WorldWideScience

Sample records for stable core structure

  1. The Socially Stable Core in Structured Transferable Utility Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herings, P.J.J.; van der Laan, G.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    We consider cooperative games with transferable utility (TU-games), in which we allow for a social structure on the set of players, for instance a hierarchical ordering or a dominance relation.The social structure is utilized to refine the core of the game, being the set of payoffs to the players

  2. An AgI@g-C3N4 hybrid core@shell structure: Stable and enhanced photocatalytic degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Qi, Yuehong; Yang, Jinyi; Cui, Wenquan; Li, Xingang; Zhang, Zisheng

    2015-12-01

    A novel visible-light-active material AgI@g-C3N4 was prepared by ultrasonication/chemisorption method. The core@shell structure AgI@g-C3N4 catalyst showed high efficiency for the degradation of MB under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm). Nearly 96.5% of MB was degraded after 120 min of irradiation in the presence of the AgI@g-C3N4 photocatalyst. Superior stability was also observed in the cyclic runs indicating that the as prepared hybrid composite is highly desirable for the remediation of organic contaminated wastewaters. The improved photocatalytic performance is due to synergistic effects at the interface of AgI and g-C3N4 which can effectively accelerate the charge separation and reinforce the photostability of hybrid composite. The possible mechanism for the photocatalytic activity of AgI@g-C3N4 was tentatively proposed.

  3. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author).

  4. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.A.N.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author)

  5. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  6. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.

    2004-01-01

    Ice cores are the most direct, continuous, and high resolution archive for Late Quaternary paleoclimate reconstruction. Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate migration strategies for New Zealand. (author). 23 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  7. Stable Structures for Distributed Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Eugen DUMITRASCU; Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    For distributed applications, we define the linear, tree and graph structure types with different variants and modalities to aggregate them. The distributed applications have assigned structures that through their characteristics influence the costs of stages for developing cycle and the costs for exploitation, transferred to each user. We also present the quality characteristics of a structure for a stable application, which is focused on stability characteristic. For that characteristic we ...

  8. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.

    2009-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate mitigation strategies for New Zealand. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author). 45 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.

    2009-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate mitigation strategies for New Zealand. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author). 27 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.A.N.

    2012-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate mitigation strategies for New Zealand. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author). 28 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.

    2008-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate mitigation strategies for New Zealand. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author). 27 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.

    2006-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate mitigation strategies for New Zealand. (author). 27 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate mitigation strategies for New Zealand. (author). 27 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertler, N.

    2007-01-01

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Their study helps us to improve our understanding of regional patterns of climate behaviour in Antarctica and its influence on New Zealand, leading to more realistic regional climate models. Such models are needed to sensibly interpret current Antarctic and New Zealand climate variability and for the development of appropriate mitigation strategies for New Zealand. (author). 27 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Core-shell structural nanodiamond@TiN supported Pt nanoparticles as a highly efficient and stable electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuling; Wang, Yanhui; Dong, Liang; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Junjie; Zang, Jianbing; Lu, Jing; Xu, Xipeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Core-shell structural nanodiamond@TiN was used as a novel support for Pt catalysts. • The ND@TiN support possessed a high electrochemical stability than carbon black. • The Pt/ND@TiN showed a higher catalytic activity for MOR and ORR than the Pt/C. • The Pt/ND@TiN demonstrated a much better durability compared with the Pt/C. - Abstract: A novel core-shell support material was designed with nanodiamond (ND) as core possessed excellent stability and TiN as shell improved the conductivity of support. The nano-TiN shell was decorated on the surface of ND by annealing TiO 2 in nitrogen atmosphere, and the obtained ND@TiN was employed to support Pt nanoparticles (NPs). The ND@TiN support and Pt/ND@TiN electrocatalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. ND particles were coated uniformly by the TiN layer and Pt NPs with a mean size of 4.2 nm were highly dispersed on the surface of ND@TiN. The electrochemical results confirmed that the ND@TiN support possessed a much more stability than the carbon black and exhibited a bigger background current density than the ND. The Pt/ND@TiN catalyst showed higher catalytic activity and better stability in methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions compared with the Pt/C and Pt/ND

  16. Stable Structures for Distributed Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen DUMITRASCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For distributed applications, we define the linear, tree and graph structure types with different variants and modalities to aggregate them. The distributed applications have assigned structures that through their characteristics influence the costs of stages for developing cycle and the costs for exploitation, transferred to each user. We also present the quality characteristics of a structure for a stable application, which is focused on stability characteristic. For that characteristic we define the estimated measure indicators for a level. The influence of the factors of stability and the ways for increasing it are thus identified, and at the same time the costs of development stages, the costs of usage and the costs of maintenance to be keep on between limits that assure the global efficiency of application. It is presented the base aspects for distributed applications: definition, peculiarities and importance. The aspects for the development cycle of distributed application are detailed. In this article, we alongside give the mechanisms for building the defined structures and analyze the complexity of the defined structures for a distributed application of a virtual store.

  17. Super-stable Poissonian structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we characterize classes of Poisson processes whose statistical structures are super-stable. We consider a flow generated by a one-dimensional ordinary differential equation, and an ensemble of particles ‘surfing’ the flow. The particles start from random initial positions, and are propagated along the flow by stochastic ‘wave processes’ with general statistics and general cross correlations. Setting the initial positions to be Poisson processes, we characterize the classes of Poisson processes that render the particles’ positions—at all times, and invariantly with respect to the wave processes—statistically identical to their initial positions. These Poisson processes are termed ‘super-stable’ and facilitate the generalization of the notion of stationary distributions far beyond the realm of Markov dynamics. (paper)

  18. Super-stable Poissonian structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we characterize classes of Poisson processes whose statistical structures are super-stable. We consider a flow generated by a one-dimensional ordinary differential equation, and an ensemble of particles ‘surfing’ the flow. The particles start from random initial positions, and are propagated along the flow by stochastic ‘wave processes’ with general statistics and general cross correlations. Setting the initial positions to be Poisson processes, we characterize the classes of Poisson processes that render the particles’ positions—at all times, and invariantly with respect to the wave processes—statistically identical to their initial positions. These Poisson processes are termed ‘super-stable’ and facilitate the generalization of the notion of stationary distributions far beyond the realm of Markov dynamics.

  19. Structure of acid-stable carmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yoko; Sato, Kyoko; Aoki, Hiromitsu; Ichi, Takahito; Koda, Takatoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-02-01

    Acid-stable carmine has recently been distributed in the U.S. market because of its good acid stability, but it is not permitted in Japan. We analyzed and determined the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine, in order to establish an analytical method for it. Carminic acid was transformed into a different type of pigment, named acid-stable carmine, through amination when heated in ammonia solution. The features of the structure were clarified using a model compound, purpurin, in which the orientation of hydroxyl groups on the A ring of the anthraquinone skeleton is the same as that of carminic acid. By spectroscopic means and the synthesis of acid-stable carmine and purpurin derivatives, the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine was established as 4-aminocarminic acid, a novel compound.

  20. Sub-structure formation in starless cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, C.; Galli, D.; Verdini, A.; Del Zanna, L.; Landi, S.

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by recent observational searches of sub-structure in starless molecular cloud cores, we investigate the evolution of density perturbations on scales smaller than the Jeans length embedded in contracting isothermal clouds, adopting the same formalism developed for the expanding Universe and the solar wind. We find that initially small amplitude, Jeans-stable perturbations (propagating as sound waves in the absence of a magnetic field) are amplified adiabatically during the contraction, approximately conserving the wave action density, until they either become non-linear and steepen into shocks at a time tnl, or become gravitationally unstable when the Jeans length decreases below the scale of the perturbations at a time tgr. We evaluate analytically the time tnl at which the perturbations enter the non-linear stage using a Burgers' equation approach, and we verify numerically that this time marks the beginning of the phase of rapid dissipation of the kinetic energy of the perturbations. We then show that for typical values of the rms Mach number in molecular cloud cores, tnl is smaller than tgr, and therefore density perturbations likely dissipate before becoming gravitational unstable. Solenoidal modes grow at a faster rate than compressible modes, and may eventually promote fragmentation through the formation of vortical structures.

  1. Composite Structure with Origami Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    spherical linkages using the mechanism theory . Precise motions of origami were identified. In the second case, we identified a link between thick panel...operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism . Using theory , we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in...structures. Our research has paved the way for much broader utilization of such structures in aeronautics and aerospace industries. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  2. Highly stable supercapacitors with conducting polymer core-shell electrodes for energy storage applications

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2015-01-14

    Conducting polymers such as polyaniline (PAni) show a great potential as pseudocapacitor materials for electrochemical energy storage applications. Yet, the cycling instability of PAni resulting from structural alteration is a major hurdle to its commercial application. Here, the development of nanostructured PAni-RuO2 core-shell arrays as electrodes for highly stable pseudocapacitors with excellent energy storage performance is reported. A thin layer of RuO2 grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on PAni nanofibers plays a crucial role in stabilizing the PAni pseudocapacitors and improving their energy density. The pseudocapacitors, which are based on optimized PAni-RuO2 core-shell nanostructured electrodes, exhibit very high specific capacitance (710 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1) and power density (42.2 kW kg-1) at an energy density of 10 Wh kg-1. Furthermore, they exhibit remarkable capacitance retention of ≈88% after 10 000 cycles at very high current density of 20 A g-1, superior to that of pristine PAni-based pseudocapacitors. This prominently enhanced electrochemical stability successfully demonstrates the buffering effect of ALD coating on PAni, which provides a new approach for the preparation of metal-oxide/conducting polymer hybrid electrodes with excellent electrochemical performance.

  3. DFT computations of the lattice constant, stable atomic structure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the most stable atomic structure and lattice constant of Fullerenes (C60). FHI-aims DFT code was used to predict the stable structure and the computational lattice constant of C60. These were compared with known experimental structures and lattice constants of C60. The results obtained showed that ...

  4. Highly stable supercapacitors with conducting polymer core-shell electrodes for energy storage applications

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xianbin; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Wei, Nini; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    commercial application. Here, the development of nanostructured PAni-RuO2 core-shell arrays as electrodes for highly stable pseudocapacitors with excellent energy storage performance is reported. A thin layer of RuO2 grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD

  5. Multi-Stable Morphing Cellular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    stiffness on critical buckling load and arch stres - ses. It should be noted that although the arches in these studies snapped-through, they did not...switch roles in moving the VMT back from the second to the first stable equilibrium state. A prototype is designed and fabricated and the transition...pulling forward on the insert on the right blade and assisting its deployment. During this process the cable 3-4-1 goes slack and plays no role , but if

  6. Core support structure for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkamp, E.; Tautz, J.; Ries, H.

    1979-01-01

    A core support structure for nuclear power plants includes a grid of mutually crossing bridges and a support ring surrounding the grid and connected to ends of the outer bridges of the grid, the grid being formed of profile rod crosses having legs of given length, respective legs of pairs of adjacent crosses abutting one another endwise to form together a side of the smallest mesh opening of the grid, and weld means for securing the profile rod crosses to one another at the mutually abutting ends of the legs thereof; and method of producing the foregoing core support structure

  7. Stable pelagic vertebrate community structure through extreme Paleogene greenhouse conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, E. C.; Friedman, M.; Hull, P. M.; Hunt, G.; Norris, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    The species composition (structure) and energy transfer (function) of an ecosystem is reflected by the presence and type of consumers that it supports. Here we use ichthyoliths, microfossil fish teeth and shark denticles, to assess the ecological variability of the pelagic fish community structure and composition from the Late Cretaceous to the middle Eocene from a drill core in the South Pacific gyre (DSDP Site 596). We find that the overall vertebrate community structure, as measured by the relative abundance of sharks to ray-finned fishes, has a punctuated change at the Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction. The vertebrate community structure remained stable throughout the Paleogene despite a five-fold increase in overall abundance of ichthyoliths during the extreme greenhouse of the Early Eocene. Further, we use a novel system to quantify the morphological variation in fish teeth. We find that the morphospace occupied by the tooth assemblage is conserved throughout the interval, with a slight expansion following the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction, and the evolution of a distinct morphotype-group around the Paleocene-Eocene boundary. While there are elevated rates of morphotype origination and extinction following the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction, the extreme greenhouse warming of the Early Eocene and associated increase in fish production produce near-zero origination and extinction rates. The relative stability in composition of the pelagic vertebrate community during intervals of extreme climate change and across large ranges of total fish accumulation, suggests that pelagic ecosystem structure is robust to climate events, and that the overall structure of the pelagic fish community may be decoupled from both climate and ecosystem function.

  8. On the consequences of strong stable stratification at the top of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy

    1990-01-01

    The consequences of strong stable stratification at the top of the earth's fluid outer core are considered, concentrating on the generation of the geomagnetic secular variation. It is assumed that the core near the core-mantle boundary is both strongly stably stratified and free of Lorentz forces: it is found that this set of assumptions severely limits the class of possible motions, none of which is compatible with the geomagnetic secular variation. Relaxing either assumption is adequate: tangentially geostrophic flows are consistent with the secular variation if the assumption that the core is strongly stably stratified is relaxed (while retaining the assumption that Lorentz forces are negligible); purely toroidal flows may explain the secular variation if Lorentz forces are included.

  9. One-pot synthesis of stable water soluble Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hao; Gao Xue; Liu Siyu; Su Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Department of Analytical Chemistry (China)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper, Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell-doped quantum dots (d-dots) with 3-mercaptopropionic acid as the stabilizer are successfully synthesized through a simple one-pot synthesis procedure in aqueous solution. The average diameter of Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell d-dots is about 2.9 nm, which is lager than that of Mn:ZnSe cores (about 1.9 nm). The optical features and structure of the obtained Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots have been characterized by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photostability against UV irradiation and chemical stability against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} etching have been studied, and the results showed that the prepared Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell d-dots are more stable than CdTe quantum dots prepared in aqueous solution. Finally, the resulting core/shell quantum dots are used as fluorescent label in human osteoblast-like HepG2 cell imaging.

  10. Jealousy Graphs: Structure and Complexity of Decentralized Stable Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    REPORT Jealousy Graphs: Structure and Complexity of Decentralized Stable Matching 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The stable matching...Franceschetti 858-822-2284 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - Jealousy Graphs: Structure and...market. Using this structure, we are able to provide a ner analysis of the complexity of a subclass of decentralized matching markets. Jealousy

  11. Influence of precipitating light elements on stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, J. G.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary is often invoked to explain anomalously low seismic velocities in this region. Diffusion of light elements like oxygen or, more slowly, silicon could create a stabilizing chemical gradient in the outermost core. Heat flow less than that conducted along the adiabatic gradient may also produce thermal stratification. However, reconciling either origin with the apparent longevity (>3.45 billion years) of Earth's magnetic field remains difficult. Sub-isentropic heat flow would not drive a dynamo by thermal convection before the nucleation of the inner core, which likely occurred less than one billion years ago and did not instantly change the heat flow. Moreover, an oxygen-enriched layer below the core/mantle boundary—the source of thermal buoyancy—could establish double-diffusive convection where motion in the bulk fluid is suppressed below a slowly advancing interface. Here we present new models that explain both stable stratification and a long-lived dynamo by considering ongoing precipitation of magnesium oxide and/or silicon dioxide from the core. Lithophile elements may partition into iron alloys under extreme pressure and temperature during Earth's formation, especially after giant impacts. Modest core/mantle heat flow then drives compositional convection—regardless of thermal conductivity—since their solubility is strongly temperature-dependent. Our models begin with bulk abundances for the mantle and core determined by the redox conditions during accretion. We then track equilibration between the core and a primordial basal magma ocean followed by downward diffusion of light elements. Precipitation begins at a depth that is most sensitive to temperature and oxygen abundance and then creates feedbacks with the radial thermal and chemical profiles. Successful models feature a stable layer with low seismic velocity (which mandates multi-component evolution since a single light element typically

  12. Structure of a Stable G-Hairpin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajarský, M.; Zivkovic, M.L.; Stadlbauer, Petr; Pagano, B.; Fiala, R.; Amato, J.; Tomáška, L´.; Šponer, Jiří; Plavec, J.; Trantírek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 10 (2017), s. 3591-3594 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28310S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13721S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : g-quadruplex structures * human telomeric dna * single-stranded-dna * g-triplex Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  13. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2015-01-01

    of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping...

  14. High precision and stable structures for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Da Mota Silva, S; Hauviller, Claude

    1999-01-01

    The central detectors used in High Energy Physics Experiments require the use of light and stable structures capable of supporting delicate and precise radiation detection elements. These structures need to be highly stable under environmental conditions where external vibrations, high radiation levels, temperature and humidity gradients should be taken into account. Their main design drivers are high dimension and dynamic stability, high stiffness to mass ratio and large radiation length. For most applications, these constraints lead us to choose Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics ( CFRP) as structural element. The construction of light and stable structures with CFRP for these applications can be achieved by careful design engineering and further confirmation at the prototyping phase. However, the experimental environment can influence their characteristics and behavior. In this case, theuse of adaptive structures could become a solution for this problem. We are studying structures in CFRP with bonded piezoel...

