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Sample records for stable coronary disease

  1. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per m...

  2. Management standards for stable coronary artery disease in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Mishra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is one of the important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality globally, giving rise to more than 7 million deaths annually. An increasing burden of CAD in India is a major cause of concern with angina being the leading manifestation. Stable coronary artery disease (SCAD is characterised by episodes of transient central chest pain (angina pectoris, often triggered by exercise, emotion or other forms of stress, generally triggered by a reversible mismatch between myocardial oxygen demand and supply resulting in myocardial ischemia or hypoxia. A stabilised, frequently asymptomatic phase following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS is also classified as SCAD. This definition of SCAD also encompasses vasospastic and microvascular angina under the common umbrella.

  3. YKL-40 a new biomarker in patients with acute coronary syndrome or stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y.Z.; Ripa, R.S.; Johansen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background. YKL-40 is involved in remodelling and angiogenesis in non-cardiac inflammatory diseases. Aim was to quantitate plasma YKL-40 in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or stable chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), and YKL-40 gene activation in human myocardium....... Methods and results. We included 73 patients: I) 20 patients with STEMI; II) 28 patients with stable CAD; III) 15 CAD patients referred for coronary by-pass surgery. YKL-40 mRNA expression was measured in myocardium subtended by stenotic or occluded arteries and areas with no apparent disease; and IV) 10...

  4. Functional Testing or Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads E; Andersson, Charlotte; Nørgaard, Bjarne L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The choice of either anatomical or functional noninvasive testing to evaluate suspected coronary artery disease might affect subsequent clinical management and outcomes. OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed the association of initial noninvasive cardiac testing in outpatients with stable.......05), and a lower risk of MI (hazard ratio: 0.71; 95% confidence interval: 0.61 to 0.82). CONCLUSIONS: In stable patients undergoing initial evaluation for suspected coronary artery disease, coronary CTA was associated with greater use of statins, aspirin, and invasive procedures, and higher costs than functional...... symptoms, with subsequent use of medications, invasive procedures, and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We studied patients enrolled in a Danish nationwide register who underwent initial noninvasive cardiac testing with either coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) or functional testing (exercise...

  5. Fractional flow reserve-guided PCI for stable coronary artery disease

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    De Bruyne, Bernard; Fearon, William F; Pijls, Nico H J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that in patients with stable coronary artery disease and stenosis, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed on the basis of the fractional flow reserve (FFR) would be superior to medical therapy. METHODS: In 1220 patients with stable coronary artery disease, we...... years was lower in the PCI group than in the medical-therapy group (4.6% vs. 8.0%, P=0.04). Among registry patients, the rate of the primary end point was 9.0% at 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with stable coronary artery disease, FFR-guided PCI, as compared with medical therapy alone, improved...

  6. Relation of ABO blood groups to coronary lesion complexity in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

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    Kaya, Ahmet; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Kurt, Mustafa; Işık, Turgay; Kaya, Yasemin; Günaydın, Zeki Yüksel; Aksakal, Enbiya

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between ABO blood groups and complexity of coronary lesions assessed by SYNTAX score (SS) in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Our cross-sectional and observational study population consisted of 559 stable CAD patients. From all patients, ABO blood group was determined and the SS was calculated as low SYNTAX score (0-22), intermediate SYNTAX (23-32) score and high SYNTAX score (>32). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test, ANOVA, or Kruskal-Wallis test and chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the independent predictors of high SS. The analysis between the SS tertiles revealed that the frequency of non-O blood group was significantly higher in the upper SS tertiles (56.2% vs. 75.9 vs. 80.2%, pABO blood groups and complexity of angiographic CAD.

  7. Serum YKL-40 for monitoring myocardial ischemia after revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease

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    Harutyunyan, Marina Jurjevna; Johansen, Julia S; Mygind, Naja D

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim was to investigate the inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 as a monitor of myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: A total of 311 patients with stable CAD were included. Blood samples were taken at baseline, the day after coronary angiography and/or after...... percutaneous coronary intervention and after 6 months. RESULTS: A total of 148 (48%) patients were revascularized and 163 patients underwent only coronary angiography. In the entire population, serum YKL-40 increased significantly from baseline to 6 months (p = 0.05). This tendency was seen...... of disease progression but not of myocardial ischemia in patients with stable CAD....

  8. Differential Associations Between Specific Depressive Symptoms and Cardiovascular Prognosis in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, Petra W.; Whooley, Mary A.; Martens, Elisabeth J.; Na, Beeya; van Melle, Joost P.; de Jonge, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this research was to evaluate the relationship between cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms and cardiovascular prognosis. Background Depression in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with poor cardiac prognosis. Whether certain depressive

  9. [The effects of coronary artery disease severity on left atrial deformation parameters in patients with stable coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycı, Arzu; Karabay, Can Yücel; Taşar, Onur; İzci, Servet; Geçmen, Çetin; Oduncu, Vecih; İzgi, İbrahim Akın; Kırma, Cevat

    2017-03-01

    Aim of the present study was to investigate correlation between left atrial (LA) deformation parameters assessed using 2-dimensional (2D) speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and complexity of coronary artery disease according to SYNTAX score (SXscore) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD). Total of 60 moderate-risk SCAD patients (40 men, 20 women) who underwent coronary angiography and 30 healthy controls were included. Measurements of conventional echocardiographic parameters as well as peak LA strain during ventricular systole (LA-RES), peak LA strain during atrial systole (LA-PUMP), peak LA strain rate during ventricular systole (LA-SRS), peak LA strain rate during early diastole (LA-SRE), and peak LA strain rate during atrial systole (LA-SRA) were obtained. Patients were categorized into 2 groups: low SXscore of SCAD who have high SXscore. In addition, evaluation of LA-RES and LA-PUMP functions might be useful in estimating severity of disease in patients with SCAD.

  10. The influence of contrast media on kidney function in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Simon Bertram; Harutyunyan, Marina; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the incidence of contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for elective coronary intervention following hydration routines. The reversibility of CIN was followed in a 6 month-period. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total...... coronary interventions. Kidney function and the amount of contrast media used was not a predictor of CIN development. The induced CIN was not completely normalized in a 6-month follow-up period....

  11. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT angiography in stable coronary disease: a new standard in non-invasive testing?

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    Noergaard, B.L.; Jensen, J.M. [Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus N (Denmark); Leipsic, J. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Department Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for lesion-specific decisions on coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Current guidelines recommend non-invasive functional or anatomic testing as a gatekeeper to the catheterization laboratory. However, the ''holy grail'' in non-invasive testing of CAD is to establish a single test that quantifies both coronary lesion severity and the associated ischemia. Most evidence to date of such a test is based on the addition of computational analysis of FFR to the anatomic information obtained from standard-acquired coronary CTA data sets at rest (FFR{sub CT}). This review summarizes the clinical evidence for the use of FFR{sub CT} in stable CAD in context to the diagnostic performance of other non-invasive testing modalities. (orig.)

  12. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT angiography in stable coronary disease: a new standard in non-invasive testing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noergaard, B.L.; Jensen, J.M.; Leipsic, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for lesion-specific decisions on coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Current guidelines recommend non-invasive functional or anatomic testing as a gatekeeper to the catheterization laboratory. However, the ''holy grail'' in non-invasive testing of CAD is to establish a single test that quantifies both coronary lesion severity and the associated ischemia. Most evidence to date of such a test is based on the addition of computational analysis of FFR to the anatomic information obtained from standard-acquired coronary CTA data sets at rest (FFR CT ). This review summarizes the clinical evidence for the use of FFR CT in stable CAD in context to the diagnostic performance of other non-invasive testing modalities. (orig.)

  13. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Kazmi

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21, non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93, patients with unstable angina (n = 16, stable coronary artery disease (n = 14 and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207. We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6 and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7. In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN classification method (k = 3. The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms.

  14. Osteoprotegerin independently predicts mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Mette; Hilden, Jørgen; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the prognostic power of serum osteoprotegerin (OPG) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Serum OPG levels were measured in the CLARICOR trial cohort of 4063 patients with stable CAD on blood samples drawn at randomization. The follow-up was 2...

  15. Metabolic syndrome and mortality in stable coronary heart disease: relation to gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Køber, Lars; Faber, Jens

    2007-01-01

    is unknown. METHODS: 1041 patients with stable coronary heart disease, referred for elective coronary angiography were included in this study. At baseline, history of hypertension, body mass index, lipids, fasting plasma glucose, and insulin were recorded. All-cause mortality was determined after a median...... follow-up of 9.2 years. RESULTS: At follow-up 296 (28%) patients had died. 315 (30%) patients had MS based on the definition by the World Health Organization. Patients with MS more frequently had diabetes and three-vessel disease of the coronary arteries. Men had a more severe risk profile than women...

  16. Revascularisation versus medical treatment in patients with stable coronary artery disease

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    Windecker, Stephan; Stortecky, Stefan; Stefanini, Giulio G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether revascularisation improves prognosis compared with medical treatment among patients with stable coronary artery disease. DESIGN: Bayesian network meta-analyses to combine direct within trial comparisons between treatments with indirect evidence from other trials...... while maintaining randomisation. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES: A strategy of initial medical treatment compared with revascularisation by coronary artery bypass grafting or Food and Drug Administration approved techniques for percutaneous revascularization: balloon angioplasty, bare metal...

  17. Fractional flow reserve is not associated with inflammatory markers in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem E M Sels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition and increased blood levels of inflammatory biomarkers have been observed in acute coronary syndromes. In addition, high expression of inflammatory markers is associated with worse prognosis of coronary artery disease. The presence and extent of inducible ischemia in patients with stable angina has previously been shown to have strong prognostic value. We hypothesized that evidence of inducible myocardial ischemia by local lesions, as measured by fractional flow reserve (FFR, is associated with increased levels of blood based inflammatory biomarkers. METHODS: Whole blood samples of 89 patients with stable angina pectoris and 16 healthy controls were analyzed. The patients with stable angina pectoris underwent coronary angiography and FFR of all coronary lesions. We analyzed plasma levels of cytokines IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and membrane expression of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4, CD11b, CD62L and CD14 on monocytes and granulocytes as markers of inflammation. Furthermore, we quantified the severity of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease by calculating Functional Syntax Score (FSS, an extension of the Syntax Score. RESULTS: For the majority of biomarkers, we observed lower levels in the healthy control group compared with patients with stable angina who underwent coronary catheterization. We found no difference for any of the selected biomarkers between patients with a positive FFR (≤ 0.75 and negative FFR (>0.80. We observed no relationship between the investigated biomarkers and FSS. CONCLUSION: The presence of local atherosclerotic lesions that result in inducible myocardial ischemia as measured by FFR in patients with stable coronary artery disease is not associated with increased plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α or increased expression of TLR2 and TLR4, CD11b, CD62L and CD14 on circulating leukocytes.

  18. Darapladib for preventing ischemic events in stable coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, Harvey D.; Held, Claes; Stewart, Ralph; Tarka, Elizabeth; Brown, Rebekkah; Davies, Richard Y.; Budaj, Andrzej; Harrington, Robert A.; Steg, P. Gabriel; Ardissino, Diego; Armstrong, Paul W.; Avezum, Alvaro; Aylward, Philip E.; Bryce, Alfonso; Chen, Hong; Chen, Ming-Fong; Corbalan, Ramon; Dalby, Anthony J.; Danchin, Nicolas; de Winter, Robbert J.; Denchev, Stefan; Diaz, Rafael; Elisaf, Moses; Flather, Marcus D.; Goudev, Assen R.; Granger, Christopher B.; Grinfeld, Liliana; Hochman, Judith S.; Husted, Steen; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Koenig, Wolfgang; Linhart, Ales; Lonn, Eva; López-Sendón, José; Manolis, Athanasios J.; Mohler, Emile R.; Nicolau, José C.; Pais, Prem; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Pedersen, Terje R.; Pella, Daniel; Ramos-Corrales, Marco A.; Ruda, Mikhail; Sereg, Mátyás; Siddique, Saulat; Sinnaeve, Peter; Smith, Peter; Sritara, Piyamitr; Swart, Henk P.; Sy, Rody G.; Teramoto, Tamio; Tse, Hung-Fat; Watson, David; Weaver, W. Douglas; Weiss, Robert; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinereanu, Dragos; Zhu, Junren; Cannon, Christopher P.; Wallentin, Lars; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Bucan, Olga; Elfström, Charlotta; Hegg, Lisa; Jarosz, Marie; Krug-Gourley, Sue; Rudman, Jerry; Collins, Rory; Anderson, Jeffrey; DeMets, David; Ganz, Peter; Sandercock, Peter; Weber, Michael; Fisher, Marian; Buhr, Kevin; Diegel, Scott; Schultz, Melissa; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Alexander, John H.; Al-Khatib, Sana; Baron, Tomasz; Bergström, Olle; Bushnell, Cheryl; Christersson, Christina; Eggers, Kai; Fredlund, Bengt-Olov; Hagström, Emil; Hijazi, Ziad; Örndahl, Lovisa Holm; James, Stefan K.; Jernberg, Tomas; Johnston, Nina; Lopez, Renato D.; Mehta, Rajendra H.; Newby, Kristin L.; Nordmark, Örjan; Oldgren, Jonas; Roe, Matthew T.; Saldéen, Katarina; Stenborg, Anna; Szummer, Karolina; Varenhorst, Christoph; Åkerblom, Axel; Bodén, Ulrika; Holmgren, Pernilla; Alm, Cristina; Hallberg, Theresa; Forsman, Margareta; Ljung, Hanna; Svanberg, Camilla; Loebs, Patrick F.; Atwater, Karen; Baldwin, Robert; Butts, Maria; Chan, Tuan; Connolly, Patricia; Esposito, Gerry; Hillier, Jacalyn B.; Jordan, Marla; Lane, Kathleen; Eckart, Debra; O'Malia, Kimberly; Ryan, Grace; Smitheran, Patsy; Tait, Maunette; Vyas, Sachin; Frazilus, Jessy; Douglas, Sarah; Alsweiler, Caroline; Ball, Lorinda; Bucan, Ana; Mackay, Laura; Wiviott, Stephen; Gignac, Gretchen; Goessling, Wolfram; Hochberg, Ephraim; Lane, Andrew; Rosenberg, Carol; Wagner, Andrew; Wolpin, Brian M.; Lowe, Cheryl; Mills, Kristen; Alkhalil, Maria; Ruvido, Jessica; Rehman, Mian Qasim; Shimmer, Margarita; Stebletsova, Irina; Barnes, Allison; Chiswell, Karen; Stebbins, Amanda; Bustamante Labarta, Miguel; Cartasegna, Luis R.; Chekherdemian, Sergio; Cuello, Jose L.; Elías, Pedro; Giordano, Jorge; Hirschson, Alfredo; Hominal, Miguel Angel; Ibañez, Julio O.; Jure, Horacio O.; Litvak, Marcos; Macin, Stella M.; MacKinnon, Ignacio Jorge; Maffei, Laura Elena; Montaña, Oscar R.; Prado, Aldo D.; Sala, Jorgelina M.; Sanchez, Ramiro A.; Brieger, David; Chew, Derek; Cross, David; de Looze, Ferdinandus J.; Farshid, Ahmad; Hall, Stephen; Krum, Henry; Lane, Geoff K.; Oqueli Flores, Ernesto; Stickland, John; Purnell, Peter W.; Szto, Gregory Y. F.; Thompson, Peter L.; Waites, Jonathan; William, Maged; Beauloye, Christophe; Boland, Jean; Charlier, Filip; de Raedt, Herbert J. L. P.; Dens, Joseph A. Y.; Dujardin, Karl; Friart, Alain; Scheen, André; Schröder, Erwin; Sinnaeve, Peter R.; Verheye, Stefan; Vranckx, Pascal; Abrantes, José A. M.; Albuquerque, Denilson; Ardito, Wilma Roberta; Baracioli, Luciano M.; Bertolami, Marcelo C.; Bodanese, Luiz C.; Dos Santos Filho, Raul D.; Maia, Lilia N.; Manenti, Euler R. F.; Marino, Roberto L.; Ogawa Indio do Brasil, Clarisse K.; Paiva, Maria Sanali de Oliveira; Rabelo Alves Junior, Álvaro; Rassi, Salvador; Reis, Gilmar; Rossi, Paulo R. F.; Saraiva, José Francisco K.; Benov, Haralambi; Chompalova, Boryana; Goudev, Assen; Grigorova, Valentina; Mihov, Atanas; Mincheva, Valentina; Petrova, Sylvia; Staneva, Angelina; Raev, Dimitar; Tisheva, Snezhanka; Aronson, Ronnie; Bedard, Jacques; Bhargava, Rakesh K.; Borts, David; Constance, Christian; Cusson, Jean; Davies, Richard F.; Ducas, John; Ferguson, Murdo E. R.; Goldenberg, Ronald M.; Grondin, Francois; Gyenes, Gabor; Halperin, Frank; Kornder, Jan; Kouz, Simon; Lainesse, Andre Y.; Leader, Rolland; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Lonn, Eva M.; Milot, Alain; Pearce, Murray E.; Pliamm, Lew; Powell, Calvin N.; Rose, Barry F.; Rupka, Dennis W.; Siega, Anthony J. D.; Klinke, Peter W.; St-Amour, Eric; Talbot, Paul; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tishler, Steven J.; Title, Lawrence; Wong, Graham C.; Buller, Christopher E.; Acevedo Blanco, Monica Andrea; Albornoz Alarcon, Francisco Javier; Escobar, Edgardo; Florenzano Urzua, Fernando; Pedemonte Villablanca, Oneglio Antonio; Prieto Dominguez, Juan Carlos; Sanhueza Cardemil, Patricio; Varleta Olivares, Paola Elena; Chen, Jiyan; Dong, Yugang; Ge, Junbo; He, Ben; Huo, Yong; Li, Weimin; Li, Xin-li; Liao, Yuhua; Wei, Meng; Yan, Xiaowei; Ye, Ping; Yuan, Zuyi; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Jianhua; Cermak, Ondrej; Dedek, Vratislav; Francek, Lumir; Grunfeldova, Hana; Hubac, Jan; Franc, Pavel; Kellnerova, Ivana; Klimsa, Zdenek; Kroupa, Josef; Kuchar, Ladislav; Malecha, Jan; Povolny, Jiri; Velimsky, Tomas; Volf, Roman; Jirka, Vladimir; Bang, Lia; Grande, Peer; Frost, Lars; Husted, Steen E.; Laursen, Rikke V.; Nielsen, Tonny; Hedman, Anu; Muda, Piibe; Planken, Ulle; Barnay, Claude; Bauters, Christophe; Bayet, Gilles; Bonnet, Jacques; Bruckert, Eric; Cottin, Yves; Courreges, Jean-Pierre; Decoulx, Eric; Demarcq, Jean-Michel; Dubois-Rande, Jean-Luc; Elbaz, Meyer; Khalife, Khalifé; Krempf, Michel; Maupas, Eric; Ovize, Michel; Roul, José Gérald; Schiele, François; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Steg, Gabriel; Vaisse, Bernard; Aigner, Ulrich Michael; Bavendiek, Udo; Fischer, Dieter; Benedix, Gisela; Boeneke, Hilmar; Bott, Jochen; Brado, Bernadett; Buhr, Marianne; Butter, Christian; Fischer, Steffen; Foerster, Andreas P. D.; Grad, Marc Oliver; Grosskopf, Josef; Hanefeld, Markolf; Hoeltz, Susanne; Frick, Horst-Michael; Illies, Gabriele; Jung, Thomas W. G. E.; Kademann, Barbara; Kahrmann, Gert; Bourrat, Alexandra; Horacek, Thomas; Reusch, Regina; Klausmann, Gerhard; Klein, Christiane; Krause, Karl Heinz; Kuesters, Detlev; Mellwig, Klaus-Peter; Menke, Thomas; Mueller, Steve; Neumann, Gerhard; Nischik, Ruth; Preusche, Andreas; Prohaska, Martin; Regner, Stefan Franz; Rein, Wilfried; Rummel, Reinhard; Samer, Holger; Schaefer, Thomas; Schenkenberger, Isabelle; Schmidt, Ekkehard; Schoen, Norbert; Schreckenberg, Andreas; Schulze, Uwe; Wunderlich, Joachim; Sohn, Hae-Young; Klauss, Volker; Toursarkissian, Nicole; Voigt, Jan-Gerrit; Weber, Dirk; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Zuechner, Dirk; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Geleris, Parashos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis; Kranidis, Athanasios; Manolis, Athanasios; Mantas, Ioannis; Olympios, Christoforos; Tziakas, Dimitrios; Voudris, Vassilis; Lam, Yat Yin Homer; Yip, Wai Kwok Gabriel; Siu, Chung Wah David; Benczúr, Béla; Hornyik, Andrea; László, Zoltán; Papp, András; Papp, Anikó; Plés, Zsolt; Piros, Annamária; Szakál, Imre; Túri, Tibor; Vértes, András; Abraham, Sunitha; Banker, Darshan N.; Chandwani, Prakash; Gupta, Rajeev; Hiremath, Jagdish; Jayadev, Santhosh; Joseph, Stigimon; Menon, Jaideep; Keshavamurth, C.; Srinivas, Arun; Parikh, Keyur; Pothineni, Ramesh B.; Sathe, Shireesh P.; Sawhney, Jitendra P.; Sethi, Sumeet; Chandra, Praveen Kumar; Varma, Sudhir; Bobbio, Marco; Bongo, Angelo S.; Cipollone, Francesco; Mezzetti, Andrea; Colivicchi, Furio; Santini, Massimo; Esposito, Giovanni; Chiariello, Massimo; Marzilli, Mario; Merlini, Piera; Moretti, Luciano; Olivari, Zoran; Patrizi, Giampiero; Valgimigli, Marco; Amemiya, Hiroshi; Ando, Kenji; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Endo, Masahiro; Nagashima, Hirotaka; Kametani, Ryosuke; Koike, Akihiro; Kuramochi, Takehiko; Nakamura, Yuichiro; Oku, Koji; Okutsu, Masaaki; Sueyoshi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Wataru; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Jun; Tanaka, Hideki; Kashima, Katsuro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Takeshita, Satoshi; Teranishi, Junichi; Betsuyaku, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamazaki, Seiji; Yano, Shoji; Yoshida, Kazuro; Chae, Jei-Keon; Chae, Shung-Chull; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Dong-Ju; Hong, Taek-Jong; Jeon, Hui-Kyung; Jeong, MyungHo; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon-Sam; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Do-Sun; Park, Seong-Wook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Cervantes-Escárcega, Jose-Luis; Hernández-Santamaría, Ismael; Sánchez-Díaz, Carlos Jerjes; Uribe-Rios, Marittza-Arasely; Alvarado-Ruiz, Ricardo; Dijkgraaf, René; Jansen, Rutger M. G.; Knufman, Nicole M. J.; Frederiks, Joost; Kuijper, Adrianus; Post, Johannes C.; Michels, Herman R.; Roeters van Lennep, Hendrik W. O.; Liem, Anho; Smits, Pieter C.; Swart, Hendrik P.; van Boven, Adrianus J.; van Daele, Marc E. R. M.; van der Zwaan, Coenraad; von Birgelen, Clemens; Westendorp, Iris C. D.; Davidson, Laura; Devlin, Gerard P.; Elliott, John M.; Hamer, Andrew W.; Harrison, Nigel A.; Rankin, Richard J.; Hart, Hamish H.; Hills, Matthew J.; O'Meeghan, Timothy J.; Scott, Douglas S.; Stewart, Ralph A. H.; Tisch, Jonathan G.; Williams, Michael J. A.; Chen, Victor H. T.; Berge, Christ; Istad, Helge; Sirnes, Per Anton; Hanif, Bashir; Ishaq, Riaz; Kayani, Azhar Mahmood; Qureshi, Muhammad Bilal Ahsan; Yaqub, Zia; Doig, Rafael; Britto, Frank; Yanac, Pedro; Horna, Manuel; Valdivia, José; Zubiate, Mario Cesar; Abelardo, Nelson S.; Abola, Maria Teresa B.; Añonuevo, John C.; Atilano, Alberto A.; Cheng, Federick C.; Gaspar-Trinidad, Emma Y.; Sison, Jorge A.; Sulit, Dennis Jose V.; Uy, Norbert Lingling; Chmielinski, Arkadiusz; Czepiel, Aleksandra; Guzniczak, Ewa M.; Siminiak, Tomasz; Kania, Grzegorz; Kincel, Krzysztof; Kopaczewski, Jerzy; Kubica, Jacek; Lysek, Roman; Miekus, Pawel; Mlodziankowski, Adam; Napora, Piotr; Prochaczek, Fryderyk; Ruscika, Teresa; Tarchalski, Janusz; Tracz, Wieslawa; Wrzosek, Bozena; Basarab, Gheorghe V.; Benedek, Imre; Cinteza, Mircea; Cristea, Madalina I.; Dimulescu, Doina R.; Dragusin, Daniela; Gabor, Iulia; Ginghina, Carmen D.; Macarie, Cezar E.; Sinescu, Crina; Tatu-Chitoiu, Gabriel; Andryushina, Natalya A.; Baum, Svetlana R.; Arkhipov, Mikhail V.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Boldueva, Svetlana; Boyarkin, Mikhail V.; Demko, Arkady P.; Freydlin, Marina S.; Golitsyn, Sergei P.; Gordeev, Ivan; Gratsiansky, Nikolay; Karpov, Yuri A.; Kobalava, Zhanna; Konstantinov, Vladimir; Kuimov, Andrey D.; Kukharchuk, Valery V.; Panov, Alexey; Ruda, Mikhail Y.; Sayganov, Sergey A.; Simanenkov, Vladimir; Smolenskaya, Olga G.; Tsyba, Larisa P.; Vishnevsky, Alexander Y.; Yakhontova, Polina K.; Yakushin, Sergey S.; Zateyshchikov, Dmitry A.; Gaspar, Ludovit; Hranai, Marian; Kokles, Martin; Badat, Aysha; Sliwa-Hahnle, Karen; Blignaut, Suzanne; Burgess, Lesley; Dalby, Anthony; Dawood, Saleem Y.; Gray, Thomas; Horak, Adrian R.; Mabin, Thomas; Manga, Pravin; Moodley, Rajendran; Pretorius, Maria M.; Hough, Frans S.; Roodt, Andre; Saaiman, Jan; Theron, Hendrik D.; Alonso Karlezi, Rodrigo; Mata López, Pedro; Aranda Granados, Pedro; Berrazueta Fernández, José Ramón; Carnevali Ruiz, Daniel; Castro Conde, Almudena; Cruz Fernández, José Ma; de Teresa Galván, Eduardo; de Teresa Parreño, Luis; Díaz Buschmann, Isabel; Domínguez Escribano, José Ramón; Garcia Puig, Juan; Gil Extremera, Blas; Gómez Cerezo, Jorge; Macaya, Carlos Miguel; Mostaza Prieto, José Ma; Muñoz Aguilera, Roberto; Pérez Muñoz, Carlos; Querejeta Iraola, Ramón; Romero Hinojosa, José Antonio; Ruilope Urioste, Luis Miguel; Sabán Ruiz, José; Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Suárez Suárez, Enma Concepción; Lozano Martínez-Luengas, Iñigo; Al-Khalili, Faris; Bandh, Stellan; Bennermo, Marie; Dellborg, Mikael; Herlitz, Johan; Johanson, Per; Hjelmaeus, Lars; Landergren, Karl; Linderfalk, Carina; Lindholm, Carl-Johan; Lindmark, Krister; Mooe, Thomas; Nilsson, Jan; Wodlin, Peter; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Hou, Charles; Hsia, Chien-Hsun; Lin, Shing-Jong; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Chotinaiwattarakul, Chunhakasem; Kuanprasert, Srun; Sansanayudh, Nakarin; Suithichaiyakul, Taworn; Andriyevska, Svitlana; Basylevych, Andriy Y.; Denesiuk, Vitaliy I.; Kononenko, Lyudmyla G.; Korzh, Oleksii M.; Kovalenko, Volodymyr M.; Kraiz, Igor G.; Lishnevska, Viktoriia Y.; Lutay, Mykhaylo I.; Parkhomenko, Oleksandr M.; Rudenko, Leonid V.; Telyatnikova, Zinaida Y.; Tseluyko, Vira Y.; Vatutin, Mykola T.; Vizir, Vadym A.; Bakhai, Ameet; Bijral, Harbal S.; Stewart, Edmund; Dargie, Henry; Barlow, Marion G.; Dutka, David P.; Findlay, Iain N.; Fisher, Michael; Gorog, Diana A.; Jacques, Adam M.; Beeton, Ian; Logie, Brian; Pepper, John R.; Purcell, Ian F.; Scullion, William; Thompson, James F.; Senior, Roxy; Simpson, David A.; Thackray, Simon D. R.; Alamgir, Mohammed F.; Wilding, John P. H.; Wong, Yuk-ki; Ahmed, Abdel M.; Antonishen, Mark C.; Atassi, Keith; Azocar, Jose; Ball, Eric M.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Bays, Harold E.; Beavins, Jill E.; Benjamin, Sabrina A.; Benson, Mark R.; Berger, Peter B.; Buckley, Jeremy W.; Betz, William R.; Biederman, Robert W. W.; Bisher, Edward W.; Bittner, Vera A.; Breton, Cristian F.; Buttaci, Salvatore; Changlani, Mahesh; Patterson, John B.; Byrd, Leroy J.; Canaday, Donald B.; Cashion, William R.; Chandna, Harish; Chang, Anna R.; Chin, John; Claybrook, Harry P.; Martin, Frederick A.; Cohen, Kenneth R.; Colan, David R.; Coodley, Gregg O.; Corson, Marshall A.; Knopp, Robert H.; Paramsothy, Pathmaja; Cottiero, Richard A.; Dandona, Paresh; Davidson, Michael H.; Kamaradt, Kent T.; Davuluri, Ashwini K.; Desai, Vikas S.; Garson, Glen D.; East, Cara; Ebrahimi, Ramin; Ellison, Howard S.; Erickson, Bernard R.; Fernandes, Valerian L.; Flores, Angel R.; Folkerth, Steven D.; Foster, Robert E.; Gaona, Raul E.; Gardner, Timothy J.; George, William H.; Gessler, Carl J.; Gill, Santosh K.; Go, Alan S.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldschmidt, Marc E.; Gorman, Timothy A.; Brautigam, Donald F.; Guyton, John R.; Haffey, Thomas; Henry, Sheldon D.; Hermany, Paul R.; Hoekstra, John A.; Hudson, Michael; Iteld, Bruce J.; Jack, David B.; Johnson, Frank P.; Joswig, Bill C.; Kaissar, Amy J.; Karns, Adam D.; Karns, Robert M.; Kaster, Steven R.; Kerzner, Boris; Khan, Mohammed S.; Ahmed, Ismail S.; Kieval, Joshua; Kim, Edward; Klaff, Leslie J.; Klein, Eric J.; Koren, Michael J.; Kosinski, Edward J.; Krumian, Razmig; Portnoy, Edward B.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Michael M.; Letts, Dustin P.; Lipetz, Robert S.; Long, William J.; Thomas, Ignatius; Lopes-Virella, Maria; Lubin, Barry C.; Martin, Richard A.; Masri, Bassem; Matthews, George; Corbelli, John C.; McCullum, Kevin; Meholick, Alan W.; Mitchell, Jerry R.; Modares, Fariba; Mohler, Emile; Morcos, Charle N.; Murdock, David K.; Narayan, Puneet; Oberoi, Mandeep S.; O'Connor, Thomas; Schnecker, Robert J.; O'Donnell, Philip J.; Ong, Stephen T.; Parang, Pirouz; Pasquini, John A.; Patel, Rajesh J.; Patlola, Raghotham; Penny, William; Pepine, Carl J.; Pierce, Charles H.; Stein, Evan A.; Popeil, Larry R.; Pratt, Stephen E.; Price, Robert W.; Raikhel, Marina; Ravi, Ram C.; Cho, Donald; Rhyne, James M.; Richards, Mary K.; Rivera, Ernesto; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Roth, Eli M.; Rubenstein, Carl J.; Sandoval, Jaime D.; Sangrigoli, Renee A.; Schramm, Erichn L.; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Serfer, Gregory T.; Shah, Dhiren H.; Shalek, Marc S.; Shanes, Jeffrey G.; Sharma, Marigene S.; Bretton, Elizabeth M.; Sheikh, Zafar; Sklaver, Neal L.; Solano, Maria Del Pilar; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Srivastava, Nalin K.; Staniloae, Cezar S.; Staub, Jonathan S.; Stillabower, Michael E.; Suresh, Damodhar P.; Szulawski, Ireneusz; Thompson, Paul; Polk, Donna M.; Tinkel, Jodi L.; Pandya, Utpal H.; Toth, Phillip T.; Traboulssi, Mourhaf; Tuohy, Edward R.; Uusinarkaus, Kari T.; Vijay, Nampalli K.; Voyce, Stephen; Wainwright, William; Rhancock, Holly; Walder, James S.; Wang, Tracy Yu-Ping; Watkins, Stanley P.; Weiss, Robert J.; Whitney, Edwin J.; Wickemeyer, William J.; Willis, John G.; Wilson, Dennis F.; Abrams, Cyril; Wiseman, Alan; Wolfson, Eric; Wright, David; Zawada, Edward T.; Verma, Suneet

    2014-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity promotes the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, and elevated plasma levels of this enzyme are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Darapladib is a selective oral inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated

  19. Good interobserver agreement was attainable on outcome adjudication in patients with stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjoller, Erik; Hilden, Jørgen; Winkel, Per

    2012-01-01

    In clinical trials, agreement on outcomes is of utmost importance for valid estimation of intervention effects. As there is limited knowledge about adjudicator agreement in cardiology, we examined the level of agreement among three cardiology specialists adjudicating all possible events in a rand...... in a randomized controlled clinical trial of patients with stable coronary heart disease....

  20. Serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T after exercise stress test in stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Ruwald, Martin Huth; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).......The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  1. Ad hoc vs. Non-ad hoc Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Strategies in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Toshiaki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Ando, Kenji; Ono, Koh; Shizuta, Satoshi; Kato, Takao; Saito, Naritatsu; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Horie, Minoru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2017-03-24

    Few studies have evaluated the prevalence and clinical outcomes of ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), performing diagnostic coronary angiography and PCI in the same session, in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) patients.Methods and Results:From the CREDO-Kyoto PCI/CABG registry cohort-2, 6,943 patients were analyzed as having stable CAD and undergoing first PCI. Ad hoc PCI and non-ad hoc PCI were performed in 1,722 (24.8%) and 5,221 (75.1%) patients, respectively. The cumulative 5-year incidence and adjusted risk for all-cause death were not significantly different between the 2 groups (15% vs. 15%, P=0.53; hazard ratio: 1.15, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-1.35, P=0.08). Ad hoc PCI relative to non-ad hoc PCI was associated with neutral risk for myocardial infarction, any coronary revascularization, and bleeding, but was associated with a trend towards lower risk for stroke (hazard ratio: 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.60-1.02, P=0.06). Ad hoc PCI in stable CAD patients was associated with at least comparable 5-year clinical outcomes as with non-ad hoc PCI. Considering patients' preference and the cost-saving, the ad hoc PCI strategy might be a safe and attractive option for patients with stable CAD, although the prevalence of ad hoc PCI was low in the current study population.

  2. Prognostic assessment of stable coronary artery disease as determined by coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüche Nielsen, Lene; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik T.

    2017-01-01

    included 16,949 patients (median age 57 years; 57% women) with new-onset symptoms suggestive of CAD, who underwent CCTA between January 2008 and December 2012. The endpoint was a composite of late coronary revascularization procedure >90 days after CCTA, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death...... 90 days. The composite endpoint occurred in 486 patients. Risk of the composite endpoint was 1.5% for patients without CAD, 6.8% for obstructive CAD, and 15% for three-vessel/left main disease. Compared with patients without CAD, higher relative risk of the composite endpoint was observed for non......, and comorbidity. Conclusion: Coronary artery disease determined by CCTA in real-world practice predicts the 3.5 year composite risk of late revascularization, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death across different groups of age, sex, or comorbidity burden....

  3. Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of the CLARIFY registry of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    Despite major advances in prevention and treatment, coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Whereas many sources of data are available on the epidemiology of acute coronary syndromes, fewer datasets reflect the contemporary management and outcomes of stable CAD patients. A worldwide contemporary registry would improve our knowledge about stable CAD. The main objectives are to describe the demographics, clinical profile, contemporary management and outcomes of outpatients with stable CAD; to identify gaps between evidence and treatment; and to investigate long-term prognostic determinants. CLARIFY (ProspeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease) is an ongoing international observational longitudinal registry. Stable CAD patients from 45 countries in Europe, Asia, America, Middle East, Australia and Africa were enrolled between November 2009 and June 2010. The inclusion criteria were previous myocardial infarction, evidence of coronary stenosis >50%, proven symptomatic myocardial ischemia or prior revascularization procedure. The main exclusion criteria were serious non-cardiovascular disease, conditions interfering with life expectancy or severe other cardiovascular disease (including advanced heart failure). Follow-up visits were planned annually for up to 5 years, interspersed with 6-month telephone calls. Of the 32,703 patients enrolled, most (77.6%) were male, age (mean ± SD) was 64.2 ± 10.5 years, and 71.0% were receiving treatment for hypertension; mean ± SD resting heart rate was 68.2 ± 10.6 bpm. Patients were enrolled based on a history of myocardial infarction >3 months earlier (57.7%), having at least one stenosis >50% on coronary angiography (61.1%), proven symptomatic myocardial ischemia on non-invasive testing (23.1%), or history of percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft (69.8%). Baseline characteristics were similar across the four

  4. The role of vaspin as a predictor of coronary angiography result in SCAD (stable coronary artery disease) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stančík, Matej; Ságová, Ivana; Kantorová, Ema; Mokáň, Marián

    2017-05-08

    The role of vaspin in the pathogenesis of stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) have been repeatedly addressed in clinical studies. However, from the point of view of clinical practice, the results of earlier studies are still inconclusive. The data of 106 SCAD patients who received coronary angiography and 85 coronary artery disease-free controls were collected and analysed. The patients were divided into subgroups according to their pre-test probability (PTP) and according to the result of coronary angiography. Fasting vaspin concentrations were compared between subgroups of SCAD patients and between target group and controls. The effect of age and smoking on the result of coronary angiography was compared to the effect of vaspin using the binomial regression. We did not find significant difference in vaspin level between target group and controls. Unless the pre-test probability was taken into account, we did not find vaspin difference in the target group, when dividing patients on the basis of presence/absence of significant coronary stenosis. In the subgroup of SCAD patients with PTP between 15% - 65%, those with significant coronary stenoses had higher mean vaspin concentration (0,579 ± 0,898 ng/ml) than patients without significant stenoses. (0,379 ± 0,732 ng/ml) (t = -2595; p = 0,012; d = 0,658; 1-β = 0,850). Age, smoking status and vaspin significantly contributed to the HSCS prediction in binomial regression model in patients with low PTP (OR: 1.1, 4.9, 8.7, respectively). According to our results, vaspin cannot be used as an independent marker for the presence of CAD in general population. However, our results indicate that measuring vaspin in SCAD patients might be clinically useful in patients with PTP below 66%.

  5. Prognostic Value of High-sensitivity Troponin T After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndrepepa, Gjin; Braun, Siegmund; Cassese, Salvatore; Mayer, Katharina; Lohaus, Raphaela; Lahmann, Anna L; Fusaro, Massimiliano; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Schunkert, Heribert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2016-08-01

    The prognostic value of high-sensitivity troponin T after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with stable coronary artery disease is unclear. We investigated this clinically relevant question in 3463 consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. This study included patients with stable coronary artery disease and baseline high-sensitivity troponin T below the 99th percentile upper reference limit (0.014μg/L). High-sensitivity troponin T was measured before and at 6, 12 and 24hours after the procedure. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Patients were divided into a group with peak postprocedural troponin T≤99th percentile (n=742), a group with peak postprocedural troponin T>99th to 5×99th percentile (n=1928), and a group with peak postprocedural troponin T>5×99th percentile upper reference limit (n=793). Advanced age, smaller body mass index, baseline troponin level, complex lesions, bifurcation lesions and stented length were independently associated with elevated troponin T levels after the procedure. The median follow-up was 15.5 months. There were 56 deaths: 5 deaths (1.7%) among patients with peak postprocedural troponin T≤99th percentile, 35 deaths (4.5%) among patients with peak postprocedural troponin T>99th to 5×99th percentile and 16 deaths (4.3%) among patients with peak postprocedural troponin T>5×99th percentile upper reference limit (hazard ratio=1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.25; P=.047). After adjustment, peak postprocedural troponin T level was not independently associated with mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (P=.094). In patients with stable coronary artery disease and without elevated baseline high-sensitivity troponin T, elevated high-sensitivity troponin T level after percutaneous coronary intervention was not associated with postprocedural mortality. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Amir; Stone, Gregg W; Leipsic, Jonathon; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Kern, Morton J; Hecht, Harvey; Erlinge, David; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Maehara, Akiko; Arbustini, Eloisa; Serruys, Patrick; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Narula, Jagat

    2016-07-08

    Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Clinical presentation and management of stable coronary artery disease in Austria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Pichlhöfer

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in Austria. However, no systematic information exists regarding characteristics and treatments of contemporary patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD in Austria. We assembled two retrospective physicians' databases to describe demographics, clinical profiles, and therapeutic strategies in patients with stable CAD. In addition, we compared patient profiles of secondary care internists and hospital-based cardiologists with those of general practitioners in a primary care setting outside of hospital.The study population was identified from retrospective chart review of 1020 patients from 106 primary care physicians in Austria (ProCor II registry, and was merged with a previous similar database of 1280 patients under secondary care (ProCor I registry to yield a total patient number of 2300.Female patients with stable CAD were older, had more angina and/or heart failure symptoms, and more depression than males. Female gender, type 2 diabetes mellitus, higher CCS class and asthma/COPD were predictors of elevated heart rate, while previous coronary events/revascularization predicted a lower heart rate in multivariate analysis. There were no significant differences with regard to characteristics and management of patients of general practitioners in the primary care setting versus internists in secondary care.Characteristics and treatments of unselected patients with stable ischemic heart disease in Austria resemble the pattern of large international registries of stable ischemic heart disease, with the exception that diabetes and systemic hypertension were more prevalent.

  8. Diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting He

    Full Text Available A comprehensive search of PubMed and Embase was performed in January 2015 to examine the available literature on validated diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease and to describe the characteristics of the models. Studies that were designed to develop and validate diagnostic models of pre-test probability for stable coronary artery disease were included. Data regarding baseline patient characteristics, procedural characteristics, modeling methods, metrics of model performance, risk of bias, and clinical usefulness were extracted. Ten studies involving the development of 12 models and two studies focusing on external validation were identified. Seven models were validated internally, and seven models were validated externally. Discrimination varied between studies that were validated internally (C statistic 0.66-0.81 and externally (0.49-0.87. Only one study presented reclassification indices. The majority of better performing models included sex, age, symptoms, diabetes, smoking, and hyperlipidemia as variables. Only two diagnostic models evaluated the effects on clinical decision making processes or patient outcomes. Most diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease have had modest success, and very few present data regarding the effects of these models on clinical decision making processes or patient outcomes.

  9. Periodontal disease and inflammatory blood cytokines in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio KAMPITS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Periodontal disease has been associated with elevations of blood cytokines involved in atherosclerosis in systemically healthy individuals, but little is known about this association in stable cardiovascular patients. The aim of this study was to assess the association between periodontal disease (exposure and blood cytokine levels (outcomes in a target population of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study included 91 patients with stable CAD who had been under optimized cardiovascular care. Blood levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by Luminex technology. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted to record probing depth (PD and clinical attachment (CA loss. Multiple linear regression models, adjusting for gender, body mass index, oral hypoglycemic drugs, smoking, and occurre:nce of acute myocardial infarction were applied. Results CAD patients that experienced major events had higher concentrations of IFN-γ (median: 5.05 pg/mL vs. 3.01 pg/mL; p=0.01, IL-10 (median: 2.33 pg/mL vs. 1.01 pg/mL; p=0.03, and TNF-α (median: 9.17 pg/mL vs. 7.47 pg/mL; p=0.02. Higher numbers of teeth with at least 6 mm of CA loss (R2=0.07 and PD (R2=0.06 were significantly associated with higher IFN-γ log concentrations. Mean CA loss (R2=0.05 and PD (R2=0.06 were significantly related to IL-10 concentrations. Elevated concentrations of TNF-α were associated with higher mean CA loss (R2=0.07. Conclusion Periodontal disease is associated with increased systemic inflammation in stable cardiovascular patients. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the idea that periodontal disease can be a prognostic factor in cardiovascular patients.

  10. The correlation between lymphocyte/monocyte ratio and coronary collateral circulation in stable coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtul, Alparslan; Duran, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Coronary collateral circulation (CCC) has an important impact on cardiovascular prognosis and well-developed CCC is associated with better clinical outcomes. We investigated whether lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR) has an association with CCC in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD). The study population consisted of 245 patients with SCAD. Patients were classified into a poor CCC group (Rentrop grades 0/1, n = 87), or good CCC group (Rentrop grades 2/3, n = 158). LMR values were significantly higher in patients with good CCC than in those with poor CCC (4.41 ± 1.58 vs 2.76 ± 1.10; p 3.38 (OR 4.637; p = 0.004), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (OR 0.810, p SCAD patients.

  11. Long-term outcome of FFR-guided PCI for stable coronary artery disease in daily clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Biasco, Luigi; Lønborg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Our aim was to investigate the strength of fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) in daily practice. METHODS AND RESULTS: For this study, 3,512 patients with stable CAD and at least one 50-89% coronary stenosis ...... that performing FFR has a significant impact on therapeutic strategy and demonstrates the favourable long-term outcome of FFR-guided PCI in an "all-comers" population of patients with stable CAD in daily clinical practice....

  12. Plasma levels of myeloperoxidase are not elevated in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Lukas; Lu, Guijing; Baldus, Stephan; Berglund, Lars; Eiserich, Jason P

    2008-08-01

    Plasma and serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a redox-active hemoprotein released by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) upon activation, is now recognized as a powerful prognostic determinant of myocardial infarction in patients suffering acute coronary syndromes. However, there is limited information on whether systemic MPO levels are also elevated and of discriminating value in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) representing different ethnic groups. Plasma levels of MPO and traditional CAD risk factors were quantified in African American and Caucasian patients (n=557) undergoing elective coronary angiography. MPO levels did not differ significantly between patients with or without CAD [421 pM (321, 533) vs. 412 pM (326, 500), p>0.05]. MPO levels were similar across ethnicity and gender, and correlated positively with CRP and fibrinogen levels (r=0.132, p=0.002 and r=0.106, p=0.011, respectively). In conclusion, plasma MPO levels were not elevated in patients with stable CAD, suggesting that systemic release of MPO is not a characteristic feature of asymptomatic CAD.

  13. Impact of double filtration plasmapheresis on adhesion molecules levels in patients with stable coronary heart disease after coronary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishko, Valerii V; Sokolov, Alexey A; Belskih, Andrei N; Ivanov, Andrei M; Meshkova, Marina E; Skorinova, Tatyana S

    2017-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory reaction at the site of damage plays a key role in the formation of neointimal hyperplasia, and in the progression of atherosclerosis. The initiating role in these processes is assigned to adhesion molecules. We studied the dynamics of the level of adhesion molecules soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble form of the molecule platelet adhesion and endothelial type-1 (sPECAM-1), sL-, sP-, sE-selectins during double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) with use of plasma fractionators (PF) Cascadeflo EC-50W and EC-40W (Asahi Kasei Medical Co., Japan) in patients with stable coronary heart disease and hyperlipidemia-(a) in the early post-implantation period after coronary stenting. DFPP reduces the level of plasma adhesion molecules. When using PF Cascadeflo EC-40W, a more pronounced decrease occurs. The rejection coefficient (RC) of adhesion molecules has been identified for these PF. These RCs reflect the immediate removal efficiency of adhesion molecules in the perfusion of plasma through PF. The removal effectiveness of adhesion molecules when using PF Cascadeflo EC-40W is higher than when using the PF Cascadeflo EC-50W (sICAM-1 - 2.5 times, sVCAM-1 - 2.2 times, sPECAM-1.6 times, sL-selectin - 5 times, sP-selectin - 2.8 times, sE - selectin - 3 times). Reducing adhesion molecule levels when using DFPP may play an important role in correcting of endothelial dysfunction in response to damage to the arterial wall in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during the early post-implantation period after coronary stenting. DFPP is a promising approach to prevent in-stent restenosis (ISR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical therapy v. PCI in stable coronary artery disease: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Tomlinson, George; Ko, Dennis T; Dzavik, Vladimir; Krahn, Murray D

    2013-10-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with either drug-eluting stents (DES) or bare metal stents (BMS) reduces angina and repeat procedures compared with optimal medical therapy alone. It remains unclear if these benefits are sufficient to offset their increased costs and small increase in adverse events. Cost utility analysis of initial medical therapy v. PCI with either BMS or DES. . Markov cohort decision model. Data Sources. Propensity-matched observational data from Ontario, Canada, for baseline event rates. Effectiveness and utility data obtained from the published literature, with costs from the Ontario Case Costing Initiative. Patients with stable coronary artery disease, confirmed after angiography, stratified by risk of restenosis based on diabetic status, lesion size, and lesion length. Time Horizon. Lifetime. Perspective. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. Interventions. Optimal medical therapy, PCI with BMS or DES. Lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). of Base Case Analysis. In the overall population, medical therapy had the lowest lifetime costs at $22,952 v. $25,081 and $25,536 for BMS and DES, respectively. Medical therapy had a quality-adjusted life expectancy of 10.1 v. 10.26 QALYs for BMS, producing an ICER of $13,271/QALY. The DES strategy had a quality-adjusted life expectancy of only 10.20 QALYs and was dominated by the BMS strategy. This ranking was consistent in all groups stratified by restenosis risk, except diabetic patients with long lesions in small arteries, in whom DES was cost-effective compared with medical therapy (ICER of $18,826/QALY). Limitations. There is the possibility of residual unobserved confounding. In patients with stable coronary artery disease, an initial BMS strategy is cost-effective.

  15. Quality of Life of Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Combined with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vakalyuk, Iryna; Virstyuk, Nataliya; Petryna, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life assessment is an integral part of a comprehensive treatment in modern medical practice. Analysis of quality of life of patients with comorbidities is an interesting and poorly understood issue.  The objective of the research was to evaluate the quality of life of patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis depending on the presence and progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Material and methods. The research included 300 patients with stable coronary ...

  16. Stable angina pectoris with no obstructive coronary artery disease is associated with increased risks of major adverse cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, L.; Hvelplund, A.; Abildstrom, S. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Patients with chest pain and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are considered at low risk for cardiovascular events but evidence supporting this is scarce. We investigated the prognostic implications of stable angina pectoris in relation to the presence and degree of CAD with no o...... with stable angina and normal coronary arteries or diffuse non-obstructive CAD have elevated risks of MACE and all-cause mortality compared with a reference population without ischaemic heart disease.......Aims Patients with chest pain and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are considered at low risk for cardiovascular events but evidence supporting this is scarce. We investigated the prognostic implications of stable angina pectoris in relation to the presence and degree of CAD...... (MACE), defined as cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure, and all-cause mortality. Significantly more women (65%) than men (32%) had no obstructive CAD (P

  17. Impact of aspirin according to type of stable coronary artery disease: insights from a large international cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavry, Anthony A; Gong, Yan; Handberg, Eileen M; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Aspirin is recommended in stable coronary artery disease based on myocardial infarction and stroke studies. However, benefit among stable coronary artery disease patients who have not suffered an acute ischemic event is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of aspirin in stable coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that aspirin's benefit would be attenuated among individuals with stable coronary artery disease but no prior ischemic event. An observational study was conducted from the INternational VErapamil-SR/Trandolapril STudy cohort. Ambulatory patients ≥ 50 years of age with clinically stable coronary artery disease requiring antihypertensive drug therapy (n = 22,576) were classified "ischemic" if they had a history of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, or stroke at the baseline visit. All others were classified "non-ischemic." Aspirin use was updated at each clinic visit and considered as a time-varying covariate in a Cox regression model. The primary outcome was first occurrence of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke. At baseline, 56.7% of all participants used aspirin, which increased to 69.3% at study close out. Among the "non-ischemic" group (n = 13,091), aspirin was not associated with a reduction in risk (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.28; P = .13); however, among the "ischemic" group (n = 9485), aspirin was associated with a reduction in risk (HR 0.87; 95% CI, 0.77-0.99; P = .033). In patients with stable coronary artery disease and hypertension, aspirin use was associated with reduced risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes among those with prior ischemic events. Among patients with no prior ischemic events, aspirin use was not associated with a reduction in risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Heart rate and use of beta-blockers in stable outpatients with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph Gabriel Steg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart rate (HR is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD. However, there is little contemporary data regarding HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta-blockers, among patients with stable CAD in routine clinical practice. The goal of the present analysis was to describe HR in such patients, overall and in relation to beta-blocker use, and to describe the determinants of HR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis of >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,438 patients from 45 countries in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Middle East, and Asia/Pacific were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010. Most of the 33,177 patients included in this analysis were men (77.5%. Mean (SD age was 64.2 (10.5 years, HR by pulse was 68.3 (10.6 bpm, and by electrocardiogram was 67.2 (11.4 bpm. Overall, 44.0% had HR ≥ 70 bpm. Beta-blockers were used in 75.1% of patients and another 14.4% had intolerance or contraindications to beta-blocker therapy. Among 24,910 patients on beta-blockers, 41.1% had HR ≥ 70 bpm. HR ≥ 70 bpm was independently associated with higher prevalence and severity of angina, more frequent evidence of myocardial ischemia, and lack of use of HR-lowering agents. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high rate of use of beta-blockers, stable CAD patients often have resting HR ≥ 70 bpm, which was associated with an overall worse health status, more frequent angina and ischemia. Further HR lowering is possible in many patients with CAD. Whether it will improve symptoms and outcomes is being tested.

  19. Paraoxonase-1 and Simvastatin Treatment in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Januszek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is the crucial antioxidant marker of high-density lipoproteins. The present study is aimed at assessing the effect of simvastatin treatment on PON1 activity and its relationship to Q192R and M55L polymorphisms in subjects with stable coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods. The patient group was composed of 53 individuals with stable CAD, and the control group included 53 sex-matched police officers without CAD. CAD patients were treated with simvastatin 40mg/day for 12 months. Respectively, flow mediated dilatation (FMD, serum hs-CRP and TNF-α levels, urinary 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations, and PON1 activity were evaluated in definitive intervals. Results. There was no effect of simvastatin treatment on urinary 8-iso-PGF2α. Simvastatin treatment significantly increased FMD value, decreased CRP and TNF-α concentration. After adjusting for PON1 genotypes, significantly higher PON1 activity was noted in the 192R allele carriers, in both groups. Regardless of genotype, PON1 activity remained stable after simvastatin treatment. Conclusions. The present study confirms a positive effect of simvastatin therapy on endothelial function and inflammatory markers in secondary prevention. Simvastatin treatment shows no effects on PON1 activity and 8-isoprostanes level. The effect of simvastatin therapy on PON1 activity is not modulated by Q192R and M55L polymorphisms.

  20. Revascularisation versus medical treatment in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windecker, Stephan; Stortecky, Stefan; Stefanini, Giulio G

    2014-01-01

    stent, early generation paclitaxel eluting stent, sirolimus eluting stent, and zotarolimus eluting (Endeavor) stent, and new generation everolimus eluting stent, and zotarolimus eluting (Resolute) stent among patients with stable coronary artery disease. DATA SOURCES: Medline and Embase from 1980.......80, 95% credibility interval 0.70 to 0.91) compared with medical treatment. New generation drug eluting stents (everolimus: 0.75, 0.59 to 0.96; zotarolimus (Resolute): 0.65, 0.42 to 1.00) but not balloon angioplasty (0.85, 0.68 to 1.04), bare metal stents (0.92, 0.79 to 1.05), or early generation drug...... eluting stents (paclitaxel: 0.92, 0.75 to 1.12; sirolimus: 0.91, 0.75 to 1.10; zotarolimus (Endeavor): 0.88, 0.69 to 1.10) were associated with improved survival compared with medical treatment. Coronary artery bypass grafting reduced the risk of myocardial infarction compared with medical treatment (0...

  1. Physical Activity and Mortality in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ralph A H; Held, Claes; Hadziosmanovic, Nermin; Armstrong, Paul W; Cannon, Christopher P; Granger, Christopher B; Hagström, Emil; Hochman, Judith S; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lonn, Eva; Nicolau, José C; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Vedin, Ola; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D

    2017-10-03

    Recommendations for physical activity in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) are based on modest evidence. The authors analyzed the association between self-reported exercise and mortality in patients with stable CHD. A total of 15,486 patients from 39 countries with stable CHD who participated in the STABILITY (Stabilization of Atherosclerotic Plaque by Initiation of Darapladib Therapy) study completed questions at baseline on hours spent each week taking mild, moderate, and vigorous exercise. Associations between the volume of habitual exercise in metabolic equivalents of task hours/week and adverse outcomes during a median follow-up of 3.7 years were evaluated. A graded decrease in mortality occurred with increased habitual exercise that was steeper at lower compared with higher exercise levels. Doubling exercise volume was associated with lower all-cause mortality (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79 to 0.85; adjusting for covariates, HR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.87 to 0.93). These associations were similar for cardiovascular mortality (unadjusted HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.80 to 0.87; adjusted HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.88 to 0.96), but myocardial infarction and stroke were not associated with exercise volume after adjusting for covariates. The association between decrease in mortality and greater physical activity was stronger in the subgroup of patients at higher risk estimated by the ABC-CHD (Age, Biomarkers, Clinical-Coronary Heart Disease) risk score (p for interaction = 0.0007). In patients with stable CHD, more physical activity was associated with lower mortality. The largest benefits occurred between sedentary patient groups and between those with the highest mortality risk. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of outpatients in France with stable coronary artery disease. Findings from the prospeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease (CLARIFY) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Nicolas; Ferrieres, Jean; Guenoun, Maxime; Cattan, Simon; Rushton-Smith, Sophie K; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in the treatment of coronary artery disease mean that an increasing number of patients survive acute cardiovascular events and live as outpatients with or without anginal symptoms. To determine the characteristics and management of contemporary outpatients with stable coronary artery disease in Western Europe, and to compare France with the other Western European countries. CLARIFY (prospeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease) is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal study. Between November 2009 and July 2010, 32,954 adult outpatients with stable coronary artery disease (defined as a history of documented myocardial infarction [of >3 months], prior coronary revascularization, chest pain with myocardial ischaemia, or coronary stenosis of>50% proven by angiography) were enrolled in 45 countries. The demographics and management of CLARIFY patients enrolled in France were compared with those enrolled in other Western European countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and the UK). Of the 14,726 patients enrolled in Western Europe (mean age 66.2 [10.2] years; 79.6% male), 2432 (16.5%) were from France. The use of aspirin was lower in France than in other Western European countries (74.5% vs. 86.9%, respectively), whereas use of thienopyridines (48.5% vs. 21.7%), oral anticoagulants (12.3% vs. 9.0%) and lipid-lowering drugs (95.8% vs. 92.5%) was higher. Beta-blockers were used in 73% of both groups. Angina was less prevalent in France (6.3% vs. 15.5%) and French patients showed higher levels of physical activity than their counterparts in Western Europe. The management of patients with stable CAD in France appears favourable, with good adherence to guideline-based therapies, but there remains room for improvement in terms of symptom and risk factor control. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, Pcoronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Persistent psychological distress and mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ralph A H; Colquhoun, David M; Marschner, Simone L; Kirby, Adrienne C; Simes, John; Nestel, Paul J; Glozier, Nick; O'Neil, Adrienne; Oldenburg, Brian; White, Harvey D; Tonkin, Andrew M

    2017-12-01

    A single assessment of psychological distress, which includes depression and anxiety, has been associated with increased mortality in patients with coronary heart disease, but the prognostic importance of persistence of distress symptoms is less certain. To determine whether intermittent and/or persistent psychological distress is associated with long-term cardiovascular (CV) and total mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease. 950 participants in the Long-Term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischaemic Disease (LIPID) trial completed at least four General Health Questionnaires (GHQ-30) at baseline and after ½, 1, 2 and 4 years. In a landmark analysis from 4 years, Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the risk of CV and total mortality by increasing levels of psychological distress: never distressed, sometimes any severity (GHQ score >5), persistent mild (GHQ score >5 on three or more occasions) and persistent moderate distress (GHQ score >10) on three or more occasions, over a median of 12.1 (IQR 8.6-12.5) years. The models were both unadjusted and adjusted for known baseline risk factors. Persistent moderate or greater psychological stress was reported on three or more assessments by 35 (3.7%) subjects. These patients had a higher risk of both CV death (adjusted HR 3.94, 95% CI 2.05 to 7.56, ppsychological distress of at least moderate severity is associated with a substantial increase in CV and all-cause mortality. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Implementation of recommended measures in patients with stable coronary artery disease: the data from 2014 Russian registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotin A.S.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A report presents the data on assessment of recommended treatment implementation in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD. The source of the data of the year 2014 was multicenter Russian registry of hypertension, CAD and chronic heart failure.

