pipes , used in the pneumatic coal -transport system of fluidized -bed gasification test facility. The coal- gas flow inside the flow elements are modeled by combining Reynolds -stress Averaged Navier- Stokes equations Solver (RANS), k- ε turbulence model and Discrete Phase Model (DPM) in the ANSYS Fluent code. Using the developed coal -gas flow analysis model, computations are carried out to investigate the gas flow path, the coal particle behavior and the pressure loss characteristics in flow element at various coal/ gas loading ratio and coal mass flux. The present prediction results show the coal -gas flow behavior of each flow element is changed from dilute -flow to dense -flow pattern at a specific coal/gas loading ratio where pressure loss is abruptly increased. From the numerical results, the present study also provides the limiting coal/gas loading conditions to secure stable coal feeding and the correlations for pressure losses in horizontal, vertical and elbow pipes, which can be suitable for the design guidelines of actual fluidized -bed coal gasification. Key words : Pneumatic Coal -Transport; Coal -Gas Flow, Dense Phase Flow; Dilute Phase Flow; Pressure Loss; Coal/Gas Loading Ratio; Correlation

  8. Microbiological characterization of stable resuspended dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Kováts

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Air quality in the stables is characterized by elevated level of dust and aeroallergens which are supposed to directly cause or exacerbate several respiratory disorders. The most often recognized problem is recurrent airway obstruction (RAO, previously known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. There is some indication that aeroallergens (among them endotoxins may also cause inflammation in human airways and may exceed safe levels in stables. Monitoring studies have covered mainly the determination of the concentration of respirable particles and of culturable fungi and their toxins. However, these particles do not only directly affect the respiratory system, but might act as a carrier conveying toxic contaminants and biological agents such as bacteria. In a typical, 20-horse Hungarian stable, microbial community of respirable fraction of resuspended dust has been characterized to reveal if these particles convey hazardous pathogenic bacteria, posing risk to either horses or staff. Material and Methods: Resuspended dust was sampled using a mobile instrument. The instrument contains a PARTISOL-FRM model 2000 sampler that was operated at a flow rate of 16.7 l/min and a cyclone separator which collected the particulate matter with an aerodynamic size between 1 μm and 10 μm (PM1–10 fraction. Microbial taxa were identified by culture-independent next generation sequencing (NGS of variable 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA gene regions. Results: In total, 1491 different taxa were identified, of them 384 were identified to species level, 961 to genus level. The sample was dominated by common ubiquitous soil and organic material-dwelling taxa. Conclusions: Pathogens occurred at low abundance, and were represented by mostly facultative human pathogens, with the prevalence of Staphylococcus species.

  9. Limiter surface observation by infrared techniques, AES, and SEM in the JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomay, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Maeno, M.

    1979-01-01

    The surface characteristics of molybdenum rail-type limiters in the JFT-2 tokamak have been studied by means of infrared techniques, AES, and SEM. The maximum temperature of the limiter surface during the discharge was 550 0 C which is low enough to neglect the evaporation. The limiter surface was found to be eroded uniformly by exposure to the plasma, probably by ion sputtering. Microarcing with arc spots of 0.5-20 μm diameters was observed on the limiter exposed only to stable discharges. Since the arc current of microarcing is estimated to be 1-40 A, the return current can be supplied with electron flow to the nearby area of arc spots. Microarcing as well as ion sputtering may play important roles in limiter material injection into the plasma. (orig.)

  10. Radiation-stable polyolefin compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekers, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions of olefinic polymers suitable for high energy radiation treatment. In particular, the invention relates to olefinic polymer compositions that are stable to sterilizing dosages of high energy radiation such as a gamma radiation. Stabilizers are described that include benzhydrol and benzhydrol derivatives; these stabilizers may be used alone or in combination with secondary antioxidants or synergists

  11. Monitoring of stable glaucoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Holtzer-Goor (Kim); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); H.G. Lemij (Hans); T. Plochg; E. van Sprundel (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA high workload for ophthalmologists and long waiting lists for patients challenge the organization of ophthalmic care. Tasks that require less specialized skills, like the monitoring of stable (well controlled) glaucoma patients could be substituted from ophthalmologists to other

  12. Combined coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion by computed tomography in the identification of flow-limiting stenosis - The CORE320 study: An integrated analysis of CT coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Tiago A; Kishi, Satoru; George, Richard T; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Vavere, Andrea L; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Miller, Julie M; Brinker, Jeffrey; Di Carli, Marcelo; Rybicki, Frank J; Rochitte, Carlos E; Clouse, Melvin E; Lima, João A C

    2015-01-01

    The combination of coronary CT angiography (CTA) and myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) is gaining increasing acceptance, but a standardized approach to be implemented in the clinical setting is necessary. To investigate the accuracy of a combined coronary CTA and myocardial CTP comprehensive protocol compared to coronary CTA alone, using a combination of invasive coronary angiography and single photon emission CT as reference. Three hundred eighty-one patients included in the CORE320 trial were analyzed in this study. Flow-limiting stenosis was defined as the presence of ≥50% stenosis by invasive coronary angiography with a related perfusion defect by single photon emission CT. The combined CTA + CTP definition of disease was the presence of a ≥50% stenosis with a related perfusion defect. All data sets were analyzed by 2 experienced readers, aligning anatomic findings by CTA with perfusion defects by CTP. Mean patient age was 62 ± 6 years (66% male), 27% with prior history of myocardial infarction. In a per-patient analysis, sensitivity for CTA alone was 93%, specificity was 54%, positive predictive value was 55%, negative predictive value was 93%, and overall accuracy was 69%. After combining CTA and CTP, sensitivity was 78%, specificity was 73%, negative predictive value was 64%, positive predictive value was 0.85%, and overall accuracy was 75%. In a per-vessel analysis, overall accuracy of CTA alone was 73% compared to 79% for the combination of CTA and CTP (P perfusion defect. Copyright © 2015 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. TensorFlow Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Joshua V.; Langmore, Ian; Tran, Dustin; Brevdo, Eugene; Vasudevan, Srinivas; Moore, Dave; Patton, Brian; Alemi, Alex; Hoffman, Matt; Saurous, Rif A.

    2017-01-01

    The TensorFlow Distributions library implements a vision of probability theory adapted to the modern deep-learning paradigm of end-to-end differentiable computation. Building on two basic abstractions, it offers flexible building blocks for probabilistic computation. Distributions provide fast, numerically stable methods for generating samples and computing statistics, e.g., log density. Bijectors provide composable volume-tracking transformations with automatic caching. Together these enable...

  14. Age Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Antfolk

    2017-01-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men—regardless of their age—have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes’ age preferences is resolved according to women’s preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in...

  15. Embedded Controller Design for Pig Stable Ventilation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jan Jacob

    present an early result for performing system identification for zone based climate dynamics, based on an idea of guaranteed internal flow directions. Paper 6 presents a verified stable distributed temperature controller for pig stables divided into zones. Paper 7 is an expanded journal version of paper 6......This thesis focuses on zone based climate control in pig stables and how to implement climate controllers in a new range of products. The presented controllers are based on simple models of climate dynamics and simple models of actuators. The implementation uses graphical point and click features...... from the Mathworks' range of products and automatic code generation. It is furthermore shown how to build new climate control systems based on cheap and readily available hardware and software. An early result for performing system identification for zone based climate dynamics is also presented...

  16. Toward Practical Secure Stable Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazi M. Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stable Matching (SM algorithm has been deployed in many real-world scenarios including the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP and financial applications such as matching of suppliers and consumers in capital markets. Since these applications typically involve highly sensitive information such as the underlying preference lists, their current implementations rely on trusted third parties. This paper introduces the first provably secure and scalable implementation of SM based on Yao’s garbled circuit protocol and Oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our scheme can securely compute a stable match for 8k pairs four orders of magnitude faster than the previously best known method. We achieve this by introducing a compact and efficient sub-linear size circuit. We even further decrease the computation cost by three orders of magnitude by proposing a novel technique to avoid unnecessary iterations in the SM algorithm. We evaluate our implementation for several problem sizes and plan to publish it as open-source.

  17. Towards stable acceleration in LINACS

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A D

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-stable and -reproducible high-energy particle beams with short bunches are needed in novel linear accelerators and, in particular, in the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. A passive beam phase stabilization system based on a bunch compression with a negative transfer matrix element R56 and acceleration at a positive off-crest phase is proposed. The motivation and expected advantages of the proposed scheme are outlined.

  18. Pore Structure and Limit Pressure of Gas Slippage Effect in Tight Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun You

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas slip effect is an important mechanism that the gas flow is different from liquid flow in porous media. It is generally considered that the lower the permeability in porous media is, the more severe slip effect of gas flow will be. We design and then carry out experiments with the increase of backpressure at the outlet of the core samples based on the definition of gas slip effect and in view of different levels of permeability of tight sandstone reservoir. This study inspects a limit pressure of the gas slip effect in tight sandstones and analyzes the characteristic parameter of capillary pressure curves. The experimental results indicate that gas slip effect can be eliminated when the backpressure reaches a limit pressure. When the backpressure exceeds the limit pressure, the measured gas permeability is a relatively stable value whose range is less than 3% for a given core sample. It is also found that the limit pressure increases with the decreasing in permeability and has close relation with pore structure of the core samples. The results have an important influence on correlation study on gas flow in porous medium, and are beneficial to reduce the workload of laboratory experiment.

  19. Pore structure and limit pressure of gas slippage effect in tight sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Lijun; Xue, Kunlin; Kang, Yili; Liao, Yi; Kong, Lie

    2013-01-01

    Gas slip effect is an important mechanism that the gas flow is different from liquid flow in porous media. It is generally considered that the lower the permeability in porous media is, the more severe slip effect of gas flow will be. We design and then carry out experiments with the increase of backpressure at the outlet of the core samples based on the definition of gas slip effect and in view of different levels of permeability of tight sandstone reservoir. This study inspects a limit pressure of the gas slip effect in tight sandstones and analyzes the characteristic parameter of capillary pressure curves. The experimental results indicate that gas slip effect can be eliminated when the backpressure reaches a limit pressure. When the backpressure exceeds the limit pressure, the measured gas permeability is a relatively stable value whose range is less than 3% for a given core sample. It is also found that the limit pressure increases with the decreasing in permeability and has close relation with pore structure of the core samples. The results have an important influence on correlation study on gas flow in porous medium, and are beneficial to reduce the workload of laboratory experiment.

  20. Copper stable isotopes to trace copper behavior in wetland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2014-05-20

    Wetlands are reactive zones of the landscape that can sequester metals released by industrial and agricultural activities. Copper (Cu) stable isotope ratios (δ(65)Cu) have recently been used as tracers of transport and transformation processes in polluted environments. Here, we used Cu stable isotopes to trace the behavior of Cu in a stormwater wetland receiving runoff from a vineyard catchment (Alsace, France). The Cu loads and stable isotope ratios were determined in the dissolved phase, suspended particulate matter (SPM), wetland sediments, and vegetation. The wetland retained >68% of the dissolved Cu and >92% of the SPM-bound Cu, which represented 84.4% of the total Cu in the runoff. The dissolved Cu became depleted in (65)Cu when passing through the wetland (Δ(65)Cuinlet-outlet from 0.03‰ to 0.77‰), which reflects Cu adsorption to aluminum minerals and organic matter. The δ(65)Cu values varied little in the wetland sediments (0.04 ± 0.10‰), which stored >96% of the total Cu mass within the wetland. During high-flow conditions, the Cu flowing out of the wetland became isotopically lighter, indicating the mobilization of reduced Cu(I) species from the sediments and Cu reduction within the sediments. Our results demonstrate that the Cu stable isotope ratios may help trace Cu behavior in redox-dynamic environments such as wetlands.

  1. A multi-stable isotope framework to understand eutrophication in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooddy, Daren C; Lapworth, Dan J; Bennett, Sarah A; Heaton, Tim H E; Williams, Peter J; Surridge, Ben W J

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication is a globally significant challenge facing aquatic ecosystems, associated with human induced enrichment of these ecosystems with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). However, the limited availability of inherent labels for P and N has constrained understanding of the triggers for eutrophication in natural ecosystems and appropriate targeting of management responses. This paper proposes and evaluates a new multi-stable isotope framework that offers inherent labels to track biogeochemical reactions governing both P and N in natural ecosystems. The framework couples highly novel analysis of the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate (δ(18)OPO4) with dual isotope analysis of oxygen and N within nitrate (δ(15)NNO3, δ(18)ONO3) and with stable N isotope analysis in ammonium (δ(15)NNH4). The River Beult in England is used as an exemplar system for initial evaluation of this framework. Our data demonstrate the potential to use stable isotope labels to track the input and downstream fate of nutrients from point sources, on the basis of isotopic differentiation for both P and N between river water and waste water treatment work effluent (mean difference = +1.7‰ for δ(18)OPO4; +15.5‰ for δ(15)NNH4 (under high flow); +7.3‰ for δ(18)ONO3 and +4.4‰ for δ(15)NNO3). Stable isotope data reveal nutrient inputs to the river upstream of the waste water treatment works that are consistent with partially denitrified sewage or livestock sources of nitrate (δ(15)NNO3 range = +11.5 to +13.1‰) and with agricultural sources of phosphate (δ(18)OPO4 range = +16.6 to +19.0‰). The importance of abiotic and metabolic processes for the in-river fate of N and P are also explored through the stable isotope framework. Microbial uptake of ammonium to meet metabolic demand for N is suggested by substantial enrichment of δ(15)NNH4 (by 10.2‰ over a 100 m reach) under summer low flow conditions. Whilst the concentration of both nitrate and phosphate

  2. Optimal energy growth in a stably stratified shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Sharath; Roy, Anubhab; Bale, Rahul; Iyer, Krithika; Govindarajan, Rama

    2018-02-01

    Transient growth of perturbations by a linear non-modal evolution is studied here in a stably stratified bounded Couette flow. The density stratification is linear. Classical inviscid stability theory states that a parallel shear flow is stable to exponentially growing disturbances if the Richardson number (Ri) is greater than 1/4 everywhere in the flow. Experiments and numerical simulations at higher Ri show however that algebraically growing disturbances can lead to transient amplification. The complexity of a stably stratified shear flow stems from its ability to combine this transient amplification with propagating internal gravity waves (IGWs). The optimal perturbations associated with maximum energy amplification are numerically obtained at intermediate Reynolds numbers. It is shown that in this wall-bounded flow, the three-dimensional optimal perturbations are oblique, unlike in unstratified flow. A partitioning of energy into kinetic and potential helps in understanding the exchange of energies and how it modifies the transient growth. We show that the apportionment between potential and kinetic energy depends, in an interesting manner, on the Richardson number, and on time, as the transient growth proceeds from an optimal perturbation. The oft-quoted stabilizing role of stratification is also probed in the non-diffusive limit in the context of disturbance energy amplification.