  15. Mitotic evolution of Plasmodium falciparum shows a stable core genome but recombination in antigen families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina E R Bopp

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites elude eradication attempts both within the human host and across nations. At the individual level, parasites evade the host immune responses through antigenic variation. At the global level, parasites escape drug pressure through single nucleotide variants and gene copy amplification events conferring drug resistance. Despite their importance to global health, the rates at which these genomic alterations emerge have not been determined. We studied the complete genomes of different Plasmodium falciparum clones that had been propagated asexually over one year in the presence and absence of drug pressure. A combination of whole-genome microarray analysis and next-generation deep resequencing (totaling 14 terabases revealed a stable core genome with only 38 novel single nucleotide variants appearing in seventeen evolved clones (avg. 5.4 per clone. In clones exposed to atovaquone, we found cytochrome b mutations as well as an amplification event encompassing the P. falciparum multidrug resistance associated protein (mrp1 on chromosome 1. We observed 18 large-scale (>1 kb on average deletions of telomere-proximal regions encoding multigene families, involved in immune evasion (9.5×10(-6 structural variants per base pair per generation. Six of these deletions were associated with chromosomal crossovers generated during mitosis. We found only minor differences in rates between genetically distinct strains and between parasites cultured in the presence or absence of drug. Using these derived mutation rates for P. falciparum (1.0-9.7×10(-9 mutations per base pair per generation, we can now model the frequency at which drug or immune resistance alleles will emerge under a well-defined set of assumptions. Further, the detection of mitotic recombination events in var gene families illustrates how multigene families can arise and change over time in P. falciparum. These results will help improve our understanding of how P. falciparum

  16. Mitotic Evolution of Plasmodium falciparum Shows a Stable Core Genome but Recombination in Antigen Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Selina E. R.; Manary, Micah J.; Bright, A. Taylor; Johnston, Geoffrey L.; Dharia, Neekesh V.; Luna, Fabio L.; McCormack, Susan; Plouffe, David; McNamara, Case W.; Walker, John R.; Fidock, David A.; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria parasites elude eradication attempts both within the human host and across nations. At the individual level, parasites evade the host immune responses through antigenic variation. At the global level, parasites escape drug pressure through single nucleotide variants and gene copy amplification events conferring drug resistance. Despite their importance to global health, the rates at which these genomic alterations emerge have not been determined. We studied the complete genomes of different Plasmodium falciparum clones that had been propagated asexually over one year in the presence and absence of drug pressure. A combination of whole-genome microarray analysis and next-generation deep resequencing (totaling 14 terabases) revealed a stable core genome with only 38 novel single nucleotide variants appearing in seventeen evolved clones (avg. 5.4 per clone). In clones exposed to atovaquone, we found cytochrome b mutations as well as an amplification event encompassing the P. falciparum multidrug resistance associated protein (mrp1) on chromosome 1. We observed 18 large-scale (>1 kb on average) deletions of telomere-proximal regions encoding multigene families, involved in immune evasion (9.5×10−6 structural variants per base pair per generation). Six of these deletions were associated with chromosomal crossovers generated during mitosis. We found only minor differences in rates between genetically distinct strains and between parasites cultured in the presence or absence of drug. Using these derived mutation rates for P. falciparum (1.0–9.7×10−9 mutations per base pair per generation), we can now model the frequency at which drug or immune resistance alleles will emerge under a well-defined set of assumptions. Further, the detection of mitotic recombination events in var gene families illustrates how multigene families can arise and change over time in P. falciparum. These results will help improve our understanding of how P. falciparum evolves to

  17. Dynamics and control of twisting bi-stable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Andres F.; van Gemmeren, Valentin; Anderson, Aaron J.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2018-02-01

    Compliance-based morphing structures have the potential to offer large shape adaptation, high stiffness and low weight, while reducing complexity, friction, and scalability problems of mechanism based systems. A promising class of structure that enables these characteristics are multi-stable structures given their ability to exhibit large deflections and rotations without the expensive need for continuous actuation, with the latter only required intermittently. Furthermore, multi-stable structures exhibit inherently fast response due to the snap-through instability governing changes between stable states, enabling rapid configuration switching between the discrete number of programmed shapes of the structure. In this paper, the design and utilisation of the inherent nonlinear dynamics of bi-stable twisting I-beam structures for actuation with low strain piezoelectric materials is presented. The I-beam structure consists of three compliant components assembled into a monolithic single element, free of moving parts, and showing large deflections between two stable states. Finite element analysis is utilised to uncover the distribution of strain across the width of the flange, guiding the choice of positioning for piezoelectric actuators. In addition, the actuation authority is maximised by calculating the generalised coupling coefficient for different positions of the piezoelectric actuators. The results obtained are employed to tailor and test I-beam designs exhibiting desired large deflection between stable states, while still enabling the activation of snap-through with the low strain piezoelectric actuators. To this end, the dynamic response of the I-beams to piezoelectric excitation is investigated, revealing that resonant excitations are insufficient to dynamically trigger snap-through. A novel bang-bang control strategy, which exploits the nonlinear dynamics of the structure successfully triggers both single and constant snap-through between the stable states

  18. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2002-01-01

    We present studies of the structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. alpha-Fe nanoparticles were fabricated by sputtering and subsequently covered with a protective nanocrystalline oxide shell consisting of either maghaemite (gamma-Fe2O3) or partially oxidized...... magnetite (Fe3O4). We observed that the nanoparticles were stable against further oxidation, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at high applied magnetic fields and low temperatures revealed a stable form of partly oxidized magnetite. The nanocrystalline structure of the oxide shell results in strong canting...... of the spin structure in the oxide shell, which thereby modifies the magnetic properties of the core-shell nanoparticles....

  19. Clipperton Atoll Core 2B Stable Isotope (delta 13C, delta 18O) Data for 1893 to 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 101 year stable isotope record from P. lobata, core 4B, Clipperton Atoll, eastern Pacific. Sampling at annual and 12/year resolution, files clipperton.4B.iso.txt and...

  20. Clipperton Atoll Core 3C Stable Isotope (delta 13C, delta 18O) Data for 1893 to 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 101 year stable isotope record from P. lobata, core 4B, Clipperton Atoll, eastern Pacific. Sampling at annual and 12/year resolution, files clipperton.4B.iso.txt and...

  1. Clipperton Atoll Core 4B Stable Isotope (delta 13C, delta 18O) Data for 1893 to 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 101 year stable isotope record from P. lobata, core 4B, Clipperton Atoll, eastern Pacific. Sampling at annual and 12/year resolution, files clipperton.4B.iso.txt and...

  2. Structural integrity of graphite core support structures of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Toyota, Junji; Sato, Sadao; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1990-02-01

    The graphite core support structures (GCSSs) of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) are an arrangement of graphite blocks and posts that support the core and provide a lower plenum and a hot-leg path for the primary coolant. The GCSSs are designed not to be replaced by new items during plant life time (about twenty years). To maintain structural integrity of the GCSSs, conservative design has been made sufficiently on the basis of structural tests. The present study confirmed that reactor safety was still maintained even if failure and destruction of the GCSSs is supposed to occur. The GCSSs are fabricated under strict quality control and the observation and surveillance programs are planed to examine the structual integrity of the GCSSs during an operation. This paper describes the concept of design and quality control and summarizes structural tests, observation and surveillance programs. (author)

  3. Development of Structural Core Components for Breeder Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2013-01-01

    Core structural materials: • The desire is to have only fuel in the core, structural material form 25% of the total core: – To support and to retain the fuel in position; – Provide necessary ducts to make coolant flow through & transfer/remove heat. • For 500 MWe FBR with Oxide fuel (Peak Linear Power 450 W/cm), total fuel pins required in the core are of the order 39277 pins (both inner & outer core Fuel SA); • Considering 217 pins/Fuel SA there are 181 Fuel SA wrapper tubes • These structural materials see hostile core with max temperature and neutron flux

  4. Structural strength of core graphite bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Futakawa, M.

    1987-01-01

    A HTR core consists of fuel, hot plenum, reflector and thermal barrier blocks. Each graphite block is supported by three thin cylindrical graphite bars called support post. Static and dynamic core loads are transmitted by the support posts to the thermal barrier blocks and a support plate. These posts are in contact with the blocks through hemispherical post seats to absorb the relative displacement caused by seismic force and the difference of thermal expansion of materials at the time of the start-up and shutdown of a reactor. The mixed fracture criterion of principal stress and modified Mohr-Coulomb's theory as well as the fracture criterion of principal stress based on elastic stress analysis was discussed in connection with the application to HTR graphite components. The buckling fracture of a support post was taken in consideration as one of the fracture modes. The effect that the length/diameter ratio of a post, small rotation and the curvature of post ends and seats exerted on the fracture strength was studied by using IG-110 graphite. Contacting stress analysis was carried out by using the structural analysis code 'COSMOS-7'. The experimental method, the analysis of buckling strength and the results are reported. The fracture of a support post is caused by the mixed mode of bending deformation, split fracture and shearing fracture. (Kako, I.)

  5. Geostatistical analysis and isoscape of ice core derived water stable isotope records in an Antarctic macro region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani, István Gábor; Leuenberger, Markus; Kohán, Balázs; Kern, Zoltán

    2017-09-01

    Water stable isotopes preserved in ice cores provide essential information about polar precipitation. In the present study, multivariate regression and variogram analyses were conducted on 22 δ2H and 53 δ18O records from 60 ice cores covering the second half of the 20th century. Taking the multicollinearity of the explanatory variables into account, as also the model's adjusted R2 and its mean absolute error, longitude, elevation and distance from the coast were found to be the main independent geographical driving factors governing the spatial δ18O variability of firn/ice in the chosen Antarctic macro region. After diminishing the effects of these factors, using variography, the weights for interpolation with kriging were obtained and the spatial autocorrelation structure of the dataset was revealed. This indicates an average area of influence with a radius of 350 km. This allows the determination of the areas which are as yet not covered by the spatial variability of the existing network of ice cores. Finally, the regional isoscape was obtained for the study area, and this may be considered the first step towards a geostatistically improved isoscape for Antarctica.

  6. Highly stable thin film transistors using multilayer channel structure

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pradipta K.; Wang, Zhenwei; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    We report highly stable gate-bias stress performance of thin film transistors (TFTs) using zinc oxide (ZnO)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) multilayer structure as the channel layer. Positive and negative gate-bias stress stability of the TFTs was measured

  7. Stable isotopes and their relationship to temperature and precipitation as recorded in low latitude ice cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.G.; Davis, M.E.; Pin-Nan, Lin

    2002-01-01

    The potential of stable isotopic ratios ( 18 O/ 16 O and 2 H/ 1 H) in mid to low latitude glaciers as modern tools for paleoclimate reconstruction is reviewed. The isotopic composition of precipitation should be viewed not only as a powerful proxy indicator of climate, but also as an additional parameter for understanding climate-induced changes in the water cycle, on both regional and global scales. To interpret quantitatively the ice core isotopic records, the response of the isotopic composition of precipitation to long-term fluctuations of key climatic parameters (temperature, precipitation amount, relative humidity) over a given area should be known. Furthermore, it is important to establish the transfer functions that relate the climate-induced changes of the isotopic composition of precipitation to the isotope record preserved in the glacier. The factors that govern the values of stable isotopes in snowfall are enigmatic and as yet no satisfactory model has been developed to link them directly with any one meteorological or oceanographic factor. This is particularly problematic in the high altitude glaciers in the tropics, where complications are present due not only to continental effects, but also to altitude effects and convective air mass instability, particularly in the monsoon climates of the tropics. This paper presents long and short-term perspectives of isotopic composition variations in ice cores spanning the last 25,000 years from the mid- to low-latitude glaciers. The isotopic records will also be examined as a function of the altitude of the individual coring sites which ranges from 5325 meters to 7200 meters. On the short, term isotopic records from ice cores from the Andes of South America, the Tibetan Plateau and Kilimanjaro in Africa through the year 2000 will be presented. All the tropical glaciers for which data exist are disappearing, and these sites show isotopic enrichment in the 20th century that suggests that large scale low latitude

  8. An Ocean Sediment Core-Top Calibration of Foraminiferal (Cibicides) Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Mix, A. C.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Peterson, C.; Mackensen, A.; Cartapanis, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) measured on calcium carbonate shells of benthic foraminifera (cibicides) from late Holocene sediments (δ13CCib) are compiled and compared with newly updated datasets of contemporary water-column δ13C observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) as the initial core-top calibration of the international Ocean Circulation and CarbonCycling (OC3) project. Using selection criteria based on the spatial distance between samples we find high correlation between δ13CCib and natural (pre-industrial) δ13CDIC, confirming earlier work. However, our analysis reveals systematic differences such as higher (lower) δ13CCib values in the Atlantic (Indian and Pacific) oceans. Regression analyses are impacted by anthropogenic carbon and suggest significant carbonate ion, temperature, and pressure effects, consistent with lab experiments with planktonic foraminifera and theory. The estimated standard error of core-top sediment data is generally σ ~= 0.25 ‰, whereas modern foram data from the South Atlantic indicate larger errors (σ ~= 0.4 ‰).

  9. Recent developments in low cost stable structures for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, T.C.; Grastataro, C.; Smith, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) is advancing the development of low cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in spacecraft and stable structures. The use of advanced composites is well developed, but the application of an all-composite tracker structure has never been achieved. This paper investigates the application of composite technology to the design and fabrication of an all-composite spacecraft bus for small satellites, using technology directly applicable to central tracking in a high luminosity environment. The satellite program Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) is the second in a series of satellites to be launched into orbit for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper will discuss recent developments in the area of low cost composites, used for either spacecraft or ultra stable applications in high energy physics (HEP) detectors. The use of advanced composites is a relatively new development in the area of HEP. The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) spawned a new generation of Trackers which made extensive use of graphite fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite systems. LANL has designed a structure employing new fabrication technology. This concept will lower the cost of composite structures to a point that they may now compete with conventional materials. This paper will discuss the design, analysis and proposed fabrication of a small satellite structure. Central tracking structures using advanced materials capable of operating in an adverse environment typical of that found in a high luminosity collider could use identical concepts

  10. New Polymorph of Fe3O4 Stable at Core-Mantle Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetite Fe3O4 (and its high-pressure polymorphs) is one of the most studied iron bearing minerals. One reason for the interest in magnetite is that it contains both Fe2+ and Fe3+, which is especially important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of Earth's deep interior. Early studies on magnetite debated the nature of the structural phase transition at 35 GPa [1-4]. This high-pressure structure was shown to be of the CaTi2O4-type [5], but with Fe3+ occupying multiple sites. Furthermore, at pressures above 65 GPa a second structural transition to a Pmma space group was shown to take place [5], similar to that in Fe3-xTixO4 solid solution [6]. Other studies have focused on the P-T stability of Fe3O4. Early studies by Lazor et al. [7] predicted that Fe3O4 might disproportionate into FeO and h-Fe2O3 at 50 GPa. Other studies suggested that the high-pressure phase should be stable up to 100 GPa [3]. A more recent experimental study by Ricolleau and Fei [8] revealed that Fe3O4 is stable at least up to 103 GPa. Thus far, structural studies of Fe3O4 have been limited to pressures below 105 GPa. We have studied Fe3O4 up to pressures of 175 GPa and temperatures above 4000K, using diamond anvil cells in combination with synchrotron x-ray diffraction and an online pulsed laser-heating system to study the stability of Fe3O4 at relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Our results show that Fe3O4 is stable up to at least 176 GPa and 4200 K. We have discovered a new polymorph of Fe3O4 at these high P-T conditions. This new phase is stable in the pressure range of at least 100Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 15, 7697 (2003). [4] Xu et al. Pysical Review B 70, 174106 (2004). [5] Greenberg et al. Physical Review B 95, 195150 (2017). [6] Yamanaka et al. American Mineralogist 98, 736 (2013). [7] Lazor et al. Journal of Geophysical Research 109, B05201 (2004). [8] Ricolleau and Fei. American Mineralogist 101, 719 (2016).

  11. Chamber Core Structures for Fairing Acoustic Mitigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, Steven A; Henderson, Kyle; Williams, Andrew; Ardelean, Emil

    2007-01-01

    .... A composite chamber core fairing consists of many axial tubes sandwiched between face sheets, tubes that can be used as acoustic dampers to reduce low-frequency interior noise with virtually no added mass...

  12. Stable and pH-responsive core-shell nanoparticles based on HEC and PMAA networks via template copolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Jin, Q.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, J.

    2011-10-01

    Taking advantage of the specific hydrogen bonding interactions, stable and pH-responsive core-shell nanoparticles based on hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) and polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) networks, with a size ranging from 190 to 250 nm, can be efficiently prepared via facile one-step co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) on HEC template in water. Using dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic light scattering, fluorescence spectrometry, thermo-gravimetric analysis, TEM, and AFM observations, the influence of crosslinker MBA as well as the reaction parameters were studied. The results show that after the introduction of crosslinker MBA, the nanoparticles became less compact; their size exhibited a smaller pH sensitivity, and their stability against pH value was improved greatly. Furthermore, the size, structure, and pH response of the nanoparticles can be adjusted via varying the reaction parameters: nanoparticles of smaller size, more compact structure, and higher swelling capacity were produced as pH value of the reaction medium increased or the HEC/MAA ratio decreased; while nanoparticles of smaller size, less compact structure and smaller swelling capacity were produced as the total feeding concentration increased.

  13. Stable structures of coalitions in competitive and altruistic military teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurangzeb, M.; Mikulski, D.; Hudas, G.; Lewis, F. L.; Gu, Edward

    2013-05-01

    In heterogeneous battlefield teams, the balance between team and individual objectives forms the basis for the internal topological structure of teams. The stability of team structure is studied by presenting a graphical coalitional game (GCG) with Positional Advantage (PA). PA is Shapley value strengthened by the Axioms of value. The notion of team and individual objectives is studied by defining altruistic and competitive contribution made by an individual; altruistic and competitive contributions made by an agent are components of its total or marginal contribution. Moreover, the paper examines dynamic team effects by defining three online sequential decision games based on marginal, competitive and altruistic contributions of the individuals towards team. The stable graphs under these sequential decision games are studied and found to be structurally connected, complete, or tree respectively.

  14. Support structure for reactor core constituent element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Yasuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    A connection pipe having an entrance nozzle inserted therein as a reactor core constituent element is protruded above the upper surface of a reactor core support plate. A through hole is disposed to the protruding portion of the connection pipe. The through hole and a through hole disposed to the reactor core support plate are connected by a communication pipe. A shear rod is disposed in a horizontal portion at the inside of the communication pipe and is supported by a spring horizontally movably. Further, a groove is disposed at a position of the entrance nozzle opposing to the shear rod. The shear rod is urged out of the communication pipe by the pressure of the high pressure plenum and the top end portion of the shear rod is inserted to the groove of the entrance nozzle during operation. Accordingly, the shear rod is positioned in a state where it is extended from the through hole of the communication pipe to the groove of the entrance nozzle. This can mechanically constrain the rising of the reactor core constituent elements by the shear rod upon occurrence of earthquakes. (I.N.)

  15. Multiplant strategy under core-periphery structure

    OpenAIRE

    Tsubota, Kenmei

    2012-01-01

    A typical implicit assumption on monopolistic competition models for trade and economic geography is that firms can produce and sell only at one place. This paper fallows endogenous determination of the number of plants in a new economic geography model and examine the stable outcomes of organization choice between single-plant and multi-plant in two regions. We explicitly consider the firms' trade-off between larger economies of scale under single plant configuration and the saving in interr...