  6. Antiplatelet Therapy for Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Taking an Oral Anticoagulant A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, M.; Gislason, G. H.; Lip, G. Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal long-term antithrombotic treatment of patients with coexisting atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease is unresolved, and commonly, a single antiplatelet agent is added to oral anticoagulation. We investigated the effectiveness and safety of adding antiplatelet...

  7. A genetic risk score predicts cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Nyegaard, Mette; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic risk scores (GRSs) may predict cardiovascular risk in community-based populations. However, studies investigating the association with recurrent cardiovascular events in patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) are conflicting. METHODS: We genotyped 879 patients...

  8. [Efficacy comparison of 3 strategies for real-world stable coronary artery disease patients with three-vessel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Jiang, L; Xu, L J; Tian, J; Zhao, X Y; Zhang, Y; Xu, J J; Song, Y; Wang, H H; Gao, Z; Song, L; Yuan, J Q

    2017-12-24

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or medical therapy (MT) alone for real-world stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) patients with three-vessel disease (TVD) in mainland China. Methods: A total of 8 943 consecutive cases with TVD hospitalized in our center from April 2004 to February 2011 were screened for this study. In this cohort, 3 435 cases diagnosed as SCAD were analyzed. PCI, CABG, MT alone were performed in 1 313 (38.2%), 1 259 (36.7%) and 863 (25.1%) patients, respectively. Propensity score matching (PSM) analysis using nearest neighbor matching with a 1∶1 ratio was applied, and 758 pairs of CABG and PCI groups, 552 pairs of PCI and MT groups, 639 pairs of CABG and MT groups were selected, respectively. 1- and 2-year clinical outcomes were evaluated among PCI, CABG and MT group. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariable Cox regression method were used for survival analysis. Results: Significant differences were found at baseline between PCI, CABG and MT group, including age, gender, body mass index, family history of coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, previous myocardial infarction, stroke, previous revascularization, peripheral vascular disease, SNYTAX score, left ventricular ejection fraction, hemoglobin, serum creatinine, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, triglyceride and medication (all PSCAD patients with TVD, CABG shows better effectiveness by reducing MI and revascularization risk as compared to PCI, even though stroke risk is somehow higher in CABG patients. Patients received MT alone are associated with worse outcomes than those undergoing revascularization strategies.

  9. Determinants of heart rate turbulence in individuals without apparent heart disease and in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnacchio, Gaetano; Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Stazi, Alessandra; Careri, Giulia; Coviello, Ilaria; Mollo, Roberto; Crea, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    To assess the characteristics and determinants of heart rate turbulence (HRT) in individuals without any apparent heart disease and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Heart rate turbulence parameters, turbulence onset (TO), and turbulence slope (TS) were calculated on 24 h electrocardiogram recordings in 209 individuals without any heart disease (group 1) and in 157 CAD patients (group 2). In group 1, only age independently predicted abnormal TO (≥0%) [odds ratio (OR), 1.05; PCoronary artery disease group, however, did not predict abnormal HRT parameters in multivariable analyses, both in the whole population and when comparing two subgroups matched for age and gender. Age and (for TS) LVEF, indeed, were the only independent predictors of abnormal HRT. Age is a major HRT determinant both in subjects without any apparent heart disease and in stable CAD patients. Hypertension and LVEF contribute independently to HRT in these two groups, respectively. Coronary artery disease group was not by itself associated with abnormal HRT parameters in multivariable analyses. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Platelet turnover in stable coronary artery disease - influence of thrombopoietin and low-grade inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Bøjet Larsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Newly formed platelets are associated with increased aggregation and adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of platelet turnover in patients with CAD are largely unknown. AIM: To investigate associations between platelet turnover parameters, thrombopoietin and markers of low-grade inflammation in patients with stable CAD. Furthermore, to explore the relationship between platelet turnover parameters and type 2 diabetes, prior myocardial infarction, smoking, age, gender and renal insufficiency. METHODS: We studied 581 stable CAD patients. Platelet turnover parameters (immature platelet fraction, immature platelet count, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet large cell-ratio were determined using automated flow cytometry (Sysmex XE-2100. Furthermore, we measured thrombopoietin and evaluated low-grade inflammation by measurement of high-sensitive CRP and interleukin-6. RESULTS: We found strong associations between the immature platelet fraction, immature platelet count, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet large cell ratio (r = 0.61-0.99, p<0.0001. Thrombopoietin levels were inversely related to all of the platelet turnover parameters (r = -0.17--0.25, p<0.0001. Moreover, thrombopoietin levels were significantly increased in patients with diabetes (p = 0.03 and in smokers (p = 0.003. Low-grade inflammation evaluated by high-sensitive CRP correlated significantly, yet weakly, with immature platelet count (r = 0.10, p = 0.03 and thrombopoietin (r = 0.16, p<0.001. Also interleukin-6 correlated with thrombopoietin (r = 0.10, p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: In stable CAD patients, thrombopoietin was inversely associated with platelet turnover parameters. Furthermore, thrombopoietin levels were increased in patients with diabetes and in smokers. However, low-grade inflammation did not seem to have a

  11. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists and clinical outcomes in stable coronary artery disease without heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel; Labreuche, Julien; Simon, Tabassome; Delorme, Laurent; Danchin, Nicolas; Amarenco, Pierre; Goto, Shinya; Meune, Christophe; Eagle, Kim A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB) use is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) but without heart failure (HF) receiving contemporary medical management. Using data from the Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) registry, we examined, using propensity score approaches, relationships between cardiovascular outcomes and ACEI/ARB use (64.1% users) in 20 909 outpatients with stable CAD and free of HF at baseline. As internal control, we assessed the relation between statin use and outcomes. At 4-year follow-up, the risk of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke (primary outcome) was similar in ACEI/ARB users compared with non-users (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91-1.16; P = 0.66). Similarly, the risk of the primary outcome and cardiovascular hospitalization for atherothrombotic events (secondary outcome) was not reduced in ACEI/ARB users (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P = 0.04), nor were the rates of any of its components. Analyses using propensity score matching yielded similar results, as did sensitivity analyses accounting for missing covariates, changes in medications over time, or analysing separately ACEI and ARB use. In contrast, in the same cohort, statin use was associated with lower rates for all outcomes. Use of ACEI/ARB was not associated with better outcomes in stable CAD outpatients without HF. The benefit of ACEI/ARB seen in randomized clinical trials was not replicated in this large contemporary cohort, which questions their value in this specific subset. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Cognitive function in patients with stable coronary heart disease: Related cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gayda

    Full Text Available Chronic exercise has been shown to prevent or slow age-related decline in cognitive functions in otherwise healthy, asymptomatic individuals. We sought to assess cognitive function in a stable coronary heart disease (CHD sample and its relationship to cerebral oxygenation-perfusion, cardiac hemodynamic responses, and [Formula: see text] peak compared to age-matched and young healthy control subjects. Twenty-two young healthy controls (YHC, 20 age-matched old healthy controls (OHC and 25 patients with stable CHD were recruited. Cognitive function assessment included short term-working memory, perceptual abilities, processing speed, cognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory. Maximal cardiopulmonary function (gas exchange analysis, cardiac hemodynamic (impedance cardiography and left frontal cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (near-infra red spectroscopy were measured during and after a maximal incremental ergocycle test. Compared to OHC and CHD, YHC had higher [Formula: see text] peak, maximal cardiac index (CI max, cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (ΔO2 Hb, ΔtHb: exercise and recovery and cognitive function (for all items (P<0.05. Compared to OHC, CHD patients had lower [Formula: see text] peak, CI max, cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (during recovery and short term-working memory, processing speed, cognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory (P<0.05. [Formula: see text] peak and CI max were related to exercise cerebral oxygenation-perfusion and cognitive function (P<0.005. Cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (exercise was related to cognitive function (P<0.005. Stable CHD patients have a worse cognitive function, a similar cerebral oxygenation/perfusion during exercise but reduced one during recovery vs. their aged-matched healthy counterparts. In the all sample, cognitive functions correlated with [Formula: see text] peak, CI max and cerebral oxygenation-perfusion.

  13. Psychosocial stress and major cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, E; Norlund, F; Stebbins, A; Armstrong, P W; Chiswell, K; Granger, C B; López-Sendón, J; Pella, D; Soffer, J; Sy, R; Wallentin, L; White, H D; Stewart, R A H; Held, C

    2018-01-01

    Assess the risk of ischaemic events associated with psychosocial stress in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Psychosocial stress was assessed by a questionnaire in 14 577 patients (median age 65.0, IQR 59, 71; 81.6% males) with stable CHD on optimal secondary preventive therapy in the prospective randomized STABILITY clinical trial. Adjusted Cox regression models were used to assess associations between individual stressors, baseline cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes. After 3.7 years of follow-up, depressive symptoms, loss of interest and financial stress were associated with increased risk (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) of CV death (1.21, 1.09-1.34; 1.15, 1.05-1.27; and 1.19, 1.08-1.30, respectively) and the primary composite end-point of CV death, nonfatal MI or nonfatal stroke (1.21, 1.13-1.30; 1.19, 1.11-1.27; and 1.17, 1.10-1.24, respectively). Living alone was related to higher risk of CV death (1.68, 1.38-2.05) and the primary composite end-point (1.28, 1.11-1.48), whereas being married as compared with being widowed, was associated with lower risk of CV death (0.64, 0.49-0.82) and the primary composite end-point (0.81, 0.67-0.97). Psychosocial stress, such as depressive symptoms, loss of interest, living alone and financial stress, were associated with increased CV mortality in patients with stable CHD despite optimal medical secondary prevention treatment. Secondary prevention of CHD should therefore focus also on psychosocial issues both in clinical management and in future clinical trials. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  14. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Grønning, Bjørn; Køber, Lars

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of the inactive N-terminal fragment of pro-brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a strong predictor of mortality among patients with acute coronary syndromes and may be a strong prognostic marker in patients with chronic coronary heart disease as well. We assessed...... quartile was 2.4 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.5 to 4.0; Prisk factors, including the patient's age; sex; family history with respect to ischemic heart disease; the presence or absence of a history......-term mortality in patients with stable coronary disease and provides prognostic information above and beyond that provided by conventional cardiovascular risk factors and the degree of left ventricular systolic dysfunction....

  15. Usefulness of Beta blockade in contemporary management of patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Pepine, Carl J

    2014-11-15

    Considerable progress has been made over the last few decades in the management of clinically stable coronary heart disease (SCHD), including improvements in interventions (e.g., percutaneous revascularization), pharmacological management, and risk factor control (e.g., smoking, diet, activity level, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension). Although β blockers have long been used for the treatment of SCHD, their efficacy was established in the era before widespread use of reperfusion interventions, modern medical therapy (e.g., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers), or preventive treatments (e.g., aspirin, statins). On the basis of these older data, β blockers are assumed beneficial, and their use has been extrapolated beyond patients with heart failure and previous myocardial infarction, which provided the best evidence for efficacy. However, there are no randomized clinical trials demonstrating that β blockers decrease clinical events in patients with SCHD in the modern era. Furthermore, these agents are associated with weight gain, problems with glycemic control, fatigue, and bronchospasm, underscoring the fact that their use is not without risk. In conclusion, data are currently lacking to support the widespread use of β blockers for all SCHD patients, but contemporary data suggest that they be reserved for a well-defined high-risk group of patients with evidence of ongoing ischemia, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, and perhaps some arrhythmias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Insufficient control of heart rate in stable coronary artery disease patients in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balode, Inga; Mintāle, Iveta; Latkovskis, Gustavs; Jēgere, Sanda; Narbute, Inga; Bajāre, Iveta; Greenlaw, Nicola; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Ferrari, Roberto; Ērglis, Andrejs

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) ≥70 beats per minute (bpm) increases cardiovascular risk in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. The objective of the analysis is to characterize HR as well as other clinical parameters in outpatients with stable CAD in Latvia. CLARIFY is an ongoing international registry of outpatients with established CAD. Latvian data regarding 120 patients enrolled in CLARIFY and collected at baseline visit during 2009-2010 were analyzed. The mean HR was 67.7±9.5 and 66.9±10.7bpm when measured by pulse palpation and electrocardiography, respectively. HR ≤60bpm and ≥70bpm was observed in 25% and 35.8% of patients, respectively. When analyzing patients with angina symptoms, 22.8% had HR ≤60bpm while HR ≥70bpm was observed in 33.3% of the cases. HR ≥70bpm was observed in 36.2% of patients with symptoms of chronic heart failure. Beta-blockers were used in 81.7% of the patients. Metoprolol (long acting succinate), bisoprolol, nebivolol and carvedilol in average daily doses 63.8, 5.3, 4.5, and 10.4mg/d were used in 47, 37, 11 and 3 cases, respectively. Among patients with HR ≥70bpm 79.1% were using beta-blockers. Medications did not differ significantly between the three groups according to HR level (≤60, 61-69 and ≥70bpm). Despite the wide use of beta-blockers, HR is insufficiently controlled in the analyzed sample of stable CAD patients in Latvia. Target HR ≤60bpm is achieved only in 25% of the patients while more than one third have increased HR ≥70bpm. Copyright © 2014 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  18. Statin treatment prevents increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality associated with clarithromycin in patients with stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gorm B; Hilden, Jørgen; Als-Nielsen, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    In the CLARICOR trial, significantly increased cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality in stable patients with coronary heart disease were observed after a short course of clarithromycin. We report on the impact of statin treatment at entry on the CV and all-cause mortality. The multicenter...... CLARICOR trial randomized patients to oral clarithromycin (500 mg daily; n = 2172) versus matching placebo (daily; n = 2201) for 2 weeks. Patients were followed through public databases. In the 41% patients on statin treatment at entry, no significant effect of clarithromycin was observed on CV (hazard.......0003; statin-clarithromycin interaction P = 0.0029) and all-cause mortality (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.05-1.67; P = 0.016; statin-clarithromycin interaction P = 0.41). Multivariate analysis and 6-year follow up confirmed these results. Concomitant statin treatment in stable patients with coronary heart disease...

  19. [ANMCO/GICR-IACPR/SICI-GISE Consensus document: Clinical management of patients with stable coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Carmine; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Colivicchi, Furio; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Faggiano, Pompilio Massimo; Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; Rossini, Roberta; Fattirolli, Francesco; Valente, Serafina; Mureddu, Gian Francesco; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Olivari, Zoran; Amico, Antonio Francesco; Casolo, Giancarlo; Fresco, Claudio; Menozzi, Alberto; Nardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Stable coronary artery disease is of epidemiological importance. It is becoming increasingly common due to the longer life expectancy, being strictly related to age and to advances in diagnostic techniques and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.Stable coronary artery disease encompasses a variety of clinical and anatomic presentations, making the identification of its clinical and anatomical features challenging. Therapeutic interventions should be defined on an individual basis according to the patient's risk profile. To this aim, management flow-charts have been reviewed based on sustainability and appropriateness derived from recent evidence. Special emphasis has been placed on non-pharmacological interventions, stressing the importance of lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation, regular physical activity and diet. Adherence to therapy as an emerging risk factor is also discussed.

  20. Periodontal disease and inflammatory blood cytokines in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampits, Cassio; Montenegro, Marlon M; Ribeiro, Ingrid W J; Furtado, Mariana V; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Rösing, Cassiano K; Haas, Alex N

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study included 91 patients with stable CAD who had been under optimized cardiovascular care. Blood levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by Luminex technology. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted to record probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment (CA) loss. Multiple linear regression models, adjusting for gender, body mass index, oral hypoglycemic drugs, smoking, and occurre:nce of acute myocardial infarction were applied. CAD patients that experienced major events had higher concentrations of IFN-γ (median: 5.05 pg/mL vs. 3.01 pg/mL; p=0.01), IL-10 (median: 2.33 pg/mL vs. 1.01 pg/mL; p=0.03), and TNF-α (median: 9.17 pg/mL vs. 7.47 pg/mL; p=0.02). Higher numbers of teeth with at least 6 mm of CA loss (R2=0.07) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly associated with higher IFN-γ log concentrations. Mean CA loss (R2=0.05) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly related to IL-10 concentrations. Elevated concentrations of TNF-α were associated with higher mean CA loss (R2=0.07). Periodontal disease is associated with increased systemic inflammation in stable cardiovascular patients. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the idea that periodontal disease can be a prognostic factor in cardiovascular patients.

  1. Biological effects of ticagrelor over clopidogrel in patients with stable coronary artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Gianluca; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Pavasini, Rita; Aquila, Giorgio; Gallo, Francesco; Fortini, Francesca; Tonet, Elisabetta; Cimaglia, Paolo; Del Franco, Annamaria; Pestelli, Gabriele; Pecoraro, Alessandro; Contoli, Marco; Balla, Cristina; Biscaglia, Simone; Rizzo, Paola; Ferrari, Roberto

    2017-03-23

    Patients with SCAD and concomitant COPD are at high risk of cardiovascular adverse events, due to chronic inflammation, responsible of endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and heightened platelet reactivity (PR). The objective of this randomised clinical trial was to test if ticagrelor is superior to clopidogrel in improving endothelial function in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) and concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty-six patients with SCAD and COPD undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned to receive clopidogrel (n=23) or ticagrelor (n=23) on top of standard therapy with aspirin. The following parameters were assessed at baseline and after 1 month: i) rate of apoptosis and ii) nitric oxide (NO) levels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), iii) levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cell, iv) 29 cytokines/chemokines, v) on-treatment PR. The primary endpoint of the study was the 1-month rate of HUVECs apoptosis. The rate of apoptosis after 1 month was significantly lower in patients treated with ticagrelor (7.4 ± 1.3 % vs 9.3 ± 1.5 %, pSCAD and COPD undergoing PCI, ticagrelor, as compared to clopidogrel is superior in improving surrogate markers of endothelial function and on-treatment PR (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02519608).

  2. Heart rate modulation in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure: What we have already learned from SIGNIFY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Piero Perna

    2016-12-01

    In conclusion, heart rate is a marker of risk but is not a risk factor and/or a target of therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease and preserved ventricular systolic function. Standard doses of ivabradine are indicated for treatment of angina as an alternative or in addition to beta-blockers, but should not be administered in association with CYP3A4 inhibitors or heart rate-lowering calcium-channel blockers.

  3. [ISCHEMIA - the Largest Ever R andomized Study in Stable Coronary Artery Disease. Baseline Characteristics of Enrolled Patients in One Russian Site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayganov, S A; Bershteyn, L L; Andreeva, A E; Katamadze, N O; Zbyshevskaya, E V; Kuzmina-Krutetskaya, A M; Volkov, A V; Gumerova, V E; Bitakova, F I

    2017-10-01

    Indications for coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), presented in the current international guidelines are largely based on the clinical trials conducted sometimes more than 30 years ago. ISCHEMIA is the major multicenter international randomized trial intended to answer the question about the optimal treatment strategy in stable coronary artery disease at the present time. To analyze the most important baseline characteristics of patients enrolled in the ISCHEMIA study in one Russian site. The principal inclusion criteria are a positive stress test (in our center, exercise stress echocardiography) of at least moderate risk and obstructive coronary heart disease confirmed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Main exclusion criteria are a significant stenosis of the left main coronary artery by CCTA, clinical progression/destabilization of the ischemic heart disease, angina of IV CCS class, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) 80% - beta blockers, >80% - ACE inhibitors/ARBs. They are at well controlled resting heart rate (.

  4. Relationships Between Components of Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ford, Ian; Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, P Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Observational studies have shown a J-shaped relationship between diastolic blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. We investigated whether the increased risk associated with low diastolic BP reflects elevated pulse pressure (PP). In 22 672 hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease from the CLARIFY registry (Prospective Observational Longitudinal Registry of Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease), followed for a median of 5.0 years, BP was measured annually and averaged. The relationships between PP and diastolic BP, alone or combined, and the primary composite outcome (cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction) were analyzed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Adjusted hazard ratios for the primary outcome were 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-1.87), 1.00 (ref), 1.07 (95% CI, 0.94-1.21), 1.54 (95% CI, 1.32-1.79), and 2.34 (95% CI, 1.95-2.81) for PPhypertensive patients with coronary artery disease persists in patients within the lowest-risk PP range and is therefore unlikely to be solely the consequence of an increased PP reflecting advanced vascular disease. URL: http://www.clarify-registry.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN43070564. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The composition and daily variation of microparticles in whole blood in stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christersson, Christina; Lindahl, Bertil; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of circadian variation of microparticles (MPs) in stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the daily variation of platelet-, endothelial- and monocyte-derived MPs in whole blood and their tissue factor expression (TF) in SCAD and whether these MPs were related to other endothelial and coagulation markers. Serial blood samples from patients with SCAD were collected during one day. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate the amount of large MPs 0.5-1.0 μm, positive for annexin, and their expression of CD41, CD62P, CD144, CD14 and TF. The lag time and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) was calculated by Calibrated Automated Thrombogram and soluble (s)P-selectin, sTF and vWF by ELISA. The majority of MPs in whole blood consisted of CD41 + MPs with no significant daily variation. In contrast, the concentration of CD62P + MPs described a daily variation with the lowest concentrations found in the evening (p = 0.031). CD62P + and CD144 + MPs had the highest expression of TF, 52.6% and 42.9%, respectively, and correlated to the endothelial activity evaluated by vWF. There was a circadian rhythm of lag time (p monocyte-derived MPs do not present the same circadian variation and they differ in TF expression in SCAD. The MPs from activated platelets, endothelial cells and monocytes exist in low concentrations in whole blood but are related to the endothelial and coagulation activity found in SCAD.

  6. The diagnostic value of mean platelet volume in males with premature atherosclerotic coronary artery disease having stable angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Malçok Gürel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate whether platelet count and mean platelet volume (MPV could be new biomarkers addition to classical risk factors in premature coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods: Totally 124 male patients (mean age: 45.8±13.0 year; range of age: 27-78 year, with stable angina pectoris, were included. Clinical and laboratory findings (whole blood cell count, glucose, creatinine, lipid profile were recorded. Automatic blood counter was used for hematological parameters. Conventional coronary angiography was performed. Patients having acute coronary syndrome within the last six months, with severe valvular, structural or congenital heart disease, thyroid and hepatic dysfunction or signs of any infection were excluded. Results: The study population were separated into three groups by coronary angiography: 51 with stable CAD aged ≤40 years (premature CAD, 38 with stable CAD older than 40 (mature CAD and 35 with the normal coronary arteries (NCA. No significant difference was found in MPV values between premature CAD and mature CAD and also between premature CAD and NCA (p>0.05. A significant negative correlation was found between MPV and platelet count in premature CAD (r=-0.419, p=0.002. Both in premature CAD and mature CAD groups, higher MPV values was found in critical CAD subgroup than noncritical CAD subgroup, but the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in MPV between premature and mature male CAD patients compared to NCA group. A positive but non-significant correlation was found between the MPV values and the severity of CAD. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 381-385

  7. Outcome with invasive versus medical treatment of stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jane A; Johansen, Allan; Gerke, Oke

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Our aim was to address the combined influence of myocardial perfusion defects and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on outcome with coronary revascularisation in stable CAD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Of 527 patients with ischaemia by myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, 343 had...... the effect of large compared to small/moderate defects vanished when adjusted for LVEF and ischaemia (HR=1.01, p=0.99). Considering the outcome difference as a function of both LVEF and ischaemia, we found no advantage or even a disadvantage of revascularisation in patients with mild/moderate ischaemia...

  8. Can mean platelet component be used as an index of platelet activity in stable coronary artery disease?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, John

    2012-01-31

    Acute coronary syndrome is associated with intracoronary thrombosis secondary to platelet activation. Previous groups have investigated platelet activation in both stable and unstable vascular disease. Most measures of platelet activation are not routinely available or easily adaptable to large scale clinical use. Recently, measurement of the mean platelet component (MPC) has become part of the routine data provided by an automated full blood count analyser, the Advia 120. MPC measures platelet density which changes on platelet activation. Our objectives were to determine if platelet activation, as measured by MPC, is increased in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and to determine if MPC could be useful in differentiating people with stable CAD from controls on an everyday clinical basis. Three hundred and forty-five consecutive patients attending for elective coronary angiography had full blood count analysis and MPC measurement performed using an ADVIA-120 analyser. Three hundred and twenty-four were analysed in our final dataset. Two hundred and fifty-three (78%) had CAD. Patients with CAD were significantly (p<0.001) older than those without (63.8 versus 56.0 years). Results failed to demonstrate a difference (p=0.467) in MPC between patients with CAD and those with normal coronary arteries (25.8 versus 26.0). Likewise, there was no correlation between MPC and the severity of CAD (Kendall\\'s tau b=-0.086, p=0.04). MPC is not a useful index of platelet activity in stable CAD when used in everyday clinical practice.

  9. Can mean platelet component be used as an index of platelet activity in stable coronary artery disease?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, John

    2009-04-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is associated with intracoronary thrombosis secondary to platelet activation. Previous groups have investigated platelet activation in both stable and unstable vascular disease. Most measures of platelet activation are not routinely available or easily adaptable to large scale clinical use. Recently, measurement of the mean platelet component (MPC) has become part of the routine data provided by an automated full blood count analyser, the Advia 120. MPC measures platelet density which changes on platelet activation. Our objectives were to determine if platelet activation, as measured by MPC, is increased in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and to determine if MPC could be useful in differentiating people with stable CAD from controls on an everyday clinical basis. Three hundred and forty-five consecutive patients attending for elective coronary angiography had full blood count analysis and MPC measurement performed using an ADVIA-120 analyser. Three hundred and twenty-four were analysed in our final dataset. Two hundred and fifty-three (78%) had CAD. Patients with CAD were significantly (p<0.001) older than those without (63.8 versus 56.0 years). Results failed to demonstrate a difference (p=0.467) in MPC between patients with CAD and those with normal coronary arteries (25.8 versus 26.0). Likewise, there was no correlation between MPC and the severity of CAD (Kendall\\'s tau b=-0.086, p=0.04). MPC is not a useful index of platelet activity in stable CAD when used in everyday clinical practice.

  10. Association of small dense LDL serum levels and circulating monocyte subsets in stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A Krychtiuk

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered to be an inflammatory disease in which monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role. Circulating monocytes can be divided into three distinct subtypes, namely in classical monocytes (CM; CD14++CD16-, intermediate monocytes (IM; CD14++CD16+ and non-classical monocytes (NCM; CD14+CD16++. Low density lipoprotein particles are heterogeneous in size and density, with small, dense LDL (sdLDL crucially implicated in atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine whether monocyte subsets are associated with sdLDL serum levels.We included 90 patients with angiographically documented stable coronary artery disease and determined monocyte subtypes by flow cytometry. sdLDL was measured by an electrophoresis method on polyacrylamide gel.Patients with sdLDL levels in the highest tertile (sdLDL≥4mg/dL;T3 showed the highest levels of pro-inflammatory NCM (15.2±7% vs. 11.4±6% and 10.9±4%, respectively; p<0.01 when compared with patients in the middle (sdLDL=2-3mg/dL;T2 and lowest tertile (sdLDL=0-1mg/dL;T1. Furthermore, patients in the highest sdLDL tertile showed lower CM levels than patients in the middle and lowest tertile (79.2±8% vs. 83.9±7% and 82.7±5%; p<0.01 for T3 vs. T2+T1. Levels of IM were not related to sdLDL levels (5.6±4% vs. 4.6±3% vs. 6.4±3% for T3, T2 and T1, respectively. In contrast to monocyte subset distribution, levels of circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory markers were not associated with sdLDL levels.The atherogenic lipoprotein fraction sdLDL is associated with an increase of NCM and a decrease of CM. This could be a new link between lipid metabolism dysregulation, innate immunity and atherosclerosis.

  11. The effects of short-duration exercise on arterial stiffness in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jidong; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Cho, Soo Jin; Hong, Sun Hee; Huh, Eun Hee; Park, Seung Woo

    2009-10-01

    Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effect of short duration exercise using the treadmill test on arterial stiffness in the presence of coronary artery disease. We enrolled patients with and without coronary artery diseases (CAD and control group, 50 patients each) referred for treadmill testing. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured before and after treadmill testing. Values of baPWV were significantly reduced at 10 min after exercise in both groups, more in the CAD group than in the control group (baseline baPWV and post-exercise change [cm/sec]: 1,527+/-245 and -132+/-155 in the CAD group, 1,439+/-202 and -77+/-93 in the control group, respectively, P for change in each group arterial pressure (MAP), MAP decreases, and baseline baPWV. Significant post-exercise baPWV reductions were observed in both groups, and more prominently in the CAD group. This finding suggests that short-duration exercise may effectively improve arterial stiffness even in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

  12. Randomised placebo controlled multicentre trial to assess short term clarithromycin for patients with stable coronary heart disease: CLARICOR trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Christian M; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Damgaard, Morten

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the macrolide clarithromycin affects mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Centrally randomised multicentre trial. All parties at all stages were blinded. Analyses were by intention to treat. SETTING: Five...... Copenhagen University cardiology departments and a coordinating centre. PARTICIPANTS: 13,702 patients aged 18 to 85 years who had a discharge diagnosis of myocardial infarction or angina pectoris in 1993-9 and alive in August 1999 were invited by letter; 4373 were randomised. INTERVENTIONS: Two weeks...

  13. Randomised placebo controlled multicentre trial to assess short term clarithromycin for patients with stable coronary heart disease: CLARICOR trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, CM; Als-Nielsen, B; Damgaard, M

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the macrolide clarithromycin affects mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Centrally randomised multicentre trial. All parties at all stages were blinded. Analyses were by intention to treat. SETTING: Five...... Copenhagen University cardiology departments and a coordinating centre. PARTICIPANTS: 13,702 patients aged 18 to 85 years who had a discharge diagnosis of myocardial infarction or angina pectoris in 1993-9 and alive in August 1999 were invited by letter; 4373 were randomised. INTERVENTIONS: Two weeks...

  14. Change in Leukocyte Telomere Length Predicts Mortality in Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease from the Heart and Soul Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Goglin

    Full Text Available Short telomere length independently predicts mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. Whether 5-year change in telomere length predicts subsequent mortality in patients with coronary heart disease has not been evaluated.In a prospective cohort study of 608 individuals with stable coronary artery disease, we measured leukocyte telomere length at baseline and after five years of follow-up. We divided the sample into tertiles of telomere change: shortened, maintained or lengthened. We used Cox survival models to evaluate 5-year change in telomere length as a predictor of mortality.During an average of 4.2 years follow-up, there were 149 deaths. Change in telomere length was inversely predictive of all-cause mortality. Using the continuous variable of telomere length change, each standard deviation (325 base pair greater increase in telomere length was associated with a 24% reduction in mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.94; p = 0.01, adjusted for age, sex, waist to hip ratio, exercise capacity, LV ejection fraction, serum creatinine, and year 5 telomere length. Mortality occurred in 39% (79/203 of patients who experienced telomere shortening, 22% (45/203 of patients whose telomere length was maintained, and 12% (25/202 of patients who experienced telomere lengthening (p<0.001. As compared with patients whose telomere length was maintained, those who experienced telomere lengthening were 56% less likely to die (HR 0.44, 95% CI, 0.23-0.87.In patients with coronary heart disease, an increase in leukocyte telomere length over 5 years is associated with decreased mortality.

  15. Changes in myocardial perfusion due to physical exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendziorra, Kai; Foerster, Marcus; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Walther, Claudia; Moebius-Winkler, Sven; Conradi, Katrin; Schuler, Gerhard; Hambrecht, Rainer [University of Leipzig, Heart Center, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is one of the main therapy options for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resulting in an improvement in myocardial perfusion and exercise capacity. Nevertheless, studies have also demonstrated a positive effect of regular exercise training on myocardial perfusion and maximum exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in myocardial stress perfusion after 1 year of exercise training in comparison with the effects of PTCA in patients with CAD. In 66 male patients with angiographically confirmed significant coronary artery stenosis in one target vessel, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy was performed at baseline and 12 months after randomisation into either a physical exercise group or a PTCA group. Circumferential count rate profiles in 16 wall segments were classified according to their relative count rate and localisation within or outside the area supplied by the stenosed vessel. Ischaemic segments showed a significant improvement in myocardial count rate within the target area after 12 months in both the PTCA and the training group (PTCA group: from 76.8{+-}4.9% to 86.6{+-}10.9%, p=0.03; training group: from 74.0{+-}7.3% to 83.7{+-}10.8%, p<0.01). Outside the target area only the training group showed a significant improvement (from 77.7{+-}4.4% to 91.7{+-}4.8%, p<0.01). Our data indicate a significant improvement in stress myocardial perfusion in the training group after 12 months. The ischaemia is reduced not only in the target region of the leading stenosis but also in other ischaemic myocardial areas. In contrast, after PTCA stress perfusion improves only in the initially ischaemic parts of the target area. (orig.)

  16. Coronary Collateral Growth Induced by Physical Exercise: Results of the Impact of Intensive Exercise Training on Coronary Collateral Circulation in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease (EXCITE) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius-Winkler, Sven; Uhlemann, Madlen; Adams, Volker; Sandri, Marcus; Erbs, Sandra; Lenk, Karsten; Mangner, Norman; Mueller, Ulrike; Adam, Jennifer; Grunze, Martin; Brunner, Susanne; Hilberg, Thomas; Mende, Meinhard; Linke, Axel P; Schuler, Gerhard

    2016-04-12

    A well-developed coronary collateral circulation provides a potential source of blood supply in coronary artery disease. However, the prognostic importance and functional relevance of coronary collaterals is controversial with the association between exercise training and collateral growth still unclear. This prospective, open-label study randomly assigned 60 patients with significant coronary artery disease (fractional flow reserve ≤0.75) to high-intensity exercise (group A, 20 patients) or moderate-intensity exercise (group B, 20 patients) for 4 weeks or to a control group (group C, 20 patients). The primary end point was the change of the coronary collateral flow index (CFI) after 4 weeks. Analysis was based on the intention to treat. After 4 weeks, baseline CFI increased significantly by 39.4% in group A (from 0.142±0.07 at beginning to 0.198±0.09 at 4 weeks) in comparison with 41.3% in group B (from 0.143±0.06 to 0.202±0.09), whereas CFI in the control group remained unchanged (0.7%, from 0.149±0.09 to 0.150±0.08). High-intensity exercise did not lead to a greater CFI than moderate-intensity training. After 4 weeks, exercise capacity, Vo2 peak and ischemic threshold increased significantly in group A and group B in comparison with group C with no difference between group A and group B. A significant improvement in CFI was demonstrated in response to moderate- and high-intensity exercise performed for 10 hours per week. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01209637. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Clarithromycin for 2 Weeks for Stable Coronary Heart Disease: 6-Year Follow-Up of the CLARICOR Randomized Trial and Updated Meta-Analysis of Antibiotics for Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Damgaard, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: We have reported increased 2.6-year mortality in clarithromycin- versus placebo-exposed stable coronary heart disease patients, but meta-analysis of randomized trials in coronary heart disease patients showed no significant effect of antibiotics on mortality. Here we report the 6-year......,372 patients with stable coronary heart disease to clarithromycin 500 mg (n = 2,172) or placebo (n = 2,200) once daily for 2 weeks. Mortality was followed through public register. Nine hundred and twenty-three patients (21.1%) died. Six-year mortality was significantly higher in the clarithromycin group...... disease versus placebo/no intervention (17 trials, 25,271 patients, 1,877 deaths) showed a significantly increased relative risk of death from antibiotics of 1.10 (1.01-1.20) without heterogeneity. Conclusions: Our results stress the necessity to consider carefully the strength of the indication before...

  18. Diagnosing coronary artery disease by sound analysis from coronary stenosis induced turbulent blood flow: diagnostic performance in patients with stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Simon; Schmidt, Samuel Emil; Holm, Niels Ramsing; Toft, Egon; Struijk, Johannes Jan; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Bøttcher, Morten

    2016-02-01

    Optimizing risk assessment may reduce use of advanced diagnostic testing in patients with symptoms suggestive of stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Detection of diastolic murmurs from post-stenotic coronary turbulence with an acoustic sensor placed on the chest wall can serve as an easy, safe, and low-cost supplement to assist in the diagnosis of CAD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an acoustic test (CAD-score) to detect CAD and compare it to clinical risk stratification and coronary artery calcium score (CACS). We prospectively enrolled patients with symptoms of CAD referred to either coronary computed tomography or invasive coronary angiography (ICA). All patients were tested with the CAD-score system. Obstructive CAD was defined as more than 50 % diameter stenosis diagnosed by quantitative analysis of the ICA. In total, 255 patients were included and obstructive CAD was diagnosed in 63 patients (28 %). Diagnostic accuracy evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curves was 72 % for the CAD-score, which was similar to the Diamond-Forrester clinical risk stratification score, 79 % (p = 0.12), but lower than CACS, 86 % (p < 0.01). Combining the CAD-score and Diamond-Forrester score, AUC increased to 82 %, which was significantly higher than the standalone CAD-score (p < 0.01) and Diamond-Forrester score (p < 0.05). Addition of the CAD-score to the Diamond-Forrester score increased correct reclassification, categorical net-reclassification index = 0.31 (p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the potential use of an acoustic system to identify CAD. The combination of clinical risk scores and an acoustic test seems to optimize patient selection for diagnostic investigation.

  19. [Impact of platelet distribution width on the extent and long-term outcome of patients with stable coronary artery disease post percutaneous coronary intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P; Song, Y; Xu, J J; Ma, Y L; Tang, X F; Yao, Y; Jiang, L; Wang, H H; Zhang, X; Diao, X L; Yang, Y J; Gao, R L; Qiao, S B; Xu, B; Yuan, J Q

    2017-10-24

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between platelet distribution width(PDW) and the extent of coronary artery disease and 2-year outcome in patients received percutaneous coronary artery intervention(PCI) because of stable coronary artery disease(SCAD). Methods: We consecutively enrolled 4 293 patients who received PCI because of SCAD in Fuwai Hospital from Jan 2013 to Dec 2013, patients were followed up for 2 years. Patients were divided into three groups according to tertiles values of PDW as follows: PDW≤11.4%(1 402 patients), 11.4%12.9% (1 450 patients). Major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were defined as the occurrence of death, myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, intra stent thrombosis and stroke during follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between PDW and the extent of CAD. Multivariable Cox regression was used to evaluate the relationship between PDW and prognosis of SCAD patients. Results: PDW was associated with diabetes mellitus, body mass index, red cell distribution width, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet counts and glycosylated haemoglobin ( P 0.05). PDW was not correlated with the extent of CAD( P =0.990), SYNTAX score( P =0.721), no-reflow phenomenon after PCI( P =0.978). Multivariable logistic regression also showed no relationship between PDW and extent of CAD ( OR =0.994, 95% CI 0.961-1.029, P =0.73). PDW was found to be an independent risk factor of 2-year cardiac death ( HR =1.242, 95% CI 1.031-1.497, P =0.022), but was not an independent risk factor of all-cause death and MACCE. Conclusions: PDW is not related with the extent of coronary artery disease. PDW is an independent risk factor of 2-year cardiac death, but is not an independent risk factor of all-cause death and MACCE in this patient cohort.

  20. Pregnancy associated plasma protein-A as a marker for myocardial infarction and death in patients with stable coronary artery disease: A prognostic study within the CLARICOR Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper K; Teisner, Børge; Winkel, Per

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a potential new marker for vulnerable plaques in the coronary arteries only examined in stable coronary disease (CAD) in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Here we address the prognostic value of serum PAPP-A in unselected stable...... outcomes were all-cause mortality and myocardial infarction. RESULTS: Patients (n=4243) were followed for a median of 2.8 years. In a Cox analysis, elevated PAPP-A was significantly related to the composite outcome of myocardial infarction and death (HR 1.99, 95% CI 1.62-2.45, p...

  1. Prognostic Value of Plasma Pentraxin-3 Levels in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease after Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is an inflammatory marker thought to be more specific to cardiovascular inflammation than C-reactive protein (CRP. Our aim was to assess the prognostic value of PTX3 in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD after drug eluting stent (DES implantation. Plasma PTX3 levels were measured before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI and at 24 h post-PCI in 596 consecutive patients with stable CAD. Patients were followed up for a median of 3 years (range 1–5 for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs. We found that the post-PCI plasma PTX3 levels were significantly higher at 24 h after PCI than pre-PCI, patients with MACEs had higher post-PCI PTX3 levels compared with MACEs-free patients, patients with higher post-PCI PTX3 levels (median > 4.384 ng/mL had a higher risk for MACEs than those with PTX3 < 4.384 ng/mL, and post-PCI PTX3, cTnI, multiple stents, and age but not high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP were independently associated with the prevalence of MACEs after DES implantation. The present study shows that post-PCI PTX3 may be a more reliable inflammatory predictor of long-term MACEs in patients with stable CAD undergoing DES implantation than CRP. Measurement of post-PCI PTX3 levels could provide a rationale for risk stratification of patients with stable CAD after DES implantation.

  2. Prognosis by C-reactive protein and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels in stable coronary heart disease during 15 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, N; Kragelund, C; Steffensen, R

    2012-01-01

    associate with prognosis in patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured baseline plasma CRP and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in 1090 patients with stable coronary heart disease and as the primary composite endpoint detected incident unstable angina, myocardial infarction......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Elevated CRP and matrix metalloproteinase-9 associate with increased risk of cardiovascular events, possibly because these plasma proteins mark vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. We tested the hypothesis that levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-9...

  3. Resistin, exercise capacity, and inducible ischemia in patients with stable coronary heart disease: data from the Heart and Soul study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mary H; Na, Beeya; Schiller, Nelson B; Whooley, Mary A

    2010-12-01

    Resistin is an adipocytokine involved in insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. Its role in the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD) is not yet well-characterized. We performed a cross-sectional study to evaluate the association between serum resistin levels, exercise capacity, and exercise-induced cardiac ischemia among patients with stable CHD. We measured serum resistin concentrations and determined treadmill exercise capacity and inducible ischemia by stress echocardiography in 899 outpatients with documented CHD. Of these, 215 (24%) had poor exercise capacity (<5 metabolic equivalent tasks), and 217 (24%) had inducible ischemia. As compared with participants who had resistin levels in the lowest quartile, those with resistin levels in the highest quartile were more likely to have poor exercise capacity (33% versus 16%, odds ratio [OR] 2.68, P<0.0001) and inducible ischemia (30% versus 17%, OR 2.08, P=0.001). Both associations remained robust after adjusting for numerous clinical risk factors, metabolic variables, and markers of insulin resistance (poor exercise capacity adjusted OR 1.73, P=0.04; inducible ischemia adjusted OR 1.82, P=0.01). However, further adjustments for C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α eliminated the association with poor exercise capacity (adjusted OR 1.50, P=0.14) and substantially weakened the association with inducible ischemia (adjusted OR 1.72, P=0.03). Elevated serum resistin is associated with poor exercise capacity and exercise-induced cardiac ischemia in patients with stable coronary disease. Adjustment for inflammatory markers attenuated these associations, suggesting a possible role for resistin in inflammation and CHD pathophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... more calcium, the higher your chance for CHD. Exercise stress test . Heart CT scan . Nuclear stress test .

  5. Ivabradine and Bisoprolol on Doppler-derived Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Beyond the Heart Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliamonte, Ercole; Cirillo, Teresa; Rigo, Fausto; Astarita, Costantino; Coppola, Antonino; Romano, Carlo; Capuano, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) is an important prognostic marker in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Beta-blockers and ivabradine have been shown to improve CFVR in patients with stable CAD, but their effects were never compared. The aim of the current study was to compare the effects of bisoprolol and ivabradine on CFVR in patients with stable CAD. Patients in sinus rhythm with stable CAD were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind trial. Patients had to be in a stable condition for at least 15 days before enrollment, on their usual therapy. Patients who were receiving beta-blockers or ivabradine entered a 2-week washout period from these drugs before randomization. Transthoracic Doppler-derived CFVR was assessed in left anterior descending coronary artery, and was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline diastolic coronary flow velocity (CFV). Hyperemic CFV was obtained using dipyridamole administration using standard protocols. After CFVR assessment, patients were randomized to ivabradine or bisoprolol and entered an up-titration phase, and CFVR was assessed again 1 month after the end of the up-titration phase. Fifty-nine patients (38 male, 21 female; mean age 69 ± 9 years) were enrolled. Transthoracic Doppler-derived assessment of CFV and CFVR was successfully performed in all patients. Baseline characteristics were similar between the bisoprolol and ivabradine groups. No patient dropped out during the study. At baseline, rest and hyperemic peak CFV as well as CFVR was not significantly different in the ivabradine and bisoprolol groups. After the therapy, resting peak CFV significantly decreased in both the ivabradine and bisoprolol groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups (ivabradine group 20.7 ± 4.6 vs. 22.8 ± 5.2, P < 0.001; bisoprolol group 20.1 ± 4.1 vs. 22.1 ± 4.3, P < 0.001). However, hyperemic peak CFV significantly increased in both groups, but to a

  6. Gender- and age-related differences in clinical presentation and management of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Abergel, Hélène; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M; Greenlaw, Nicola; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Hu, Dayi; Tendera, Michal; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2013-09-10

    Contemporary generalizable data on the demographics and management of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) in routine clinical practice are sparse. Using the data from the CLARIFY registry we describe gender- and age-related differences in baseline characteristics and management of these patients across broad geographic regions. This international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry enrolled stable CAD outpatients from 45 countries in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, the Middle East, and North, Central, and South America. Baseline data were available for 33280 patients. Mean (SD) age was 64 (10.5) years and 22.5% of patients were female. The prevalence of CAD risk factors was generally higher in women than in men. Women were older (66.6 vs 63.4 years), more frequently diagnosed with diabetes (33% vs 28%), hypertension (79% vs 69%), and higher resting heart rate (69 vs 67 bpm), and were less physically active. Smoking and a history of myocardial infarction were more common in men. Women were more likely to have angina (28% vs 20%), but less likely to have undergone revascularization procedures. CAD was more likely to be asymptomatic in older patients perhaps because of reduced levels of physical activity. Prescription of evidence-based medication for secondary prevention varied with age, with patients ≥ 75 years treated less often with beta blockers, aspirin and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors than patients age groups of outpatients with stable CAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prognostic impact of nutritional status assessed by the Controlling Nutritional Status score in patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hideki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Doi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Tsuboi, Shuta; Ogita, Manabu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Okazaki, Shinya; Isoda, Kikuo; Suwa, Satoru; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    Recently, malnutrition has been shown to be related to worse clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure. However, the association between nutritional status and clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. We investigated the prognostic value of malnutrition assessed by the Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT; range 0-12, higher = worse, consisting of serum albumin, cholesterol and lymphocytes) score in patients with CAD. The CONUT score was measured on admission in a total of 1987 patients with stable CAD who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between 2000 and 2011. Patients were divided into two groups according to their CONUT score (0-1 vs. ≥2). The incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), including all-cause death and non-fatal myocardial infarction, was evaluated. The median CONUT score was 1 (interquartile range 0-2). During the median follow-up of 7.4 years, 342 MACE occurred (17.2%). Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that patients with high CONUT scores had higher rates of MACE (log-rank p Nutritional status assessed by the CONUT score was significantly associated with long-term clinical outcomes in patients with CAD. Pre-PCI assessment of the CONUT score may provide useful prognostic information.

  8. Confluence of depression and acute psychological stress among patients with stable coronary heart disease: effects on myocardial perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Matthew M; Meadows, Judith; Shimbo, Daichi; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E; Soufer, Robert

    2014-10-30

    Depression is prevalent in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and increases risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) recurrence and mortality despite optimal medical care. The pathways underlying this risk remain elusive. Psychological stress (PS) can provoke impairment in myocardial perfusion and trigger ACS. A confluence of acute PS with depression might reveal coronary vascular mechanisms of risk. We tested whether depression increased risk for impaired myocardial perfusion during acute PS among patients with stable CHD. Patients (N=146) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-I (BDI-I), a measure of depression linked to recurrent ACS and post-ACS mortality, and underwent single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and during acute PS. The likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS as a function of depression severity was tested. On the BDI-I, 41 patients scored in the normal range, 48 in the high normal range, and 57 in the depressed range previously linked to CHD prognosis. A BDI-I score in the depressed range was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS (odds ratio =2.89, 95% CI: 1.26 to 6.63, P=0.012). This remained significant in models controlling ACS recurrence/mortality risk factors and medications. There was no effect for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications. Depressed patients with CHD are particularly susceptible to impairment in myocardial perfusion during PS. The confluence of PS with depression may contribute to a better understanding of the depression-associated risk for ACS recurrence and mortality. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Low paraoxonase 1 arylesterase activity and high von Willebrand factor levels are associated with severe coronary atherosclerosis in patients with non-diabetic stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jieying; Chen, Qizhi; Zhuang, Xing; Feng, Zhilei; Xu, Lili; Chen, Fuxiang

    2014-11-25

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and von Willebrand factor (VWF) release are associated with lesion initiation in atherosclerosis. Diabetes can complicate coronary artery disease (CAD) due to the production of advanced glycation end products. This study evaluated PON1 activity and VWF levels in non-post-acute coronary syndrome, stable CAD (SCAD) patients without diabetes. Non-diabetic SCAD patients and patients experiencing acute stress periods were selected (n=130). Forty-seven cases with normal coronary angiography and 50 healthy individuals served as controls. The non-diabetic SCAD group was then stratified into single-vessel lesions, multiple-vessel lesions, and mild or severe luminal stenosis according to the number and the degree of luminal stenoses. Serum PON1 paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and plasma VWF levels were measured, as well as serum total cholesterol, total triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein A1. PON1 arylesterase activity was detected with an ordinary chemistry system using a novel phenylacetate derivative. Both PON1 paraoxonase and arylesterase were lower in the non-diabetic SCAD group, but VWF levels were higher (versus controls, all Pparaoxonase activity (OR=0.991), PON1 arylesterase activity (OR=0.981), and VWF (OR 2.854) influenced SCAD in multiple logistic regression. Decreased PON1 arylesterase activity and increased VWF levels were associated with severe atherosclerosis in non-diabetic SCAD patients. We also observed a slight negative correlation between VWF and PON1 paraoxonase/arylesterase. PON1 and VWF are detectable markers that may predict the severity of stenoses, ideally facilitating a non-diabetic SCAD diagnosis before the sudden onset of life-threatening symptoms.

  10. Which Costs Matter? Costs Included in Economic Evaluation and their Impact on Decision Uncertainty for Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, James; Asaria, Miqdad; Bojke, Laura; Gale, Chris P; Richardson, Gerry; Walker, Simon

    2018-02-14

    Variation exists in the resource categories included in economic evaluations, and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance suggests the inclusion only of costs related to the index condition or intervention. However, there is a growing consensus that all healthcare costs should be included in economic evaluations for Health Technology Assessments (HTAs), particularly those related to extended years of life. We aimed to quantify the impact of a range of cost categories on the adoption decision about a hypothetical intervention, and uncertainty around that decision, for stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) based on a dataset comprising 94,966 patients. Three costing scenarios were considered: coronary heart disease (CHD) costs only, cardiovascular disease (CVD) costs and all costs. The first two illustrate different interpretations of what might be regarded as related costs. Employing a 20-year time horizon, the highest mean expected incremental cost was when all costs were included (£2468) and the lowest when CVD costs only were included (£2377). The probability of the treatment being cost effective, estimating health opportunity costs using a ratio of £30,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), was different for each of the CHD (70%) costs, CVD costs (73%) and all costs (56%) scenarios. The results concern a hypothetical intervention and are illustrative only, as such they cannot necessarily be generalised to all interventions and diseases. Cost categories included in an economic evaluation of SCAD impact on estimates of both cost effectiveness and decision uncertainty. With an aging and co-morbid population, the inclusion of all healthcare costs may have important ramifications for the selection of healthcare provision on economic grounds.

  11. Risk of Stroke in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention versus Optimal Medical Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevio Taglieri

    Full Text Available Stroke is a rare but serious adverse event associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. However, the relative risk of stroke between stable patients undergoing a direct PCI strategy and those undergoing an initial optimal medical therapy (OMT strategy has not been established yet. This study sought to investigate if, in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD, an initial strategy PCI is associated with a higher risk of stroke than a strategy based on OMT alone.We performed a meta-analysis of 6 contemporary randomized control trials in which 5673 patients with SCAD were randomized to initial PCI or OMT. Only trials with stent utilization more than 50% were included. Study endpoint was the rate of stroke during follow up.Mean age of patients ranged from 60 to 65 years and stent utilization ranged from 72% to 100%. Rate of stroke was 2.0% at a weighted mean follow up of 55.3 months. On pooled analysis, the risk of stroke was similar between patients undergoing a PCI plus OMT and those receiving only OMT (2.2% vs. 1.8%, OR on fixed effect = 1.24 95%CI: 0.85-1.79. There was no heterogeneity among the studies (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.15. On sensitivity analysis after removing each individual study the pooled effect estimate remains unchanged.In patients with SCAD an initial strategy based on a direct PCI is not associated with an increased risk of stroke during long-term follow up compared to an initial strategy based on OMT alone.

  12. Skin autofluorescence is elevated in patients with stable coronary artery disease and is associated with serum levels of neopterin and the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Douwe J.; van Haelst, Paul L.; Gross, Sascha; de Leeuw, Karina; Bijzet, Johannes; Graaff, Reindert; Gans, Rijk O.; Zijlstra, Felix; Smit, Andries J.

    Aims: To investigate whether skin autofluorescence (AF), a non-invasive marker for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), is elevated in stable coronary artery disease (sCAD) and to investigate its relationship with serum levels of the soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE), neopterin and C-reactive

  13. The rationale and design of the PERindopril GENEtic association study (PERGENE): a pharmacogenetic analysis of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugts, J. J.; de Maat, M. P. M.; Boersma, E.; Witteman, J. C. M.; van Duijn, C.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Bertrand, M.; Remme, W.; Fox, K.; Ferrari, R.; Danser, A. H. J.; Simoons, M. L.; Remme, W. J.; Aldershville, J.; Hildebrandt, P.; Bassand, J. P.; Cokkinos, D.; Toutouzas, P.; Eha, J.; Erhardt, L.; Erikssen, J.; Grybauskas, R.; Kalnins, U.; Karsch, K.; Sechtem, U.; Keltai, M.; Klein, W.; Luescher, T.; Mulcahy, D.; Nieminen, M.; Oto, A.; Ozsaruhan, O.; Paulus, W.; Providencia, L.; Riecansky, I.; Ruzyllo, W.; Santini, U.; Tavazzi, L.; Soler-Soler, J.; Widimsky, P.; Julian, D.; Dargie, H.; Kobler, W.; Duprez, D.; Steg, G.; Thygesen, K.; Drexel, H.; Gombotz, G.; Stoeckl, G.; Heyndrickx, G. H.; Legrand, V.; Materne, P.; van Mieghem, W.; Bocek, P.; Branny, M.; Cech, M.; Charouzek, J.; Drazka, J.; Fabik, L.; Florian, J.; Francek, L.; Groch, L.; Havranek, P.; Herman, A.; Hradec, J.; Jansky, P.; Jirmar, R.; Jokl, I.; Krejcova, H.; Kvasnak, M.; Maratka, T.; Marcinek, G.; Moravcova, J.; Nedbal, P.; Peterka, K.; Povolny, J.; Rosolova, H.; Semrad, B.; Sochor, K.; Spacek, R.; Spinar, J.; Stipal, R.; Stuchlik, K.; Sulda, M.; Ulman, J.; Vaclavicek, A.; Vojtisek, P.; Bjerregard Andersen, H.; Dorff, B.; Kristensen, K.; Madsen, J. K.; Markenvard, J.; Meibom, J.; Norgaard, A.; Scheibel, M.; Leht, A.; Teesalu, R.; Vahulaa, V.; Itkonen, A.; Juvonen, J.; Karmakoski, J.; Kilkki, E.; Koskela, E.; Kotila, M. J.; Melin, J.; Nieminen, M. S.; Savola, R.; Terho, T.; Voipio Pulkki, L. M.; Apffel, F.; Attali, P.; Baron, B.; Berthier, Y.; Dambrine, P.; Danchin, N.; Decoulx, E.; Deshayes, P.; Fouche, R.; Genest, M.; Godard, S.; Guillot, J. P.; Hanania, G.; Lelguen, C.; Leroy, F.; Mansourati, J.; Mery, D.; Michel, A. N.; Quiret, J. C.; Raynaud, P.; Rondepierre, D.; Roynard, J. L.; van Belle, E.; Veyrat, A.; Gaudron, P.; Karsch, K. R.; Lauer, B.; Rettig Stsrmer, G.; Riessen, R.; Rutsch, W.; Sigel, H. A.; Simon, R.; Stork, S.; von Schacky, C.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Christakos, S.; Feggos, S.; Geleris, P.; Georgiadis, S.; Gialafos, J.; Goudevenos, I.; Kardara, D.; Kardaras, F.; Karidis, C.; Kelesides, C.; Kyriakidis, M.; Koliopoulos, N.; Kremastinos, D.; Liberi, S.; Manolis, A. N.; Pyrgakis, V.; Papasteriadis, E.; Papazoglou, N.; Skoufas, P.; Stamatelopoulos, S.; Stambola, S.; Stavridis, A.; Syribeis, S.; Vardas, P.; Vassiliadis, I.; Voudris, V.; Zacharoulis, A.; Zobolos, S.; Zouras, C.; Berenyi, I.; Bocsa, Z.; Csendes, E.; Edes, I.; Gelesz, E.; Janosi, A.; Kalo, E.; Karpati, P.; Kornel, S.; Pap, I.; Pinter, I.; Polak, G.; Reiber, I.; Rusznak, M.; Simon, A.; Tarjan, J.; Tihanyi, L.; Timar, S.; Toth, K.; Veress, G.; Barton, J.; Crean, P.; Daly, K.; Kearney, P.; Meany, T. B.; Quigley, P.; Azzolini, P.; Barone, G.; Barsotti, A.; Bellone, E.; Borghetti, A.; Branzi, A.; Brunelli, C.; Capponi, E.; Capucci, A.; Casaccia, M.; Casali, G.; Cecchetti, E.; Ceci, V.; Celegon, L.; Chimini, C.; Colombo, A.; Corsini, G.; Cucchini, F.; Dalla Volta, S.; de Luca, I.; de Servi, S.; Delise, P.; Di Donato, M.; Di Giacomo, U.; Di Pasquale, G.; Fiorentini, C.; Gaddi, O.; Giannetto, M.; Giannuzzi, P.; Giordano, A.; Giovannini, E.; Iacono, A.; Inama, G.; Ippoliti, G.; Leghissa, R.; Lorusso, R.; Marzilli, M.; Minutiello, L.; Moretti, G.; Mosele, G. M.; Pasotti, C.; Pettinati, G.; Pezzano, A.; Polimeni, M. R.; Portaluppi, F.; Proto, C.; Riva, S.; Sanguinetti, M.; Santini, M.; Severi, S.; Sinagra, G.; Tantalo, L.; Vajola, S. F.; Vincenzi, M.; Volterrani, M.; Zavatteri, G.; Zogno, M.; Gailiss, E.; Gersamija, A.; Ozolina, M. A.; Skards, J.; Baubiniene, A.; Berukstis, E.; Grigoniene, L.; Grybauskas, A. N.; Kibarskis, A.; Kirkutis, A.; Marcinkus, R.; Milvidaite, I.; Vasiliauskas, D.; Aalders, J. C. A.; Bruggeling, W. A. J.; Bucx, J. J. J.; de Feyter, P. J.; de Leeuw, M. J.; de Waard, D. E. P.; de Weerd, G. J.; de Zwaan, C.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Droste, H. T.; Freericks, M. P.; Hagoort Kok, A. W.; Jap, W. T. J.; Jochemsen, G. M.; Kiemeney, K.; Kuijer, P. J. P.; Mannaerts, H. F. J.; Piek, J. J.; Saelman, J. P. M.; Slob, F. D.; Smits, W. C. G.; Spierenburg, H. A. M.; Suttorp, M. J.; Tan, T. B.; van Beek, G. J.; van Daele, M. E. R. M.; van den Merkhof, L. F. M.; van den Toren, E. W.; van Hessen, M. W. J.; van Langeveld, R. A. M.; van Loo, L. W. H.; van Nierop, P. R.; van Rey, F. J. W.; van Straalen, M. J.; Vos, J.; Werner, H. A.; Westendorp, J. J. C.; Zwiers, G.; Achremczyk, P.; Adamus, J.; Baska, J.; Bolinska Soltysiak, H.; Bubinski, R.; Ceremuzynski, L.; Cieslinski, A.; Dariusz, D.; Deptulski, T.; Drewla, P.; Drozdowski, P.; Dubiel, J. S.; Dudek, D.; Galewicz, M.; Ghlebus, K.; Halawa, B.; Jakubowska Majnigier, M.; Janion, M.; Jaworska, K.; Kaszewska, I.; Kleinrok, A.; Kornacewicz Jach, Z.; Krawczyk, W.; Krynicki, R.; Krzciuk, M.; Krzeminska Pakula, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce clinical symptoms and improve outcome in patients with hypertension, heart failure, and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and are among the most frequently used drugs in these patient groups. For hypertension, treatment is guided

  14. Effects of high-dose atorvastatin on cerebrovascular events in patients with stable coronary disease in the TNT (treating to new targets) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, David D.; LaRosa, John C.; Barter, Philip; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Gotto, Antonio M.; Carter, Roddy; Breazna, Andrei; Kastelein, John J. P.; Grundy, Scott M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the effects on cerebrovascular events of treating patients with stable coronary disease with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels substantially below 100 mg/dl. BACKGROUND: Lowering LDL-C with statins has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke in

  15. Metabolic syndrome is independently associated with increased 20-year mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Arwa; Younis, Anan; Tzur, Boaz; Peled, Yael; Shlomo, Nir; Goldenberg, Ilan; Fisman, Enrique Z; Tenenbaum, Alexander; Klempfner, Robert

    2016-10-28

    Data regarding long-term association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with adverse outcomes are conflicting. We aim to determine the independent association of MetS (based on its different definitions) with 20 year all-cause mortality among patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Our study comprised 15,524 patients who were enrolled in the Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention registry between February 1, 1990, and October 31, 1992, and subsequently followed-up for the long-term mortality through December 31, 2014. MetS was defined according to two definitions: The International Diabetes Federation (IDF); and the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP). According to the IDF criteria 2122 (14%) patients had MetS, whereas according to the NCEP definition 7446 (48%) patients had MetS. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that all-cause mortality was significantly higher among patients with MetS defined by both the IDF (67 vs. 61%; log rank-p definition. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that long-term increased mortality risk associated with MetS was consistent among most clinical subgroups excepted patients with renal failure (p value for interaction Metabolic syndrome is independently associated with an increased 20-year all-cause mortality risk among patients with stable CAD. This association was consistent when either the IDF or NCEP definitions were used. Trial registration retrospective registered.