  3. A device for two-phase flow control in nanochannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Kim, Tae Song; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Twek-Dong; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Choo, Jaebm; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel method to control two-phase flow in nanochannels using regulating microchannels connected to the nanochannels. The flow rate inside a nanochannel can be regulated based on the pressure drops along the channel network. Stable flows with flow rates as low as 10-5 �?�L.min-1 (<

  4. Lagrangian structure of flows in the Chesapeake Bay: challenges and perspectives on the analysis of estuarine flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Branicki

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we discuss applications of Lagrangian techniques to study transport properties of flows generated by shallow water models of estuarine flows. We focus on the flow in the Chesapeake Bay generated by Quoddy (see Lynch and Werner, 1991, a finite-element (shallow water model adopted to the bay by Gross et al. (2001. The main goal of this analysis is to outline the potential benefits of using Lagrangian tools for both understanding transport properties of such flows, and for validating the model output and identifying model deficiencies. We argue that the currently available 2-D Lagrangian tools, including the stable and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic trajectories and techniques exploiting 2-D finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, are of limited use in the case of partially mixed estuarine flows. A further development and efficient implementation of three-dimensional Lagrangian techniques, as well as improvements in the shallow-water modelling of 3-D velocity fields, are required for reliable transport analysis in such flows. Some aspects of the 3-D trajectory structure in the Chesapeake Bay, based on the Quoddy output, are also discussed.

  5. Stable Fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), Dispersal and Governing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showler, Allan T; Osbrink, Weste L A

    2015-01-01

    Although the movement of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), has been studied, its extent and significance has been uncertain. On a local scale (fly movement occurs between host animals and resting sites to feed and mate, mainly at on-farm locations where herbivorous livestock regularly congregate. Small numbers emigrate from livestock congregation sites in search of other hosts and oviposition substrate, mostly within stable flies are active year-round in warm latitudes, cold winters in temperate areas result in substantial population and activity declines, limiting movement of any sort to warmer seasons. Long-distance dispersal (>13 km) is mainly wind-driven by weather fronts that carry stable flies from inland farm areas for up to 225 km to beaches of northwestern Florida and Lake Superior. Stable flies can reproduce for a short time each year in washed-up sea grass, but the beaches are not conducive to establishment. Such movement is passive and does not appear to be advantageous to stable fly's survival. On a regional scale, stable flies exhibit little genetic differentiation, and on the global scale, while there might be more than one "lineage", the species is nevertheless considered to be panmictic. Population expansion across much of the globe likely occurred from the late Pleistocene to the early Holocene in association with the spread of domesticated nomad livestock and particularly with more sedentary, penned livestock.

  6. Metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Jan G

    2015-03-03

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals in natural systems is often accompanied by stable isotope fractionation which can now be measured due to recent analytical advances. In consequence, a new research field has emerged over the last two decades, complementing the traditional stable isotope systems (H, C, O, N, S) with many more elements across the periodic table (Li, B, Mg, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, W, Pt, Hg, Tl, U) which are being explored and potentially applicable as novel geochemical tracers. This review presents the application of metal stable isotopes as source and process tracers in environmental studies, in particular by using mixing and Rayleigh model approaches. The most important concepts of mass-dependent and mass-independent metal stable isotope fractionation are introduced, and the extent of natural isotopic variations for different elements is compared. A particular focus lies on a discussion of processes (redox transformations, complexation, sorption, precipitation, dissolution, evaporation, diffusion, biological cycling) which are able to induce metal stable isotope fractionation in environmental systems. Additionally, the usefulness and limitations of metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry are discussed and future perspectives presented.

  7. Stable Hemiaminals: 2-Aminopyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kwiecień

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stable hemiaminals can be obtained in the one-pot reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine and nitrobenzaldehyde derivatives. Ten new hemiaminals have been obtained, six of them in crystal state. The molecular stability of these intermediates results from the presence of both electron-withdrawing nitro groups as substituents on the phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring, so no further stabilisation by intramolecular interaction is required. Hemiaminal molecules possess a tetrahedral carbon atom constituting a stereogenic centre. As the result of crystallisation in centrosymmetric space groups both enantiomers are present in the crystal structure.

  8. Organic synthesis with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daub, G.H.; Kerr, V.N.; Williams, D.L.; Whaley, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Some general considerations concerning organic synthesis with stable isotopes are presented. Illustrative examples are described and discussed. The examples include DL-2-amino-3-methyl- 13 C-butanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-valine- 13 C 3 ); methyl oleate-1- 13 C; thymine-2,6- 13 C 2 ; 2-aminoethanesulfonic- 13 C acid (taurine- 13 C); D-glucose-6- 13 C; DL-2-amino-3-methylpentanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-isoleucine- 13 C 2 ); benzidine- 15 N 2 ; and 4-ethylsulfonyl-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide- 15 N

  9. Stable agents for imaging investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofe, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns highly stable compounds useful in preparing technetium 99m based scintiscanning exploration agents. The compounds of this invention include a pertechnetate reducing agent or a solution of oxidized pertechnetate and an efficient proportion, sufficient to stabilize the compounds in the presence of oxygen and of radiolysis products, of ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of this acid. The invention also concerns a perfected process for preparing a technetium based exploration agent, consisting in codissolving the ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of such an acid and a pertechnetate reducing agent in a solution of oxidized pertechnetate [fr

  10. Age Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  11. Age Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Antfolk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men—regardless of their age—have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes’ age preferences is resolved according to women’s preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years. Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men’s age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men’s sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  12. Effects of Cooling Fluid Flow Rate on the Critical Heat Flux and Flow Stability in the Plate Fuel Type 2 MW TRIGA Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Rahardjo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The conversion program of the 2 MW TRIGA reactor in Bandung consisted of the replacement of cylindrical fuel (produced by General Atomic with plate fuel (produced by BATAN. The replacement led into the change of core cooling process from upward natural convection type to downward forced convection type, and resulted in different thermohydraulic safety criteria, such as critical heat flux (CHF limit, boiling limit, and cooling fluid flow stability. In this paper, a thermohydraulic safety analysis of the converted TRIGA reactor is presented by considering the Dynamic Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR criterion, Onset Nucleate Boiling Ratio (ONBR limit, and cooling fluid flow stability at various cooling fluid flow rate.The numerical analyses were performed using the HEATHYD program on the hottest channels of reactor core.The combination of heat transfer and fluid flow analysis were conducted for reactor operation at 2 MW with 20 fuel element bundles and four control rod bundles. Incoming fluid flow to the cooling channel was fixed at 44.5 °C temperature and 1.9970 bar pressure, and its flow rate was varied from 1.25 to 3.5 m3/h. By inputting these values, as well as the total power of fuel elements per bundle, the wall temperature distribution of the plate fuel element, cooling fluid temperature distribution, and pressure losses in the channels were obtained for the analysis of CHF limit, boiling limit, and flow stability. It was shown that no boiling occurred for the cooling fluid flow rate range of 2.4 to 3.5 m3/h, and even at the cooling fluid flow rate of 1.25 m3/h where some bubbles occurred, the DNBR was higher than the critical limit (more than 23 while the flow stability criterion in some channels were slightly less than 1 (unstable. At the cooling fluid flow rate of 1.4 m3/h, however, the flow became stable in all channel. Low flow hydrology: a review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smakhtin, VU

    2001-01-10

    Full Text Available prolonged dry weather’. This definition does not make a clear distinction between low flows and droughts. Low flows is a seasonal phenomenon, and an integral component of a flow regime of any river. Drought, on the other hand, is a natural event...-flow generating mechanisms is rather limited. At the same time, identification of relative importance of various low-flow generation mechanisms and factors should ideally precede any low-flow analysis and also form an integral part of developing plans...

  13. Stable isotope tracers and exercise physiology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Brook, Matthew S; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2017-05-01

    Stable isotope tracers have been invaluable assets in physiological research for over 80 years. The application of substrate-specific stable isotope tracers has permitted exquisite insight into amino acid, fatty-acid and carbohydrate metabolic regulation (i.e. incorporation, flux, and oxidation, in a tissue-specific and whole-body fashion) in health, disease and response to acute and chronic exercise. Yet, despite many breakthroughs, there are limitations to 'substrate-specific' stable isotope tracers, which limit physiological insight, e.g. the need for intravenous infusions and restriction to short-term studies (hours) in controlled laboratory settings. In recent years significant interest has developed in alternative stable isotope tracer techniques that overcome these limitations, in particular deuterium oxide (D 2 O or heavy water). The unique properties of this tracer mean that through oral administration, the turnover and flux through a number of different substrates (muscle proteins, lipids, glucose, DNA (satellite cells)) can be monitored simultaneously and flexibly (hours/weeks/months) without the need for restrictive experimental control. This makes it uniquely suited for the study of 'real world' human exercise physiology (amongst many other applications). Moreover, using D 2 O permits evaluation of turnover of plasma and muscle proteins (e.g. dynamic proteomics) in addition to metabolomics (e.g. fluxomics) to seek molecular underpinnings, e.g. of exercise adaptation. Here, we provide insight into the role of stable isotope tracers, from substrate-specific to novel D 2 O approaches, in facilitating our understanding of metabolism. Further novel potential applications of stable isotope tracers are also discussed in the context of integration with the snowballing field of 'omic' technologies. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  14. Stable cosmology in chameleon bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji; Oliosi, Michele; Watanabe, Yota

    2018-02-01

    The recently proposed chameleonic extension of bigravity theory, by including a scalar field dependence in the graviton potential, avoids several fine-tunings found to be necessary in usual massive bigravity. In particular it ensures that the Higuchi bound is satisfied at all scales, that no Vainshtein mechanism is needed to satisfy Solar System experiments, and that the strong coupling scale is always above the scale of cosmological interest all the way up to the early Universe. This paper extends the previous work by presenting a stable example of cosmology in the chameleon bigravity model. We find a set of initial conditions and parameters such that the derived stability conditions on general flat Friedmann background are satisfied at all times. The evolution goes through radiation-dominated, matter-dominated, and de Sitter eras. We argue that the parameter space allowing for such a stable evolution may be large enough to encompass an observationally viable evolution. We also argue that our model satisfies all known constraints due to gravitational wave observations so far and thus can be considered as a unique testing ground of gravitational wave phenomenologies in bimetric theories of gravity.

  15. Critical heat flux of forced flow boiling in a narrow one-side heated rectangular flow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Limin; Iguchi, Tadashi; Kureta, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Hajime.

    1997-08-01

    The present work deals with the critical heat flux (CHF) under subcooled flow boiling in a narrow one-side uniformly heated rectangular flow channel. The range of interest of parameters such as pressure, flow velocity and subcooling is around 0.1 MPa, 5-15 ms -1 and 50degC, respectively. The rectangular flow channel used is 50 mm long, 12 mm in width and 0.2 to 3 mm in height. Test conditions were selected by combination of the following parameters: Gap=0.2-3.0 mm (D hy =0.3934-4.8 mm); flow length, 50.0 mm; water mass flux, 4.94-14.82 Mgm -2 s -1 (water flow velocity, 5-15 ms -1 ); exit pressure, 0.1 MPa; inlet temperature, 50degC, inlet coolant subcooling, 50degC. Over 40 CHF stable data points were obtained. CHF increased with the gap and flow velocity in a non-linear fashion. HTC increased with flow velocity and decreasing gap. Based on the experimental results, an empirical correlation was developed, indicating the dependence of CHF on the gap and flow velocity. All of data points predicted within ±18% error band for the present experimental data. On the other hand, another similitude-based correlation was also developed, indicating the dependence of Boiling number (Bo) on Reynolds number (Re) and the variable of Gap/La, where La is a characteristic length known as Laplace capillary constant. For the limited present experimental data, all of data points were predicted within ±16%. (author)

  16. Target-like pigmentation after minipunch grafting in stable vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelee Bisen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment for vitiligo has been ever evolving. Each surgical modality has its own benefits and limitations. Miniature punch grafting is the most extensively performed surgery, which gives good results in stable vitiligo. Herein we report an unusual type of repigmentation observed after minipunch grafting in a patient of stable vitiligo, which resembled target-like lesions with a "perigraft halo" surrounding individual grafts. Such pigment spread occurred despite the use of 0.5 mm larger graft from the donor site.

  17. Remarks on search methods for stable, massive, elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, Martin L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper was presented at the 69th birthday celebration of Professor Eugene Commins, honoring his research achievements. These remarks are about the experimental techniques used in the search for new stable, massive particles, particles at least as massive as the electron. A variety of experimental methods such as accelerator experiments, cosmic ray studies, searches for halo particles in the galaxy and searches for exotic particles in bulk matter are described. A summary is presented of the measured limits on the existence of new stable, massive particle

  18. Stable-channel design in gravel-bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, George A.

    1981-07-01

    Regime relations are derived for more or less straight, stable, symmetrical, wide reaches of coarse gravel-bed rivers having low rates of bedload transport at bankfull flow conditions. The relations are combined to express channel width as a function of median size of bed pavement, energy slope and bankfull water discharge, for sediment of constant specific gravity. This stable-channel design equation, together with three others of similar form in current usage, is tested for accuracy of channel width prediction with 60 field data sets from appropriate gravel-bed river reaches. The minimum mean deviation of predicted width, from the actual width prescribed in each data set, was 160%, with a standard deviation of 430%. A dimensionless stability index, defined in terms of the above parameters, is deduced and shown to be remarkably constant in value at stable reach sections on particular gravel-bed rivers, and for rivers within a single watershed. Employment of this index will result in a substantial improvement in the accuracy of stable-channel design. The range of application of the stability index method is increased by a combination with an empirical equation that predicts median bed-pavement size, from given flow conditions over gravel-bed material having a known initial sediment size distribution. An example of the suggested design procedure, following from this combination, is given for an existing unstable river-diversion channel. Some recommendations are made concerning the identification of stable river reaches and the determination of the requisite sediment parameters for design.

  19. Flow visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Merzkirch, Wolfgang

    1974-01-01

    Flow Visualization describes the most widely used methods for visualizing flows. Flow visualization evaluates certain properties of a flow field directly accessible to visual perception. Organized into five chapters, this book first presents the methods that create a visible flow pattern that could be investigated by visual inspection, such as simple dye and density-sensitive visualization methods. It then deals with the application of electron beams and streaming birefringence. Optical methods for compressible flows, hydraulic analogy, and high-speed photography are discussed in other cha

  1. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  2. Stable Isotope Group 1984 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    The work of the group in 1984 is described and includes studies in isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation. Geothermal studies have decreased compared to other years, but major data summaries were made for Wairakei and Ngawha. The hydrology of Whakarewarewa and Rotorua is being elucidated using water isotopes. Models of the subsurface flows at Kawerau and Ngawha are being made to relate fluid to mineral isotope compositions. A study of the δ 13 C and δ 34 S compositions of New Zealand oils has been started. Groups of oils of related origin are being defined, and compositions will be compared with those of potential source rocks. A method was developed for isotope analysis of sulphur in rocks. The isotopic composition of water is being used to identify and characterise groundwater aquifers in the Wairarapa and at Poverty Bay. Stable carbon isotopes have been used to identify food sources for invertebrates, and to show biochemical pathways in lactation by cows. The geochronology group is involved in major studies in Antarctica, using U-Pb, Rb-Sr and K-Ar methods. Rocks from North Victoria Land, Marie Byrd Land and the USARP mountains are being compared with possible correlatives in New Zealand and Argentina. Strontium isotope data is being applied to the origin of magmas in several regions of New Zealand. The K-Ar data is being stored on computer files. Fission track measurements are being applied to unravel uplift histories in Westland and Taranaki

  3. Stable rotating dipole solitons in nonlocal media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Skupin, Stefan; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2006-01-01

    We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons.......We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons....