  16. Bioinspired Omnidirectional Self-Stable Reflectors with Multiscale Hierarchical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Mu, Zhengzhi; Li, Bo; Feng, Xiaoming; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2017-08-30

    Structured surfaces, demonstrating various wondrous physicochemical performances, are ubiquitous phenomena in nature. Butterfly wings with impressive structural colors are an interesting example for multiscale hierarchical structures (MHSs). However, most natural structural colors are relatively unstable and highly sensitive to incident angles, which limit their potential practical applications to a certain extent. Here, we reported a bioinspired color reflector with omnidirectional reflective self-stable (ORS) properties, which is inspired by the wing scales of Papilio palinurus butterfly. Through experimental exploration and theoretical analysis, it was found that the vivid colors of such butterfly wings are structure-based and possess novel ORS properties, which attributes to the multiple optical actions between light and the complex structures coupling the inverse opal-like structures (IOSs) and stacked lamellar ridges (SLRs). On the basis of this, we designed and successfully fabricated the SiO 2 -based bioinspired color reflectors (BCRs) through a facile and effective biotemplate method. It was confirmed that the MHSs in biotemplate are inherited by the obtained SiO 2 -based BCRs. More importantly, the SiO 2 -based BCRs also demonstrated the similar ORS properties in a wide wavelength range. We forcefully anticipate that the reported MHS-based ORS performance discovered in butterfly wing scales here could offer new thoughts for scientists to solve unstable reflection issues in particular optical field. The involved biotemplate fabrication method offers a facile and effective strategy for fabricating functional nanomaterials or bioinspired nanodevices with 3D complex nanostructures, such as structured optical devices, displays, and optoelectronic equipment.

  17. Finding the core : Network structure in interbank markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in 't Veld, Daan; van Lelyveld, Iman

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the network structure of interbank markets. Using a dataset of interbank exposures in the Netherlands, we corroborate the recent hypothesis that the core periphery model is a 'stylised fact' of interbank markets. We find a core of highly connected banks intermediating between

  18. Highly stable thin film transistors using multilayer channel structure

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pradipta K.

    2015-03-09

    We report highly stable gate-bias stress performance of thin film transistors (TFTs) using zinc oxide (ZnO)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) multilayer structure as the channel layer. Positive and negative gate-bias stress stability of the TFTs was measured at room temperature and at 60°C. A tremendous improvement in gate-bias stress stability was obtained in case of the TFT with multiple layers of ZnO embedded between HfO2 layers compared to the TFT with a single layer of ZnO as the semiconductor. The ultra-thin HfO2 layers act as passivation layers, which prevent the adsorption of oxygen and water molecules in the ZnO layer and hence significantly improve the gate-bias stress stability of ZnO TFTs.

  19. Can common measures of core stability distinguish performance in a shoulder pressing task under stable and unstable conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Aickin, Sam E; Oldham, Anthony R H

    2010-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether a range of static core stability (CS) measures could distinguish shoulder press performance in unstable vs. stable conditions. Thirty resistance-trained men gave informed consent to participate in this study. One-repetition maximum strength (from 0.90), moderate (0.85 Core stability training (with or without a SB) may therefore only lead to significant improvements in functional dynamic performance if the postures, mode and velocity of contraction performed in training, are similar to the competitive tasks.

  20. Hurricane Inner-Core Structure as Revealed by GPS Dropwindsondes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leejoice, Robert

    2000-01-01

    New high-resolution information of the vertical thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the hurricane inner-core is now available from aircraft released Global Positioning System (GPS) dropwindsondes...

  1. Structure and stability of warm cores in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez Cabanell, J M [Departamento de Mecanica y Astronomia, Facultad de Matematicas, Burjasot-Valencia (Spain)

    1981-12-01

    Relativistic equations of structure are solved using Lamb's equations of state for warm neutron degenerate matter. The stability of isothermal cores in neutron stars is discussed and also the possible compatibility of the results obtained with experimental evidence is shown.

  2. Structure of stable degeneration of K3 surfaces into pairs of rational elliptic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    F-theory/heterotic duality is formulated in the stable degeneration limit of a K3 fibration on the F-theory side. In this note, we analyze the structure of the stable degeneration limit. We discuss whether stable degeneration exists for pairs of rational elliptic surfaces. We demonstrate that, when two rational elliptic surfaces have an identical complex structure, stable degeneration always exists. We provide an equation that systematically describes the stable degeneration of a K3 surface i...

  3. R and D on thermal hydraulics of core and core-bottom structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hino, Ryutaro; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Takase, Kazuyuki; Ioka, Ikuo; Maruyama, So

    2004-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic tests on the core and core-bottom structure of the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) were carried out with the helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) under simulated reactor operating conditions. The HENDEL was composed of helium gas circulation loops, mother sections (M 1 and M 2 ) and adaptor section (A), and two test sections, i.e. the fuel stack test section (T 1 ) and in-core structure test section (T 2 ). In the T 1 test section simulating a fuel stack of the core, thermal and hydraulic performances of helium gas flowing through a fuel block were investigated for thermal design of the HTTR core. In the T 2 test section simulating the core-bottom structure, demonstration tests were performed to verify the structural integrity of graphite and metal components, seal performance against helium gas leakage among the graphite permanent blocks and thermal mixing performance of helium gas. The above test results in the T 1 and T 2 test sections were applied to the detailed design and licensing works of the HTTR and the HENDEL-loop was dismantled in 1999

  4. Process to make core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N

    2014-01-07

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains core-shell structured nanoparticles. The process includes providing a precursor in the form of a powder a liquid and/or a vapor of a liquid that contains a core material and a shell material, and suspending the precursor in an aerosol gas to produce an aerosol containing the precursor. In addition, the process includes providing a plasma that has a hot zone and passing the aerosol through the hot zone of the plasma. As the aerosol passes through the hot zone of the plasma, at least part of the core material and at least part of the shell material in the aerosol is vaporized. Vapor that contains the core material and the shell material that has been vaporized is removed from the hot zone of the plasma and allowed to condense into core-shell structured nanoparticles.

  5. Dislocation core structures in Si-doped GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhode, S. L.; Fu, W. Y.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Horton, M. K.; Pennycook, T. J.; Dusane, R. O.; Moram, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the core structures of threading dislocations in plan-view geometry of GaN films with a range of Si-doping levels and dislocation densities ranging between (5 ± 1) × 10 8  and (10 ± 1) × 10 9  cm −2 . All a-type (edge) dislocation core structures in all samples formed 5/7-atom ring core structures, whereas all (a + c)-type (mixed) dislocations formed either double 5/6-atom, dissociated 7/4/8/4/9-atom, or dissociated 7/4/8/4/8/4/9-atom core structures. This shows that Si-doping does not affect threading dislocation core structures in GaN. However, electron beam damage at 300 keV produces 4-atom ring structures for (a + c)-type cores in Si-doped GaN

  6. Dislocation core structures in Si-doped GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhode, S. L., E-mail: srhode@imperial.ac.uk; Fu, W. Y.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Horton, M. K. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pennycook, T. J. [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Dusane, R. O. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Moram, M. A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-14

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the core structures of threading dislocations in plan-view geometry of GaN films with a range of Si-doping levels and dislocation densities ranging between (5 ± 1) × 10{sup 8} and (10 ± 1) × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. All a-type (edge) dislocation core structures in all samples formed 5/7-atom ring core structures, whereas all (a + c)-type (mixed) dislocations formed either double 5/6-atom, dissociated 7/4/8/4/9-atom, or dissociated 7/4/8/4/8/4/9-atom core structures. This shows that Si-doping does not affect threading dislocation core structures in GaN. However, electron beam damage at 300 keV produces 4-atom ring structures for (a + c)-type cores in Si-doped GaN.

  7. Stable structural color patterns displayed on transparent insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Ekaterina; Hansson, Christer; Janzen, Daniel H; Kjærandsen, Jostein

    2011-01-11

    Color patterns play central roles in the behavior of insects, and are important traits for taxonomic studies. Here we report striking and stable structural color patterns--wing interference patterns (WIPs)--in the transparent wings of small Hymenoptera and Diptera, patterns that have been largely overlooked by biologists. These extremely thin wings reflect vivid color patterns caused by thin film interference. The visibility of these patterns is affected by the way the insects display their wings against various backgrounds with different light properties. The specific color sequence displayed lacks pure red and matches the color vision of most insects, strongly suggesting that the biological significance of WIPs lies in visual signaling. Taxon-specific color patterns are formed by uneven membrane thickness, pigmentation, venation, and hair placement. The optically refracted pattern is also stabilized by microstructures of the wing such as membrane corrugations and spherical cell structures that reinforce the pattern and make it essentially noniridescent over a large range of light incidences. WIPs can be applied to map the micromorphology of wings through direct observation and are useful in several fields of biology. We demonstrate their usefulness as identification patterns to solve cases of cryptic species complexes in tiny parasitic wasps, and indicate their potentials for research on the genetic control of wing development through direct links between the transregulatory wing landscape and interference patterns we observe in Drosophila model species. Some species display sexually dimorphic WIPs, suggesting sexual selection as one of the driving forces for their evolution.

  8. Rift Valley fever phlebovirus NSs protein core domain structure suggests molecular basis for nuclear filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barski, Michal; Brennan, Benjamin; Miller, Ona K; Potter, Jane A; Vijayakrishnan, Swetha; Bhella, David; Naismith, James H; Elliott, Richard M; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich

    2017-09-15

    Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV) is a clinically and economically important pathogen increasingly likely to cause widespread epidemics. RVFV virulence depends on the interferon antagonist non-structural protein (NSs), which remains poorly characterized. We identified a stable core domain of RVFV NSs (residues 83-248), and solved its crystal structure, a novel all-helical fold organized into highly ordered fibrils. A hallmark of RVFV pathology is NSs filament formation in infected cell nuclei. Recombinant virus encoding the NSs core domain induced intranuclear filaments, suggesting it contains all essential determinants for nuclear translocation and filament formation. Mutations of key crystal fibril interface residues in viruses encoding full-length NSs completely abrogated intranuclear filament formation in infected cells. We propose the fibrillar arrangement of the NSs core domain in crystals reveals the molecular basis of assembly of this key virulence factor in cell nuclei. Our findings have important implications for fundamental understanding of RVFV virulence.

  9. The electronic structure of core states under extreme compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    At normal density and for modest compressions, the electronic structure of a metal can be accurately described by treating the conduction electrons and their interactions with the usual methods of band theory. The core electrons remain essentially the same as for an isolated free atom and do not participate in the bonding forces responsible for creating a condensed phase. As the density increases, the core electrons begin to ''see'' one another as the overlap of the tails of wave functions can no longer be neglected. The electronic structure of the core electrons is responsible for an effective repulsive interaction that eventually becomes free-electron-like at very high compressions. The electronic structure of the interacting core electrons may be treated in a simple manner using the Atomic Surface Method (ASM). The ASM is a first-principles treatment of the electronic structure involving a rigorous integration of the Schroedinger equation within the atomic-sphere approximation. Solid phase wave functions are constructed from isolated atom wave functions and the band width W l and the center of gravity of the band C l are obtained from simple formulas. The ASM can also utilize analytic forms of the atomic wave functions and thus provide direct functional dependence of various aspects of the electronic structure. Of particular use in understanding the behavior of the core electrons, the ASM provides the ability to analytically determine the density dependence of the band widths and positions. The process whereby core states interact with one another is best viewed as the formation of narrow electron bands formed from atomic states. As the core-core overlap increases, the bands increase in width and mean energy. In Sec.3 this picture is further developed and from the ASM one obtains the analytic dependence on density of the relative motion of the different bands. Also in Sec. 3 is a discussion of the transition to free electron bands

  10. Structural assessment of TAPS core shroud under accident loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhasin, Vivek; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1996-09-01

    Over the last few years, the Core Shroud of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) operating in foreign countries, have developed cracks at weld locations. As a first step for assessment of structural safety of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) core shroud, its detailed stress analysis was done for postulated accident loads. This report is concerned with structural assessment of core shroud, of BWR at TAPS, subjected to loads resulting from main steam line break (MSLB), recirculation line break (RLB) and safe shut down earthquake. The stress analysis was done for core shroud in healthy condition and without any crack since, visual examination conducted till now, do not indicate presence of any flaw. Dynamic structural analysis for MSLB and RLB events was done using dynamic load factor (DLF) method. The complete core shroud and its associated components were modelled and analysed using 3D plate/shell elements. Since, the components of core shroud are submerged in water, hence, hydrodynamic added mass was also considered for evaluation of natural frequencies. It was concluded that from structural point of view, adequate safety margin is available under all the accident loads. Nonlinear analysis was done to evaluate buckling/collapse load. The collapse/buckling load have sufficient margin against the allowable limits. The displacements are low hence, the insertion of control rod may not be affected. (author)

  11. MOX recycling in GEN 3 + EPR Reactor homogeneous and stable full MOX core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, M.; Villele, E. de; Gauthier, J.C.; Marincic, A. [AREVA - Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the case of the EPR (European Pressurized Reactor) reactor, 100% MOX core management is possible with simple design adaptations which are not significantly costly. 100% MOX core management offers several highly attractive advantages. First, it is possible to have the same plutonium content in all the rods of a fuel assembly instead of having rods with 3 different plutonium contents, as in MOX assemblies in current PWRs. Secondly, the full MOX core is more homogeneous. Thirdly, the stability of the core is significantly increased due to a large reduction in the Xe effect. Fourthly, there is a potential for the performance of the MOX fuel to match that of new high performance UO{sub 2} fuel (enrichment up to 4.95 %) in terms of increased burn up and cycle length. Fifthly, since there is only one plutonium content, the manufacturing costs are reduced. Sixthly, there is an increase in the operating margins of the reactor, and in the safety margins in accident conditions. The use of 100% MOX core will improve both utilisation of natural uranium resources and reductions in high level radioactive waste inventory.

  12. MOX recycling in GEN 3 + EPR Reactor homogeneous and stable full MOX core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, M.; Villele, E. de; Gauthier, J.C.; Marincic, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the case of the EPR (European Pressurized Reactor) reactor, 100% MOX core management is possible with simple design adaptations which are not significantly costly. 100% MOX core management offers several highly attractive advantages. First, it is possible to have the same plutonium content in all the rods of a fuel assembly instead of having rods with 3 different plutonium contents, as in MOX assemblies in current PWRs. Secondly, the full MOX core is more homogeneous. Thirdly, the stability of the core is significantly increased due to a large reduction in the Xe effect. Fourthly, there is a potential for the performance of the MOX fuel to match that of new high performance UO 2 fuel (enrichment up to 4.95 %) in terms of increased burn up and cycle length. Fifthly, since there is only one plutonium content, the manufacturing costs are reduced. Sixthly, there is an increase in the operating margins of the reactor, and in the safety margins in accident conditions. The use of 100% MOX core will improve both utilisation of natural uranium resources and reductions in high level radioactive waste inventory

  13. The Core Gut Microbiome of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana, Is Stable and Resilient to Dietary Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Kara A; Ottesen, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-15

    The omnivorous cockroach Periplaneta americana hosts a diverse hindgut microbiota encompassing hundreds of microbial species. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to examine the effect of diet on the composition of the P. americana hindgut microbial community. Results show that the hindgut microbiota of P. americana exhibit a highly stable core microbial community with low variance in compositions between individuals and minimal community change in response to dietary shifts. This core hindgut microbiome is shared between laboratory-hosted and wild-caught individuals, although wild-caught specimens exhibited a higher diversity of low-abundance microbes that were lost following extended cultivation under laboratory conditions. This taxonomic stability strongly contrasts with observations of the gut microbiota of mammals, which have been shown to be highly responsive to dietary change. A comparison of P. americana hindgut samples with human fecal samples indicated that the cockroach hindgut community exhibited higher alpha diversity but a substantially lower beta diversity than the human gut microbiome. This suggests that cockroaches have evolved unique mechanisms for establishing and maintaining a diverse and stable core microbiome. The gut microbiome plays an important role in the overall health of its host. A healthy gut microbiota typically assists with defense against pathogens and the digestion and absorption of nutrients from food, while dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been associated with reduced health. In this study, we examined the composition and stability of the gut microbiota from the omnivorous cockroach Periplaneta americana. We found that P. americana hosts a diverse core gut microbiome that remains stable after drastic long-term changes in diet. While other insects, notably ant and bee species, have evolved mechanisms for maintaining a stable association with specific gut microbiota, these insects typically host low-diversity gut

  14. A new CF-IRMS system for quantifying stable isotopes of carbon monoxide from ice cores and small air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new analysis technique for stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from ice core samples. The technique is an online cryogenic vacuum extraction followed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS; it can also be used with small air samples. The CO extraction system includes two multi-loop cryogenic cleanup traps, a chemical oxidant for oxidation to CO2, a cryogenic collection trap, a cryofocusing unit, gas chromatography purification, and subsequent injection into a Finnigan Delta Plus IRMS. Analytical precision of 0.2‰ (±1δ for δ13C and 0.6‰ (±1δ for δ18O can be obtained for 100 mL (STP air samples with CO mixing ratios ranging from 60 ppbv to 140 ppbv (~268–625 pmol CO. Six South Pole ice core samples from depths ranging from 133 m to 177 m were processed for CO isotope analysis after wet extraction. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of stable isotopes of CO in ice core air.