  16. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Eikelboom, John W; Bosch, Jackie

    2018-01-01

    coronary intervention, or previous multi-vessel coronary artery bypass graft surgery. After a 30-day run in period, patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive rivaroxaban (2·5 mg orally twice a day) plus aspirin (100 mg once a day), rivaroxaban alone (5 mg orally twice a day), or aspirin alone (100....... The combination of rivaroxaban plus aspirin reduced the primary outcome more than aspirin alone (347 [4%] of 8313 vs 460 [6%] of 8261; hazard ratio [HR] 0·74, 95% CI 0·65-0·86, palone did not significantly improve the primary outcome when compared with treatment...... with aspirin alone (411 [5%] of 8250 vs 460 [6%] of 8261; HR 0·89, 95% CI 0·78-1·02, p=0·094). Combined rivaroxaban plus aspirin treatment resulted in more major bleeds than treatment with aspirin alone (263 [3%] of 8313 vs 158 [2%] of 8261; HR 1·66, 95% CI 1·37-2·03, p

  17. Relation of Leukocytes and Its Subsets Counts with the Severity of Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Diabetic Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Song-Hui; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Qing, Ping; Xu, Rui-Xia; Wu, Na-Qiong; Jiang, Li-Xin; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background Both coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with inflammation. However, whether and which leukocytes can predict the presence and extent of CAD in patients with DM has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of leukocyte and its subsets counts with the severity of CAD in patients with DM. Methods and Findings Three hundred and seventy-three diabetic patients who were scheduled for coronary angiography due to typical stable angina pectoris were enrolled in this study. They were classified into the three groups according to tertiles of Gensini score (GS, low group 28, n = 121). The relationship between the leukocyte and its subsets counts with the severity of CAD were evaluated. The data indicated that there were significant correlations between leukocyte and neutrophil counts with GS (r = 0.154 and 0.156, respectively, all Pleukocyte and neutrophil counts were 0.61 and 0.60 respectively (95%CI: 0.55–0.67, all P = 0.001) for predicting high GS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that leukocyte count was an independent predictor for high GS patients with DM (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.03–1.39, P = 0.023) after adjusting for conventional risk factors of CAD. Conclusions Compared with its subsets, leukocyte count appeared to be an independent predictor for the severity of CAD and the optimal cut-off value for predicting high GS (>28 points) was 5.0×109 cells/L in diabetic patients. PMID:24599246

  18. Meta-analysis of trials on mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention compared with medical therapy in patients with stable coronary heart disease and objective evidence of myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gada, Hemal; Kirtane, Ajay J; Kereiakes, Dean J; Bangalore, Sripal; Moses, Jeffrey W; Généreux, Philippe; Mehran, Roxana; Dangas, George D; Leon, Martin B; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-05-01

    Outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) versus medical therapy (MT) in the management of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) remain controversial, with some but not all studies showing improved results in patients with ischemia. We sought to elucidate whether PCI improves mortality compared to MT in patients with objective evidence of ischemia (assessed using noninvasive imaging or its invasive equivalent). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PCI to MT in patients with SIHD. To maintain a high degree of specificity for ischemia, studies were only included if ischemia was defined on the basis of noninvasive stress imaging or abnormal fractional flow reserve. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. We identified 3 RCTs (Effects of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in Silent Ischemia After Myocardial Infarction II, Fractional Flow Reserve versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation 2, and a substudy of the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation trial) enrolling a total of 1,557 patients followed for an average of 3.0 years. When compared with MT in this population of patients with objective ischemia, PCI was associated with lower mortality (hazard ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.30 to 0.92, p=0.02). There was no evidence of study heterogeneity or bias among included trials. In this meta-analysis of published RCTs, PCI was shown to have a mortality benefit over MT in patients with SIHD and objective assessment of ischemia using noninvasive imaging or its invasive equivalent. In conclusion, this study provides insight into the management of a higher-risk SIHD population that is the focus of the ongoing International Study of Comparative Health Effectiveness with Medical and Invasive Approaches trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Insufficient control of heart rate in stable coronary artery disease patients in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Balode

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Despite the wide use of beta-blockers, HR is insufficiently controlled in the analyzed sample of stable CAD patients in Latvia. Target HR ≤60 bpm is achieved only in 25% of the patients while more than one third have increased HR ≥70 bpm.

  20. A randomized study of coconut oil versus sunflower oil on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Maniyal; Vasudevan, D M; Sundaram, K R; Krishnan, Sajitha; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Nandakumar, Sandya; Chandrasekhar, Rajiv; Mathew, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and its pathological atherosclerotic process are closely related to lipids. Lipids levels are in turn influenced by dietary oils and fats. Saturated fatty acids increase the risk for atherosclerosis by increasing the cholesterol level. This study was conducted to investigate the impact of cooking oil media (coconut oil and sunflower oil) on lipid profile, antioxidant mechanism, and endothelial function in patients with established CAD. In a single center randomized study in India, patients with stable CAD on standard medical care were assigned to receive coconut oil (Group I) or sunflower oil (Group II) as cooking media for 2 years. Anthropometric measurements, serum, lipids, Lipoprotein a, apo B/A-1 ratio, antioxidants, flow-mediated vasodilation, and cardiovascular events were assessed at 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Hundred patients in each arm completed 2 years with 98% follow-up. There was no statistically significant difference in the anthropometric, biochemical, vascular function, and in cardiovascular events after 2 years. Coconut oil even though rich in saturated fatty acids in comparison to sunflower oil when used as cooking oil media over a period of 2 years did not change the lipid-related cardiovascular risk factors and events in those receiving standard medical care. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of a train-the-trainer program for stable coronary artery disease management in community settings: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyun; Jiang, Changying; Chen, Liqun

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of conducting a train-the-trainer (TTT) program for stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) management in community settings. The study involved two steps: (1) tutors trained community nurses as trainers and (2) the community nurses trained patients. 51 community nurses attended a 2-day TTT program and completed questionnaires assessing knowledge, self-efficacy, and satisfaction. By a feasibility and non-randomized control study, 120 SCAD patients were assigned either to intervention group (which received interventions from trained nurses) or control group (which received routine management). Pre- and post-intervention, patients' self-management behaviors and satisfaction were assessed to determine the program's overall impact. Community nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy improved (PSCAD management in community settings in China was generally feasible and effective, but many obstacles remain including patients' noncompliance, nurses' busy work schedules, and lack of policy supports. Finding ways to enhance the motivation of community nurses and patients with SCAD are important in implementing community-based TTT programs for SCAD management; further multicenter and randomized control trials are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic therapy in the comprehensive treatment of patients with comorbidity of chronic pancreatitis and stable coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Babinets

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic therapy is one of the few ways to restore normal functions of all the vital organs and systems. The goal of the research was to explore the effectiveness of a course of treatment using metabolic drug Vazonat (meldonium dihydrate to correct prooxidant-antioxidant and trophological disorders in patients with comorbid course of chronic pancreatitis (CP and stable coronary artery disease (SCAD. The study included 90 patients with CP in combination with SCAD, who were divided into two groups (depending on the treatment program: I group (45 patients received conventional treatment (CT; group II (45 patients in addition to CT received Vazonat as follows: 5 ml intravenous bolus injection 1 time a day for 10 days followed by administration of 1 capsule (250 mg, 2 times per day for one month. It has been shown that the addition of Vazonat to the treatment of patients with comorbidity of CP and SCAD is more conducive to improving the performance and trophological prooxidant-antioxidant status than the standard basic therapy.

  3. [Stress Echocardiography in the Assessment of Long-Term Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, A Y; Elkanova, M M; Shitov, N V; Botvina, V U; Lopukhova, V V; Saidova, A M

    2017-07-01

    To study the possibilities of stress echocardiography (EchoCG) in the assessment of clinical state of patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We included into this study 80 patients with stable ischemic heart disease. After preliminary examination, all patients underwent PCI. Stress EchoCG was carried out in 6 and 12 months after PCI. Clinical effect assessed in 12 months after revascularization was good in 90% of patients. We registered significant increase of exercise capacity (from 97 to 118 W; p=0.001), increase of double product (from 232 to 275; p=0.009), decrease of myocardial ischemia volume (regional contractility impairment index before PCI 1.36, a year after PCI 1.16; p=0.001). The incidence of restenosis was 7.5%. Restenosis was accompanied by a deterioration of clinical status of patients (silent myocardial ischemia, angina recurrence). The accuracy of stress echocardiography in detecting myocardial ischemia in patients after PCI was 94%. Stress EchoCG has high diagnostic accuracy for detection of myocardial ischemia in patients after PCI during the first 12 months after revascularization.

  4. Clarithromycin for stable coronary heart disease increases all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and cerebrovascular morbidity over 10years in the CLARICOR randomised, blinded clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Per; Hilden, Jørgen; Hansen, Jørgen Fischer

    2015-01-01

    -cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.21) and cerebrovascular disease during 10years (HR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38). The increased mortality and morbidity were restricted to patients not on statin at entry (HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.04-1.31, and HR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1...... death outside hospital and cerebrovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease who were not on statin. The increased cardiovascular mortality was years later compensated, likely through frailty attrition.......BACKGROUND: The CLARICOR trial reported that clarithromycin compared with placebo increased all-cause mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. This study investigates the effects of clarithromycin versus placebo during 10years follow up. METHODS: The CLARICOR trial is a randomised...

  5. Coronary artery disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the coronary arteries narrow, the flow of blood to the ...

  6. Plasma levels of myeloperoxidase are not elevated in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubala, Lukáš; Lu, G.; Baldus, S.; Berglund, L.; Eiserich, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 394, - (2008), s. 59-62 ISSN 0009-8981 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/06/1197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cardiovascular disease s * myeloperoxidase * polymorphonuclear neutrophils Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.960, year: 2008

  7. A case-control validation of Type D personality in Greek patients with stable coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christodoulou, C.; Douzenis, A.; Mommersteeg, P.M.C.; Rallidis, L.S.; Poulios, A.; Efstathiou, V.; Bouras, G.; Varounis, C.; Korkoliakou, P.; Palios, J.; Kremastinos, D.T.; Lykouras, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Type D personality has been associated with a variety of emotional and social difficulties as well as with poor prognosis in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the psychometric properties and validity of the Type D Scale-14 (DS14) and the prevalence of

  8. Design and rationale of the MR-INFORM study: stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to guide the management of patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Shazia T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD, decisions regarding revascularisation are primarily driven by the severity and extent of coronary luminal stenoses as determined by invasive coronary angiography. More recently, revascularisation decisions based on invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR have shown improved event free survival. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR perfusion imaging has been shown to be non-inferior to nuclear perfusion imaging in a multi-centre setting and superior in a single centre trial. In addition, it is similar to invasively determined FFR and therefore has the potential to become the non-invasive test of choice to determine need for revascularisation. Trial design The MR-INFORM study is a prospective, multi-centre, randomised controlled non-inferiority, outcome trial. The objective is to compare the efficacy of two investigative strategies for the management of patients with suspected CAD. Patients presenting with stable angina are randomised into two groups: 1 The FFR-INFORMED group has subsequent management decisions guided by coronary angiography and fractional flow reserve measurements. 2 The MR-INFORMED group has decisions guided by stress perfusion CMR. The primary end-point will be the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction and repeat revascularisation at one year. Clinical trials.gov identifier NCT01236807. Conclusion MR INFORM will assess whether an initial strategy of CMR perfusion is non-inferior to invasive angiography supplemented by FFR measurements to guide the management of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Non-inferiority of CMR perfusion imaging to the current invasive reference standard (FFR would establish CMR perfusion imaging as an attractive non-invasive alternative to current diagnostic pathways.

  9. Autotransplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone-marrow to heart in patients with severe stable coronary artery disease and refractory angina — Final 3-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Jørgensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed long-term safety and efficacy of intramyocardial injection of autologous bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) in patients with severe stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina.......The study assessed long-term safety and efficacy of intramyocardial injection of autologous bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) in patients with severe stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina....

  10. Treatment with triple combination of atorvastatin, perindopril, and amlodipine in patients with stable coronary artery disease: A subgroup analysis from the PAPA-CAD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dézsi, Csaba András

    2018-01-01

    Background In patients with stable coronary artery disease, aspirin, a statin, and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor are recommended as first-line agents for secondary prevention. Subgroup analyses of the previously published Hungarian Perindopril plus Amlodipine in PAtients with Coronary Artery Disease (PAPA-CAD) non-interventional trial demonstrated that the addition of the metabolically beneficial, fixed combination of perindopril + amlodipine to atorvastatin further improves the patient's lipid profile. Methods The PAPA-CAD study, a 6-month open-label, prospective, multicenter, observational/non-interventional survey evaluated data accumulated from patients with hypertensive patients with stable coronary artery disease. The herein-reported subgroup analysis was conducted using the findings from those 1130 patients, who were taking atorvastatin in addition to the fixed combination of perindopril + amlodipine at the time of all four study visits (i.e., at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months later). Results In the subgroup of patients taking atorvastatin as an add-on agent, 82.5% reached the target blood pressure of 140/90 mmHg compared with 78.8% of those not taking a statin. The addition of atorvastatin to the fixed combination of perindopril + amlodipine resulted in further significant improvements of key metabolic parameters. Conclusion This subgroup analysis confirmed that favorable synergism exists among perindopril, amlodipine, and atorvastatin.

  11. Lipoprotein(a as a predictor of poor collateral circulation in patients with chronic stable coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fan

    Full Text Available As a mechanism compensating for obstructive coronary artery disease, coronary collateral circulation (CCC has attracted cardiologists for a long time to explore its potential impact. In the present study, Chinese patients suffering from ≥95% coronary stenosis, as diagnosed by angiography, have been investigated for the correlation between CCC and lipoprotein(a [Lp(a] levels. A cohort of 654 patients was divided into four categories according to Rentrop grades 0, 1, 2, and 3. Lp(a levels were divided into model 1, discretized with critical values of 33 and 66%, and model 2, discretized with a cutoff value of 30.0 mg/dL. Furthermore, we evaluated the correlation between CCC and serum Lp(a levels. The four groups had significantly different Lp(a levels (25.80±24.72, 18.99±17.83, 15.39±15.80, and 8.40±7.75 mg/dL; P30.0 group (OR=6.77, 95%CI=4.44-10.4 was greater than that of Lp(a <30.0 mg/dL. The worst condition of CCC can be predicted independently by Lp(a levels. In addition to clinical usage, Lp(a levels can also be utilized as biological markers.

  12. Diagnostic significance of the newest biomarkers of steatosis progression in patients with stable coronary heart disease, combined with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vakalyuk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to determine the diagnostic value of selenoprotein P and M30 fragments of cytokeratin 18 in conjunction with proinflammatory cytokines for early diagnosis and progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD. Materials and methods. 140 patients with NAFLD and stable CHD of II-III functional classes were examined: 89 patients with non-alcoholic steatosis (Group I; 51 patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (Group II. General-clinical examination, electrocardiography, coronary angiography, echocardiography, liver ultrasound, determination of cytokeratin 18 M30, selenoprotein P, TNF-alpha, interleukin-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein serum levels were performed to all patients. Results. The presence of liver steatosis of different degrees was established in all examined patients. However, the majority of the patients of Group I had steatosis of 1 and 2 degrees; in group 2 – steatosis of 3 degree prevailed. Selenoprotein P level in patients with steatosis of 1 degree was on 39.6 % higher compared with 0 degree; at 2 degree – it was by 2.8 times higher vs. its level in the control group and by 1.9 times vs. its level at steatosis of 1 degree (P < 0.05. Cytokeratin 18 M30 level at steatosis of 1 degree was by 1.8 times higher than its value in the control group; at 2 degree – it exceed this value by 2.3 times; at 3 degree – it reached its highest value (P < 0.05. TNF-alpha level at 1 degree of steatosis was by 2.5 times higher than its value in the control group; at 2 degree – it exceed this value by 3.7 times; at 3 degree – it was by 5.4; 2.2 and 1.5 times higher vs. its value at steatosis 0, 1 and 2 degrees (P < 0.05. Similar patterns were observed by IL-6 and hsCRP levels. Positive correlation relationships between serum selenoprotein P, cytokeratin 18 M30 and proinflammatory cytokines levels were revealed. Conclusion. Increasing of serum selenoprotein

  13. Effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1receptor agonist liraglutide on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes and stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumarathurai, Preman; Anholm, Christian; Fabricius-Bjerre, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    -one patients with type 2 diabetes and stable coronary artery disease were randomized to receive liraglutide or placebo to a backbone therapy of metformin in this double-blind, placebo-controlled 12 along with 12 weeks crossover study. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed at the start...... or the nocturnal BP dipping. Conclusions: We could not demonstrate any BP-lowering effect of liraglutide when using 24-h ABPM. Liraglutide exhibited diurnal variation in the effect on BP without affecting the BP variability or nocturnal BP dipping....

  14. Stable coronary syndromes: pathophysiology, diagnostic advances and therapeutic need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, David

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostic management of patients with angina pectoris typically centres on the detection of obstructive epicardial CAD, which aligns with evidence-based treatment options that include medical therapy and myocardial revascularisation. This clinical paradigm fails to account for the considerable proportion (approximately one-third) of patients with angina in whom obstructive CAD is excluded. This common scenario presents a diagnostic conundrum whereby angina occurs but there is no obstructive CAD (ischaemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease—INOCA). We review new insights into the pathophysiology of angina whereby myocardial ischaemia results from a deficient supply of oxygenated blood to the myocardium, due to various combinations of focal or diffuse epicardial disease (macrovascular), microvascular dysfunction or both. Macrovascular disease may be due to the presence of obstructive CAD secondary to atherosclerosis, or may be dynamic due to a functional disorder (eg, coronary artery spasm, myocardial bridging). Pathophysiology of coronary microvascular disease may involve anatomical abnormalities resulting in increased coronary resistance, or functional abnormalities resulting in abnormal vasomotor tone. We consider novel clinical diagnostic techniques enabling new insights into the causes of angina and appraise the need for improved therapeutic options for patients with INOCA. We conclude that the taxonomy of stable CAD could improve to better reflect the heterogeneous pathophysiology of the coronary circulation. We propose the term ‘stable coronary syndromes’ (SCS), which aligns with the well-established terminology for ‘acute coronary syndromes’. SCS subtends a clinically relevant classification that more fully encompasses the different diseases of the epicardial and microvascular coronary circulation. PMID:29030424

  15. Association of Fibrinogen with Severity of Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetic Mellitus

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    Li-Feng Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some studies have suggested a relation of plasma fibrinogen to the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD. However, whether plasma fibrinogen can predict the presence and severity of CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus has not been determined. Methods. A total of consecutive 373 diabetic patients with typical angina pectoris who received coronary angiography were enrolled and classified into three groups by tertiles of Gensini score (GS, low group 28. The relationship between fibrinogen and GS was evaluated. Results. There were correlations of fibrinogen with hemoglobin A1c, C-reactive protein, and GS (r=0.17, r=0.52, and r=0.21, resp.; all P<0.001. Area under the receivers operating characteristic curve of fibrinogen was 0.62 (95% CI 0.56–0.68, P<0.001 for predicting a high GS. Multivariate analysis suggested that plasma fibrinogen was an independent predictor of a high GS for diabetic patients (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.04–1.88, and P=0.026 after adjusting for traditional risk factors of CAD. Conclusions. The present data indicated that plasma fibrinogen, a readily measurable systematic inflammatory marker, appeared to be an independent predictor for the severity of CAD in diabetic patients.

  16. Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in some patients. Calcium channel blockers may cause constipation and leg swelling. Most patients don’t have ... stress test, cardiovascular, Chest Pain, coronary artery disease, elderly, electrocardiogram, older adults, senior, shortness of breath March ...

  17. Relation of whole blood n-3 fatty acid levels to exercise parameters in patients with stable coronary artery disease (from the heart and soul study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, Brian; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Harris, William S; Garg, Sachin; Na, Beeya; Whooley, Mary A

    2011-04-15

    Dietary intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular events. Mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood but may include beneficial effects on physical conditioning and vagal tone. We investigated the association of n-3 fatty acid levels to exercise parameters in 992 subjects with stable coronary artery disease. Cross-sectional associations of heart rate recovery time, treadmill exercise capacity, and exercise time with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels were evaluated in multivariable linear and logistic regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, co-morbidities, self-reported physical activity, medication use, and left ventricular function. After multivariable adjustment, n-3 fatty acid levels (DHA + EPA) were strongly associated with heart rate recovery (beta 2.1, p = 0.003), exercise capacity (beta 0.8, p exercise time (beta 0.9, p exercise time (odds ratio 0.7, p = 0.01) and trended toward significance for exercise capacity (odds ratio 0.8, p = 0.07). These associations were not modified by demographics, body mass index, smoking, co-morbid conditions, statin use, or β-blocker use (p for interaction >0.1 for all comparisons). In conclusion, an independent association exists between n-3 fatty acid levels and important exercise parameters in patients with stable coronary artery disease. These findings support the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acids may increase vagal tone and physical conditioning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Incidence, prognostic impact, and optimal definition of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in consecutive patients with stable or unstable coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. insights from the all-comer PRODIGY trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimi, Gabriele; Leonardi, Sergio; Costa, Francesco; Ariotti, Sara; Tebaldi, Matteo; Biscaglia, Simone; Valgimigli, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is associated with poor outcome. Whether this association differs in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) as compared to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients is unknown. Definitions and Methods: PRODIGY trial patients were defined as stable CAD or ACS according to the initial presentation. CI-AKI was defined as an increase (Δ) of serum creatinine (SCr) ≥25% above baseline. Two endpoints were considered: all-cause death and the composite of death, stroke, or myocardial infarction (MI). The interaction between CI-AKI, clinical setting, and the impact of increasing ΔSCr% cut-offs were also explored. Two thousand three patients were enrolled in the PRODIGY trial, 85 patients were excluded for missing SCr data, leading to a population of 1,918 patients. CI-AKI incidence was 6.7% in stable CAD and 12.2% in ACS patients. CI-AKI was associated with all-cause mortality [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-3.05, P  0.001]. In a large, contemporary, all-comers percutaneous coronary intervention population, CI-AKI was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death and the composite of death, stroke, or MI. While CI-AKI is more common in ACS than in stable CAD patients, its adjusted prognostic impact on the composite endpoint appears to be more pronounced in patients with stable CAD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The effects of implementation of guideline-directed medical therapy on relief of angina in patients with stable coronary artery disease in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adherence to proposed lifestyle changes and prescribed medication in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD is poor. Objective. We sought to investigate the influence of adjusting guideline proposed medications on relief of angina in a large group of patients with SCAD in Serbia. Methods. The study included a total of 3,490 patients from 15 cardiology clinics with symptoms of stable angina and at least one of the following criteria: abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG, history of myocardial infarction (MI, positive stress test, significant coronary artery disease on coronary angiogram or previous revascularization. All the patients underwent comprehensive evaluation at initial visit and after two months. The relief of angina was study end-point defined as any reduction in Canadian Cardiology Society (CCS class, number of angina attacks per week and/or number of tablets of short-acting nitrates per week. Results. Most patients were included based on abnormal ECG (48.4%. At Visit 1, the average number of prescribed classes of medications to a single patient increased from 4.16 ± 1.29 to 4.63 ± 1.57 (p < 0.001. At the follow-up, the patients had significantly lower blood pressure (141 ± 19 / 85 ± 11 vs. 130 ± 12 / 80 ± 8 mmHg; p < 0.001 and most of them reported CCS class I (63.3%. The average weekly number of angina attacks was reduced from 2.82 ± 2.50 at Visit 1 to 1.72 0 ± 1.66 at Visit 2, as well as average weekly use of short-acting nitrates to treat these attacks (2.69 ± 2.53 to 1.74 ± 1.47 tablets; p < 0.001 for all. Conclusion. Adjustment of prescribed medications to guideline recommendations in a large Serbian patient population with prevalent risk factors led to significant relief of angina.

  20. [Effects of aerobic exercise combined with resistance training on the cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity of patients with stable coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S X; Chen, Y Y; Xie, K L; Zhang, W L

    2017-12-24

    Objective: To observe the effects of aerobic exercise combined with resistance training on the cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) . Methods: From June 2014 to December 2015, 73 patients with stable CAD in our department were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups: the control group ( n= 38) and the exercise group ( n= 35) . Patients in both groups received conventional medical treatment for CAD and related cardiac health education. While for patients in exercise group, a twelve-week aerobic exercise combined with resistance training program were applied on top of conventional treatment and health education. Cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity were evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Results: (1) The exercise capacity was significantly increased in the exercise group after 12 weeks training as compared to baseline level: peak oxygen uptake per kilogram ( (26.25±5.14) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) vs. (20.88±4.59) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) , anaerobic threshold ( (15.24±2.75) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) vs. (13.52±2.92) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)], peak oxygen pulse ( (11.91±2.89) ml/beat vs. (9.77±2.49) ml/beat) , peak Watts ( (113.2±34.0) W vs. (103.7±27.9) W) , peak metabolic equivalent ( (7.57±1.46) METs vs. (6.00±1.32) METs) (all Pexercise group than in control group (all Pcoronary artery disease. This combined exercise program can significantly improve the cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity of patients with stable coronary artery disease.

  1. Clinical characteristics and usage of statins in patients with stable ischemic heart disease referred for angiography or coronary artery bypass grafting

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    I.V. Shklianka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to compare the clinical characteristics and frequency of statins usage in real clinical practice in patients referred to a specialized clinic for angiography or coronary artery bypass grafting. Materials and methods. In a retrospective slice single-center study data from a primary examination of 155 patients with stable ischemic heart disease, consecutively selected for coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, were analyzed. Depending on the inclusion of statins in the list of medicinal prescriptions, patients were retrospectively divided into two groups: those who had been prescribed statins while they were initially referred to a specialized cardiac surgery center for angiography or revascularization (n = 84 and those who were not prescribed statins (n ​​= 71. Results. The studied patients’ cohort was characterized by earlier coronary events, signs of the peripheral artery atherosclerosis and other absolute indications for treatment with statins in vast majority of cases. At the same time, groups of patients who had been and had not been prescribed statins, did not differ by vast majority of demographic, clinical and instrumental characteristics, concomitant diseases and risk factors. No statin therapy was associated with higher levels of total cholesterol and interleukin-6 compared with the group of patients taking statins (total cholesterol, respectively, 4.8 versus 4.2 mmol/l (p = 0.016 and interleukin-6, respectively, 4.4 versus. 3.1 p/ml (p = 0.022. In general, statins were prescribed in 54,2 % of patients, among them high doses – in 17 patients (20.2 %, moderate – 46 patients (54.8 %, low – 21 patients (25 %. Conclusions. The obtained data show the insufficient level of ambulatory statins usage in patients with ischemic heart disease referred for myocardial revascularization and significant discrepancy between clinical characteristics and real statins usage. Therefore, there is a great need to determine the

  2. A Comparison of the Updated Diamond-Forrester, CAD Consortium, and CONFIRM History-Based Risk Scores for Predicting Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Stable Chest Pain: The SCOT-HEART Coronary CTA Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Lohendran; Danad, Ibrahim; Gransar, Heidi; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Lin, Fay Y; Peña, Jessica M; Hunter, Amanda; Newby, David E; Adamson, Philip D; Min, James K

    2018-04-13

    This study sought to compare the performance of history-based risk scores in predicting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) among patients with stable chest pain from the SCOT-HEART study. Risk scores for estimating pre-test probability of CAD are derived from referral-based populations with a high prevalence of disease. The generalizability of these scores to lower prevalence populations in the initial patient encounter for chest pain is uncertain. We compared 3 scores among patients with suspected CAD in the coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) randomized arm of the SCOT-HEART study for the outcome of obstructive CAD by coronary CTA: the updated Diamond-Forrester score (UDF), CAD Consortium clinical score (CAD2), and CONFIRM risk score (CRS). We tested calibration with goodness-of-fit, discrimination with area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC), and reclassification with net reclassification improvement (NRI) to identify low-risk patients. In 1,738 patients (58 ± 10 years and 44.0% women), overall calibration was best for UDF, with underestimation by CRS and CAD2. Discrimination by AUC was highest for CAD2 at 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77 to 0.81) than for UDF (0.77 [95% CI: 0.74 to 0.79]) or CRS (0.75 [95% CI: 0.73 to 0.77]) (p CAD2 (NRI 0.31, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.35) followed by CRS (NRI 0.21, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.25) compared with UDF (p CAD and uniform CAD evaluation by coronary CTA, CAD2 provided the best discrimination and classification, despite overestimation of obstructive CAD as evaluated by coronary CTA. CRS exhibited intermediate performance followed by UDF for discrimination and reclassification. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Clinical proteomics identifies urinary CD14 as a potential biomarker for diagnosis of stable coronary artery disease.

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    Min-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a key role in coronary artery disease (CAD and other manifestations of atherosclerosis. Recently, urinary proteins were found to be useful markers for reflecting inflammation status of different organs. To identify potential biomarker for diagnosis of CAD, we performed one-dimensional SDS-gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Among the proteins differentially expressed in urine samples, monocyte antigen CD14 was found to be consistently expressed in higher amounts in the CAD patients as compared to normal controls. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to analyze the concentrations of CD14 in urine and serum, we confirmed that urinary CD14 levels were significantly higher in patients (n = 73 with multi-vessel and single vessel CAD than in normal control (n = 35 (P < 0.001. Logistic regression analysis further showed that urinary CD14 concentration level is associated with severity or number of diseased vessels and SYNTAX score after adjustment for potential confounders. Concomitantly, the proportion of CD14+ monocytes was significantly increased in CAD patients (59.7 ± 3.6% as compared with healthy controls (14.9 ± 2.1% (P < 0.001, implicating that a high level of urinary CD14 may be potentially involved in mechanism(s leading to CAD pathogenesis. By performing shotgun proteomics, we further revealed that CD14-associated inflammatory response networks may play an essential role in CAD. In conclusion, the current study has demonstrated that release of CD14 in urine coupled with more CD14+ monocytes in CAD patients is significantly correlated with severity of CAD, pointing to the potential application of urinary CD14 as a novel noninvasive biomarker for large-scale diagnostic screening of susceptible CAD patients.

  4. Coronary revascularization does not decrease cardiac events in patients with stable ischemic heart disease but might do in those who showed moderate to severe ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroi, Masao; Yamashina, Akira; Tsukamoto, Kazumasa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2012-07-12

    As an initial management strategy for stable ischemic heart disease (IHD), coronary revascularization therapy is thought to be equal to optimal medical therapy alone regarding prognosis. Whether or not the effects of revascularization on the prognosis of patients with stable IHD are associated with the amount of ischemic myocardium detected by nuclear stress imaging was evaluated. This retrospective study analyzed data from 4629 patients with suspected or known IHD who underwent gated stress myocardial-perfusion SPECT at 117 hospitals in Japan. The follow-up periods were three years and the combined endpoints consisted of cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization. After matching propensity scores between patients who underwent early revascularization and those who did not (n=316 per group), we compared cardiac event rates in relation to the amount of ischemic myocardium. Cardiac event rates did not significantly differ between patients who underwent early revascularization and those who did not (5.4% vs. 6.4%). Among patients with ≤ 5%, 6-10%, and >10% ischemic myocardium, cardiac event rates were 8%, 3% and 0% respectively, who underwent early revascularization compared with 4.5%, 6.1%, and 12.3%, respectively, among those who did not. Cardiac event rates were significantly lower among patients with >10% ischemic myocardium who underwent early revascularization compared with those who did not (0% vs. 12.3%, p=0.0062). Coronary revascularization for stable IHD does not decrease major cardiac events in all patients but might do in patients with moderate to severe ischemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anxiety and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anja Kokalj; Brigita Novak Šarotar

    2018-01-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease anxiety is often overlooked. Symptoms of anxiety are often similar to coronary heart disease symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety in general population and coronary heart disease patients is very high. While the underlying pathophysiology of the connection remains unclear, anxiety lowers the quality of life and is a factor for a higher risk of morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  6. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis of the correlation of Chinese medicine syndrome evolvement and cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Li, Si-wei; Shang, Qing-hua; Fu, Chang-geng; Gao, Zhu-ye; Xu, Hao; Shi, Da-zhuo; Chen, Ke-ji

    2014-05-01

    To analyze the correlation of Chinese medicine syndrome evolvement and cardiovascular: events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). This prospective cohort study investigated and: collected the clinical information of patients with stable CHD and observed the syndrome type at the baseline and 6-month at follow-up, as well as the cardiovascular events during the 6-month and 12-month follow-up. The patients were divided into the event group and the non-event group. The interaction and the impact of syndrome evolvement on cardiovascular events were examined through multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis and the results were verified by Chi-square test. Totally 1,333 of 1,503 stable CHD patients enrolled met the inclusion criteria: of MDR analysis. Among them, 959 (71.9%) cases were males and 374 (28.1%) cases were females. Thirty seven cases had cardiovascular events during 6 to 12 months after the study began. The results of the MDR analysis and verification using Chi-square test showed that the development of cardiovascular events was positively correlated with interaction between blood stasis and toxic syndrome at the baseline, blood stasis at the baseline and qi deficiency at the 6-month follow-up, toxic syndrome at the baseline and qi deficiency at the 6-month follow-up, toxic syndrome at the base line and blood stasis at the 6-month follow-up, qi deficiency and blood stasis at the 6-month follow-up (P<0.05 for all). Blood stasis, toxic syndrome and qi deficiency are important factors of stable CHD. There: are positive correlation between cardiovascular events and syndrome evolution from blood stasis to qi deficiency, from toxic syndrome to qi deficiency and from toxic syndrome to blood stasis, indicating the pathogenesis of toxin consuming qi, toxin leading to blood-stasis in stable CHD patients prone to recurrent cardiovascular events.

  7. Practice Patterns for Outpatients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Case Vignette-based Survey Among French Cardiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Bauters

    2015-11-01

    Interpretation: When not guided by high-level recommendations, practice patterns for routine clinical situations in stable CAD vary considerably. Future clinical trials should address these clinical interrogations.

  8. Traditional Risk Factors Versus Biomarkers for Prediction of Secondary Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease: From the Heart and Soul Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Alexis L; Ku, Ivy A; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Christenson, Robert H; DeFilippi, Christopher R; Ganz, Peter; Ix, Joachim H; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Omland, Torbjørn; Sabatine, Marc S; Schiller, Nelson B; Shlipak, Michael G; Skali, Hicham; Takeuchi, Madoka; Vittinghoff, Eric; Whooley, Mary A

    2015-07-06

    Patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) have widely varying prognoses and treatment options. Validated models for risk stratification of patients with CHD are needed. We sought to evaluate traditional and novel risk factors as predictors of secondary cardiovascular (CV) events, and to develop a prediction model that could be used to risk stratify patients with stable CHD. We used independent derivation (912 participants in the Heart and Soul Study) and validation (2876 participants in the PEACE trial) cohorts of patients with stable CHD to develop a risk prediction model using Cox proportional hazards models. The outcome was CV events, defined as myocardial infarction, stroke, or CV death. The annual rate of CV events was 3.4% in the derivation cohort and 2.2% in the validation cohort. With the exception of smoking, traditional risk factors (including age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes) did not emerge as the top predictors of secondary CV events. The top 4 predictors of secondary events were the following: N-terminal pro-type brain natriuretic peptide, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T, urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, and current smoking. The 5-year C-index for this 4-predictor model was 0.73 in the derivation cohort and 0.65 in the validation cohort. As compared with variables in the Framingham secondary events model, the Heart and Soul risk model resulted in net reclassification improvement of 0.47 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.73) in the derivation cohort and 0.18 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.40) in the validation cohort. Novel risk factors are superior to traditional risk factors for predicting 5-year risk of secondary events in patients with stable CHD. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    A family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important risk factor for adverse coronary events, in particular if the disease has an early onset. The risk of CAD is influenced by genetic and environmental factors with a greater genetic contribution earlier in life. Through recent years......), and to characterize and quantify subclinical atherosclerosis in their relatives. Furthermore, the aim was to explore the impact of common genetic risk variants on the age of onset, familial clustering and disease severity. In study I, 143 patients with early- onset CAD were recruited from the Western Denmark Heart...... the advances in genetic techniques has led to an increased understanding of the genetic background of CAD, which may potentially be translated into clinical use. The studies of this thesis aimed to investigate the burden of conventional risk factors and control in early-onset CAD (i.e.

  10. Exercise capacity and heart rate responses to exercise as predictors of short-term outcome among patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Lepojärvi, Samuli; Kenttä, Tuomas V; Junttila, M Juhani; Perkiömäki, Juha S; Piira, Olli-Pekka; Ukkola, Olavi; Hautala, Arto J; Tulppo, Mikko P; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2015-11-15

    Although exercise capacity (EC) and autonomic responses to exercise predict clinical outcomes in various populations, they are not routinely applied in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that the composite index of EC and exercise heart rate responses would be a powerful determinant of short-term risk in CAD. Patients with angiographically documented stable CAD and treated with β blockers (n = 1,531) underwent exercise testing to allow the calculation of age- and gender-adjusted EC, maximal chronotropic response index (CRI), and 2-minute postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR, percentage of maximal heart rate). Cardiovascular deaths and hospitalization due to heart failure, registered during a 2-year follow-up (n = 39, 2.5%), were defined as the composite primary end point. An exercise test risk score was calculated as the sum of hazard ratios related to abnormal (lowest tertile) EC, CRI, and HRR. Abnormal EC, CRI, and HRR predicted the primary end point, involving 4.5-, 2.2-, and 6.2-fold risk, respectively, independently of each other. The patients with intermediate and high exercise test risk score had 11.1-fold (95% confidence interval 2.4 to 51.1, p = 0.002) and 25.4-fold (95% confidence interval 5.5 to 116.8, p exercise and recovery is a powerful predictor of short-term outcome in patients with stable CAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coronary CT angiography in coronary artery disease: Opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary CT angiography is widely recognised as a reliable imaging modality for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Coronary CT angiography not only provides excellent visualisation of anatomical changes in the coronary artery with high diagnostic value in the detection of lumen stenosis or occlusion, but also offers quantitative characterisation of coronary plaque components. Furthermore, coronary CT angiography allows myocardial perfusion imaging with diagnostic value comparable to the reference standard method. Coronary CT angiography-derived haemodynamic analysis has the potential to evaluate functional significance of coronary lesions. This review article aims to provide an overview of clinical applications of coronary CT angiography in coronary artery disease.

  12. Coronary artery disease in women

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    Lekha Adik Pathak

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Though coronary artery disease is late to present in women it significantly hamper quality of life. The clinical presentation of coronary artery disease in women varies from asymptomatic to severe unstable angina to myocardial infarction. Stress testing and 2D-ECHO helps to some extent for prediction of coronary artery disease but false positive as well as false negative test results are not negligible. Coronary angiography is the conclusive test to determine spectrum and characterization of coronary artery anatomy in women. As this study is based on experience at single center, various biases may be possible. Widespread data collection involving multiple center and multiple operators will be helpful.

  13. 320-row CT coronary angiography predicts freedom from revascularisation and acts as a gatekeeper to defer invasive angiography in stable coronary artery disease: a fractional flow reserve-correlated study

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    Ko, Brian S.; Wong, Dennis T.L.; Cameron, James D.; Leung, Michael; Meredith, Ian T.; Nerlekar, Nitesh; Antonis, Paul; Harper, Richard; Malaiapan, Yuvaraj; Seneviratne, Sujith K. [Southern Health and Monash University, Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, MonashHEART, Department of Medicine Monash Medical Centre (MMC), Melbourne (Australia); Leong, Darryl P. [University of Adelaide, Discipline of Medicine, Adelaide (Australia); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia); Crossett, Marcus; Troupis, John [Southern Health and Monash University, Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, MonashHEART, Department of Medicine Monash Medical Centre (MMC), Melbourne (Australia); Southern Health and Monash University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, MMC, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    To determine the accuracy of 320-row multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (M320-CCTA) to detect functional stenoses using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard and to predict revascularisation in stable coronary artery disease. One hundred and fifteen patients (230 vessels) underwent M320-CCTA and FFR assessment and were followed for 18 months. Diameter stenosis on invasive angiography (ICA) and M320-CCTA were assessed by consensus by two observers and significant stenosis was defined as ≥50 %. FFR ≤0.8 indicated functionally significant stenoses. M320-CCTA had 94 % sensitivity and 94 % negative predictive value (NPV) for FFR ≤0.8. Overall accuracy was 70 %, specificity 54 % and positive predictive value 65 %. On receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for CCTA to predict FFR ≤0.8 was 0.74 which was comparable with ICA. The absence of a significant stenosis on M320-CCTA was associated with a 6 % revascularisation rate. M320-CCTA predicted revascularisation with an AUC of 0.71 which was comparable with ICA. M320-CCTA has excellent sensitivity and NPV for functional stenoses and therefore may act as an effective gatekeeper to defer ICA and revascularisation. Like ICA, M320-CCTA lacks specificity for functional stenoses and only has moderate accuracy to predict the need for revascularisation. (orig.)

  14. 320-row CT coronary angiography predicts freedom from revascularisation and acts as a gatekeeper to defer invasive angiography in stable coronary artery disease: a fractional flow reserve-correlated study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Brian S.; Wong, Dennis T.L.; Cameron, James D.; Leung, Michael; Meredith, Ian T.; Nerlekar, Nitesh; Antonis, Paul; Harper, Richard; Malaiapan, Yuvaraj; Seneviratne, Sujith K.; Leong, Darryl P.; Crossett, Marcus; Troupis, John

    2014-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of 320-row multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (M320-CCTA) to detect functional stenoses using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard and to predict revascularisation in stable coronary artery disease. One hundred and fifteen patients (230 vessels) underwent M320-CCTA and FFR assessment and were followed for 18 months. Diameter stenosis on invasive angiography (ICA) and M320-CCTA were assessed by consensus by two observers and significant stenosis was defined as ≥50 %. FFR ≤0.8 indicated functionally significant stenoses. M320-CCTA had 94 % sensitivity and 94 % negative predictive value (NPV) for FFR ≤0.8. Overall accuracy was 70 %, specificity 54 % and positive predictive value 65 %. On receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for CCTA to predict FFR ≤0.8 was 0.74 which was comparable with ICA. The absence of a significant stenosis on M320-CCTA was associated with a 6 % revascularisation rate. M320-CCTA predicted revascularisation with an AUC of 0.71 which was comparable with ICA. M320-CCTA has excellent sensitivity and NPV for functional stenoses and therefore may act as an effective gatekeeper to defer ICA and revascularisation. Like ICA, M320-CCTA lacks specificity for functional stenoses and only has moderate accuracy to predict the need for revascularisation. (orig.)

  15. Prevalence and prognostic significance of incidental cardiac troponin T elevation in ambulatory patients with stable coronary artery disease: Data from The Heart and Soul Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Bill P. C.; Rogers, Adam M.; Na, Beeya; Wu, Alan H. B.; Schiller, Nelson B.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The significance of troponin elevation and clinical utility of troponin testing in ambulatory patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have not been examined. We sought to investigate the prevalence and prognostic value of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) elevation in a population with stable CAD. Methods We studied 987 patients with stable CAD enrolled in the Heart & Soul study who had plasma cTnT measurements before performing exercise treadmill testing. Results Of the studied population, 58 patients or 6.2% had detectable cTnT levels, ≥0.01 ng/mL (0.01–0.72 ng/mL). During a mean follow-up period of 4.3 (0.1–6.5) years, 58.6% of participants with detectable cTnT had cardiovascular events compared with 22.5% of those without detectable cTnT (hazard ratio [HR] 3.8, 95% CI 2.6–5.4, P <.001). This association remained strong after adjustment for traditional risk factors and C-reactive protein (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–3.1, P = .002). However, after further adjustment for N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide and echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular function, cTnT elevation was not an independent predictor of cardiovascular events (HR 1.3, 95% CI, 0.8–2.3, P = .28). Conclusions In ambulatory patients with stable CAD, the prevalence of cTnT elevation was 6.2%. Cardiac troponin T elevation detected using the conventional troponin assay was associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but its prognostic value was not incremental over N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide and echocardiographic evidence of cardiac abnormalities. PMID:19781430

  16. Coronary single vessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenbach, M.; Kober, G.; Satter, P.; Gruentzig, A.; Myler, R.; Sterzer, S.

    1980-01-01

    The seven-years-survival rate is about 80 percent with respect to the most favourable long-time prognosis for coronary single vessel diseases under conservative therapy. In this contribution the control angiography of 76 patients after aorto-coronary bypass operation or transluminal angioplastic is reported. Only two patients subjected to a bypass operation. The recidivity rate is 10 percent after an operation, whereby it is not possible to make a recidivity prognosis. If a recidivity shows up it is being developped during the first three months. If the control angiography three months after the operation shows a good result, then a favourable steady state result can be expected. A comparison of the result with four different centers is given. (APR) [de

  17. Comparison of Efficacy and Safety between First and Second Generation Drug-eluting Stents in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Single-center Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ru; Xiong, Fei; Wen, Yuan; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Yao, Yi; Gao, Zhan; Xu, Bo; Yang, Yue-Jin; Qiao, Shu-Bin; Gao, Run-Lin; Yuan, Jin-Qing

    2017-07-20

    Lots of trials demonstrate that second-generation drug-eluting stents (G2-DES), with their improved properties, offer significantly superior efficacy and safety profiles compared to first generation DES (G1-DES) for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) receiving percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This study aimed to verify the advantage of G2-DES over G1-DES in Chinese patients with stable CAD (SCAD). For this retrospective observational analysis, 2709 SCAD patients with either G1-DES (n = 863) or G2-DES (n = 1846) were enrolled consecutively throughout 2013. Propensity score matching (PSM) was applied to control differing baseline factors. Two-year outcomes, including major adverse coronary events as well as individual events, including target vessel-related myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization, and cardiogenic death were evaluated. The incidence of revascularization between G1- and G2-DES showed a trend of significant difference with a threshold P - value (8.6% vs. 6.7%, χ2 = 2.995, P = 0.084). G2-DES significantly improved TLR-free survival compared to G1-DES (96.6% vs. 97.9%, P = 0.049) and revascularization-free survival curve showed a trend of improvement of G2-DES (92.0% vs. 93.8%, P = 0.082). These differences diminished after PSM. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed a trend for G1-associated increase in revascularization (hazard ratio: 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 0.95-1.72, P = 0.099) while no significance was found after PSM. Other endpoints showed no significant differences after multivariate adjustment regardless of PSM. G1-DES showed the same safety as G2-DES in this large Chinese cohort of real-world patients. However, G2-DES improved TLR-free survival of SCAD patients 2 years after PCI. The advantage was influenced by baseline clinical factors. G1-DES was associated with a trend of increase in revascularization risk and was not an independent

  18. Biomarker-Based Risk Model to Predict Cardiovascular Mortality in Patients With Stable Coronary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Daniel; Lindbäck, Johan; Armstrong, Paul W; Budaj, Andrzej; Cannon, Christopher P; Granger, Christopher B; Hagström, Emil; Held, Claes; Koenig, Wolfgang; Östlund, Ollie; Stewart, Ralph A H; Soffer, Joseph; White, Harvey D; de Winter, Robbert J; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Siegbahn, Agneta; Kleber, Marcus E; Dressel, Alexander; Grammer, Tanja B; März, Winfried; Wallentin, Lars

    2017-08-15

    Currently, there is no generally accepted model to predict outcomes in stable coronary heart disease (CHD). This study evaluated and compared the prognostic value of biomarkers and clinical variables to develop a biomarker-based prediction model in patients with stable CHD. In a prospective, randomized trial cohort of 13,164 patients with stable CHD, we analyzed several candidate biomarkers and clinical variables and used multivariable Cox regression to develop a clinical prediction model based on the most important markers. The primary outcome was cardiovascular (CV) death, but model performance was also explored for other key outcomes. It was internally bootstrap validated, and externally validated in 1,547 patients in another study. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 591 cases of CV death. The 3 most important biomarkers were N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, where NT-proBNP and hs-cTnT had greater prognostic value than any other biomarker or clinical variable. The final prediction model included age (A), biomarkers (B) (NT-proBNP, hs-cTnT, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and clinical variables (C) (smoking, diabetes mellitus, and peripheral arterial disease). This "ABC-CHD" model had high discriminatory ability for CV death (c-index 0.81 in derivation cohort, 0.78 in validation cohort), with adequate calibration in both cohorts. This model provided a robust tool for the prediction of CV death in patients with stable CHD. As it is based on a small number of readily available biomarkers and clinical factors, it can be widely employed to complement clinical assessment and guide management based on CV risk. (The Stabilization of Atherosclerotic Plaque by Initiation of Darapladib Therapy Trial [STABILITY]; NCT00799903). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  19. Impact of minimum contrast media volumes during elective percutaneous coronary intervention for prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, Soichiro; Kurita, Tairo; Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Nasu, Kenya; Kimura, Masashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kinoshita, Yoshihisa; Tsuchikane, Etsuo; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Suzuki, Takahiko

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is an important complication following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The clinical importance of a minimum contrast media volume (CMV) for PCI to prevent CIN has not been well evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of minimum CMV to prevent CIN after PCI. In this study, 2052 consecutive patients who underwent elective PCI in our institute were analyzed. We divided patients into two groups according to CMV: a minimum CMV PCI group [CMV ≤50 ml (n = 94)] and a non-minimum CMV PCI group [CMV >50 ml (n = 1958)]. CIN occurred in 160 (7.8 %) patients. The incidence of CIN was significantly lower in the minimum CMV PCI group than in the non-minimum CMV PCI group (2.1 vs. 8.1 %; P = 0.03). According to multivariate analysis, elderly patients and diabetes mellitus patients were at high risk of developing CIN in this study population. When analyzing only high-risk patients, the incidence of CIN was also significantly lower in the minimum CMV group than in the non-minimum CMV group (2.6 vs. 10.3 %; P = 0.03). Minimum CMV PCI could reduce the incidence of CIN, particularly in high-risk patients; as such, defining the minimum CMV clinical cut-off values may be useful for the prevention of CIN.

  20. Serum levels of C-reactive protein in patients with stable coronary artery disease: JUPITER in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saely, Christoph H; Rein, Philipp; Vonbank, Alexander; Drexel, Heinz

    2010-10-29

    The JUPITER trial has recently demonstrated an outstanding reduction of cardiovascular events by 20 mg rosuvastatin/day in subjects with high CRP who were apparently healthy at baseline. However, absence of atherosclerosis in JUPITER was based on the subjects' history and not proven objectively. To put the results of JUPITER in perspective, we evaluated serum CRP in a consecutive series of 703 statin-naïve Caucasian patients with angiographically proven stable CAD. From these stable CAD patients, only 69.2% met the ≥2.0 mg/l serum CRP inclusion criterion of the JUPITER trial. Median CRP [interquartile range] in our CAD patients was 3.3 [1.6-6.6] mg/l, which was significantly (pJUPITER (4.2 mg/l). Our results point to considerable subclinical atherosclerosis in the patients studied in JUPITER. The impressive results of that trial may not be generalizable to healthy populations all over the world. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Same Day Discharge versus Overnight Stay in the Hospital following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravesh Kumar Bundhun

    Full Text Available New research in interventional cardiology has shown the demand for percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI to have increased tremendously. Effective treatment with a lower hospital cost has been the aim of several PCI capable centers. This study aimed to compare the adverse clinical outcomes associated with same day discharge versus overnight stay in the hospital following PCI in a population of randomized patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD.The National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE/PubMed, the Cochrane Registry of Randomized Controlled Trials and EMBASE databases were searched (from March to June 2016 for randomized trials comparing same-day discharge versus overnight stay in the hospital following PCI. Main endpoints in this analysis included adverse cardiovascular outcomes observed during a 30-day period. Statistical analysis was carried out by the RevMan 5.3 software whereby odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated with respect to a fixed or a random effects model.Eight randomized trials with a total number of 3081 patients (1598 patients who were discharged on the same day and 1483 patients who stayed overnight in the hospital were included. Results of this analysis showed that mortality, myocardial infarction (MI and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs were not significantly different between same day discharge versus overnight stay following PCI with OR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.04-1.35; P = 0.10, OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.33-1.41; P = 0.30 and OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.20-1.02; P = 0.06 respectively. Blood transfusion and re-hospitalization were also not significantly different between these two groups with OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.13-3.21; P = 0.59 and OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.88-2.65; P = 0.13 respectively. Similarly, any adverse event, major bleeding and repeated revascularization were also not significantly different between these two groups of patients with stable CAD, with OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.05-3.97; P = 0.45, OR: 0

  2. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Grønning, Bjørn; Køber, Lars

    2005-01-01

    heart disease. The rate of death from all causes was determined after a median follow-up of nine years. RESULTS: At follow-up, 288 patients had died. The median NT-pro-BNP level was significantly lower among patients who survived than among those who died (120 pg per milliliter [interquartile range, 50...... to 318] vs. 386 pg per milliliter [interquartile range, 146 to 897], P

  3. Coronary artery disease: medical therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviews the impact of medical therapy on the risk of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. SA Fam Pract 2010;52(4):305-306 ... and the risk factors influence the development of atherosclerosis throughout one's lifetime.2 ... studies persistently reported a decreased number of coronary heart disease events in ...