  4. Flow-injection amperometric glucose biosensors based on graphene/Nafion hybrid electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Bong Gill, E-mail: k1811@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 Program), KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jinkyu, E-mail: JINQ@paran.com [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegidong, Dongdamoongu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoon Sik, E-mail: khs2004@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegidong, Dongdamoongu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, HoSeok, E-mail: phs0727@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seochon-dong, Giheung-gu, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Amperometric biosensors based on graphene hybrids showed the fast, sensitive, and stable amperometric responses in the flow injection system for automatically monitoring glucose. Display Omitted Highlights: > Flow-injection amperometric glucose biosensors were fabricated using reduced graphene oxide/Nafion hybrids. > The electrochemical kinetics of biosensors were comprehensively investigated by analysing electron transfer rate, charge transfer resistance, and ion diffusion coefficient, respectively. > The biosensors exhibited the fast, sensitive, and stable amperometric responses in the flow injection system for detecting glucose. - Abstract: In this research, we demonstrated the fabrication of flow-injection amperometric glucose biosensors based on RGO/Nafion hybrids. The nanohybridization of the reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by Nafion provided the fast electron transfer (ET) for the sensitive amperometric biosensor platforms. The ET rate (k{sub s}) and the charge transfer resistance (R{sub CT}) of GOx-RGO/Nafion hybrids were evaluated to verify the accelerated ET. Moreover, hybrid biosensors revealed a quasi-reversible and surface controlled process, as confirmed by the low peak-to-peak ({Delta}E{sub p}) and linear relations between I{sub p} and scan rate ({nu}). Hybrid biosensors showed the fast response time of {approx}3 s, the sensitivity of 3.8 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, the limit of detection of 170 {mu}M, and the linear detection range of 2-20 mM for the flow-injection amperometric detection of glucose. Furthermore, interference effect of oxidizable species such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) on the performance of hybrid biosensors was prevented at the operating potential of -0.20 V even under the flow injection mode. Therefore, the fast, sensitive, and stable amperometric responses of hybrid biosensors in the flow injection system make it highly suitable for automatically monitoring glucose.

  5. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  6. Periodicity of the stable isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, J C A

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all stable (non-radioactive) isotopes are formally interrelated as the products of systematically adding alpha particles to four elementary units. The region of stability against radioactive decay is shown to obey a general trend based on number theory and contains the periodic law of the elements as a special case. This general law restricts the number of what may be considered as natural elements to 100 and is based on a proton:neutron ratio that matches the golden ratio, characteristic of biological and crystal growth structures. Different forms of the periodic table inferred at other proton:neutron ratios indicate that the electronic configuration of atoms is variable and may be a function of environmental pressure. Cosmic consequences of this postulate are examined. (author)

  7. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.; Yukalova, E. P.; Henry, J.-Y.; Cobb, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  8. Theory of stable allocations II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish Royal Academy awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics to Lloyd Shapley and Alvin Roth, for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design. These two American researchers worked independently from each other, combining basic theory and empirical investigations. Through their experiments and practical design they generated a flourishing field of research and improved the performance of many markets. Shapley provided the fundamental theoretical contribution to this field of research, whereas Roth, a professor at the Harvard University in Boston, developed and upgraded these theoretical investigations by applying them to the American market of medical doctors. Namely, their research helps explain the market processes at work, for instance, when doctors are assigned to hospitals, students to schools and human organs for transplant to recipients.

  9. Study of Near-Stall Flow Behavior in a Modern Transonic Fan with Composite Sweep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Shin, Hyoun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Detailed flow behavior in a modern transonic fan with a composite sweep is investigated in this paper. Both unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods are applied to investigate the flow field over a wide operating range. The calculated flow fields are compared with the data from an array of high-frequency response pressure transducers embedded in the fan casing. The current study shows that a relatively fine computational grid is required to resolve the flow field adequately and to calculate the pressure rise across the fan correctly. The calculated flow field shows detailed flow structure near the fan rotor tip region. Due to the introduction of composite sweep toward the rotor tip, the flow structure at the rotor tip is much more stable compared to that of the conventional blade design. The passage shock stays very close to the leading edge at the rotor tip even at the throttle limit. On the other hand, the passage shock becomes stronger and detaches earlier from the blade passage at the radius where the blade sweep is in the opposite direction. The interaction between the tip clearance vortex and the passage shock becomes intense as the fan operates toward the stall limit, and tip clearance vortex breakdown occurs at near-stall operation. URANS calculates the time-averaged flow field fairly well. Details of measured RMS static pressure are not calculated with sufficient accuracy with URANS. On the other hand, LES calculates details of the measured unsteady flow features in the current transonic fan with composite sweep fairly well and reveals the flow mechanism behind the measured unsteady flow field.

  10. Monitoring Subsurface Fluid Flow Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers: Another Tool Potentially Available for Subsurface Fluid Flow Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorocarbon Tracers (PFTs) Complement stable Isotopes and Geochemistry for Verifying, Assessing or Modeling Fluid Flow. Geochemistry, Isotopes and PFT’s complement Geophysics to monitor and verify plume movement, leakage to shallow aquifers or surface

  11. Thermodilution-determined Internal Jugular Venous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Widmer, Mario; Hilty, Matthias P

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases ~20% during whole body exercise although a Kety-Schmidt-determined CBF is reported to remain stable; a discrepancy that could reflect evaluation of arterial vs. internal jugular venous (IJV) flow and/or that CBF is influenced by posture. Here we test...

  12. Picosecond pulse generated supercontinuum as a stable seed for OPCPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Lukáš; Batysta, František; Hříbek, Petr; Novák, Jakub; Hubka, Zbyněk; Green, Jonathan T; Antipenkov, Roman; Boge, Robert; Naylon, Jack A; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2017-02-15

    We present a stable supercontinuum (SC) generated in a bulk YAG crystal, pumped by 3 ps chirped pulses at 1030 nm. The SC is generated in a loose focus geometry in a 13 cm long YAG crystal, allowing for stable and robust single-filament generation. The SC energy stability exceeds that of the pump laser by almost a factor of 3. Additionally, we show that the SC spectrum has long-term stability and that the SC is coherent and compressible by compressing the portions of SC spectra close to the corresponding Fourier limit. This makes the picosecond-pulse-driven SC a suitable stable seed for OPCPA amplifiers.

  13. Stable solitons of quadratic ginzburg-landau equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasovan; Malomed; Mihalache; Mazilu; Lederer

    2000-07-01

    We present a physical model based on coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations that supports stable temporal solitary-wave pulses. The system consists of two parallel-coupled cores, one having a quadratic nonlinearity, the other one being effectively linear. The former core is active, with bandwidth-limited amplification built into it, while the latter core has only losses. Parameters of the model can be easily selected so that the zero background is stable. The model has nongeneric exact analytical solutions in the form of solitary pulses ("dissipative solitons"). Direct numerical simulations, using these exact solutions as initial configurations, show that they are unstable; however, the evolution initiated by the exact unstable solitons ends up with nontrivial stable localized pulses, which are very robust attractors. Direct simulations also demonstrate that the presence of group-velocity mismatch (walkoff) between the two harmonics in the active core makes the pulses move at a constant velocity, but does not destabilize them.

  14. Turbulence Spreading into Linearly Stable Zone and Transport Scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2003-01-01

    We study the simplest problem of turbulence spreading corresponding to the spatio-temporal propagation of a patch of turbulence from a region where it is locally excited to a region of weaker excitation, or even local damping. A single model equation for the local turbulence intensity I(x, t) includes the effects of local linear growth and damping, spatially local nonlinear coupling to dissipation and spatial scattering of turbulence energy induced by nonlinear coupling. In the absence of dissipation, the front propagation into the linearly stable zone occurs with the property of rapid progression at small t, followed by slower subdiffusive progression at late times. The turbulence radial spreading into the linearly stable zone reduces the turbulent intensity in the linearly unstable zone, and introduces an additional dependence on the rho* is always equal to rho i/a to the turbulent intensity and the transport scaling. These are in broad, semi-quantitative agreements with a number of global gyrokinetic simulation results with zonal flows and without zonal flows. The front propagation stops when the radial flux of fluctuation energy from the linearly unstable region is balanced by local dissipation in the linearly stable region

  15. A highly stable microchannel heat sink for convective boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chun Ting; Pan Chin

    2009-01-01

    To develop a highly stable two-phase microchannel heat sink, we experimented with convective boiling in diverging, parallel microchannels with different distributions of laser-etched artificial nucleation sites. Each microchannel had a mean hydraulic diameter of 120 µm. The two-phase flow visualization and the magnitudes of pressure drop and inlet temperature oscillations under boiling conditions demonstrated clearly the merits of using artificial nucleation sites to further stabilize the flow boiling in diverging, parallel microchannels. The stability map showed the plane of subcooling number versus phase change number. It illustrated that diverging, parallel microchannels with artificial nucleation cavities have a much wider stable region than parallel microchannels with uniform cross-sections or diverging, parallel microchannels without artificial nucleation cavities. In addition, the results revealed that the design with cavities distributed uniformly along the downstream half of the channel presented the best stability performance among the three distributions of nucleation sites. This particular design can be regarded as a highly stable microchannel heat sink for convective boiling

  16. An experimental study of the stable and unstable operation of an LPP gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuka, Sulabh Kumar

    A study was performed to better understand the stable operation of an LPP combustor and formulate a mechanism behind the unstable operation. A unique combustor facility was developed at the University of Michigan that incorporates the latest injector developed by GE Aircraft Engines and enables operation at elevated pressures with preheated air at flow-rates reflective of actual conditions. The large optical access has enabled the use of a multitude of state-of-the-art laser diagnostics such as PIV and PLIF, and has shed invaluable light not only into the GE injector specifically but also into gas turbine combustors in general. Results from Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) have illustrated the role of velocity, instantaneous vortices, and key recirculation zones that are all critical to the combustor's operation. It was found that considerable differences exist between the iso-thermal and reacting flows, and between the instantaneous and mean flow fields. To image the flame, Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of the formaldehyde radical was successfully utilized for the first time in a Jet-A flame. Parameters regarding the flame's location and structure have been obtained that assist in interpreting the velocity results. These results have also shown that some of the fuel injected from the main fuel injectors actually reacts in the diffusion flame of the pilot. The unstable operation of the combustor was studied in depth to obtain the stability limits of the combustor, behavior of the flame dynamics, and frequencies of the oscillations. Results from simultaneous pressure and high speed chemiluminescence images have shown that the low frequency dynamics can be characterized as flashback oscillations. The results have also shown that the stability of the combustor can be explained by simple and well established premixed flame stability mechanisms. This study has allowed the development of a model that describes the instability mechanism and accurately

  17. Income trusts and limited partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toews, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    This author provided a conceptual overview of income trusts and limited partnerships that are designed to pass operating cash flow directly to investors without the imposition of corporate taxes, discussed the evolution of the market, the mechanism used to price income funds, past and present performance of the sector, and made some predictions concerning the sector's future performance. 13 figs

  18. Insights into Wilson's Warbler migration from analyses of hydrogen stable-isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey F. Kelly; Viorel Atudorei; Zachary D. Sharp; Deborah M. Finch

    2002-01-01

    Our ability to link the breeding locations of individual passerines to migration stopover sites and wintering locations is limited. Stable isotopes of hydrogen contained in bird feathers have recently shown potential in this regard. We measured hydrogen stable-isotope ratios (deltaD) of feathers from breeding, migrating, and wintering Wilson's Warblers. Analyses...

  19. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  20. Quantifying global international migration flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Guy J; Sander, Nikola

    2014-03-28

    Widely available data on the number of people living outside of their country of birth do not adequately capture contemporary intensities and patterns of global migration flows. We present data on bilateral flows between 196 countries from 1990 through 2010 that provide a comprehensive view of international migration flows. Our data suggest a stable intensity of global 5-year migration flows at ~0.6% of world population since 1995. In addition, the results aid the interpretation of trends and patterns of migration flows to and from individual countries by placing them in a regional or global context. We estimate the largest movements to occur between South and West Asia, from Latin to North America, and within Africa.

  1. Simulation of gas compressible flow by free surface water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altafini, C.R.; Silva Ferreira, R.T. da

    1981-01-01

    The analogy between the water flow with a free surface and the compressible fluid flow, commonly called hydraulic analogy, is analyzed and its limitations are identified. The water table is the equipment used for this simulation, which allows the quatitative analysis of subsonic and supersonic flow with a low cost apparatus. The hydraulic analogy is applied to subsonic flow around circular cylinders and supersonic flow around cones. The results are compared with available theoretical and experimental data and a good agreement is achieved. (Author) [pt

  2. Stable Treemaps via Local Moves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondag, Max; Speckmann, Bettina; Verbeek, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Treemaps are a popular tool to visualize hierarchical data: items are represented by nested rectangles and the area of each rectangle corresponds to the data being visualized for this item. The visual quality of a treemap is commonly measured via the aspect ratio of the rectangles. If the data changes, then a second important quality criterion is the stability of the treemap: how much does the treemap change as the data changes. We present a novel stable treemapping algorithm that has very high visual quality. Whereas existing treemapping algorithms generally recompute the treemap every time the input changes, our algorithm changes the layout of the treemap using only local modifications. This approach not only gives us direct control over stability, but it also allows us to use a larger set of possible layouts, thus provably resulting in treemaps of higher visual quality compared to existing algorithms. We further prove that we can reach all possible treemap layouts using only our local modifications. Furthermore, we introduce a new measure for stability that better captures the relative positions of rectangles. We finally show via experiments on real-world data that our algorithm outperforms existing treemapping algorithms also in practice on either visual quality and/or stability. Our algorithm scores high on stability regardless of whether we use an existing stability measure or our new measure.