  15. Flexural Behavior of Aluminum Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Vidyasagar; Kumar, J. Suresh; Venkataraviteja, Duddu; Reddy, Guggulla Bharath Kumar

    2017-05-01

    This project is concerned with the fabrication and flexural testing of aluminium honey comb sandwich structure which is a special case of composite materials that is fabricated by attaching two thin but stiff skins to a light weight but thick core. The core material is normally low density material but its high thickness provide the sandwich composite with high bonding stiffness. Honeycomb core are classified into two types based on the materials and structures. Hexagonal shape has a unique properties i.e has more bonding strength and less formation time based on the cell size and sheet thickness. Sandwich structure exhibit different properties such as high load bearing capacity at low weight and has excellent thermal insulation. By considering the above properties it has tendency to minimize the structural problem. So honey comb sandwich structure is choosed. The core structure has a different applications such as aircraft, ship interiors, construction industries. As there is no proper research on strength characteristics of sandwich structure. So, we use light weight material to desire the strength. There are different parameters involved in this structure i.e cell size, sheet thickness and core height. In this project we considered 3 level of comparison among the 3 different parameters cell size of 4, 6 and 8 mm, sheet thickness of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 mm, and core height of 20,25 and 30 mm. In order to reduce the number of experiment we use taguchi design of experiment, and we select the L8 orthogonal array is the best array for this type of situation, which clearly identifies the parameters by independent of material weight to support this we add the minitab software, to identify the main effective plots and regression equation which involves the individual response and corresponding parameters. Aluminium material is used for the fabrication of Honeycomb sandwich structure among the various grades of aluminium we consider the AL6061 which is light weight material

  16. Estimating Past Temperature Change in Antarctica Based on Ice Core Stable Water Isotope Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, E. C.; Markle, B. R.; Holme, C.; Jones, T. R.; Steig, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    The magnitude of the last glacial-interglacial transition is a key target for constraining climate sensitivity on long timescales. Ice core proxy records and general circulation models (GCMs) both provide insight on the magnitude of climate change through the last glacial-interglacial transition, but appear to provide different answers. In particular, the magnitude of the glacial-interglacial temperature change reconstructed from East Antarctic ice-core water-isotope records is greater ( 9 degrees C) than that from most GCM simulations ( 6 degrees C). A possible source of this difference is error in the linear-scaling of water isotopes to temperature. We employ a novel, nonlinear temperature-reconstruction technique using the physics of water-isotope diffusion to infer past temperature. Based on new, ice-core data from the South Pole, this diffusion technique suggests East Antarctic temperature change was smaller than previously thought. We are able to confirm this result using a simple, water-isotope fractionation model to nonlinearly reconstruct temperature change at ice core locations across Antarctica based on combined oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. Both methods produce a temperature change of 6 degrees C for South Pole, agreeing with GCM results for East Antarctica. Furthermore, both produce much larger changes in West Antarctica, also in agreement with GCM results and independent borehole thermometry. These results support the fidelity of GCMs in simulating last glacial maximum climate, and contradict the idea, based on previous work, that the climate sensitivity of current GCMs is too low.

  17. Controlling interface characteristics by adjusting core-shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.Y.; Cheng, S.Y.; Sheu, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Most grain boundary layer ceramics comprise semiconductive/conductive grains and insulated grain boundaries. Such a structure can be theoretically regarded as a shell (grain boundary layer) surrounds a core (conductive or semiconductive grain). The core-shell structure of titanium (Ti)-strontium titanate (ST) is composed of three zones - ST, non-stoichiometric strontium-titanium oxide and Ti, in order from shell to core. It was successfully prepared using a hydrothermal method. The Ti-ST core-shell structure was sintered in a reducing atmosphere and then annealed in air to achieve the metal-insulator-metal structure (MIM structure). The resulting MIM structure, annealed in air, changes with the oxygen stoichiometry of the ST shell (insulator layer) at various temperatures, which is thus used to tune its electrical characteristics. The characteristics exhibit nonlinear behavior. Accordingly, the thickness of the insulator layer can be adjusted in various annealing atmospheres and at various temperatures to develop various interfacial devices, such as varistors, capacitors and thermistors, without the use of complex donor/acceptor doping technology

  18. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  19. Reservoir age variations and stable isotope values of bulk sediment in a core from the Limfjord, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente; Olsen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Peter

    The Limfjord is a sound in Northern Jutland, Denmark, connecting the North Sea with the Kattegat. A multi-proxy approach has been applied to a sediment core from Kilen, a former fjord arm near the town of Struer, to reveal the Limfjord’s development in more detail. In this paper, we concentrate...... on radiocarbon dating of shells and on stable isotope measurements of bulk sediment from 7400 to 1300 cal BP. Reservoir ages in coastal waters and estuaries can differ considerably from the global model ocean. The seas around Denmark have a reservoir age of c. 400 years, while a hardwater effect of a few...... of organic matter can thus be estimated. The d13C and C/N inferred salinity can be related to changes in Delta-R and other palaeoenvironmental proxies. An increasing marine influence throughout the largest part of the core is followed by large variations around 2000 cal BP....

  20. Constraining recent lead pollution sources in the North Pacific using ice core stable lead isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, B. H.; Kreutz, K. J.; Osterberg, E. C.; McConnell, J. R.; Handley, M.; Wake, C. P.; Yalcin, K.

    2012-08-01

    Trends and sources of lead (Pb) aerosol pollution in the North Pacific rim of North America from 1850 to 2001 are investigated using a high-resolution (subannual to annual) ice core record recovered from Eclipse Icefield (3017 masl; St. Elias Mountains, Canada). Beginning in the early 1940s, increasing Pb concentration at Eclipse Icefield occurs coevally with anthropogenic Pb deposition in central Greenland, suggesting that North American Pb pollution may have been in part or wholly responsible in both regions. Isotopic ratios (208Pb/207Pb and 206Pb/207Pb) from 1970 to 2001 confirm that a portion of the Pb deposited at Eclipse Icefield is anthropogenic, and that it represents a variable mixture of East Asian (Chinese and Japanese) emissions transported eastward across the Pacific Ocean and a North American component resulting from transient meridional atmospheric flow. Based on comparison with source material Pb isotope ratios, Chinese and North American coal combustion have likely been the primary sources of Eclipse Icefield Pb over the 1970-2001 time period. The Eclipse Icefield Pb isotope composition also implies that the North Pacific mid-troposphere is not directly impacted by transpolar atmospheric flow from Europe. Annually averaged Pb concentrations in the Eclipse Icefield ice core record show no long-term trend during 1970-2001; however, increasing208Pb/207Pb and decreasing 206Pb/207Pb ratios reflect the progressive East Asian industrialization and increase in Asian pollutant outflow. The post-1970 decrease in North American Pb emissions is likely necessary to explain the Eclipse Icefield Pb concentration time series. When compared with low (lichen) and high (Mt. Logan ice core) elevation Pb data, the Eclipse ice core record suggests a gradual increase in pollutant deposition and stronger trans-Pacific Asian contribution with rising elevation in the mountains of the North Pacific rim.

  1. Archival processes of the water stable isotope signal in East Antarctic ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Mathieu; Landais, Amaelle; Picard, Ghislain; Münch, Thomas; Laepple, Thomas; Stenni, Barbara; Dreossi, Giuliano; Ekaykin, Alexey; Arnaud, Laurent; Genthon, Christophe; Touzeau, Alexandra; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Jouzel, Jean

    2018-05-01

    The oldest ice core records are obtained from the East Antarctic Plateau. Water isotopes are key proxies to reconstructing past climatic conditions over the ice sheet and at the evaporation source. The accuracy of climate reconstructions depends on knowledge of all processes affecting water vapour, precipitation and snow isotopic compositions. Fractionation processes are well understood and can be integrated in trajectory-based Rayleigh distillation and isotope-enabled climate models. However, a quantitative understanding of processes potentially altering snow isotopic composition after deposition is still missing. In low-accumulation sites, such as those found in East Antarctica, these poorly constrained processes are likely to play a significant role and limit the interpretability of an ice core's isotopic composition. By combining observations of isotopic composition in vapour, precipitation, surface snow and buried snow from Dome C, a deep ice core site on the East Antarctic Plateau, we found indications of a seasonal impact of metamorphism on the surface snow isotopic signal when compared to the initial precipitation. Particularly in summer, exchanges of water molecules between vapour and snow are driven by the diurnal sublimation-condensation cycles. Overall, we observe in between precipitation events modification of the surface snow isotopic composition. Using high-resolution water isotopic composition profiles from snow pits at five Antarctic sites with different accumulation rates, we identified common patterns which cannot be attributed to the seasonal variability of precipitation. These differences in the precipitation, surface snow and buried snow isotopic composition provide evidence of post-deposition processes affecting ice core records in low-accumulation areas.

  2. Use of stainless steel as structural materials in reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are used as structural materials in reactor cores, due to their good mechanical properties at working temperatures and high generalized corrosion resistance in aqueous medium. The objective of this paper is to compare several 300 series austenitic stainless steels related to mechanical properties, localized corrosion resistance (SCC and intergranular) and content of delta ferrite. (author)

  3. How Does Amino Acid Ligand Modulate Au Core Structure and Characteristics in Peptide Coated Au Nanocluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hongkang; Zhao, Lina

    2018-03-01

    The atomic structures and the corresponding physicochemical properties of peptide coated Au nanoclusters determine their distinctive biological targeting applications. To learn the modulation of amino acid ligand on the atomic structure and electronic characteristics of coated Au core is the fundamental knowledge for peptide coated Au nanocluster design and construction. Based on our recent coated Au nanocluster configuration study (Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 11454), we built the typically simplified Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) system to more clearly learn the basic modulation information of amino acid ligand on Au core by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. There are two isomers as ligand adjacent bonding (Iso1) and diagonal bonding (Iso2) to Au13 cores. The geometry optimizations indicate the adjacent bonding Iso1 is more stable than Iso2. More important, the Au13 core of Iso1 distorts much more significantly than that of Iso2 by Cys-Au-Cys bonding through the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) analysis, which modulate their electronic characteristics in different ways. In addition, the frontier molecular orbital results of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) isomers confirm that the Au cores mainly determine the blue shifts of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) systems versus the original Au13 core in their UV-visible absorption spectrum studies. The configuration of Au13 core performs deformation under Cys-Au-Cys ligand modulation to reach new stability with distinct atomic structure and electronic properties, which could be the theory basis for peptide coated AuNCs design and construction.

  4. Core Promoter Structure in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Adele; Smart, Christine D.; Fry, William E.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the core promoter structure of the oomycete Phytophthora infestans. The transcriptional start sites (TSS) of three previously characterized P. infestans genes, Piexo1, Piexo3, and Piendo1, were determined by primer extension analyses. The TSS regions were homologous to a previously identified 16-nucleotide (nt) core sequence that overlaps the TSS in most oomycete genes. The core promoter regions of Piexo1 and Piendo1 were investigated by using a transient protoplast expression assay and the reporter gene β-glucuronidase. Mutational analyses of the promoters of Piexo1 and Piendo1 showed that there is a putative core promoter element encompassing the TSS (−2 to + 5) that has high sequence and functional homology to a known core promoter element present in other eukaryotes, the initiator element (Inr). Downstream and flanking the Inr is a highly conserved oomycete promoter region (+7 to + 15), hereafter referred to as FPR (flanking promoter region), which is also important for promoter function. The importance of the 19-nt core promoter region (Inr and FPR) in Piexo1 and Piendo1 was further investigated through electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). The EMSA studies showed that (i) both core promoters were able to specifically bind a protein or protein complex in a P. infestans whole-cell protein extract and (ii) the same mutations that reduced binding of the EMSA complex also reduced β-glucuronidase (GUS) levels in transient expression assays. The consistency of results obtained using two different assays (GUS transient assays [in vivo] and EMSA studies [in vitro]) supports a convergence of inference about the relative importance of specific nucleotides within the 19-nt core promoter region. PMID:14871940

  5. Modified Organosilica Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Stable pH Sensing in Biological Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kye J; Huynh, Gabriel T; Kouskousis, Betty P; Fletcher, Nicholas L; Houston, Zachary H; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Corrie, Simon R

    2018-04-19

    Continuous monitoring using nanoparticle-based sensors has been successfully employed in complex biological systems, yet the sensors still suffer from poor long-term stability partially because of the scaffold materials chosen to date. Organosilica core-shell nanoparticles containing a mixture of covalently incorporated pH-sensitive (shell) and pH-insensitive (core) fluorophores is presented as a continuous pH sensor for application in biological media. In contrast to previous studies focusing on similar materials, we sought to investigate the sensor characteristics (dynamic range, sensitivity, response time, stability) as a function of material properties. The ratio of the fluorescence intensities at specific wavelengths was found to be highly sensitive to pH over a physiologically relevant range (4.5-8) with a response time of pH-specific signals when stored at room temperature for more than 80 days. Finally, we demonstrated that the nanosensors successfully monitored the pH of a bacterial culture over 15 h and that pH changes in the skin of mouse cadavers could also be observed via in vivo fluorescence imaging following subcutaneous injection. The understanding gained from linking sensor characteristics and material properties will inform the next generation of optical nanosensors for continuous-monitoring applications.

  6. The structure of protostellar dense cores: a millimeter continuum study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Frederique

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical scenario explains low-mass star formation and describes the gravitational collapse of an isolated 'ideal' dense core. The major aim of this thesis is to check the standard model predictions on the structure of protostellar dense cores (or envelopes). The earliest stages of star formation remain poorly known because the protostars are still deeply embedded in massive, opaque circumstellar cocoons. On the one hand, sensitive bolometer arrays very recently allow us to measure the millimeter continuum emission arising from dense cores. Such observations are a powerful tool to constrain the density structure of proto-stellar dense cores (on large length scale). In particular, we studied the structure of isolated proto-stellar envelopes in Taurus and protostars in the ρ Ophiuchi cluster. In order to accurately derive their envelope density power law, we simulated the observation of several envelope models. Then we show that most of the Taurus protostars present a density structure consistent with the standard model predictions. In contrast, dense cores in ρ Ophiuchi main cloud are highly fragmented and protostellar envelope have finite size. Moreover fragmentation appears to be essential in determining the final stellar mass of ρ Oph forming stars. In clusters, fragmentation may thus be at the origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). On the other hand, our interferometric millimeter continuum observations are tracing (with higher angular resolution) the inner part of protostellar envelopes. Our study show that disks during protostellar stages are not yet massive and thus do not perturb the analysis of envelope density structure. (author) [fr

  7. Disentangling bipartite and core-periphery structure in financial networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barucca, Paolo; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of systems are represented as networks whose architecture conveys significant information and determines many of their properties. Examples of network architecture include modular, bipartite, and core-periphery structures. However inferring the network structure is a non trivial task and can depend sometimes on the chosen null model. Here we propose a method for classifying network structures and ranking its nodes in a statistically well-grounded fashion. The method is based on the use of Belief Propagation for learning through Entropy Maximization on both the Stochastic Block Model (SBM) and the degree-corrected Stochastic Block Model (dcSBM). As a specific application we show how the combined use of the two ensembles—SBM and dcSBM—allows to disentangle the bipartite and the core-periphery structure in the case of the e-MID interbank network. Specifically we find that, taking into account the degree, this interbank network is better described by a bipartite structure, while using the SBM the core-periphery structure emerges only when data are aggregated for more than a week.

  8. Dislocation core structures in (0001) InGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhode, S. L.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Kappers, M. J.; McAleese, C.; Humphreys, C. J.; Horton, M. K.; Haigh, S. J.; Pennycook, T. J.; Dusane, R. O.; Moram, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Threading dislocation core structures in c-plane GaN and In x Ga 1−x N (0.057 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) films were investigated by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. a-type dislocations are unaffected by alloying with indium and have a 5/7-atom ring core structure in both GaN and In x Ga 1−x N. In contrast, the dissociation lengths of (a + c)-type dislocations are reduced, and new 7/4/9-atom ring and 7/4/8/5-atom ring core structures were observed for the dissociated (a + c)-type dislocations in In x Ga 1−x N, which is associated with the segregation of indium near (a + c)-type and c-type dislocation cores in In x Ga 1−x N, consistent with predictions from atomistic Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Dislocation core structures in (0001) InGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhode, S. L.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Kappers, M. J.; McAleese, C.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Horton, M. K. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Haigh, S. J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Pennycook, T. J. [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Dusane, R. O. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Moram, M. A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-14

    Threading dislocation core structures in c-plane GaN and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N (0.057 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) films were investigated by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. a-type dislocations are unaffected by alloying with indium and have a 5/7-atom ring core structure in both GaN and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N. In contrast, the dissociation lengths of (a + c)-type dislocations are reduced, and new 7/4/9-atom ring and 7/4/8/5-atom ring core structures were observed for the dissociated (a + c)-type dislocations in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, which is associated with the segregation of indium near (a + c)-type and c-type dislocation cores in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, consistent with predictions from atomistic Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. Modified ferrite core-shell nanoparticles magneto-structural characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekotka, Urszula; Piotrowska, Beata; Satuła, Dariusz; Kalska-Szostko, Beata

    2018-06-01

    In this study, ferrite nanoparticles with core-shell structures and different chemical compositions of both the core and shell were prepared with success. Proposed nanoparticles have in the first and second series magnetite core, and the shell is composed of a mixture of ferrites with Fe3+, Fe2+ and M ions (where M = Co2+, Mn2+ or Ni2+) with a general composition of M0.5Fe2.5O4. In the third series, the composition is inverted, the core is composed of a mixture of ferrites and as a shell magnetite is placed. Morphology and structural characterization of nanoparticles were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Infrared spectroscopy (IR). While room temperature magnetic properties were measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). It is seen from Mössbauer measurements that Co always increases hyperfine magnetic field on Fe atoms at RT, while Ni and Mn have opposite influences in comparison to pure Fe ferrite, regardless of the nanoparticles structure.