  4. Diabetes, glycemic control, and new-onset heart failure in patients with stable coronary artery disease : data from the heart and soul study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, J.P.; Bot, M.; de Jonge, P.; de Boer, R.A.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Whooley, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is a predictor of both coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. It is unknown to what extent the association between diabetes and heart failure is influenced by other risk factors for heart failure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated the association of diabetes and

  5. The BEAUTIFUL study: randomized trial of ivabradine in patients with stable coronary artery disease and left ventricular systolic dysfunction - baseline characteristics of the study population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, R.; Ford, I.; Fox, K.; Steg, P. G.; Tendera, M.; Cohen Arazi, H.; Nul, D. R.; Ahuad Guerrero, R. A.; Luciardi, H. L.; Sinisi, V. A.; Perna, E. R.; Schygiel, P. O.; Sanjurjo, M. S.; Fernandez, A. A.; del Valle Lobo Marquez, L. L.; Fuselli, J. J.; Hasbani, E.; Ibañez, J. O.; Cartasegna, L. R.; Lembo, L. A.; Thierer, J.; Varini, S.; Buscema, J. J.; Orlandini, A. D.; Bustos, B.; Guzmán, L. A.; Luquez, H. A.; Amuchastegui, M.; Allall, O. A.; Iglesias, R. M.; Sokn, F. J.; Montaña, O. R.; Sanchez, A.; Vogel, D.; Eber, B.; Huber, K.; Lang, I.; Pichler, A. N.; Dendale, P. A. C.; Vanderheyden, M.; van Mieghem, W.; Chenu, P.; Friart, A.; Missault, L.; Vachiery, J. L.; Materne, P.; François, B. A. A.; Sirakova, V.; Penkov, N.; Georgiev, B.; Grigorov, M.; Taseva, T.; Nachev, C.; Guenova, D.; Perchev, I.; Denchev, S.; Donova, T.; Torbova, S.; Goudev, A.; Raev, D.; Gotchev, D.; Tzekova, M.; Chompalova, B.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Kamenova, Z.; Dzhurzdhev, A.; Tardif, J. C.; Talbot, P.; Yao, L.; Ma, P.; Constance, C.; Bernstein, V.; Heath, J.; Lalani, A.; Haddad, H.; To, T. B.; Pandey, S.; Desrochers, D.; Fortin, C.; Poirier, P.; Savard, D.; Baird, M.; Lonn, E.; Coutu, B.; Vertes, G. E.; Rebane, T.; Kouz, S.; Raco, D.; Rajda, M.; Parker, J. O.; Glanz, A.; Lepage, S.; Parker, J. D.; Klinke, W. P.; Rupka, D.; Hill, L. L.; Nawaz, S.; Chehayeb, R.; Lauzon, C.; Matangi, M.; Syan, G. S.; Hu, D.; Lv, S.; Yan, X.; Gai, L.; Ge, J. B.; Dong, Y.; Sun, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, F.; Wang, X.; Wang, W.; Hradec, J.; Florian, J.; Sulda, M.; Spinar, J.; Fábik, L.; Stípal, R.; Kaislerová, M.; Vitovec, J.; Vojtísek, P.; Krejcova, H.; Maratka, T.; Sochor, K.; Marcinek, G.; Povolný, J.; Jerábek, O.; Karetová, D.; Vojacek, J.; Lavicka, V.; Vencour, D.; Kotík, L.; Kuchar, J.; Drazka, J.; Penicka, M.; Kryza, R.; Soucek, M.; Ballek, L.; Spacek, R.; Brønnum Schou, J.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Nielsen, T.; Markenvard, J.; Tuxen, C.; Hildebrandt, P.; Sejersen, H.; Rokkedal, J.; Ralfkiaer, N.; Agner, E.; Skagen, K.; Roseva Nielsen, N.; Vigholt, E.; Dodt, K. K.; Lind Rasmussen, L.; Pedersen, L.; Stentebjerg, S. E.; Asklund, M.; Klarlund, K.; Haghfelt, T.; Gøtzsche, L.; Rickers, H.; Køber, L.; Jensen, G.; Dahlstrøm, C. G.; Gøtzsche, O.; Egstrup, K.; Petersen, J.; Larsen, J.; McNair, A.; Jakobsen, T.; Larsen, C. T.; Eha, J.; Vahula, V.; Averina, O.; Viigimaa, M.; Sildmäe, S.; Kolbassova, O.; Melin, J.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Harjola, V. P.; Luoma, J.; Ovize, M.; Sellier, P.; Barthelemy, J. C.; Beaune, J.; Magnin, D.; Dambrine, P.; Khalife, K.; Wolf, J. E.; Roudaut, R.; Gabrovescu, M.; Dubois-Rande, J. L.; Galinier, M.; Genest, M.; Mansourati, J.; Aliot, E.; Carlioz, R.; Cherbi, C.; Slama, M.; Colin, P.; Decoulx, E.; Escande, M.; Fournier, P. Y.; Galley, D.; Khanoyan, P.; Jaboureck, O.; Leborgne, L.; Mann, H.; Pierre-Justin, E.; Roynard, J. L.; Soto, F. X.; Bourdon, A.; Bauer, F.; Belin, A.; Boudahne, A.; Bouvier, J. M.; Chati, Z.; Chevalier, J. M.; Chevrier, J.; Doucet, B.; Drawin, T.; Mansour, N. El; Funck, F.; Godenir, J. P.; Guillot, J. P.; Gully, C.; Habib, G.; Kahn, J. C.; Koenig, A.; Martelet, M.; Matina, D.; Gay, A.; Meurice, T.; Perret, T.; Riou, A.; Thisse, J. Y.; Demarcq, J. M.; Bodur, G.; Claudon, O.; Lemoine, C.; Roul, G.; Olive, T. G.; Huyghe de Mahenge, A.; Meinertz, T.; Baumann, G.; Böhm, M.; Cieslinski, G.; Figulla, H. R.; Gonska, B. D.; Hasenfuss, G.; Heckel, D.; Hoppe, U.; Katus, H.; Kombächer, H. D.; Müller, O.; Münzel, T.; Nienaber, C.; Oeff, M.; Rupprecht, H. J.; von Schacky, C.; Schmidt, J.; Schreckenberg, A.; Schuler, G.; Schultheiss, H. P.; Seidl, K.; Steindorf, J.; Strasser, R.; Werdan, K.; Hengstenberg, C.; Haverkamp, W.; Windstetter, U.; Al-Zoebi, A.; Pötsch, T.; Proskynitopoulos, N.; Baar, M.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Jeserich, M.; Tammen, A.; Appel, K. F.; Fries, P.; Ammer, K.; Droese, A. N.; Bergmann, K.; Bott, J.; Lange, R.; Taggeselle, J.; Rummel, R.; Kleinertz, K.; Deissner, M.; Drescher, T.; Zahorsky, R.; Schenkenberger, I.; Grooterorst, P.; Frick, H. M.; Spengler, U.; Jahnke, N.; Bauknecht, C.; Lehmann, G.; Spanier, C.; Wolde, C. H.; Natour, M.; Bosch, R.; Rüdell, U.; Gola, G.; Hering, R.; Heuer, H.; Gärtner, J.; Vardas, P.; Kremastinos, D.; Anastasiou-Nana, M.; Kallikazaros, I.; Theodorakis, G.; Kyriakides, Z.; Pyrgakis, V. N.; Siogas, K.; Kapordelis, C.; Apostolou, T.; Karvounis, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Tziakas, D.; Tryposkiadis, F.; Koliopoulos, N.; Alexopoulos, D.; Fotiadis, I.; Kolettis, T.; Manolis, A.; Pras, A.; Lee, K.; Borbola, J.; Préda, U.; Tomcsányi, J.; Edes, I.; Nagy, A.; Lippai, J.; Regos, L.; Tóth, K.; Takács, J.; Cziráki, A.; Matoltsy, A.; Sidó, Z.; Nagy, L.; Nyárádi, A.; Mohay, A.; Rumi, G.; Polgár, P.; Zámolyi, K.; Tahy, A.; Piros, G.; Veress, G.; Barsi, B.; Kovács, A.; Sereg, M.; Pálinkás, A.; Sármán, P.; Juhász, A.; Mohácsi, A.; Harmati, L.; Lupkovics, G.; Dézsi, C. A.; Nagy, K.; Vegh, G.; Váradi, A.; Farsang, C.; Lakatos, F.; Barton, J.; Crean, P.; Foley, D.; Daly, K.; de Luca, I.; Urbinati, S.; Zanetta, M.; Porcu, M.; Cocchieri, M.; Buia, E.; Minneci, C.; Leghissa, R.; Della Cassa, S.; Pizzimenti, G.; Ingrilli, F.; Fuscaldo, G.; Bellone, E.; Pulitano, G.; Santini, M.; Uguccioni, M.; Carbonieri, E.; Barbuzzi, S.; Alberti, E.; Proto, C.; Pettinati, G.; Cosmi, F.; Colombo, A.; de Cristofaro, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Maresta, A.; de Matteis, C.; Mos, L.; Giustiniani, S.; Paparoni, S.; Proietti, G.; Giannuzzi, P.; Cardona, N.; Perna, B.; Gavazzi, A.; Capucci, A.; Reggianini, L.; Zanini, R.; Keisa, M.; Erglis, A.; Ozolina, M. A.; Gersamija, A.; Gailiss, E.; Volans, E.; Stoma, M.; Libins, A.; Grabauskiene, V.; Petrulioniene, Z.; Berukstis, E.; Kibarskis, A.; Zaliunas, R.; Marcinkeviciene, J.; Naudziunas, A.; Kirkutis, A.; Varoneckas, G.; Cornel, J. H.; Hamer, B. J. B.; Hoedemaker, G.; van den Berg, B. J.; Somer, S. T.; van der Veen, M.; van Rossum, P.; Bartels, G. L.; van Vlies, B.; Lionarons, R. J.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Wesdorp, J. C. L.; Kragten, J. A.; Fast, J.; de Milliano, P. A. R.; van Rugge, F. P.; Hoogslag, P. A. M.; Göbel, E. J. A.; Leenders, C. M.; van der Heijden, R.; Swart, H.; van Beek, G. J.; van der Zwaan, C.; Holwerda, N. J.; Winter, J. B.; Galema, T. W.; Voors, A. A.; Kirkels, J. H.; Jaarsma, W.; Zwart, P. A. G.; Thijssen, H.; Linssen, G. C. M.; Verheul, J. A.; Maas, A. H. E. M.; Willems, A. R.; Nagelsmit, M. J.; Freericks, M. P.; Pinto, Y. M.; Bruning, T. A.; Michels, H. M.; Withagen, A. J. A. M.; Jap Tjoen San, W. T. J.; Robles de Medina, R.; Nierop, P. R.; Daniels, M. C. G.; van Kempen, L. H. J.; Herrman, J. P. R.; van Wijk, L. M.; Atar, D.; Myhre, E. P.; Dickstein, K.; Musial, W.; Pulkowski, G.; Sinkiewicz, W.; Kubica, J.; Janik, K.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Miekus, P.; Szpajer, M.; Zadrozna, Z.; Krzeminska-Pakula, M.; Goch, J.; Krynicki, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Janion, M.; Zinka, E.; Kawecka-Jaszcz, K.; Piwowarska, W.; Piotrowski, W.; Bloch, C.; Trojnar, R.; Targonski, R.; Pluta, W.; Krzciuk, M.; Achremczyk, P.; Kuzniar, J.; Baska, J.; Ruszkowski, P.; Drozdowski, P.; Kurowski, M.; Krupa, E.; Slowinski, S.; Skura, M.; Pusz, T.; Jaworska, K.; Dluzniewski, M.; Opolski, G.; Piepiorka, M.; Andrzejak, R.; Wrabec, K.; Ponikowski, P.; Loboz-Grudzien, K.; Wodniecki, J.; Kalarus, Z.; Tracz, W.; Kozlowski, A.; Ruzyllo, W.; Mazurek, W.; Szolkiewicz, M.; Paisana Lopes, J. P.; Carvalho, N.; Teixeira, M.; Ferreira Da Silva, G.; Aguiar, J.; Lousada, N.; Salgado, A.; Providencia, L. A.; Freitas, J.; Oliveira Soares, A.; Capalneanu, R.; Macarie, C.; Bruckner, I.; Cinteza, M.; Nanea, T.; Dorobantu, M.; Vintila, M.; Dan, G. A.; Dimulescu, D. R.; Arsenescu, C.; Ionescu, D. D.; Dragulescu, I. S.; Avram, R.; Opris, M.; Manitiu, I.; Craiu, E.; Babes, K.; Tase, A.; Tintoiu, I.; Apetrei, E.; Olinic, N. C.; Radoi, M.; Minescu, B.; Tanaseanu, C. M.; Sinescu, C. J.; Tomescu, M.; Loariu, C.; Carasca, E.; Datcu, M. D.; Dumitrascu, D. L.; Ionascu-Fometescu, C. R.; Pop, C.; Radu, I.; Vladoianu, M.; Kiss, L.; Toplnitchi, L.; Aroutiounov, G. P.; Beloussov, Y. B.; Vasyuk, Y. A.; Vertkine, A. L.; Zadionchenko, V. S.; Zateyshchikov, D. A.; Ya Ivleva, A.; Karpov, Y. A.; Kisliak, O. A.; Kobalava, J. D.; Yu Konyakhin, A.; Kukes, V. G.; Yu Mareev, V.; Mkrtchyan, V. R.; Orlov, V. A.; Sidorenko, B. A.; Stryuk, R. I.; Tereschenko, S. N.; Shpektor, A. V.; Pozdnyakov, Y. M.; Khrustalev, O. A.; Yakusevich, V. V.; Yakushin, S. S.; Azarin, O. G.; Karpov, Y. B.; Moiseeva, O. M.; Perepech, N. B.; Sayganov, S. A.; Svistov, A. S.; Sorokin, L. A.; Shlyakhto, E. V.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Kuimov, A. D.; Tsyba, L. P.; Yakhontova, P. K.; Chumakova, G. A.; Barbarsh, O. L.; Bart, B. Y.; Bychkova, L.; Golukhova, E.; Zhilyaev, E. V.; Rodoman, G. V.; Rudnev, D. V.; Tankhilevich, B. M.; Shostak, N. A.; Kastanaian, A. A.; Pimenov, L. T.; Murín, J.; Kamenský, G.; Gonsorcík, J.; Bada, V.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Vahala, P.; Bugán, V.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Rakovec, P.; Kanic, V.; Skrabl-Mocnik, F.; Slemenik-Pusnik, C.; Melihen-Bartolic, C.; Markez, J.; Macaya de Miguel, C.; Grande, A.; Jimenez Navarro, M.; Romero Hinojosa, J. A.; Bertomeu Martinez, V.; Paz Bermejo, M. A.; Illa Gay, J.; Gusi Tragant, G.; Calvo Gomez, C.; Iglesias Cubero, G.; Balaguer Recena, J.; López García-Aranda, V.; Caparos Valderrama, J.; Iglesias Alonso, L. F.; San Román Calvar, A.; Fernanez Aviles, F.; Perez Villa, F.; Bruguera Cortada, J.; Fernandez Alvarez, R.; Noriega Peiro, F.; Calvo Iglesias, F.; Sevilla Toral, B.; López Bescós, L.; Garcia de Burgos, F.; Sola Casado, R.; Galve, E.; Casares Garcia, G.; Delborg, M.; Herlitz, J.; Ullman, B.; Blomgren, J.; Bandh, S.; Ohlin, H.; Dubach, P.; Gallino, A.; Hess, O.; Moccetti, T.; Eeckhout, E.; Vontobel, H.; Delabays, A.; Erol, K.; Kozan, O.; Mutlu, B.; Ergene, O.; Acarturk, E.; Yilmaz, H.; Ural, D.; Parkhomenko, O.; Polyvoda, S.; Dyadyk, A.; Vatutin, M.; Karpenko, O.; Kubyshkin, V.; Rudenko, L.; Putintsev, V.; Krayz, I.; Kovalsky, I.; Rudyk, Y.; Yurlov, V.; Mostovoy, Y.; Rishko, M.; Barna, O.; Slyvka, Y.; Perepelytsya, M.; Seredyuk, N.; Bazylevych, A.; Glushko, L.; Tashchuk, V.; Girina, O.; Vizir, V.; Pertseva, T.; Vlasenko, M.; Goloborodko, B.; Kolomiets, S.; Dzyak, G.; Sharuk, O.; Storozhuk, B.; Kovalenko, V.; Khomazyuk, T.; Soldatchenko, S.; Lutay, M.; Zharinov, O.; Serkova, V.; Korkushko, O.; Korzh, O.; Netyazheko, V.; Sakharchuck, I.; Stadnyuk, L.; Bereznyakov, I.; Semidotska, Z.; Kolchin, Y.; Voronkov, L.; Tseluyko, V.; Amosova, K.; Batuschkin, V.; Hall, A.; Lindsay, S.; Moriarty, A.; Kadr, H.; Francis, C. M.; Saltissi, S.; Rozkovec, A.; Groves, P.; Crook, J. R.; Purvis, J.; Brooksby, P.; Stewart, M.; Dutka, D.; Timmis, A.; Baig, M. W.; Brady, A.; Williams, S.; Brooks, N.; Greaves, K.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Ivabradine is a selective heart rate-lowering agent that acts by inhibiting the pacemaker current If in sinoatrial node cells. Patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction are at high risk of death and cardiac events, and the BEAUTIFUL study was designed to

  6. Diabetes, Glycemic Control, and New-Onset Heart Failure in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease Data from the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, Joost P.; Bot, Marisica; De Jonge, Peter; De Boer, Rudolf A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Whooley, Mary A.

    OBJECTIVE- Diabetes is a predictor of both coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. It is unknown to what extent the association between diabetes and heart failure is influenced by other risk factors for heart failure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- We evaluated the association of diabetes and

  7. Scared to Death? Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease The Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Elisabeth J.; de Jonge, Peter; Na, Beeya; Cohen, Beth E.; Lett, Heather; Whooley, Mary A.

    Context: Anxiety is common in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), but studies examining the effect of anxiety on cardiovascular prognosis and the role of potential mediators have yielded inconsistent results. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) on

  8. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness Correlates with the Presence and Severity of Angiographic Coronary Artery Disease in Stable Patients with Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Fabien A.; Gueret, Pascal; Laissy, Jean-Pierre; Champagne, Stéphane; Leclercq, Florence; Carrié, Didier; Juliard, Jean-Michel; Henry, Patrick; Niarra, Ralph; Chatellier, Gilles; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is suggested to correlate with metabolic risk factors and to promote plaque development in the coronary arteries. We sought to determine whether EAT thickness was associated or not with the presence and extent of angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We measured epicardial fat thickness by computed tomography and assessed the presence and extent of CAD by coronary angiography in participants from the prospective EVASCAN study. The association of EAT thickness with cardiovascular risk factors, coronary artery calcification scoring and angiographic CAD was assessed using multivariate regression analysis. Results Of 970 patients (age 60.9 years, 71% male), 75% (n = 731) had CAD. Patients with angiographic CAD had thicker EAT on the left ventricle lateral wall when compared with patients without CAD (2.74±2.4 mm vs. 2.08±2.1 mm; p = 0.0001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for a patient with a LVLW EAT value ≥2.8 mm to have CAD was OR = 1.46 [1.03–2.08], p = 0.0326 after adjusting for risk factors. EAT also correlated with the number of diseased vessels (p = 0.0001 for trend). By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, an EAT value ≥2.8 mm best predicted the presence of>50% diameter coronary artery stenosis, with a sensitivity and specificity of 46.1% and 66.5% respectively (AUC:0.58). Coronary artery calcium scoring had an AUC of 0.76. Conclusion Although left ventricle lateral wall EAT thickness correlated with the presence and extent of angiographic CAD, it has a low performance for the diagnosis of CAD. PMID:25335187

  9. Baseline stress myocardial perfusion imaging results and outcomes in patients with stable ischemic heart disease randomized to optimal medical therapy with or without percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Leslee J; Weintraub, William S; Maron, David J; Hartigan, Pamela M; Hachamovitch, Rory; Min, James K; Dada, Marcin; Mancini, G B John; Hayes, Sean W; O'Rourke, Robert A; Spertus, John A; Kostuk, William; Gosselin, Gilbert; Chaitman, Bernard R; Knudtson, Merill; Friedman, John; Slomka, Piotr; Germano, Guido; Bates, Eric R; Teo, Koon K; Boden, William E; Berman, Daniel S

    2012-08-01

    The COURAGE trial reported similar clinical outcomes for patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) receiving optimal medical therapy (OMT) with or without percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The current post hoc substudy analysis examined the relationship between baseline stress myocardial ischemia and clinical outcomes based on randomized treatment assignment. A total of 1,381 randomized patients (OMT n = 699, PCI + OMT n = 682) underwent baseline stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging. Site investigators interpreted the extent of ischemia by the number of ischemic segments using a 6-segment myocardial model. Patients were divided into those with no to mild (ischemic segments) and moderate to severe ischemia (≥ 3 ischemic segments). Cox proportional hazards models were calculated to assess time to the primary end point of death or myocardial infarction. At baseline, moderate to severe ischemia occurred in more than one-quarter of patients (n = 468), and the incidence was comparable in both treatment groups (P = .36). The primary end point, death or myocardial infarction, was similar in the OMT and PCI + OMT treatment groups for no to mild (18% and 19%, P = .92) and moderate to severe ischemia (19% and 22%, P = .53, interaction P value = .65). There was no gradient increase in events for the overall cohort with the extent of ischemia. From the COURAGE trial post hoc substudy, the extent of site-defined ischemia did not predict adverse events and did not alter treatment effectiveness. Currently, evidence supports equipoise as to whether the extent and severity of ischemia impact on therapeutic effectiveness. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Progress in genetics of coronary artery disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radwa Gamal

    Progress in genetics of coronary artery disease. To the Editor. Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide [1] and it is a result of coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease refers to the build-up of atherosclerotic plaque in the blood vessels that supply oxygen.

  11. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease, Angina Basic Facts & Information What ... and oxygen supply; this is what causes a heart attack. If the damaged area is small, however, your ...

  12. Coronary Artery Disease - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Heart Cath and Heart Angioplasty - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  13. The changes of oxidative stress and endothelial function biomarkers after 6 weeks of aerobic physical training in patients with stable ischemic coronary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đinđić Boris J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation improves endothelialBackground/Aim. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation improves endothelial function, reduces cardiac mortality and anginal symptoms in patients with established cardiovascular disease. We evaluated the changes of oxidative stress and endothelial function biomarkers after 6 weeks of aerobic physical training in patients with stable ischemic coronary disease (IHD participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise program. Methods. Thirty-five patients with stable IHD engaged in cardiovascular rehabilitation program with the regular aerobic physical activity during 6 weeks were consecutively included together with 37 control, age and sex-matched, IHD patients with a sedentary lifestyle. Clinical data about anthropometric and cardiovascular parameters and laboratory data: serum cell adhesion molecules intracellular (sICAM-1 and vascular (sVCAM-1, reactive carbonyl derivatives (RCD, lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde (MDA and nitric oxide (NO concentration were determined at the beginning and after 6 weeks of aerobic training (45 minutes of continuous exercise up to 80% of maximal heart rate, 3 times a week. Results. The baseline characteristics of examined groups were similar according to age, gender, and cardiovascular risk profiles. The regular aerobic physical activity induced significant reduction of body mass index, blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, RCD (1.27 ± 0.48 μmol/g proteins vs. 1.04 ± 0.22 μmol/g proteins, sVCAM-1 [100.4, interquartile range (IQR(78.4–118.3 ng/mL vs. 80.0 IQR(68.5–97.2 ng/mL] and increasing of NO (64.72 ± 16.06 nmol/mg proteins vs. 74.38 ± 18.57 nmol/mg proteins and HDL cholesterol (p < 0.05, which was not seen in sedentary control RCD (1.16 ± 0.25 interquartile range vs. 1.12 ± 0.14 interquartile range, sVCAM-1 [92.2 IQR (73.6–106.8 ng/mL vs. 91.3 IQR (73.0–105.3 ng/mL and NO (68.5 ± 17.9 nmol/mg vs. 65.7

  14. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper M; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke Bøgelund

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  15. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk and stress in a person's life, their health behaviors and socioeconomic status. These factors may affect established ... Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) • Consumer Healthcare • Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & ...

  16. Metabolic coronary-flow regulation and exogenous nitric oxide in human coronary artery disease: assessment by intravenous administration of nitroglycerin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kal, J. E.; van Wezel, H. B.; Porsius, M.; Vergroesen, I.; Spaan, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of intravenous administration of the nitric oxide--donor substance nitroglycerin (NTG) on metabolic coronary-flow regulation in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In 12 patients with stable CAD, we measured coronary sinus blood flow and myocardial oxygen

  17. Role of coronary physiology in the contemporary management of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Kharbanda, Rajesh K

    2015-02-16

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide with approximately 1 in 30 patients with stable CAD experiencing death or acute myocardial infarction each year. The presence and extent of resultant myocardial ischaemia has been shown to confer an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Whilst, optimal medical therapy (OMT) forms the cornerstone of the management of patients with stable CAD, a significant number of patients present with ischaemia refractory to OMT. Historically coronary angiography alone has been used to determine coronary lesion severity in both stable and acute settings. It is increasingly clear that this approach fails to accurately identify the haemodynamic significance of lesions; especially those that are visually "intermediate" in severity. Revascularisation based upon angiographic appearances alone may not reduce coronary events above OMT. Technological advances have enabled the measurement of physiological indices including the fractional flow reserve, the index of microcirculatory resistance and the coronary flow reserve. The integration of these parameters into the routine management of patients presenting to the cardiac catheterization laboratory with CAD represents a critical adjunctive tool in the optimal management of these patients by identifying patients that would most benefit from revascularisation and importantly also highlighting patients that would not gain benefit and therefore reducing the likelihood of adverse outcomes associated with coronary revascularisation. Furthermore, these techniques are applicable to a broad range of patients including those with left main stem disease, proximal coronary disease, diabetes mellitus, previous percutaneous coronary intervention and with previous coronary artery bypass grafting. This review will discuss current concepts relevant to coronary physiology assessment, its role in the management of both stable and acute patients and future applications.

  18. Role of coronary physiology in the contemporary management of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Kharbanda, Rajesh K

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide with approximately 1 in 30 patients with stable CAD experiencing death or acute myocardial infarction each year. The presence and extent of resultant myocardial ischaemia has been shown to confer an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Whilst, optimal medical therapy (OMT) forms the cornerstone of the management of patients with stable CAD, a significant number of patients present with ischaemia refractory to OMT. Historically coronary angiography alone has been used to determine coronary lesion severity in both stable and acute settings. It is increasingly clear that this approach fails to accurately identify the haemodynamic significance of lesions; especially those that are visually “intermediate” in severity. Revascularisation based upon angiographic appearances alone may not reduce coronary events above OMT. Technological advances have enabled the measurement of physiological indices including the fractional flow reserve, the index of microcirculatory resistance and the coronary flow reserve. The integration of these parameters into the routine management of patients presenting to the cardiac catheterization laboratory with CAD represents a critical adjunctive tool in the optimal management of these patients by identifying patients that would most benefit from revascularisation and importantly also highlighting patients that would not gain benefit and therefore reducing the likelihood of adverse outcomes associated with coronary revascularisation. Furthermore, these techniques are applicable to a broad range of patients including those with left main stem disease, proximal coronary disease, diabetes mellitus, previous percutaneous coronary intervention and with previous coronary artery bypass grafting. This review will discuss current concepts relevant to coronary physiology assessment, its role in the management of both stable and acute patients and future applications. PMID

  19. Comparison of plaque characteristics in narrowings with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-STEMI/unstable angina pectoris and stable coronary artery disease (from the ADAPT-DES IVUS Substudy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Mintz, Gary S; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Metzger, D Christopher; Rinaldi, Michael J; Duffy, Peter L; Weisz, Giora; Stuckey, Thomas D; Brodie, Bruce R; Yun, Kyeong Ho; Xu, Ke; Kirtane, Ajay J; Stone, Gregg W; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Drug-Eluting Stents (ADAPT-DES) was a prospective, multicenter registry of 8,582 consecutive stable and unstable patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention using a drug-eluting stent. We sought to identify key morphologic features leading to ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) versus non-STEMI (NSTEMI) or unstable angina pectoris (UA) versus stable coronary artery disease (CAD) presentation. In the prespecified grayscale and virtual histology (VH) substudy of ADAPT-DES, preintervention imaging identified 676 patients with a single culprit lesion. The relation between lesion morphology and clinical presentation was compared among patients with (1) STEMI, (2) NSTEMI or UA, and (3) stable CAD. Intravascular ultrasound identified more plaque rupture and VH thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA) in STEMI lesions compared with NSTEMI/UA or stable CAD lesions; conversely, fibroatheromas appeared more often calcified with a thick fibrous cap in stable CAD. Minimum lumen cross-sectional area (MLA) was smaller with larger plaque burden and positive remodeling in STEMI lesions. Lesions with plaque rupture versus those without plaque rupture showed higher prevalence of VH-TCFA and larger plaque burden with positive remodeling, especially in patients with STEMI. Multivariate analysis showed that in the lesions with plaque rupture, plaque burden at the MLA site was the only independent predictor for STEMI (cutoff of plaque burden = 85%) and in lesions without plaque rupture, MLA was the only independent predictor for STEMI (cutoff of MLA = 2.3 mm(2)). In conclusion, culprit lesions causing STEMI have smaller lumen areas, greater plaque burden, and more plaque rupture or VH-TCFA compared with NSTEMI/UA or stable CAD; in lesions with plaque rupture, only plaque burden predicted STEMI, and in lesions without plaque rupture, only MLA area predicted STEMI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating the quality of research into a single prognostic biomarker: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 83 studies of C-reactive protein in stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Hemingway

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Systematic evaluations of the quality of research on a single prognostic biomarker are rare. We sought to evaluate the quality of prognostic research evidence for the association of C-reactive protein (CRP with fatal and nonfatal events among patients with stable coronary disease.We searched MEDLINE (1966 to 2009 and EMBASE (1980 to 2009 and selected prospective studies of patients with stable coronary disease, reporting a relative risk for the association of CRP with death and nonfatal cardiovascular events. We included 83 studies, reporting 61,684 patients and 6,485 outcome events. No study reported a prespecified statistical analysis protocol; only two studies reported the time elapsed (in months or years between initial presentation of symptomatic coronary disease and inclusion in the study. Studies reported a median of seven items (of 17 from the REMARK reporting guidelines, with no evidence of change over time. The pooled relative risk for the top versus bottom third of CRP distribution was 1.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78-2.17, with substantial heterogeneity (I(2 = 79.5. Only 13 studies adjusted for conventional risk factors (age, sex, smoking, obesity, diabetes, and low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol and these had a relative risk of 1.65 (95% CI 1.39-1.96, I(2 = 33.7. Studies reported ten different ways of comparing CRP values, with weaker relative risks for those based on continuous measures. Adjusting for publication bias (for which there was strong evidence, Egger's p<0.001 using a validated method reduced the relative risk to 1.19 (95% CI 1.13-1.25. Only two studies reported a measure of discrimination (c-statistic. In 20 studies the detection rate for subsequent events could be calculated and was 31% for a 10% false positive rate, and the calculated pooled c-statistic was 0.61 (0.57-0.66.Multiple types of reporting bias, and publication bias, make the magnitude of any independent association between CRP and prognosis

  1. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreci......Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  2. Tissue Doppler echocardiography improves the diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Soren; Jensen, Jan Skov; Iversen, Allan Zeeberg

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine if colour tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) performed at rest in patients with suspected stable angina pectoris (SAP) is able to predict the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: This study comprises 296 consecutive patients with clinically...

  3. Weight loss is superior to exercise in improving the atherogenic lipid profile in a sedentary, overweight population with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Anholm, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia and low-grade inflammation are integral in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We aim to compare the effects of a considerable weight loss and intensive exercise training on lipid atherogenicity and low-grade inflammation in a high-risk population with coronary artery...... disease (CAD). METHODS: Seventy non-diabetic participants with CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2), age 45-75 years were randomized to 12 weeks' aerobic interval training (AIT) at 85-90% of peak heart rate three times/week or a low energy diet (LED, 800-1000 kcal/day) for 8-10 weeks followed by 2-4 weeks' weight...

  4. Coronary Heart Disease and Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga SAKA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease is a chronic process, of which the progression can rapidly change the functional capacity of patients. In CAD patients, the quality of life can be improved with an appropriate exercise prescription. This article explains how a safe exercise program for CAD patients can be prescribed.

  5. Development of Coronary Pulse Wave Velocity: New Pathophysiological Insight Into Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaoui, Brahim; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Cividjian, Andrei; Lantelme, Pierre

    2017-02-02

    Although aortic stiffness assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a strong predictor of coronary artery disease, the significance of local coronary stiffness has never been tackled. The first objective of this study was to describe a method of measuring coronary PWV (CoPWV) invasively and to describe its determinants. The second objective was to assess both CoPWV and aortic PWV in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes or stable coronary artery disease. In 53 patients, CoPWV was measured from the delay in pressure wave and distance traveled as a pressure wire was withdrawn from the distal to the proximal coronary segment. Similarly, aortic PWV was measured invasively when the wire was pulled across the ascending aorta; carotid-femoral PWV was also measured noninvasively using the SphygmoCor system (AtCor Medical). Mean CoPWV was 10.3±6.1 m/s. Determinants of increased CoPWV were fractional flow reserve, diastolic blood pressure, and previous stent implantation in the recorded artery. CoPWV was lower in patients with acute coronary syndromes versus stable coronary artery disease (7.6±3 versus 11.5±6.4 m/s; P=0.02), and this persisted after adjustment for confounders. In contrast, aortic stiffness, assessed by aortic and carotid-femoral PWV, did not differ significantly. CoPWV seems associated with acute coronary events more closely than aortic PWV. High coronary compliance, whether per se or because it leads to a distal shift in compliance mismatch, may expose vulnerable plaques to high cyclic stretch. CoPWV is a new tool to assess local compliance at the coronary level; it paves the way for a new field of research. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. Isosorbide dinitrate in coronary diseases patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savioli, R.M.; Federico, W.A.; Britto, F.S. de; Nassif, M.; Alonso, G.; Martins, L.R.F.; Del Nero Junior, E.

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients with coronary artery disease and stable angina pectoris were studied. The patients were submited to radioisotopic cineventriculographic study with tecnecio-99m during isotonic exercise in supine position using adapted ergometric bycle. The tests were performed after 30 minutes of rest; 30 minutes after sub-lingual admnistration of 2,5 mg of isosorbide dinitrate and after 30 minutes of sub-lingual admnistration of 5 mg of isosorbide dinitrate. The following variables were analysed: a)ST segment variations; b)occurence of pain during exercise; c)wall ventricular motion; d)left ventricular ejection fraction and their variations. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Safety and efficacy of angioplasty with intracoronary stenting in patients with unstable coronary syndromes. Comparison with stable coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís C. L. Correia

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess safety and efficacy of coronary angioplasty with stent implantation in unstable coronary syndromes. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of in-hospital and late evolution of 74 patients with unstable coronary syndromes (unstable angina or infarction without elevation of the ST segment undergoing coronary angioplasty with stent placement. These 74 patients were compared with 31 patients with stable coronary syndromes (stable angina or stable silent ischemia undergoing the same procedure. RESULTS: No death and no need for revascularization of the culprit artery occurred in the in-hospital phase. The incidences of acute non-Q-wave myocardial infarction were 1.4% and 3.2% (p=0.6 in the unstable and stable coronary syndrome groups, respectively. In the late follow-up (11.2±7.5 months, the incidences of these events combined were 5.7% in the unstable coronary syndrome group and 6.9% (p=0.8 in the stable coronary syndrome group. In the multivariate analysis, the only variable with a tendency to significance as an event predictor was diabetes mellitus (p=0.07; OR=5.2; 95% CI=0.9-29.9. CONCLUSION: The in-hospital and late evolutions of patients with unstable coronary syndrome undergoing angioplasty with intracoronary stent implantation are similar to those of the stable coronary syndrome group, suggesting that this procedure is safe and efficacious when performed in unstable coronary syndrome patients.

  8. Nanomedicine in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambesh, Paurush; Campia, Umberto; Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Bansal, Rashika; Shetty, Vijay; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    Nanomedicine is one of the most promising therapeutic modalities researchers are working on. It involves development of drugs and devices that work at the nanoscale (10-9m). Coronary artery disease (CAD) is responsible for more than a third of all deaths in age group >35 years. With such a huge burden of mortality, CAD is one of the diseases where nanomedicine is being employed for preventive and therapeutic interventions. Nanomedicine can effectively deliver focused drug payload at sites of local plaque formation. Non-invasive strategies include thwarting angiogenesis, intra-arterial thrombosis and local inflammation. Invasive strategies following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) include anti-restenosis and healing enhancement. However, before practical application becomes widespread, many challenges need to be dealt with. These include manufacturing at the nanoscale, direct nanomaterial cellular toxicity and visualization. Copyright © 2017 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Coronary Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Coronary Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents David ... up inside your arteries. One atherosclerosis-related disease, coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common heart disease and ...

  10. Multiple coronary artery aneurysms in Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jin Woo; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Cha, In Ho; Chung, Kyoo Byung

    1986-01-01

    Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome (Kawasaki disease) is a new disease entity that was first described by Kawasaki in 1967. It occurs predominantly in children less than 5 yrs old and acute febrile illness, which is mucocutaneous involvement associated with swelling of cervical lymph nodes. The coronary artery aneurysms have been revealed 20-30% of patients with Kawasaki disease. The authors report a case of multiple coronary artery aneurysms in Kawasaki disease which was diagnosed by a coronary arteriography.

  11. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have bee...

  12. FAME 2 – The best initial strategy for patients with stable coronary artery disease: Do we have an answer at last?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M ElGuindy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of the Fractional flow reserve versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation 2 (FAME 2 trial were recently presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC meeting in Munich and published concurrently in the New England Journal of Medicine1. Interpretation of the results and clinical significance of the study continue to be topics of considerable controversy. FAME 2 is a randomized “all-comers” multicenter trial, designed to test the hypothesis that in patients with stable ischemic heart disease (IHD, stenting ischemia-producing stenoses – defined as fractional flow reserve (FFR < 0.80 – plus optimal medical treatment (OMT, would reduce the composite end-point of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI and urgent revascularization, compared to OMT alone. Secondary endpoints included individual components of the primary endpoint, cardiac death, non-urgent revascularization and angina class. The trial was funded by St. Jude Medical, Inc.

  13. Genetics of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Robert

    2014-06-06

    There is almost no data on the genetics of acute coronary syndromes, so this review discusses primarily the 50 genetic risk variants associated with coronary artery disease that are of genome-wide significance in the discovery population and replicated in an independent population. All of these risk variants are extremely common with more than half occurring in >50% of the general population. They increased only minimally the relative risk for coronary artery disease. The most striking finding is that 35 of the 50 risk variants act independently of known risk factors, indicating there are several pathways yet to be appreciated, contributing to the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. All of the genetic variants seem to act through atherosclerosis, except for the ABO blood groups, which show that A and B are associated with increased risk for myocardial infarction, mediated by a prolonged von Willebrand plasma half life leading to thrombosis. The potential molecular mechanisms of 9p21 are discussed, including cell cycle kinase inhibitors. Discovery of risk variants associated with PCSK9 has led to the development of novel treatment for plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A monoclonal antibody inhibiting PCSK9 has already undergone phase I and II clinical trials, showing it is a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and is mediated through more rapid removal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol from the plasma. This therapy complements that of statin therapy, which inhibits the synthesis of cholesterol. The benefits of Mendelian randomization to assess safety and efficacy and their limitations are discussed along with future directions. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  15. Ivabradine for patients with stable coronary artery disease and left-ventricular systolic dysfunction (BEAUTIFUL): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, P. Gabriel; Tendera, Michal; Ferrari, Roberto; Grancelli, H.; Freedman, B.; Eber, B.; Vanoverschelde, J. L.; Finkov, B.; Yotov, Y.; Tardif, J. C.; Hu, D.; Lau, C.; Hradec, J.; Hildebrandt, P.; Eha, J.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Danchin, N.; Steg, P. G.; Meinertz, T.; Vardas, P.; Borbola, J.; Mulcahy, D.; Maggioni, A.; Erglis, A.; Jirgensons, J.; Kalnins, U.; Laucevicius, A.; Dickstein, K.; Ruzyllo, W.; Tendera, M.; Seabra-Gomes, R.; Capalneanu, R.; Belenkov, Y.; Mareev, Y.; Murin, J.; Rakovec, P.; Macaya, C.; Dellborg, M.; Lüscher, T. U.; van Gilst, W.; Oto, A.; Ford, I.; Fox, K.; Hall, A.; Parkhomenko, A.; Robertson, M.; Weir, C.; Aziz, J.; Kean, S.; Wilson, R.; Thygesen, K.; Frenneaux, M.; Jondeau, G.; Camm, A. J.; Dargie, H.; Kjekshus, J.; Murray, G.; Ahuad Guerrero, R. A.; Allall, O. A.; Amuchastegui, M.; Buscema, J. J.; Bustos, B.; Cartasegna, L. R.; Cohen Arazi, H.; Fernandez, A. A.; Fuselli, J. J.; Guzmén, L. A.; Hasbani, E.; Ibañez, J. O.; Iglesias, R. M.; Lembo, L. A.; Luciardi, H. L.; Luquez, H. A.; Montaña, O. R.; Nul, D. R.; Orlandini, A. D.; Perna, E. R.; Sanchez, A.; Sanjurjo, M. S.; Schygiel, P. O.; Sinisi, V. A.; Sokn, F. J.; Thierer, J.; del Valle Lobo Marquez, L. L.; Varini, S.; Vogel, D.; Alford, K.; Amerena, J.; Arnolda, L.; Atherton, J.; Bradley, J.; Cameron, J.; Colquhoun, D.; Counsell, J.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Horowitz, J.; Ireland, M.; Karrasch, J.; Kaye, D.; Lattimore, J. D.; Marwick, T.; O'Shea, J.; Owensby, D.; de Pasquale, C.; Prior, D.; Rogers, J.; Sindone, A.; Singh, B. B.; Stickland, J.; Szto, G.; Tofler, G.; Vogl, E.; Waites, J.; Walsh, W.; Eber, E.; Huber, K.; Lang, I.; Pichler, M.; Chenu, P.; Dendale, P. A. C.; François, P. A. A.; Friart, A.; Goethals, M.; Materne, P.; van Mieghem, W.; Missault, L.; Vachiery, J. L.; Vanderheyden, M.; Chompalova, B.; Denchev, S.; Donova, T.; Dzhurzdhev, A.; Georgiev, B.; Gotchev, D.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Guenova, D.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Kamenova, Z.; Nachev, C.; Penkov, N.; Perchev, I.; Raev, D.; Sirakova, V.; Taseva, T.; Torbova, S.; Tzekova, M.; Baird, M.; Bernstein, V.; Chehayeb, R.; Constance, C.; Coutu, B.; Desrochers, D.; Fortin, C.; Glanz, A.; Haddad, H.; Heath, J.; Hill, L. L.; Klinke, W. P.; Kouz, S.; Lalani, A.; Lauzon, C.; Lepage, S.; Lonn, E.; Ma, P.; Matangi, M.; Nawaz, S.; Pandey, S.; Parker, J. D.; Parker, J. O.; Poirier, P.; Raco, D.; Rajda, M.; Rebane, T.; Rupka, D.; Savard, D.; Syan, G. S.; Talbot, P.; To, T. B.; Vakani, M. T.; Vertes, G. E.; Yao, L.; Dong, Y.; Gai, L.; Ge, J. B.; Lv, S.; Sun, Y.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Yan, X.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, F.; Ballek, L.; Drazka, J.; Fébik, L.; Florian, J.; Kaislerová, M.; Karetová, D.; Jerábek, O.; Kotík, L.; Krejcova, H.; Kryza, R.; Kuchar, J.; Lavicka, V.; Maratka, T.; Marcinek, G.; Penicka, M.; Povolný, J.; Sochor, K.; Soucek, M.; Spacek, R.; Spinar, J.; Stípal, R.; Sulda, M.; Vencour, D.; Vitovec, J.; Vojacek, J.; Vojtísek, P.; Agner, E.; Asklund, M.; Brønnum Schou, J.; Dahlstrøm, C. G.; Dodt, K. K.; Egstrup, K.; Gøtzsche, L.; Gøtzsche, O.; Haghfelt, T.; Jakobsen, T.; Jensen, G.; Klarlund, K.; Køber, L.; Larsen, C. T.; Larsen, J.; Lind Rasmussen, S.; Lysko Svendsen, T.; Markenvard, J.; McNair, A.; Nielson, H.; Pedersen, L.; Petersen, J.; Ralfkiaer, N.; Rickers, H.; Rokkedal, J.; Romer, F.; Roseva Nielsen, N.; Scheibel, M.; Sejersen, H.; Skagen, K.; Stentebjerg, S. E.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Tuxen, C.; Vigholt, E.; Averina, O.; Kolbassova, O.; Sildmäe, S.; Vahula, V.; Viigimaa, M.; Harjola, V. P.; Luoma, J.; Melin, J.; Aliot, E.; Barthelemy, J. C.; Bauer, F.; Beaune, J.; Belin, A.; Bodur, G.; Boudahne, A.; Bourdon, A.; Bouvier, J. M.; Carlioz, R.; Chati, Z.; Cherbi, C.; Chevalier, J. M.; Chevrier, J.; Claudon, O.; Colin, P.; Dambrine, P.; Decoulx, E.; Demarcq, J. M.; Doucet, B.; Drawin, T.; Dubois-Rande, J. L.; El Mansour, N.; Escande, M.; Fournier, P. Y.; Funck, F.; Gabrovescu, M.; Galinier, M.; Galley, D.; Gay, A.; Genest, M.; Godenir, J. P.; Guillot, J. P.; Gully, C.; Habib, G.; Huyghe de Mahenge, A.; Jaboureck, O.; Kahn, J. C.; Khalife, K.; Khanoyan, P.; Koenig, A.; Leborgne, L.; Lemoine, C.; Magnin, D.; Mann, H.; Mansourati, J.; Martelet, M.; Matina, D.; Meurice, T.; Olive, T. G.; Ovize, M.; Perret, T.; Pierre-Justin, E.; Riou, A.; Roudaut, R.; Roul, G.; Roynard, J. L.; Sellier, P.; Slama, M.; Soto, F. X.; Thisse, J. Y.; Wolf, J. E.; Ammer, K.; Appel, K. F.; Baar, M.; Bauknecht, C.; Baumann, G.; Bergmann, K.; Böhm, M.; Bosch, R.; Bott, J.; Cieslinski, G.; Deissner, M.; Drescher, T.; Droese, K.; Figulla, H. R.; Frick, H. M.; Fries, P.; Gärtner, J.; Gola, G.; Gonska, B. D.; Grooterhorst, P.; Hasenfuss, G.; Haverkamp, W.; Heckel, D.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hering, R.; Heuer, H.; Hoppe, U.; Jahnke, N.; Jeserich, M.; Katus, H.; Kleinertz, K.; Kombächer, H. D.; Lange, R.; Lehmann, G.; Müller, O.; Münzel, T.; Natour, M.; Nienaber, C.; Oeff, M.; Pötsch, T.; Proskynitopoulos, N.; Rüdell, U.; Rummel, R.; Rupprecht, H. J.; von Schacky, C.; Schenkenberger, I.; Schmidt, J.; Schreckenberg, A.; Schuler, G.; Schultheiss, H. P.; Seidl, K.; Spanier, C.; Spengler, U.; Steindorf, J.; Strasser, R.; Taggeselle, J.; Tammen, A.; Werdan, K.; Windstetter, U.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Wolde, C. H.; Zahorsky, R.; Al-Zoebi, A.; Alexopoulos, D.; Anastasiou-Nana, M.; Apostolou, T.; Fotiadis, I.; Hatzinikolaou-Kotsakou, E.; Kallikazaros, I.; Kapordelis, C.; Karvounis, H.; Kolettis, T.; Koliopoulos, N.; Kremastinos, D.; Kyriakides, Z.; Manolis, A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pras, A.; Pyrgakis, V. N.; Siogas, K.; Theodorakis, G.; Tryposkiadis, F.; Tziakas, D.; Lee, K.; Barsi, B.; Cziráki, A.; Dézsi, C. A.; Edes, I.; Farsang, C.; Harmati, L.; Juhász, A.; Kovács, A.; Lakatos, F.; Lippai, J.; Lupkovics, G.; Matoltsy, A.; Mohácsi, A.; Mohay, A.; Nagy, A.; Nagy, K.; Nagy, L.; Nyárádi, A.; Pálinkás, A.; Piros, G.; Polgár, P.; Préda, I.; Regos, L.; Rumi, G.; Sármán, P.; Sereg, M.; Sidó, Z.; Tahy, A.; Takács, J.; Tomcsányi, J.; Tóth, K.; Váradi, A.; Vegh, G.; Veress, G.; Zámolyi, K.; Barton, J.; Crean, P.; Daly, K.; Foley, D.; Alberti, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Barbuzzi, S.; Bellone, E.; Buia, E.; Capucci, A.; Carbonieri, E.; Cardona, N.; Della Casa, S.; Cocchieri, M.; Colombo, A.; Cosmi, F.; de Cristofaro, M.; Ferrari, R.; Fuscaldo, G.; Gavazzi, A.; Giannuzzi, P.; Giustiniani, S.; Ingrilli, F.; Leghissa, R.; de Luca, I.; Maresta, A.; de Matteis, C.; Minneci, C.; Mos, L.; Paparoni, S.; Perna, B.; Pettinati, G.; Pinelli, G.; Pizzimenti, G.; Porcu, M.; Proietti, G.; Proto, C.; Pulitano, G.; Reggianini, L.; Santini, M.; Uguccioni, M.; Urbinati, S.; Zanetta, M.; Zanini, R.; Gailiss, E.; Gersamija, A.; Keisa, M.; Libins, A.; Ozolina, M. A.; Stoma, M.; Volans, E.; Berukstis, E.; Grabauskiene, V.; Kibarskis, A.; Kirkutis, A.; Marcinkeviciene, J.; Naudziunas, A.; Petrulioniene, Z.; Varoneckas, G.; Zaliunas, R.; Bartels, G. L.; van Beek, G. J.; van den Berg, B. J.; Bruning, T. A.; Cornel, J. H.; Daniels, M. C. G.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Fast, J.; Freericks, M. P.; Galema, T. W.; Göbel, E. J. A.; Hamer, L. H. J.; van der Heijden, R.; Herrman, J. P. R.; Hoedemaker, G.; Holwerda, N. J.; Hoogslag, P. A. M.; Jaarsma, W.; Jap Tjoen San, W. T. J.; van Kempen, L. H. J.; Kirkels, J. H.; Kragten, J. A.; Leenders, C. M.; Linssen, G. C. M.; Lionarons, R. J.; Maas, A. H. E. M.; Michels, H. M.; de Milliano, P. A. R.; Nagelsmit, M. J.; Nierop, P. R.; Pinto, Y. M.; Robles de Medina, R.; van Rossum, P.; van Rugge, F. P.; Somer, S. T.; Swart, H.; Thijssen, H.; van der Veen, M.; Verheul, J. A.; van Vlies, B.; Voors, A. A.; Wesdorp, J. C. L.; van Wijk, L. M.; Willems, A. R.; Winter, J. B.; Withagen, A. J. A. M.; van der Zwaan, C.; Zwart, P. A. G.; Atar, D.; Myhre, E. P.; Achremczyk, P.; Andrzejak, R.; Baska, J.; Bloch, C.; Dluzniewski, M.; Drozdowski, P.; Goch, J. H.; Janik, K.; Janion, M.; Jaworska, K.; Kalarus, Z.; Kawecka-Jaszcz, K.; Kozlowski, A.; Krupa, E.; Krynicki, R.; Krzciuk, M.; Krzeminska-Pakula, M.; Kubica, J.; Kurowski, M.; Kuzniar, J.; Loboz-Grudzien, K.; Mazurek, W.; Miekus, P.; Musial, W.; Opolski, G.; Piepiorka, M.; Piotrowski, W.; Piwowarska, W.; Pluta, W.; Ponikowski, P.; Pulkowski, G.; Pusz, T.; Ruszkowski, P.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Sinkiewicz, W.; Skura, M.; Slowinski, S.; Szolkiewicz, M.; Szpajer, M.; Targonski, R.; Tracz, W.; Trojnar, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Wodniecki, J.; Wrabec, K.; Zadrozna, Z.; Zinka, E.; Aguiar, J.; Carvalho, N.; Ferreira Da Silva, G.; Freitas, J.; Lousada, N.; Oliveira Soares, A.; Paisana Lopes, J. P.; Providencia, L. A.; Salgado, A.; Teixeira, M.; Apetrei, E.; Arsenescu, C.; Avram, R.; Babes, K.; Bruckner, I.; Carasca, E.; Cinteza, M.; Craiu, E.; Dan, G. A.; Datcu, M. D.; Dimulescu, D. R.; Dorobantu, M.; Dragomor, D.; Dragulescu, I. S.; Dumitrascu, D. L.; Georgescu, I. M.; Ionescu, D. D.; Ionascu-Fometescu, C. R.; Kiss, L.; Macarie, C.; Manitiu, I.; Minescu, B.; Nanea, T.; Olariu, C.; Olinic, N. C.; Opris, M.; Pop, C.; Radoi, M.; Radu, I.; Sinescu, C. J.; Tanaseanu, C. M.; Tase, A.; Tintoiu, I.; Tomescu, M.; Topolnitchi, L.; Vintila, M.; Vladoianu, M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Aroutiounov, G. P.; Azarin, O. G.; Barbarash, O. L.; Bart, B. Y.; Beloussov, Y. B.; Bychkova, L.; Chumakova, G. A.; Glezer, M. G.; Golukhova, E.; Gorbachenkov, A. A.; Gordeev, I. G.; Ivleva, A. Ya; Karpov, Y. A.; Karpov, Y. B.; Kastanaian, A. A.; Kisliak, O. A.; Kobalava, J. D.; Konyakhin, A. Yu; Khrustalev, O. A.; Kuimov, A. D.; Kukes, A. G.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Mareev, V. Yu; Moiseeva, O. M.; Mkrtchyan, V. R.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Orlov, V. A.; Perepech, N. B.; Pimenov, L. T.; Pozdnyakov, Y. M.; Rodoman, G. V.; Rudnev, D. V.; Sayganov, S. A.; Shlyakhto, E. V.; Shostak, N. A.; Shpektor, A. V.; Sidorenko, B. A.; Sorokin, L. A.; Stryuk, R. I.; Svistov, A. S.; Tankhilevich, B. M.; Tereschenko, S. N.; Tsyba, L. P.; Vasyuk, Y. A.; Vertkine, A. L.; Yakhontova, P. K.; Yakusevich, V. V.; Yakushin, S. S.; Zadionchenko, V. S.; Zateyshchikov, D. A.; Zhilyaev, E. V.; Bada, V.; Bugán, V.; Gonsorcík, J.; Kamenský, G.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Murín, J.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Vahala, P.; Bombek, M.; Kanic, V.; Markez, J.; Melihen-Bartolic, C.; Rakove, P.; Skrabl-Mocnik, F.; Slemenik-Pusnik, C.; Balaguer Recena, J.; Bertomeu Martinez, V.; Bruguera Cortada, J.; Calvo Gomez, C.; Calvo Iglesias, F.; Caparros Valderrama, J.; Casares Garcia, G.; Fernandez Alvarez, R.; Galve, E.; Garcia de Burgos, F.; Grande, A.; Gusi Tragant, G.; Iglesias Alonso, L. F.; Iglesias Cubero, G.; Illa Gay, J.; Jimenez Navarro, M.; López Bescós, L.; López García-Aranda, V.; Macaya de Miguel, C.; Noriega Peiro, F.; Paz Bermejo, M. A.; Perez Villa, F.; Romero Hinojosa, J. A.; San Román Calvar, A.; Sevilla Toral, B.; Sola Casado, R.; Bandh, A.; Blomgren, J.; Herlitz, J.; Ohlin, H.; Ullman, B.; Delabays, A.; Dubach, P.; Eeckhout, E.; Gallino, A.; Hess, O.; Moccetti, T.; Vontobel, H.; Acarturk, E.; Ergene, O.; Erol, K.; Kozan, O.; Mutlu, B.; Ural, D.; Yilmaz, H.; Amosova, K.; Barna, O.; Batushkin, V.; Bazylevych, A.; Bereznyakov, I.; Dyadyk, A.; Dzyak, G.; Girina, O.; Glushko, L.; Goloborodko, B.; Karpenko, O.; Khomazyuk, T.; Kolchin, Y.; Kolomiets, S.; Korkushko, O.; Korzh, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kovalsky, I.; Krayz, I.; Kubyshkin, V.; Lutay, M.; Mostovoy, Y.; Netyazhenko, V.; Perepelytsya, M.; Pertseva, T.; Polyvoda, S.; Putintsev, V.; Rishko, L. M.; Rudyk, Y.; Sakharchuk, I.; Semidotska, Z.; Seredyuk, N.; Serkova, V.; Sharuk, O.; Slyvka, Y.; Soldatchenko, S.; Stadnyuk, L.; Storozhuk, B.; Tashchuk, V.; Tseluyko, V.; Vatutin, M.; Vizir, V.; Vlasenko, M.; Voronkov, L.; Yurlov, V.; Zharinov, O.; Baig, M. W.; Brady, A.; Brooks, N.; Brooksby, P.; Crook, J. R.; Dutka, D.; Francis, C. M.; Greaves, K.; Groves, P.; Kadr, H.; Lindsay, S.; Moriarty, A.; Purvis, J.; Rozkovec, A.; Saltissi, S.; Stewart, M.; Timmis, A.; Williams, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ivabradine specifically inhibits the I(f) current in the sinoatrial node to lower heart rate, without affecting other aspects of cardiac function. We aimed to test whether lowering the heart rate with ivabradine reduces cardiovascular death and morbidity in patients with coronary artery

  16. Weight loss is superior to exercise in improving the atherogenic lipid profile in a sedentary, overweight population with stable coronary artery disease: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Anholm, Christian; Walzem, Rosemary L; Fenger, Mogens; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Haugaard, Steen Bendix; Prescott, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Dyslipidemia and low-grade inflammation are integral in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We aim to compare the effects of a considerable weight loss and intensive exercise training on lipid atherogenicity and low-grade inflammation in a high-risk population with coronary artery disease (CAD). Seventy non-diabetic participants with CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2), age 45-75 years were randomized to 12 weeks' aerobic interval training (AIT) at 85-90% of peak heart rate three times/week or a low energy diet (LED, 800-1000 kcal/day) for 8-10 weeks followed by 2-4 weeks' weight maintenance diet. Lipid profile atherogenicity was described using lipoprotein particle size and density profiling. Low-grade inflammation was evaluated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor. Twenty-six (74%) AIT and 29 (83%) LED participants completed intervention per protocol. AIT and LED decreased total (AIT: -518 {-906;-129},P = 0.011, LED: -767 {-1128:-406},P < 0.001) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, AIT: -186 {-306;-65},P = 0.004, LED: -277 {-433;-122},P < 0.001) assessed as the area under the density profile curve. LED was superior to AIT in decreasing atherogenicity reflected by increased LDL (between-group: 1.0 Å {0.4; 1.7},P = 0.003) and high-density lipoprotein (between-group: 1.2 Å {0.2; 2.4},P = 0.026) particle size and a decreased proportion of total lipoprotein constituted by the small, dense LDL5 subfraction (between-group: -5.0% {-8.4;-1.7},P = 0.004). LED decreased TNFα (9.5% {-15.8;-2.6},P = 0.009). No changes were seen following AIT. LED and AIT decreased total and LDL lipoprotein. LED was superior in decreasing atherogenicity assessed by a shift in density profile and increased particle size. Effect on low-grade inflammation was limited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Treg/Th17 balance in stable CAD patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potekhina, Alexandra V; Pylaeva, Ekaterina; Provatorov, Sergey; Ruleva, Natalya; Masenko, Valery; Noeva, Elena; Krasnikova, Tatiana; Arefieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Immune processes play a significant role in atherosclerosis plaque progression. Regulatory T cells and T helpers 17 were shown to possess anti- and pro-atherogenic activity, respectively. We aimed to investigate the balance of circulating Treg and Th17 in stable angina patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods. Treg, Th17 and Th1 cell frequencies were studied in 117 patients via direct immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry. Group 1 had intact coronary arteries. Group 2 and Group 3 had undergone previous coronary stenting; in Group 2 no coronary atherosclerosis progression was found, in Group 3 patients had disease progression in non-invaded coronary arteries. Group 4 had severe coronary atherosclerosis. Results. The frequencies of CD4+CD25highCD127low, CD4+foxp3+, and CD4+IL10 + T cells were decreased, and CD4+IL17 + T cells frequencies were increased in group 4 vs. 1. Treg/Th17 ratios were declined in groups 3 and 4 vs. groups 1 and 2. IL-10 level was lower while hsCRP and sCD25 levels were higher in group 4 vs. 1. Conclusion. We assume that the imbalance in pro- and anti-inflammatory/atherogenic lymphocyte subpopulations is associated with atherosclerosis progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The diagnostic accuracy and outcomes after coronary computed tomography angiography vs. conventional functional testing in patients with stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene H; Ortner, Nino; Nørgaard, Bjarne L

    2014-01-01

    suspected of stable coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: We systematically searched for studies published from January 2002 to February 2013 examining the diagnostic accuracy (defined as at least ≥50% luminal obstruction on invasive coronary angiography) and outcomes of coronary CTA (≥16......AIMS: To systematically review and perform a meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy and post-test outcomes of conventional exercise electrocardiography (XECG) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) compared with coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) in patients...... slice) in comparison with XECG and SPECT. The search revealed 11 eligible studies (N = 1575) comparing the diagnostic accuracy and 7 studies (N = 216.603) the outcomes of coronary CTA vs. XECG or/and SPECT. The per-patient sensitivity [95% confidence interval (95% CI)] to identify significant CAD was 98...

  19. The Relationships between Polymorphisms in Genes Encoding the Growth Factors TGF-β1, PDGFB, EGF, bFGF and VEGF-A and the Restenosis Process in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Treated with Bare Metal Stent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Osadnik

    Full Text Available Neointima forming after stent implantation consists of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in 90%. Growth factors TGF-β1, PDGFB, EGF, bFGF and VEGF-A play an important role in VSMC proliferation and migration to the tunica intima after arterial wall injury. The aim of this paper was an analysis of functional polymorphisms in genes encoding TGF-β1, PDGFB, EGF, bFGF and VEGF-A in relation to in-stent restenosis (ISR.265 patients with a stable coronary artery disease (SCAD hospitalized in our center in the years 2007-2011 were included in the study. All patients underwent stent implantation at admission to the hospital and had another coronary angiography performed due to recurrence of the ailments or a positive result of the test assessing the coronary flow reserve. Angiographically significant ISR was defined as stenosis >50% in the stented coronary artery segment. The patients were divided into two groups-with angiographically significant ISR (n = 53 and without significant ISR (n = 212. Additionally, the assessment of late lumen loss (LLL in vessel was performed. EGF rs4444903 polymorphism was genotyped using the PCR-RFLP method whilst rs1800470 (TGFB1, rs2285094 (PDGFB rs308395 (bFGF and rs699947 (VEGF-A were determined using the TaqMan method.Angiographically significant ISR was significantly less frequently observed in the group of patients with the A/A genotype of rs1800470 polymorphism (TGFB1 versus patients with A/G and G/G genotypes. In the multivariable analysis, LLL was significantly lower in patients with the A/A genotype of rs1800470 (TGFB1 versus those with the A/G and G/G genotypes and higher in patients with the A/A genotype of the VEGF-A polymorphism versus the A/C and C/C genotypes. The C/C genotype of rs2285094 (PDGFB was associated with greater LLL compared to C/T heterozygotes and T/T homozygotes.The polymorphisms rs1800470, rs2285094 and rs6999447 of the TGFB1, PDGFB and VEGF-A genes, respectively, are associated with LLL

  20. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-01

    Sep 1, 1990 ... Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ... monitored exercise testing for detecting coronary artery disease was ... Images were photographed in 32 steps over 1800 rotation. Redistribution images were photographed approximately 3 hours later. Pre-processing of the data was ...

  1. Heart rate at discharge and long-term prognosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in stable and acute coronary syndromes — results from the BASKET PROVE trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Kaiser, Christoph; Sandsten, Karl Erik

    2013-01-01

    Elevated heart rate (HR) is associated with mortality in a number of heart diseases. We examined the long-term prognostic significance of HR at discharge in a contemporary population of patients with stable angina (SAP), non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), and ST...

  2. Relative clinical and economic impact of exercise echocardiography vs. exercise electrocardiography, as first line investigation in patients without known coronary artery disease and new stable angina: a randomized prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Konstantinos; Ahmed, Asrar; Shah, Benoy N; Gurunathan, Sothinathan; Young, Grace; Acosta, Dionisio; Senior, Roxy

    2017-02-01

    Exercise electrocardiography (ExECG) is widely used in suspected stable angina (SA) as the initial test for the evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that exercise stress echo (ESE) would be efficacious with cost advantage over ExECG when utilized as the initial test. Consecutive patients with suspected SA, without known CAD were randomized into ExECG or ESE. Patients with positive tests were offered coronary angiography (CA) and with inconclusive tests were referred for further investigations. All patients were followed-up for cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, and unplanned revascularization). Cost to diagnosis of CAD was calculated by adding the cost of all investigations, up to and including CA. In the 194 and 191 patients in the ExECG vs. ESE groups, respectively, pre-test probability of CAD was similar (34 ± 23 vs. 35 ± 25%, P = 0.6). Results of ExECG were: 108 (55.7%) negative, 14 (7.2%) positive, 72 (37.1%) inconclusive and of ESE were 181 (94.8%) negative, 9 (4.7%) positive, 1 (0.5%) inconclusive, respectively. Patients with obstructive CAD following positive ESE vs. Ex ECG were 9/9 vs. 9/14, respectively (P = 0.04). Cost to diagnosis of CAD was £266 for ESE vs. £327 for ExECG (P = 0.005). Over a mean follow-up period of 21 ± 5 months, event rates were similar between the two groups. In this first randomized study, ESE was more efficacious and demonstrated superior cost-saving, compared with ExECG when used as the initial investigation for the evaluation of CAD in patients with new-onset suspected SA without known CAD. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [Renaissance of surgery for coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, S H; Salzberg, S P

    2011-01-05

    Coronary bypass surgery is now a standard therapy for the treatment of coronary heart disease. Developed in the 1960s, the coronary artery bypass operation was the most performed operation at all in the 1980s. There was and still is rapidly advancing. The recovery of coronary surgery was held back in the 1970s with the introduction of heart catheterisation. To date, the number of interventional revascularizations has increased, while the number of bypass operations has reached a plateau. 30 resp. 40 years after the introduction of the two techniques it is still controversial which is the method of choice. According to the latest guidelines there is strong evidence that coronary artery surgery for patients with complex coronary artery disease is the gold standard: A Renaissance of bypass surgery.