  3. Limits of mass-transfer in parallel plate dialyzers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolev, S.D.; Kolev, Spas D.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    The absolute limits of mass transfer across the membrane in a parallel-plate dialyser set by the flow pattern in both channels were determined on the basis of a mathematical model assuming axially dispersed plug flow. The lower limit corresponds to the case of mass transfer under laminar flow

  4. Towards the conceptualisation of flow in corporate financial reporting theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette Rehwinkel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Developments in science, technology and sophisticated interconnected social networks increase the speed and volatility of the flow of economic-related energies, such as financial and intellectual capital. These developments require an information theory on corporate financial reporting that is stable at a fundamental level and focused on the disclosure of those systemic attributes that are pivotal to the sustenance of business entities operating in the global economy, or in economies with similar traits. The limited success in attaining stability is caused by, among others, the application of diverse, restricted and even opposing perspectives, resulting in random theoretical development, often unaligned with economic reality. The main aim of the article is to investigate whether the introduction of an underlying concept, principle or theorem, founded on the phenomenon of flow, to general- purpose corporate financial reporting theory could contribute to rendering stable guidance for coherent theoretical development while simultaneously enhancing alignment with the current global economy. As the study was conducted at conceptual level, a qualitative, transdisciplinary theoretical research methodology was applied by taking into account related basic concepts of philosophy, corporate financial reporting theory, economics, management accounting, physics and complexity. The study suggests that the conceptualisation of flow in general-purpose corporate financial reporting theory could contribute to rendering stable guidance for further coherent theoretical development, and improve on the alignment of the theory with the dynamics of the current global economy. This finding creates the opportunity to explore a variety of new reporting approaches from a scientific perspective, which could aid to enhance the disclosure of useful financial information.

  5. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  6. Environmental flow assessments in estuaries based on an integrated multi-objective method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An integrated multi-objective method for environmental flow assessments was developed that considered variability of potential habitats as a critical factor in determining how ecosystems respond to hydrological alterations. Responses of habitat area, and the magnitude of those responses as influenced by salinity and water depth, were established and assessed according to fluctuations in river discharge and tidal currents. The requirements of typical migratory species during pivotal life-stage seasons (e.g., reproduction and juvenile growth and natural flow variations were integrated into the flow-needs assessment. Critical environmental flows for a typical species were defined based on two primary objectives: (1 high level of habitat area and (2 low variability of habitat area. After integrating the water requirements for various species with the maximum acceptable discharge boundary, appropriate temporal limits of environmental flows for ecosystems were recommended. The method was applied in the Yellow River estuary in eastern Shandong province, China. Our results show that, while recommended environmental flows established with variability of potential habitats in mind may not necessarily benefit short-term survival of a typical resident organism on a limited temporal or spatial scale, they may encourage long-term, stable biodiversity and ecosystem health. Thus, short-term ecosystem losses may be compensated by significant long-term gains.

  7. Thermo-solutal and kinetic modes of stable dendritic growth with different symmetries of crystalline anisotropy in the presence of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V.; Galenko, Peter K.; Toropova, Lyubov V.

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by important applications in materials science and geophysics, we consider the steady-state growth of anisotropic needle-like dendrites in undercooled binary mixtures with a forced convective flow. We analyse the stable mode of dendritic evolution in the case of small anisotropies of growth kinetics and surface energy for arbitrary Péclet numbers and n-fold symmetry of dendritic crystals. On the basis of solvability and stability theories, we formulate a selection criterion giving a stable combination between dendrite tip diameter and tip velocity. A set of nonlinear equations consisting of the solvability criterion and undercooling balance is solved analytically for the tip velocity V and tip diameter ρ of dendrites with n-fold symmetry in the absence of convective flow. The case of convective heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a binary mixture occurring as a result of intensive flows in the liquid phase is detailed. A selection criterion that describes such solidification conditions is derived. The theory under consideration comprises previously considered theoretical approaches and results as limiting cases. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  8. Population Games, Stable Games, and Passivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Fox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The class of “stable games”, introduced by Hofbauer and Sandholm in 2009, has the attractive property of admitting global convergence to equilibria under many evolutionary dynamics. We show that stable games can be identified as a special case of the feedback-system-theoretic notion of a “passive” dynamical system. Motivated by this observation, we develop a notion of passivity for evolutionary dynamics that complements the definition of the class of stable games. Since interconnections of passive dynamical systems exhibit stable behavior, we can make conclusions about passive evolutionary dynamics coupled with stable games. We show how established evolutionary dynamics qualify as passive dynamical systems. Moreover, we exploit the flexibility of the definition of passive dynamical systems to analyze generalizations of stable games and evolutionary dynamics that include forecasting heuristics as well as certain games with memory.

  9. Limit, breakthrough and prosperity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru

    1973-01-01

    It is pointed out that the flow toward serious crises is in progress with regard to energy and industrial problems. Technical and industrial preparation and countermeasure to the flow are proposed, and the existence of a certain new world attainable on the assumption that the countermeasure is successful is described. The relation between oil output and the increasing demand for energy is pointed out as a subject matter of the crisis. The contribution of oil energy to total energy, after the output turns to decreasing process, decreases by 177.87x10 6 tons (converted to coal at the rate 6848 kcal/kg) per year at maximum. Converted to the GNP of the world, this becomes (425 dollar/ton x 177.87 x 10 6 ton=75.6 x 10 9 dollar). This fluctuation width in a year must be compensated by the change of industrial structure and energy supplying means. The countermeasure and preparation are proposed from the viewpoints of the energy and the industrial structure in which nuclear power generation plays important role. The largest production on the earth limited by energy consumption and the temperature balance on the earth is investigated, and the perspective in the future is given. (Yamamoto, Y.)

  10. Flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liles, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Internal boundaries in multiphase flow greatly complicate fluid-dynamic and heat-transfer descriptions. Different flow regimes or topological configurations can have radically dissimilar interfacial and wall mass, momentum, and energy exchanges. To model the flow dynamics properly requires estimates of these rates. In this paper the common flow regimes for gas-liquid systems are defined and the techniques used to estimate the extent of a particular regime are described. Also, the current computer-code procedures are delineated and introduce a potentially better method is introduced

  11. Introducing Stable Radicals into Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2017-09-27

    Ever since their discovery, stable organic radicals have received considerable attention from chemists because of their unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. Currently, one of the most appealing challenges for the chemical community is to develop sophisticated artificial molecular machines that can do work by consuming external energy, after the manner of motor proteins. In this context, radical-pairing interactions are important in addressing the challenge: they not only provide supramolecular assistance in the synthesis of molecular machines but also open the door to developing multifunctional systems relying on the various properties of the radical species. In this Outlook, by taking the radical cationic state of 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY •+ ) as an example, we highlight our research on the art and science of introducing radical-pairing interactions into functional systems, from prototypical molecular switches to complex molecular machines, followed by a discussion of the (i) limitations of the current systems and (ii) future research directions for designing BIPY •+ -based molecular machines with useful functions.

  12. Chemically Stable Lipids for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishchenko, Andrii; Peng, Lingling; Zinovev, Egor; Vlasov, Alexey; Lee, Sung Chang; Kuklin, Alexander; Mishin, Alexey; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Zhang, Qinghai; Cherezov, Vadim (MIPT); (USC); (Scripps)

    2017-05-01

    The lipidic cubic phase (LCP) has been widely recognized as a promising membrane-mimicking matrix for biophysical studies of membrane proteins and their crystallization in a lipidic environment. Application of this material to a wide variety of membrane proteins, however, is hindered due to a limited number of available host lipids, mostly monoacylglycerols (MAGs). Here, we designed, synthesized, and characterized a series of chemically stable lipids resistant to hydrolysis, with properties complementary to the widely used MAGs. In order to assess their potential to serve as host lipids for crystallization, we characterized the phase properties and lattice parameters of mesophases made of two most promising lipids at a variety of different conditions by polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Both lipids showed remarkable chemical stability and an extended LCP region in the phase diagram covering a wide range of temperatures down to 4 °C. One of these lipids has been used for crystallization and structure determination of a prototypical membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin at 4 and 20 °C.

  13. Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.grolmusova@geology.sk [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Rapčanová, Anna [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Michalko, Juraj; Čech, Peter [State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Veis, Pavel [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-10-15

    Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values. These data were compared to previously published δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking. - Highlights: • This study deals with stable isotope analyses of fingernails from Slovak volunteers. • δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values of vegetarian and omnivore fingernails were compared. • Influence of sex, diet and smoking was studied.

  14. Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, James C [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

  15. Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana; Rapčanová, Anna; Michalko, Juraj; Čech, Peter; Veis, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for δ 13 C and δ 15 N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in 13 C and 15 N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both δ 13 C and δ 15 N values. These data were compared to previously published δ 13 C and δ 15 N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking. - Highlights: • This study deals with stable isotope analyses of fingernails from Slovak volunteers. • δ 13 C and δ 15 N values of vegetarian and omnivore fingernails were compared. • Influence of sex, diet and smoking was studied

  16. Experimental study on low pressure flow instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Wu Shaorong; Bo Jinhai; Zhang Youjie

    1997-05-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The flow behavior for a wide range of inlet subcooling, in which the flow undergoes from single phase to two phase, is described in a natural circulation system at low pressure (p = 0.1, 0.24 MPa). Several kinds of flow instability, e.g. subcooled boiling instability, subcooled boiling induced flashing instability, pure flashing instability as well as flashing coupled density wave instability and high frequency flow oscillation, are investigated. The mechanism of flashing and flashing concerned flow instability, which has never been studied well in this field, is especially interpreted. The experimental results show that, firstly, for a low pressure natural circulation system the two phase flow is unstable in most of inlet subcooling conditions, the two phase stable flow can only be reached at very low inlet subcooling; secondly, at high inlet subcooling the flow instability is dominated by subcooled boiling in the heated section, and at middle inlet subcooling is dominated by void flashing in the adiabatic long riser; thirdly, in two phase stable flow region the condition for boiling out of the core, namely, single phase flow in the heated section, two phase flow in the riser due to vapor flashing, can be realized. The experimental results are very important for the design and accident analysis of the vessel and swimming pool type natural circulation nuclear heating reactor. (7 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)

  17. Nonlinear density waves in a marginally stable gravitating disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchagin, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of short nonlinear density waves in a disk at the stability limit is studied for arbitrary values of the radial wave number k/sub r/. For waves with wave numbers that do not lie at the minimum of the dispersion curve, the behavior of the amplitude is described by a nonlinear parabolic equation; however, stationary soliton solutions cannot exist in such a system since there is no dispersion spreading of a packet. For wave numbers lying at the minimum of the dispersion curve, soliton structures with determined amplitude are possible. In stable gravitating disks and in a disk at the stability limit, two physically different types of soliton can exist

  18. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in a cylindrical, swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. L.; Celik, Z. Z.; Cantwell, B. J.; Lopez, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of a steady, vortical flow in a cylindrical container with one rotating endwall has been experimentally examined to gain insight into the process of vortex breakdowwn. The dynamics of the flow are governed by the Reynolds number (Re) and the aspect ratio of the cylinder. Re is given by Omega R(sup 2)/nu, where Omega is the speed of rotation of the endwall, R is the cylinder radius, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid filling the cylinder. The aspect ratio is H/R, where H is the height of the cylinder. Numerical simulation studies disagree whether or not the steady breakdown is stable beyond a critical Reynolds number, Re(sub c). Previous experimental researches have considered the steady and unsteady flows near Re(sub c), but have not explored the stability of the steady breakdown structures beyond this value. In this investigation, laser induced fluorescence was utilized to observe both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown at a fixed H/R of 2.5 with Re varying around Re(sub c). When the Re of a steady flow was slowly increased beyond Re(sub c), the breakdown structure remained steady even though unsteadiness was possible. In addition, a number of hysteresis events involving the oscillation periods of the unsteady flow were noted. The results show that both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown occur for a limited range of Re above Re(sub c). Also, with increasing Re, complex flow transformations take place that alter the period at which the unsteady flow oscillates.

  19. Simulation of free-space optical guiding structure based on colliding gas flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, D; Palastro, J P; Chen, Y-H; Gordon, D F; Helle, M H; Ting, A

    2015-11-01

    Preformed plasma channels with parabolic radial density profiles enable the extended and stable optical guiding of high-intensity laser pulses. High-voltage discharge capillaries, commonly used for channel formation, have limited guiding length and opaque walls, complicating the diagnosis of the plasma within. This paper proposes a free-space gas channel produced by the collision of several gas flows. The collision of the gas flows forms an on-axis density depression surrounded by higher density walls. By offsetting the flows, we demonstrated the creation of what we believe is a novel vortex structure that exhibits a long-lived parabolic density profile. Once ionized, the resulting plasma density profile has a near-parabolic dependence appropriate for guiding. We then performed detailed two-dimensional (2D) fluid dynamics simulations to examine the properties and stability of the guiding structure.

  20. Stable nuclear transformation of Eudorina elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerche Kai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental step in evolution was the transition from unicellular to differentiated, multicellular organisms. Volvocine algae have been used for several decades as a model lineage to investigate the evolutionary aspects of multicellularity and cellular differentiation. There are two well-studied volvocine species, a unicellular alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and a multicellular alga with differentiated cell types (Volvox carteri. Species with intermediate characteristics also exist, which blur the boundaries between unicellularity and differentiated multicellularity. These species include the globular alga Eudorina elegans, which is composed of 16–32 cells. However, detailed molecular analyses of E. elegans require genetic manipulation. Unfortunately, genetic engineering has not yet been established for Eudorina, and only limited DNA and/or protein sequence information is available. Results Here, we describe the stable nuclear transformation of E. elegans by particle bombardment using both a chimeric selectable marker and reporter genes from different heterologous sources. Transgenic algae resistant to paromomycin were achieved using the aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII gene of Streptomyces rimosus, an actinobacterium, under the control of an artificial promoter consisting of two V. carteri promoters in tandem. Transformants exhibited an increase in resistance to paromomycin by up to 333-fold. Co-transformation with non-selectable plasmids was achieved with a rate of 50 - 100%. The luciferase (gluc gene from the marine copepod Gaussia princeps, which previously was engineered to match the codon usage of C. reinhardtii, was used as a reporter gene. The expression of gluc was mediated by promoters from C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Heterologous heat shock promoters induced an increase in luciferase activity (up to 600-fold at elevated temperatures. Long-term stability and both constitutive and

  1. Numerical simulations of the IPPE target geometry flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Akshay; Kakarantzas, Sotiris; Bernardi, Davide; Micciche, Gioacchino; Massaut, Vincent; Knaepen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We performed numerical simulation of flow over IPPE geometry using turbulence models in FLUENT. ► Stable free surface profile well within the required design limits was predicted by the models. ► Velocity profiles across the liquid jet and jet thickness different for different models. ► There were some 3D effects noticeable for the velocity profiles but the predicted jet thickness similar to 2D models. ► TKE predicted by different models close to each other and compare will with published data. -- Abstract: A high speed water and liquid lithium (Li) flow is computed over the IPPE geometry to evaluate the performance of different turbulence models in 2D and 3D simulations. Results reported are the thickness of the liquid jet, irregularities in the surface, transient phenomena at the wall which can affect fluid surface and effect of the variation in bulk velocity on these quantities. All models show good near wall resolution of the boundary layer and expected profiles for the free surface flow. Predicted turbulent kinetic energy compare well with published data. Fluctuations of the flow surface at the control location (center of the curved section) and elsewhere are well within 1 mm for all models. However it was observed that the predictions are strongly dependent on the model used. Overall, the predictions of RANS models are close to each other whereas predictions of laminar simulations are close to those obtained with LES models

  2. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. I - Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1981-01-01

    Newtonian flow theory for unsteady flow at very high Mach numbers is completed by the addition of a centrifugal force correction to the impact pressures. The correction term is the unsteady counterpart of Busemann's centrifugal force correction to impact pressures in steady flow. For airfoils of arbitary shape, exact formulas for the unsteady pressure and stiffness and damping-in-pitch derivatives are obtained in closed form, which require only numerical quadratures of terms involving the airfoil shape. They are applicable to airfoils of arbitrary thickness having sharp or blunt leading edges. For wedges and thin airfoils these formulas are greatly simplified, and it is proved that the pitching motions of thin airfoils of convex shape and of wedges of arbitrary thickness are always dynamically stable according to Newton-Busemann theory. Leading-edge bluntness is shown to have a favorable effect on the dynamic stability; on the other hand, airfoils of concave shape tend toward dynamic instability over a range of axis positions if the surface curvature exceeds a certain limit. As a byproduct, it is also shown that a pressure formula recently given by Barron and Mandl for unsteady Newtonian flow over a pitching power-law shaped airfoil is erroneous and that their conclusion regarding the effect of pivot position on the dynamic stability is misleading.