  11. Effects of core strength training using stable versus unstable surfaces on physical fitness in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Schellbach, Jörg; Klein, Katja; Prieske, Olaf; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Muehlbauer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that core strength training is an effective means to enhance trunk muscle strength (TMS) and proxies of physical fitness in youth. Of note, cross-sectional studies revealed that the inclusion of unstable elements in core strengthening exercises produced increases in trunk muscle activity and thus provide potential extra training stimuli for performance enhancement. Thus, utilizing unstable surfaces during core strength training may even produce larger performance gains. However, the effects of core strength training using unstable surfaces are unresolved in youth. This randomized controlled study specifically investigated the effects of core strength training performed on stable surfaces (CSTS) compared to unstable surfaces (CSTU) on physical fitness in school-aged children. Twenty-seven (14 girls, 13 boys) healthy subjects (mean age: 14 ± 1 years, age range: 13-15 years) were randomly assigned to a CSTS (n = 13) or a CSTU (n = 14) group. Both training programs lasted 6 weeks (2 sessions/week) and included frontal, dorsal, and lateral core exercises. During CSTU, these exercises were conducted on unstable surfaces (e.g., TOGU© DYNAIR CUSSIONS, THERA-BAND© STABILITY TRAINER). Significant main effects of Time (pre vs. post) were observed for the TMS tests (8-22%, f = 0.47-0.76), the jumping sideways test (4-5%, f = 1.07), and the Y balance test (2-3%, f = 0.46-0.49). Trends towards significance were found for the standing long jump test (1-3%, f = 0.39) and the stand-and-reach test (0-2%, f = 0.39). We could not detect any significant main effects of Group. Significant Time x Group interactions were detected for the stand-and-reach test in favour of the CSTU group (2%, f = 0.54). Core strength training resulted in significant increases in proxies of physical fitness in adolescents. However, CSTU as compared to CSTS had only limited additional effects (i.e., stand-and-reach test). Consequently, if the

  12. The Expanded FindCore Method for Identification of a Core Atom Set for Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David A.; Grullon, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing the scientific impact of NMR-based structure determination requires robust and statistically sound methods for assessing the precision of NMR-derived structures. In particular, a method to define a core atom set for calculating superimpositions and validating structure predictions is critical to the use of NMR-derived structures as targets in the CASP competition. FindCore (D.A. Snyder and G.T. Montelione PROTEINS 2005;59:673–686) is a superimposition independent method for identifying a core atom set, and partitioning that set into domains. However, as FindCore optimizes superimposition by sensitively excluding not-well-defined atoms, the FindCore core may not comprise all atoms suitable for use in certain applications of NMR structures, including the CASP assessment process. Adapting the FindCore approach to assess predicted models against experimental NMR structures in CASP10 required modification of the FindCore method. This paper describes conventions and a standard protocol to calculate an “Expanded FindCore” atom set suitable for validation and application in biological and biophysical contexts. A key application of the Expanded FindCore method is to identify a core set of atoms in the experimental NMR structure for which it makes sense to validate predicted protein structure models. We demonstrate the application of this Expanded FindCore method in characterizing well-defined regions of 18 NMR-derived CASP10 target structures. The Expanded FindCore protocol defines “expanded core atom sets” that match an expert’s intuition of which parts of the structure are sufficiently well-defined to use in assessing CASP model predictions. We also illustrate the impact of this analysis on the CASP GDT assessment scores. PMID:24327305

  13. Use of water stable isotopes in climatology and paleoclimatology illustrated from polar ice cores studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouzel, J.; Lorius, C.

    1994-01-01

    The isotopic content of ancient waters (deuterium and oxygen 18) gives a key access to past climatic changes. An essentially linear relationship exists between the isotopic content of a precipitation and the temperature of the site (at least for medium and high latitudes). This link between water isotope atmospheric cycle and climate is presented through various isotopic models and illustrated from the deuterium profile obtained along the Vostok ice core in East Antarctica. This 2 km record which covers a full glacial-interglacial cycle (160000 years) confirms the existence of a link between insolation changes and climate (Milankovitch theory). It shows also that the greenhouse effect has played a role in glacial-interglacial changes in amplifying this orbital forcing. (authors). 10 figs., 23 refs

  14. Preparation of porous carbon particle with shell/core structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous carbon particles with a shell/core structure have been prepared successfully by controlled precipitation of the polymer from droplets of oil-in-water emulsion, followed by curing and carbonization. The droplets of the oil phase are composed of phenolic resin (PFR, a good solvent (ethyl acetate and porogen (Poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA. The microstructure was characterized in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nitrogen adsorption, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The obtained carbon particles have a capsular structure with a microporous carbon shell and a mesoporous carbon core. The BET surface area and porous volume are calculated to be 499 m2g-1 and 0.56 cm3g-1, respectively. The effects of the amount of porogen (PMMA, co-solvent (acetone and surfactant on the resultant structure were studied in detail.

  15. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Casillo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core, wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants. The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

  16. Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project Completes Coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the Scientific Staff of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project (CBIS Project completed its coring operations during September–December 2005 and April–May 2006. Cores were collected continuously to a total depth of 1766 m. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of impactites beneath 444 m of post-impact continental shelf sediments.The CBIS Project is a joint venture of the International Continental Scientifi c Drilling Program (ICDP and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS. Project activities began with a planning workshop in September 2003 attended by sixtythree scientists from ten countries. Field operations began with site preparation in July 2005, and coring began in September 2005. Drilling, Observation and Sampling of theEarth’s Continental Crust (DOSECC was the general contractor for the drilling operations throughout 2005.

  17. Structural characterization of Mumps virus fusion protein core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueyong; Xu Yanhui; Lou Zhiyong; Zhu Jieqing; Hu Xuebo; Gao, George F.; Qiu Bingsheng; Rao Zihe; Tien, Po

    2006-01-01

    The fusion proteins of enveloped viruses mediating the fusion between the viral and cellular membranes comprise two discontinuous heptad repeat (HR) domains located at the ectodomain of the enveloped glycoproteins. The crystal structure of the fusion protein core of Mumps virus (MuV) was determined at 2.2 A resolution. The complex is a six-helix bundle in which three HR1 peptides form a central highly hydrophobic coiled-coil and three HR2 peptides pack against the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of central coiled-coil in an oblique antiparallel manner. Fusion core of MuV, like those of simian virus 5 and human respiratory syncytium virus, forms typical 3-4-4-4-3 spacing. The similar charecterization in HR1 regions, as well as the existence of O-X-O motif in extended regions of HR2 helix, suggests a basic rule for the formation of the fusion core of viral fusion proteins

  18. Novel highly dispersible, thermally stable core/shell proppants for geothermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childers, Ian M.; Endres, Mackenzie; Burns, Carolyne; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Liu, Jian; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Bonneville, Alain; Moore, Joseph; Leavy, Ian I.; Zhong, Lirong; Schaef, Herbert T.; Fu, Li; Wang, Hong-Fei; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2017-11-01

    The use of proppants during reservoir stimulation in tight oil and gas plays requires the introduction of highly viscous fluids to transport the proppants (µm–mm) with the fracturing fluid. The highly viscous fluids required result in increased pump loads and energy costs. Furthermore, although proppant deployment with fracturing fluids is a standard practice for unconventional oil and gas stimulation operations, there are only a few examples in the US of the applying proppant technology to geothermal energy production. This is due to proppant dissolution, proppant flowback and loss of permeability associated with the extreme temperatures found in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). This work demonstrates proof-of-concept of a novel, CO2-responsive, lightweight sintered-bauxite/polymer core/shell proppant. The polymer shell has two main roles; 1) increase the stability of the proppant dispersion in water without the addition of rheology modifiers, and 2) once at the fracture network react with CO2 to promote particle aggregation and prop fractures open. In this work, both of these roles are demonstrated together with the thermal and chemical stability of the materials showing the potential of these CO2-responsive proppants as an alternative proppant technology for geothermal and unconventional oil/gas applications.

  19. Density functional theory studies of screw dislocation core structures in bcc metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Søren Lund; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2003-01-01

    The core structures of (I 11) screw dislocations in bee metals are studied using density functional theory in the local-density approximation. For Mo and Fe, direct calculations of the core structures show the cores to be symmetric with respect to 180degrees rotations around an axis perpendicular...... to symmetric core structures for all the studied metals....

  20. Stable structures for Al{sub 20} clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Changhong [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)]. E-mail: phych@zju.edu.cn; Song Bin [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Cao Peilin [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2005-06-20

    The low-lying energy structures of Al{sub 20} cluster are obtained by full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital molecular-dynamics (FP-LMTO-MD) method. A set of new low-lying energy structures including a new lowest energy structure, were found in our calculation. The waist-capped double icosahedral structure, which was considered as the global minimum previously, is merely one of the low-lying structures. Comparison and discussion between Al{sub 20} and Si{sub 20} have been made.

  1. Shock absorber in combination with a nuclear reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to the provision of shock absorbers for use in blind control rod passages of a nuclear reactor core structure which are not subject to degradation. The shock absorber elements are made of a porous brittle carbonaceous material, a porous brittle ceramic material, or a porous brittle refractory oxide and have a void volume of between 30% and 70% of the total volume of the element for energy absorption by fracturing due to impact loading by a control rod. (UK)

  2. Supermodes in Coupled Multi-Core Waveguide Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    this section, we begin the study of higher-order supermodes from the simplest two-core structure by demon - strating how angle-dependent coupling...Communication Conf., Los Angeles , CA, USA, 2011, Paper PDPB10. 4401212 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 2, MARCH/APRIL...microstructured fiber,” presented at the IEEE Optical Fiber Com- munication Conf., Los Angeles , CA, USA, 2012, Paper PDP5C.2. [12] S. G. Leon-Saval, A

  3. Core/Shell Structured Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biological Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used for biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, drug delivery and cell signaling. The surface modification of the nanomaterials is required for biomedical use to give physiogical stability, surface reactivity and targeting properties. Among many approaches for the surface modification with materials, such as polymers, organic ligands and metals, one of the most attractive ways is using metals. The fabrication of metal-based, monolayer-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively studied. However, the synthesis of metal-capped magnetic nanoparticles with monodispersities and controllable sizes is still challenged. Recently, gold-capped magnetic nanoparticles have been reported to increase stability and to provide biocompatibility. Magnetic nanoparticle with gold coating is an attractive system, which can be stabilized in biological conditions and readily functionalized in biological conditions and readily functionalized through well-established surface modification (Au-S) chemistry. The Au coating offers plasmonic properties to magnetic nanoparticles. This makes the magnetic/Au core/shell combinations interesting for magnetic and optical applications. Herein, the synthesis and characterization of gold capped-magnetic core structured nanomaterials with different gold sources, such as gold acetate and chloroauric acid have been reported. The core/shell nanoparticles were transferred from organic to aqueous solutions for biomedical applications. Magnetic core/shell structured nanoparticles have been prepared and transferred from organic phase to aqueous solutions. The resulting Au-coated magnetic core nanoparticles might be an attractive system for biomedical applications, which are needed both magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging

  4. Structural characterization of core-bradavidin in complex with biotin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nitin; Määttä, Juha A. E.; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Johnson, Mark S.; Airenne, Tomi T.

    2017-01-01

    Bradavidin is a tetrameric biotin-binding protein similar to chicken avidin and bacterial streptavidin, and was originally cloned from the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. We have previously reported the crystal structure of the full-length, wild-type (wt) bradavidin with 138 amino acids, where the C-terminal residues Gly129-Lys138 (“Brad-tag”) act as an intrinsic ligand (i.e. Gly129-Lys138 bind into the biotin-binding site of an adjacent subunit within the same tetramer) and has potential as an affinity tag for biotechnological purposes. Here, the X-ray structure of core-bradavidin lacking the C-terminal residues Gly114-Lys138, and hence missing the Brad-tag, was crystallized in complex with biotin at 1.60 Å resolution [PDB:4BBO]. We also report a homology model of rhodavidin, an avidin-like protein from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, and of an avidin-like protein from Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2, both of which have the Brad-tag sequence at their C-terminus. Moreover, core-bradavidin V1, an engineered variant of the original core-bradavidin, was also expressed at high levels in E. coli, as well as a double mutant (Cys39Ala and Cys69Ala) of core-bradavidin (CC mutant). Our data help us to further engineer the core-bradavidin–Brad-tag pair for biotechnological assays and chemical biology applications, and provide deeper insight into the biotin-binding mode of bradavidin. PMID:28426764

  5. Structural characterization of core-bradavidin in complex with biotin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Agrawal

    Full Text Available Bradavidin is a tetrameric biotin-binding protein similar to chicken avidin and bacterial streptavidin, and was originally cloned from the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. We have previously reported the crystal structure of the full-length, wild-type (wt bradavidin with 138 amino acids, where the C-terminal residues Gly129-Lys138 ("Brad-tag" act as an intrinsic ligand (i.e. Gly129-Lys138 bind into the biotin-binding site of an adjacent subunit within the same tetramer and has potential as an affinity tag for biotechnological purposes. Here, the X-ray structure of core-bradavidin lacking the C-terminal residues Gly114-Lys138, and hence missing the Brad-tag, was crystallized in complex with biotin at 1.60 Å resolution [PDB:4BBO]. We also report a homology model of rhodavidin, an avidin-like protein from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, and of an avidin-like protein from Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2, both of which have the Brad-tag sequence at their C-terminus. Moreover, core-bradavidin V1, an engineered variant of the original core-bradavidin, was also expressed at high levels in E. coli, as well as a double mutant (Cys39Ala and Cys69Ala of core-bradavidin (CC mutant. Our data help us to further engineer the core-bradavidin-Brad-tag pair for biotechnological assays and chemical biology applications, and provide deeper insight into the biotin-binding mode of bradavidin.

  6. Synthesis and Performance of Highly Stable Star-Shaped Polyaniline Electrochromic Materials with Triphenylamine Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shanxin; Li, Shuaishuai; Zhang, Xiangkai; Wang, Ru; Zhang, Runlan; Wang, Xiaoqin; Wu, Bohua; Gong, Ming; Chu, Jia

    2018-02-01

    The molecular architecture of conducting polymers has a significant impact on their conjugated structure and electrochemical properties. We have investigated the influence of star-shaped structure on the electrochemical and electrochromic properties of polyaniline (PANI). Star-shaped PANI (SPANI) was prepared by copolymerization of aniline with triphenylamine (TPA) using an emulsion polymerization method. With addition of less than 4.0 mol.% TPA, the resulting SPANI exhibited good solubility in xylene with dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) as doping acid. The structure and thermal stability of the SPANI were characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, and the electrochemical behavior was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrochromic properties of SPANI were tested using an electrochemical workstation combined with an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. The results show that, with increasing TPA loading, the thermal stability of SPANI increased. With addition of 4.0 mol.% TPA, the weight loss of SPANI was 36.9% at 700°C, much lower than the value of 71.2% for PANI at the same temperature. The low oxidation potential and large enclosed area of the CV curves indicate that SPANI possesses higher electrochemical activity than PANI. Enhanced electrochromic properties including higher optical contrast and better electrochromic stability of SPANI were also obtained. SPANI with 1.6 mol.% TPA loading exhibited the highest optical contrast of 0.71, higher than the values of 0.58 for PANI, 0.66 for SPANI-0.4%, or 0.63 for SPANI-4.0%. Overdosing of TPA resulted in slow switching speed due to slow ion transport in short branched chains of star-shaped PANI electrochromic material. Long-term stability testing confirmed that all the SPANI-based devices exhibited better stability than the PANI-based device.

  7. Stable water isotopes of precipitation and firn cores from the northern Antarctic Peninsula region as a proxy for climate reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fernandoy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the climate variability in the northern Antarctic Peninsula region, this paper focuses on the relationship between stable isotope content of precipitation and firn, and main meteorological variables (air temperature, relative humidity, sea surface temperature, and sea ice extent. Between 2008 and 2010, we collected precipitation samples and retrieved firn cores from several key sites in this region. We conclude that the deuterium excess oscillation represents a robust indicator of the meteorological variability on a seasonal to sub-seasonal scale. Low absolute deuterium excess values and the synchronous variation of both deuterium excess and air temperature imply that the evaporation of moisture occurs in the adjacent Southern Ocean. The δ18O-air temperature relationship is complicated and significant only at a (multiseasonal scale. Backward trajectory calculations show that air-parcels arriving at the region during precipitation events predominantly originate at the South Pacific Ocean and Bellingshausen Sea. These investigations will be used as a calibration for ongoing and future research in the area, suggesting that appropriate locations for future ice core research are located above 600 m a.s.l. We selected the Plateau Laclavere, Antarctic Peninsula as the most promising site for a deeper drilling campaign.

  8. Glacial/interglacial wetland, biomass burning, and geologic methane emissions constrained by dual stable isotopic CH4 ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Beck, Jonas; Seth, Barbara; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Fischer, Hubertus

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) records reconstructed from polar ice cores represent an integrated view on processes predominantly taking place in the terrestrial biogeosphere. Here, we present dual stable isotopic methane records [δ13CH4 and δD(CH4)] from four Antarctic ice cores, which provide improved constraints on past changes in natural methane sources. Our isotope data show that tropical wetlands and seasonally inundated floodplains are most likely the controlling sources of atmospheric methane variations for the current and two older interglacials and their preceding glacial maxima. The changes in these sources are steered by variations in temperature, precipitation, and the water table as modulated by insolation, (local) sea level, and monsoon intensity. Based on our δD(CH4) constraint, it seems that geologic emissions of methane may play a steady but only minor role in atmospheric CH4 changes and that the glacial budget is not dominated by these sources. Superimposed on the glacial/interglacial variations is a marked difference in both isotope records, with systematically higher values during the last 25,000 y compared with older time periods. This shift cannot be explained by climatic changes. Rather, our isotopic methane budget points to a marked increase in fire activity, possibly caused by biome changes and accumulation of fuel related to the late Pleistocene megafauna extinction, which took place in the course of the last glacial.

  9. Stable Photocatalytic Paints Prepared from Hybrid Core-Shell Fluorinated/Acrylic/TiO2 Waterborne Dispersions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Bonnefond

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air and water is one of the major concerns towards the development of a sustainable world in the 21st century. In this context many efforts are devoted to the design of photocatalytic paints able to degrade chemical and biological impurities present in air and water. In this work, the photocatalytic activity of hybrid films formed from the blends of pure acrylic or core/shell fluorinated/acrylic waterborne dispersions and photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticle dispersions was first assessed. The films show photocatalytic activity (inactivation of the Escherichia coli bacteria under UV irradiation at the substrate-film interface, but very reduced activity in the air-film interface due to the substantially lower amount of the TiO2 nanoparticles in the vicinity of this interface. In a second step, the fluorinated/(methacrylic core-shell hybrid dispersions were used as binders in the formulation of waterborne photocatalytic paints and the stability of the paints, in terms of gloss retain and color change, was assessed during 5000 hours of accelerated weathering tests (QUV-B. Although a decrease in gloss retention and increased color change occurs during the first 1000 hours of exposure, no further change of these properties takes place, which is an excellent indication of stable photocatalytic paints.

  10. Stable chromium isotopic composition of meteorites and metal-silicate experiments: Implications for fractionation during core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnand, P.; Williams, H. M.; Parkinson, I. J.; Wood, B. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present new mass independent and mass dependent Cr isotope compositions for meteorites measured by double spike thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Small differences in both mass independent 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth are reported and are very similar to previously published values. Carbonaceous chondrites are characterised by an excess in 54Cr compared to ordinary and enstatite chondrites which make mass independent Cr isotopes a useful tool for distinguishing between meteoritic groups. Mass dependent stable Cr isotope compositions for the same samples are also reported. Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites are identical within uncertainty with average δ53 Cr values of - 0.118 ± 0.040 ‰ and - 0.143 ± 0.074 ‰ respectively. The heaviest isotope compositions are recorded by an enstatite chondrite and a CO carbonaceous chondrite, both of which have relatively reduced chemical compositions implying some stable Cr isotope fractionation related to redox processes in the circumstellar disk. The average δ53 Cr values for chondrites are within error of the estimate for the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) also determined by double spiking. The lack of isotopic difference between chondritic material and the BSE provides evidence that Cr isotopes were not fractionated during core formation on Earth. A series of high-pressure experiments was also carried out to investigate stable Cr isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and no demonstrable fractionation was observed, consistent with our meteorites data. Mass dependent Cr isotope data for achondrites suggest that Cr isotopes are fractionated during magmatic differentiation and therefore further work is required to constrain the Cr isotopic compositions of the mantles of Vesta and Mars.