  4. Coronary artery calcification in Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ino, T.; Shimazaki, S.; Akimoto, K.; Park, I.; Nishimoto, K.; Yabuta, K.; Tanaka, A.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the angiographic features of coronary lesions in Kawasaki disease with coronary artery calcification, cinefluoroscopy and cineangiography were retrospectively reviewed in 116 patients who had undergone coronary angiography between 1982 and 1989. Angiographic abnormalities of coronary arteries were demonstrated in 55 of 116 patients. In 5 (9.1%) of the 55 patients, 9 with calcification were identified by cinefluoroscopy and chest X-ray. Eight of the 9 calcified lesions showed a circular or ring-shape configuration. Coronary angiography revealed a total occlusion of the right coronary artery with collateral circulation from the distal left coronary artery in 2 patients and a severe stenosis of the right coronary artery in 2 patients, in whom anticoagulant therapy had not been continued during the follow-up periods. The remaining patient in whom anticoagulant therapy had been continued had bilateral aneurysms but no significant stenosis. These results indicate that a ring-shape calcification on chest X-ray in 2 patients with a history of Kawasaki disease may suggest an involvement by coronary artery stenosis even when anticoagulant drugs had been given. Therefore, coronary angiography should be performed to evaluate the stenotic lesions if this type of calcification is found by routine radiographic examination. (orig.)

  5. Relationship between stress and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurd, Bushra Jawaid; Dar, Mudassir Iqbal; Shoaib, Maria; Malik, Laraib; Aijaz, Zobia; Asif, Iqra

    2014-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and accounts for 13.7% of deaths in countries like Pakistan. Its association with stress has not been well considered in our setup. Patients with coronary artery disease admitted for coronary artery bypass grafting may have a high prevalence of stress that might increase the risk of adverse outcomes. 60 patients with coronary artery disease admitted to the Civil Hospital Karachi for coronary artery bypass graft surgery from January 1 to March 31, 2012, were evaluated using a stress evaluation scale. Stress of varying degrees was found to be a significant independent risk factor in patients with coronary heart disease. Analysis of our collected sample of patients with stress showed 60% with high stress (p = 0.025) and 36.7% moderate stress (p = 0.0025). An appreciable relationship was found between stress and patient age, sex, body mass index, blood group, and the incidence of myocardial infarction. Our study found evidence of an independent causative association between psychological stress and coronary heart disease, of a similar order to the more conventional coronary heart disease risk factors.

  6. Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McPherson, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute importantly to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), and in the past decade, there has been major progress in this area. The tools applied include genome-wide association studies encompassing >200,000 individuals complemented by bioinformatic approaches, including...... identified. Furthermore, a total of 202 independent signals in 109 loci have achieved a false discovery rate (qgenetic risk scores that can improve risk prediction beyond conventional risk...... have led to a broader understanding of the genetic architecture of CAD and demonstrate that it largely derives from the cumulative effect of multiple common risk alleles individually of small effect size rather than rare variants with large effects on CAD risk. Despite this success, there has been...

  7. Invasive angiography and revascularization in patients with stable angina following prior coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Francis R; Biasco, Luigi; Pedersen, Frants

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are limited data to guide the optimum approach to patients presenting with angina after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Although often referred for invasive angiography, the effectiveness of this is unknown; angina may also result from diffuse distal or micro......-vascular coronary disease and it is not known how often targets for intervention are identified. METHODS: Retrospective review of 50,460 patients undergoing angiography in East Denmark between January 2010 and December 2014. Clinical and procedural data were prospectively stored in a regional electronic database....... Follow-up data were available for all patients, by means of records linked to each Danish social security number. RESULTS: In patients with prior CABG and stable angina (n = 2,309), diagnostic angiography led to revascularization in 574 (24.9%) cases. Chronic kidney disease (HR 1.93 [1.08-3.44], P = 0...

  8. Impact of Antithrombotic Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation on the Presentation of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Hei Chan

    Full Text Available Little is known about whether atrial fibrillation is a presentation of coronary disease. There is a paucity of knowledge about their causal relationship and also the impact of different antithrombotic strategies on the subsequent presentation of symptomatic coronary disease.We studied 7,526 Chinese patients diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and no documented history of coronary artery disease. The primary endpoint was the new occurrence of coronary artery disease--either stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome. After a mean follow-up of 3.2±3.5 years (24,071 patient-years, a primary endpoint occurred in 987 patients (13.1%. The overall annual incidence of coronary artery disease was 4.10%/year. No significant differences in age, sex, and mean CHA2DS2-VASc score were observed between patients with and without the primary endpoint. When stratified according to the antithrombotic strategies applied for stroke prevention, the annual incidence of coronary artery disease was 5.49%/year, 4.45%/year and 2.16%/year respectively in those prescribed no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and warfarin. Similar trends were observed in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Diabetes mellitus, smoking history and renal failure requiring dialysis were predictors for primary endpoint in all antithrombotic therapies.In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, there is a modest association with coronary artery disease. Patients prescribed warfarin had the lowest risk of new onset coronary artery disease.

  9. Coronary artery disease following mediastinal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annest, L.S.; Anderson, R.P.; Li, W.; Hafermann, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Coronary artery disease occurred in four young men (mean age 41 years) who had received curative irradiation therapy for mediastinal malignancies 12 to 18 (mean 15) years previously. None was at high risk for developing coronary artery disease by Framingham criteria. Angiography demonstrated proximal coronary artery disease with normal distal vessels. Distribution of the lesions correlated with radiation dosimetry in that vessels exposed to higher radiation intensity were more frequently diseased. Three patients had coronary bypass grafting for intractable angina and are asymptomatic at 10 to 43 months. A total of 163 patients underwent mediastinal irradiation for lymphoma or thymoma between 1959 and 1980. Among the 29 who survived 10 or more years, five (18%) developed severe coronary artery disease, implicating thoracic radiotherapy as an important risk factor. Because of the importance of mantle irradiation in the treatment of lymphomas, the prevalence of these neoplasms, and the survival patterns following treatment, many long-term survivors may be at increased risk for the development of coronary artery disease. Recognition of the relationship between radiotherapy and coronary artery disease may lead to earlier diagnosis and more timely intervention. Standard surgical treatment may be particularly beneficial because of the relative youth of most of these patients and because the proximal distribution of typical lesions increases the likelihood of complete revascularization

  10. Clinical characteristics and methods of treatment of patients with stable coronary heart disease in the primary care settings--the results of the Polish, Multicentre Angina Treatment Pattern (ATP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzyllo, W; Ponikowski, P; Wilkins, A

    2004-12-01

    For further improvement of coronary heart disease (CHD) management large epidemiological studies are required to characterise the real population of patients with CHD, treated in the primary care settings, and to evaluate how the guidelines are implemented in the everyday clinical practice. The aim of the Angina Treatment Pattern (ATP) survey was to characterise (i) the population of patients, treated by the primary care physicians for stable CHD, (ii) the methods applied by the primary care physicians to establish diagnosis of CHD and (iii) the pharmacological therapies for CHD. Across Poland, 397 primary care physicians were randomly selected. They recruited 7420 patients (49% men; mean age, 62 +/- 10 years; range: 25-93 years), treated for stable CHD. The duration of CHD was 7.4 +/- 6.6 years (range: 6 months-50 years), 2750 (37%) patients had myocardial infarction. The following risk factors of CHD were present: arterial hypertension in 58%, dyslipidaemia in 52%, smoking in 40%, family history of CHD in 56% and obesity or overweight in 73% of patients. Primary care physicians based a diagnosis of CHD predominantly on a history of anginal pain (in 33% patients), accompanied either by abnormal resting ECG or positive exercise test (in additional 31% patients). Only in 5% of patients, coronary angiography was applied to diagnose CAD. The following groups of drugs have been used: long-acting nitrates in 90%, anti-platelet drugs or anti-coagulants in 71% (aspirin in 65%), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in 51%, beta-blockers in 48%, calcium antagonists 31%, hypolipaemic drugs in 23% (statins in 10%) and metabolic agents in 16% of patients. Despite an extensive use of classical anti-anginal drugs (including at least one of the following: long-acting nitrates, beta-blockers, calcium antagonists in 95% of patients), 85% of patients still complained of anginal symptoms. Neither prevalence of angina among patients nor nitroglycerin intake depended on the number

  11. Coronary-to-bronchial artery fistula in a patient with multivessel coronary disease treated by percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigattieri, Stefano; Fedele, Silvio; Sperandio, Massimiliano; Martuscelli, Eugenio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Altamura, Giuliano; Loschiavo, Paolo

    2010-08-01

    We describe the case of a 78-year-old patient, admitted to our hospital with an acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography showed multivessel coronary artery disease and an anomalous coronary vessel branching from the right coronary artery. After successful percutaneous revascularization and discharge, the anomalous vessel was diagnosed by contrast enhanced 64-multidetector computed tomography as a coronary-to-bronchial fistula. Since the patient was asymptomatic, conservative treatment was selected.

  12. Stable ischemic heart disease in women: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Fatima; Agarwal, Anushree; Samad, Zainab

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women accounting for 1 in every 4 female deaths. Pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease in women includes epicardial coronary artery, endothelial dysfunction, coronary vasospasm, plaque erosion and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angina is the most common presentation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) in women. Risk factors for SIHD include traditional risks such as older age, obesity (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m 2 ), smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, family history of premature coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus, and nontraditional risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, insulin resistance/polycystic ovarian disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, menopause, mental stress and autoimmune diseases. Diagnostic testing can be used effectively to risk stratify women. Guidelines-directed medical therapy including aspirin, statins, beta-blocker therapy, calcium channel blockers and ranolazine should be instituted for symptom and ischemia management. Despite robust evidence regarding the adverse outcomes seen in women with ischemic heart disease, knowledge gaps exist in several areas. Future research needs to be directed toward a greater understanding of the role of nontraditional risk factors for SIHD in women, gaining deeper insights into the sex differences in therapeutic effects and formulating a sex-specific algorithm for the management of SIHD in women.

  13. Updates in management of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Heon; Chae, Shung Chull

    2005-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been increasing during the last decade and is the one of major causes of death. The management of patients with coronary artery disease has evolved considerably. There are two main strategies in the management of CAD, complementary, not competitive, each other; the pharmacologic therapy to prevent and treat CAD and the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to restore coronary flow. Antiplatelet drugs and cholesterol lowering drugs have central roles in pharmacotherapy. Drug eluting stent (DES) bring about revolutional changes in PCL in the management of patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI), there has been a debate on the better strategy for the restoration of coronary flow. Thrombolytic therapy is widely available and easy to administer, whereas primary PCI is less available and more complex, but more complete. Recently published evidences in the pharmacologic therapy including antiplatelet and statin, and PCI including DES and reperfusion therapy in patients with ST segment elevation AMI were reviewed

  14. Updates in management of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Heon; Chae, Shung Chull [Kyungpook National University Medical School, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been increasing during the last decade and is the one of major causes of death. The management of patients with coronary artery disease has evolved considerably. There are two main strategies in the management of CAD, complementary, not competitive, each other; the pharmacologic therapy to prevent and treat CAD and the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to restore coronary flow. Antiplatelet drugs and cholesterol lowering drugs have central roles in pharmacotherapy. Drug eluting stent (DES) bring about revolutional changes in PCL in the management of patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI), there has been a debate on the better strategy for the restoration of coronary flow. Thrombolytic therapy is widely available and easy to administer, whereas primary PCI is less available and more complex, but more complete. Recently published evidences in the pharmacologic therapy including antiplatelet and statin, and PCI including DES and reperfusion therapy in patients with ST segment elevation AMI were reviewed.

  15. Myocardial Strain Analysis by 2-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography Improves Diagnostics of Coronary Artery Stenosis in Stable Angina Pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Hoffmann, Soren; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two-dimensional strain echocardiography detects early signs of left ventricular dysfunction; however, it is unknown whether myocardial strain analysis at rest in patients with suspected stable angina pectoris predicts the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS:...

  16. Vascular remodeling in coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. di Mario (Carlo); P.N. Ruygrok (Peter); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractTraditionally, the diagnosis of significant coronary atherosclerotic disease has relied on angiographic techniques. Both histologic analyses and, more recently, intravascular ultrasonography techniques have revealed that a significant atherosclerotic plaque load may be present in

  17. Myocardial perfusion studies in coronary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mut, Fernando

    1994-01-01

    For detecting in precocious form a coronary disease is necessary to apply a diagnostic techniques. The main considerations to be indicated in the present work are: physiological considerations, myocardial perfusion studies with radiotracers such as Talio 201, 99mTc, MIBI, 99mTc-Teboroxima, 99mTc-Fosfinas, instrumentation for obtain good images,proceedings protocols, studies interpretation, standards, SPECT, anomalies standards, coronary diseases

  18. Coronary collateral circulation in patients of coronary ectasia with significant coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chao Hsu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Patients with coronary ectasia (CE usually have coexisting coronary stenosis resulting in myoischemia. Coronary collateral plays an important role in protecting myocardium from ischemia and reducing cardiovascular events. However, limited studies investigate the role of CE in coronary collaterals development. METHODS: We evaluated 1020 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography and 552 patients with significant coronary artery disease (SCAD, defined as diameter stenosis more than 70%, were finally analyzed. CE is defined as the ectatic diameter 1.5 times larger than adjacent reference segment. Rentrop collateral score was used to classify patients into poor (grades 0 and 1 or good (grades 2 and 3 collateral group. RESULTS: 73 patients (13.2% had CE lesions which were most located in the right coronary artery (53.4%. Patients with CE had a lower incidence of diabetes (43.8% vs 30.1%, p = 0.03, higher body mass index (25.4±3.5 vs 26.7±4.6, p = 0.027 and poorer coronary collateral (58.2% vs 71.2%, p = 0.040. Patients with poor collateral (n = 331 had a higher incidence of CE (15.7% vs 9.5%, p = 0.040 and fewer diseased vessels numbers (1.96±0.84 vs 2.48±0.69, p<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed diabetes (odd ratio (OR 0.630, p = 0.026, CE (OR = 0.544, p = 0.048, and number of diseased vessels (OR = 2.488, p<0.001 were significant predictors of coronary collaterals development. CONCLUSION: The presence of CE was associated with poorer coronary collateral development in patients with SCAD.

  19. Relation of coronary vasoreactivity and coronary calcification in asymptomatic subjects with a family history of premature coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirich, Christian [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna University Hospital, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Leber, Alexander; Knez, Andreas [Medizinische Klinik I, Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany); Bengel, Frank M.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Haberl, Ralph [Medical Hospital I, University of Munich, Muenchen Pasing (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) allows non-invasive imaging of coronary calcification and has been promoted as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) in asymptomatic high-risk subjects. This study assessed the relation of coronary calcifications to alterations in coronary vascular reactivity by means of positron emission tomography (PET) in asymptomatic subjects with a familial history of premature CAD. Twenty-one subjects (mean age 51{+-}10 years) underwent EBCT imaging for coronary calcifications expressed as the coronary calcium score (CCS according to Agatston) and rest/adenosine-stress nitrogen-13 ammonia PET with quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). The mean CCS was 237{+-}256 (median 146, range 0-915). The CCS was <100 in eight subjects and >100 units in 13. As defined by age-related thresholds, 15 subjects had an increased CCS (>75th percentile). Overall mean resting and stress MBF and CFR were 71{+-}16 ml 100 g{sup -1} min{sup -1}, 218{+-}54 ml 100 g{sup -1} min{sup -1} and 3.20{+-}0.77, respectively. Three subjects with CCS ranging from 114 to 451 units had an abnormal CFR (<2.5). There was no relation between CCS and resting or stress MBF or CFR (r=0.17, 0.18 and 0.10, respectively). In asymptomatic subjects a pathological CCS was five times more prevalent than an abnormal CFR. The absence of any close relationship between CCS and CFR reflects the fact that quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with PET characterises the dynamic process of vascular reactivity while EBCT is a measure of more stable calcified lesions in the arterial wall whose presence is closely related to age. (orig.)

  20. Perceived Social Support and Physical Activity Among Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Mi Hwa; Son, Youn-Jung

    2017-12-01

    Adherence to recommended physical activity after a cardiac event is important to prevent cardiac recurrence. Social support from peers and family is known to improve self-care in chronic illnesses, including cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between social support from health care providers and physical activity among patients with coronary artery disease remains unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the relationship between perceived social support from health care providers and physical activity among patients with stable coronary artery disease. The study included 237 patients with stable coronary artery disease attending an outpatient clinic. Hierarchical linear regression found that perceived social support explained 12% of variance in physical activity, F(14, 222) = 7.37, p < .001. In addition, self-efficacy partially mediated the relationships between perceived social support and physical activity. Abundant support from health care providers plays a key role in promoting physical activity among patients with stable coronary artery disease.

  1. Periodontal Disease and its Association with Angiographically Verified Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vražić, Domagoj; Miovski, Zoran; Strozzi, Maja; Puhar, Ivan; Badovinac, Ana; Božić, Darko; Plančak, Darije

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the association of chronic and aggressive periodontitis with the severity of coronary artery disease which was angiographically verified. Subjects were selected among the hospitalized patients at the University Hospital Centre Zagreb who had coronary angiography done because of the chest pain. Thorough clinical examination included periodontal indices and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of participants. Subjects were divided in two test groups, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD), and the control group with no significant CAD. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson's Chi-Square test. From 106 subjects, 66 (62.3%) were hospitalized for ACS, 22 (20.7%) had stable CAD and only 18 (17.0%) had no significant CAD. Only 26 (24.5%) out of 106 patients were never smokers (pperiodontitis was the most common finding with 68.2% in ACS group and 54.5% in stable CAD group, while healthy patients without periodontitis (72.6%) were dominant in the control group (pPeriodontitis was shown to be associated with angiographically verified coronary artery disease. Physical inactivity, poor oral hygiene and periodontal inflammation were observed in patients with ACS and stable CAD.

  2. What Is Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the results explained to you: Blood pressure measurement. Fasting blood glucose. This test is for diabetes. Lipoprotein ... coronary MVD and also have anemia , you may benefit from treatment for that condition. Anemia is thought ...

  3. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / ... narrows or blocks these arteries—a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD) or coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs. A ...

  4. Stable ischemic heart disease in women: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatima Samad,1 Anushree Agarwal,2 Zainab Samad3 1Aurora Cardiovascular Services, Aurora Sinai/Aurora St Luke’s Medical Centers, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 2Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women accounting for 1 in every 4 female deaths. Pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease in women includes epicardial coronary artery, endothelial dysfunction, coronary vasospasm, plaque erosion and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angina is the most common presentation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD in women. Risk factors for SIHD include traditional risks such as older age, obesity (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m2, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, family history of premature coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus, and nontraditional risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, insulin resistance/polycystic ovarian disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, menopause, mental stress and autoimmune diseases. Diagnostic testing can be used effectively to risk stratify women. Guidelines-directed medical therapy including aspirin, statins, beta-blocker therapy, calcium channel blockers and ranolazine should be instituted for symptom and ischemia management. Despite robust evidence regarding the adverse outcomes seen in women with ischemic heart disease, knowledge gaps exist in several areas. Future research needs to be directed toward a greater understanding of the role of nontraditional risk factors for SIHD in women, gaining deeper insights into the sex differences in therapeutic effects and formulating a sex-specific algorithm for the

  5. [Correlation between blood stasis syndrome and pathological characteristics of coronary artery in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian-Peng; Shi, Da-Zhuo; Li, Tian-Chang; Xu, Hao; Chen, Hao

    2010-09-01

    To study the correlation of blood stasis syndrome or its accompanied syndromes with Gensini score in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) in stable condition. The syndrome types of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and blood stasis score in 131 CHD patients confirmed by coronary angiography were recorded. Gensini score was calculated according to the coronary pathological characteristics showed by angiography. The correlations of blood stasis syndrome and its accompanied syndromes with coronary lesion and Gensini score were analyzed. Among the TCM syndrome types, blood stasis, turbid phlegm and qi deficiency were the most common syndromes, revealed in 85 patients (64.9%), 83 patients (63.4%) and 85 patients (64.9%), respectively. The coronary lesion length and Gensini score in the patients with blood stasis syndrome were much higher than those in the patients with non-blood stasis syndrome (Psyndrome were higher than those in the patients with non-blood stasis syndrome (Psyndrome score was more than 9 points, the coronary lesion length was higher than that in the patients whose blood stasis syndrome score was less than 9 points (Psyndrome score showed no correlation with Gensini score (Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.104, P=0.241). Blood stasis syndrome is the most common TCM syndrome in CHD patients in stable condition. The blood stasis syndrome score is proportional to coronary lesion length, and reflects the severity of coronary lesion.

  6. Efficacy of Patient Selection for Diagnostic Coronary Angiography in Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Flávio Costa Filho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Guidelines recommend that in suspected stable coronary artery disease (CAD, a clinical (non-invasive evaluation should be performed before coronary angiography.Objective:We assessed the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography in suspected stable CAD.Methods:We prospectively selected consecutive patients without known CAD, referred to a high-volume tertiary center. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, symptoms and non-invasive test results were correlated to the presence of obstructive CAD. We estimated the CAD probability based on available clinical data and the incremental diagnostic value of previous non-invasive tests.Results:A total of 830 patients were included; median age was 61 years, 49.3% were males, 81% had hypertension and 35.5% were diabetics. Non-invasive tests were performed in 64.8% of the patients. At coronary angiography, 23.8% of the patients had obstructive CAD. The independent predictors for obstructive CAD were: male gender (odds ratio [OR], 3.95; confidence interval [CI] 95%, 2.70 - 5.77, age (OR for 5 years increment, 1.15; CI 95%, 1.06 - 1.26, diabetes (OR, 2.01; CI 95%, 1.40 - 2.90, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.02; CI 95%, 1.32 - 3.07, typical angina (OR, 2.92; CI 95%, 1.77 - 4.83 and previous non-invasive test (OR 1.54; CI 95% 1.05 - 2.27.Conclusions:In this study, less than a quarter of the patients referred for coronary angiography with suspected CAD had the diagnosis confirmed. A better clinical and non-invasive assessment is necessary, to improve the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography.

  7. Triglyceride-mediated pathways and coronary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Ricketts, Sally L

    2010-01-01

    disease who had information about lipoprotein concentration and diameter obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. FINDINGS: The minor allele frequency of -1131T>C was 8% (95% CI 7-9). -1131T>C was not significantly associated with several non-lipid risk factors or LDL cholesterol......BACKGROUND: Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality. METHODS: We assessed the -1131T>C (rs662799) promoter polymorphism...... of the apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene in relation to triglyceride concentration, several other risk factors, and risk of coronary heart disease. We compared disease risk for genetically-raised triglyceride concentration (20,842 patients with coronary heart disease, 35,206 controls) with that recorded for equivalent...

  8. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  9. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...

  10. Early results of coronary artery bypass grafting with coronary endarterectomy for severe coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toischer Karl

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the existence of controversial debates on the efficiency of coronary endarterectomy (CE, it is still used as an adjunct to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. This is particularly true in patients with endstage coronary artery disease. Given the improvements in cardiac surgery and postoperative care, as well as the rising number of elderly patient with numerous co-morbidities, re-evaluating the pros and cons of this technique is needed. Methods Patient demographic information, operative details and outcome data of 104 patients with diffuse calcified coronary artery disease were retrospectively analyzed with respect to functional capacity (NYHA, angina pectoris (CCS and mortality. Actuarial survival was reported using a Kaplan-Meyer analysis. Results Between August 2001 and March 2005, 104 patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG with adjunctive coronary endarterectomy (CE in the Department of Thoracic-, Cardiac- and Vascular Surgery, University of Goettingen. Four patients were lost during follow-up. Data were gained from 88 male and 12 female patients; mean age was 65.5 ± 9 years. A total of 396 vessels were bypassed (4 ± 0.9 vessels per patient. In 98% left internal thoracic artery (LITA was used as arterial bypass graft and a total of 114 vessels were endarterectomized. CE was performed on right coronary artery (RCA (n = 55, on left anterior descending artery (LAD (n = 52 and circumflex artery (RCX (n = 7. Ninety-five patients suffered from 3-vessel-disease, 3 from 2-vessel- and 2 from 1-vessel-disease. Closed technique was used in 18%, open technique in 79% and in 3% a combination of both. The most frequent endarterectomized localization was right coronary artery (RCA = 55%. Despite the severity of endstage atherosclerosis, hospital mortality was only 5% (n = 5. During follow-up (24.5 ± 13.4 months, which is 96% complete (4 patients were lost caused by unknown address 8 patients died (cardiac

  11. Adherence to Treatment, Safety, Tolerance, and Effectiveness of Perindopril/Amlodipine Fixed-Dose Combination in Greek Patients with Hypertension and Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Pan-Hellenic Prospective Observational Study of Daily Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Charalampos I; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios P; Kotsis, Vasilios T

    2017-10-01

    Initiation of antihypertensive therapy with a two-drug fixed-dose combination (FDC) in a single tablet may be recommended in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events to improve adherence and effectiveness. Preferred combinations include an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with a dihydropyridine calcium antagonist. This study assessed adherence to and the safety, tolerance, and effectiveness of the perindopril/amlodipine FDC in Greek patients with hypertension and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) over a 4-month period. A total of 1907 patients with hypertension and CAD (59.1% males) who had recently (≤2 weeks) commenced treatment with the perindopril/amlodipine FDC (5/5, 5/10, 10/5, or 10/10 mg) were studied at baseline and at 1 and 4 months. Adherence to treatment was assessed with the Morisky Medication-taking Adherence Scale (MMAS). Seven patients (0.4%) did not attend the scheduled visits. In total, 1607 (84.6%) patients received a constant treatment dose throughout the study. High adherence (MMAS score = 0) was reported by 1592 (83.6%), 1628 (85.7%), and 1477 (77.7%) patients at the second and the third visit and at both visits, respectively. Adverse reactions were reported by only 13 (0.7%) patients, were all minor, and did not result in treatment discontinuation. Office blood pressure (BP) was significantly decreased at the third visit (130.8 ± 8.4/78.2 ± 6.4 mmHg) compared with baseline (156.5 ± 15.0/89.9 ± 9.6 mmHg; p < 0.001), regardless of previous antihypertensive treatment. Patients with grade 1, 2, and 3 hypertension at baseline showed a reduction in BP of 19.3/9.4, 31.5/13.5, and 47.8/22.2 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.001). Uncontrolled hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) was notably reduced from 90.3% at baseline to 18.5% at the third visit. The perindopril/amlodipine FDC is characterized by high adherence and effectiveness, regardless of previous treatment. Degree of BP reduction was related to baseline BP levels

  12. Coronary artery disease and symptoms of depression in a Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coronary artery disease and symptoms of depression in a Kenyan population. ... death. Little is known about the co-morbidity of heart disease and depression in Africa. Objective: To describe the prevalence of depression in Black Africans with and without. Coronary Artery Disease as documented on coronary angiography ...

  13. Gender differences in the prevalence of coronary artery tortuosity and its association with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Chiha

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: There is a significant relationship between coronary artery tortuosity and gender. Women with severe tortuosity are more likely to have normal coronary arteries or less severe disease than men despite presenting with chest pain.

  14. C-reactive protein, dietary n-3 fatty acids, and the extent of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Skou, Helle Aarup; Hansen, Vibeke Ellegaard

    2001-01-01

    The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Experimental and clinical studies provide evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from fish. We have studied the effect of marin.......003). The inverse correlation between CRP and DHA may reflect an anti-inflammatory effect of DHA in patients with stable coronary artery disease and suggest a novel mechanism by which fish consumption may decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. (C) 2001 by Excerpta Medica, Inc....

  15. [Coronary heart disease: epidemiologic-genetic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, F H

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and the risk factors which predispose to it aggregate in families. How much of this clustering of disease is "explained" by the familial resemblance in predisposing factors? The published reports which bear on this question fall into six distinct study designs: prospective studies, persons at high or low risk or persons with and without a positive family history as points of departure, case-control studies, studies of patients who had a coronary angiogram and studies in different ethnic groups. The findings of the 16 investigations reviewed suggest that there are as yet unidentified factors - genetic, environmental or both - which are responsible for familial clustering of coronary heart disease, apart from the three main risk factors (serum lipids, blood pressure, smoking) and diabetes. Future research must put greater emphasis on studies of families rather than individuals and on closer collaboration between epidemiologists and geneticists, in order to fill these gaps in knowledge. It is likely that the individual predisposition to coronary heart disease is due in part to genetic influences which remain to be discovered in the course of such studies. They would help in identifying susceptible person in the population with greater precision than is now possible. The "high-risk strategy" of coronary heart disease prevention will become more efficient as more specific and sensitive tests of disease prediction are developed. In the meantime, preventive programmes must be put into action on the basis of what is already known, on the level of both the high-risk and the community-wide mass strategy.

  16. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability to exercise, using this ...

  17. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  18. Genetically Determined Height and Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, Christopher P.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Saleheen, Danish; Hopewell, Jenna C.; Zeng, Lingyao; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Burgess, Stephen; Amouyel, Phillipe; Anand, Sonia; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Clarke, Robert J.; Collins, Rory; Dedoussis, George; Farrall, Martin; Franks, Paul W.; Groop, Leif; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ingelsson, Erik; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; König, Inke R.; Kooner, Jaspal; Lehtimäki, Terho; März, Winifred; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Peters, Annette; Perola, Markus; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ripatti, Samuli; Roberts, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; Shah, Svati H.; Schreiber, Stefan; Siegbahn, Agneta; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Veronesi, Giovani; Wareham, Nicholas; Willer, Cristen J.; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Deloukas, Panos; Watkins, Hugh; Schunkert, Heribert; Danesh, John; Thompson, John R.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Assimes, Themistocles; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Johansson, Åsa; Lee, Jong-Young; Chambers, John C.; Esko, Tõnu; Folkersen, Lasse; Goel, Anuj; Grundberg, Elin; Havulinna, Aki S.; Ho, Weang K.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Eriksson, Niclas; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lundmark, Per; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Rafelt, Suzanne; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Zuydam, Natalie; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Altshuler, David; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barroso, Inês; Braund, Peter S.; Burgdorf, Christof; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cox, David; Dimitriou, Maria; Do, Ron; Doney, Alex S. F.; El Mokhtari, NourEddine; Eriksson, Per; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gigante, Bruna; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hager, Jörg; Hallmans, Göran; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kang, Hyun M.; Illig, Thomas; Kessler, Thorsten; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lundmark, Anders; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meisinger, Christa; Melander, Olle; Mihailov, Evelin; Maouche, Seraya; Morris, Andrew D.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nikus, Kjell; Peden, John F.; Rayner, N. William; Rasheed, Asif; Rosinger, Silke; Rubin, Diana; Rumpf, Moritz P.; Schäfer, Arne; Sivananthan, Mohan; Song, Ci; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Wagner, Peter J.; Wells, George A.; Wild, Philipp S.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Basart, Hanneke; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brambilla, Paolo; Cambien, Francois; Cupples, Adrienne L.; de Faire, Ulf; Dehghan, Abbas; Diemert, Patrick; Epstein, Stephen E.; Evans, Alun; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Gauguier, Dominique; Go, Alan S.; Goodall, Alison H.; Gudnason, Villi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Holm, Hilma; Iribarren, Carlos; Jang, Yangsoo; Kähönen, Mika; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Klopp, Norman; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laakso, Markku; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lee, Ji-Young; Lind, Lars; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Parish, Sarah; Park, Jeong E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rader, Daniel J.; Schadt, Eric; Sinisalo, Juha; Stark, Klaus; Stefansson, Kari; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wallentin, Lars; Zimmermann, Martina E.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Blankenberg, Stefan S.; Clarke, Robert; O'Donnell, Christopher; März, Winfried; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. METHODS We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested

  19. Acute and long-term outcome of directional coronary atherectomy for stable and unstable angina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.A.W.M. Umans (Victor); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); D.C. MacLeod (Donald); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.W. Deckers (Jaap)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe clinical efficacy and safety of directional coronary atherectomy for the treatment of stable and unstable angina were assessed in 82 patients with stable and 68 patients with unstable angina. Therefore, clinical and angiographic follow-up was obtained in a prospectively collected

  20. Plaque disruption by coronary computed tomographic angiography in stable patients vs. acute coronary syndrome: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilolikar, Abhay N; Goldstein, James A; Madder, Ryan D; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to determine whether coronary CT angiography (CTA) can detect features of plaque disruption in clinically stable patients and to compare lesion prevalence and features between stable patients and those with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We retrospectively identified patients undergoing CTA, followed by invasive coronary angiography (ICA) within 60 days. Quantitative 3-vessel CTA lesion analysis was performed on all plaques ≥25% stenosis to assess total plaque volume, low attenuation plaque (LAP, disruption, including ulceration and intra-plaque dye penetration (IDP). ICA was employed as a reference standard for disruption. A total of 145 (94 ACS and 51 stable) patients were identified. By CTA, plaque disruption was evident in 77.7% of ACS cases. Although more common among those with ACS, CTA also detected plaque disruption in 37.3% of clinically stable patients (P disruption as determined by CTA. Though the prevalence of plaque disruption is less than patients with ACS, these findings support the concept that some clinically stable patients may harbour 'silent' disrupted plaques. These findings may have implications for detection of 'at risk' plaques and patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Depression in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Safaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the Common psychological disorders. From the cognitive point of view, the unhealthy attitudes increase the severity of the depression. The aim of this study was to investigate depression and unhealthy attitudes in coronary patients hospitalized at Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center. Methods: One hundred twenty eight hospitalized patients having myocardial Infarctions were studied regarding unhealthy attitudes, severity of depression and demographic data. Results: The study showed a significant relation between unhealthy attitudes, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and severe depression. Moreover, a significant relation existed between gender and depression (P=0.0001. In addition, the level of education increased the intensity of unhealthy attitudes (P=0.0001. Several researches in both outside and inside Iran support the idea. Conclusion: Based on present study and more other investigations, it can be suggested to provide the necessary elements and parameters such as antidepressant medication, psychologists, complementary treatment for coping with negative mood and its unwanted consequences.

  2. status, risk factors disease Socio-economic and coronary heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... status, risk factors disease. Socio-economic and coronary heart. The CORIS baseline study. J. E. ROSSOUW, P. L. JOOSTE, H. J. STEENKAMP, M. L. THOMPSON, ... and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease .... definition, was decided upon after exploration of their strength of association ...

  3. Influence of the coronary calcium score on the ability to rule out coronary artery stenoses by coronary CT angiography in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Schmid, Jasmin; Zimmer, Thomas; Muschiol, Gerd; Hell, Michaela M; Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Recent guidelines for the workup of patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease include coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). However, its diagnostic value may be limited in patients with severe coronary calcification. We investigated the relationship between the extent of coronary calcium and the ability of coronary CTA to rule out significant stenoses in a series of consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease. 2614 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease in whom coronary calcium scoring and coronary CTA had been performed by Dual Source CT were analyzed. The ability of coronary CTA to rule out coronary artery stenoses (fully evaluable coronary arteries and absence of any luminal stenosis >75%) was analyzed relative to the coronary calcium score. The median coronary calcium score was 12, with calcium present in 60.5% of all patients. Coronary CTA ruled out stenoses in 82% of patients, while in 18% of patients at least one stenosis was found or could not be excluded. The threshold above which coronary CTA permitted to rule out stenoses in less than 50% of patients was an "Agatston Score" of 287. This threshold was significantly lower for male patients (213 vs. 330), for patients with a heart rate >65 beats/min (157 vs. 317) and for patients with a body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2) (208 vs. 392). The evaluability of coronary arteries decreased with increasing amounts of calcium and differed significantly between heart rates ≤65 beats/min and >65 beats/min (p coronary CTA permits to rule out coronary artery stenoses in less than 50% of cases. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Emerging genomic applications in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damani, Samir B; Topol, Eric J

    2011-05-01

    Over the last 4 years, an unprecedented number of studies illuminating the genomic underpinnings of common "polygenic" diseases including coronary artery disease have been published. Notably, these studies have established numerous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) variants within or near chromosome 9p21.3, the LPA, CXADR, and APOE genes, to name a few, as key coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death susceptibility markers. Most importantly, many of these DNA variants confer over a 2-fold increase in risk for coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and ventricular fibrillation. Additionally, loss-of-function variants in the hepatic cytochrome 2C19 system have now been found to be the predominant genetic mediators of clopidogrel antiplatelet response, with variant carriers having a >3-fold increase in risk for stent thrombosis. In the near future, many additional rare polymorphisms, structural variants, and tissue-specific epigenetic features of the human genome including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin state will emerge as significant contributors to disease pathogenesis and drug response. In aggregate, these findings will have the potential to radically change the practice of cardiovascular medicine. However, only the individual clinician can ultimately enable the translation of these important discoveries to systematic implementation in clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Angiographic evaluation of coronary arterial abnormalities in Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ik Joon; Kim, Yang Min; Kim, Me Young; Kim, Jung Suk; Je, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Seong Bae; Moon, Yung; Kim, Seong Ho; Bae, Eun Jung

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the coronary angiographic findings of patients with Kawasaki disease and to investigate the natural course of aneurysms of the coronary artery. Between June 1989 and January 1996, we evaluated the coronary angiographic findings of 12 consecutive children with Kawasaki disease whose coronary artery was abnormal. On initial study, we retrospectively analysed the size, configuration, and location of 35 coronary aneurysms, and in five children, follow-up coronary angiography was performed at intervals of 17 to 28 (mean, 23) months. Seventeen aneurysms detected on initial study were evaluated for subsequent change. In patients with Kawasaki disease, information regarding the size and configuration of coronary aneurysms may be useful for predicting the natural course and prognosis of coronary artery disease. (author). 17 refs., 3 figs

  6. Diabetic retinopathy: A predictor of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia El Demerdash

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy is a good predictor of coronary artery disease that exceeds the conventional risk factors. Diabetics with retinopathy would benefit from early coronary angiography and diabetic retinocoronary clinics are warranted.

  7. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate the empiri......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  8. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  9. Moderators of Coronary Vasomotion during Mental Stress in Coronary Artery Disease Patients: Stress Reactivity, Serum Lipoproteins, and Severity of Atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howell, Robert H

    1996-01-01

    Impaired coronary artery vasomotion in response to behavioral triggers such as mental stress may be an important pathophysiological process involved in acute manifestations of coronary artery disease...

  10. Homocysteine in coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Franciscus Florimondus

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we review epidemiological evidence of the relationship between homocysteine and cardiovascular disease with an introduction to homocysteine metabolism in relation to the genetics of hyperhomocysteinemia and the impact of homocysteine for atherosclerosis and endothelial function.

  11. Incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score for the prediction of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genders, Tessa S.S.; Pugliese, Francesca; Mollet, Nico R.; Meijboom, W. Bob; Weustink, Annick C.; Mieghem, Carlos A.G. van; Feyter, Pim J. de; Hunink, M.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    To validate published prediction models for the presence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with new onset stable typical or atypical angina pectoris and to assess the incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score (CTCS). We searched the literature for clinical prediction rules for the diagnosis of obstructive CAD, defined as ≥50% stenosis in at least one vessel on conventional coronary angiography. Significant variables were re-analysed in our dataset of 254 patients with logistic regression. CTCS was subsequently included in the models. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to assess diagnostic performance. Re-analysing the variables used by Diamond and Forrester yielded an AUC of 0.798, which increased to 0.890 by adding CTCS. For Pryor, Morise 1994, Morise 1997 and Shaw the AUC increased from 0.838 to 0.901, 0.831 to 0.899, 0.840 to 0.898 and 0.833 to 0.899. CTCS significantly improved model performance in each model. Validation demonstrated good diagnostic performance across all models. CTCS improves the prediction of the presence of obstructive CAD, independent of clinical predictors, and should be considered in its diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  12. Coronary CT angiography and MR angiography of Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, In-Sook; Ko, Jae Kon; Kim, Young Hwee

    2006-01-01

    Although the incidence of coronary artery aneurysms has diminished in patients with Kawasaki disease, coronary artery involvement is still regarded as a major complication of the disease, significantly affecting morbidity and mortality. Recent technical advances in coronary CT angiography (CTA) and MR angiography (MRA) have led to the possibility of using these two imaging methods as minimally invasive alternatives to the more invasive diagnostic catheter angiography in evaluating coronary artery abnormalities, such as aneurysm, stenosis, and occlusion. In this article, we describe imaging techniques and findings of coronary CTA and MRA in Kawasaki disease. (orig.)

  13. Different manifestation of irradiation induced coronary artery disease detected with coronary computed tomography compared with matched non-irradiated controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendael, A.R. van; Daniels, L.A.; Dimitriu-Leen, A.C.; Smit, J.M.; Rosendael, P.J. van; Schalij, M.J.; Bax, J.J.; Scholte, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients who received chest irradiation for treatment of a malignancy are at increased risk for the development of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Little is known about the anatomical coronary artery plaque characteristics of irradiation induced coronary artery disease

  14. Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conventional medicine , such as treating lead poisoning or iron overload. When used as a complementary treatment for heart disease, a health care provider typically administers a solution of disodium EDTA, a man-made amino acid, in a series of infusions ...

  15. Dipyridamole coronary flow reserve stratifies prognosis in acute coronary syndrome patients without left anterior descending disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Luigi; Carlomagno, Guido; Sordelli, Chiara; Iengo, Raffaele; Monda, Vittorio; Severino, Sergio; Merenda, Raffaele; D'Andrea, Antonello; Caso, Pio

    2013-09-01

    Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessment by transthoracic ultrasound of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery during dipyridamole stress echocardiography has been shown to predict prognosis in large unselected populations. Low values of CFR are strongly correlated with significant stenosis of the LAD; aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic impact of CFR in patients recovering from an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with proven absence of LAD disease. From an overall cohort of 325 patients with ACS who underwent a high-dose dipyridamole stress with combined assessment of CFR in the LAD and wall motion, 152 patients without LAD disease (stenosis <50%) were included in the present analysis; all subjects underwent coronary angiography and were subsequently monitored for the incidence of major cardiac events (MACE). After a median follow-up of 29 months, 22 patients developed MACE. Patients who experienced MACE differed from stable patients in terms of age, prevalence of diabetes, and CFR. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis defined a CFR <2.25 as the optimal cut point for prediction of MACE. Cox multivariable analysis for the prediction of MACE demonstrated independent predictive value only for CFR <2.25, smoking status, and number of stenotic vessels at angiogram. In high-risk patients with ACS, even in the absence of LAD disease, CFR significantly improves prediction of adverse events when added to standard evaluation. This finding supports a role of CFR in the risk stratification early after ACS and is in context with the concept that CFR reflects global atherosclerotic burden, endothelial dysfunction, and microvascular damage, more than just mirroring focal LAD disease.

  16. Glycated hemoglobin level is significantly associated with the severity of coronary artery disease in non-diabetic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Anping; Li, Guang; Chen, Jiyan; Li, Xida; Wei, Xuebiao; Li, Liwen; Zhou, Yingling

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate relationship between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level and coronary artery disease (CAD) severity. Methods Observational study was conducted and 573 participants were enrolled and baseline characteristics were collected. Clinical presentations in terms of stable angina, unstable angina or acute myocardial infarction were diagnosed. All participants were performed coronary angiography to figure out the numbers of coronary artery stenosis in terms of none-stenosis (< 5...

  17. Could neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio be an indicator of coronary artery disease, coronary artery ectasia and coronary slow flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Hasan; Bilen, Mehmet Nail; Uku, Ökkeş; Kurtoğlu, Ertuğrul

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) differed between patients with isolated coronary artery disease (CAD), isolated coronary artery ectasia (CAE), coronary slow flow and normal coronary anatomy. Methods Patients who underwent coronary angiography were consecutively enrolled into one of four groups: CAD, coronary slow flow, CAE and normal coronary anatomy. Results The CAD (n = 40), coronary slow flow (n = 40), and CAE (n = 40) groups had similar NLRs (2.51 ± 0.7, 2.40 ± 0.8, 2.6 ± 0.6, respectively) that were significantly higher than patients with normal coronary anatomy (n = 40; NLR, 1.73 ± 0.7). Receiver operating characteristics demonstrated that with NLR > 2.12, specificity in predicting isolated CAD was 85% and sensitivity was 75%, with NLR > 2.22 specificity in predicting isolated CAE was 86% and sensitivity was 75%. With NLR > 1.92, specificity in predicting coronary slow flow was 89% and sensitivity was 75%. Multivariate logistic regression analyses identified NLR as an independent predictor of isolated CAE (β = −0.499, 95% CI −0.502, −0.178; P <  0.001), CAD (β = −0.426, 95% CI −1.321, −0.408; P <  0.001), and coronary slow flow (β = −0.430, 95% CI −0.811, −0.240; P = 0.001 Table 2). Conclusions NLR was higher in patients with CAD, coronary slow flow and CAE versus normal coronary anatomy. NLR may be an indicator of CAD, CAE and coronary slow flow. PMID:28322100

  18. [Depression, anxiety, and stress in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belialov, F I

    The analytical paper summarized the results of recent studies of an association of depression, anxiety, and stress with coronary heart disease (CHD). Mental disorders are shown to be associated with increased risk of CHD and to worsen the course of coronary disease. Antidepressants and psychotherapy improve the control of mental disorders, quality of life, and, in some cases, have a positive impact on the course of coronary disease.

  19. Coronary microvascular function, insulin sensitivity and body composition in predicting exercise capacity in overweight patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürs, Anders; Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a negative impact on exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to determine how coronary microvascular function, glucose metabolism and body composition contribute to exercise capacity in overweight patients with CAD and without diabetes. METHODS...... by a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Body composition was determined by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was used as a measure of microvascular function. RESULTS: Median BMI was 31.3 and 72......: Sixty-five non-diabetic, overweight patients with stable CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) above 35 % were recruited. A 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate glucose metabolism. Peak aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak) was assessed...

  20. Coronary artery disease and experiences of losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Rachel; Romano, Bellkiss Wilma

    2009-10-01

    In literature, depression is associated with cardiovascular diseases. From clinical experience, we observed that the psychological category 'experience of loss' was associated with the onset and development of coronary heart disease. The experience of loss caused by self-reported significant event(s) leads to grief and the psychosocial factors which predispose the patient to diseases. To study the impact of the experience of loss by investigating the relationship between mourning and depression, in hospitalized patients with coronary heart disease. 44 inpatients (50% men and 50% women, aged 33 to 65 years), with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction or angina, were evaluated. Two instruments were used: a semi-structured interview, for investigating the experience of loss and evaluating the state of grief; and the Beck Depression Inventory, for measuring the severity of depression. The results were expressed using the computer program Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 11.0. 66% of the patients were in mourning, the relationship between mourning and depression was significant (pmourning. The most frequent self-reported significant event was death of a family member (47%) and death of a close person (13%), totaling 60% of the events, reported by 84% of the participants. According to the results of Beck Depression Inventory, 48% of them had depression. This study suggests that the psychological category 'experience of loss' should be used as an indicator of the existence of psychological factors that could predispose the patient to CAD, and also confirms the relationship between a state of mourning and depression.

  1. Noninvasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography in the management of coronary artery disease: technology and clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakanishi R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rine Nakanishi, Mathew J Budoff Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA Abstract: After a decade of clinical use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA to evaluate the anatomic severity of coronary artery disease, new methods of deriving functional information from CCTA have been developed. These methods utilize the anatomic information provided by CCTA in conjunction with computational fluid dynamics to calculate fractional flow reserve (FFR values from CCTA image data sets. Computed tomography-derived FFR (CT-FFR enables the identification of lesion-specific drop noninvasively. A three-dimensional CT-FFR modeling technique, which provides FFR values throughout the coronary tree (HeartFlow FFRCT analysis, has been validated against measured FFR and is now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for clinical use. This technique requires off-site supercomputer analysis. More recently, a one-dimensional computational analysis technique (Siemens cFFR, which can be performed on on-site workstations, has been developed and is currently under investigation. This article reviews CT-FFR technology and clinical evidence for its use in stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Keywords: fractional flow reserve, coronary computed tomographic angiography, FFRCT, cFFR

  2. Correlation between C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Vein and Coronary Sinus in Stable and Unstable Angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Weverton Ferreira, E-mail: wfleite@cardiol.br [Instituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ramires, José Antonio Franchini; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho; Strunz, Célia Maria Cassaro [Instituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mangione, José Armando [Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is commonly used in clinical practice to assess cardiovascular risk. However, a correlation has not yet been established between the absolute levels of peripheral and central hs-CRP. To assess the correlation between serum hs-CRP levels (mg/L) in a peripheral vein in the left forearm (LFPV) with those in the coronary sinus (CS) of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a diagnosis of stable angina (SA) or unstable angina (UA). This observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was conducted at the Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clinicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, and at the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, where CAD patients referred to the hospital for coronary angiography were evaluated. Forty patients with CAD (20 with SA and 20 with UA) were included in the study. Blood samples from LFPV and CS were collected before coronary angiography. Furthermore, analysis of the correlation between serum levels of hs-CRP in LFPV versus CS showed a strong linear correlation for both SA (r = 0.993, p < 0.001) and UA (r = 0.976, p < 0.001) and for the entire sample (r = 0.985, p < 0.001). Our data suggest a strong linear correlation between hs-CRP levels in LFPV versus CS in patients with SA and UA.

  3. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  4. Haemostatic function in coronary artery disease (CAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Sikka, M; Madan, N; Dwidedi, S; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1997-04-01

    Tests to evaluate haemostatic function bleeding time (BT), prothrombin time (PT) partial thromboplastin time with kaolin (PTTK), thrombin time (TT), platelet count, platelet function tests (platelet adhesiveness and microthrombus index) and plasma fibrinogen levels were performed in 30 patients of coronary artery disease (14 myocardial infarction, 16 angina pectoris) and 20 age and sex matched controls. There was no statistically significant difference in platelet adhesiveness and mean microthrombus index in patients and controls. The BT, PT, PTTK and TT were normal in all patients and controls. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that plasma fibrinogen was an independent risk factor in the production of CAD.

  5. Linking erectile dysfunction and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J J; Al Dashti, R; Schwarz, E R

    2005-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are both highly prevalent conditions that frequently coexist. Additionally, they share mutual vascular risk factors, suggesting that they are both manifestations of systemic vascular disease. The role of endothelial dysfunction in CAD is well established. Normal erectile function is primarily a vascular event that relies heavily on endothelially derived, nitric oxide-induced vasodilation. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction appears to be a common pathological etiology and mechanism of disease progression between CAD and ED. The risk factors of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity and tobacco abuse contribute to endothelial dysfunction. This article reviews the role of vascular endothelium in health, the abnormalities resulting from vascular risk factors, and clinical trials evaluating the role of endothelial dysfunction in ED.

  6. An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD, remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients.

  7. Medicinal Herbals with Antiplatelet Properties Benefit in Coronary Atherothrombotic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Nor, Nurul Huda; Othman, Fauziah; Mohd Tohit, Eusni Rahayu; Md Noor, Sabariah

    2016-01-01

    Coronary atherothrombotic diseases such as coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and heart failure are the serious concerns of the thrombus formed in blood vessels. Anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs are the cornerstones of the management of these diseases. To prevent the recurrence of these diseases, double antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin and clopidogrel has been the standard management in most hospitals. However, aspirin resistance and clopidogr...

  8. Extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Chantal M; Loyer, Xavier; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amabile, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    Membrane vesicles released in the extracellular space are composed of a lipid bilayer enclosing soluble cytosolic material and nuclear components. Extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, exosomes, and microvesicles (also known previously as microparticles). Originating from different subcellular compartments, the role of extracellular vesicles as regulators of transfer of biological information, acting locally and remotely, is now acknowledged. Circulating vesicles released from platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells contain potential valuable biological information for biomarker discovery in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Extracellular vesicles also accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques, where they affect major biological pathways, including inflammation, proliferation, thrombosis, calcification, and vasoactive responses. Extracellular vesicles also recapitulate the beneficial effect of stem cells to treat cardiac consequences of acute myocardial infarction, and now emerge as an attractive alternative to cell therapy, opening new avenues to vectorize biological information to target tissues. Although interest in microvesicles in the cardiovascular field emerged about 2 decades ago, that for extracellular vesicles, in particular exosomes, started to unfold a decade ago, opening new research and therapeutic avenues. This Review summarizes current knowledge on the role of extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease, and their emerging potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents.

  9. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-10-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes and stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing SIHD and acute coronary syndromes individually. This document presents the AUC for SIHD.Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice. These scenarios included information on symptom status; risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing; coronary disease burden; and, in some scenarios, fractional flow reserve testing, presence or absence of diabetes, and SYNTAX score. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt were affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization.A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range of 4 to 6 indicate that

  10. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublishe...

  11. Association of plasma protein C levels and coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several studies have shown the risk factor causes of coronary heart disease. In this study we tested the hypothesis that plasma protein C level might be used as a biomarker for coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction. The study included 60 men that were classified into 3 groups according to clinical examination; ...

  12. Imaging techniques in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.

    1997-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Coronary angiography makes it possible to visualize coronary artery stenosis and can be used for angioplasty and stent implantation; however, it does not allow the assessment of changes in myocardial microcirculation. The severity of an angiographically evaluated coronary stenosis does not always correspond to the extent of myocardial ischemia. Nonivasive techniques are needed to reexamine our reliance on coronary angiography and to explore the clinical value fo the physiological assessment of coronary artery stenoses. Such noninvasive techniques might become important tools in the future following an overal evaluation of coronary morphology, myocardial function and perfusion ascertained by all available methods. (orig.) [de

  13. Psychological Stress, Inflammation, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Petra H; von Känel, Roland

    2017-09-20

    In this review, we summarize evidence on the risk factor psychological stress in the context of coronary heart disease (CHD) in humans and explore the role of inflammation as a potential underlying mechanism. While chronic stress increases the risk of incident CHD and poor cardiovascular prognosis, acute emotional stress can trigger acute CHD events in vulnerable patients. Evidence supporting a potential role for inflammation as a promising biological mechanism comes from population-based studies showing associations between chronic stress and increased inflammation. Similarly, experimental studies demonstrate acute stress-induced increases in inflammatory markers and suggest modulatory potential for pharmacological and biobehavioral interventions. So far, studies investigating patients with cardiovascular disease are few and the full sequence of events from stress to inflammation to CHD remains to be established. Psychological stress is an independent CHD risk factor associated with increased inflammation. Although promising, causality needs to be further explored.

  14. Benefits of exercise training on coronary blood flow in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Rebecca S; Sturek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Every 34 seconds an American experiences a myocardial infarction or cardiac death. Approximately 80% of these coronary artery disease (CAD)-related deaths are attributable to modifiable behaviors, such as a lack of physical exercise training (ET). Regular ET decreases CAD morbidity and mortality through systemic and cardiac-specific adaptations. ET increases myocardial oxygen demand acting as a stimulus to increase coronary blood flow and thus myocardial oxygen supply, which reduces myocardial infarction and angina. ET augments coronary blood flow through direct actions on the vasculature that improve endothelial and coronary smooth muscle function, enhancing coronary vasodilation. Additionally, ET promotes collateralization, thereby, increasing blood flow to ischemic myocardium and also treats macrovascular CAD by attenuating the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and restenosis, potentially through stabilization of atherosclerotic lesions. In summary, ET can be used as a relatively safe and inexpensive way to prevent and treat CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pregnancy risks in women with pre-existing coronary artery disease, or following acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burchill, Luke J.; Lameijer, Heleen; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Grewal, Jasmine; Ruys, Titia P. E.; Kulikowski, Julia D.; Burchill, Laura A.; Oudijk, M. A.; Wald, Rachel M.; Colman, Jack M.; Siu, Samuel C.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Silversides, Candice K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine outcomes in pregnant women with pre-existing coronary artery disease (CAD) or following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) including myocardial infarction (MI). Background The physiological changes of pregnancy can contribute to myocardial

  16. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Higaki, Tadanao; Shimonaga, Takashi; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-09-15

    Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, an index of endothelium-independent vasodilation, is measured for the assessment of vascular smooth muscle cell function or alterations of vascular structure. Both coronary and brachial artery responses to nitroglycerine have been demonstrated to be independent prognostic markers of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in the same patients. We measured nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in 30 subjects with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent coronary angiography (19 men and 11 women; mean age, 69.0±8.8years; age range, 42-85years). The mean values of nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery, left anterior descending coronary artery, and left circumflex coronary artery were 12.6±5.2%, 11.6±10.3%, and 11.9±11.0%, respectively. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery correlated significantly with that in the left anterior descending coronary artery (r=0.43, P=0.02) and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.49, P=0.006). There was also a significant correlation between nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the left anterior descending coronary artery and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.72, Parteries and that in coronary arteries are simultaneously present. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery could be used as a surrogate for that in a coronary artery and as a prognostic marker for cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The diagnostic value of circulating microRNAs for middle-aged (40–60-year-old coronary artery disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sheikh Md Sayed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Circulating microRNAs have been recognized as promising biomarkers for various diseases. The present study aimed to explore the potential roles of circulating miR-149, miR-424 and miR-765 as non-invasive biomarkers for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in middle-aged (40–60-year-old patients. METHODS: Sixty-five stable coronary artery disease patients (49–57 years old, 30 unstable coronary artery disease patients (49–58 years old, and 32 non-coronary artery disease patients (49–-57 years old who were matched for age, sex, smoking habits, hypertension and diabetes were enrolled in this study. Total RNA was isolated from plasma with TRIzol reagent. Circulating miRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Circulating miR-149 levels were decreased 4.49-fold in stable coronary artery disease patients (1.18 ± 0.84 and 5.09-fold in unstable coronary artery disease patients (1.04 ± 0.65 compared with non-coronary artery disease patients (5.30 ± 2.57 (p<0.001. Circulating miR-424 levels were reduced 3.6-fold in stable coronary artery disease patients (1.18 ± 0.60 and 5-fold in unstable coronary artery disease patients (0.86 ± 0.54 compared with non-coronary artery disease patients (4.35 ± 2.20 (p<0.001. In contrast, circulating miR-765 levels were elevated 3.98-fold in stable coronary artery disease patients (6.09 ± 2.27 and 5.33-fold in unstable coronary artery disease patients (8.17 ± 2.77 compared with non-coronary artery disease patients (1.53 ± 0.99 (p<0.001. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the respective areas under the curve for circulating miR-149, miR-424 and miR-765 were 0.938, 0.919 and 0.968 in stable CAD patients and 0.951, 0.960 and 0.977 in unstable coronary artery disease patients compared with non-coronary artery disease patients. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that circulating miR-149, miR-424 and miR-765 might be novel, non

  18. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...... of antioxidant vitamins and CHD risk. DESIGN: A cohort study pooling 9 prospective studies that included information on intakes of vitamin E, carotenoids, and vitamin C and that met specific criteria was carried out. During a 10-y follow-up, 4647 major incident CHD events occurred in 293 172 subjects who were...... free of CHD at baseline. RESULTS: Dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins was only weakly related to a reduced CHD risk after adjustment for potential nondietary and dietary confounding factors. Compared with subjects in the lowest dietary intake quintiles for vitamins E and C, those in the highest...

  19. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Cifková, R.; Lánská, V.; O'Flaherty, M.; Critchley, J.A.; Holub, J.; Janský, P.; Zvárová, Jana; Capewell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2014), s. 829-839 ISSN 2047-4873 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : coronary heart disease * Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA * coronary heart disease management * coronary heart disease mortality * coronary heart disease risk factors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.319, year: 2014

  20. Risk of coronary artery involvement in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Ramos, María; Martínez-Del Val, Elena; Negreira Cepeda, Sagrario; González-Tomé, María I; Cedena Romero, Pilar; Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Albert de la Torre, Leticia; Blázquez-Gamero, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Kawasaki disease refers to systemic vasculitis with risk of coronary artery disease. Our objective is to identify risk factors associated with coronary artery disease in patients with complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Descriptive, retrospective study conducted in patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease in a tertiary-care hospital between 2008 and 2014. The American Heart Association diagnostic criteria were used to define complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Thirty-one children were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease; 24 met the criteria for the complete form, and 7, for the incomplete form of this condition. Five had coronary artery disease. One of them had incomplete Kawasaki disease (1/7= 14.3%), and the remaining four had the complete form (4/24= 16.7%). No significant differences were found between both groups (p= 1.0). Patients with coronary artery involvement had a higher C-reactive protein level (median: 16.2 mg/dL versus 8.4 mg/dL, p= 0.047) and lower albuminemia (median: 3.2 mg/dL versus 3.99 mg/dL, p= 0.002). The risk of coronary artery involvement in incomplete Kawasaki disease is similar to that in complete Kawasaki disease; therefore, in patients with the incomplete form, immunoglobulin therapy should not be delayed. In our population, C-reactive protein and albumin levels were related to a higher risk of coronary artery involvement. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  1. Association of ischemic stroke to coronary artery disease using computed tomography coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K; Medina, Hector; Nørgaard, Bjarne L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and cerebrovascular disease share similar risk factor profiles, data on whether IS can be considered a "CAD equivalent" are limited. We aimed to determine whether ischemic stroke is an independent predictor of CAD by using cardiac...... increase odds of having coronary artery plaque (odds ratio [OR] 4.9, P4 segments of plaque than 0-4 segments as compared to patients without stroke (OR 18.3, P...