  3. Numerical simulations of the IPPE target geometry flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Akshay, E-mail: akshayprakash@gmail.com [University Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Kakarantzas, Sotiris [University of Thessaly, Volos (Greece); Bernardi, Davide; Micciche, Gioacchino [EURATOM-ENEA, Brasimore (Italy); Massaut, Vincent [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Knaepen, Bernard [University Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We performed numerical simulation of flow over IPPE geometry using turbulence models in FLUENT. ► Stable free surface profile well within the required design limits was predicted by the models. ► Velocity profiles across the liquid jet and jet thickness different for different models. ► There were some 3D effects noticeable for the velocity profiles but the predicted jet thickness similar to 2D models. ► TKE predicted by different models close to each other and compare will with published data. -- Abstract: A high speed water and liquid lithium (Li) flow is computed over the IPPE geometry to evaluate the performance of different turbulence models in 2D and 3D simulations. Results reported are the thickness of the liquid jet, irregularities in the surface, transient phenomena at the wall which can affect fluid surface and effect of the variation in bulk velocity on these quantities. All models show good near wall resolution of the boundary layer and expected profiles for the free surface flow. Predicted turbulent kinetic energy compare well with published data. Fluctuations of the flow surface at the control location (center of the curved section) and elsewhere are well within 1 mm for all models. However it was observed that the predictions are strongly dependent on the model used. Overall, the predictions of RANS models are close to each other whereas predictions of laminar simulations are close to those obtained with LES models.

  4. Gas phase thermal diffusion of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of stable isotopes at Mound Facility is reviewed from a historical perspective. The historical development of thermal diffusion from a laboratory process to a separation facility that handles all the noble gases is described. In addition, elementary thermal diffusion theory and elementary cascade theory are presented along with a brief review of the uses of stable isotopes

  5. physico-chemical and stable isotopes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper details the mineralogical, chemical and stable isotope abundances of calcrete in the Letlhakeng fossil valley. The stable isotope abundances (O and C) of calcretes yielded some values which were tested against the nature of the calcretes – pedogenic or groundwater type. The Kgalagadi (Kalahari) is a vast ...

  6. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled:

    Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow

    H.A.M. Sterk

    Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015

    Summary

    The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs

  7. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  8. Stable isotopes and biomarkers in microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of biomarkers in combination with stable isotope analysis is a new approach in microbial ecology and a number of papers on a variety of subjects have appeared. We will first discuss the techniques for analysing stable isotopes in biomarkers, primarily gas chromatography-combustion-isotope

  9. Stable Agrobacterium -mediated transformation of the halophytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the halophytic Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Yan-Lin Sun, Soon-Kwan Hong. Abstract. In this study, an efficient procedure for stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Leymus chinensis (Trin.) was established. Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105, harboring a ...

  10. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  11. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beg Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective : The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Design : Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods : Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naοve asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. Results : All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54±28.01 vs 22.00±6.69; P =0.0001 but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54±28.01 vs 84.78±39.32 P = 0.0285.The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. Conclusion : There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects.

  12. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Mohammed F. S.; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A.; Abba, Abdullah A.; Habib, Syed S.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naïve asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. RESULTS: All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54±28.01 vs 22.00±6.69; P=0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54±28.01 vs 84.78±39.32 P=0.0285).The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV1/FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. CONCLUSION: There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. PMID:19561927

  13. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beg Mohammed F S; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A; Habib, Syed S; Abba, Abdullah A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naive asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 22.00 + -6.69; P =0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 84.78+ - 39.32 P 0.0285). The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. (author)

  14. Structure of acid-stable carmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yoko; Sato, Kyoko; Aoki, Hiromitsu; Ichi, Takahito; Koda, Takatoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-02-01

    Acid-stable carmine has recently been distributed in the U.S. market because of its good acid stability, but it is not permitted in Japan. We analyzed and determined the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine, in order to establish an analytical method for it. Carminic acid was transformed into a different type of pigment, named acid-stable carmine, through amination when heated in ammonia solution. The features of the structure were clarified using a model compound, purpurin, in which the orientation of hydroxyl groups on the A ring of the anthraquinone skeleton is the same as that of carminic acid. By spectroscopic means and the synthesis of acid-stable carmine and purpurin derivatives, the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine was established as 4-aminocarminic acid, a novel compound.

  15. Stable Fly, (L., Dispersal and Governing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T. Showler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the movement of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L., has been studied, its extent and significance has been uncertain. On a local scale (13 km is mainly wind-driven by weather fronts that carry stable flies from inland farm areas for up to 225 km to beaches of northwestern Florida and Lake Superior. Stable flies can reproduce for a short time each year in washed-up sea grass, but the beaches are not conducive to establishment. Such movement is passive and does not appear to be advantageous to stable fly's survival. On a regional scale, stable flies exhibit little genetic differentiation, and on the global scale, while there might be more than one “lineage”, the species is nevertheless considered to be panmictic. Population expansion across much of the globe likely occurred from the late Pleistocene to the early Holocene in association with the spread of domesticated nomad livestock and particularly with more sedentary, penned livestock.

  16. Quantification of long-term wastewater fluxes at the surface water/groundwater-interface: an integrative model perspective using stable isotopes and acesulfame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, I; Barth, J A C; Bol, R; Schulz, M; Ternes, T A; Schüth, C; van Geldern, R

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of acesulfame to trace wastewater-related surface water fluxes from streams into the hyporheic and riparian zones over long-term periods was investigated. The transport behavior of acesulfame was compared with the transport of water stable isotopes (δ(18)O or δ(2)H). A calibrated model based on a joint inversion of temperature, acesulfame, and piezometric pressure heads was employed in a model validation using data sets of acesulfame and water stable isotopes collected over 5months in a stream and groundwater. The spatial distribution of fresh water within the groundwater resulting from surface water infiltration was estimated by computing groundwater ages and compared with the predicted acesulfame plume obtained after 153day simulation time. Both, surface water ratios calculated with a mixing equation from water stable isotopes and simulated acesulfame mass fluxes, were investigated for their ability to estimate the contribution of wastewater-related surface water inflow within groundwater. The results of this study point to limitations for the application of acesulfame to trace surface water-groundwater interactions properly. Acesulfame completely missed the wastewater-related surface water volumes that still remained in the hyporheic zone under stream-gaining conditions. In contrast, under stream-losing conditions, which developed after periods of stagnating hydraulic exchange, acesulfame based predictions lead to an overestimation of the surface water volume of up to 25% in the riparian zone. If slow seepage velocities prevail a proportion of acesulfame might be stored in smaller pores, while when released under fast flowing water conditions it will travel further downstream with the groundwater flow direction. Therefore, under such conditions acesulfame can be a less-ideal tracer in the hyporheic and riparian zones and additional monitoring with other environmental tracers such as water stable isotopes is highly recommended. © 2013 Elsevier

  17. Effect of inspiratory flow rate on the efficiency of carbon dioxide removal at tidal volumes below instrumental dead space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Edward H; Keszler, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The ability to ventilate babies with tidal volumes (V T s) below dead space has been demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro, though it appears to violate classical respiratory physiology. We hypothesised that this phenomenon is made possible by rapid flow of gas that penetrates the dead space allowing fresh gas to reach the lungs and that the magnitude of this phenomenon is affected by flow rate or how rapidly air flows through the endotracheal tube. We conducted two bench experiments. First, we measured the time needed for complete CO 2 washout from a test lung to assess how fixed V T but different inflation flow rates affect ventilation. For the second experiment, we infused carbon dioxide at a low rate into the test lung, varied the inflation flow rate and adjusted the V T to maintain stable end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO 2 ). At all tested V T s, lower flow rate increased the time it took for CO 2 to washout from the test lung. The effect was most pronounced for V T s below dead space. The CO 2 steady-state experiment showed that ETCO 2 increased when the flow rate decreased. Ventilating with a slower flow rate required a nearly 20% increase in V T for the same effective alveolar ventilation. Inflation flow rate affects the efficiency of CO 2 removal with low V T . Our results are relevant for providers using volume-controlled ventilation or other modes that use low inflation flow rates because the V T required for normocapnia will be higher than published values that were generated using pressure-limited ventilation modes with high inflation flows. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Stable blood lubricated hydrodynamic journal bearing with magnetic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanoski, S B; Belawski, H; Horvath, D; Smith, W A; Golding, L R

    1998-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Foundation's Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS) is distinguished by the use of a special hydrodynamic journal bearing to support the rotating assembly of the blood pump. In a permanently implanted blood pump, this bearing's characteristics of long life and high reliability are of paramount importance. In addition, this bearing's inherent self-pumping flow and the axial through flow caused by an imposed end-to-end pressure difference provides good washing, thus guarding against deposition. The basic computer analysis and preliminary testing results of this bearing were previously presented. This article reports the ongoing studies (both analytic and in vitro tests) on this innovative bearing as a component of the IVAS in general, with particular emphasis on its stable operating characteristics and reliability. The absence of vibration attributable to hydrodynamic instabilities related to the thick fluid film are both calculated and demonstrated during testing. A stable operating center of the rotor is shown to be inherent under magnetic side loads and resulting hydrodynamic bearing forces. A low shear as a result of large fluid-film thicknesses has been calculated, and low hemolysis has been shown by in vitro testing. Several unique design features of the bearing are believed to be responsible for this high level of performance.

  19. Stable nocturnal spectral characteristics over a vineyard (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueger, John H.; Alfieri, joesph G.; Hipps, Lawrence E.; Kustas, William P.; Neale, Christopher M.

    2016-10-01

    Vineyards are agricultural surfaces that present a unique structural perturbation to the mean wind flow. As part of the Grape Remote Sensing Atmospheric Profiling and Evapotranspiration Experiment (GRAPEX) a 10-m profile tower of three sonic anemometers at 2, 3.75 and 8 m above ground level in in a mature vineyard having was deployed to measure high frequency diurnal variations of 3-dimensional velocity components (u, v, w) and temperature (T) throughout the growing season. Previous work has been published involving eddy covariance measurements in vineyards but these mostly represented convective daytime unstable conditions. Significantly less has been published about turbulence in vineyards during stable nocturnal periods. Hence, in this study we focused on the nocturnal stable periods under clear skies and relatively light winds typical of the northern portion of California's Central Valley. Our objective was to characterize and evaluate turbulent exchange processes in the layer near the top of a vine canopy during nocturnal periods which are often characterized by weak and intermittent turbulence. Spectra, cospectra and coherence plots were evaluated for nocturnal periods. The spectra suggest there are periods of intermittent turbulence with features indicative of local and regional scale processes. Additionally the impact of the vine structure and spacing on slow meandering flows enhance the decomposition of organized turbulent eddies resulting in intricate mechanical turbulence generated by intermittent eddies that are rapidly decomposed as eddies interact with the vine structure and spacing. Preliminary results will be discussed that provide insight into turbulence characteristics at several heights above a canopy vineyard as affected by vine structure and spacing, wind speed, direction and stable conditions.

  20. [Expression of human Jagged-1 protein on eukaryotic cells and establishment of stable transfectant cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Yu; Yan, Hua; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2010-08-01

    Jagged-1 protein is one of the ligands belonging to Notch signaling pathway. Notch signaling pathway is one of the major signaling pathways mediated by contact between cells and plays an important role to regulate the process of proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells in the hematopoietic microenvironment. To study the biological effect after the combination of receptor and ligand in Notch signaling pathway and the mechanism of Notch signaling pathway in bone marrow stromal cells mediated-drug resistance, a NIH-3T3 cell line over-expressing Jagged-1 protein was constructed for further research purposes. A full coding region of Jagged-1 gene was cloned and inserted into eukaryotic expression plasmid to construct pEGFP-IRES2-Jagged-1 eukaryotic expression vector, then transfected into NIH-3T3 cell line, a mammalian cells. As a result Western blot analysis confirmed that the transfectant NIH-3T3 cells highly expressed Jagged-1 protein and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the NIH-3T3-pEGFP-IRES2-Jagged-1 cell line over-expressed Jagged-1 protein was monoclonal after screened by selective medium and limiting dilution analysis. It is concluded that the pEGFP-IRES2-Jagged-1 eukaryotic expression vector and a stable transfectant monoclonal NIH-3T3 cell line are successfully established. The construction of the stable transfectant monoclonal NIH-3T3 cell line which overexpressed Jagged-1 protein, provides the conditions to further study the mechanism of the bone marrow stromal cell-mediated drug resistance and to discover the new drug targets.

  1. England and Wales: Stable fertility and pronounced social status differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Sigle-Rushton

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available For nearly three decades, the total fertility rate in England and Wales has remained high relative to other European countries, and stable at about 1.7 births per woman. In this chapter, we examine trends in both period and cohort fertility throughout the twentieth century, and demonstrate some important differences across demographic and social groups in the timing and quantum of fertility. Breaking with a market-oriented and laissez-faire approach to work and family issues, the last 10 years have seen the introduction of new social and economic policies aimed at providing greater support to families with children. However, the effect of the changes is likely to be limited to families on the lower end of the income scale. Rather than facilitating work and parenthood, some policies create incentives for a traditional gendered division of labour. Fertility appears to have remained stable despite, rather than because of, government actions.