  11. Evaluation of aseismic integrity in HTTR core-bottom structure. Pt. 1. Aseismic test for core-bottom structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, T.; Futakawa, M.; Ishihara, M.

    1994-01-01

    The aseismic tests were carried out using (1)/(5)-scale and (1)/(3)-scale models of the core-bottom structure of the HTTR to quantitatively evaluate the response of acceleration, strain, impact load etc. The following conclusions are obtained. (i) The frequency response of the keyway strain is correlative with that of the impact acceleration on the hot plenum block. (ii) It was confirmed through (1)/(5)-scale and (1)/(3)-scale model tests that the applied similarity law is valid to evaluate the seismic response characteristics of the core-bottom structure. (ii) The stress of graphite components estimated from the scale model test using S 2 -earthquake excitation was sufficiently lower than the allowable stress used as the design criterion. ((orig.))

  12. Nanocrystalline Aluminum Truss Cores for Lightweight Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Chan, Lisa J.; Clough, Eric C.; Stilke, Morgan A.; Hundley, Jacob M.; Masur, Lawrence J.

    2017-12-01

    Substitution of conventional honeycomb composite sandwich structures with lighter alternatives has the potential to reduce the mass of future vehicles. Here we demonstrate nanocrystalline aluminum-manganese truss cores that achieve 2-4 times higher strength than aluminum alloy 5056 honeycombs of the same density. The scalable fabrication approach starts with additive manufacturing of polymer templates, followed by electrodeposition of nanocrystalline Al-Mn alloy, removal of the polymer, and facesheet integration. This facilitates curved and net-shaped sandwich structures, as well as co-curing of the facesheets, which eliminates the need for extra adhesive. The nanocrystalline Al-Mn alloy thin-film material exhibits high strength and ductility and can be converted into a three-dimensional hollow truss structure with this approach. Ultra-lightweight sandwich structures are of interest for a range of applications in aerospace, such as fairings, wings, and flaps, as well as for the automotive and sports industries.

  13. Dynamico-FE: A Structure-Preserving Hydrostatic Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Christopher; Dubos, Thomas; Kritsikis, Evaggelos

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the inviscid, adiabatic equations of atmospheric motion constitute a non-canonical Hamiltonian system, and therefore posses many important conserved quantities such as as mass, potential vorticity and total energy. In addition, there are also key mimetic properties (such as curl grad = 0) of the underlying continuous vector calculus. Ideally, a dynamical core should have similar properties. A general approach to deriving such structure-preserving numerical schemes has been developed under the frameworks of Hamiltonian methods and mimetic discretizations, and over the past decade, there has been a great deal of work on the development of atmospheric dynamical cores using these techniques. An important example is Dynamico, which conserves mass, potential vorticity and total energy; and possesses additional mimetic properties such as a curl-free pressure gradient. Unfortunately, the underlying finite-difference discretization scheme used in Dynamico has been shown to be inconsistent on general grids. To resolve these accuracy issues, a scheme based on mimetic Galerkin discretizations has been developed that achieves higher-order accuracy while retaining the structure-preserving properties of the existing discretization. This presentation will discuss the new dynamical core, termed Dynamico-FE, and show results from a standard set of test cases on both the plane and the sphere.

  14. Space Launch System, Core Stage, Structural Test Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Ray

    2017-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama are working to design, develop and implement the SLS Core Stage structural testing. The SLS will have the capability to return humans to the Moon and beyond and its first launch is scheduled for December of 2017. The SLS Core Stage consist of five major elements; Forward Skirt, Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank, Intertank (IT), Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank and the Engine Section (ES). Structural Test Articles (STA) for each of these elements are being designed and produced by Boeing at Michoud Assembly Facility located in New Orleans, La. The structural test for the Core Stage STAs (LH2, LOX, IT and ES) are to be conducted by the MSFC Test Laboratory. Additionally, the MSFC Test Laboratory manages the Structural Test Equipment (STE) design and development to support the STAs. It was decided early (April 2012) in the project life that the LH2 and LOX tank STAs would require new test stands and the Engine Section and Intertank would be tested in existing facilities. This decision impacted schedules immediately because the new facilities would require Construction of Facilities (C of F) funds that require congressional approval and long lead times. The Engine Section and Intertank structural test are to be conducted in existing facilities which will limit lead times required to support the first launch of SLS. With a SLS launch date of December, 2017 Boeing had a need date for testing to be complete by September of 2017 to support flight certification requirements. The test facilities were required to be ready by October of 2016 to support test article delivery. The race was on to get the stands ready before Test Article delivery and meet the test complete date of September 2017. This paper documents the past and current design and development phases and the supporting processes, tools, and

  15. Active structural control with stable fuzzy PID techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a detailed discussion of intelligent techniques to measure the displacement of buildings when they are subjected to vibration. It shows how these techniques are used to control active devices that can reduce vibration 60–80% more effectively than widely used passive anti-seismic systems. After introducing various structural control devices and building-modeling and active structural control methods, the authors propose offset cancellation and high-pass filtering techniques to solve some common problems of building-displacement measurement using accelerometers. The most popular control algorithms in industrial settings, PD/PID controllers, are then analyzed and then combined with fuzzy compensation. The stability of this combination is proven with standard weight-training algorithms. These conditions provide explicit methods for selecting PD/PID controllers. Finally, fuzzy-logic and sliding-mode control are applied to the control of wind-induced vibration. The methods described are support...

  16. The structure of the stable negative ion of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.; Compton, R.N.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of the Ca/sup /minus// ion has been determined using a crossed laser-ion beams apparatus. The photoelectron detachment spectrum shows that, contrary to earlier expectations, the Ca/sup /minus// ion is stably bound in the (4s 2 4p) 2 p state. The electron affinity of Ca was measured to be 0.043 +- 0.007 eV

  17. On the core-halo structure of NGC 604

    CERN Document Server

    Melnick, Yu M

    1980-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of the core-halo structure of the largest H II region in M 33, NGC 604, using newly obtained multi- aperture H/sub beta / photometry and Fabry-Perot interferometry, in conjunction with published radio continuum observations. Based on a comparison between the radio continuum and H/sub beta / luminosities of NGC 604, a dust density of rho /sub d/=6 10/sup -25/ g cm/sup -3/ is derived for the nebular core, in good agreement with published far- infrared results. By contrast, the halo of NGC 604 appears to contain virtually no dust. It is also shown that the turbulent component of the H/sub alpha /-line profile width of the halo of NGC 604 is significantly lower than that of the nebular core. This result is found to be inconsistent with models in which the highly supersonic velocities implied by the observed emission line profile widths in both nebular components are interpreted in terms of expansion motions. (14 refs).

  18. IDEAL STRUCTURE OF UNIFORM ROE ALGEBRAS OVER SIMPLE CORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN XIAOMAN; WANG QIN

    2004-01-01

    This paper characterizes ideal structure of the uniform Roe algebra B* (X) over sinple cores X. A necessary and sufficient condition for a principal ideal of B*(X) to be spatial is given and an example of non-spatial ideal of B* (X) is constructed. By establishing an one-one correspondence between the ideals of B* (X) and the ω-filters on X, the maximal ideals of B* (X) are completely described by the corona of the Stone-Cech compactification of X.

  19. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

    1998-07-28

    Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

  20. New approach to the design of core support structures for large LMFBR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes an innovative design concept for a LMFBR Core Support Structure. A hanging Core Support Structure is described and analyzed. The design offers inherent safety features, constructibility advantages, and potential cost reductions

  1. The retro-GCN4 leucine zipper sequence forms a stable three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittl, Peer R. E.; Deillon, Christine; Sargent, David; Liu, Niankun; Klauser, Stephan; Thomas, Richard M.; Gutte, Bernd; Grütter, Markus G.

    2000-01-01

    The question of whether a protein whose natural sequence is inverted adopts a stable fold is still under debate. We have determined the 2.1-Å crystal structure of the retro-GCN4 leucine zipper. In contrast to the two-stranded helical coiled-coil GCN4 leucine zipper, the retro-leucine zipper formed a very stable, parallel four-helix bundle, which now lends itself to further structural and functional studies. PMID:10716989

  2. High taxonomic variability despite stable functional structure across microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Stilianos; Jacques, Saulo M S; Pires, Aliny P F; Leal, Juliana S; Srivastava, Diane S; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Farjalla, Vinicius F; Doebeli, Michael

    2016-12-05

    Understanding the processes that are driving variation of natural microbial communities across space or time is a major challenge for ecologists. Environmental conditions strongly shape the metabolic function of microbial communities; however, other processes such as biotic interactions, random demographic drift or dispersal limitation may also influence community dynamics. The relative importance of these processes and their effects on community function remain largely unknown. To address this uncertainty, here we examined bacterial and archaeal communities in replicate 'miniature' aquatic ecosystems contained within the foliage of wild bromeliads. We used marker gene sequencing to infer the taxonomic composition within nine metabolic functional groups, and shotgun environmental DNA sequencing to estimate the relative abundances of these groups. We found that all of the bromeliads exhibited remarkably similar functional community structures, but that the taxonomic composition within individual functional groups was highly variable. Furthermore, using statistical analyses, we found that non-neutral processes, including environmental filtering and potentially biotic interactions, at least partly shaped the composition within functional groups and were more important than spatial dispersal limitation and demographic drift. Hence both the functional structure and taxonomic composition within functional groups of natural microbial communities may be shaped by non-neutral and roughly separate processes.

  3. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Jing; Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. → The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. → The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 o C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  4. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Jing [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China); Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Jian-Feng, E-mail: chenjf@mail.buct.edu.cn [Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. {yields} The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. {yields} The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 {sup o}C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  5. Numerically stable fluid–structure interactions between compressible flow and solid structures

    KAUST Repository

    Grétarsson, Jón Tómas

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel method to implicitly two-way couple Eulerian compressible flow to volumetric Lagrangian solids. The method works for both deformable and rigid solids and for arbitrary equations of state. The method exploits the formulation of [11] which solves compressible fluid in a semi-implicit manner, solving for the advection part explicitly and then correcting the intermediate state to time tn+1 using an implicit pressure, obtained by solving a modified Poisson system. Similar to previous fluid-structure interaction methods, we apply pressure forces to the solid and enforce a velocity boundary condition on the fluid in order to satisfy a no-slip constraint. Unlike previous methods, however, we apply these coupled interactions implicitly by adding the constraint to the pressure system and combining it with any implicit solid forces in order to obtain a strongly coupled, symmetric indefinite system (similar to [17], which only handles incompressible flow). We also show that, under a few reasonable assumptions, this system can be made symmetric positive-definite by following the methodology of [16]. Because our method handles the fluid-structure interactions implicitly, we avoid introducing any new time step restrictions and obtain stable results even for high density-to-mass ratios, where explicit methods struggle or fail. We exactly conserve momentum and kinetic energy (thermal fluid-structure interactions are not considered) at the fluid-structure interface, and hence naturally handle highly non-linear phenomenon such as shocks, contacts and rarefactions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  6. Spatial variations in food web structures with alternative stable states: evidence from stable isotope analysis in a large eutrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunkai; Zhang, Yuying; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Shuo

    2018-03-01

    Food web structures are well known to vary widely among ecosystems. Moreover, many food web studies of lakes have generally attempted to characterize the overall food web structure and have largely ignored internal spatial and environmental variations. In this study, we hypothesize that there is a high degree of spatial heterogeneity within an ecosystem and such heterogeneity may lead to strong variations in environmental conditions and resource availability, in turn resulting in different trophic pathways. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were employed for the whole food web to describe the structure of the food web in different sub-basins within Taihu Lake. This lake is a large eutrophic freshwater lake that has been intensively managed and highly influenced by human activities for more than 50 years. The results show significant isotopic differences between basins with different environmental characteristics. Such differences likely result from isotopic baseline differences combining with a shift in food web structure. Both are related to local spatial heterogeneity in nutrient loading in waters. Such variation should be explicitly considered in future food web studies and ecosystem-based management in this lake ecosystem.

  7. Spatial variations in food web structures with alternative stable states: evidence from stable isotope analysis in a large eutrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunkai; Zhang, Yuying; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Shuo

    2017-05-01

    Food web structures are well known to vary widely among ecosystems. Moreover, many food web studies of lakes have generally attempted to characterize the overall food web structure and have largely ignored internal spatial and environmental variations. In this study, we hypothesize that there is a high degree of spatial heterogeneity within an ecosystem and such heterogeneity may lead to strong variations in environmental conditions and resource availability, in turn resulting in different trophic pathways. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were employed for the whole food web to describe the structure of the food web in different sub-basins within Taihu Lake. This lake is a large eutrophic freshwater lake that has been intensively managed and highly influenced by human activities for more than 50 years. The results show significant isotopic differences between basins with different environmental characteristics. Such differences likely result from isotopic baseline differences combining with a shift in food web structure. Both are related to local spatial heterogeneity in nutrient loading in waters. Such variation should be explicitly considered in future food web studies and ecosystem-based management in this lake ecosystem.

  8. Inert and stable erbium(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins bearing aryl-ether dendron for optical amplification: synthesis and emission enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Buem; Kim, Yong Hee; Nah, Min Kook; Kim, Hwan Kyu

    2005-01-01

    We have developed novel inert and stable erbium (Er)(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins for optical amplification. The functionalized metalloporphyrin ligands have been designed and synthesized to provide enough coordination sites for the formation of inert and stable 9-coordinated Er(III)-cored complexes. Er 3+ ions were encapsulated by the metalloporphyrin ligands, such as Zn(II)- and Pt(II)-porphyrins. The near-infrared (IR) emission intensity of Er 3+ ion is much stronger in the Er(III)-cored complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin than Er(III)-cored complex based on Zn(II)-porphyrin. Furthermore, we have incorporated a G2-aryl-ether functionalized dendron into the Er(III)-cored complex, yielding an Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex bearing the Pt(II)-porphyrin. The Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex shows the stronger near-IR emission intensity than the corresponding complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin by seven times in solid state. The lifetimes of the emission band of Pt(II)-porphyrin ligands in the visible region were found to be 30 and 40 μs for the Er(III)-cored complex and the Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin in deoxygenated THF solution samples, respectively. Also, in both cases, the sensitized luminescence intensity is increased in deoxygenated solution. Therefore, it indicates that the energy transfer from the metalloporphyrins to Er 3+ ions takes places through the triplet state. In this paper, the synthesis and photophysical properties of novel Er(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins and Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex based on metalloporphyrin will be discussed

  9. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  10. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  11. Structural characterization of the fusion core in syncytin, envelope protein of human endogenous retrovirus family W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Rui; Peng Xiaoxue; Kang Shuli; Feng Huixing; Huang Jianying; Zhang Wentao; Lin Donghai; Tien Po; Xiao Gengfu

    2005-01-01

    Syncytin is a captive retroviral envelope protein, possibly involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer generated by trophoblast cell fusion at the maternal-fetal interface. We found that syncytin and type I viral envelope proteins shared similar structural profiling, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR). We expressed the predicted regions of NHR (41 aa) and CHR (34 aa) in syncytin as a native single chain (named 2-helix protein) to characterize it. 2-helix protein exists as a trimer and is highly α-helix, thermo-stable, and denatured by low pH. NHR and CHR could form a protease-resistant complex. The complex structure built by the molecular docking demonstrated that NHR and CHR associated in an antiparallel manner. Overall, the 2-helix protein could form a thermo-stable coiled coil trimer. The fusion core structure of syncytin was first demonstrated in endogenous retrovirus. These results support the explanation how syncytin mediates cytotrophoblast cell fusion involved in placental morphogenesis

  12. Tribological properties of coating films for core structure of HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Kenji; Kikuchi, Akiyoshi; Kawakami, Haruo

    1985-01-01

    The tribological properties of the various coating films used for the in-core structures of a high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor were examined. When the explosion sprayed films of chrome carbide were applied for preventing galling in core restraining mechanism, the hardness of substrate materials exerted influence on the strength of the coating films. Also the effect of the surface roughness of the plasma sprayed films of zirconia on the sliding characteristics of the zirconia films and PGX graphite used for support plates was clarified. The coefficient of friction and the dependence of the amount of wear on surface pressure of these materials were examined. These results have been effectively utilized for the design of the test bodies of HENDEL-T2. In helium atmosphere, oxide film is hard to be formed on metal surface, especially on the contact surface of metals exposed to high temperature, there is the possibility to cause adhesion due to mutual diffusion and galling in sliding. As the means to prevent those, ceramic coating has been attempted. Sliding test, high pressure joining test, thermal cycle test and corrosion test in helium were carried out to evaluate the properties. (Koko, I.)

  13. Insights on the structure and stability of Licanantase: a trimeric acid-stable coiled-coil lipoprotein from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Abarca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Licanantase (Lic is the major component of the secretome of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans when grown in elemental sulphur. When used as an additive, Lic improves copper recovery from bioleaching processes. However, this recovery enhancement is not fully understood. In this context, our aim is to predict the 3D structure of Lic, to shed light on its structure-function relationships. Bioinformatics analyses on the amino acid sequence of Lic showed a great similarity with Lpp, an Escherichia coli Lipoprotein that can form stable trimers in solution. Lic and Lpp share the secretion motif, intracellular processing and alpha helix structure, as well as the distribution of hydrophobic residues in heptads forming a hydrophobic core, typical of coiled-coil structures. Cross-linking experiments showed the presence of Lic trimers, supporting our predictions. Taking the in vitro and in silico evidence as a whole, we propose that the most probable structure for Lic is a trimeric coiled-coil. According to this prediction, a suitable model for Lic was produced using the de novo algorithm “Rosetta Fold-and-Dock”. To assess the structural stability of our model, Molecular Dynamics (MD and Replica Exchange MD simulations were performed using the structure of Lpp and a 14-alanine Lpp mutant as controls, at both acidic and neutral pH. Our results suggest that Lic was the most stable structure among the studied proteins in both pH conditions. This increased stability can be explained by a higher number of both intermonomer hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds, key elements for the stability of Lic’s secondary and tertiary structure.