  2. Associations between osteoporosis and coronary artery disease in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S N; Cho, J-Y; Eun, Y-M; Song, S-W; Moon, K-W

    2016-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and osteoporosis are major causes of mortality and morbidity in postmenopausal women. We aimed to investigate the association between osteoporosis and CAD in asymptomatic postmenopausal women at a single center. This study included 863 postmenopausal women without histories of cardiovascular diseases who visited the Health Promotion Center from June 1, 2004 to May 31, 2015. All subjects were screened for bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and for the degree of CAD by multidetector computed tomography. Low BMD including osteopenia and osteoporosis was found to be significantly associated with old age, low body mass index, and a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus. The incidences of CAD including a high coronary artery calcium score (≥100), obstructive coronary artery disease, and multivessel disease were significantly higher in subjects with low BMD. After adjusting for age and cardiovascular risk factors, osteoporosis was associated with a high coronary artery calcium score (p = 0.015) and with obstructive coronary artery disease (p = 0.002). There was a trend toward significance with multivessel disease (p = 0.052). High coronary artery calcium score and obstructive coronary artery disease, as revealed by multidetector computed tomography, were associated with osteoporosis in asymptomatic postmenopausal women, independent of cardiovascular risk factors and age.

  3. [Aftermaths of lesions of coronary arteries in Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostokova, A A; Grunina, E A; Klemenov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease, also known as cutaneous-mucous-glandular mucocutaneous glandular syndrome, is acute systemic vasculitis of small-to-medium calibre arteries, frequently involving coronary arteries, affect almost exceptionally children, with reports concerning cases of Kawasaki syndrome in 20-to-30-year-old adults being extremely rare. The most serious manifestation of Kawasaki disease is coronaritis and formation of coronary artery aneurysms. The dynamics of the formed coronary aneurysms and, consequently, the fate of patients may be different. Thrombosis of an aneurysm in the early period of the disease and stenosing of the affected coronary artery later on present possible complications of Kawasaki disease and potential causes of myocardial infection in young adults. Increased risk of coronary artery thromboses in Kawasaki disease is conditioned by a decrease in velocity of blood flow and its turbulent pattern in the aneurysms, endothelial dysfunction due to currently existing or endured coronaritis and thrombocytosis typical of this pathology. Predisposing factors of coronary artery stenosing are unfavourable haemodynamic conditions appearing at the sites of the "entry" and "exit" of the aneurysm. Described herein are two case reports of myocardial infarction, one of which being a complication of an acute case of Kawasaki disease in a 29-year-old patient, with the second one being a consequence of coronary artery stenosing in a 25-year-old patient who had endured Kawasaki disease in his childhood.

  4. Evaluation of thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.G.; McKillop, J.H.; Bessent, R.G.; Turner, J.G.; Lorimer, A.R.; Hutton, I.; Greig, W.R.; Lawrie, T.D.V.

    1979-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial imaging provides a non-invasive technique in the investigation of patients with suspected coronary heart disease. This study was designed to evaluate thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) scintigraphy in predicting the presence or absence of coronary heart disease in 50 patients presenting with chest pain. The results suggest that computer analysed 201 Tl exercise scintigraphy is a valuable technique for identifying patients with significant coronary artery disease. 201 Tl image data were highly sensitive for detecting the presence of coronary artery disease though accuracy in predicting the extent of disease was limited in patients with multiple vessel disease. The data provides further justification for the use of exercise 201 Tl scintigraphy especially in conjunction with exercise electrocardiography in the investigation of patients with chest pain. (author)

  5. Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhang (Yaojun); C.V. Bourantas (Christos); V. Farooq (Vasim); T. Muramatsu (Takashi); R. Diletti (Roberto); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDrug-eluting stents have reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis and have broadened the application in percutaneous coronary intervention in coronary artery disease. However, the concept of using a permanent metallic endovascular device to restore the patency of a stenotic artery has

  6. Socio-economic status, risk factors and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship of socio-economic status (SES) indicators and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence was examined in 5620 subjects aged 20 ... The SES indicators had Iitlle or no independent effect on CHD prevalence in multivariate logistic analyses after, inclusion of the standard RFs.

  7. Knowledge about coronary artery disease among patients admitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge about coronary artery disease among patients admitted to Aseer central hospital with acute coronary syndrome. ... West African Journal of Medicine ... les patients consecutivement admi a l'Hôpital Central d'Aseer avec le diagnostic d'un syndrome coronaire aigu pendant la période (janvier 2000 au fevrier 2001).

  8. Volumetric evaluation of coronary plaque in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction or stable angina pectoris-a multislice computerized tomography study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Hansen, Sophia; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Kelbaek, Henning

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that unstable clinical presentation of coronary artery disease is associated with distinct characteristics of culprit lesions identifiable by multislice computed tomography (MSCT). METHODS: Patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) (n = 57) or stable...... angina (SA) pectoris (n = 19) were studied. Coronary culprit lesions in patients with NSTEMI and symptomatic lesions in patients with SA were evaluated with 64-slice MSCT and a volumetric plaque imaging tool. Plaque volumes of lipid, fibrous tissue, or calcification according to signal intensity were...

  9. Psoriasis and ischemic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiques-Santos, L; Soriano-Navarro, C J; Perez-Pastor, G; Tomas-Cabedo, G; Pitarch-Bort, G; Valcuende-Cavero, F

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an increased risk of ischemic coronary artery disease (CAD) in some populations. We aimed to determine the association between these 2 diseases in our geographic area. We performed a cross-sectional study of patient records between 2005 and 2012 in the database (Abucacis, Datamart) that contains all medical case histories in the province of Castellón, Spain. Patients diagnosed with psoriasis were compared with a control group of patients diagnosed with melanocytic nevus. The prevalence of CAD and the presence or absence of the main cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in each group. A total of 9181 patients with psoriasis and 21925 with melanocytic nevus were studied. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that CAD was significantly associated with psoriasis, age (in years), sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity (P<.05). On adjustment for age, sex, and the other cardiovascular risk factors, multivariate regression analysis established that psoriasis was independently associated with CAD (P<.029). Our findings in a large sample of patients in a Mediterranean area support the hypothesis that patients in this population have an increased risk of ischemic CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathogenetic relationship between coronary heart disease and osteopenic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mykhailovskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the comorbidity problem of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis is caused by the rising prevalence, lack of early detection, prevention, severe complications and significant impact on the quality of life of the patients. Aim. In order to compile and submit a current point of view on the pathogenetic relationship between the coronary heart disease and the osteopenic syndrome we reviewed specialized literature. Conclusion. We established that coronary heart disease and osteoporosis have common mechanisms of progression involving a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, endothelial dysfunction, estrogen, calcium deficiency, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous system.

  11. Exercise radionuclide imaging approaches to coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging and exercise radionuclide angiography are the two techniques of nuclear cardiology most widly used for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Each of these tests provides information of diagnostic and functional value. The diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of these two tests for the detection of coronary artery disease are compared. The strengths and weakness of each approach are discussed. A clinical approach to the detection and evaluation of coronary artery disease using these radionuclide exercise techniques is presented

  12. Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Scaffolds for Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen G; Kereiakes, Dean J; Metzger, D Christopher; Caputo, Ronald P; Rizik, David G; Teirstein, Paul S; Litt, Marc R; Kini, Annapoorna; Kabour, Ameer; Marx, Steven O; Popma, Jeffrey J; McGreevy, Robert; Zhang, Zhen; Simonton, Charles; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-11-12

    In patients with coronary artery disease who receive metallic drug-eluting coronary stents, adverse events such as late target-lesion failure may be related in part to the persistent presence of the metallic stent frame in the coronary-vessel wall. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds have been developed to attempt to improve long-term outcomes. In this large, multicenter, randomized trial, 2008 patients with stable or unstable angina were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular (Absorb) scaffold (1322 patients) or an everolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium (Xience) stent (686 patients). The primary end point, which was tested for both noninferiority (margin, 4.5 percentage points for the risk difference) and superiority, was target-lesion failure (cardiac death, target-vessel myocardial infarction, or ischemia-driven target-lesion revascularization) at 1 year. Target-lesion failure at 1 year occurred in 7.8% of patients in the Absorb group and in 6.1% of patients in the Xience group (difference, 1.7 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, -0.5 to 3.9; P=0.007 for noninferiority and P=0.16 for superiority). There was no significant difference between the Absorb group and the Xience group in rates of cardiac death (0.6% and 0.1%, respectively; P=0.29), target-vessel myocardial infarction (6.0% and 4.6%, respectively; P=0.18), or ischemia-driven target-lesion revascularization (3.0% and 2.5%, respectively; P=0.50). Device thrombosis within 1 year occurred in 1.5% of patients in the Absorb group and in 0.7% of patients in the Xience group (P=0.13). In this large-scale, randomized trial, treatment of noncomplex obstructive coronary artery disease with an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold, as compared with an everolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium stent, was within the prespecified margin for noninferiority with respect to target-lesion failure at 1 year. (Funded by Abbott Vascular; ABSORB III Clinical

  13. Stable Titania Nanostructures on Stainless Steel Coronary Stent Surface for Enhanced Corrosion Resistance and Endothelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chandini C; Cherian, Aleena Mary; Kurup, Sujish; Joseph, John; Nair, Manitha B; Vijayakumar, Maniyal; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2017-06-01

    Stainless steel (SS) coronary stents continue to present risk of in-stent restenosis that impact its long term safety and efficacy. The present work focuses on developing a drug-free and polymer-less surface on coronary stents by utilizing a titania (TiO 2 ) nanotexturing approach through hydrothermal processing, that will offer improved stent performance in vivo. Mechanically stable and durable nanotextured coatings are obtained on SS stents that also offer good corrosion resistance. In vitro vascular cell (endothelial and smooth muscle cells) studies on surface modified SS show preferential rapid endothelialization with enhanced nitric oxide production and reduce smooth muscle cell proliferation, in comparison to unmodified SS. In vivo evaluation of the nanotextured stents after subcutaneous implantation in rabbits show reduced irritability and minimal localized inflammatory response. These beneficial effects suggest that the stable, easily scalable titania nanosurface modification strategy on coronary stent surfaces can be a much cheaper alternative to drug eluting stents in addressing in-stent restenosis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Coronary 64-slice CT angiography predicts outcome in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver; Valenta, Ines; Schepis, Tiziano [University Hospital Zurich NUK C 32, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Husmann, Lars; Scheffel, Hans; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich NUK C 32, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of 64-slice CT angiography (CTA) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixty-four-slice coronary CTA was performed in 220 patients [mean age 63 {+-} 11 years, 77 (35%) female] with known or suspected CAD. CTA images were analyzed with regard to the presence and number of coronary lesions. Patients were followed-up for the occurrence of the following clinical endpoints: death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and coronary revascularization. During a mean follow-up of 14 {+-} 4 months, 59 patients (27%) reached at least one of the predefined clinical endpoints. Patients with abnormal coronary arteries on CTA (i.e., presence of coronary plaques) had a 1st-year event rate of 34%, whereas in patients with normal coronary arteries no events occurred (event rate, 0%, p < 0.001). Similarly, obstructive lesions ({>=}50% luminal narrowing) on CTA were associated with a high first-year event rate (59%) compared to patients without stenoses (3%, p < 0.001). The presence of obstructive lesions was a significant independent predictor of an adverse cardiac outcome. Sixty-four-slice CTA predicts cardiac events in patients with known or suspected CAD. Conversely, patients with normal coronary arteries on CTA have an excellent mid-term prognosis. (orig.)

  15. Five year change in alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer and coronary heart disease among postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Marie K.; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla A.; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    cancer of 1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.23) and 1.29 (1.07 to 1.55), respectively, compared to women with stable intake, and adjusted for age, education, body mass index, smoking, Mediterranean diet score, parity, number of births, and hormone replacement therapy. For coronary heart disease......Objective: To test the hypothesis that postmenopausal women who increase their alcohol intake over a five year period have a higher risk of breast cancer and a lower risk of coronary heart disease compared with stable alcohol intake. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Denmark, 1993...... the five year period had a higher risk of breast cancer and a lower risk of coronary heart disease than women with a stable alcohol intake. For instance, women who increased their alcohol intake by seven or 14 drinks per week (corresponding to one or two drinks more per day) had hazard ratios of breast...

  16. Coronary flow reserve and relative flow reserve measured by N-13 ammonia PET for characterization of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Park, Ki Seong; Kim, Jahae; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Ju Han; Cho, Jae Yeong; Hong, Young Joon; Jabin, Zeenat; Park, Hee Jeong; Jeong, Geum-Cheol; Kwon, Seong Young; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Hyeon Sik; Min, Jung-Joon; Garcia, Ernest V; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the relationships between coronary flow reserve (CFR) and relative flow reserve (RFR) measured by N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) for characterization of epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixty-nine consecutive stable angina patients underwent N-13 ammonia PET, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and if necessary, invasive coronary angiography (CAG) within 2 weeks. Myocardial blood flow (MBF), CFR, RFR, and coronary vascular resistance of the reference arterial territory (CVR ref ) were measured by N-13 ammonia PET. The presence of significant stenosis (SS) and diffuse atherosclerosis (DA) was evaluated on CCTA and CAG. Functional parameters measured by PET were compared among arteries with and without SS and DA. Arteries with SS and those with DA showed significantly lower stress MBF, as compared to those without. RFR was significantly lower in arteries with SS as compared to those without, while CFR was not. CFR was significantly lower in arteries with DA as compared to those without, while RFR was not. Among arteries without SS, CFR was significantly lower in those with DA as compared to those without. However, among arteries with SS, CFR was similar between those with and without DA. In contrast, RFR was significantly lower in arteries with SS, regardless of the presence of DA. CFR and RFR showed a weak positive correlation (r = 0.269) with discordance in 24 cases (35%). Among the arteries with CFR-RFR discordance, the prevalence of DA was significantly higher in those with low CFR but preserved RFR, as compared to those with preserved CFR but low RFR (75 vs 25%, p = 0.028). CVR ref was significantly higher in arteries with DA, implicating a correlation of DA with underlying microvascular disease. CFR and RFR measured by myocardial perfusion PET could provide a comprehensive information for characterization of epicardial CAD.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Torsten; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Several chronic infections have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, including Chlamydia pneumoniae, human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis. This review evaluates the literature on the association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of coronary artery...

  18. Use of Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention to Treat Left Main Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Banning, Adrian P

    2017-05-01

    Due to its potential prognostic implications and technical complexity, revascularisation of left main coronary artery (LMCA) disease requires careful consideration. Since publication of the results of the SYNTAX study, and more recently the EXCEL and NOBLE trials, there has been particular interest in percutaneous revascularisation of the LMCA. It is becoming clear that percutaneous revascularisation of LMCA disease requires appropriate lesion preparation and carefully optimised stenting in order to offer patients a treatment option as effective as coronary artery bypass grafting. For this reason intravascular imaging, and especially intravascular ultrasound, is becoming a key procedural step in LMCA percutaneous coronary intervention. In the current review paper we analyse the role of intravascular imaging with intravascular ultrasound in LMCA percutaneous coronary intervention, focusing on the main applications in this context from lesion assessment to stent sizing and optimisation.

  19. Thermolabile defect of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S S; Passen, E L; Ruggie, N; Wong, P W; Sora, H

    1993-10-01

    To determine whether or not a moderate genetic defect of homocysteine metabolism is associated with the development of coronary artery disease, we studied the prevalence of thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, which is probably the most common genetic defect of homocysteine metabolism. Three hundred thirty-nine subjects who underwent coronary angiography were classified into three groups: (1) patients with severe coronary artery stenosis (> or = 70% occlusion in one or more coronary arteries or > or = 50% occlusion in the left main coronary artery), (2) patients with mild to moderate coronary artery stenosis (< 70% occlusion in one or more coronary arteries or < 50% occlusion in the left main coronary artery), and (3) patients with non-coronary heart disease or noncardiac chest pain (nonstenotic coronary arteries). The thermolability of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was prospectively determined in all subjects. Plasma homocyst(e)ine levels were then measured in those with thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. The traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease were thereafter ascertained by chart review of all subjects. The prevalence of thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was 18.1% in group 1, 13.4% in group 2, and 7.9% in group 3. There was a significant difference between the prevalence of thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in groups 1 and 3 (P < .04). All individuals with thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase irrespective of their clinical grouping had higher plasma homocyst(e)ine levels than normal (group 1, 14.86 +/- 5.85; group 2, 15.36 +/- 5.70; group 3, 13.39 +/- 3.80; normal, 8.50 +/- 2.8 nmol/mL). Nonetheless, there was no statistically significant difference in the plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations of these patients with or without coronary artery stenosis. Using discriminant function analysis, thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was predictive of angiographically

  20. Detection of high risk coronary artery disease by thallium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, M J; Lahiri, A; Whittington, J R; Crawley, J C; Raftery, E B

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and three patients who underwent coronary arteriography were studied by thallium imaging and the results analysed by Bayesian principles to assess the usefulness of semiquantitative stress thallium imaging for predicting the presence or absence of multivessel coronary disease. Significant disease was found in 80 patients, of whom 77 had abnormal thallium scans (sensitivity 96%). Thallium images were normal in 15 of 23 patients with no significant disease (specificity 65%). Multiple thallium segmental defects were found to be 90% sensitive and 65% specific for multivessel coronary artery disease and were present in 80% of patients with left main stem disease and in 93% of patients with triple vessel disease. A single thallium defect or normal scan excluded multivessel, left main, and triple vessel disease with 81%, 94%, and 91% predictive accuracy respectively. By Bayesian analysis the predictive accuracy for excluding multivessel disease was greater than 90% in patients with a pretest probability of multivessel disease of less than or equal to 40%. Coronary arteriography to exclude multivessel disease is therefore unnecessary in a high proportion of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. PMID:4005084

  1. [Heart rate as a therapeutic target after acute coronary syndrome and in chronic coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Marco; Scardina, Giuseppe; Favretto, Giuseppe; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Faggiano, Pompilio Massimo; Greco, Cesare; Pedretti, Roberto Franco

    2017-03-01

    For patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD), either after hospitalization for acute cardiac events or in the chronic phase, comprehensive treatment programs should be devoted to: (i) reducing mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events, (ii) reducing the ischemic burden and related symptoms, and (iii) increasing exercise capacity and quality of life.Heart rate (HR) has demonstrated to have prognostic value and patients beyond the limit of 70 bpm display increased risk of all the above adverse outcomes, even after adjustment for parameters such as the extension of myocardial infarction and the presence of heart failure. It is well known that a sustained HR elevation may contribute to the pathogenesis of SCAD, being the likelihood of developing ischemia, plaque instability, trigger for arrhythmias, increased vascular oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction the mechanisms resulting in this effect. Moreover, high HR could promote chronotropic incompetence, leading to functional disability and reduced quality of life.Despite the strong relationship between HR and prognosis, there is heterogeneity among current guidelines in considering HR as a formal therapeutic target for secondary prevention in SCAD, as far as the cut-off limit. This expert opinion document considered major trials and observational registries in the modern treatment era with beta-blockers and ivabradine, suggesting that an adequate HR control could represent a target for (i), (ii), and (iii) therapeutic goals in SCAD patients with systolic dysfunction (with major evidence for reduced left ventricular ejection fraction SCAD patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The defined cut-off limit is 70 bpm. To date, there is room for improvement of HR control, since in contemporary SCAD patients HR values <70 bpm are present in less than half of cases, even in the vulnerable phase after an acute coronary syndrome.

  2. Atrophic gastritis is associated with coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukui, Michiaki; Tanaka, Muhei; Kuroda, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Naito, Yuji; Hasegawa, Goji; Toda, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis is characterized by chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori infection and other factors. Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to coronary artery disease. To our knowledge, however, no reports are available on the relationship between atrophic gastritis and coronary artery disease. In this study, we investigated the relationship between atrophic gastritis, which is diagnosed based on serum pepsinogen levels (pepsinogen I ≤ 70 ng/mL and pepsinog...

  3. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: Optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Praveen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative β-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  4. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, Praveen Kumar; Vijayakumar, Arun; Manikandan, S; Rathod, Ramesh Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative beta-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined) coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  5. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON INFLAMMATORY MARKERS.THE RISK OF NEW CORONARY EVENT IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorka Savic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and several markers of inflammation have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Physical activity may lower the risk of coronary heart disease(CHD by mitigating inflammation. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on systemic inflammatory response in patients with stabile coronary artery disease participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise program. Male (n=29 and female (n=23 patients with stable coronary heart disease were recruited for this study. All patients were divided into two groups: group with regular aerobic physical training during cardiovascular rehabilitation program phase II along 3 weeks in rehabilitation center and 3 weeks after that in home of patients and sedentary lifestyle group. There were no significant differences in gender distribution among analyzed groups. Student’s t test showed no significant difference in mean age, waist circumference (OS and waist/hip ratio (WHR. Degree of obesity was measured by BMI, and there was a significant improvement in BMI in patients who underwent the six-week physical training compared to control group (p<0.05.Physical training during 6 weeks did not show any effects on leukocyte count and ICAM-1 levels compared to control group. The exercise training induced reduction in plasma CRP levels by 23.72%, p<0.001, and reduction in plasma VCAM-1 levels by Moderate aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of inflammatory state by decreasing CRP and VCAM-1 levels without significant body mass and visceral obesity reduction. The obtained results indicate that regular physical activity is clinically attractive in primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart diseases.

  6. Giant coronary artery aneurysms complicating Kawasaki disease in Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-García, Luis M; Morán-Villaseñor, Edna; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A; Cravioto, Patricia; Galván, Fernando

    2018-03-01

    One of the most important complications of Kawasaki disease is the development of giant coronary aneurysms. Risk factors for their development are still not clear. A retrospective analysis was conducted at the National Institute of Paediatrics in Mexico City, Mexico. It included all patients with a diagnosis of acute Kawasaki disease between August, 1995 and August, 2015. Clinical and laboratory findings, as well as echocardiographic measurements, were recorded. Patients with giant coronary aneurysms (z-score⩾10) were compared with the rest of the patients. A value of pKawasaki disease. Of them, 34 developed giant coronary aneurysms during the acute stage of the disease. In the multivariate analysis, patients younger than 1 year, those with a higher duration of illness at the time of diagnosis, and those who received additional intravenous immunoglobulin showed a significantly higher frequency of giant coronary aneurysms. One of the main factors associated with the development of giant coronary aneurysms was the delay in the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. This finding highlights the importance of maintaining a high suspicion of the disease, which would enable an early diagnosis and prompt treatment and decrease the risk for developing giant coronary aneurysms.

  7. Coronary heart disease: dietary links and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, S; Lanzmann-Petithory, D

    2001-04-01

    For decades it has been postulated that the main environmental factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) was the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Nevertheless, confirmation of the role of SFA in CHD through intervention trials has been disappointing. It was only when the diet was enriched in n-3 fatty acids that CHD was significantly prevented, especially cardiac death. In addition to n-3 fatty acids, many other foodstuffs or nutrients such as fibers, antioxidants, folic acid, calcium and even alcohol contribute to prevent CHD. Thus the relationship between diet and CHD morbidity and mortality appears to be much more complex than formerly suspected considering as key factors only SFA, linoleic acid, cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Some of the mechanisms are briefly described, but many additional nutrients (or non nutrients) may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD. Finally, as a result of the most recent epidemiologic studies the ideal diet may comprise: 8% energy from SFA, 5% from polyunsaturated fatty acids with a ratio 5/1 of linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid+longer chains n-3, oleic acid as desired, large intake of cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits, fish twice a week, cheese and yogurt as dairy products, rapeseed and olive oils as edible fat. Without side effects, such a diet can be highly palatable, easily enjoyed by many populations and may prevent effectively and rapidly (within a few weeks or months) CHD.

  8. Severity of coronary artery disease in obese patients undergoing coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, A.; Ali, J.; Kayani, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship of severity of coronary artery disease with obesity in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology - National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC-NIHD), 1st February 2010 to 31st August 2010 Patients and Methods: The study population included 468 patients undergoing coronary angiography. Obesity was classified according to the BMI using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria as normal (BMI 21-24 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25-29 kg/m2), obesity class I (BMI 30-34 kg/m2), obesity class II (BMI 35 to 39 kg/m2 and obesity class III (BMI 40 or above kg/m2). Coronary angiography data were obtained from the Siemens Queries software system, which maintains the database including detailed angiographic findings of all patients at this institution. Significant lesions were defined as those with >70% diameter narrowing of coronary arteries (>50% for the left main coronary artery). We attempted to quantify the 'severity of CAD' by ascertaining the prevalence of High-Risk Coronary Anatomy (HRCA). Results: Insignificant difference was observed in traditional risk factors i.e. age, diabetes mellitus and smoking except hypertension and gender. Statistically significantly low prevalence of HRCA was encountered in the obese group (57.7%) as compared to normal/overweight group (75.8%) (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that obesity is associated with less severe coronary artery disease. (author)

  9. [Present and premorbid self-image in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Beata; Opolska, Aneta; Papuć, Ewa; Witczak, Władysław

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find the differences between premorbid and present self-image in patients with coronary heart disease. 70 patients with stable coronary heart disease treated at the Internal Medicine Department of the Military Hospital in Lublin and 70 healthy controls were studied. Mean age of the investigated patients was 53.11 years. 77% of the studied patients were city inhabitants and 23% were countryside dwellers. Subjects were studied with the use of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, by the Adjective Check List (ACL) and a questionnaire designed especially for the study of sociodemographic data of the investigated patients. Premorbid and present self-images were compared with the use of the ANOVA test. Our results showed that there are statistically significant differences between premorbid and present self-image in the perception of patients with coronary heart disease. 1. In present self-image, compared to the premorbid one, patients with coronary heart disease have low self-esteem, greater fear about the future, low endurance in performing tasks, they are less enterprising, have lower ability to overcome stress, they are more dependent and have a greater need to look for safety. 2. Women with coronary heart disease perceive themselves as having low self-esteem, low self-trust, more difficulties in overcoming stress and a lower ability to understand other people's behaviour as compared to the time before the disease. 3. Men with coronary heart disease perceive themselves as having less endurance, being less enterprising, having a negative attitude towards themselves and other people and being more dependant compared to the time before the illness.

  10. Coronary artery disease confined to secondary branches of the left coronary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Klein, B.L.; Segal, B.L.; Kimbiris, D.; Bemis, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among 3,000 patients studied by coronary arteriography during a 4-year period, 31 patients (1%) had coronary artery disease limited to a diagonal branch of the left anterior descending (15 patients), marginal branch of the left circumflex (10 patients), or to both branches (6 patients). Ten patients had 50-69% and twenty-one had greater than or equal to 70% diameter narrowing. The suitability for grafting was noted in 20 patients as judged by the caliber and distribution of the diseased branches. Collaterals were noted in seven patients. Disease was present in 28 men and 3 women (age range 38-70 years). At least one major coronary risk factor was present in 27 patients. Angina was noted in 27 patients; prior myocardial infarction was noted in 5 patients by history and in 4 by ECG. The left ventriculogram was normal in 22 patients and showed mild segmental asynergy in 9; ejection fraction was normal in all. Exercise ECGs were positive in 12 of 25 patients; exercise 201thallium scans were positive in 13. All patients responded to medical therapy. In conclusion, among the population of patients who undergo catheterization, coronary branch disease is rare. The clinical findings are indistinguishable from patients with major coronary disease. Prognosis remains benign and patients respond to medical therapy

  11. Coronary heart disease after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Zhanat A.; Land, Charles E.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Weinstock, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Griem, Melvin L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease after radiotherapy (RT) for peptic ulcer disease. Methods and materials: Peptic ulcer disease patients treated with RT (n = 1859) or by other means (n = 1860) at the University of Chicago Medical Center between 1936 and 1965, were followed through 1997. The observed numbers of cause-specific deaths were compared with the expected numbers from the general population rates. During RT, 5% of the heart was in the treatment field and the remainder of the heart mostly received scattered radiation. A volume-weighted cardiac dose was computed to describe the average tissue dose to the entire organ. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to analyze the CHD and cerebrovascular disease risk associated with RT, adjusting for confounding factors. Results: Greater than expected CHD mortality was observed among the irradiated patients. The irradiated patients received volume-weighted cardiac doses ranging from 1.6 to 3.9 Gy and the portion of the heart directly in the field received doses of 7.6-18.4 Gy. The CHD risk increased with the cardiac dose (p trend = 0.01). The cerebrovascular disease risk was not associated with the surrogate carotid dose. Conclusion: The excess CHD risk in patients undergoing RT for peptic ulcer disease decades previously indicates the need for long-term follow-up for cardiovascular disease after chest RT

  12. The Association of Five-Year Changes in the Levels of N-Terminal Fragment of the Prohormone Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) with Subsequent Heart Failure and Death in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: The Heart and Soul Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Judson, Gregory; Christenson, Robert H; DeFilippi, Christopher; Wu, Alan H B; Whooley, Mary A

    The N-terminal fragment of the prohormone brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a powerful predictor of adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, little is known regarding the prognostic significance of longitudinal changes in NT-proBNP levels. We evaluated the ability of 5-year changes in NT-proBNP levels to predict subsequent heart failure (HF) hospitalization or cardiovascular (CV) death in 635 participants with stable CAD enrolled in the Heart and Soul Study. The median (IQR) 5-year change in NT-proBNP was 50 pg/mL (-5 to +222). During an average of 4.0 ± 1.4 years follow-up (i.e., 9 years from the baseline measurement), there were 67 events. Participants with 5-year changes in the highest quartile (≥ 223 pg/mL increase in NT-proBNP) had an almost 4-fold greater risk of subsequent HF or CV death than those in the lowest quartile of ≤-5 pg/mL (HR 3.8; 95% CI 2.0-7.3; p < 0.001). This association remained strong after adjustment for demographic variables, comorbidities, left ventricular mass index, systolic and diastolic function, and baseline and follow-up NT-proBNP levels (HR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-13.4; p = 0.01). Changes in NT-proBNP levels at 5 years predict subsequent HF or CV death in patients with stable CAD, independent of other prognostic markers, including baseline and follow-up NT-proBNP levels. A stable NT-proBNP level predicts a low risk of subsequent events. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Prognosis of Patients With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease Versus Normal Arteries Determined by Invasive Coronary Angiography or Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tao; Lv, Wen-Yu; Liu, Wei; Peng, Yong; Xia, Tian-Li; Wang, Peng-Ju; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Liu, Rui-Shuang; Zhang, Chen; Gui, Yi-Yue; Liao, Yan-Biao; Chen, Mao; Zhu, Ye

    2016-03-01

    Limited data exist regarding the outcomes of patients with nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) detected by computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) or invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Our aim was to compare the prognosis of patients with nonobstructive coronary artery plaques with that of patients with entirely normal arteries. The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase databases were searched. Studies comparing the prognosis of individuals with nonobstructive CAD versus normal coronary arteries detected by CTCA or ICA were included. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACE) including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, hospitalization due to unstable angina or revascularization. A fixed effects model was chosen to pool the estimates of odds ratios (ORs). Forty-eight studies with 64,905 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Patients in the nonobstructive CAD arm had a significantly higher risk of MACE compared to their counterparts in the normal artery arm (pooled OR, 3.17, 95% confidence interval, 2.77-3.63). When excluding revascularization as an endpoint, hard cardiac composite outcomes were also more frequent among patients with nonobstructive CAD (pooled OR, 2.10; 95%CI, 1.79-2.45). All subgroups (age, sex, follow-up duration, different outcomes, diagnostic modality, and CAD risk factor) consistently showed a poorer prognosis with nonobstructive CAD than with normal arteries. When dividing the studies into a CTCA and ICA group for further analysis based on the indications for diagnostic tests, we also found nonobstructive CAD to be associated with a higher risk of MACE in both stable and acute chest pain. Patients with nonobstructive CAD had a poorer prognosis compared with their counterparts with normal arteries.

  14. Circulating irisin levels are lower in patients with either stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial infarction (MI) versus healthy controls, whereas follistatin and activin A levels are higher and can discriminate MI from CAD with similar to CK-MB accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasilakis, Athanasios D; Koulaxis, Dimitrios; Kefala, Nikoleta; Polyzos, Stergios A; Upadhyay, Jagriti; Pagkalidou, Eirini; Economou, Fotios; Anastasilakis, Chrysostomos D; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2017-08-01

    Several myokines are produced by cardiac muscle. We investigated changes in myokine levels at the time of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and following reperfusion in relation to controls. Patients with MI (MI Group, n=31) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were compared to patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) subjected to scheduled PCI (CAD Group, n=40) and controls with symptoms mimicking CAD without stenosis in angiography (Control Group, n=43). The number and degree of stenosis were recorded. Irisin, follistatin, follistatin-like 3, activin A and B, ALT, AST, CK and CK-MB were measured at baseline and 6 or 24h after the intervention. MI and CAD patients had lower irisin than controls (pCAD patients and controls (all p≤0.001). None of the myokines changed following reperfusion. Circulating irisin was associated with the degree of stenosis in all patients (p=0.05). Irisin was not inferior to CK-MB in predicting MI while folistatin and activin A could discriminate MI from CAD patients with similar to CK-MB accuracy. None of these myokines was altered following PCI in contrast to CK-MB. Irisin levels are lower in MI and CAD implying that their production may depend on myocadial blood supply. Follistatin and activin A are higher in MI than in CAD suggesting increased release due to myocardial necrosis. They can predict MI with accuracy similar to CK-MB and their role in the diagnosis of MI remains to be confirmed by prospective large clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coronary CT angiography in clinical triage of patients at high risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, J Tobias; Hove, Jens D; Kristensen, Thomas S

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test if cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) can be used in the triage of patients at high risk of coronary artery disease. DESIGN: The diagnostic value of 64-detector CCTA was evaluated in 400 patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction using......%) coronary artery diameter stenosis with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 99%, 81%, 96% and 95%, respectively. CCTA was used to triage patients into guideline defined treatment groups of "no or medical treatment", "referral to percutaneous coronary intervention......" or to "coronary artery bypass graft surgery" and was compared to the index ICA. CCTA correctly triaged patients in 86% of cases. During a median follow-up of 50 months, the presence of an occluded artery by CCTA was associated with adverse outcome. CONCLUSION: CCTA has high diagnostic and prognostic value...

  16. Psychological interventions for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Suzanne H; Anderson, Lindsey; Jenkinson, Caroline E; Whalley, Ben; Rees, Karen; Davies, Philippa; Bennett, Paul; Liu, Zulian; West, Robert; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2017-04-28

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death globally, although mortality rates are falling. Psychological symptoms are prevalent for people with CHD, and many psychological treatments are offered following cardiac events or procedures with the aim of improving health and outcomes. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. To assess the effectiveness of psychological interventions (alone or with cardiac rehabilitation) compared with usual care (including cardiac rehabilitation where available) for people with CHD on total mortality and cardiac mortality; cardiac morbidity; and participant-reported psychological outcomes of levels of depression, anxiety, and stress; and to explore potential study-level predictors of the effectiveness of psychological interventions in this population. We updated the previous Cochrane Review searches by searching the following databases on 27 April 2016: CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), and CINAHL (EBSCO). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions compared to usual care, administered by trained staff, and delivered to adults with a specific diagnosis of CHD. We selected only studies estimating the independent effect of the psychological component, and with a minimum follow-up of six months. The study population comprised of adults after: a myocardial infarction (MI), a revascularisation procedure (coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), and adults with angina or angiographically defined coronary artery disease (CAD). RCTs had to report at least one of the following outcomes: mortality (total- or cardiac-related); cardiac morbidity (MI, revascularisation procedures); or participant-reported levels of depression, anxiety, or stress. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of all references for eligibility. A lead review author

  17. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with stable coronary artery disease: a prognostic study within the CLARICOR Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harutyunyan, Marina J; Mathiasen, Anders B; Winkel, Per

    2011-01-01

    be prognostic biomarkers in patients with stable CAD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the 2.6-year follow-up period 270 patients among the 4264 patients with stable CAD in the CLARICOR trial suffered myocardial infarction (MI) and 377 died (187 cardiovascular deaths (CVD)). RESULTS: Serum NT......-proBNP was significantly associated with MI (hazard ratio (HR), 1. 65 (refers to a 2.72 fold increase in serum level, p = 0.0005), CVD (HR, 2.42, p ....0005) and non-CVD (HR, 1.66, p 20, p = 0.001), CVD (HR, 1.39, p

  18. Detection of coronary calcium with electron beam tomography in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberl, R.; Knez, A.; Becker, A.; Becker, C.; Bruening, R.; Reiser, M.; Maass, A.; Steinbeck, G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Coronary calcium is a powerful indicator of arteriosclerosis and can be detected very precisely with electron beam tomography. The method can be applied in patients with known coronary artery disease or in asymptomatic patients at risk of arteriosclerotic disease. Results: At the University of Munich we performed an EBT scan of the heart in 1100 patients within the last year. In 567 patients coronary angiography was performed also (±3 days). Confirming previous reports in the literature, we found a correlation of the calcium score with the age and gender of the patients. Severe coronary artery disease (stenoses ≥ 75%) was associated with significantly more calcium than less severe CAD. The calcium score did not discriminate between one-, two- and three-vessel disease. The site of calcification does not correlate with the localization of stenoses. Thirty-three percent of the patients with significant coronary artery disease showed a normal age-adjusted calcium score; a total of 8.1% of patients with severe stenoses did not reveal any coronary calcification (score =0). With asymptomatic patients there are only a few studies available. Soft plaques cannot be detected with EBT, but in most patients soft plaques occur together with hard plaques. Our results show that spiral CT of the newest generation may also be used for calcium screening. There was an excellent correlation of the calcium scores of EBT and spiral CT at all levels of calcification. Discussion: Coronary calcium is a sensitive marker of coronary artery disease. In the clinical setting EBT is indicated in patients with known coronary artery disease (to evaluate prognosis), in patients who are unable to perform a stress test, and in patients with atypical chest pain. However, lack of calcification may be associated with severe stenoses in a minority of patients. The clinical value in asymptomatic patients needs to be defined: Randomized studies are necessary. We see a possible indication in

  19. CT coronary angiography in patients with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease (SCOT-HEART): an open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-13

    The benefit of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients presenting with stable chest pain has not been systematically studied. We aimed to assess the effect of CTCA on the diagnosis, management, and outcome of patients referred to the cardiology clinic with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. In this prospective open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial, we recruited patients aged 18-75 years referred for the assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease from 12 cardiology chest pain clinics across Scotland. We randomly assigned (1:1) participants to standard care plus CTCA or standard care alone. Randomisation was done with a web-based service to ensure allocation concealment. The primary endpoint was certainty of the diagnosis of angina secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. All analyses were intention to treat, and patients were analysed in the group they were allocated to, irrespective of compliance with scanning. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01149590. Between Nov 18, 2010, and Sept 24, 2014, we randomly assigned 4146 (42%) of 9849 patients who had been referred for assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. 47% of participants had a baseline clinic diagnosis of coronary heart disease and 36% had angina due to coronary heart disease. At 6 weeks, CTCA reclassified the diagnosis of coronary heart disease in 558 (27%) patients and the diagnosis of angina due to coronary heart disease in 481 (23%) patients (standard care 22 [1%] and 23 [1%]; pcoronary heart disease increased (1·09, 1·02-1·17; p=0·0172), the certainty increased (1·79, 1·62-1·96; pcoronary heart disease. This changed planned investigations (15% vs 1%; pcoronary heart disease, CTCA clarifies the diagnosis, enables targeting of interventions, and might reduce the future risk of myocardial infarction. The Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates funded the trial

  20. The association of opium with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Saeed; Darvish, Soodabeh; Davoodi, Gholamreza; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Mahmoodian, Mehran; Fallah, Nader; Karimi, Abbas Ali

    2007-10-01

    The effects of opium consumption on coronary artery disease are still unknown. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 2405 patients admitted to the Angiographic Ward at Tehran Heart Center from 7 May 2005 to 13 August 2005. After adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors, opium consumption was a significant risk factor for coronary artery disease (P=0.01 and odds ratio=1.8). Moreover, the amount of opium consumption was associated significantly with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis, as measured by clinical vessel score (r=0.2, P=0.002). To our knowledge, this is the first time that the adverse effects of opium consumption on coronary arteries was defined.

  1. Women, Loneliness, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between loneliness and risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) over a 19-year follow-up period in a community sample of men and women. Loneliness, the perceived discrepancy between actual and desired social relationships, has been linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, no previous research has prospectively examined the association between loneliness and incident CHD in a community sample of men and women. Methods Hypotheses were examined using data from the First National Health and Nutrition Survey and its follow-up studies (n = 3003). Loneliness, assessed by one item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression scale, and covariates were derived from baseline interviews. Incident CHD was derived from hospital records/death certificates over 19 years of follow-up. Hypotheses were evaluated, using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Among women, high loneliness was associated with increased risk of incident CHD (high: hazard ratio = 1.76, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.17â2.63; medium: hazard ratio = 0.98, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.64â1.49; reference: low), controlling for age, race, education, income, marital status, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and body mass index. Findings persisted additionally controlling for depressive symptoms. No significant associations were observed among men. Conclusions Loneliness was prospectively associated with increased risk of incident CHD, controlling for multiple confounding factors. Loneliness among women may merit clinical attention, not only due to its impact on quality of life but also its potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:19661189

  2. Platelet pathophysiology, pharmacology, and function in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Homam; Kleiman, Neal S

    2017-11-01

    Platelets play a key role in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes. Our understanding of platelet function in thrombus formation has increased considerably, resulting in the development of clinically effective treatment strategies and identification of new targets. An underappreciated platelet function is their contribution toward acute and chronic inflammatory processes including atherogenesis. In this review, we discuss the role of platelets in atherosclerosis and thrombosis, platelet function testing, and the pharmacology of currently available antiplatelet drugs.

  3. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  4. Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yaojun; Bourantas, Christos; Farooq, Vasim; Muramatsu, Takashi; Diletti, Roberto; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Garcia-Garcia, Hector; Serruys, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDrug-eluting stents have reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis and have broadened the application in percutaneous coronary intervention in coronary artery disease. However, the concept of using a permanent metallic endovascular device to restore the patency of a stenotic artery has inherited pitfalls, namely the presence of a foreign body within the artery causing vascular inflammation, late complications such as restenosis and stent thrombosis, and impeding the restoration of t...

  5. Prognosis of non-significant coronary atherosclerotic disease detected by coronary artery tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Siqueira, Bruna Pinto; Guimaraes, Carolina Camargos Braichi; Cruz, David Filipe Silva; Guimaraes, Leiziane Assuncao Alves; Lima, Maicom Marcio Perigolo, E-mail: marciovlbarros@gmail.com [Faculdade de Saude e Ecologia Humana, Vespasiano, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira [Universidade de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz [Hospital Materdei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Introduction: Although studies have shown high diagnostic accuracy of coronary tomography (CT) in detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), data on the prognostic value of this method in patients with no significant coronary obstruction are limited. Objective: To evaluate the value of CT in predicting adverse events in patients with suspected CAD and no significant coronary obstruction. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 440 patients between January 2008 and July 2013 by MDCT, diagnosed with no significant obstruction or no atherosclerotic coronary obstruction with an average follow-up of 33 months. The outcomes evaluated were: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina associated with hospitalization or coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: Of the 440 patients studied, 295 (67%) were men with mean age 55.9 ± 12.0 years. Non-significant obstruction was found in 152 (35%) of the patients and there were 49 (11%) outcomes. In the multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model, the predictors of clinical outcomes were non-significant obstruction on CT (hazard ratio 3.51; 95% CI 1.73 - 7.8; p <0.01), age and hypertension. Non-significant obstruction on CT was associated with adverse clinical outcomes and survival analysis showed a significant difference (log-rank 24.6; p <0.01) in predicting these outcomes. Conclusion: The detection of non-significant atherosclerotic obstruction by CT was associated with the presence of adverse events in patients with suspected CAD, which may prove useful in the risk stratification of these patients. (author)

  6. Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces cardiovascular events in nonheart failure, stable patients with prior coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young; Lim, Sungmin; Lee, Kwan Yong; Park, Ha-Wook; Byeon, Jaeho; Hwang, Byung-Hee; Kim, Jin Jin; Oh, Yong-Seog; Youn, Ho-Joong; Jung, Wook Sung; Seung, Ki-Bae; Chang, Kiyuk

    2018-02-27

    The effects of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade on the clinical outcome in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) are conflicting. We evaluated the long-term effects of RAS blockers (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker) on the clinical outcomes in patients with SCAD without heart failure (HF) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent using a large-scale, multicenter, prospective cohort registry. A total of 5722 patients with SCAD were enrolled and divided into two groups according to the use of RAS blockers after PCI: RAS blocker group included 4070 patients and no RAS blocker group included 1652 patients. Exclusion criteria were left ventricular ejection fraction less than 50% and the history of HF or myocardial infarction. A major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke. During a median follow-up of 29.7 months, RAS blockers were associated with a significant reduction in the risk of MACE [adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 0.781; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.626-0.975; P=0.015] and all-cause death (adjusted HR: 0.788; 95% CI: 0.627-0.990; P=0.041) but did not affect the risk of coronary revascularization. In the propensity score matched cohort, overall findings were consistent (MACE: adjusted HR: 0.679; 95% CI: 0.514-0.897; P=0.006; all-cause death: adjusted HR: 0.723; 95% CI: 0.548-0.954; P=0.022), and the benefit of RAS blockade was maintained in all predefined subgroups. This study demonstrated that RAS blockers were effective preventive therapies for reducing long-term cardiovascular events in patients with SCAD without HF who underwent PCI.

  7. Comparison of change in coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable versus unstable angina pectoris receiving statin therapy (from the Treatment With Statin on Atheroma Regression Evaluated by Intravascular Ultrasound With Virtual Histology [TRUTH] study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Tohyama, Shinichi; Fukui, Kazuki; Umezawa, Shigeo; Onishi, Yuko; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Sato, Akira; Nozato, Toshihiro; Miyake, Shogo; Takeyama, Youichi; Morino, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Takao; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Michishita, Ichiro

    2013-04-01

    Although statin-induced regression in coronary atherosclerosis seems to be greater in patients with acute coronary syndrome than in those with stable coronary artery disease, no reports have examined this. The purpose of the present study was to compare the changes in coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable versus unstable angina pectoris (AP). The effects of 8-month statin therapy on coronary atherosclerosis were evaluated using virtual histology intravascular ultrasound, and analyzable intravascular ultrasound data were obtained from 119 patients (83 patients with stable AP and 36 with unstable AP). A significant decrease in plaque volume was observed in patients with unstable AP (-2.2%, p = 0.02) but not in patients with stable AP. A significant increase in the necrotic-core component (0.30 mm(3)/mm, p = 0.009) was observed only in patients with unstable AP. Significant positive correlations were observed between the percentage of change in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase and the percentage of change in plaque volume (r = 0.346, p = 0.05) in patients with unstable AP. No significant correlations were observed in patients with stable AP. Multivariate regression analyses showed that a reduction in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase was associated with regression in coronary atherosclerosis, particularly of the fibrous component (β = 0.443, p = 0.003), in patients with unstable AP. In conclusion, regression of the coronary artery plaque volume was greater, although statin therapy did not halt the increases in plaque vulnerability, in patients with unstable AP compared to those with stable AP. A reduction in the serum platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase level was associated with regression in coronary atherosclerosis, particularly the fibrous plaque volume, in patients with unstable AP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S S; Wong, P W; Zhou, J M; Sora, J; Lessick, M; Ruggie, N; Grcevich, G

    1988-07-01

    Thermostability of lymphocyte methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was determined in 21 patients aged less than 50 years with proven coronary artery disease, and in 21 age- and sex-matched controls without clinical evidence of vascular disease. The mean +/- SD of residual activity after heat inactivation at 46 degrees C for five minutes was 37.6% +/- 5.6% in the controls. In contrast, patients with coronary artery disease could be divided into two subgroups. Fifteen of them had 38.1 +/- 5.9% residual activity which was similar to that of the controls. In six of them the mean +/- SD residual activity after heat inactivation was 13.6% +/- 5.1% which was below 2 SD of the normal mean. These observations suggested that thermolabile MTHFR was associated with development of coronary artery disease.

  9. [Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary arterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Reports of randomized controlled trials and prospective observational studies provide the most reliable data on the association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease (CHD). The totality of the evidence indicate a strong association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease, which is continuous at levels of less than 115 mm Hg of systolic. In general, 60 to 69 years of age, 10 lower mm Hg systolic blood pressure is associated with lower risk of one-fifth of a coronary heart disease event. The size and shape of this Association are consistent in all regions, for men and women and life-threatening events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Trials that compared active treatment with placebo or no treatment have shown that the benefits of reducing blood pressure with different classes of drugs (e.g., diuretics, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) are quite similar, with about a fifth of reduction in coronary heart disease. The important points in this review are: First, that the relative benefit to the decline in blood pressure for the prevention of coronary heart disease appears to be constant in a range of different populations. Second, it is likely that considerable benefit with blood pressure low below thresholds of "traditional" blood pressure (140/90 mm Hg), especially in those with high absolute risk. Third, start, reduce with caution -especially in adult- and keep the maximum tolerance of blood pressure reduction is an issue more important than the choice of the initial agent.

  10. Characteristics of coronary heart disease in Japanese taxi drivers as determined by coronary angiographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaka, K; Daida, H; Muto, T; Watanabe, Y; Kawai, S; Yamaguchi, H

    2000-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease is higher in occupational drivers than in people with other occupations. Although occupation categories can be surrogate measures for coronary risk factors, the relationships between taxi driving and severity of coronary heart disease (CHD) has not been investigated. Even more important, the contribution of risk factors to the severity of CHD in taxi drivers remains unclear. Our study tested the hypothesis that taxi driving could be associated with the severity of CHD. We also examined the relation between this occupation and risk factors and social lifestyle. We analyzed the coronary angiograms of 57 consecutive male taxi driver patients and compared them with those of 215 age-adjusted male non-taxi-driver patients. The number of diseased vessels and risk factors were compared between two groups. The prevalence of myocardial infarction and multi-vessel disease was higher in the taxi-driver patients than in the non-taxi-driver patients. The taxi-driver patients had higher prevalence of body mass index (BMI), diabetes, and smoking, higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and lower levels of apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that multi-vessel disease was associated with BMI and diabetes mellitus in taxi-driver patients. The taxi-driver patients were characterized by more extensive coronary atherosclerosis associated with higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity. These characteristics may be explained by in part their working environment.

  11. Risk stratification in stable coronary artery disease is possible at cardiac troponin levels below conventional detection and is improved by use of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Winkel, Per; Gøtze, Jens P

    2014-01-01

    /l. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with stable CAD, any detectable hs-cTnT level is significantly associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and myocardial infarction after adjustment for traditional risk factors and NT-pro-BNP. Excess mortality is particularly pronounced in patients with NT...... the conventional 99th percentile (13.5 ng/l) in 23%. Across all levels of hs-cTnT there was a graded increase in the risk of cardiovascular death after adjustment for known prognostic indicators: hazard ratio (HR) per unit increase in the natural logarithm of the hs-cTnT level, 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI...

  12. Functional Information in Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Sørgaard, Mathias H; Linde, Jesper J

    2017-01-01

    as an add-on to standard coronary CT angiography (CCTA), to identify regions of myocardial hypoperfusion, at rest and during adenosine stress. The principle of measurement is well-validated in animal experimental models, and CT myocardial perfusion imaging has a high degree of concordance with already...

  13. [The usefulness of the scale before exercise and exercise to identify coronary artery disease by physiotherapists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejer-Barczewska, Anna; Kapusta, Joanna; Godala, Małgorzata; Kowalczyk, Edward; Irzmański, Robert; Kowalski, Jan

    2017-05-23

    Myocardial ischemia can be assessed by ECG at rest or doing the stress test, which also serves to evaluate the results of cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of the scale before exercise and exercise to assess the risk of coronary heart disease and recognition by physiotherapists. The study included three groups of people: 1. 65 patients with stable coronary heart disease (IHD), including 45 men and 20 women, ranging in age from 33 to 79 years, an average of 60.18 ± 9.43 years who exercise test was positive; 2. 24 patients after myocardial infarction undergoing subsequent rehabilitation, including 20 men and 4 women, aged from 42 to 78 years, an average of 58.75 ± 8.45 years; 3. 70 healthy subjects without ischemic heart disease, including 34 men and 36 women, ranging in age from 24 to 70 years, an average of 56.24 ± 12.33 years. All healthy people and patients were hospitalized in the Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiac Rehabilitation, University Hospital im. WAM in Lodz. The study groups were assessed risk of coronary heart disease based on the result obtained in the scale before exercise and exercise. The results were statistically analyzed using Statistica version 12 (StatSoft, Poland). For the statistically significant level of pdisease (p=0.04) and in the group treated with rehabilitation (p=0.03) results in a scale before stress was significant higher. Compared to healthy individuals, both in the group of ischemic heart disease (p exercise were significantly higher. The use of scale before exercise to assess the risk of coronary heart disease is useful for physical therapists in their professional practice. There legitimacy of the use of scale exercise for the initial diagnosis of coronary artery disease without knowing the interpretation of the ECG stress test.

  14. Scaling laws of coronary circulation in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-08-16

    The heterogeneity and complexity of coronary vasculature (structure) and myocardial flow (function) have fractal-like characteristics and can be described by scaling laws with remarkable simplicity. In contrast with allometric (interspecific) scaling law, intraspecific scaling laws describe the design rules of vascular trees within a species. This paper provides an overview of intraspecific scaling laws of vascular trees and the physiological and clinical implications thereof. The significance and shortcomings of these scaling laws are discussed in relation to diffuse coronary artery disease, Glagov's positive remodeling in early stages of coronary atherosclerosis, treatment guidelines of complex bifurcation lesions, and for estimation of outlet resistance values for computation of blood flow in epicardial coronary arteries. Finally, we summarize the highlights of scaling relations and suggest some future directions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adherence of Sudanese Coronary Artery Disease Patients to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD), worldwide, is the most common type of heart disease. Adherence to the evidence-based medications for secondary prevention is associated with further improvement in the outcomes. Objectives: To identify level of adherence towards secondary prevention medications among ...

  16. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Diabetes has long been known to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) would have important public health importance by allowing the distribution of limited resources to be directed on those who ...

  17. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Butterworth, Adam S; Freitag, Daniel F

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied...

  18. Spirituality and negative emotions in individuals with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Becker, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) experience disease-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anger. Spirituality may be helpful to cope with these negative emotions. Research findings on the role of spirituality in dealing with negative emotions are inconsistent. In this study, we

  19. Attentional bias and anxiety in individuals with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Becker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether in an emotional Stroop task, individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) would show greater attention towards the threatening words related to their disease than healthy persons, and if such an attentional bias is associated with anxiety. An emotional Stroop task with

  20. An assessment of the physical fitness and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health and fitness clubs play an important role in addressing the causes of hypokinetic diseases and coronary heart disease (CHD). In order to be well prepared, service providers should be aware of the health and fitness profiles of their clients when they join their clubs. In the current study 243 white female subjects ...

  1. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Maria Nery

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results: The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard.

  2. Prevalence and characteristics of coronary artery anomalies in children with congenital heart disease diagnosed with coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Münevver Tuğba; Coşkun, Mehmet Enes; Başpınar, Osman; Demiryürek, Abdullah Tuncay

    2017-09-01

    Aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of coronary artery anomalies in children with congenital heart disease. Data of 1138 consecutive patients who were referred for cardiac catheterization and angiography for assessment of coronary anomaly between January 2005 and December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Total of 515 patients whose coronary arteries could be examined through left ventricle and aortic root injection were included in the study. Of 515 angiograms with visible coronaries, 42 patients (20 males, 22 females; mean age: 5.3±2.0 years) were found to have final diagnosis of coronary anomaly. Prevalence of coronary artery anomalies was 8.16% in this study. It was determined that 38 (90.4%) were anomalies of origination, 2 (4.8%) were anomalies of intrinsic coronary arterial anatomy, and 2 (4.8%) were anomalies of coronary termination. Most common coronary artery abnormality was anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left aortic sinus (16 patients; 38.1%), and the most common congenital heart disease was tetralogy of Fallot (18 patients; 42.9%). Recognizing variability of coronary artery anomalies is critical when considering surgical or interventional therapies in children with congenital heart disease.

  3. Prevalence of asymptomatic coronary disease in fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassagnes, Lucie; Gaillard, Vianney [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Monge, Emmanuel [Department of Pulmonology, Center of Competence for Rare Pulmonary Diseases, Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Faivre, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Delhaye, Cédric [Department of Cardiology, Cardiology Hospital, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Petyt, Grégory; Hossein-Foucher, Claude [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Salengro, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Wallaert, Benoit [Department of Pulmonology, Center of Competence for Rare Pulmonary Diseases, Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [Department of Medical Statistics (EA 2694), Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Remy, Jacques [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine, E-mail: martine.remy@chru-lille.fr [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Because of growing body of interest on the association between fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (f-IIP) and ischaemic heart disease, we initiated this prospective study to evaluate the prevalence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with f-IIP. Methods: Forty-two patients with f-IIP underwent noninvasive screening for CAD that included (a) a chest CT examination enabling calculation of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, then depiction of coronary artery stenosis; and (b) stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Patients with significant coronary abnormalities, defined by a CAC score >400 or coronary artery stenosis >50% at CT and/or perfusion defect >5% at MPS, were referred to the cardiologist. Coronary angiography was indicated in presence of a perfusion defect >10% at MPS or significant left main or proximal left anterior descending stenosis whatever MPS findings. Results: Combining CT and MPS, significant abnormalities were detected in 32/42 patients (76%). The cardiologist: (a) did not consider further investigation in 21 patients (CT abnormalities but no ischaemia at MPS: 12/21; false-positive findings at MPS: 3/21; poor respiratory condition: 6/21); (b) proceeded to coronary angiography in 11 patients which confirmed significant stenoses in 5 patients (5/42; 12%). In the worst-case-scenario (i.e., inclusion of 6 patients with significant coronary artery abnormalities who were not investigated due to poor respiratory condition), the prevalence of CAD reached 26% (11/42). Conclusion: In the studied population of patients with f-IIP, asymptomatic CAD ranged between 12% and 26%.

  4. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of premature coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography in Kurdistan, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ameen Mosa; Jehangeer, Hekmat Izzat; Shaikhow, Sabri Khalif

    2015-11-18

    Premature coronary artery disease (PCAD) seems to increase, particularly in developing countries. Given the lack of such studies in the country, this study examines the prevalence, associated cardiovascular risk factors, and coronary angiographic profile of the disease in Iraq. Data was collected from a total of 445 adult patients undergoing coronary angiography at Duhok Heart Center, Kurdistan in a period between March and September 2014. Patients were divided into PCAD (male 70 % compared to lesser obstruction. Premature coronary artery disease is alarming  in the country. Cardiovascular risk factors are clustered among them. But the angiographic profile and therapeutic options of PCAD are close to those reported from previous studies.

  6. Coronary artery abnormalities in Kawasaki disease - Comparison between CT and MR coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Woo; Goo, Hyun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although CT coronary angiography (CTCA) and MR coronary angiography (MRCA) are increasingly used in patients with Kawasaki disease, comparison of coronary artery assessability and diagnostic performance between the two imaging modalities has been rarely performed. Purpose: To investigate which imaging modality, CTCA or MRCA, is better for evaluating coronary artery abnormalities in patients with Kawasaki disease. Material and Methods: Between 2003 and 2011, 56 patients (38 boys/men; age range, 1-24 years) with Kawasaki disease underwent CTCA or MRCA (group A). Of these, 17 underwent both CTCA and MRCA (group B). Visibility of 11 coronary arterial segments in each patient was graded on a four-point scale. Coronary artery aneurysm, stenosis, and occlusion were evaluated by CTCA and MRCA, based on a reference standard obtained from cardiac catheterization, echocardiography, follow-up CTCA and MRCA, and clinical history. Coronary artery assessability and diagnostic performance were compared between CTCA and MRCA. Results: In per-segment analysis, more segments were assessable on CTCA than on MRCA in both groups. In per-patient analysis of group B, no significant difference in the assessability was found between CTCA (95.0%, 128.3/135 segments) and MRCA (92.4%, 124.8/135 segments) (P > 0.05). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CTCA vs. MRCA were 93.1% vs. 77.9% (P < 0.001), 99.2% vs. 99.7% (P = 0.65), 96.8% vs. 98.7% (P = 0.65), 98.2% vs. 94.1% (P < 0.001), and 98.0% vs. 94.9% (P = 0.008), respectively, in group A, and 91.8% vs. 70.4% (P < 0.001), 99.5% vs. 99.5% (P = 1.000), 98.5% vs. 98.0% (P = 1.000), 97.2% vs. 91.1% (P = 0.006), and 97.6% vs. 92.3% (P = 0.004), respectively, in group B. Conclusion: Although CTCA and MRCA show comparable assessability in per-patient analysis, CTCA shows higher diagnostic performance than MRCA for evaluating coronary artery abnormalities in patients with Kawasaki

  7. Prevalence and predictors of coronary artery disease in adults with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jalaj; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Paudel, Rajiv; Chatterjee, Saurav; Ahmad, Hasan; Snyder, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Accelerated coronary atherosclerosis in patients with Kawasaki disease, in conjunction with coronary artery aneurysm and stenosis that characterise this disease, are potential risk factors for developing coronary artery disease in young adults. We aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of coronary artery disease in adult patients with Kawasaki disease. All patients aged 18-55 years of age diagnosed with Kawasaki disease were sampled from Nationwide Inpatient Sample database using International Classification of Diseases 9th revision (ICD 9 code 446.1) from 2009 to 2010. Demographics, prevalence of coronary artery disease, and other traditional risk factors in adult patients with Kawasaki disease were analysed using ICD 9 codes. The prevalence of Kawasaki disease among adults was 0.0005% (n=215) of all in-hospital admissions in United States. The mean age was 27.3 years with women (27.6 years) older than men (27.1 years). Traditional risk factors were hypertension (21%), hyperlipidaemia (15.6%), diabetes (11.5%), tobacco use (8.8%), and obesity (8.8%), with no significant difference between men and women. Coronary artery disease (32.4%), however, was more prevalent in men (44.7%) than in women (12.1%; p=0.03). In multivariate regression analysis, after adjusting for demographics and traditional risk factors, hypertension (OR=13.2, p=0.03) was an independent risk factor of coronary artery disease. There was increased preponderance of coronary artery disease in men with Kawasaki disease. On multivariate analysis, hypertension was found to be the only independent predictor of coronary artery disease in this population after adjusting for other risk factors.