  2. Testbed for High-Acuity Imaging and Stable Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, James

    This proposal from MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL) accompanies the NASA/APRA proposal enti-tled THAI-SPICE: Testbed for High-Acuity Imaging - Stable Photometry and Image-Motion Compensa-tion Experiment (submitted by Eliot Young, Southwest Research Institute). The goal of the THAI-SPICE project is to demonstrate three technologies that will help low-cost balloon-borne telescopes achieve diffraction-limited imaging: stable pointing, passive thermal stabilization and in-flight monitoring of the wave front error. This MIT LL proposal supplies a key element of the pointing stabilization component of THAI-SPICE: an electronic camera based on an orthogonaltransfer charge-coupled device (OTCCD). OTCCD cameras have been demonstrated with charge-transfer efficiencies >0.99999, noise of 90%. In addition to supplying a camera with an OTCCD detector, MIT LL will help with integration and testing of the OTCCD with the THAI-SPICE payload’s guide camera.

  3. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman; Nor Afiqah Harun; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Md Suhaimi Elias; Salmah Moosa

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalization of food markets and the relative ease with which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents, means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are use as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  4. Oxidatively stable polyaniline:polyacid electrodes for electrochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ju-Won; Ma, Yuguang; Mike, Jared F; Shao, Lin; Balbuena, Perla B; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L

    2013-06-28

    Conjugated polymers, such as polyaniline, have been widely explored as sensors, electrodes, and conductive fillers. As an electrode material in electrochemical energy storage systems, polyaniline can be subject to irreversible oxidation that reduces cycle life and electrode capacity, thus, limiting its widespread application. Here we present a simple route to produce and prepare polyaniline-based electrodes that are oxidatively stable up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li(+). The route uses a polyacid to stabilize the fully oxidized pernigraniline salt form of polyaniline, which is normally highly unstable as a homopolymer. The result is an organic electrode of exceptionally high capacity, energy density, power density, and cycle life. We demonstrate that the polyaniline:polyacid electrode stores 230 mA h g(-1) of polyaniline for over 800 cycles, far surpassing homopolymer polyaniline under equivalent conditions. This approach provides a highly stable, electrochemically reversible replacement for conventional polyaniline.

  5. T-regulatory cells in chronic rejection versus stable grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wedaie, Fatima; Farid, Eman; Tabbara, Khaled; El-Agroudy, Amgad E; Al-Ghareeb, Sumaya M

    2015-04-01

    Studying regulatory T cells in kidney allograft acceptance versus chronic rejection may help in the understanding of more mechanisms of immune tolerance and, in the future, may enable clinicians to induce immune tolerance and decrease the use of immunosuppressive drugs. The aim of the current study was to evaluate regulatory T cells in kidney transplant patients with stable graft versus transplant with biopsy-proven chronic rejection. The 3 groups that were studied included: kidney transplanted patients with no rejection episodes (n = 43); transplanted patients with biopsy-proven renal rejection (n = 27); and healthy age-matched nontransplanted individuals as controls (n = 42).The percentage of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) in blood was determined by flow cytometry. The regulatory T cell percentage was significantly lower in chronic rejection patients than control or stable graft groups. No significant difference was observed in regulatory T cell percentage between the stable graft and control groups. In the stable graft group, patients on rapamycin had a significantly higher regulatory T cell percentage than patients on cyclosporine. No effect of donor type, infection, or duration after transplant was observed on regulatory T cell percentage. The results of the current study are consistent with previous studies addressing the function of regulatory T cells in inducing immunotolerance after kidney transplant. Considering the established role of regulatory T cells in graft maintenance and our observation of high regulatory T cell percentage in patients receiving rapamycin than cyclosporine, we recommend including rapamycin when possible in immunosuppressive protocols. The findings from the current study on the chronic rejection group support ongoing research of having treatment with regulatory T cells, which may constitute a novel, efficient antirejection therapy in the future.

  6. Stable Organic Neutral Diradical via Reversible Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenpin; Quanz, Henrik; Burghaus, Olaf; Hofmann, Jonas; Logemann, Christian; Beeck, Sebastian; Schreiner, Peter R; Wegner, Hermann A

    2017-12-27

    We report the formation of a stable neutral diboron diradical simply by coordination of an aromatic dinitrogen compound to an ortho-phenyldiborane. This process is reversible upon addition of pyridine. The diradical species is stable above 200 °C. Computations are consistent with an open-shell triplet diradical with a very small open-shell singlet-triplet energy gap that is indicative of the electronic disjointness of the two radical sites. This opens a new way of generating stable radicals with fascinating electronic properties useful for a large variety of applications.

  7. Chemical-looping combustion in a reverse-flow fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Lu; Bollas, George M.

    2016-01-01

    A reverse-flow fixed bed reactor concept for CLC (chemical-looping combustion) is explored. The limitations of conventional fixed bed reactors, as applied to CLC, are overcome by reversing the gas flow direction periodically to enhance the mixing characteristics of the bed, thus improving oxygen carrier utilization and energy efficiency with respect to power generation. The reverse-flow reactor is simulated by a dusty-gas model and compared with an equivalent fixed bed reactor without flow reversal. Dynamic optimization is used to calculate conditions at which each reactor operates at maximum energy efficiency. Several cases studies illustrate the benefits of reverse-flow operation for the CLC with CuO and NiO oxygen carriers and methane and syngas fuels. The results show that periodic reversal of the flow during reduction improves the contact between the fuel and unconverted oxygen carrier, enabling the system to suppress unwanted catalytic reactions and axial temperature and conversion gradients. The operational scheme presented reduces the fluctuations of temperature during oxidation and increases the high-temperature heat produced by the process. CLC in a reverse-flow reactor has the potential to achieve higher energy efficiency than conventional fixed bed CLC reactors, when integrated with a downstream gas turbine of a combined cycle power plant. - Highlights: • Reverse-flow fixed bed CLC reactors for combined cycle power systems. • Dynamic optimization tunes operation of batch and transient CLC systems. • The reverse-flow CLC system provides stable turbine-ready gas stream. • Reverse-flow CLC fixed bed reactor has superior CO 2 capture and thermal efficiency.

  8. Towards effective and stable probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarullina, D R; Damshkaln, L G; Bruslik, N L; Konovalova, O A; Ilinskaya, O N; Lozinsky, V I

    2015-01-01

    -MDT, Moscow, Russia).Starch swelling and dissolution was studied in simulated colonic fluid (SCF), prepared according to [3] and in distilled water (pH = 6.0) as control. Amylase from Aspergillus oryzae (A8220, Sigma) was added to the solutions to study the influence of amylase. The formulation form was examined visually during 14 h incubation time.Fluorescence microscopy images were obtained with a Leica DM6000B (Germany) fluorescent microscope using Leica FW4000 software.L. plantarum 8PA3 loaded in SPS were placed either in HCl solution (pH 2), or in 2% oxgall bile solution, or in 0.85% NaCl solution. Viability was tested after 2, 4 and 6 h incubation at 37°C by plating diluted aliquots onto MRS agar with subsequent counting of bacterial colony forming units (CFU). In addition, viability was determined using LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit L-7012 (Molecular Probes, Invitrogen) as described elsewhere [4]. Fluorescence in the stained samples was estimated with BD FACS Canto II (USA) flow cytometer or fluorescent microscope.Nitric oxide (NO) production was assessed with DAF-FM DA and DAA fluorescent dyes as described earlier [4]. Each experiment was performed in triplicate. In the present study we studied the probiotic composition comprising of SPS and bacteria L. plantarum 8PA3. We used AFM to confirm effective fixation of the cells to carbohydrate. The compositions were found to swell quickly (~5 min) in aqueous solutions either containing amylase, or not. Tested starch formulations disintegrated during the first 5-10 min of incubation in amylase solutions whereas in amylase-free probes dissolution was less intensive (after ~30 min). Amylolysis of starch excipients was less pronounced in aqueous amylase solution than in SCF, supplemented with amylase. None of 19 studied Lactobacillus strains hydrolyzed SPS when growing on MRS agar supplemented with it. The amount of viable L. plantarum 8PA3 cells formulated with SPS was high and did not change when stored for 6

  9. Highly scalable multichannel mesh electronics for stable chronic brain electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian-Ming; Hong, Guosong; Viveros, Robert D; Zhou, Tao; Lieber, Charles M

    2017-11-21

    Implantable electrical probes have led to advances in neuroscience, brain-machine interfaces, and treatment of neurological diseases, yet they remain limited in several key aspects. Ideally, an electrical probe should be capable of recording from large numbers of neurons across multiple local circuits and, importantly, allow stable tracking of the evolution of these neurons over the entire course of study. Silicon probes based on microfabrication can yield large-scale, high-density recording but face challenges of chronic gliosis and instability due to mechanical and structural mismatch with the brain. Ultraflexible mesh electronics, on the other hand, have demonstrated negligible chronic immune response and stable long-term brain monitoring at single-neuron level, although, to date, it has been limited to 16 channels. Here, we present a scalable scheme for highly multiplexed mesh electronics probes to bridge the gap between scalability and flexibility, where 32 to 128 channels per probe were implemented while the crucial brain-like structure and mechanics were maintained. Combining this mesh design with multisite injection, we demonstrate stable 128-channel local field potential and single-unit recordings from multiple brain regions in awake restrained mice over 4 mo. In addition, the newly integrated mesh is used to validate stable chronic recordings in freely behaving mice. This scalable scheme for mesh electronics together with demonstrated long-term stability represent important progress toward the realization of ideal implantable electrical probes allowing for mapping and tracking single-neuron level circuit changes associated with learning, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  10. Stable isotope fractionation in response to variable fluid residence time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogeochemical processes governing groundwater quantity and quality are often inferred from fluid samples that are the flux-weighted average of a heterogeneous system. This connection has been demonstrated for solutes subject to transport and equilibrium constraints, in which the steady state concentration - discharge relationship is cast in terms of the choice of expression for residence time distribution (Maher, 2011). Here, we examine the extent to which the spatial correlation of the permeability field, which governs the fluid residence time distribution, exerts a principle control on the partitioning of stable isotopes between reactant and product species during heterogeneous reactions in groundwater systems. We demonstrate this relationship using numerical simulations of δ53Cr fractionation due to abiotic CrO42- reduction by Fe2+, implemented in the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. The chemically homogeneous redox reaction generates Cr3+ with an isotope ratio distinct from the reactant pool, and in turn this product species precipitates as a mineral phase Cr(OH)3(s) through a non-fractionating reaction. The corresponding chromate δ53Cr enrichment across a homogeneous domain varies from a maximum value set by the kinetic fractionation factor (αk) at high mean fluid residence times, to a value reaction-limited to transport-limited regimes. For physically heterogeneous flow fields, the transition in isotopic fractionation from a reaction-limited to a transport-limited regime becomes variable, and falls between the upper and lower bounds set by the homogeneous simulations at slow and fast precipitation rates, respectively. Our results show that while minimal variation occurs in the steady-state isotopic profile of the reactant species (δ53Cr of CrO42-), the combined effects of the precipitation rate and the heterogeneous structure of the porous media lead to a wide range in the steady state isotopic composition of the product species (δ53Cr of Cr3

  11. Limit cycles in quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Patrick

    2015-04-27

    In this thesis we investigate Limit Cycles in Quantum Systems. Limit cycles are a renormalization group (RG) topology. When degrees of freedom are integrated out, the coupling constants flow periodically in a closed curve. The presence of limit cycles is restricted by the necessary condition of discrete scale invariance. A signature of discrete scale invariance and limit cycles is log-periodic behavior. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the study of limit cycles with the similarity renormalization group (SRG). Limit cycles are mainly investigated within conventional renormalization group frameworks, where degrees of freedom, which are larger than a given cutoff, are integrated out. In contrast, in the SRG potentials are unitarily transformed and thereby obtain a band-diagonal structure. The width of the band structure can be regarded as an effective cutoff. We investigate the appearance of limit cycles in the SRG evolution. Our aim is to extract signatures as well as the scaling factor of the limit cycle. We consider the 1/R{sup 2}-potential in a two-body system and a three-body system with large scattering lengths. Both systems display a limit cycle. Besides the frequently used kinetic energy generator we apply the exponential and the inverse generator. In the second part of this thesis, Limit Cycles at Finite Density, we examine the pole structure of the scattering amplitude for distinguishable fermions at zero temperature in the medium. Unequal masses and a filled Fermi sphere for each fermion species are considered. We focus on negative scattering lengths and the unitary limit. The properties of the three-body spectrum in the medium and implications for the phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases are discussed.

  12. Magnetic shielding of a limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevnov, N.N.; Stepanov, S.B.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodal, D.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Localization of plasma interaction with material surfaces in a separate chamber, from where the escape of impurities is hardly realized, i.e. application of magnetic divertors or pump limiters, is the main technique for reduction of the impurity content in a plasma. In this case, the production of a divertor configuration requires a considerable power consumption and results in a less effective utilization of the magnetic field volume. Utilization of a pump limiter, for example the ICL-type, under tokamak-reactor conditions would result in the extremely high and forbidden local heat loadings onto the limiter surface. Moreover, the magnetically-shielded pump limiter (MSL) was proposed to combine positive properties of the divertor and the pump limiter. The idea of magnetic shielding is to locate the winding with current inside the limiter head so that the field lines of the resultant magnetic field do not intercept the limiter surface. In this case the plasma flows around the limiter leading edges and penetrates into the space under the limiter. The shielding magnetic field can be directed either counter the toroidal field or counter the poloidal one of a tokamak, dependent on the concrete diagram of the device. Such a limiter has a number of advantages: -opportunity to control over the particle and impurity recycling without practical influence upon the plasma column geometry, - perturbation of a plasma column magnetic configuration from the side of such a limiter is less than that from the side of the divertor coils. The main deficiency is the necessity to locate active windings inside the discharge chamber. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  13. Intraoperative Cardiac Ultrasound Examination Using Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse

    2013-01-01

    cyclic beat-to-beat flow patterns were seen in the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery of each patient, but these patterns varied between patients. Early systolic retrograde flow filling the aortic sinuses was seen in the ascending aorta as well as early systolic retrograde flow in the pulmonary artery....... In diastole, stable vortices in aortic sinuses of the ascending aorta created central antegrade flow. A stable vortex in the right atrium was seen during the entire heart cycle. The measurements were compared with estimates obtained intraoperatively with conventional spectral Doppler US using...

  14. Stable Isotope Group 1983 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1984-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and related fields, and mass spectrometer instrumentation, during 1983, is described

  15. Stable Isotope Group 1982 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1983-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences during 1982, in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation, is described

  16. Bartolome Island, Galapagos Stable Oxygen Calibration Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Galapagos Coral Stable Oxygen Calibration Data. Sites: Bartolome Island: 0 deg, 17'S, 90 deg 33' W. Champion Island: 1 deg, 15'S, 90 deg, 05' W. Urvina Bay (Isabela...

  17. Allan Hills Stable Water Isotopes, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes stable water isotope values at 10 m resolution along an approximately 5 km transect through the main icefield of the Allan Hills Blue Ice...

  18. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  19. Tannaka duality and stable infinity-categories

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanari, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the notion of fine tannakian infinity-categories and prove Tannaka duality results for symmetric monoidal stable infinity-categories over a field of characteristic zero. We also discuss several examples.