  14. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with one-component Cowan-Griffin relativistic Hartree-Fock orbitals, which successfully incorporate the mass-velocity and Darwin terms present in more complicated wavefunctions such as Dirac-Hartree-Fock, one can derive relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's) to carry out molecular calculations. These potentials implicitly include the dominant relativistic terms for molecules while allowing one to use the traditional quantum chemical techniques for studying the electronic structure of molecules. The effects of spin-orbit coupling can then be included using orbitals from such calculations using an effective 1-electron, 1-center spin-orbit operator. Applications to molecular systems involving heavy atoms, show good agreement with available spectroscopic data on molecular geometries and excitation energies

  15. Diagnostic Technology Development for Core Internal Structure in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Cheong, Y. M.; Lee, Y. S. and others

    2005-04-01

    Degradation of critical components of nuclear power plants has become important as the operating years of plants increase. The necessity of degradation study including measurement and monitoring technology has increased continuously. Because the fuel channels and the neighboring sensing tubes and control rods are particularly one of the critical components in CANDU nuclear plant, they are treated as a major research target in order to counteract the possible problems and establish the counterplan for the CANDU reactor safety improvement. To ensure the core structure integrity in CANDU nuclear plant, the following 2 research tasks were performed: Development of NDE technologies for the gap measurement between the fuel channels and LIN tubes. Development of vibration monitoring technology of the fuel channels and sensing tubes. The technologies developed in this study could contribute to the nuclear safety and estimation of the remaining life of operating CANDU nuclear power plants

  16. Technical Meeting on Liquid Metal Reactor Concepts: Core Design and Structural Materials. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the Technical Meeting is to present and discuss innovative liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) core designs with special focus on the choice, development, testing and qualification of advanced reactor core structural materials

  17. Thermal interaction of core melt debris with the TMI-2 baffle, core-former, and lower head structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Tolman, E.L.

    1987-09-01

    Recent inspection of the TMI-2 core-former baffle walls (vertical), former plates (horizontal), and lower plenum has been conducted to assess potential damage to these structures. Video observations show evidence of localized melt failure of the baffle walls, whereas fiberoptics data indicate the presence of resolidified debris on the former plates. Lower plenum inspection also confirms the presence of 20 tons or more of core debris in the lower plenum. These data indicate massive core melt relocation and the potential for melt attack on vessel structural components. This report presents analyses aimed at developing an understanding of melt relocation behavior and damage progression to TMI-2 vessel components. Thermal analysis indicates melt-through of the baffle plates, but maintenance of structural integrity of the former plates and lower head. Differences in the damage of these structures is attributed largely to differences in contact time with melt debris and pressure of water. 29 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs

  18. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP....

  19. Structure of stable degeneration of K3 surfaces into pairs of rational elliptic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2018-03-01

    F-theory/heterotic duality is formulated in the stable degeneration limit of a K3 fibration on the F-theory side. In this note, we analyze the structure of the stable degeneration limit. We discuss whether stable degeneration exists for pairs of rational elliptic surfaces. We demonstrate that, when two rational elliptic surfaces have an identical complex structure, stable degeneration always exists. We provide an equation that systematically describes the stable degeneration of a K3 surface into a pair of isomorphic rational elliptic surfaces. When two rational elliptic surfaces have different complex structures, whether their sum glued along a smooth fiber admits deformation to a K3 surface can be determined by studying the structure of the K3 lattice. We investigate the lattice theoretic condition to determine whether a deformation to a K3 surface exists for pairs of extremal rational elliptic surfaces. In addition, we discuss the configurations of singular fibers under stable degeneration. The sum of two isomorphic rational elliptic surfaces glued together admits a deformation to a K3 surface, the singular fibers of which are twice that of the rational elliptic surface. For special situations, singular fibers of the resulting K3 surface collide and they are enhanced to a fiber of another type. Some K3 surfaces become attractive in these situations. We determine the complex structures and the Weierstrass forms of these attractive K3 surfaces. We also deduce the gauge groups in F-theory compactifications on these attractive K3 surfaces times a K3. E 6, E 7, E 8, SU(5), and SO(10) gauge groups arise in these compactifications.

  20. Core Design Concept and Core Structural Material Development for a Prototype SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jinwook

    2013-01-01

    Core design Concept: – Initial core is Uranium metal fueled core, then it will evolve into TRU core; – Tight pressure drop constraint lowers power density; – Trade-off studies with relaxed pressure drop constraint (~0.4MPa) are on-going; – Major feature will be finalized this year. • KAERI is developing advanced cladding for high burnup fuel in Ptototype SFR: – Advanced cladding materials are now developing, which shows superior high temperature mechanical property to the conventional material; – Processing technologies related to tube making process are now developed to enhance high temperature mechanical propertyl – Preliminary HT9 cladding tube was manufactured and out-of pile mechanical properties were evaluated. Advanced cladding tube is now being developed and being prepared for irradiation test

  1. Biomarker Evidence of Relatively Stable Community Structure in the Northern South China Sea during the Last Glacial and Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution molecular abundance records for several marine biomarkers during the last glacial and Holocene have been generated for core MD05-2904 (19 _ 116 _ 2066 mwater depth from the northern South China Sea. The UK' 37 SST record indicates a 4.4 C cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum for this site, consistent with previous reconstructions. The contents of C37 alkenones, dinosterol, brassicasterol, and C30 alkyl diols are used as productivity proxies for haptophytes, dinoflagellates, diatoms, and eustigmatophytes, respectively. These records reveal that both individual phytoplankton group and total productivity increased by several factors during the LGM compared with those for the Holocene, in response to increased nutrient supply. However, the community structure based on biomarker percentages remained relatively stable during the last glacial-Holocene transition, although there were short-term oscillations.

  2. Stable preparations of tyrosine hydroxylase provide the solution structure of the full-length enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezem, Maria T.; Baumann, Anne; Skjærven, Lars; Meyer, Romain; Kursula, Petri; Martinez, Aurora; Flydal, Marte I.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. TH is a highly complex enzyme at mechanistic, structural, and regulatory levels, and the preparation of kinetically and conformationally stable enzyme for structural characterization has been challenging. Here, we report on improved protocols for purification of recombinant human TH isoform 1 (TH1), which provide large amounts of pure, stable, active TH1 with an intact N-terminus. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged maltose-binding protein on amylose resin was representative of the iron-bound functional enzyme, showing high activity and stabilization by the natural feedback inhibitor dopamine. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged ZZ domain on TALON is remarkably stable, as it was partially inhibited by resin-derived cobalt. This more stable enzyme preparation provided high-quality small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and reliable structural models of full-length tetrameric TH1. The SAXS-derived model reveals an elongated conformation (Dmax = 20 nm) for TH1, different arrangement of the catalytic domains compared with the crystal structure of truncated forms, and an N-terminal region with an unstructured tail that hosts the phosphorylation sites and a separated Ala-rich helical motif that may have a role in regulation of TH by interacting with binding partners. PMID:27462005

  3. Structure and Stability of Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, Saskia; de Vries, Renko; Norde, Willem; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham

    2007-01-01

    Encapsulation of enzymes by polymers is a promising method to influence their activity and stability. Here, we explore the use of complex coacervate core micelles for encapsulation of enzymes. The core of the micelles consists of negatively charged blocks of the diblock copolymer PAA42PAAm417 and

  4. Structure and stability of complex coacervate core micelles with lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, Saskia; de Vries, Renko; Norde, Willem; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.

    Encapsulation of enzymes by polymers is a promising method to influence their activity and stability. Here, we explore the use of complex coacervate core micelles for encapsulation of enzymes. The core of the micelles consists of negatively charged blocks of the diblock copolymer PAA(42)PAAm(417)

  5. Design of the core support and restraint structures for FFTF and CRBRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, H.G.; Rylatt, J.A.

    1977-12-01

    This paper presents and compares the design and fabrication of the FFTF and CRBRP reactor structures which support and restrain the reactor core assemblies. The fabrication of the core support structure (CSS) for the FFTF reactor was completed October 1972 and this paper discusses how the fabrication problems encountered with the FFTF were avoided in the subsequent design of the CRBR CSS. The radial core restraint structure of the FFTF was designed and fabricated such that an active system could replace the present passive system which is segmented and relies on the CSS core barrel for total structure integrity to maintain core geometry. The CRBR core restraint structure is designed for passive restraint only, and this paper discusses how the combined strengths of the restraint structure former rings and the CSS core barrel are utilized to maintain core geometry. Whereas the CSS for the FFTF interfaces directly with the reactor core assemblies, the CRBR CSS does not. A comparison is made on how intermediate structures in CRBR (inlet modules) provide the necessary design interfaces for supporting and providing flow distribution to the reactor core assemblies. A discussion is given on how the CRBR CSS satisfied the design requirements of the Equipment Specification, including thermal transient, dynamic and seismic loadings, and results of flow distribution testing that supported the CRBR design effort. The approach taken to simplify fabrication of the CRBR components, and a novel 20 inch deep narrow gap weld joint in the CSS are described

  6. Structures of glide-set 90 deg. partial dislocation cores in diamond cubic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, S.P.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    Two core reconstructions of the 90 deg. partial dislocations in diamond cubic semiconductors, the so-called single- and double-period structures, are often found to be nearly degenerate in energy. This near degeneracy suggests the possibility that both core reconstructions may be present simultaneously along the same dislocation core, with the domain sizes of the competing reconstructions dependent on temperature and the local stress state. To explore this dependence, a simple statistical mechanics-based model of the dislocation core reconstructions is developed and analyzed. Predictions for the temperature-dependent structure of the dislocation core are presented

  7. Embodied memory: effective and stable perception by combining optic flow and image structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing Samantha; Bingham, Ned; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2013-12-01

    Visual perception studies typically focus either on optic flow structure or image structure, but not on the combination and interaction of these two sources of information. Each offers unique strengths in contrast to the other's weaknesses. Optic flow yields intrinsically powerful information about 3D structure, but is ephemeral. It ceases when motion stops. Image structure is less powerful in specifying 3D structure, but is stable. It remains when motion stops. Optic flow and image structure are intrinsically related in vision because the optic flow carries one image to the next. This relation is especially important in the context of progressive occlusion, in which optic flow provides information about the location of targets hidden in subsequent image structure. In four experiments, we investigated the role of image structure in "embodied memory" in contrast to memory that is only in the head. We found that either optic flow (Experiment 1) or image structure (Experiment 2) alone were relatively ineffective, whereas the combination was effective and, in contrast to conditions requiring reliance on memory-in-the-head, much more stable over extended time (Experiments 2 through 4). Limits well documented for visual short memory (that is, memory-in-the-head) were strongly exceeded by embodied memory. The findings support J. J. Gibson's (1979/1986, The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception, Boston, MA, Houghton Mifflin) insights about progressive occlusion and the embodied nature of perception and memory.

  8. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database

  9. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  10. Structural organization of the quiescent core region in a turbulent channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jongmin; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The structural organization of the quiescent core region in a turbulent channel flow is explored. • The quiescent core region is the uniform momentum zone located at the center of the channel. • The boundary of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. • The prograde and retrograde vortices form a counter-rotating vortex pair at the boundary of the core region. - Abstract: The structural organization of the quiescent core region in a turbulent channel flow was explored using direct numerical simulation data at Re_τ = 930. The quiescent core region is the uniform momentum zone located at the center of the channel, and contains the highest momentum with a low level of turbulence. The boundary of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. The streamwise velocity changes abruptly near the boundary of the core region. The abrupt jump leads the increase of the velocity gradient, which is similar to the vorticity thickness of the laminar superlayer at the turbulent/non-turbulent interface. The strong shear induced from the abrupt change is originated from the vortical structure lying on the boundary of the core region. The spanwise population densities of the prograde and retrograde vortices have a local maximum near the boundary of the core region. The prograde vortex dominantly contributes to the total mean shear near the core boundary and the contribution to the total mean shear rapidly decreases within the core region. The prograde and retrograde vortices form a counter-rotating vortex pair at the boundary of the core region associated with the nibbling mechanism. The boundary of the core region contains large-scale concave and convex features. The concave (convex) core interface is organized by the negative-u (positive-u) regions which induce the ejections (sweeps) around the core boundary.

  11. Dipolar Quinoidal Acene Analogues as Stable Isoelectronic Structures of Pentacene and Nonacene

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xueliang

    2015-10-08

    Quinoidal thia-acene analogues, as the respective isoelectronic structures of pentacene and nonacene, were synthesized and an unusual 1,2-sulfur migration was observed during the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. The analogues display a closed-shell quinoidal structure in the ground state with a distinctive dipolar character. In contrast to their acene isoelectronic structures, both compounds are stable because of the existence of more aromatic sextet rings, a dipolar character, and kinetic blocking. They exhibit unique packing in single crystals resulting from balanced dipole-dipole and [C-H⋯π]/[C-H⋯S] interactions.

  12. Dynamic response of cylindrical ACS support structures to core energy release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    The code SAFE/RAS is applied to the analysis of a new design concept for the above-core structures when subjected to the loads of a core disruptive accident. The analysis involves the determination of the postbuckling response of a thin cylinder loaded both axially and vertically. The effects of variation of cylinder thickness and fluid-structure interaction are investigated

  13. Engineering review of the core support structure of the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The review of the core support structure of the gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) covered such areas as the design criteria, the design and analysis of the concepts, the development plan, and the projected manufacturing costs. Recommendations are provided to establish a basis for future work on the GCFR core support structure

  14. Stable structures of Al510–800 clusters and lowest energy sequence of truncated octahedral Al clusters up to 10,000 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xia; He, Chengdong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The stable structures of Al 510–800 clusters are obtained with the NP-B potential. ► Al 510–800 clusters adopt truncated octahedral (TO) growth pattern based on complete TOs at Al 405 , Al 586 , and Al 711 . ► The lowest energy sequence of complete TOs up to the size 10,000 is proposed. -- Abstract: The stable structures of Al 510–800 clusters are obtained using dynamic lattice searching with constructed cores (DLSc) method by the NP-B potential. According to the structural growth rule, octahedra and truncated octahedra (TO) configurations are adopted as the inner cores in DLSc method. The results show that in the optimized structures two complete TO structures are found at Al 586 and Al 711 . Furthermore, Al 510–800 clusters adopt TO growth pattern on complete TOs at Al 405 , Al 586 , and Al 711 , and the configurations of the surface atoms are investigated. On the other hand, Al clusters with complete TO motifs are studied up to the size 10,000 by the geometrical construction method. The structural characteristics of complete TOs are denoted by the term “family”, and the growth sequence of Al clusters is investigated. The lowest energy sequence of complete TOs is proposed.

  15. Effect of varying geometrical parameters of trapezoidal corrugated-core sandwich structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid N.Z.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structure is an attractive alternative that increasingly used in the transportation and aerospace industry. Corrugated-core with trapezoidal shape allows enhancing the damage resistance to the sandwich structure, but on the other hand, it changes the structural response of the sandwich structure. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of varying geometrical parameters of trapezoidal corrugated-core sandwich structure under compression loading. The corrugated-core specimen was fabricated using press technique, following the shape of trapezoidal shape. Two different materials were used in the study, glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP. The result shows that the mechanical properties of the core in compression loading are sensitive to the variation of a number of unit cells and the core thickness.

  16. Dark matter halos with cores from hierarchical structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigari, Louis E.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Bullock, James S.

    2007-01-01

    We show that dark matter emerging from late decays (z or approx. 0.1 Mpc), and simultaneously generates observable constant-density cores in small dark matter halos. We refer to this class of models as meta-cold dark matter (mCDM), because it is born with nonrelativistic velocities from the decays of cold thermal relics. The constant-density cores are a result of the low phase-space density of mCDM at birth. Warm dark matter cannot produce similar size phase-space limited cores without saturating the Lyα power spectrum bounds. Dark matter-dominated galaxy rotation curves and stellar velocity dispersion profiles may provide the best means to discriminate between mCDM and CDM. mCDM candidates are motivated by the particle spectrum of supersymmetric and extra dimensional extensions to the standard model of particle physics

  17. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    In this review an approach is outlined for studying molecules containing heavy atoms with the use of relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's). These potentials play the dual roles of (1) replacing the chemically-inert core electrons and (2) incorporating the mass velocity and Darwin term into a one-electron effective potential. This reduces the problem to a valence-electron problem and avoids computation of additional matrix elements involving relativistic operators. The spin-orbit effects are subsequently included using the molecular orbitals derived from the RECP calculation as a basis

  18. Structural Integrity Evaluation of the KALIMER-600 Reactor Core Support Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Jae Han

    2005-01-01

    KALIMER-600(Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor, 600MWe) is a pool type sodium-cooled liquid metal reactor. Since the normal operating temperature of KALIMER-600 is 545 .deg. C, the reactor structures in the hot pool region are designed and evaluated according to the elevated temperature design rules such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III, Subsection NH. Since the core support structure of KALIMER-600 is in the cold pool region under 400 .deg. C, a high temperature inelastic behavior is not expected. Thus the stress and fatigue limits are the main concerns to assure the structural design integrity following the ASME Subsection NG. In this paper, the evaluations of the stress and fatigue damage for the core support structure of KALIMER-600 are carrried out in the case of a normal operation condition using the rules of ASME Subsection NG. To obtain the stress values, a heat transfer analysis and a stress analysis under a combined loading condition are performed. From the stress distribution results, the critical sections are selected and the stress and fatigue limits are evaluated for the selected regions

  19. Rigid polyurethane foam – kenaf core composites for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is a fast growing summer annual crop with numerous commercial applications (fibers, biofuels, bioremediation, paper pulp, building materials, cover crops, and livestock forages). The stalks of the kenaf plants contain two distinct fiber types, bast and core fibers. The...

  20. Phase behaviour and structure of stable complexes of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, V.; Auvray, L.; Zeghal, M.

    2009-03-01

    We study the formation and structure of stable electrostatic complexes between oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, a long polymethacrylic acid and a shorter polyethylenimine, at low pH, where the polyacid is weakly charged. We explore the phase diagram as a function of the charge and concentration ratio of the constituents. In agreement with theory, turbidity and ζ potential measurements show two distinct regimes of weak and strong complexation, which appear successively as the pH is increased and are separated by a well-defined limit. Weak complexes observed by neutron scattering and contrast matching have an open, non-compact structure, while strong complexes are condensed.