  8. Diagnosing coronary artery disease after a positive coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, L; Winther, S; Westra, J

    2018-01-01

    of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) against ICA with fractional flow reserve (FFR) in patients suspected of CAD by CCTA. Methods and results: Included were consecutive patients (1675) referred to CCTA......Aims: Perfusion scans after coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) may reduce unnecessary invasive coronary angiographies (ICAs). However, the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion scans after primary CCTA is unknown. The aim...... with symptoms of CAD and low/intermediate risk profile. Patients with suspected CAD based on CCTA were randomized 1:1 to CMR or MPS followed by ICA with FFR. Obstructive CAD was defined as FFR ≤ 0.80 or > 90% diameter stenosis by visual assessment. After initial CCTA, 392 patients (23%) were randomized; 197...

  9. Modern antiplatelet agents in coronary artery disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Rachel F

    2012-10-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is well recognized in the prevention of thrombotic complications of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary interventions. Despite clinical benefits of aspirin and clopidogrel therapy, a number of limitations curtail their efficacy: slow onset of action, variability in platelet inhibitory response and potential drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, the single platelet-activation pathway targeted by these agents allows continued platelet activation via other pathways, ensuring incomplete protection against ischemic events, thus, underscoring the need for alternate antiplatelet treatment strategies. A number of novel antiplatelet agents are currently in advance development and many have established superior effects on platelet inhibition, clinical outcomes and safety profile than clopidogrel in high-risk patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current status of P2Y12 receptor inhibition and PAR-1 antagonists in determining a future strategy for individualized antiplatelet therapy.

  10. Efficacy of magnetic resonance coronary angiography for evaluating coronary arterial lesions due to Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Rikako; Suzuki, Atsuko; Sato, Katsuhiko; Ono, Masae; Hosina, Kiyoshi; Furuyama, Tamio; Takemura, Atsusi; Korenaga, Tateo

    2002-01-01

    To reduce the number of invasive X-ray coronary angiography (XCA) in patients with coronary arterial lesions (CAL) due to Kawasaki disease, we evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA). We preformed MRCA on 30 patients with Kawasaki disease (age 4 months to 37 years; medium 9 years) by SIEMENS MAGNETOM Symphony 1.5 T. MRCA with free respiration using navigator echo 3D fast low angle shot (3D-FLASH) was performed on 10 young children. Evaluation of MRCA was based on the findings of 2D echo cardiogram (30 patients) and XCA (14 patients). All 17 aneurysms (100%) were detected by MRCA; four out of five dilatations were detected by MRCA (80%), but a slight dilatation was not detected (i.e., appeared to be a normal coronary artery). We observed seven stenoses (100%) that were detected on XCA and one new stenosis on MRCA; both of two aortocoronary bypass graphs (one in each of two patients; 100%) were observed to be patent. These results demonstrated that MRCA was highly beneficial, first for detecting CAL after the acute phase even in young infants, second for reducing the number of XCA examination times for following up CAL, and third for screening of CAL in adults with a history of Kawasaki disease. (author)

  11. Radial artery spasm occurred in transradial coronary intervention for coronary heart disease: its occurrence and predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Jiming; Li Lang; Lu Yongguang; Zeng Shuyi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the incidence and clinical predictors of radial artery spasm occurred in performing transradial coronary intervention for coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 1020 patients, who underwent transradial coronary procedures for coronary heart disease during the period of May 2007 Jan 2010 in authors' hospital, were enrolled in this study. All clinical information and medication were recorded in detail. Arteriography via radial artery was performed in all patients. The diameter of the radial artery as well as the arterial anatomy, including arterial variations, were determined and observed, which was follow by coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was adopted to evaluate the variables, such as clinical parameters, angiographic characteristics of the radial artery and procedure-related factors, in predicting the occurrence of radial artery spasm. Results: Radial artery spasm occurred in 209 (20.5%) patients. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that the following eight factors were independently associated with the occurrence of radial artery spasm. These factors were as follows: female gender (OR=2.8, 95% CI 2.5-5.8; P=0.001), age (OR=0.68, 95% CI 0.60-0.92; P=0.003), smoking (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.8-4.1; P=0.026), moderate-to-severe pain of forearm during radial artery cannulation (OR=3.0, 95% CI 2.3-4.8; P=0.006), radial artery anatomical abnormalities (OR=4.7, 95% CI 3.6-7.2; P=0.002), the ratio of radial artery diameter to patient's height (RAH) (OR=5.2, 95% CI 3.7-8.1; P=0.012), the ratio of radial artery diameter to outer diameter of the sheath (RAOD) (OR=5.8, 95% CI 4.2-6.9; P=0.006) and the number of catheter exchange (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.4-4.3; P=0.038). Conclusion: Radial artery spasm occurred in performing transradial coronary intervention for coronary heart disease is frequently seen in clinical practice. Female gender, younger age, smoking, forearm pain during

  12. Haplotype of the angiotensinogen gene is associated with coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Net, Jeroen B.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Familial hypercholesterolemia is characterized by high plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and premature coronary heart disease. Despite the monogenetic origin of familial hypercholesterolemia, the incidence of coronary heart disease varies considerably among patients, which

  13. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease.......To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease....

  14. Correlation between serum Hcy content and coronary atherosclerosis severity in patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the correlation between serum Hcy content and coronary atherosclerosis severity in patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease. Methods: 48 patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease were selected as observation group, and 57 patients with normal hypertension and coronary heart disease were selected as control group. Echocardiography was used to determine coronary lesion parameters, enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to determine serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy and coronary heart disease-related indexes, and the correlation between Hcy levels and coronary heart disease was further analyzed. Results: Serum Hcy level of observation group was higher than that of control group (P<0.05, absolute GLPSS value and E/A value under echocardiography were less than those of control group while E-DT and E/e value were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum adiponectin (APN level was lower than that of control group while P-selectin, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, oxidized high-density lipoprotein (OX-HDL, MMP-2, MMP-9, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 and Resistin levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; Hcy was negatively correlated with absolute GLPSS value, E/A value and APN level, and was positively correlated with E-DT value, E/e value as well as P-selectin, ADMA, OX-HDL, MMP-2, MMP-9, Lp- PLA2 and Resistin levels (P<0.05. Conclusions: There is direct correlation between serum Hcy levels and the severity of coronary heart disease in patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease, it can be a reliable way to early screen for coronary heart disease and evaluate the illness, and it is also a new target of coronary heart disease intervention.

  15. A large left atrial lipoma combined with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Zheng, Xiaomei; Du, Yu; Zhu, Zhicheng; Wang, Tiance; Xu, Rihao; Li, Dan; Liu, Kexiang

    2017-08-22

    Primary benign tumors of the heart are extremely rare and usually difficult to diagnose for their asymptomatic signs. A 66-year-old woman was admitted for shortness of breath caused by a large left atrial lipoma combined with coronary artery disease. Next, we successfully performed simultaneous curative surgery for the large cardiac lipoma and coronary artery bypass grafting with a "starfish" and no cardiopulmonary bypass was used.The patient was discharged on the eighth postoperative day in a good condition, and has remained asymptomatic at the 5-month follow-up. Lipomas are rare and difficult to diagnose, while computed tomography and computed tomography angiography can give us very important clues. Surgery is necessary. We can introduce a "starfish"to the operationand the cardiopulmonary bypass is unnecessary for the left lipoma with coronary artery disease.

  16. Early-onset Coronary Artery Disease: Clinical and Hereditary Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    A family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important risk factor for adverse coronary events, in particular if the disease has an early onset. The risk of CAD is influenced by genetic and environmental factors with a greater genetic contribution earlier in life. Through recent years...... the advances in genetic techniques has led to an increased understanding of the genetic background of CAD, which may potentially be translated into clinical use. The studies of this thesis aimed to investigate the burden of conventional risk factors and control in early-onset CAD (i.e. ... component of coronary atherosclerosis and underpin the need for risk factor optimization in early-onset CAD. Furthermore, our data support that yet identified common risk variants may have little clinical relevance in the clinical setting of early-onset CAD....

  17. Cardiac troponin T and CK-MB mass release after visually successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravkilde, J; Nissen, H; Mickley, H

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of cardiac troponin T (Tn-T) and creatine kinase (CK) isoenzyme MB mass release was studied in 23 patients with stable angina pectoris undergoing visually successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Serial blood samples were drawn for measurement of serum Tn...

  18. Depression and Coronary Artery Disease: The Association, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Khawaja, Imran Shuja; Westermeyer, Joseph J.; Gajwani, Prashant; Feinstein, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a comprehensive review of the literature to determine whether or not a relationship between depression and coronary artery disease exists. Our literature search supports the following: Depression and coronary artery disease have a bidirectional relationship, i.e., coronary artery disease can cause depression and depression is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and its complications; depression may contribute to sudden cardiac death and increase all causes of c...

  19. Automatic prediction of coronary artery disease from clinical narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Kevin; Filannino, Michele; Uzuner, Özlem

    2017-08-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is not only the most common form of heart disease, but also the leading cause of death in both men and women (Coronary Artery Disease: MedlinePlus, 2015). We present a system that is able to automatically predict whether patients develop coronary artery disease based on their narrative medical histories, i.e., clinical free text. Although the free text in medical records has been used in several studies for identifying risk factors of coronary artery disease, to the best of our knowledge our work marks the first attempt at automatically predicting development of CAD. We tackle this task on a small corpus of diabetic patients. The size of this corpus makes it important to limit the number of features in order to avoid overfitting. We propose an ontology-guided approach to feature extraction, and compare it with two classic feature selection techniques. Our system achieves state-of-the-art performance of 77.4% F1 score. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Serum protein profiles predict coronary artery disease in symptomatic patients referred for coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaFramboise William A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than a million diagnostic cardiac catheterizations are performed annually in the US for evaluation of coronary artery anatomy and the presence of atherosclerosis. Nearly half of these patients have no significant coronary lesions or do not require mechanical or surgical revascularization. Consequently, the ability to rule out clinically significant coronary artery disease (CAD using low cost, low risk tests of serum biomarkers in even a small percentage of patients with normal coronary arteries could be highly beneficial. Methods Serum from 359 symptomatic subjects referred for catheterization was interrogated for proteins involved in atherogenesis, atherosclerosis, and plaque vulnerability. Coronary angiography classified 150 patients without flow-limiting CAD who did not require percutaneous intervention (PCI while 209 required coronary revascularization (stents, angioplasty, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Continuous variables were compared across the two patient groups for each analyte including calculation of false discovery rate (FDR ≤ 1% and Q value (P value for statistical significance adjusted to ≤ 0.01. Results Significant differences were detected in circulating proteins from patients requiring revascularization including increased apolipoprotein B100 (APO-B100, C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO, resistin, osteopontin, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and N-terminal fragment protein precursor brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pBNP and decreased apolipoprotein A1 (APO-A1. Biomarker classification signatures comprising up to 5 analytes were identified using a tunable scoring function trained against 239 samples and validated with 120 additional samples. A total of 14 overlapping signatures classified patients without significant coronary disease (38% to 59% specificity while maintaining 95% sensitivity for patients requiring

  1. Diagnostic and prognostic value of a careful symptom evaluation and high sensitive troponin in patients with suspected stable angina pectoris without prior cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Debbie Maria; Diederichsen, Axel C P; Hosbond, Susanne E

    2017-01-01

    -TnI in stable chest pain patients without prior cardiovascular disease. METHODS: During a one-year period, 487 patients with suspected stable AP underwent invasive or CT-coronary angiography (significant stenosis ≥50%). At study inclusion, a careful symptom evaluation was obtained, and patients were classified...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease following myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Kawasoe, Yasutaka; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori.

    1989-01-01

    It is sometimes difficult to establish the diagnosis of coronary obstructive lesions noninvasively in patients with Kawasaki disease. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 11 patients (ranging from 7 months to 15 years) with Kawasaki disease following myocardial infarction for assessment of its usefulness in detecting coronary artery lesions. And we followed the time course of the MRI findings. Imaging was performed with a superconducting magnetic operating at 0.5 tesla. The time intervals between recognition of myocardial infarction and initial MRI were from 7 days to 4 years. In 20 of 22 vessels coronary arteries were visualized. In all the 14 vessels with poor contrast runoff from the coronary artery aneurysm signals within the coronary artery were observed. In 11 of 14 vessels with poor contrast runoff high signal intensity in the coronary artery was observed. In all the 6 vessels with turbulent coronary flow signals in the coronary artery were increased. In contrast, signals in the coronary artery and high signal intensity in the coronary artery were observed in 1 of 6 vessels with good contrast runoff. Signals in the coronary arterial cavity and high signal intensity in the coronary artery persisted in 5 of 6 vessels with turbulent coronary flow. From these findings mural thrombi or stagnant blood flow in the coronary aneurysm were suggested by an increase in coronary arterial signals. In conclusion, MRI is a useful modality for assessment of coronary artery lesions in Kawasaki disease with myocardial infarction. (author)

  3. Tissue Doppler echocardiography reveals distinct patterns of impaired myocardial velocities in different degrees of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Soren; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Olsen, Niels Thue

    2010-01-01

    Aim To determine how the left ventricular wall motion assessed by echocardiographic Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) is affected by increasing severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) among patients with stable angina pectoris and preserved ejection fraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: This study comprises...... global estimates. Each patient with significant coronary disease was matched with a control of the same age, sex, body mass index, and status regarding diabetes and hypertension. Global systolic and diastolic performance by TDI (in terms of global s' and E/e') were negatively correlated to the number...

  4. Coronary heart disease risk assessment and characterization of coronary artery disease using coronary CT angiography: comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Kim, Y.; Chung, I.-M.; Ryu, J.; Park, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and assess plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: Three hundred and ninety consecutive patients [asymptomatic group, n = 138; symptomatic group (atypical or non-anginal chest pain), n = 252] were retrospectively enrolled. They were subsequently classified into three CHD risk categories, based on the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, and 10 year risks of coronary events were calculated using Framingham risk score. CT was evaluated for stenosis, plaque composition, and coronary calcium scores. Results: CAD was observed in 42% of the asymptomatic group and 62% of the symptomatic group. In the former, the prevalence of CAD in low-, moderate- and high-risk subgroups was 21.4, 47.4 and 65%, respectively, and was 33.3, 74.4, and 72.4% in the symptomatic group. Framingham 10-year risks of coronary events were significantly higher in patients with CAD than in normal participants, and receiver operating characteristics curves showed that discriminatory power was poor in the asymptomatic group and symptomatic men, and good in symptomatic women. Of the participants in the asymptomatic group, 12% exhibited only non-calcified plaques and of the symptomatic group, 7% exhibited only non-calcified plaques. The coronary calcium score was significantly higher for significant stenosis than for non-significant stenosis in both groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of CAD was not negligible even in subgroups with low-to-moderate CHD risk. Additionally, the Framingham risk score was effective for predicting CAD only in symptomatic women. Coronary calcium scores correlated with significant stenosis; however, a sizeable percentage of both groups had only non-calcified plaques.

  5. Assessment of coronary artery disease and calcified coronary plaque burden by computed tomography in patients with and without diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Parma (Italy); Nieman, Koen; Weustink, Annick C.; Mollet, Nico R. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Martini, Chiara [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Parma (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Guaricci, Andrea Igoren [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Foggia, Department of Cardiology, Foggia (Italy); Tedeschi, Carlo [Ospedale San Gennaro, Department of Cardiology, Naples (Italy); Berti, Elena; Grilli, Roberto [Regione Emilia-Romagna, Healthcare and Social Agency, Bologna (Italy); Messalli, Giancarlo [SDN Foundation, IRCCS, Naples (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Parma (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria - Parma, Department of Radiology, Parma (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    To compare the coronary atherosclerotic burden in patients with and without type-2 diabetes using CT Coronary Angiography (CTCA). 147 diabetic (mean age: 65 {+-} 10 years; male: 89) and 979 nondiabetic patients (mean age: 61 {+-} 13 years; male: 567) without a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent CTCA. The per-patient number of diseased coronary segments was determined and each diseased segment was classified as showing obstructive lesion (luminal narrowing >50%) or not. Coronary calcium scoring (CCS) was assessed too. Diabetics showed a higher number of diseased segments (4.1 {+-} 4.2 vs. 2.1 {+-} 3.0; p < 0.0001); a higher rate of CCS > 400 (p < 0.001), obstructive CAD (37% vs. 18% of patients; p < 0.0001), and fewer normal coronary arteries (20% vs. 42%; p < 0.0001), as compared to nondiabetics. The percentage of patients with obstructive CAD paralleled increasing CCS in both groups. Diabetics with CCS {<=} 10 had a higher prevalence of coronary plaque (39.6% vs. 24.5%, p = 0.003) and obstructive CAD (12.5% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.01). Among patients with CCS {<=} 10 all diabetics with obstructive CAD had a zero CCS and one patient was asymptomatic. Diabetes was associated with higher coronary plaque burden. The present study demonstrates that the absence of coronary calcification does not exclude obstructive CAD especially in diabetics. (orig.)

  6. Reduced plasma adiponectin levels relative to oxidized low density lipoprotein and nitric oxide in coronary artery disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Basati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adiponectin is a circulating hormone that is produced exclusively by adipocytes and has antiinflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties. The hypothesis that there are differences in adiponectin levels between stable and unstable coronary-artery disease patients remains controversial. Furthermore, the potential relationships between the plasma adiponectin level and the inflammatory and non-inflammatory markers (oxidized low density lipoprotein and nitric oxide in patients with stable and unstable coronary-artery disease relative to normal subjects have not been assessed. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether plasma adiponectin levels differ among patients with stable and unstable coronary-artery disease and among control subjects, and to correlate plasma adiponectin level with inflammatory and clinical risk factors (such as oxidized-LDL and nitric oxide in these patients. METHODS: This study included 50 control subjects, 50 stable angina patients and 50 unstable angina patients with angiographically documented coronary-artery disease. Plasma adiponectin and oxidized-LDL levels were determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma nitric oxide, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and lipid profile levels were also measured. RESULTS: Plasma adiponectin levels were lower in the unstable angina patients (4.9 ± 1.30 µg/mL than in the stable angina patients (6.34 ± 1.0 µg/mL or in the controls (9.25 ± 1.8 µg/mL; these levels were also significantly lower in stable angina patients versus controls (p<0.001. Plasma adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with oxidized-LDL, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile and other clinical risk factors but positively correlated with nitric oxide. CONCLUSION: Plasma adiponectin levels were found to be lower in both stable and unstable angina patients relative to control subjects, and the correlation between plasma adiponectin and cardiovascular markers is weakened in these patients.

  7. Comparison of modifiable coronary artery disease risk factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the incidence of the following coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors in urban (westernised) Black and White females: physical inactivity, hypertension, cigarette smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity and multiple risk factors. Subjects: Subjects for this study were ...

  8. Genetic contribution of the leukotriene pathway to coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the genetic contribution of the leukotriene (LT) pathway to risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 4,512 Caucasian and African American subjects ascertained through elective cardiac evaluation. Of the three previously associated variants, the shorter "3" and "4" alleles of a promoter ...

  9. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  10. Childhood Antecedents to Adult Coronary Artery Diseases. Special Reference Briefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the childhood antecedents to atherosclerosis and hypertension. While diet is related to the development of coronary artery diseases, there is some disagreement about what dietary changes are necessary or desirable in children to prevent their development, and at what age such changes should be made. Fifty-five…

  11. Antibiotics for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J.; Safi, Sanam; Korang, Steven Kwasi

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antibiotics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. As a secondary objective, we plan to assess the effects of individual types of antibiotics...

  12. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Smith, George Davey; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimaeki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms

  13. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Davey Smith, George; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.; Cavadino, Alana; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Ebrahim, Shah; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Langenberg, Claudia; BenShlomo, Yoav; Whincup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established

  14. Studies bearing on coronary heart disease in South African

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-20

    Jan 20, 1973 ... middle age. from coronary heart disease. It would be wrong to think that given time, the adverse mortality situation in South African Whites will neces- sarily improve. In the USA, Burch' has recently shown that mean expectations of life at birth of both Whites and. Negroes reached plateaux 20 years ago.

  15. Risk of coronary heart disease in patients with HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanni, Markella V.; Schouten, Judith; Grinspoon, Steven K.; Reiss, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The lives of individuals infected with HIV who have access to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are substantially prolonged, which increases the risk of developing non-AIDS comorbidities, including coronary heart disease (CHD). In Europe and the USA, individuals with HIV infection have a

  16. Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in Czech Men, 1980-2004

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Tomečková, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2008), s. 12-16 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : coronary heart disease * cardiovascular * mortality * 1980-2004 Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/articles/200812/33/1.html

  17. Tea and coronary heart disease : protection through estrogenlike activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Witteman, J.C.; Launer, L.J.; Lamberts, S.J.; Pols, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Tea drinking appears to be protective against coronary heart disease in a number of epidemiologic studies. It has been suggested that tea flavonols with antioxidative activity, including quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin,1 could account for the favorable effect on cardiovascular health. In the

  18. What is killing? People's knowledge about coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From which nearly 80% can be because of modifiable risks. In Egypt, there is a lack of studies on the knowledge of people about coronary heart diseases and its modifiable risks. So, this research reported here we designed to measure the dimensions of peoples knowledge about CHD and their attitude towards prevention, ...

  19. Sudden cardiac death and coronary disease in the young

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariasardóttir, Sára; Risgaard, Bjarke; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac death caused by coronary artery disease (CAD-SCD) is the most frequent cause of SCD in persons characteristics and autopsy findings of the heart among 18-35 and 36-49year old CAD-SCD cases. METHODS: We...... to death in young CAD-SCD cases, which may enable clinicians to prevent these tragic deaths....

  20. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  1. GST polymorphisms and early-onset coronary artery disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dysfunctional detoxification enzymes are responsible for prolonged exposure to reactive molecules and can contribute to endothelial damage, an underlying factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Objectives. We aimed to assess 2 common polymorphic variant isoforms in GSTM1 and GSTP1 of GST in young CAD patients ...

  2. High density lipoproteins, dyslipidemia, and coronary heart disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2010-01-01

    ... with premature coronary heart disease (CHD). These familial disorders include lipoprotein(a) excess, dyslipidemia (high triglycerides and low HDL), combined hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol and high triglycerides often with low HDL), hypoalphalipoproteinemia (low HDL), and hypercholesterolemia. We discuss the management of these disorders. W...

  3. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  4. Genetic epidemiology of coronary artery disease: an Asian Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and folate in the diet can cause an increase in blood homo- cysteine levels. Common genetic variants in the methylene- tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) ..... Maitra A., Dash D., John S., Sannappa P. R., Das A. P., Shanker J. et al. 2009 A common variant in chromosome 9p21 associated with coronary artery disease in ...

  5. Genetic epidemiology of coronary artery disease: an Asian Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings on the role of genetic factors in the aetiopathology of CAD have implicated novel genes and variants in addition to those involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. However, our present knowledge is ...

  6. Health actions and disease patterns related to coronary heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The health-related behaviour of the Cape Peninsula coloured population, which has been shown to have an adverse coronary heart disease (CHO) risk factor profile, is reported. Private medical services were used most often by participants: 54,1% and 51,6% of males and females respectively had made use of these ...

  7. Patients with coronary artery disease – Maintaining planned lifestyle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to describe how patients with coronary artery disease, who have had one or more cardiac interventions, were maintaining their planned lifestyle adaptations at four months after the intervention. Furthermore, the study aimed to develop guidelines to further assist patients in maintaining lifestyle ...

  8. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular mechanism underlying the patho-physiology of coronary artery disease (CAD) is complex. We used global expres- sion profiling combined with analysis of biological network to dissect out potential genes and pathways associated with CAD in a representative case–control Asian Indian cohort. We initially ...

  9. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  10. heart disease of coronary population (CRISIC study) The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... A cross-sectional study of risk factors for coronary heart disease in a random sample of 976 people from a South. African coloured population revealed this group to be at great risk. The prevalences of individual and of coexisting reversible risk factors - hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension and smoking ...

  11. Education and coronary heart disease : Mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillmann, Taavi; Vaucher, Julien; Okbay, Aysu; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Malyutina, Sofia; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Fischer, Krista; Veronesi, Giovanni; Palmer, Tom; Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Bobak, Martin; Holmes, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine whether educational attainment is a causal risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. Design Mendelian randomisation study, using genetic data as proxies for education to minimise confounding. Setting The main analysis used genetic data from two large consortia

  12. Resistance training and predicted risk of coronary heart disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of resistance training, designed to prevent the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on the Framingham Risk Assessment (FRA) score. Twenty-five healthy sedentary men with low CHD risk were assigned to participate in a 16-week (three days per week) ...

  13. Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, and its incidence is increasing in the developing world. The effectiveness of interventions in developing countries has been questioned in view of the overwhelming burden of other health problems in such ...

  14. Studies Bearing on Coronary Heart Disease in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa, populations may be observed in various stages of transition from primitiveness to sophistication. Among them there are different prevalences of coronary heart disease (CHD); it is very common in Whites, somewhat less common in Indians, but remains rare in Bantu. Information on these populatio.ls is ...

  15. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  16. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern Punjab, Pakistan. ... History of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM) or its treatment was recorded after observing their medical reports. Results: The proportion of females and males was 65.53 and 34.46 %, respectively. Of the 200 patients, the mean age of ...

  17. Accurate Prediction of Coronary Artery Disease Using Bioinformatics Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Shafiee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Cardiovascular disease is one of the main causes of death in developed and Third World countries. According to the statement of the World Health Organization, it is predicted that death due to heart disease will rise to 23 million by 2030. According to the latest statistics reported by Iran’s Minister of health, 3.39% of all deaths are attributed to cardiovascular diseases and 19.5% are related to myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to predict coronary artery disease using data mining algorithms. Methods: In this study, various bioinformatics algorithms, such as decision trees, neural networks, support vector machines, clustering, etc., were used to predict coronary heart disease. The data used in this study was taken from several valid databases (including 14 data. Results: In this research, data mining techniques can be effectively used to diagnose different diseases, including coronary artery disease. Also, for the first time, a prediction system based on support vector machine with the best possible accuracy was introduced. Conclusion: The results showed that among the features, thallium scan variable is the most important feature in the diagnosis of heart disease. Designation of machine prediction models, such as support vector machine learning algorithm can differentiate between sick and healthy individuals with 100% accuracy.

  18. Invasive angiography and revascularization in patients with stable angina following prior coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Francis R; Biasco, Luigi; Pedersen, Frants

    2017-01-01

    . Follow-up data were available for all patients, by means of records linked to each Danish social security number. RESULTS: In patients with prior CABG and stable angina (n = 2,309), diagnostic angiography led to revascularization in 574 (24.9%) cases. Chronic kidney disease (HR 1.93 [1.08-3.44], P = 0...

  19. Comparative Effectiveness Trials of Imaging-Guided Strategies in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Leslee J; Phillips, Lawrence M; Nagel, Eike; Newby, David E; Narula, Jagat; Douglas, Pamela S

    2017-03-01

    The evaluation of patients with suspected stable ischemic heart disease is among the most common diagnostic evaluations with nearly 20 million imaging and exercise stress tests performed annually in the United States. Over the past decade, there has been an evolution in imaging research with an ever-increasing focus on larger registries and randomized trials comparing the effectiveness of varying diagnostic algorithms. The current review highlights recent randomized trial evidence with a particular focus comparing the effectiveness of cardiac imaging procedures within the stable ischemic heart disease evaluation for coronary artery disease detection, angina, and other quality of life measures, and major clinical outcomes. Also highlighted are secondary analyses from these trials on the economic findings related to comparative cost differences across diagnostic testing strategies. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coronary microvascular function and myocardial fibrosis in women with angina pectoris and no obstructive coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Naja Dam; Michelsen, Marie Mide; Peña, Adam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Even in absence of obstructive coronary artery disease women with angina pectoris have a poor prognosis possibly due to coronary microvascular disease. Coronary microvascular disease can be assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography measuring coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR......) and by positron emission tomography measuring myocardial blood flow reserve (MBFR). Diffuse myocardial fibrosis can be assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) T1 mapping. We hypothesized that coronary microvascular disease is associated with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. METHODS: Women with angina...... using a modified Look-Locker pulse sequence measuring T1 and extracellular volume fraction (ECV). RESULTS: CFVR and CMR were performed in 64 women, mean (SD) age 62.5 (8.3) years. MBFR was performed in a subgroup of 54 (84 %) of these women. Mean native T1 was 1023 (86) and ECV (%) was 33.7 (3.5); none...

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive 64-slice CT coronary angiography in patients with stable angina pectoris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, Francesca; Krestin, Gabriel P. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Mollet, Nico R.A.; deFeyter, Pim J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Runza, Giuseppe [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera di Parma, Department of Radiology, Parma (Italy); Mieghem, Carlos van; Meijboom, Willem B.; Baks, Timo [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Malagutti, Patrizia [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University of Ferrara, Department of Cardiology, Ferrara (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Azienda Ospedaliera di Parma, Department of Radiology, Parma (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Multislice computed tomography (CT) is an emerging technique for the non-invasive detection of coronary stenoses. While the diagnostic accuracy of 4-slice scanners was limited, 16-slice CT imagers showed promising results due to increased temporal and spatial resolution. These technical advances prompted us to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in the detection of significant stenoses (defined as {>=} 50% luminal diameter reduction) versus invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Thirty-five patients with stable angina pectoris underwent CT coronary angiography performed with a 64-slice scanner (gantry rotation time 330 ms, individual detector width 0.6 mm) prior to conventional coronary angiography. Patients with heart rates >70 beats/min received 100 mg metoprolol orally. One hundred millilitres of contrast agent with an iodine concentration of 400 mgl/ml were injected at a rate of 5 ml/s into the antecubital vein. The CT scan was triggered with the bolus tracking technique. The sensitivity, specificity and the positive and negative predictive values of 64-slice CT were 99%, 96%, 78% and 99%, respectively, on a per-segment basis. The values obtained on a per-patient basis were 100%, 90%, 96% and 100%, respectively. When referral to catheterisation is questionable, CT coronary angiography may identify subjects with normal angiograms and consistently decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures. (orig.)

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of non-invasive 64-slice CT coronary angiography in patients with stable angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliese, Francesca; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Mollet, Nico R.A.; DeFeyter, Pim J.; Runza, Giuseppe; Mieghem, Carlos van; Meijboom, Willem B.; Baks, Timo; Malagutti, Patrizia; Cademartiri, Filippo

    2006-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (CT) is an emerging technique for the non-invasive detection of coronary stenoses. While the diagnostic accuracy of 4-slice scanners was limited, 16-slice CT imagers showed promising results due to increased temporal and spatial resolution. These technical advances prompted us to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in the detection of significant stenoses (defined as ≥ 50% luminal diameter reduction) versus invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Thirty-five patients with stable angina pectoris underwent CT coronary angiography performed with a 64-slice scanner (gantry rotation time 330 ms, individual detector width 0.6 mm) prior to conventional coronary angiography. Patients with heart rates >70 beats/min received 100 mg metoprolol orally. One hundred millilitres of contrast agent with an iodine concentration of 400 mgl/ml were injected at a rate of 5 ml/s into the antecubital vein. The CT scan was triggered with the bolus tracking technique. The sensitivity, specificity and the positive and negative predictive values of 64-slice CT were 99%, 96%, 78% and 99%, respectively, on a per-segment basis. The values obtained on a per-patient basis were 100%, 90%, 96% and 100%, respectively. When referral to catheterisation is questionable, CT coronary angiography may identify subjects with normal angiograms and consistently decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures. (orig.)

  3. Cardiogenic shock due to coronary artery disease associated with interrupted aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Oliveira Dallan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary edema is a serious event. Its occurrence in association with interrupted aortic arch and coronary heart disease is rare. Recently, an old patient developed cardiogenic shock and acute pulmonary edema due to acute coronary insufficiency, associated with interrupted aortic arch. The coronary angiography revealed occlusion of the right coronary artery and 95% obstruction in the left main coronary artery, associated with interruption of the descending aorta. Coronary artery bypass graft was performed, without extracorporeal circulation, to the anterior descending coronary artery. We discuss the initial management, given the seriousness of the case.

  4. [Current developments in prevention of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, E

    1996-02-01

    The Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S-Studie) has provided proof beyond any doubt that reduction of plasma cholesterol decreases mortality. The enormous rise of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in both gender calls for preventative measures as an urgent task. With a reduction of cardiac events by 30-40% and of mortality in the same order of magnitude, cholesterol lowering and increase in HDL-cholesterol are most effective measures for the treatment of coronary artery disease. However, not treatment of late stages of the disease, but primary prevention to reduce the incidence of coronary artery disease in this country should be the principle aim. Thus, the international guidelines for the treatment of lipid disorders considering the individual patient's risk profile have been revised.

  5. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution and Interscan Measurement Variability in End-Stage Renal and Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W.; Sinjab, T.A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Coronary heart disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients have been documented to have an increased amount of coronary artery calcifications (CAC). Purpose: To evaluate the distribution of CAC and its influence on interscan variability of measurement in end-stage renal disease and coronary heart disease patients, proven to have calcifications. Material and Methods: 69 patients having CAC, including 34 with coronary heart disease and 35 with end-stage renal disease, were scanned twice with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Amount of CAC was determined as the number of calcified lesions (CN), total calcium score (CS), calcium volume (CV), and calcium mass (CM). Distribution of CAC was evaluated on a per-patient basis as the median CS and CM of a single lesion. Density of the calcifications was calculated as the patient's CM divided by CV. Results: The overall median CS was 457.2, and the median CM was 75.6 mg. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified lesions, CS, or CM between the two groups. Both CS and CM of a single lesion, as well as the mean calcium density were lower in renal disease patients (P<0.05) than in coronary heart disease subjects. The relative interscan variability of coronary calcium measurement was higher in the renal disease group (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the calcium concentration and the relative interscan variability. Conclusion: The results indicate that the coronary calcium distribution influences the measurement interscan reproducibility, and the distribution may differ between end-stage renal disease patients and coronary heart disease patients, reflecting the dissimilar nature of coronary calcifications in those groups

  6. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution and Interscan Measurement Variability in End-Stage Renal and Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W. (Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland)); Sinjab, T.A.; Wlodarczyk, Z. (Dept. of Transplantology, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Coronary heart disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients have been documented to have an increased amount of coronary artery calcifications (CAC). Purpose: To evaluate the distribution of CAC and its influence on interscan variability of measurement in end-stage renal disease and coronary heart disease patients, proven to have calcifications. Material and Methods: 69 patients having CAC, including 34 with coronary heart disease and 35 with end-stage renal disease, were scanned twice with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Amount of CAC was determined as the number of calcified lesions (CN), total calcium score (CS), calcium volume (CV), and calcium mass (CM). Distribution of CAC was evaluated on a per-patient basis as the median CS and CM of a single lesion. Density of the calcifications was calculated as the patient's CM divided by CV. Results: The overall median CS was 457.2, and the median CM was 75.6 mg. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified lesions, CS, or CM between the two groups. Both CS and CM of a single lesion, as well as the mean calcium density were lower in renal disease patients (P<0.05) than in coronary heart disease subjects. The relative interscan variability of coronary calcium measurement was higher in the renal disease group (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the calcium concentration and the relative interscan variability. Conclusion: The results indicate that the coronary calcium distribution influences the measurement interscan reproducibility, and the distribution may differ between end-stage renal disease patients and coronary heart disease patients, reflecting the dissimilar nature of coronary calcifications in those groups.

  7. Behavioral interventions for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth-Gomér Kristina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is a strong clinical need to provide effective stress reduction programs for patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Such programs for men have been implemented and their cardiovascular health benefit documented. For women such programs are scarce. In this report, The feasibility of a cognitive method that was recently demonstrated to prolong lives of women is tested. A setting with gender segregated groups was applied. Method The principles of a behavioural health educational program originally designed to attenuate the stress of patients with coronary prone behaviours were used as a basis for the intervention method. For the groups of female patients this method was tailored according to female stressors and for the groups of men according to male stressors. The same core stress reduction program was used for women and men, but the contents of discussions and responses to the pre planned program varied. These were continuously monitored throughout the fifteen sessions. Implementation group: Thirty consecutive patients, eleven women and nineteen men, hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome were included in this intervention. All expressed their need to learn how to cope with stress in daily life and were highly motivated. Five groups, three groups of men and two groups of women were formed. Psychological assessments were made immediately before and after completion of the program. Results No gender differences in the pre planned programs were found, but discussion styles varied between the women and men, Women were more open and more personal. Family issues were more frequent than job issues, although all women were employed outside their homes. Men talked about concrete and practical things, mostly about their jobs, and not directly about their feelings. Daily stresses of life decreased significantly for both men and women, but more so for women. Depressive thoughts were low at baseline, and there was no

  8. Carotid disease in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Abid, A.R.; Dar, M.A.; Noeman, A.; Amin, S.; Azhar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the severity of carotid artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: From January to June 2008, 379 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery were preoperatively evaluated for the presence of carotid stenoses by duplex scanning. Patients were divided into two groups, Group I, 156 (41.2%) diabetic patients and Group II, 223 (58.8%) non-diabetic patients. Results: There were 314 (82.8%) males and 65 (17.2%) females with a mean age of 57.2+-9.1 years. In diabetic group there were 125 (80.1%) males and 31 (19.9%) females with a mean age of 56.3+-8.9 years. Left main stem stenosis was present in 59 (37.8%) diabetics and 45 (20.2%) non-diabetics (p 70% stenosis was present in 20 (5.3%) with 13 (8.3%) diabetics and 7 (3.1%) non-diabetics (p<0.025). Stenosis of 50-70% was observed in 30 (7.9%) of which 17 (10.9%) were diabetics and 13 (5.8%) were non-diabetics. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with diffuse coronary artery disease and significant carotid artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. (author)

  9. Coexistent coronary artery disease or myocardial bridging in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Yeo Koon; Yoo, Jin Young; Choi, Sang Il; Choi, Dong Ju

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of coexistent coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial bridging (MB) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and assess the role of CCTA. The prevalence of obstructive CAD (> 50% luminal reduction) and MB (partial and full encasement) were assessed in 150 patients with HCM diagnosed by clinical findings, electrocardiography, and echocardiography of 19588 consecutive patients who underwent CCTA for suspected CAD. The overall feasibility of coronary artery visualization was 98.9% with CCTA. In patients with HCM, the prevalence of obstructive CAD and MB (14.7% partial and 28.0% full encasement) were 23.3% and 42.7%, respectively. Age, hypertension, family history of premature CAD, Framingham risk score and severe chest pain were associated with CAD, whereas male gender and septal type were associated with MB (all p < 0.05). In comparison to invasive coronary angiography (n = 37), the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of CAD and full encasement MB was 89.2% and 86.5%, respectively. One-quarter of patients with HCM had coexistent obstructive CAD or full encasement MB. CCTA can be a feasible and accurate noninvasive imaging modality for the detection of CAD and MB in patients with HCM

  10. Coexistent coronary artery disease or myocardial bridging in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Yeo Koon; Yoo, Jin Young; Choi, Sang Il; Choi, Dong Ju [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of coexistent coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial bridging (MB) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and assess the role of CCTA. The prevalence of obstructive CAD (> 50% luminal reduction) and MB (partial and full encasement) were assessed in 150 patients with HCM diagnosed by clinical findings, electrocardiography, and echocardiography of 19588 consecutive patients who underwent CCTA for suspected CAD. The overall feasibility of coronary artery visualization was 98.9% with CCTA. In patients with HCM, the prevalence of obstructive CAD and MB (14.7% partial and 28.0% full encasement) were 23.3% and 42.7%, respectively. Age, hypertension, family history of premature CAD, Framingham risk score and severe chest pain were associated with CAD, whereas male gender and septal type were associated with MB (all p < 0.05). In comparison to invasive coronary angiography (n = 37), the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of CAD and full encasement MB was 89.2% and 86.5%, respectively. One-quarter of patients with HCM had coexistent obstructive CAD or full encasement MB. CCTA can be a feasible and accurate noninvasive imaging modality for the detection of CAD and MB in patients with HCM.

  11. Markers of Inflammation and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Sarwar; Alexander J. Thompson; Emanuele Di Angelantonio

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of global mortality, with coronary heart disease (CHD) its major manifestation. Although inflammation, the body?s response to noxious stimuli, is implicated in several stages of CHD development, the relevance of circulating levels of markers of inflammation to CHD risk remains uncertain. This review summarizes available epidemiological evidence for four emerging inflammatory markers implicated in CHD (fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-asso...

  12. Health actions and disease patterns related to coronary heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... coronary heart disease (CHO) risk factor profile, is reported. ... and the disease patterns related to CHD of the coloured population of the Cape .... Ate less sugar: (%). 36,1. 46,1. Ate more fibre-rich food: (%). 64,8. 69,4. Scored less than 55% for an ll-question test on prudent diet (%). 31,0. 36,8. 36,1% of ...

  13. Benefits of smoking cessation for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD incidence increases with age and is frequently higher in the elderly.(1 Therefore prevention of CVD in the elderly through management of risk factors is important in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. There are several risk factors of CVD that can be modified, such as smoking, physical activity, and unhealthy diet. Cessation of smoking is the most potent measure to prevent thousands of CVD events and death

  14. Coronary Flow Reserve Predicts Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Independently of Systolic and Diastolic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Monk-Hansen, Tea

    2014-01-01

    Aims Despite revascularization and optimal medical treatment, patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have reduced exercise capacity. In the absence of coronary artery stenosis, coronary flow reserve (CFR) is a measure of coronary microvascular function, and a marker of future poor outcome...... in CAD patients. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship among CFR, systolic and diastolic function, peripheral vascular function, and cardiopulmonary fitness in CAD patients. Methods and Results Forty patients with median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 49 (interquartile 46....... Conclusions Coronary flow reserve measured noninvasively predicts cardiopulmonary fitness independently of resting systolic and diastolic function in CAD patients, indicating that cardiac output during maximal exercise is dependent on the ability of the coronary circulation to adapt to the higher metabolic...

  15. Coronary Flow Reserve Predicts Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Independently of Systolic and Diastolic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Monk-Hansen, Tea

    2014-01-01

    Aims Despite revascularization and optimal medical treatment, patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have reduced exercise capacity. In the absence of coronary artery stenosis, coronary flow reserve (CFR) is a measure of coronary microvascular function, and a marker of future poor outcome......–55) with documented CAD without significant left anterior descending artery (LAD) stenosis underwent cardiorespiratory exercise test with measurement of VO2peak, digital measurement of endothelial function and arterial stiffness, and an echocardiography with measurement of LVEF using the biplane Simpson model, mitral....... Conclusions Coronary flow reserve measured noninvasively predicts cardiopulmonary fitness independently of resting systolic and diastolic function in CAD patients, indicating that cardiac output during maximal exercise is dependent on the ability of the coronary circulation to adapt to the higher metabolic...

  16. The prognostic value of coronary endothelial and microvascular dysfunction in subjects with normal or non-obstructive coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brainin, Philip; Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Coronary vascular dysfunction is linked with poor cardiovascular prognosis in patients without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) but a critical appraisal of the literature is lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantify...

  17. Coronary microvascular function, insulin sensitivity and body composition in predicting exercise capacity in overweight patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürs, Anders; Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Snoer, Martin; Chabanova, Elizaveta; Haugaard, Steen Bendix; Prescott, Eva

    2015-11-27

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a negative impact on exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to determine how coronary microvascular function, glucose metabolism and body composition contribute to exercise capacity in overweight patients with CAD and without diabetes. Sixty-five non-diabetic, overweight patients with stable CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) above 35 % were recruited. A 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate glucose metabolism. Peak aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak) was assessed by a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Body composition was determined by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was used as a measure of microvascular function. Median BMI was 31.3 and 72 % had impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. VO2peak adjusted for fat free mass was correlated with CFR (r = 0.41, p = 0.0007), LVEF (r = 0.33, p = 0.008) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) (r = 0.32, p = 0.01) while it was only weakly linked to measures of glucose metabolism and body composition. CFR, EDV and LVEF remained independent predictors of VO2peak in multivariable regression analysis. The study established CFR, EDV and LVEF as independent predictors of VO2peak in overweight CAD patients with no or only mild functional symptoms and a LVEF > 35 %. Glucose metabolism and body composition had minor impact on VO2peak. The findings suggest that central hemodynamic factors are important in limiting exercise capacity in overweight non-diabetic CAD patients.

  18. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention versus Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy and Left Main Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hsin-Ru; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Shih, Chun-Che; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chan, Wan-Leong; Wu, Cheng-Hsueh; Lu, Tse-Min

    2017-03-01

    Patients with diabetic nephropathy and unprotected left main (LM) coronary artery disease suffer from high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although surgical revascularization is currently recommended in this special patient population, the optimal revascularization method for this distinct patient group has remained unclear. We collected 99 consecutive patients with unprotected LM disease and diabetic nephropathy, including 46 patients who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and 53 who had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), with a mean age of 72 ± 10; with 80.8% male. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as overt proteinuria (proteinuria > 500 mg/day) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) by the modified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . The baseline characteristics, angiographic results and long-term clinical outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. The baseline characteristic of all patients were similar except for smokers, low density lipoprotein (LDL) level and extension of coronary artery disease involvement. The median follow-up period was 3.8 years. There were 73 patients (74%) considered as high risk with additive European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) ≥ 6. During follow-up period, the long term rate of all-cause death (PCI vs. CABG: 45.7% vs. 58.5%, p = 0.20) and all-cause death/myocardial infarction (MI)/stroke (PCI vs. CABG: 52.2% vs. 60.4%, p = 0.41) were comparable between the PCI and CABG group, whereas the repeat revascularization rate was significantly higher in the PCI group (PCI vs. CABG: 32.6% vs. 9.4%, p patients with unprotected LM disease and diabetic nephropathy, we found that PCI was a comparable alternative to CABG in terms of long-term risks of all-cause death/MI/stroke, with significantly higher repeat revascularization rate. Given the small patient number and retrospective nature, our findings should be validated by

  19. Prognostic value of atherosclerotic burden and coronary vascular function in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assante, Roberta; Zampella, Emilia; Nappi, Carmela; Mainolfi, Ciro Gabriele; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Acampa, Wanda [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Arumugam, Parthiban; Tonge, Christine M. [Central Manchester University Teaching Hospitals, Nuclear Medicine Center, Manchester (United Kingdom); Gaudieri, Valeria; Panico, Mariarosaria; Magliulo, Mario [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of coronary atherosclerotic burden, assessed by coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, and coronary vascular function, assessed by coronary flow reserve (CFR) in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied 436 patients undergoing hybrid {sup 82}Rb positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging. CAC score was measured according to the Agatston method, and patients were categorized into three groups (0, <400, and ≥400). CFR was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline myocardial blood flow, and it was considered reduced when <2. Follow-up was 94% complete during a mean period of 47±15 months. During follow-up, 17 events occurred (4% cumulative event rate). Event-free survival decreased with worsening of CAC score category (p < 0.001) and in patients with reduced CFR (p < 0.005). At multivariable analysis, CAC score ≥400 (p < 0.01) and CFR (p < 0.005) were independent predictors of events. Including CFR in the prognostic model, continuous net reclassification improvement was 0.51 (0.14 in patients with events and 0.37 in those without). At classification and regression tree analysis, the initial split was on CAC score. For patients with a CAC score < 400, no further split was performed, while patients with a CAC score ≥400 were further stratified by CFR values. Decision curve analyses indicate that the model including CFR resulted in a higher net benefit across a wide range of decision threshold probabilities. In patients with suspected CAD, CFR provides significant incremental risk stratification over established cardiac risk factors and CAC score for prediction of adverse cardiac events. (orig.)

  20. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN STABLE ANGINA AND MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION COMBINED WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Popova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to determine the state of endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatation in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Material and methods. In the cross-sectional study included 122 patients with CHD associated with COPD: 68 people of them are patients with stable angina without acute coronary events in history and 54 patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. Comparison group comprised 53 patients with stable angina and 51 patients after STEMI without concomitant COPD. Patients were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: male, age <60 years, verified forms of CHD (stable angina, STEMI, documented with COPD without exacerbation and forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 30% in the groups with CHD and COPD. Arterial endothelial function was tested with high-resolution ultrasonography: brachial artery diameter was measured at rest, after flow increase (which causes endothelium-dependent dilatation, and after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin (an endothelium-independent dilator.Results. We found that endothelial dysfunction in patients with acute and chronic forms of CHD in combination with COPD are more pronounced than in isolated CHD.Conclusion. Expressed depression functional vascular reserve in patients with CHD associated with COPD, should be taken into account when conducting individualized therapy of these patients.

  1. Impact of smoking cessation and smoking interventions in patients with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.F.M. van Berkel (Dorien); R.A.M. Erdman (Ruud); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); H. Boersma (Eric)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAlthough it is well known that smoking is strongly associated with coronary heart disease, many patients continue or resume smoking after being diag- nosed with coronary heart disease and even after an important event such as a myocardial infarction, angio- plasty or coronary

  2. Persistence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary artery diseases after percutaneous coronary interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Heidari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary artery disease (CAD is as a leading cause of death and disability all around the world. Multiple risk factors have a role in the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD. It is necessary to control risk factors, to achieve optimal results of treatment. The aim of present study was to evaluate the persistence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with CADs after percutaneous cardiac interventions. Methods: In an analytical-descriptive study, 150 patient with CAD and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI were performed for them, and referred to Cardiology Clinic of Shahid Madani Hospital of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, from September 2013 to September 2015, were studied. The persistence of coronary risk factors, 12-24 months after performing PCI, was evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients at time of PCI performing was 57.90 ± 12.26 years. 72.7% of patients were male and 27.3% were female and male to female ratio was 1 to 0.37. Dyslipidemia in 52.0% of patients, hypertension in 51.3% patients, and diabetes mellitus (DM in 41.3% patients were the most common underlying comorbidities. In both before and after doing PCI, 26.7% were a smoker, and smoking rates after doing PCI also showed no significant change (P = 0.055, and also there were no significant changes in the physical activity of patients compared before and after performing PCI. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and DM, was the most frequent underlying diseases in patients with CAD respectively. Risk factors such as smoking, and lack of exercise, had no significant changes after performing PCI.

  3. [Management of sexual dysfunction in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, François

    2003-09-27

    THE CONTEXT: Patients with coronary heart disease are generally males aged more than 55 and in whom the question of sexual activity must be evoked, not only with regard to the risks involved with the sexual act itself but also regarding the management of an eventual erectile dysfunction. POSITIVE DATA: A negative and maximal for the age stress test is of predictive value and can eliminate the hypothesis of recurrent coronary ischaemia during sexual intercourse. Drug-induced effects on the libido and erectile function are known but only led to suspension of treatment in one out 438 patients treated for one year. In the case of documented erectile dysfunction, the combination of sildenafil nitrate derivatives or NO suppliers is formally contra-indicated because of the risk of hypotension. Post-marketing registers and specific studies in patients with coronary heart disease demonstrate the good haemodynamic and coronary tolerance to sildenafil in this category of patient, so long as the contra-indications are respected. The Princeton Consensus Panel has proposed a therapeutic strategy adapted to each patient and according to their level of risk and its treatment.

  4. Ivabradin and Verapamil Sr efficacy in treatment of coronary heart disease accompanied by bronchial obstructive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov V.I.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is a comparative investigation of Ivabradin vs Verapamil SR of antianginal/antiischemic activity, physical exertion tolerance and life quality of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD accompanied by bronchial obstructive diseases. Parallel groups of patients have been examined for a 16-week period. Ivabradin (average dose — 14mg/day or Verapamil SR (average dose — 443mg/day were administered to ischemic patients (n=84 with postinfarction cardiosclerosis, stable angina (class l-ll and painless myocardial ischemia. Concomitant bronchial obstructive deseases included controlled/partly controlled bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (stage II-III. Both medications have demonstrated the same antianginal/antiischemic activity and have improved physical exertion tolerance. Ivabradin was more effective for heart rate (HR aim level and 24-hour HR control. Ivabradin advantages were more expressed by changing of NYHA class (from class II to class I and increase of 6MWD. In conclusion Ivabradin has demonstrated its effectiveness in life quality improvement. Ivabradin and Verapamil SR did not cause complications in concomitant asthma/COPD and were good tolerated. It was determined that Ivabradin is a good Verapamil SR alternative for CHD treatment in case of bronchial obstructive concomitant diseases

  5. Unipolar Depression and the Progression of Coronary Artery Disease : Toward an Integrative Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Johan; de Jonge, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite extensive research on the relationship between depression and coronary artery disease (CAD) after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), causal interpretations are still difficult. This uncertainty has led to much confusion regarding screening and treatment for depression in CAD

  6. Sex Differences in Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Viola; Wilmot, Kobina; Al Mheid, Ibhar; Ramadan, Ronnie; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J; Garcia, Ernest V; Nye, Jonathon; Ward, Laura; Hammadah, Muhammad; Kutner, Michael; Long, Qi; Bremner, J Douglas; Esteves, Fabio; Raggi, Paolo; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2016-08-24

    Emerging data suggest that young women with coronary heart disease (CHD) are disproportionally vulnerable to the adverse cardiovascular effects of psychological stress. We hypothesized that younger, but not older, women with stable CHD are more likely than their male peers to develop mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI). We studied 686 patients (191 women) with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Patients underwent (99m)Tc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and with both mental (speech task) and conventional (exercise/pharmacological) stress testing. We compared quantitative (by automated software) and visual parameters of inducible ischemia between women and men and assessed age as an effect modifier. Women had a more-adverse psychosocial profile than men whereas there were few differences in medical history and CHD risk factors. Both quantitative and visual indicators of ischemia with mental stress were disproportionally larger in younger women. For each 10 years of decreasing age, the total reversibility severity score with mental stress was 9.6 incremental points higher (interaction, Pstress. Young women with stable CHD are susceptible to MSIMI, which could play a role in the prognosis of this group. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Percutaneous coronary intervention and the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients with von Willebrand disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Sulaiman; Deleon, Dexter; Akram, Hafsa; Sane, David; Ball, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Von Willebrand disease (vWD) results from quantitative or qualitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor (vWF). The occurrence of myocardial infarction is very rare in patients with vWD. A few case reports of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in vWD patients are present in the literature, but no definite management recommendations are available for such patients. We report a case of successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation in a 46-year-old woman with type 1 vWD and history of coronary artery disease (CAD). She received periprocedural dual-antiplatelet therapy for 2 weeks and then continued aspirin without any bleeding complications. The optimal management of patients with vWD and ACS is complex and presents a therapeutic challenge. We propose that dual-antiplatelet therapy can be used safely in most vWD patients presenting with ACS as most of them are type 1 vWD. PCI with BMS can be done safely. Long-term management of these patients requires a systemic approach including hematological consultation, ascertaining vWF levels, as well as patient education and close outpatient follow-up.

  8. Percutaneous coronary intervention with optimal medical therapy vs. optimal medical therapy alone for patients with stable angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenoi, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Stable Angina Pectoris (AP is a main syndrome of chronic coronary artery disease (CAD, a disease with enormous epidemiological and health economic relevance. Medical therapy and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI are the most important methods used in the treatment of chronic CAD. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, incremental cost-effectiveness as well as ethic, social and legal aspects in the use of PCI in CAD patients in comparison to optimal medical therapy alone. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in June 2010 in the electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE etc. and was completed by a hand search. The medical analysis was initially based on systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT and was followed by the evaluation of RCT with use of current optimal medical therapy. The results of the RCT were combined using meta-analysis. The strength and the applicability of the determined evidence were appraised. The health economic analysis was initially focused on the published studies. Additionally, a health economic modelling was performed with clinical assumptions derived from the conducted meta-analysis and economic assumptions derived from the German Diagnosis Related Groups 2011. Results: Seven systematic reviews (applicability of the evidence low and three RCT with use of optimal medical therapy (applicability of the evidence for the endpoints AP and revascularisations moderate, for further endpoints high were included in the medical analysis. The results from RCT are used as a base of the evaluation. The routine use of the PCI reduces the proportion of patients with AP attacks in the follow-up after one and after three years in comparison with optimal medical therapy alone (evidence strength moderate; however, this effect was not demonstrated in the follow-up after five years (evidence strength low. The difference in effect in the follow

  9. Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: Management in the Post NOBLE and EXCEL Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nyal; Kapadia, Samir R; Ellis, Stephen G

    2017-09-01

    The optimal management of unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) disease is currently a debated topic. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has seen an increased adoption for the management of ULMCA disease after numerous small-scale randomised trials and cohort studies showed equipoise with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for low complexity lesions. The recently published NOBLE and EXCEL trials are two of the largest international randomised clinical trials comparing PCI and CABG in patients with ULMCA disease. In lieu of all the available evidence, PCI appears to be equivalent to CABG in regard to mortality in patients with ULMCA disease. In non-diabetic patients with low complexity coronary disease (SYNTAX score ≤32), PCI appears to be a reasonable alternative to CABG, especially for ostial and midshaft left main coronary lesions. CABG is preferable in the presence of diabetes, multivessel coronary disease in addition to ULMCA or complex coronary lesions (SYNTAX score >33) including distal left main lesions.

  10. Factors associated with coronary artery disease progression assessed by serial coronary computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Gabriel Cordeiro; Gottlieb, Ilan, E-mail: ilangottlieb@gmail.com [Casa de Saúde São José, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rothstein, Tamara; Derenne, Maria Eduarda; Sabioni, Leticia; Lima, Ronaldo de Souza Leão [Centro de Diagnóstico por Imagem CDPI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, João A. C. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) allows for noninvasive coronary artery disease (CAD) phenotyping. Factors related to CAD progression are epidemiologically valuable. Objective: To identify factors associated with CAD progression in patients undergoing sequential CCTA testing. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 384 consecutive patients who had at least two CCTA studies between December 2005 and March 2013. Due to limitations in the quantification of CAD progression, we excluded patients who had undergone surgical revascularization previously or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between studies. CAD progression was defined as any increase in the adapted segment stenosis score (calculated using the number of diseased segments and stenosis severity) in all coronary segments without stent (in-stent restenosis was excluded from the analysis). Stepwise logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with CAD progression. Results: From a final population of 234 patients, a total of 117 (50%) had CAD progression. In a model accounting for major CAD risk factors and other baseline characteristics, only age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.01–1.07), interstudy interval (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.01–1.04), and past PCI (OR 3.66, 95%CI 1.77–7.55) showed an independent relationship with CAD progression. Conclusions: A history of PCI with stent placement was independently associated with a 3.7-fold increase in the odds of CAD progression, excluding in-stent restenosis. Age and interstudy interval were also independent predictors of progression. (author)

  11. Serum calcium levels are not associated with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Y

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Yuelong Jin,* Lianping He,* Quanhai Wang, Yan Chen, Xiaohua Ren, Hui Tang, Xiuli Song, Lingling Ding, Qin Qi, Zhiwei Huang, Jiegen Yu, Yingshui Yao Department of Preventive Medicine, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Numerous studies have reported that low calcium intake is related to a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between serum calcium and coronary heart disease is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare serum calcium levels in patients with coronary heart disease and those in healthy individuals. Methods: This retrospective, case-control study conducted in the People's Republic of China comprised 380 cases and 379 controls. Serum calcium levels, blood lipids, and anthropometric measurements were measured in both groups. The Student's unpaired t-test or Chi-square test was used to compare differences between cases and controls. Pearson's partial correlation coefficient was used to determine the association between serum calcium, blood lipids, and blood pressure in both groups. Results: Our results indicate that the average level of serum calcium in cases was higher than in controls. Serum calcium levels showed no correlation with any parameter except for triglycerides in either group. Conclusion: Overall, these data suggest that serum calcium has no influence on coronary heart disease or triglyceride levels in the general population. Keywords: serum calcium, hypertension, blood lipids

  12. Periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease assessed by coronary angiography: a cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, S M; Pereira, S S; Barbisan, J N; Vieira, L; Saba-Chujfi, E; Haas, A N; Rösing, C K

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease (CHD). There is still controversy about the relationship between periodontal disease and tooth loss with vessel obstruction assessed using coronary angiography. This cross-sectional study included 195 patients that underwent coronary angiography and presented with at least six teeth. Patients were classified into three categories of coronary obstruction severity: absence; one or more vessels with ≤ 50% obstruction; and one or more vessels with ≥ 50% obstruction. The extent of coronary obstruction was dichotomized into 0 and ≥ 1 affected vessels. A periodontist blinded to patient CHD status conducted a full mouth examination to determine mean clinical attachment loss, mean periodontal probing depth and tooth loss. Multiple logistic regression models were applied adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, smoking, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein. Most patients were males (62.1%) older than 60 years (50.8%), and 61% of them had CHD. Mean periodontal probing depth, clinical attachment loss and tooth loss were 2.64 ± 0.72 mm, 4.40 ± 1.31 mm and 12.50 ± 6.98 teeth respectively. In the multivariable models, tooth loss was significantly associated with a higher chance of having at least one obstructed vessel (odds ratio = 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.09) and with vessel obstruction ≥ 50% (odds ratio = 1.06; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.11). No significant associations were found between periodontal variables and vessel obstruction. Tooth loss was found to be a risk indicator for CHD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Morphologic Characteristic of Coronary Artery Disease, with Emphasis on Thromboses, in Patients Younger Than 40 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Tavora

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few pathologic descriptions of fatal coronary artery disease in the young. The morphologic characteristics of sudden coronary deaths in 47 hearts from patients younger than 40 years were studied. Numbers of plaques with necrotic cores were quantitated in each heart. Compared to 194 sudden coronary deaths >40 years, heart weight was lower, acute plaque erosions more frequent, and extent of disease less in the ≤40 years group. Plaque burden was less in hearts with erosions, and healed infarcts more common in hearts with stable plaque. The numbers of fibroatheromas increased with age until the 6th decade (<.0001 as well as the proportion of total plaques that were atheromatous. Plaques in younger patients have fewer lipid-rich cores. Most thrombi show areas of organization, with layering frequent in erosions, suggesting a possible method of plaque enlargement in the absence of necrotic core formation.