  20. On Stable Marriages and Greedy Matchings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manne, Fredrik; Naim, Md; Lerring, Hakon; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2016-12-11

    Research on stable marriage problems has a long and mathematically rigorous history, while that of exploiting greedy matchings in combinatorial scientific computing is a younger and less developed research field. In this paper we consider the relationships between these two areas. In particular we show that several problems related to computing greedy matchings can be formulated as stable marriage problems and as a consequence several recently proposed algorithms for computing greedy matchings are in fact special cases of well known algorithms for the stable marriage problem. However, in terms of implementations and practical scalable solutions on modern hardware, the greedy matching community has made considerable progress. We show that due to the strong relationship between these two fields many of these results are also applicable for solving stable marriage problems.

  1. The Reactivity of Stable Metallacyclobutenes and Vinylcarbenes

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Ryan Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 1. Historical Development of Stable Metallacyclobutenes Fred Tebbe and co-workers synthesized the first stable metallacyclobutene complexes in the late 1970’s by treatment of an intermediate titanium methylene species – later popularized as the “Tebbe reagent” – with acetylenes. Robert Grubbs at Caltech further studied this system, using it to detail a degenerate metathesis reaction and to isolate a metallacyclobutane complex – which was implicated in the emerging field of alkene meta...

  2. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Efficiency of osmotic pipe flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaning, Louise Sejling; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    on the relative magnitude of radial diffusion and advection as well as the ratio of the osmotic velocity to pumping velocity, in very good agreement with experiments and with no adjustable parameters. Our analysis provides criteria that are useful for optimizing osmotic flow processes in, e.g., water purification......We present experiments and theory for flows of sugar or salt solutions in cylindrical tubes with semipermeable walls (hollow fiber membranes) immersed in water, quantifying the strength of the osmotic driving force in relation to the dimensionless parameters that specify the system. The pumping...... efficiency of these flows is limited by the presence of “unstirred” concentration boundary layers near the tube walls, and our primary aim is to understand and quantify these layers and their effect on the flow. We measure the outlet flow rate Qout while varying the inlet flow rate Q*, concentration c...

  4. Establishment and Identification of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Lines with Stable Expression of Soluble CD40 Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Hua-wei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines with stable expression of soluble CD40 ligands (sCD40L. Methods: Recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L, enzyme digestion and sequencing identification were obtained by cloning sCD40L coding sequences into eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP from carrier pDC316-sCD40 containing sCD40L. CHO cells were transfected by electroporation, followed by screening of resistant clones with G418, after which monoclones were obtained by limited dilution assay and multiply cultured. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope were applied to observe the expression of green fluorescent protein, while sCD40L expression was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from aspects of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein, respectively. CHO-sCD40L was cultured together with MDA-MB-231 cells to compare the expression changes of surface molecule fatty acid synthase (Fas by flow cytometer and observe the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells after Fas activated antibodies (CH-11 were added 24 h later. Results: Plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L was successfully established, and cell lines with stable expression of sCD40L were obtained with cloned culture after CHO cell transfection, which was named as B11. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope showed >90% expression of green fluorescent protein, while PCR, RT-PCR and ELISA suggested integration of sCD40L genes into cell genome DNA, transcription of sCD40L mRNA and sCD40L protein expression being (4.5±2.1 ng/mL in the supernatant of cell culture, respectively. After co-culture of B11 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the surface Fas expression of MDA-MB-231 cells was increased from (3±1.02 % to (34.8±8.75%, while the apoptosis rate 24 h after addition of CH11 from (5.4±1.32% to (20.7±5.24%, and the differences

  5. Flow assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, O.C.; Dong, C. [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Cambridge, MA (United States); Elshahawi, H. [Shell Exploration and Production Company, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    This study emphasized the need for considering flow assurance for producing oil and gas, particularly in high cost areas such as deepwater. Phase behaviour studies, sticking propensities, and interfacial interactions have been investigated in many laboratory studies using asphaltenes, wax, hydrates, organic and inorganic scale, and even diamondoids. However, the spatial variation of reservoir fluids has received little attention, despite the fact that it is one of the most important factors affecting flow assurance. This issue was difficult to address in a systematic way in the past because of cost constraints. Today, reservoir fluid variation and flow assurance can be considered at the outset of a project given the technological advances in downhole fluid analysis. This study described the origins of reservoir fluid compositional variations and the controversies surrounding them. It also described the indispensable chemical analytical technology. The impact of these reservoir fluid compositional variations on flow assurance considerations was also discussed. A methodology that accounts for these variations at the outset in flow assurance evaluation was also presented.

  6. Non-linear Yang-Mills instantons from strings are π-stable D-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enger, H.; Luetken, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    We show that B-type Π-stable D-branes do not in general reduce to the (Gieseker-) stable holomorphic vector bundles used in mathematics to construct moduli spaces. We show that solutions of the almost Hermitian Yang-Mills equations for the non-linear deformations of Yang-Mills instantons that appear in the low-energy geometric limit of strings exist iff they are π-stable, a geometric large volume version of Π-stability. This shows that π-stability is the correct physical stability concept. We speculate that this string-canonical choice of stable objects, which is encoded in and derived from the central charge of the string-algebra, should find applications to algebraic geometry where there is no canonical choice of stable geometrical objects

  7. Liquid Hydrogen Recirculation System for Forced Flow Cooling Test of Superconducting Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Y.; Kainuma, T.; Shigeta, H.; Shiotsu, M.; Tatsumoto, H.; Naruo, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Nonaka, S.; Inatani, Y.; Yoshinaga, S.

    2017-12-01

    The knowledge of forced flow heat transfer characteristics of liquid hydrogen (LH2) is important and necessary for design and cooling analysis of high critical temperature superconducting devices. However, there are few test facilities available for LH2 forced flow cooling for superconductors. A test system to provide a LH2 forced flow (∼10 m/s) of a short period (less than 100 s) has been developed. The test system was composed of two LH2 tanks connected by a transfer line with a controllable valve, in which the forced flow rate and its period were limited by the storage capacity of tanks. In this paper, a liquid hydrogen recirculation system, which was designed and fabricated in order to study characteristics of superconducting cables in a stable forced flow of liquid hydrogen for longer period, was described. This LH2 loop system consists of a centrifugal pump with dynamic gas bearings, a heat exchanger which is immersed in a liquid hydrogen tank, and a buffer tank where a test section (superconducting wires or cables) is set. The buffer tank has LHe cooled superconducting magnet which can produce an external magnetic field (up to 7T) at the test section. A performance test was conducted. The maximum flow rate was 43.7 g/s. The lowest temperature was 22.5 K. It was confirmed that the liquid hydrogen can stably circulate for 7 hours.

  8. Fractional flow reserve-guided percutaneous coronary intervention: where to after FAME 2?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Hoef TP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tim P van de Hoef,1 Martijn Meuwissen,2 Jan J Piek1 1AMC Heartcentre, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 2Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands Abstract: Fractional flow reserve (FFR is a well-validated clinical coronary physiological parameter derived from the measurement of coronary pressures and has drastically changed revascularization decision-making in clinical practice. Nonetheless, it is important to realize that FFR is a coronary pressure-derived estimate of coronary blood flow impairment. It is thereby not the same as direct measures of coronary flow impairment that determine the occurrence of signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This consideration is important, since the FAME 2 study documented a limited discriminatory power of FFR to identify stenoses that require revascularization to prevent adverse events. The physiological difference between FFR and direct measures of coronary flow impairment may well explain the findings in FAME 2. This review aims to address the physiological background of FFR, its ambiguities, and its consequences for the application of FFR in clinical practice, as well as to reinterpret the diagnostic and prognostic characteristics of FFR in the light of the recent FAME 2 trial outcomes. Keywords: fractional flow reserve, coronary flow, stable ischemic heart disease

  9. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Wu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11

  10. A highly stable and sensitive chemically modified screen-printed electrode for sulfide analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, D.-M. [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40217, Taiwan (China); Kumar, Annamalai Senthil [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40217, Taiwan (China); Zen, J.-M. [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40217, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jmzen@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-01-18

    We report here a highly stable and sensitive chemically modified screen-printed carbon electrode (CMSPE) for sulfide analysis. The CMSPE was prepared by first ion-exchanging ferricyanide into a Tosflex anion-exchange polymer and then sealing with a tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel layer. The sol-gel overlayer coating was crucial to stabilize the electron mediator (i.e., Fe(China){sub 6} {sup 3-}) from leaching. The strong interaction between the oxy-hydroxy functional group of sol-gel and the hydrophilic sites of Tosflex makes the composite highly rigid to trap the ferricyanide mediator. An obvious electrocatalytic sulfide oxidation current signal at {approx}0.20 V versus Ag/AgCl in pH 7 phosphate buffer solution was observed at the CMSPE. A linear calibration plot over a wide range of 0.1 {mu}M to 1 mM with a slope of 5.6 nA/{mu}M was obtained by flow injection analysis. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was 8.9 nM (i.e., 25.6 ppt). Practical utility of the system was applied to the determination of sulfide trapped from cigarette smoke and sulfide content in hot spring water.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of rotating fluid flow in a closed cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Christensen, Erik Adler

    1995-01-01

    , is validated against experimental visualizations of both transient and stable periodic flows. The complexity of the flow problem is illuminated numerically by injecting flow tracers into the flow domain and following their evolution in time. The vortex dynamics appears as stretching, folding and squeezing...

  12. Local Search Approaches in Stable Matching Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Walsh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The stable marriage (SM problem has a wide variety of practical applications, ranging from matching resident doctors to hospitals, to matching students to schools or, more generally, to any two-sided market. In the classical formulation, n men and n women express their preferences (via a strict total order over the members of the other sex. Solving an SM problem means finding a stable marriage where stability is an envy-free notion: no man and woman who are not married to each other would both prefer each other to their partners or to being single. We consider both the classical stable marriage problem and one of its useful variations (denoted SMTI (Stable Marriage with Ties and Incomplete lists where the men and women express their preferences in the form of an incomplete preference list with ties over a subset of the members of the other sex. Matchings are permitted only with people who appear in these preference lists, and we try to find a stable matching that marries as many people as possible. Whilst the SM problem is polynomial to solve, the SMTI problem is NP-hard. We propose to tackle both problems via a local search approach, which exploits properties of the problems to reduce the size of the neighborhood and to make local moves efficiently. We empirically evaluate our algorithm for SM problems by measuring its runtime behavior and its ability to sample the lattice of all possible stable marriages. We evaluate our algorithm for SMTI problems in terms of both its runtime behavior and its ability to find a maximum cardinality stable marriage. Experimental results suggest that for SM problems, the number of steps of our algorithm grows only as O(n log(n, and that it samples very well the set of all stable marriages. It is thus a fair and efficient approach to generate stable marriages. Furthermore, our approach for SMTI problems is able to solve large problems, quickly returning stable matchings of large and often optimal size, despite the

  13. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  14. Iron metabolism study in humans by means of stable tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantone, M.C.; Molho, N.; Pirola, L.; Gambarini, G.; Hansen, C.; Roth, P.; Werner, E.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of iron metabolism in a female patient volunteer by administration of stable iron isotopes as tracers was performed. The applied methodology had already been tested in rabbits in comparison with radioactive tracer technique. The subject under study was given 58 Fe solution intravenously and about 45 min later 57 Fe solution orally. Ten blood samples were drawn at different times within 522 min from injection. Single iron isotopes content in plasma samples was determined by proton nuclear activation. A Compton suppressor system was utilized to improve the detector limits. The characteristic parameters of iron plasma clearance and of iron intestinal absorption were determined

  15. Trimethyl Lock: A Stable Chromogenic Substrate for Esterases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald T. Raines

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available p-Nitrophenyl acetate is the most commonly used substrate for detecting thecatalytic activity of esterases, including those that activate prodrugs in human cells. Thissubstrate is unstable in aqueous solution, limiting its utility. Here, a stable chromogenicsubstrate for esterases is produced by the structural isolation of an acetyl ester andp-nitroaniline group using a trimethyl lock moiety. Upon ester hydrolysis, unfavorablesteric interactions between the three methyl groups of this o-hydroxycinnamic acidderivative encourage rapid lactonization to form a hydrocoumarin and releasep-nitroaniline. This “prochromophore” could find use in a variety of assays.

  16. Apparatus to detect stable fractional charges on matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderspek, R.

    1980-04-01

    The construction of an apparatus designed to detect stable fractional charges on matter, if they exist, to the level of 10 -24 per nucleon is reported and discussed. The charges on a stream of highly consistent droplets produced by the apparatus are determined by accurate measurement of the deflection of the droplets in falling through a static electric field. Maintenance of certain parameters of operation calculated to limit the random effects of electrical and aerodynamical disturbances on the droplets indicate a precision in the measurement of the charge on a droplet of 0.02e can be attained. 7 figures

  17. A MODEL FOR PRODUCING STABLE, BROADBAND TERAHERTZ COHERENT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Martin, MichaelC.; Venturini, Marco

    2003-01-01

    We present a model for producing stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), enhancing higher frequency coherent emission and limits to stable emission due to a microbunching instability excited by the SR. We use this model to optimize the performance of a source for CSR emission

  18. Limits to global groundwater consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, I.; Van Beek, L. P.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater is the largest accessible freshwater resource worldwide and is of critical importance for irrigation, and so for global food security. For many regions of the world where groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge, persistent groundwater depletion occurs. A direct consequence of depletion is falling groundwater levels, reducing baseflows to rivers, harming ecosystems. Also, pumping costs increase, wells dry up and land subsidence can occur. Water demands are expected to increase further due to growing population, economic development and climate change, posing the urgent question how sustainable current water abstractions are worldwide and where and when these abstractions approach conceivable limits with all the associated problems. Here, we estimated past and future trends (1960-2050) in groundwater levels resulting from changes in abstractions and climate and predicted when limits of groundwater consumption are reached. We explored these limits by predicting where and when groundwater levels drop that low that groundwater becomes unattainable for abstractions and how river flows are affected. Water availabilities, abstractions, and lateral groundwater flows are simulated (5 arcmin. resolution) using a coupled version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and a groundwater model based on MODFLOW. The groundwater model includes a parameterization of the worlds confined and unconfined aquifer systems, needed for a realistic simulation of groundwater head dynamics. Results show that, next to the existing regions experiencing groundwater depletion (like India, Pakistan, Central Valley) new regions will develop, e.g. Southern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Using a limit that reflects present-day feasibility of groundwater abstraction, we estimate that in 2050 groundwater becomes unattainable for 20% of the global population, mainly in the developing countries and pumping cost will increase significantly. Largest impacts are found

  19. The asymptotic average-shadowing property and transitivity for flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Rongbao

    2009-01-01

    The asymptotic average-shadowing property is introduced for flows and the relationships between this property and transitivity for flows are investigated. It is shown that a flow on a compact metric space is chain transitive if it has positively (or negatively) asymptotic average-shadowing property and a positively (resp. negatively) Lyapunov stable flow is positively (resp. negatively) topologically transitive provided it has positively (resp. negatively) asymptotic average-shadowing property. Furthermore, two conditions for which a flow is a minimal flow are obtained.