  14. Myocardial flow reserve is influenced by both coronary artery stenosis severity and coronary risk factors in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Naya, Masanao; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Inubushi, Masayuki; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurement has an important role in assessing the functional severity of coronary artery stenosis. However, a discrepancy between the anatomical severity of coronary artery stenosis and MFR is often observed. Such a discrepancy may be explained by coronary risk factors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of coronary artery stenosis severity and risk factors on MFR. Seventy-four patients suspected to have coronary artery disease and seven age-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and MFR were measured using 15 O-labelled water PET. Regional MFR was calculated in regions with significant coronary artery stenosis (stenotic regions) and in regions without significant stenosis (remote regions). The contributions of coronary artery stenosis severity and coronary risk factors were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. In stenotic regions, MFR correlated inversely with coronary artery stenosis severity (r=-0.50, p<0.01). Univariate analysis did not show any significant difference in MFR between the patients with and the patients without each risk factor. In remote regions, however, MFR was significantly decreased in the diabetes and smoking groups (each p<0.05). By multivariate analysis, diabetes and smoking were independent predictors of MFR (each p<0.05). In the group with more than one risk factor, MFR was significantly lower (2.78±0.79) than in the other group (3.40±1.22, p<0.05). MFR is influenced not only by coronary stenosis severity but also by coronary risk factors. In particular, the influence of risk factors should be considered in regions without severe coronary stenosis. (orig.)

  15. Association of changes in health-related quality of life in coronary heart disease with coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollag Arnfinn

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have focused on the association between the sociodemographic characteristics of a patient with the change in health-related quality of life (HRQOL following invasive coronary procedures, and the results remain inconclusive. The objective of the present study was to measure the temporal changes in HRQOL of patients with coronary heart disease, and assess how these changes are associated with invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics. Methods This was a prospective study of 254 patients with angina pectoris and 90 patients with acute coronary syndrome. HRQOL was assessed with the multi-item scales and summary components of the SF-36, both 6 weeks and 2 years after baseline hospitalization in 1998. Paired t-tests and multiple regression analyses were used to assess temporal changes in HRQOL and to identify the associated factors. Results Physical components of HRQOL had improved most during the 2 years following invasive coronary procedures. Our findings indicated that patients with angina pectoris who were younger, male, and more educated were most likely to increase their HRQOL following invasive coronary procedures. When adjusting for baseline HRQOL scores, invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics did not explain temporal changes in patients with acute coronary syndrome, possibly due to higher comorbidity. Conclusion Sociodemographic characteristics should be taken into account when comparing and interpreting changes in HRQOL scores in patients with and without invasive coronary procedures.

  16. Predicting Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The FINRISK Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Peltonen, Markku; Puska, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    The FINRISK risk calculator predicts 10-year risk for coronary heart disease, stroke incidence, and their combination. The model is based on 10-year cohort follow-up from 3 different cohorts in 1982, 1987, and 1992 from a random population sample in 3 areas in Finland. Coronary heart disease, stroke, and their combination are predicted by smoking, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diabetes, and family history. The Internet-based calculator is commonly used in Finland in health services to assess the need for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia treatment and is used also in patients' counseling. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -blind placebo-controlled trials could not confirm the initial high efficacy of either the growth factor protein or the gene therapy approaches observed in earlier small trials. The clinical studies so far have all been without any gene-related serious adverse events. Future trials will focus on whether...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  18. Nutritional status and coronary artery disease: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Khaleghparast, Shiva; Ghadrdoost, Behshid; Bakhshandeh, Hooman

    2014-03-01

    Nutrition is among the most important factors influencing coronary artery disease. Here we aimed to study the nutritional status of patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). We performed a cross-sectional study on 600 patients referred to a cardiology clinic with the signs of ACS. The patients were then classified in to two groups (CAD group and the normal group) based on angiographic findings. The amount of nutritional profile was questioned from all participants. Men were more often diagnosed with CAD compared to women (198/362 vs. 102/238; P nutritional factors predicting CAD. White mean and type of tea were the most important predictors of CAD. Dietary prevention strategies from childhood could prevent early CAD.

  19. Dietary fiber and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Mark A; O'Reilly, Eilis; Augustsson, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    .70-0.99), and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88-1.13), respectively, for all coronary events and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.63-0.91), 0.70 (95% CI, 0.55-0.89), and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.82-1.23), respectively, for deaths. Results were similar for men and women. CONCLUSION: Consumption of dietary fiber from cereals and fruits is inversely......BACKGROUND: Few epidemiologic studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease have compared fiber types (cereal, fruit, and vegetable) or included sex-specific results. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of dietary fiber and its subtypes and risk...... interval [CI], 0.78-0.96) decrease in risk of all coronary events and a 27% (RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.61-0.87) decrease in risk of coronary death. For cereal, fruit, and vegetable fiber intake (not error corrected), RRs corresponding to 10-g/d increments were 0.90 (95% CI, 0.77-1.07), 0.84 (95% CI, 0...

  20. Coronary artery disease: new insights and their implications for radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Freie Universitaet und Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Schumannstrasse 20/21, P.O. Box 10098, 10117, Berlin (Germany); Borges, Adrian C.; Baumann, Gert [Division of Cardiology, Angiology and Pneumology, Medical Department and Outpatient Centre, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) diminishes local, regional, or global blood supply to the heart and is most commonly caused by coronary atherosclerosis. New insights into the etiology of atherosclerosis suggest that CAD is an inflammatory disorder that responds well to modulation rather than an unchangeable chronic process. Since 75% of all acute coronary syndromes result from rupture of atherosclerotic plaques, factors causing rupture have a crucial role. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT have the potential to visualize the composition of coronary artery plaques and thus to identify plaques at risk. Considering the new insights into stunning and hibernation, myocardial late enhancement on MRI might provide pivotal information for therapeutic decision making among lysis therapy, catheter intervention, and bypass surgery. Exercise electrocardiography without or with right precordial leads, stress echocardiography, and stress scintigraphy are simple clinical procedures to identify CAD with high sensitivities of 67, 92, 76, and 88%, respectively. The MRI and CT have to be compared with these good results. Nevertheless, we are expecting that MRI and CT will replace the conventional diagnostic modalities, gain a central role in diagnosing patients with suspected CAD, and prove to be cost-effective in this regard. (orig.)

  1. Non-modifiable Factors of Coronary Artery Stenosis in Late Onset Patients with Coronary Artery Disease in Southern Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeed Mohammad Bager Tabei

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: These researches show that ageing increases the risk of coronary heart stenosis; also, females are more than men protected against this disease. The impact of family history of myocardial infarction and consanguineous marriage were not associated with of CAD.

  2. Selected risk factors for coronary heart disease in male scholars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selected risk factors for coronary heart disease in male scholars from the major South African population groups. H.C. Seftel, M.S. Asvat, B.I. Joffe, F.J. Raal, V.R. Panz, W.J.H. Vermaak, M.E. Loock, M.C. Rajput, M.A.K. Omar, M.S. Jeenah, K Steyn, P.J. Becker ...

  3. Radiation for not-so-benign coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massullo, Vincent

    1996-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of malignant disease has long been accepted. More limited application of radiation in the treatment of benign conditions has been proven but generally not pursued. On the centennial anniversary of radiation therapy, a promising, but as yet unproved, application of radiation for treatment of benign vascular disease has become an exciting field of research, speculation, and controversy. This panel presentation will discuss the rationales and dilemmas of applying radiation in the prevention of arterial restenosis after therapeutic intervention. Coronary artery bypass grafting and more recently coronary angioplasty have become accepted, effective therapies to reverse significant coronary stenosis, and thereby benefit the majority of patients with coronary artery disease. However, a large proportion of patients will suffer restenosis in spite of optimal conventional therapy. The search for a means to prevent such restenosis has been partially successful by therapies, and even engineering intravascular devices. In spite of these efforts, a significant number of patients will fail today's conventional therapy and suffer arterial restenosis. Fibroblast myointimal proliferation is felt to be a major element in this restenosis process. Clinical experience shows that radiation inhibits other similar benign fibroblast proliferative processes such as keloid scar formation and heterotopic ossification. Radiation is now being considered as a means to inhibit myointimal fibroblast proliferation and hopefully prevent attendant arterial restenosis as well. This has catalyzed various animal model investigations that have shown significant arteries. Promising results in the animal model and in very early human institutional trials. These trials are designed to determine if radiation is truly effective and can be safely delivered to prevent restenosis in diseased human arteries. This panel discussion will provide a firm basic science and

  4. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise...

  5. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to update the Cochrane ...... and improvements in quality of life. These benefits appear to be consistent across patients and intervention types and were independent of study quality, setting, and publication date....

  6. Cost effectiveness of coronary angiography and calcium scoring using CT and stress MRI for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Hamm, Bernd [Humboldt University, Department of Radiology, Charite, Medical School, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    We compared the cost effectiveness of recent approaches [coronary angiography and calcium scoring using computed tomography (CT) and stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] to the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) with those of the traditional diagnostic modalities [conventional angiography (CATH), exercise ECG, and stress echocardiography] using a decision tree model. For patients with a 10% to 50% pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease, non-invasive coronary angiography using CT was the most cost effective approach, with costs per correctly identified CAD patient of EUR4,435 (10% likelihood) to EUR1,469 (50% likelihood). Only for a pretest likelihood of 30% to 40% was calcium scoring using CT more cost effective than any of the traditional diagnostic modalities, while MRI was not cost effective for any pretest likelihood. At a pretest likelihood of 60%, CT coronary angiography and CATH were equally effective, while CATH was most cost effective for a pretest likelihood of at least 70%. In conclusion, up to a pretest likelihood for coronary artery disease of 50%, CT coronary angiography is the most cost-effective procedure, being superior to the other new modalities and the most commonly used traditional diagnostic modalities. With a very high likelihood for disease (above 60%), CATH is the most effective procedure from the perspective of society. (orig.)

  7. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... harms. When there is not enough evidence to judge potential benefits and harms, the Task Force does ... disease. Your Decision About Screening How should you decide whether to be screened for CHD with ECG? ...

  8. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  9. Endothelial progenitor cells in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Michael; Quintavalle, Cristina; Chiariello, Giovanni Alfonso; Condorelli, Gerolama; Briguori, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    In the last two decades a great deal of evidence has been collected on the key role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in the mechanisms of vascular healing. The role of EPC as a marker of vascular health and prognosis of cardiovascular disease is already consolidated. This review aims to examine and evaluate recent data regarding EPC, as biomarkers, prognostic factor and potential therapy in cardiovascular disease.

  10. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Yaojun Zhang,1,2 Christos V Bourantas,1 Vasim Farooq,1 Takashi Muramatsu,1 Roberto Diletti,1 Yoshinobu Onuma,1 Hector M Garcia-Garcia,1 Patrick W Serruys11Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Drug-eluting stents have reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis and have broadened the application in percutaneous coronary intervention in coronary artery disease. However, the concept of using a permanent metallic endovascular device to restore the patency of a stenotic artery has inherited pitfalls, namely the presence of a foreign body within the artery causing vascular inflammation, late complications such as restenosis and stent thrombosis, and impeding the restoration of the physiologic function of the stented segment. Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS were introduced to potentially overcome these limitations, as they provide temporary scaffolding and then disappear, liberating the treated vessel from its cage. Currently, several BRSs are available, undergoing evaluation either in clinical trials or in preclinical settings. The aim of this review is to present the new developments in BRS technology, describe the mechanisms involved in the resorption process, and discuss the potential future prospects of this innovative therapy.Keywords: bioresorbable scaffold, drug-eluting stent, biodegradable, design, mechanism, coronary artery disease

  12. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-05

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise-based CR (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) compared with usual care on mortality, morbidity and HRQL in patients with CHD.To explore the potential study level predictors of the effectiveness of exercise-based CR in patients with CHD. We updated searches from the previous Cochrane review, by searching Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 6, 2014) from December 2009 to July 2014. We also searched MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO) and Science Citation Index Expanded (December 2009 to July 2014). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of exercise-based interventions with at least six months' follow-up, compared with a no exercise control. The study population comprised men and women of all ages who have had a myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or who have angina pectoris, or coronary artery disease. We included RCTs that reported at least one of the following outcomes: mortality, MI, revascularisations, hospitalisations, health-related quality of life (HRQL), or costs. Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion based on the above inclusion and exclusion criteria. One author extracted data from the included trials and assessed their risk of bias; a second review author checked data. We stratified meta-analysis by the duration of follow up of trials, i.e. short-term: 6

  13. Non-invasive imaging for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with peripheral artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjaer, Andreas; Hesse, Birger

    2014-01-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease are at high risk of coronary artery disease. An increasing number of studies show that a large proportion of patients with peripheral artery disease have significant coronary atherosclerosis, even in the absence of symptoms. Although the reported prevalence...... of subclinical coronary artery disease varies widely in patients with peripheral artery disease, it could include more than half of patients. No consensus exists to date on either the rationale for screening patients with peripheral artery disease for coronary atherosclerosis or the optimal algorithm and method...

  14. Usefulness of coronary artery calcium for detecting significant coronary artery disease in asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descalzo, M; Vidal-Pérez, R; Leta, R; Alomar, X; Pons-Lladó, G; Carreras, F

    2014-01-01

    To confirm the value of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score as an indicator of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in the asymptomatic Spanish population, using noninvasive coronary angiography by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). This was a retrospective study of 232 asymptomatic individuals, referred for a cardiovascular health checkup that included CAC and MDCT. Participants' mean age was 54.6 years (SD ± 12.8); 73.3% of them were men. The mean CAC value was 117.8 (SD ± 277). The individuals with arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking and 3 or more risk factors had significantly greater CAC scores. Some 16.4% of the participants were in the ≥75 percentile population for CAC. The MDCT identified 148 individuals (63.8%) with CAD; the coronary lesions were not significant in 116 individuals (50%) and were significant (>50% stenosis) in 32 (13.8%). The participants with diabetes, smoking and ≥3 risk vascular factors had a greater prevalence of significant stenosis. The individuals with >50% stenosis had higher CAC values (352.5 vs. 1; P300 (OR=10.9; 95% CI 3.35-35.8; P=.0001), belonging to the ≥75 percentile (OR=5.65; 95% CI 1.78-17.93; P=.03) and having 3 or more vascular risk factors (OR=4.19; 95% CI 1.44-12.14; P=.008). CAC quantification is an effective method for determining the extent and magnitude of CAD and delimiting the predictive capacity of traditional risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Dynamics of glucose concentration in human organism is an important diagnostic characteristic for it's parameters correlate significantly with the severity of metabolic, vessel and perfusion disorders. 36 patients with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional classes were involved in this study. All of them were men in age range of 45-59 years old. 7 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (aged from 49 to 59 years old) form the group of compare. Control group (n = 5) was of practically healthy men in comparable age. To all patients intravenous glucose solution (40%) in standard loading dose was injected. Capillary and vein blood samples were withdrawn before, and 5, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minutes after glucose load. At these time points blood pressure and glucose concentration were measured. In prepared blood smears shape, deformability and sizes of erythrocytes, quantity and degree of shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were studied. Received data were approximated by polynomial of high degree to receive concentration function of studied parameters, which first derivative elucidate velocity characteristics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease and practically healthy persons. Received data show principle differences in dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease as a possible mechanism of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  16. [THE INFLUENCE OF MONO- AND MULTIVASCULAR LESIONS OF CORONARY ARTERIES ON THE COURSE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypalo, A; Kravchun, P; Kadykova, O

    2017-03-01

    The article assesses the influence of mono- and multivascular lesions of coronary arteries on the course of coronary heart disease at patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. For this purpose, a comprehensive survey of 75 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 was arranged. Depending on the number of vascular lesions of the coronary arteries, according to the data of coronary arteries computer tomography, all patients were divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup included 27 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries. To the second subgroup were included 48 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries. During the analysis of carbohydrate metabolism in cases of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 the HOMA index increase by 25.40% and insulin level increase by 17.05% were revealed at patients with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries in comparison with patients with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries, respectively. The combination of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries was associated with an increase of sortilin level (233,47±47,85 ng/l). A significant increase in triglycerides, lipoprotein cholesterol of very low density influences greatly on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis with lesions of greater number of coronary arteries at patients surveyed. At patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries the left ventricle myocardial re-modeling occurred through the increase of left ventricle's size and cavity.

  17. Etiologies of coronary artery disease in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelson, G.; Herwig, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The growing number of patient reports of angina and myocardial infarction during cancer management prompted this review of coronary artery disease (CAD) in cancer patients. There is no definite evidence that cancer per se nor any particular tumor type predisposes to coronary atherosclerosis. Cardiac metastases can cause CAD via tumor emboli, extrinsic compression, or ostial obstruction; in these patients the diagnosis of CAD as a result of cardiac metastases often is not made until death. The course of these patients usually is fulminant. Tumor-associated coagulation disorders and non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis can cause coronary thromboemboli; treatment should be initiated early as these patients often are not in a terminal state when such CAD develops. Post-radiation CAD seen in experimental animals (via fibrosis and/or accelerated atherogenesis) can be extrapolated to the clinical situation. This is best evidenced by 10 young patients, with minimal coronary risk factors in most, who developed angina and/or myocardial infarction 2 to 100 months after chest radiotherapy; approximate mediastinal doses ranged from 1440 Roentgen to 5075 rad. In 5 patients there was no significant atherosclerosis beyond the radiation portals; 2 had successful saphenous vein bypass grafts. Lipid-lowering therapy may prevent post-radiotherapy atherogenesis in high risk individuals. Chemotherapy (acting directly or synergistically with radiotherapy) has caused angina and myocardial infarction within hours to days after the infusion of agents both classically cardiotoxic as well as others, although the exact mechanism(s) for coronary artery damage as a result of chemotherapy presently is unknown

  18. Influence of dual antiplatelet therapy on mean platelet volume in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Tadanao; Kurisu, Satoshi; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Shimonaga, Takashi; Iwasaki, Toshitaka; Mitsuba, Naoya; Ishibashi, Ken; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-03-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a well-established marker of platelet activation, and recent studies have shown that platelet activation is central to the processes in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease (CAD). The study population consisted of 45 patients with stable CAD who underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents. We selected 45 age- and sex-matched control subjects without cardiovascular diseases who did not require antiplatelet therapy. Hematological test was performed 3 times within 1 month before DAPT (baseline), at 2 weeks after PCI (post PCI) and at 9 months after PCI (follow-up). Compared to control subjects, MPV was significantly larger in patients with CAD (10.0 ± 0.6 vs 10.7 ± 0.8 fl, p < 0.01) although there was no significant difference in white blood cell count, hemoglobin, and platelet count between the 2 groups. In patients with CAD, DAPT did not affect platelet count (19.3 ± 4.8 × 10(4)-18.9 ± 4.6 × 10(4)/μl) or MPV (10.7 ± 0.8-10.5 ± 0.9 fl) during the follow-up period. MPV remained to be higher at follow-up in patients with CAD despite DAPT compared to control subjects (10.1 ± 0.7 vs 10.5 ± 0.9 fl, p < 0.05). Our data suggested that MPV might not be suitable for monitoring the effects of DAPT on platelet activity in patients with CAD undergoing PCI.

  19. Perceived social support following percutaneous coronary intervention is a crucial factor in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähkönen, Outi; Kankkunen, Päivi; Miettinen, Heikki; Lamidi, Marja-Leena; Saaranen, Terhi

    2017-05-01

    To describe perceived social support among patients with coronary heart disease following percutaneous coronary intervention. A low level of social support is considered a risk factor for coronary heart disease in healthy individuals and reduces the likelihood that people diagnosed with coronary heart disease will have a good prognosis. A descriptive cross-sectional study. A survey of 416 patients was conducted in 2013. A self-report instrument, Social Support of People with Coronary Heart Disease, was used. The instrument comprises three dimensions of social support: informational, emotional, functional supports and 16 background variables. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, mean sum variables and multivariate logistic regression. Perceived informational support was primarily high, but respondents' risk factors were not at the target level. The weakest items of informational support were advice on physical activity, continuum of care and rehabilitation. Regarding the items of emotional support, support from other cardiac patients was the weakest. The weakest item of functional support was respondents' sense of the healthcare professionals' care of patients coping with their disease. Background variables associated with perceived social support were gender, marital status, level of formal education, profession, physical activity, duration of coronary heart disease and previous myocardial infarction. Healthcare professionals should pay extra attention to women, single patients, physically inactive patients, those demonstrating a lower level of education, those with a longer duration of CHD, and respondents without previous acute myocardial infarction. Continuum of care and counselling are important to ensure especially among them. This study provides evidence that healthcare professionals should be more aware of the individual needs for social support among patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention

  20. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, David M; Ordovas, Karen G

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical and medical therapy have prolonged survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) such that general medical conditions like coronary artery disease (CAD) are now the main determinants of mortality. A summary of the association of CAD with CHD, as well as a discussion of the radiologic evaluation of the coronary arteries in adults with CHD is described herein. Cross sectional imaging to evaluate CAD in adults with CHD should follow the same appropriateness criteria as gender and aged matched patients without CHD. Coronary CT imaging may be particularly valuable in evaluating the coronary arteries in this patient population as invasive coronary angiography may prove challenging secondary to complicated or unconventional anatomy of the coronary arteries. Further, typical methods for evaluating CAD such as stress or echocardiography may be impractical in adults with CHD. Finally, delineating the anatomic relationship of the coronary arteries and their relationship with the sternum, chest wall, conduits, grafts, and valves is highly recommended in patients with CHD prior to reintervention to avoid iatrogenic complications.

  1. cholesterol, coronary heart disease and oestrogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-03

    Apr 3, 1971 ... Present concepts of the interrelationship between oestro- gens, endogenous and exogenous, and the development of atheromatosis and coronalY heart disease in the human female are reviewed. Aspects of research conducted by me at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, are incorporated.

  2. Coronary artery disease in Africa and the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurdi MI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Wael Almahmeed1, Mohamad Samir Arnaout2, Rafik Chettaoui3, Mohsen Ibrahim4, Mohamed Ibrahim Kurdi5, Mohamed Awad Taher6, Giuseppe Mancia71Heart and Vascular Institute, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 2American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon; 3General and Cardiovascular Clinic of Tunis, Tunisia; 4Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 5King Khalid University Hospital and The Kingdom Hospital, Saudi Arabia; 6Ain Shams University School of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt; 7University of Milan, Bicocca, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Countries in Africa and the Middle East bear a heavy burden from cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of coronary heart disease is promoted in turn by a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, particularly smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and sedentary lifestyles. Patients in Africa and the Middle East present with myocardial infarction at a younger age, on average, compared with patients elsewhere. The projected future burden of mortality from coronary heart disease in Africa and the Middle East is set to outstrip that observed in other geographical regions. Recent detailed nationally representative epidemiological data are lacking for many countries, and high proportions of transient expatriate workers in countries such as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates complicate the construction of such datasets. However, the development of national registries in some countries is beginning to reveal the nature of coronary heart disease. Improving lifestyles (reducing calorie intake and increasing physical activity in patients in the region will be essential, although cultural and environmental barriers will render this difficult. Appropriate prescribing of pharmacologic treatments is essential in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. In particular, recent controversies relating to the therapeutic profile of beta-blockers may have reduced their use. The

  3. Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention or Bypass Surgery in Patients With Unprotected Left Main Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalcante, Rafael; Sotomi, Yohei; Lee, Cheol W.; Ahn, Jung-Min; Farooq, Vasim; Tateishi, Hiroki; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Zeng, Yaping; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Collet, Carlos; Albuquerque, Felipe N.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Park, Seung-Jung; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently available randomized data on the comparison between percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) for the treatment of unprotected left main coronary disease (LMD) lacks statistical power due to low numbers of patients enrolled. This study assessed

  4. Sixty-four slice spiral CT angiography does not predict the functional relevance of coronary artery stenoses in patients with stable angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, Marcus; Hack, Nicolas; Hahn, Klaus; Tiling, Reinhold; Jakobs, Tobias; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Becker, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian; Ziegler, Franz von; Knez, Andreas; Koenig, Andreas; Klauss, Volker

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate spiral multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography using 64-slice technique in the detection of functionally relevant coronary artery stenoses (CAS). Thirty-eight patients (62±11 years, 28 men) with stable angina (26 with suspected and 12 with known coronary artery disease) were investigated using 64-slice MDCT angiography and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (gated SPECT); a subgroup of 30 patients had additional invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stenoses with luminal narrowing of ≥50% were defined as ''significant'' in MDCT angiography and ICA. MDCT angiography was compared with gated SPECT and the combination of gated SPECT plus ICA with respect to the detection of functionally relevant CAS. The sensitivity, specificity and negative and positive predictive values of MDCT angiography in detecting reversible perfusion defects on gated SPECT were 63%, 80%, 94% and 32%, respectively, in vessel-based analysis and 71%, 62%, 72% and 60%, respectively, in patient-based analysis. If only reversible perfusion defects on gated SPECT with CAS ≥50% on ICA were considered, the sensitivity, specificity and negative and positive predictive values were, respectively, 85%, 79%, 98% and 33% for vessel-based analysis and 85%, 59%, 83% and 61% for patient-based analysis. Sixty-four slice MDCT angiography failed to predict the functional relevance of CAS, but had a high negative predictive value in the exclusion of functionally relevant CAS in symptomatic patients. (orig.)

  5. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution

  6. Risk indicators in coronary cardiac disease and occlusive disease of the peripheral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, H.

    1982-01-01

    In 160 patients with clinically confirmed coronary heart diseases, angiograms of the coronary vessels, the left ventricle, the abdominal aorta, the pelvic and femoral arteries and the supra-aortic vessels were taken. At the same time the incidence of the risk indicators overweight, hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, hyperuricaemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cigarette smoking was established and compared with the angiograms. Hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, diabetes mellitus and hypertension are found to be in a clearly positive correlation with the frequency and severity of coronary and peripheral vascular diseases. For hyperuricaemia and overweight a relation to the frequency and severity of peripheral but not coronary vascular stenoses is outlined. Cigarette smoking, again, proves to be a clear risk indicator. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Maria Mendonça da Cunha

    Full Text Available Objective.To assess the presence of depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease in the preoperative period for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Methods. A cross-sectional study with 63 hospitalized patients prior to CABG. Two instruments were used for data collection; one for the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and the other to evaluate the presence of depressive symptoms, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results. The mean age was 58 years; most were male (60.3%; with a partner (81% low educational level (71.4% attended school through elementary school. Among the patients, 36.5% were classified with dysphoria, and 25.4% had some degree of depression (6.3% mild, 17.5% moderate, and 1.6% severe. The group of patients with lower educational level presented higher depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Six of every ten patients with coronary artery disease showed dysphoria or some degree of depression. The results of this study can support the planning of nursing care for patients before and after CABG, as well as the development of public health policies to ensure complete, quality care for these patients, understanding depression as a variable that can interfere with recovery after cardiac surgery.

  8. Markers of Inflammation and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Sarwar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of global mortality, with coronary heart disease (CHD its major manifestation. Although inflammation, the body’s response to noxious stimuli, is implicated in several stages of CHD development, the relevance of circulating levels of markers of inflammation to CHD risk remains uncertain. This review summarizes available epidemiological evidence for four emerging inflammatory markers implicated in CHD (fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and interleukin-6; considers their likely utility in cardiovascular risk prediction; and outlines areas of outstanding uncertainty.

  9. Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Bourantas, Christos V; Farooq, Vasim; Muramatsu, Takashi; Diletti, Roberto; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Serruys, Patrick W

    2013-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents have reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis and have broadened the application in percutaneous coronary intervention in coronary artery disease. However, the concept of using a permanent metallic endovascular device to restore the patency of a stenotic artery has inherited pitfalls, namely the presence of a foreign body within the artery causing vascular inflammation, late complications such as restenosis and stent thrombosis, and impeding the restoration of the physiologic function of the stented segment. Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) were introduced to potentially overcome these limitations, as they provide temporary scaffolding and then disappear, liberating the treated vessel from its cage. Currently, several BRSs are available, undergoing evaluation either in clinical trials or in preclinical settings. The aim of this review is to present the new developments in BRS technology, describe the mechanisms involved in the resorption process, and discuss the potential future prospects of this innovative therapy.

  10. Novel Echocardiographic Indices for Assessing the Left Main Coronary Artery in Children With Kawasaki Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Elaheh Malakan Rad; Iran Malekzadeh; Vahid Ziaee; Raheleh Rajabi; Zohreh Shahabi

    2016-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired myocardial infarction in children. Coronary artery involvement is the most serious feature of this vasculitis syndrome. Timely diagnosis of coronary artery involvement is of utmost importance since it can prevent long-term morbidity and mortality. The current methods for the diagnosis of coronary artery dilation in KD are inconsistent and are also not capable of detecting all the abnormal coronary arteries or t...

  11. Newer Therapies for Management of Stable Ischemic Heart Disease With Focus on Refractory Angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mukesh; Arora, Rohit

    Ischemic heart disease remains a major public health problem nationally and internationally. Stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) is one of the clinical manifestations of ischemic heart disease and is generally characterized by episodes of reversible myocardial demand/supply mismatch, related to ischemia or hypoxia, which are usually inducible by exercise, emotion, or other stress and reproducible-but which may also be occurring spontaneously. Improvements in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes along with increasing prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes and obesity, have led to increasing population of patients with SIHD. A significant number of these continue to have severe angina despite medical management and revascularization procedures performed and may progress to refractory angina. This article reviews the newer therapies in the treatment of SIHD with special focus in treating patients with refractory angina.

  12. Intercourse avoidance among women with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2014-07-01

    Avoidance of sexual intercourse has not been frequently studied among patients with chronic medical conditions and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) are not exception. We aimed to (i) compare intercourse avoidance during the past 2 weeks among women with CAD and healthy controls; and (ii) to determine factors associated with intercourse avoidance during the past 2 weeks among women with CAD. This study was conducted in an outpatient cardiology clinic in Tehran, Iran. The study included 152 married women with CAD and 50 controls. Socio-demographic and clinical data including the severity of angina (WHO Rose Questionnaire), risk factors (cigarette smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and obesity), fatigue, physical function (visual analogue scale [VAS]) and somatic comorbidities [Ifudu index], symptoms of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), and dyadic adjustment (Revised-Dyadic Adjustment Scale [R-DAS]) were considered as independent variables. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of sexual avoidance during the past 2 weeks. The main outcome was intercourse avoidance over a 2-week period, measured by the Relation and Sexuality Scale (RSS). Avoidance of intercourse during the past 2 weeks was higher among women with CAD than controls (73.0% vs. 56%, P = 0.024). According to the logistic regression, intercourse avoidance was positively associated with age (Odds ratio [OR] = 1.127, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.073, 1.185), somatic comorbidities (OR = 1.137, 95% CI = 1.061, 1.218) and depressive symptoms (OR = 1.150, 95% CI = 1.022, 1.293). Our study suggests that among women with CAD, age, depressive symptoms and somatic comorbidities are associated with avoidance of intercourse. As having intercourse is safe among patients with stable CAD, all health professionals should discuss sexual behaviors with their female CAD patients, especially those that are older, with higher

  13. Diffuse aneurysmal and obstructive coronary artery disease: a do-not-intervene patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Eulália; Melica, Bruno; Primo, João; Mota, João C; Ferreira, Nuno; P Morais, Gustavo; Ponte, Marta; Caeiro, Daniel; Carvalho, Mónica; Bettencourt, Nuno; Vouga, Luís; Gama, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms are uncommon but potentially hazardous entities found on a small percentage of coronary angiograms. The best management strategy remains to be determined; the coexistence of obstructive coronary artery disease is the main determinant of prognosis. We report the case of a middle-aged woman with mixed aneurysmal and obstructive coronary artery disease presenting as an acute myocardial infarction, probably due to atherosclerosis. The unusual severity and complexity of the angiographic presentation of this case, with involvement of all major coronary arteries, raises important issues in terms of the patient's treatment options. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of coronary artery disease risk in 5463 patients undergoing cardiac surgery: when is preoperative coronary angiography necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Nassir M; Suri, Rakesh M; Daly, Richard C; Dearani, Joseph A; Burkhart, Harold M; Park, Soon J; Greason, Kevin L; Joyce, Lyle D; Stulak, John M; Huebner, Marianne; Li, Zhuo; Frye, Robert L; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2013-11-01

    We sought to critically analyze the routine use of conventional coronary angiography (CCA) before noncoronary cardiac surgery and to assess clinical prediction models that might allow more selective use of CCA in this setting. We studied 5463 patients undergoing aortic valve surgery, mitral valve surgery, or septal myectomy with or without coronary artery bypass grafting from 2001 to 2010. Preoperative CCAs were evaluated for the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). Random forests and logistic regression methods were used to determine the predictors of significant (≥50%) coronary stenosis. Preoperative CCA was performed in 4711 patients (86%). Two thirds of those with angina, previous myocardial infarction, or percutaneous coronary intervention had significant CAD found on CCA, versus one third of patients free of these risk factors (P < .001). Among 3019 patients without angina, previous myocardial infarction or percutaneous coronary intervention, older age, male gender, diabetes, and peripheral vascular disease independently predicted significant CAD (P < .001 for all; C-index = 0.74). Specifically, a multivariate model with these variables identified 10% (301 of 3019) of patients as having a low (≤10%) probability of coronary stenosis, of whom fewer than 5% had significant CAD and fewer than 1% had left main or triple-vessel coronary disease. In the absence of angina, previous myocardial infarction, or percutaneous coronary intervention, preoperative CCA identified significant CAD in only one third of patients. Our clinical prediction models could enhance the identification of patients at low risk of significant CAD for whom CCA might potentially be avoided before cardiac surgery. This strategy may improve the efficiency of cardiac surgical care delivery by diminishing procedure-related morbidity and offering significant cost savings. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  15. Microvascular coronary dysfunction and ischemic heart disease: where are we in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John W; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cold pressor 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Dubiel, J.P.; Haibach, H.

    1982-01-01

    201 Tl myocardial scintigraphy was performed during cold pressor stimulation in 36 patients aged 36 to 69 years. Thirty-one patients had coronary artery disease and 5 patients did not, as confirmed by coronary cineangiography. 201 Tl (1.5 to 2 mCi) was injected at 30 seconds of the cold pressor stimulation. The product of systolic pressure X heart rate increased from a baseline of 77.4 +/- 16 (standard deviation [SD]) to 103.6 +/- 17 at 30 seconds of the cold pressor test (p less than 0.0005). Transient perfusion deficits developed in 24 of 31 patients with coronary artery disease (sensitivity 77%), and all 5 patients without coronary artery disease had normal scintigrams. The sensitivity in detecting coronary artery disease was 40% in patients with 1 vessel disease, 91% in patients with 2 vessel disease, and 100% in patients with 3 vessel disease. Exercise electrocardiograms (available in 29 of 36 patients) were positive for ischemia in 18 of 24 patients with coronary artery disease and in 1 of 5 patients without coronary artery disease (sensitivity 75% and specificity less than 80%). Exercise 201 Tl scintigrams, obtained in 16 patients, were positive in 11 patients with coronary artery disease and positive cold pressor 201 Tl scintigrams. Five patients without coronary artery disease and with normal cold pressor 201 Tl scintigrams had normal exercise 201 Tl scintigrams. Coronary cineangiography performed during cold pressor stimulation in 6 patients who had positive cold pressor and exercise 201 Tl scintigrams did not show coronary spasm. Our data indicate that cold pressor thallium-201 scintigraphy offers promise as a noninvasive test in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may be used in patients in whom exercise testing is not feasible

  17. Regadenoson in the detection of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Buhr

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Christiane Buhr1, Mario Gössl2, Raimund Erbel1, Holger Eggebrecht11Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USAAbstract: Myocardial perfusion studies use either physical exercise or pharmacologic vasodilator stress to induce maximum myocardial hyperemia. Adenosine and dipyridamole are the most commonly used agents to induce coronary arterial vasodilation for myocardial perfusion imaging. Both cause frequent undesirable side-effects. Because of its ultrashort half-life, adenosine must be administered by constant intravenous infusion during the examination. A key feature of an ideal A2A agonist for myocardial perfusion imaging studies would be an optimal level and duration of hyperemic response. Drugs with a longer half-time and more selective A2A adenosine receptor agonism, such as regadenoson, should theoretically result in a similar degree of coronary vasodilation with fewer or less severe side-effects than non-selective, ultrashort-lasting adenosine receptor stimulation. The available preclinical and clinical data suggest that regadenoson is a highly subtype-selective, potent, low-affinity A2A adenosine receptor agonist that holds promise for future use as a coronary vasodilator in myocardial perfusion imaging studies. Infusion of regadenoson achieves maximum coronary hyperemia that is equivalent to adenosine. After a single bolus infusion over 10 s, hyperemia is maintained significantly longer (approximately 2–5 min than with adenosine, which should facilitate radionuclide distribution for myocardial perfusion imaging studies. In comparison with the clinically competitive A2A adenosine receptor agonist binodenoson, regadenoson has a several-fold shorter duration of action, although the magnitude of hyperemic response is comparable between the two. The more rapid termination of action of regadenoson

  18. Correlation analysis of levels of adiponectin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 with stability of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the changes of adiponection (ANP) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD) of different types, to investigate the correlation between these changes and stability of coronary artery plague. Inpatients of our hospital were divided into 56 cases with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), 56 cases with unstable angina pectoris (UA), 54 cases with stable angina pectoris (SA), and 60 cases with CHD excluded by using coronary arteriongraphy as the control group. Changes of ANP and MMP-9 were determined, and the correlation was analyzed. 1. ANP and MMP-9 levels in CHD group were higher than those of control group (P < 0.01). 2. Serum ANP and MMP-9 levels in AMI and UA groups were significantly higher than those in control group and SA group (P < 0.05). 3. MMP-9 level in AMI group was significantly higher than that in UA group (P < 0.01). 1. Increased ANP and MMP-9 levels are the independent risk factors of CHD; 2. Increased levels of ANP and MMP-9 in patients with CHD suggest instability of atherosclerotic plaque.

  19. Obesity and coronary artery disease: evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Labbé, David; Ruka, Emmeline; Bertrand, Olivier F; Voisine, Pierre; Costerousse, Olivier; Poirier, Paul

    2015-02-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity, clinicians are now facing a growing population of patients with specific features of clinical presentation, diagnostic challenges, and interventional, medical, and surgical management. After briefly discussing the effect of obesity on atherosclerotic burden in this review, we will focus on strategies clinicians might use to ensure better outcomes when performing revascularization in obese and severely obese patients. These patients tend to present comorbidities at a younger age, and their anthropometric features might limit the use of traditional cardiovascular risk stratification approaches for ischemic disease. Alternative techniques have emerged, especially in nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography might be the diagnostic imaging technique of choice. When revascularization is considered, features associated with obesity must be considered to guide therapeutic strategies. In percutaneous coronary intervention, a radial approach should be favoured, and adequate antiplatelet therapy with new and more potent agents should be initiated. Weight-based anticoagulation should be contemplated if needed, with the use of drug-eluting stents. An "off-pump" approach for coronary artery bypass grafting might be preferable to the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. For patients who undergo bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting, harvesting using skeletonization might prevent deep sternal wound infections. In contrast to percutaneous coronary intervention, lower surgical bleeding has been observed when lean body mass is used for perioperative heparin dose determination. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of a postdischarge coronary artery disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housholder-Hughes, Susan D; Ranella, Michael J; Dele-Michael, Abiola; Bumpus, Sherry; Krishnan, Sangeetha M; Rubenfire, Melvyn

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a demonstration project to assess the value of a nurse practitioner (NP) based coronary artery disease management (CAD-DM) program for patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were recruited to attend three 1-h monthly visits. The intervention included assessment of clinical symptoms and guideline-based treatments; education regarding CAD/ACS; review of nutrition, exercise, and appropriate referrals; and recognition of significant symptoms and emergency response. Two hundred thirteen (84.5%) completed the program. Physician approval for patient participation was 99%. Average age was 63 ± 11 years, 70% were male, and 89% white. At baseline, 61% (n = 133) had one or more cardiopulmonary symptoms, which declined to 30% at 12 weeks, p < .001. Sixty-nine percent attended cardiac rehabilitation or an exercise consult. Compared to the initial assessment, an additional 20% were at low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 70 mg/dL (p = .04), an additional 35% met exercise goals (p < .0001), and there was an improvement in the mental (baseline 49.7 vs. 12 weeks 53, p = .0015) and physical components (44 vs. 48, p = .002) of the SF-12 health survey. This NP-based CAD-DM program was well received and participants demonstrated improvement in physical and mental health, and increased compliance with recommended lifestyle changes. © 2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuocolo, A.; Esposito, S.; Acampora, C.; Squame, C.

    1988-01-01

    Exercise radionuclide ventriculography (ERV) is considered a superior non-invasive screening test for coronary artery disease (CAD). ERV showed, however, a low specificity in hypertensive patients (H). The diagnostic accuracy of EAR and thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy (M) was evaluated in 23 patients (H) with chest pain and positive ECG-strees test. All patients underwent ERV and M, randomly, in different days. Finally, they all underwent coronary angiography: CAD was diagnosed in case of luminal narrowing ≥ 70% in 1 major coronary artery at least. Eleven patients had severe CAD. ERV was considered positive for CAD in presence of ex-induced abnormality of wall motion and/or in case of ex-induced ejection fraction increase ≤ 5% respect to the basal values. M was considered positive for CAD when perfusion defects were observed in early images only. ERV showed low diagnostic accuracy. On the contrary M had both sensibility and specificity, and a high positive and negative predictive value in the diagnosis of CAD. M is thus suggested as the non-invasive methodology of choice in hypertensive patients with suspected CAD

  2. Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging in left main coronary artery disease: sensitive but not specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, T.; Griffith, L.S.; Achuff, S.C.; Bailey, I.K.; Bulkley, B.H.; Burow, R.; Pitt, B.; Becker, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of thallium-201 scintigraphy for identifying left main coronary artery disease, the results of scintigraphy at rest and during exercise were compared in 24 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 80 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of one or more of the major coronary arteries but without left main coronary involvement. By segmental analysis of the scintigrams, perfusion defects were assigned to the left anterior descending, left circumflex or right coronary artery, singly or in combination, and the pattern of simultaneous left anterior descending and circumflex arterial defects was used to identify left main coronary artery disease. Of the 24 patients with left main coronary artery disease, 22 (92 percent) had abnormal exercise scintigrams. Despite this high sensitivity, the pattern of perfusion defects was not specific; the ''left main pattern'' was found in 3 patients (13 percent) with left main coronary artery disease but also in 3 (33 percent) of 9 patients with combined left anterior descending and left circumflex arterial disease, 4 (19 percent) of 21 patients with three vessel disease and 3 (6 percent) of 50 patients with one or two vessel disease but excluding the group with left anterior descending plus left circumflex arterial disease. The pattern of perfusion defects in the patients with left main coronary artery disease was determined by the location and severity of narrowings in the coronary arteries downstream from the left main arterial lesion. Concomitant lesions in other arteries were found in all patients with left main coronary disease (one vessel in 1 patient, two vessels in 7 patients and three vessels in 16). For this reason, it is unlikely that even with improvements in radiopharmaceutical agents and imaging techniques, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy will be sufficiently specific for definitive identification of left main coronary artery disease

  3. Imaging and intervention for coronary artery disease following irradiation of malignant thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatimi, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Thymomas are rare malignant epithelial growths, constituting 20% of mediastinal tumours. Resection followed by irradiation may be employed in all thymomas except for stage 1 thymomas. Mediastinal irradiation is associated with coronary artery disease. The mean duration of presentation of post-irradiation coronary artery disease is 16 years (range 3-29 years). In our patient coronary artery disease was found only a year post irradiation. A 55 year old male who presented with complaints of dyspnoea, retrosternal chest pain and heaviness since one year underwent resection for malignant thymoma followed by radiotherapy. He presented with coronary artery disease a year after undergoing mediastinal irradiation. On follow-up, patient was treated successfully by coronary artery bypass graft. This case is an unusual occurrence and suggests that mediastinal irradiation may result in significant coronary artery disease as early as within one year. (author)

  4. Imaging and intervention for coronary artery disease following irradiation of malignant thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimi, Saulat Hasnain; Bhimani, Salima Ahmed; Deedar-Ali-Khawaja, Ranish; Khawaja, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Thymomas are rare malignant epithelial growths, constituting 20% of mediastinal tumours. Resection followed by irradiation may be employed in all thymomas except for stage 1 thymomas. Mediastinal irradiation is associated with coronary artery disease. The mean duration of presentation of post-irradiation coronary artery disease is 16 years (range 3-29 years). In our patient coronary artery disease was found only a year post irradiation. A 55 year old male who presented with complaints of dyspnoea, retrosternal chest pain and heaviness since one year underwent resection for malignant thymoma followed by radiotherapy. He presented with coronary artery disease a year after undergoing mediastinal irradiation. On follow-up, patient was treated successfully by coronary artery bypass graft. This case is an unusual occurrence and suggests that mediastinal irradiation may result in significant coronary artery disease as early as within one year.

  5. Effect of Heart Rate and Coronary Calcification on the Diagnostic Accuracy of the Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Lingdong; Cui, Lianqun; Cheng, Yuntao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yuansheng; Wang, Yong; Xu, Fayun

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography, with a particular focus on the effect of heart rate and calcifications. One hundred and nine patients with suspected coronary disease were divided into 2 groups according to a mean heart rate ( 400). Next, the effect of heart rate and calcification on the accuracy of coronary artery stenosis detection was analyzed by using an invasive coronary angiography as a reference standard. Coronary segments of less than 1.5 mm in diameter in an American Heart Association (AHA) 15-segment model were independently assessed. The mean heart rate during the scan was 71.8 bpm, whereas the mean Agatston score was 226.5. Of the 1,588 segments examined, 1,533 (97%) were assessable. A total of 17 patients had calcium scores above 400 Agatston U, whereas 50 had heart rates ≥ 70 bpm. Overall the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for significant stenoses were: 95%, 91%, 65%, and 99% (by segment), respectively and 97%, 90%, 81%, and 91% (by artery), respectively (n = 475). Heart rate showed no significant impact on lesion detection; however, vessel calcification did show a significant impact on accuracy of assessment for coronary segments. The specificity, PPV and accuracy were 96%, 80%, and 96% (by segment), respectively for an Agatston score less than 100% and 99%, 96% and 98% (by artery). For an Agatston score of greater to or equal to 400 the specificity, PPV and accuracy were reduced to 79%, 55%, and 83% (by segment), respectively and to 79%, 69%, and 85% (by artery), respectively. The DSCT provides a high rate of accuracy for the detection of significant coronary artery disease, even in patients with high heart rates and evidence of coronary calcification. However, patients with severe coronary calcification (> 400 U) remain a challenge to diagnose

  6. Coronary arterial Disease associated with arteriosclerosis in lower extremity: Angiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, Seon Kyu; Han, Joon Koo; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Jae Seung; Han, Man Chung

    1993-01-01

    We performed both peripheral and coronary angiographies in 52 patients with an arteriosclerosis in lower extremities. The severity of arteriosclerotic narrowing of the coronary and peripheral arteries were compared on angiographies. An angiographic vascular score(AVS, 0-5) reflecting the number and the degree of stenosis in 12 lower extremity arteries and three major coronary arteries was assigned to each angiogram and the sun of scores in the lower extremity arteries was compared with the incidence of significant coronary artery disease (more than grade 3) and coronary score. Relation of incidence and severity of vascular stenosis and risk factors (diabetes metallitus, hypertension, smoking, and hypercholesterolemia) was also analyzed. Thirty-four of 52 patients (65%) had an angiographically significant coronary artery disease. Thirteen of these 34 patients (38%) had no clinical symptom and sign of the ischemic heart disease. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence and severity of coronary artery disease between high (more than 30) and low AVS group in lower extremity (p>0.14). All patients had at least one risk factor and 49 of 52 patients (94%) had multiple risk factors. Coronary angiography was normal in there patients with only one risk factors, and angiographically significant coronary artery disease existed in nine of 16 cases (56.3%) with two risk factors. 13 of 17 case (76.5%) with three risk factors, and 12 of 16 cases (75.0%) with all four risk factors. There were no significant correlations between individual risk factors and incidence, severity of arteriosclerosis in coronary and lower extremity arteries. In conclusion, angiographic evaluation of the coronary artery disease in patients with lower extremity arteriosclerosis is necessary because of the high chance of coronary artery disease and difficulty in the prediction of coronary artery disease with a severity of the peripheral arteriosclerosis, presence of various risk

  7. Very high coronary artery calcium score with normal myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is associated with a moderate incidence of severe coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuoness, Salem A.; Goha, Ahmed M.; Romsa, Jonathan G.; Akincioglu, Cigdem; Warrington, James C.; Datta, Sudip; Gambhir, Sanjay; Urbain, Jean-Luc C.; Vezina, William C. [London Health Sciences Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London, ON (Canada); Massel, David R. [London Health Sciences Centre, Division of Cardiology, London, ON (Canada); Martell, Rafael [Private Practice, London, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has limitations in the presence of balanced multivessel disease (MVD) and left main (LM) coronary artery disease, occasionally resulting in false-normal results despite the high cardiovascular risk associated with this condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of severe coronary artery disease (CAD) in the presence of a very high Agatston coronary artery calcium (CAC) score (>1,000) in stable symptomatic patients without known CAD but with normal MPI results. A total of 2,659 prospectively acquired consecutive patients were referred for MPI and evaluation of CAC score by CT. Of this patient population, 8 % (222/2,659) had ischemia without myocardial infarction (MI) on MPI and 11 % (298/2,659) had abnormal MPI (MI and/or ischemia). On presentation 1 % of the patients (26/2,659) were symptomatic, had a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI results. The definition of normal MPI was strict and included a normal hemodynamic response without ischemic ECG changes and normal imaging, particularly absence of transient ischemic dilation. All of these 26 patients with a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI findings underwent cardiac catheterization. Of these 26 patients, 58 % (15/26) had severe disease (≥70 % stenosis) leading to revascularization. Of this group, 47 % (7/15) underwent percutaneous intervention, and 53 % (8/15) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. All of these 15 patients had either MVD (14/15) or LM coronary artery disease (1/15), and represented 0.6 % (15/2,659) of all referred patients (95 % CI 0.3 - 0.9 %). The majority, 90 % (8/9), had severe CAD with typical chest pain. A very high CAC score (>1,000) with normal MPI in a small subset of symptomatically stable patients was associated with a moderate incidence of severe CAD (95 % CI 37 - 77 %). Larger studies and/or a meta-analysis of small studies are needed to more precisely estimate the incidence of CAD in this population. This study also supports

  8. Isoproterenol stress thallium scintigraphy for detecting coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeyuki; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Masuoka, Takeshi; Iida, Kaname; Sugishita, Yasuro; Ito, Iwao; Takeda, Tohru; Toyama, Hinako; Akisada, Masayoshi

    1989-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the diagnostic value of isoproterenol (ISP) thallium scintigraphy. The findings were compared with those of ISP-ECG and exercise thallium scintigraphy. The study population consisted of 24 patients who had a history of chest pain without previous myocardial infarction. ISP was given at increasing doses of 0.02, 0.04, 0.08 μg/mg/min at 3-minutes intervals, and was terminated for any of the following reasons: angina, significant arrhythmia, significant ST segment depression, or target heart rate. Thallium scintigrams were obtained immediately after terminating ISP infusion, and after a 3-hour delay, redistribution scans were obtained. Scintigrams were considered positive when a reversible defect was present. After stress tests, coronary angiography was performed. According to the presence or absence of significant coronary artery stenosis, the patients were divided into coronary artery disease (CAD) group (n=12) and so-called normal coronary (NC) group (n=12). Among 12 patients in the CAD group, ISP induced anginal pain in six (50%), and ISP-ECT and ISP thallium scintigraphy were positive in 10 (83%) and in 11 (92%), compared with four(33%), four(33%) and two (17%) in the NC group. These data indicate that ISP-ECG had a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 67%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 75%; and the corresponding figures for ISP thallium scintigraphy were 92%, 83%, and 88%. Among nine patients who underwent both ISP thallium scintgraphy and exercise thallium scintigraphy, all patients, except for one false negative case on ISP thallium scintigraphy, were correctly diagnosed. No serious complications occurred in association with the ISP infusion test. ISP thallium scintigraphy was considered to be a safe, sensitive, and specific method for diagnosing CAD when exercise tests were intolerable. (N.K.)

  9. The genetics of coronary heart disease: the contribution of twin studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, A.; van Baal, G.C.M.; McCarron, P.; de Lange, M.; Soerensen, T.I.A.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Kyvik, K.; Pedersen, N.L.; Spector, T.D.; Andrew, T.; Patterson, C.; Whitfield, J.B.; Zhu, G.; Martin, N.G.; Kaprio, J; Boomsma, D.I.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the decline in coronary heart disease in many European countries, the disease remains an enormous public health problem. Although we know a great deal about environmental risk factors for coronary heart disease, a heritable component was recognized a long time ago. The earliest and best

  10. Factors associated with coronary artery disease and stroke in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokma, Jouke P.; Zegstroo, Ineke; Kuijpers, Joey M.; Konings, Thelma C.; van Kimmenade, Roland R. J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Kiès, Philippine; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2017-01-01

    To determine factors associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and ischaemic stroke in ageing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients. We performed a multicentre case-control study, using data from the national CONgenital CORvitia (CONCOR) registry to identify ACHD patients within five

  11. THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS OF GENETIC RISK VARIANTS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Kumar Srivastava

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This review covers therapeutic implication of genetic risk variant responsible for coronary artery disease by utilising the highdensity single-nucleotide microarrays to screen the entire human genome. The sequence of the human genome provides the blueprint for life. Approximately, 99.5% of the human genome Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA sequence is identical among humans with 0.5% of the genome sequence (15 million bps accounting for all individual differences. MATERIALS AND METHODS The new technology of the computerised chip array of millions of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs as Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA markers makes it possible to study and detect genetic predisposition to common polygenic disorders such as Coronary Artery Disease (CAD. The sample sizes required for these studies are massive and large; worldwide consortiums such as Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM study have been formed to accommodate this requirement. After the identification of 9p21 progress to detect genetic predisposition has been remarkable. RESULTS There are currently a total of 50 genetic risk variants predisposing to CAD of genome-wide significance with confirmation in independent populations. Rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency, MAF <5% will require direct sequencing to detect genetic predisposition. CONCLUSION We can develop new biomarkers for detecting early CAD as well as unique targets for novel therapy. The challenge for the future will be to identify the molecular mechanisms mediating the risk of those genetic risk variants that act through nonconventional risk factors. The ultimate objective for the future is the sequencing and functional analysis of the causative polymorphisms for its therapeutic implications.

  12. Development of new risk score for pre-test probability of obstructive coronary artery disease based on coronary CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Kondo, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideya; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Tarutani, Yasuhiro; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Urabe, Yoji; Konno, Kumiko; Nishizaki, Yuji; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Kihara, Yasuki; Daida, Hiroyuki; Isshiki, Takaaki; Takase, Shinichi

    2015-09-01

    Existing methods to calculate pre-test probability of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) have been established using selected high-risk patients who were referred to conventional coronary angiography. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate our new method for pre-test probability of obstructive CAD using patients who underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA), which could be applicable to a wider range of patient population. Using consecutive 4137 patients with suspected CAD who underwent coronary CTA at our institution, a multivariate logistic regression model including clinical factors as covariates calculated the pre-test probability (K-score) of obstructive CAD determined by coronary CTA. The K-score was compared with the Duke clinical score using the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver-operating characteristic curve. External validation was performed by an independent sample of 319 patients. The final model included eight significant predictors: age, gender, coronary risk factor (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking), history of cerebral infarction, and chest symptom. The AUC of the K-score was significantly greater than that of the Duke clinical score for both derivation (0.736 vs. 0.699) and validation (0.714 vs. 0.688) data sets. Among patients who underwent coronary CTA, newly developed K-score had better pre-test prediction ability of obstructive CAD compared to Duke clinical score in Japanese population.

  13. [Study of serum levels of homocystein, lipids and their peroxidation products in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaia, O L; Fedorova, N V

    2005-01-01

    The subjects of the study were 30 patients with coronary heart disease (19--with stable, and 11--with instable angina), and 15 practically healthy individuals. The study included measurement of the levels of homocysteine (HC), total cholesterol, cholesterol of low-density lipoproteins, cholesterol of high-density lipoproteins, and lipidperoxidation (LP) products (TBA-reactive products), as well as coagulo-fibrinolytic parameters. The study revealed that patients with instable angina had significantly higher levels of HC and TBA-reactive products compared to those with stable angina and healthy controls. HC level correlated with LP processes in CHD patients (r = 0.55). Methionine loading allowed revealing latent hyperhomocysteinemia.

  14. The Myers-Briggs type indicator and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, B M; Fyfe, J H; Carskadon, T G

    1987-01-01

    Researchers have for many years attempted to establish a relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and personality type. In our study, 103 subjects completed Form G of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Comparisons were made between 93 CHD patients and an age-appropriate control group (Group C) on each of the four MBTI dimensions: Extraversion-Introversion, Sensing-Intuition, Thinking-Feeling, and Judging-Perceiving. The comparison between CHD patients and Group C showed that CHD patients were significantly more likely to prefer sensing and feeling.

  15. Education and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Taavi; Vaucher, Julien; Okbay, Aysu; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Malyutina, Sofia; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Fischer, Krista; Veronesi, Giovanni; Palmer, Tom; Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Bobak, Martin; Holmes, Michael V

    2017-08-30

    Objective  To determine whether educational attainment is a causal risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. Design  Mendelian randomisation study, using genetic data as proxies for education to minimise confounding. Setting  The main analysis used genetic data from two large consortia (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D and SSGAC), comprising 112 studies from predominantly high income countries. Findings from mendelian randomisation analyses were then compared against results from traditional observational studies (164 170 participants). Finally, genetic data from six additional consortia were analysed to investigate whether longer education can causally alter the common cardiovascular risk factors. Participants  The main analysis was of 543 733 men and women (from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D and SSGAC), predominantly of European origin. Exposure  A one standard deviation increase in the genetic predisposition towards higher education (3.6 years of additional schooling), measured by 162 genetic variants that have been previously associated with education. Main outcome measure  Combined fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease (63 746 events in CARDIoGRAMplusC4D). Results  Genetic predisposition towards 3.6 years of additional education was associated with a one third lower risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.77; P=3×10 -8 ). This was comparable to findings from traditional observational studies (prevalence odds ratio 0.73, 0.68 to 0.78; incidence odds ratio 0.80, 0.76 to 0.83). Sensitivity analyses were consistent with a causal interpretation in which major bias from genetic pleiotropy was unlikely, although this remains an untestable possibility. Genetic predisposition towards longer education was additionally associated with less smoking, lower body mass index, and a favourable blood lipid profile. Conclusions  This mendelian randomisation study found support for the hypothesis that low education is a causal risk

  16. Comparison of outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention among different coronary subsets (stable and unstable angina pectoris and ST-segment and non-ST-segment myocardial infarction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Joshua P; Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Kitabata, Hironori; Torguson, Rebecca; Omar, Alfazir; Minha, Sa'ar; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-06-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention in the setting of acute myocardial infarction is known to predict stent thrombosis (ST). This study aims to compare the ST rates across different coronary subsets. This was an observational cohort study from a large, single-center registry. Included were 12,198 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting. Patients were categorized according to their clinical presentation: stable angina pectoris (SAP, n = 3,700), unstable angina pectoris (UAP, n = 2,845), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI, n = 4,083), and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, n = 1,570). The study end points were ST rates at 1 year. Patients with STEMI were younger with a lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, except for smoking. More type C lesi