  20. Historical Drawbacks of Limited Liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Boyle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited liability is a human invention which has facilitated enormous economic growth around the world, particularly since the time of its general application in advanced countries during the nineteenth century. The individual legal identity of companies, coupled with the limited liability of their owners, has provided protection for investors from the risks associated with their investments. It has thus contributed to increase the sources of capital available to finance projects which might otherwise have been considered unviable. However, the legal protection offered to investors has negative consequences for other participants in economies. Speculation in stock markets often damages society. It is very important to study the drawbacks of limited liability and to suggest modifications to achieve a more stable, less volatile, economic growth in the world. Although this article goes to some lengths to recognise the work of authors who emphasise the positive historical economic contribution of limited lability, its main objective is to provoke a reflection around texts which point out the drawbacks and propose solutions.

  1. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric a...

  2. Search for stable stau production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaschube, Kolja

    2011-10-15

    In this thesis, a search for heavy stable charge particle production, in particular a quasistable supersymmetric tau lepton (''stau'') arising in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) models, is presented. This stable stau would cross detectors without decaying, resembling a muon, and produce signatures of high momentum or high ionization energy loss. The energy loss measurement represents a direct handle on the particle mass via the Bethe-Bloch formula. Proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy produced by the Large Hadron Collider and recorded by the CMS detector are investigated. Low-momentum collision data tracks are used to predict the background of highly ionizing tracks at high momenta. A high signal-to-background ratio is achieved by separating the search into channels with differing muon or stau multiplicities and by using the transverse momentum and energy loss measurement as the discriminating variables. Using 35.8 pb{sup -1} of data recorded in the 2010 LHC run, no excess is observed with respect to the expected Standard Model background. As a result, upper limits on the mass of stable status are derived within the context of the investigated GMSB models. (orig.)

  3. Air-stable n-type colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2014-06-08

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer promise in flexible electronics, light sensing and energy conversion. These applications rely on rectifying junctions that require the creation of high-quality CQD solids that are controllably n-type (electron-rich) or p-type (hole-rich). Unfortunately, n-type semiconductors made using soft matter are notoriously prone to oxidation within minutes of air exposure. Here we report high-performance, air-stable n-type CQD solids. Using density functional theory we identify inorganic passivants that bind strongly to the CQD surface and repel oxidative attack. A materials processing strategy that wards off strong protic attack by polar solvents enabled the synthesis of an air-stable n-type PbS CQD solid. This material was used to build an air-processed inverted quantum junction device, which shows the highest current density from any CQD solar cell and a solar power conversion efficiency as high as 8%. We also feature the n-type CQD solid in the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of atmospheric NO2. This work paves the way for new families of electronic devices that leverage air-stable quantum-tuned materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Search for stable stau production at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaschube, Kolja

    2011-10-01

    In this thesis, a search for heavy stable charge particle production, in particular a quasistable supersymmetric tau lepton (''stau'') arising in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) models, is presented. This stable stau would cross detectors without decaying, resembling a muon, and produce signatures of high momentum or high ionization energy loss. The energy loss measurement represents a direct handle on the particle mass via the Bethe-Bloch formula. Proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy produced by the Large Hadron Collider and recorded by the CMS detector are investigated. Low-momentum collision data tracks are used to predict the background of highly ionizing tracks at high momenta. A high signal-to-background ratio is achieved by separating the search into channels with differing muon or stau multiplicities and by using the transverse momentum and energy loss measurement as the discriminating variables. Using 35.8 pb -1 of data recorded in the 2010 LHC run, no excess is observed with respect to the expected Standard Model background. As a result, upper limits on the mass of stable status are derived within the context of the investigated GMSB models. (orig.)

  5. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalisation of food markets and the relative ease which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance of stable isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are used as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice that been determined by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  6. The separation of stable water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velicogna, D.; Koundakjiian, A.; Beausejour, I.

    1993-01-01

    Stable oil-in-water emulsions are a major problem in the recovery of spilled oils. Such emulsions can contain as little as 10% oil and can have properties very different from the original oils, making their storage and disposal difficult. These problems have led to experiments testing the feasibility of a process for separating these stable emulsions into dischargeable water and reusable oil. The technique investigated involves use of a recyclable solvent to remove the oil and subsequent distillation and/or membrane treatment to recover the oil and recycle the solvent. Results of preliminary tests show that stable water-in-oil emulsions can be separated quite readily with a regenerated solvent system. The only products of these systems are oil, which can be sent to a refinery, and dischargeable water. The recycled solvent can be used many times without any significant decrease in separation efficiency. In order to enhance the throughput of the system, a solvent vapor stripping method was invented. This stripping method also improves the quality of the products and the recycled solvent. Membrane methods can be used as a post-treatment for the produced water in order to achieve more adequate compliance with discharge limits. 4 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Granular flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu

    2012-01-01

    Granular material is a collection of macroscopic particles that are visible with naked eyes. The non-equilibrium nature of the granular materials makes their rheology quite different from that of molecular systems. In this minireview, we present the unique features of granular materials focusing ...... on the shear flow of dry granular materials and granule-liquid mixture....

  8. Lubrication Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  9. The JET belt limiter tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deksnis, E.

    1988-09-01

    The belt limiter system, comprising two full toroidal rings of limiter tiles, was installed in JET in 1987. In consists of water-cooled fins with the limiter material in form of tile inbetween. The tiles are designed to absorb heat fluxes during irradiation without the surface temperature exceeding 2000 0 C and to radiate this heat between pulses to the water cooled sink whose temperature is lower than that of the vacuum vessel. An important feature of the design is to maximise the area of the radiating surface facing the water cooled fin. This leads to a tile depth much greater than the width of the tile facing the heat flux. Limiter tiles intercept particles flowing out of the plasma through the area between the two belt limiter rings and through remaining surface area of the plasma column. Power deposition to a limiter tile depends strongly on the shape of the plasma, the edge plasma properties as well as on the surface profile of the tiles. This paper will discuss the methodology that was followed in producing an optimized surface profile of the tiles. This shaped profile has the feature that the resulting power deposition profile is roughly similar for a wide range of plasma parameters. (author)

  10. A Curvature Flow Unifying Symplectic Curvature Flow And Pluriclosed Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Song

    2013-01-01

    Streets and Tian introduced pluriclosed flow and symplectic curvature flow in recent years. Here we construct a curvature flow to unify these two flows. We show the short time existence of our flow and exhibit an obstruction to long time existence.

  11. Numerical simulation by CFD of the behavior of the Inter stage 1 flow in stable state of a gas turbine Frame 7; Simulacion numerica por CFD del comportamiento del flujo en la inter etapa 1 en estado estable de una turbina de gas frame 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez R, Alejandro; Lopez H, Juan Arturo R; Mazur Czerwiec, Zdizslaw; Cordero G, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This technical article presents an analysis including the three-dimensional modeling of the flow channel in the nozzle and the movable blade in order to discover the velocity distribution, temperatures and pressures of the main hot gas flow produced in the inter-stage 1. The aim is to establish key evaluation criteria leading to an opportune repair and therefore smaller operation expenses. Thus, the application of a commercial software of CFD is described to model the channel of the first stage in the gas turbine Frame 7, the geometric architecture is shown in the web of the gas turbine, as well as the border conditions used in the results assessment. [Spanish] Este articulo tecnico presenta un analisis que incluye la modelacion tridimensional del canal de flujo en la tobera y el alabe movil para conocer las distribuciones de las velocidades, temperaturas y presiones del flujo principal de gases calientes que se desarrollan en la inter-etapa 1. El fin es establecer criterios clave de evaluacion que conduzcan a una oportuna reparacion y por ende menores gastos de operacion. Asi, se describe la aplicacion de un software comercial de CFD para modelar el canal de flujo de la primera etapa de una turbina de gas Frame 7, se muestra la arquitectura geometrica y el mallado de la turbina de gas, asi como las condiciones de frontera usadas y la validacion de resultados.

  12. Quantifying Trophic Interactions and Carbon Flow in Louisiana Salt Marshes Using Multiple Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, M. J.; Lopez-Duarte, P. C.; Olin, J.; Johnson, J. J.; Able, K.; Martin, C. W.; Fodrie, J.; Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Taylor, S.; Stouffer, P.; Roberts, B. J.; Rabalais, N. N.; Jensen, O.

    2017-12-01

    Salt marshes are critical habitats for many species in the northern Gulf of Mexico. However, given their complex nature, quantifying trophic linkages and the flow of carbon through salt marsh food webs is challenging. This gap in our understanding of food web structure and function limits our ability to evaluate the impacts of natural and anthropogenic stressors on salt marsh ecosystems. For example, 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill had the potential to alter trophic and energy pathways. Even so, our ability to evaluate its effects on Louisiana salt marsh food webs was limited by a poor basis for comparison of the pre-spill baseline food web. To be better equipped to measure significant alterations in salt marsh ecosystems in the future, we quantified trophic interactions at two marsh sites in Barataria Bay, LA in May and October of 2015. Trophic structure and carbon flow across 52 species of saltmarsh primary producers and consumers were examined through a combination of three approaches: bulk tissue stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S), dietary fatty acid analysis (FAA), and compound-specific stable isotope analysis of essential amino acids (δ13C EAA). Bulk stable isotope analysis indicated similar trophic diversity between sites and seasons with the use of aquatic resources increasing concomitantly with trophic level. FAA and δ13C EAA biomarkers revealed that marsh organisms were largely divided into two groups: those that primarily derive carbon from terrestrial C4 grasses, and those that predominately derive carbon from a combination of phytoplankton and benthic microalgal sources. Differences in trophic structure and carbon flow were minimal between seasons and sites that were variably impacted by the DWH spill. These data on salt marsh ecosystem structure will be useful to inform future injury assessments and restoration initiatives.

  13. Stable chaos in fluctuation driven neural circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angulo-Garcia, David; Torcini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nonlinear instabilities in fluctuation driven (balanced) neural circuits are studied. • Balanced networks display chaos and stable phases at different post-synaptic widths. • Linear instabilities coexists with nonlinear ones in the chaotic regime. • Erratic motion appears also in linearly stable phase due to stable chaos. - Abstract: We study the dynamical stability of pulse coupled networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons against infinitesimal and finite perturbations. In particular, we compare mean versus fluctuations driven networks, the former (latter) is realized by considering purely excitatory (inhibitory) sparse neural circuits. In the excitatory case the instabilities of the system can be completely captured by an usual linear stability (Lyapunov) analysis, whereas the inhibitory networks can display the coexistence of linear and nonlinear instabilities. The nonlinear effects are associated to finite amplitude instabilities, which have been characterized in terms of suitable indicators. For inhibitory coupling one observes a transition from chaotic to non chaotic dynamics by decreasing the pulse-width. For sufficiently fast synapses the system, despite showing an erratic evolution, is linearly stable, thus representing a prototypical example of stable chaos

  14. Metabolic studies in man using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Jung, K.; Krumbiegel, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this project, stable isotope compounds and stable isotope pharmaceuticals were used (with emphasis on the application of 15 N) to study several aspects of nitrogen metabolism in man. Of the many methods available, the 15 N stable isotope tracer technique holds a special position because the methodology for application and nitrogen isotope analysis is proven and reliable. Valid routine methods using 15 N analysis by emission spectrometry have been demonstrated. Several methods for the preparation of biological material were developed during our participation in the Coordinated Research Programme. In these studies, direct procedures (i.e. use of diluted urine as a samples without chemical preparation) or rapid isolation methods were favoured. Within the scope of the Analytical Quality Control Service (AQCS) enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies were prepared and are now available through the International Atomic Energy Agency. The materials are of special importance as the increasing application of stable isotopes as tracers in medical, biological and agricultural studies has focused interest on reliable measurements of biological material of different origin. 24 refs

  15. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging using ultrasound: In-vivo examples of complex blood flow in the vascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood motion are restricted by a relatively low frame rate and angle dependent velocity estimates. The Plane Wave Excitation (PWE) method has been proposed to solve these limitations. The frame rate can be increased, and the 2-D...... vector velocity of the blood motion can be estimated. The transmitted pulse is not focused, and a full speckle image of the blood can be acquired for each emission. A 13 bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2-D...... speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. The flow patterns of six bifurcations and two veins were investigated in-vivo. It was shown: 1) that a stable vortex in the carotid bulb was present opposed to other examined bifurcations, 2) that retrograde flow was present...

  16. Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

    2012-09-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25 mUr (or-2.5 cUr or-0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  17. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  18. Manual for the Use of Stable Isotopes in Entomology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    result of problem driven inquisitiveness and technological advances, and are framed by the social and political environment. Although the external environment may mould the technological path, a technology will only become obsolete if there are viable substitution products or methods. Stable isotope methods are a substitute for many radionuclide methods. The progress made in stable isotope science over the past twenty years is a direct result of the interplay of the above factors. Stable isotopes are omnipresent in the environment and pose no health or environmental risks. Advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry in terms of detection, accuracy and automation have broadened experimental possibilities immensely over the past twenty years. It was recognised that there was significant potential for answering many of the entomologist?s biological and ecological questions using stable isotopes, an expertise the Soil Science Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory in Seibersdorf had long fostered; therefore collaboration with the Entomology Unit at the same Laboratory was established. A number of collaborative experiments were carried and subsequently published. It was soon recognised that stable isotopes have tremendous potential in entomological research and although there were numerous studies using stable isotopes in ecology, their use in entomology per se was limited. Thus it was felt that a publication was required to make stable isotope techniques more widely known among entomologists. This manual will attempt to provide an introduction to the use of stable isotopes in entomological research. It will strive to communicate the basic principles and techniques of stable isotope science and provide a springboard for further interest and research in this area

  19. Implicit time accurate simulation of unsteady flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, R.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we study the properties of an implicit time integration method for the simulation of unsteady shock boundary layer interaction flow. Using an explicit second-order Runge-Kutta scheme we determine a reference solution for the implicit second-order Crank Nicolson scheme. This a-stable

  20. On some topological properties of stable measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Krabbe

    1996-01-01

    Summary The paper shows that the set of stable probability measures and the set of Rational Beliefs relative to a given stationary measure are closed in the strong topology, but not closed in the topology of weak convergence. However, subsets of the set of stable probability measures which...... are characterized by uniformity of convergence of the empirical distribution are closed in the topology of weak convergence. It is demonstrated that such subsets exist. In particular, there is an increasing sequence of sets of SIDS measures who's union is the set of all SIDS measures generated by a particular...... system and such that each subset consists of stable measures. The uniformity requirement has a natural interpretation in terms of plausibility of Rational Beliefs...