  1. The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure: A predictive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiangmeng; Wei, Kai; He, Rujie; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A predictive model of the equivalent thermal conductivity was established. • Both the heat conduction and radiation were considered. • The predictive results were in good agreement with experiment and FEM. • Some methods for improving the thermal protection performance were proposed. - Abstract: The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure was predicted using a novel model. The predictive results were in good agreement with experimental and Finite Element Method results. The thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure was attributed to both core conduction and radiation. The core conduction caused thermal conductivity only relied on the relative density of the structure. And the radiation caused thermal conductivity increased linearly with the thickness of the core. It was found that the equivalent thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure showed a highly dependent relationship on temperature. At low temperatures, the structure exhibited a nearly thermal insulated behavior. With the temperature increasing, the thermal conductivity of the structure increased owing to radiation. Therefore, some attempts, such as reducing the emissivity of the core or designing multilayered structure, are believe to be of benefit for improving the thermal protection performance of the structure at high temperatures.

  2. Structure of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Huguet, L.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S.; Alboussiere, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone, under hyper-gravity. A commercial centrifuge has been equipped with a slip-ring so that electric power, temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. A Peltier element provides cooling at the bottom of the cell. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. Ultrasound measurements (2 to 6 MHz) is used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. A significant increase of solid fraction (or decrease of mushy layer thickness) and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core, which has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in solid fraction and a decrease in attenuation. It is hence possible that surface seismic velocity

  3. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  4. Dynamic Risk Assessment of Sexual Offenders: Validity and Dimensional Structure of the Stable-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzler, Sonja; Eher, Reinhard; Rettenberger, Martin

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the predictive and incremental validity of the Stable-2007 beyond the Static-99 was evaluated in an updated sample of N = 638 adult male sexual offenders followed-up for an average of M = 8.2 years. Data were collected at the Federal Evaluation Center for Violent and Sexual Offenders (FECVSO) in Austria within a prospective-longitudinal research design. Scores and risk categories of the Static-99 (AUC = .721; p risk categories contributed incrementally to the prediction of sexual recidivism beyond the Static-99. Analyzing the dimensional structure of the Stable-2007 yielded three factors, named Antisociality, Sexual Deviance, and Hypersexuality. Antisociality and Sexual Deviance were significant predictors for sexual recidivism. Sexual Deviance was negatively associated with non-sexual violent recidivism. Comparisons with latent dimensions of other risk assessment instruments are made and implications for applied risk assessment are discussed.

  5. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  6. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Structural insights into methanol-stable variants of lipase T6 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Adi; Kanteev, Margarita; Kagan, Irit; Gihaz, Shalev; Shahar, Anat; Fishman, Ayelet

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic production of biodiesel by transesterification of triglycerides and alcohol, catalyzed by lipases, offers an environmentally friendly and efficient alternative to the chemically catalyzed process while using low-grade feedstocks. Methanol is utilized frequently as the alcohol in the reaction due to its reactivity and low cost. However, one of the major drawbacks of the enzymatic system is the presence of high methanol concentrations which leads to methanol-induced unfolding and inactivation of the biocatalyst. Therefore, a methanol-stable lipase is of great interest for the biodiesel industry. In this study, protein engineering was applied to substitute charged surface residues with hydrophobic ones to enhance the stability in methanol of a lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. We identified a methanol-stable variant, R374W, and combined it with a variant found previously, H86Y/A269T. The triple mutant, H86Y/A269T/R374W, had a half-life value at 70 % methanol of 324 min which reflects an 87-fold enhanced stability compared to the wild type together with elevated thermostability in buffer and in 50 % methanol. This variant also exhibited an improved biodiesel yield from waste chicken oil compared to commercial Lipolase 100L® and Novozyme® CALB. Crystal structures of the wild type and the methanol-stable variants provided insights regarding structure-stability correlations. The most prominent features were the extensive formation of new hydrogen bonds between surface residues directly or mediated by structural water molecules and the stabilization of Zn and Ca binding sites. Mutation sites were also characterized by lower B-factor values calculated from the X-ray structures indicating improved rigidity.

  8. Further HTGR core support structure reliability studies. Interim report No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platus, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Results of a continuing effort to investigate high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) core support structure reliability are described. Graphite material and core support structure component physical, mechanical and strength properties required for the reliability analysis are identified. Also described are experimental and associated analytical techniques for determining the required properties, a procedure for determining number of tests required, properties that might be monitored by special surveillance of the core support structure to improve reliability predictions, and recommendations for further studies. Emphasis in the study is directed towards developing a basic understanding of graphite failure and strength degradation mechanisms; and validating analytical methods for predicting strength and strength degradation from basic material properties

  9. Effects of core perturbations on the structure of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweigart, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    A number of numerical experiments have been carried out in order to investigate the sensivity of the solar luminosity and radius to perturbations within the radiative core. In these experiments the core was perturbed by suddenly mixing various parts of the composition profile during evolutionary sequences for the present Sun. The hydrostatic readjustment caused by these ''mixing events'' induced an immediate change in the surface luminosity and radius on both the hydrodynamic time scale (approx.15 minutes) and the thermal time scale of the superadiabatic layers (approx.1 day). The subsequent evolution of the luminosity and radius perturbations was followed for 5 x 10 5 yr after each mixing event. The time-dependent behavior of these perturbations was found to depend on where the mixing event occurred. In all cases, however, the ratio W(t) = Δ log R/Δ log L had an initial value of 0.71 and showed only a mild time dependence during the first several thousand years. Two other relationships between the luminosity and radius perturbations are also discussed. One of these, V(t) = (d log R/dd)/(d log L/dt), has a fairly constant value of 0.3 +- 0.1. Both perturbations in the mixing-length ratio α and perturbations in the magnetic pressure within the solar convective envelope yield the same value for V/(t). During the normal unperturbed evolution of the present Sun, V(t) = 0.4. Our results show that core perturbations such as the present mixing events cannot explain the decrease in the solar radius indicated by the solar eclipse data between 1925 and 1980

  10. Identification of core components and transient interactors of the peroxisomal importomer by dual-track stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeljeklaus, Silke; Reinartz, Benedikt S; Wolf, Janina; Wiese, Sebastian; Tonillo, Jason; Podwojski, Katharina; Kuhlmann, Katja; Stephan, Christian; Meyer, Helmut E; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Brocard, Cécile; Erdmann, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina

    2012-04-06

    The importomer complex plays an essential role in the biogenesis of peroxisomes by mediating the translocation of matrix proteins across the organellar membrane. A central part of this highly dynamic import machinery is the docking complex consisting of Pex14p, Pex13p, and Pex17p that is linked to the RING finger complex (Pex2p, Pex10p, Pex12p) via Pex8p. To gain detailed knowledge on the molecular players governing peroxisomal matrix protein import and, thus, the integrity and functionality of peroxisomes, we aimed at a most comprehensive investigation of stable and transient interaction partners of Pex14p, the central component of the importomer. To this end, we performed a thorough quantitative proteomics study based on epitope tagging of Pex14p combined with dual-track stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture-mass spectrometry (SILAC-MS) analysis of affinity-purified Pex14p complexes and statistics. The results led to the establishment of the so far most extensive Pex14p interactome, comprising 9 core and further 12 transient components. We confirmed virtually all known Pex14p interaction partners including the core constituents of the importomer as well as Pex5p, Pex11p, Pex15p, and Dyn2p. More importantly, we identified new transient interaction partners (Pex25p, Hrr25p, Esl2p, prohibitin) that provide a valuable resource for future investigations on the functionality, dynamics, and regulation of the peroxisomal importomer.

  11. [Research progress on food sources and food web structure of wetlands based on stable isotopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan Yan; Wu, Hai Tao; Wang, Yun Biao; Lyu, Xian Guo

    2017-07-18

    The trophic dynamics of wetland organisms is the basis of assessing wetland structure and function. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen have been widely applied to identify trophic relationships in food source, food composition and food web transport in wetland ecosystem studies. This paper provided an overall review about the current methodology of isotope mixing model and trophic level in wetland ecosystems, and discussed the standards of trophic fractionation and baseline. Moreover, we characterized the typical food sources and isotopic compositions of wetland ecosystems, summarized the food sources in different trophic levels of herbivores, omnivores and carnivores based on stable isotopic analyses. We also discussed the limitations of stable isotopes in tra-cing food sources and in constructing food webs. Based on the current results, development trends and upcoming requirements, future studies should focus on sample treatment, conservation and trophic enrichment measurement in the wetland food web, as well as on combing a variety of methodologies including traditional stomach stuffing, molecular markers, and multiple isotopes.

  12. Entropy stable high order discontinuous Galerkin methods for ideal compressible MHD on structured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Shu, Chi-Wang; Zhang, Mengping

    2018-02-01

    We present a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme with suitable quadrature rules [15] for ideal compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations on structural meshes. The semi-discrete scheme is analyzed to be entropy stable by using the symmetrizable version of the equations as introduced by Godunov [32], the entropy stable DG framework with suitable quadrature rules [15], the entropy conservative flux in [14] inside each cell and the entropy dissipative approximate Godunov type numerical flux at cell interfaces to make the scheme entropy stable. The main difficulty in the generalization of the results in [15] is the appearance of the non-conservative "source terms" added in the modified MHD model introduced by Godunov [32], which do not exist in the general hyperbolic system studied in [15]. Special care must be taken to discretize these "source terms" adequately so that the resulting DG scheme satisfies entropy stability. Total variation diminishing / bounded (TVD/TVB) limiters and bound-preserving limiters are applied to control spurious oscillations. We demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of this new scheme on standard MHD examples.

  13. Optimal physiological structure of small neurons to guarantee stable information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, S. Y.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Wei, D. Q.; Luo, X. S.; Tang, W. Y.; Zeng, S. W.; Wang, R. F.

    2013-02-01

    Spike is the basic element for neuronal information processing and the spontaneous spiking frequency should be less than 1 Hz for stable information processing. If the neuronal membrane area is small, the frequency of neuronal spontaneous spiking caused by ion channel noise may be high. Therefore, it is important to suppress the deleterious spontaneous spiking of the small neurons. We find by simulation of stochastic neurons with Hodgkin-Huxley-type channels that the leakage system is critical and extremely efficient to suppress the spontaneous spiking and guarantee stable information processing of the small neurons. However, within the physiological limit the potassium system cannot do so. The suppression effect of the leakage system is super-exponential, but that of the potassium system is quasi-linear. With the minor physiological cost and the minimal consumption of metabolic energy, a slightly lower reversal potential and a relatively larger conductance of the leakage system give the optimal physiological structure to suppress the deleterious spontaneous spiking and guarantee stable information processing of small neurons, dendrites and axons.

  14. Biophysical investigation of type A PutAs reveals a conserved core oligomeric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korasick, David A. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Singh, Harkewal [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Pemberton, Travis A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Luo, Min [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Dhatwalia, Richa [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Tanner, John J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA

    2017-08-01

    Many enzymes form homooligomers, yet the functional significance of self-association is seldom obvious. Herein, we examine the connection between oligomerization and catalytic function for proline utilization A (PutA) enzymes. PutAs are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both reactions of proline catabolism. Type A PutAs are the smallest members of the family, possessing a minimal domain architecture consisting of N-terminal proline dehydrogenase and C-terminal l-glutamate-γ-semialdehyde dehydrogenase modules. Type A PutAs form domain-swapped dimers, and in one case (Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA), two of the dimers assemble into a ring-shaped tetramer. Whereas the dimer has a clear role in substrate channeling, the functional significance of the tetramer is unknown. To address this question, we performed structural studies of four-type A PutAs from two clades of the PutA tree. The crystal structure of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus PutA covalently inactivated by N-propargylglycine revealed a fold and substrate-channeling tunnel similar to other PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that Bdellovibrio PutA is dimeric in solution, in contrast to the prediction from crystal packing of a stable tetrameric assembly. SAXS studies of two other type A PutAs from separate clades also suggested that the dimer predominates in solution. To assess whether the tetramer of B. japonicum PutA is necessary for catalytic function, a hot spot disruption mutant that cleanly produces dimeric protein was generated. The dimeric variant exhibited kinetic parameters similar to the wild-type enzyme. These results implicate the domain-swapped dimer as the core structural and functional unit of type A PutAs.

  15. Some structural aspects of language are more stable than others: a comparison of seven methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Dediu

    Full Text Available Understanding the patterns and causes of differential structural stability is an area of major interest for the study of language change and evolution. It is still debated whether structural features have intrinsic stabilities across language families and geographic areas, or if the processes governing their rate of change are completely dependent upon the specific context of a given language or language family. We conducted an extensive literature review and selected seven different approaches to conceptualising and estimating the stability of structural linguistic features, aiming at comparing them using the same dataset, the World Atlas of Language Structures. We found that, despite profound conceptual and empirical differences between these methods, they tend to agree in classifying some structural linguistic features as being more stable than others. This suggests that there are intrinsic properties of such structural features influencing their stability across methods, language families and geographic areas. This finding is a major step towards understanding the nature of structural linguistic features and their interaction with idiosyncratic, lineage- and area-specific factors during language change and evolution.

  16. Design and analysis of EI core structured transverse flux linear reluctance actuator

    OpenAIRE

    FENERCİOĞLU, AHMET; AVŞAR, YUSUF

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an EI core linear actuator is proposed for horizontal movement systems. It is a transverse flux linear switched reluctance motor designed with an EI core structure geometrically. The actuator is configured into three phases and at a 6/4 pole ratio, and it has a stationary active stator along with a sliding passive translator. The stator consists of E cores and the translator consists of I cores. The actuator has a yokeless design because the stator and translator have no back i...

  17. Use of systematics in the interpretation of nuclear structure far from the beta-stable region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The use of systematics in the interpretation of nuclear structure far from the beta-stable region is discussed. In particular, a set of rules for the use of systematics is presented together with some experimental criteria that need to be fulfilled for radioactive decay scheme studies in order that all states up to a given spin-parity and energy are located. Illustrative examples are taken from the region 180 < A < 210, with particular emphasis on the odd-mass Au and Hg nuclei. 6 figures

  18. Density-based and transport-based core-periphery structures in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Cucuringu, Mihai; Porter, Mason A

    2014-03-01

    Networks often possess mesoscale structures, and studying them can yield insights into both structure and function. It is most common to study community structure, but numerous other types of mesoscale structures also exist. In this paper, we examine core-periphery structures based on both density and transport. In such structures, core network components are well-connected both among themselves and to peripheral components, which are not well-connected to anything. We examine core-periphery structures in a wide range of examples of transportation, social, and financial networks-including road networks in large urban areas, a rabbit warren, a dolphin social network, a European interbank network, and a migration network between counties in the United States. We illustrate that a recently developed transport-based notion of node coreness is very useful for characterizing transportation networks. We also generalize this notion to examine core versus peripheral edges, and we show that the resulting diagnostic is also useful for transportation networks. To examine the properties of transportation networks further, we develop a family of generative models of roadlike networks. We illustrate the effect of the dimensionality of the embedding space on transportation networks, and we demonstrate that the correlations between different measures of coreness can be very different for different types of networks.

  19. A simple approach to the construction of the core structure present in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple approach to the construction of the core structure present in bielschowskysin and ... spongeHippospongia lachneelicited considerable interest amongst the organic ..... ogy, Government of India for financial support through. J. C. Bose ...

  20. Construction of In-core Structure Test Section in HENDEL, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Ioka, Ikuo; Kondoh, Yasuo; Nekoya, Shinichi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Akisada, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    An In-core Structure Test Section (T 2 ) in Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL) simulates a part of the core bottom structure with the same scale as that of a high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) designed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The design and construction of T 2 test section were started in March 1983, and completed in June 1986. The main objectives of the T 2 test section are to verify thermal-hydraulic performance and integrity of the core bottom structure. The report describes the general outline of T 2 test section, and experience gained from construction and preliminary test with regard to the simulated core bottom structure. (author)

  1. Thailand - Social and Structural Review : Beyond the Crisis - Structural Reform for Stable Growth

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2000-01-01

    Following the East Asian financial crisis, the Bank's involvement in Thailand intensified, enabling a multifaceted stabilization, and structural reform dialogue, which deepened the economic, financial, and sector knowledge of the country. The study benefits from this analytical work, and provides an overview on the ongoing policy dialogue, regarding short- and medium-term reform, through a...

  2. Beacon: A three-dimensional structural analysis code for bowing history of fast breeder reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, K.

    1979-01-01

    The core elements of an LMFBR are bowed due to radial gradients of both temperature and neutron flux in the core. Since all hexagonal elements are multiply supported by adjacent elements or the restraint system, restraint forces and bending stresses are induced. In turn, these forces and stresses are relaxed by irradiation enhanced creep of the material. The analysis of the core bowing behavior requires a three-dimensional consideration of the mechanical interactions among the core elements, because the core consists of different kinds of elements and of fuel assemblies with various burnup histories. A new computational code BEACON has been developed for analyzing the bowing behavior of an LMFBR's core in three dimensions. To evaluate mechanical interactions among core elements, the code uses the analytical method of the earlier SHADOW code. BEACON analyzes the mechanical interactions in three directions, which form angles of 60 0 with one another. BEACON is applied to the 60 0 sector of a typical LMFBR's core for analyzing the bowing history during one equilibrium cycle. 120 core elements are treated, assuming the boundary condition of rotational symmetry. The application confirms that the code can be an effective tool for parametric studies as well as for detailed structural analysis of LMFBR's core. (orig.)

  3. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Traversa, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte

  4. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for Stable, Comparative Analyses of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Human Disease Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Alison J; Bray, James E; Jolley, Keith A; McCarthy, Noel D; Maiden, Martin C J

    2017-07-01

    Human campylobacteriosis, caused by Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli , remains a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in many countries, but the epidemiology of campylobacteriosis outbreaks remains poorly defined, largely due to limitations in the resolution and comparability of isolate characterization methods. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data enable the improvement of sequence-based typing approaches, such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST), by substantially increasing the number of loci examined. A core genome MLST (cgMLST) scheme defines a comprehensive set of those loci present in most members of a bacterial group, balancing very high resolution with comparability across the diversity of the group. Here we propose a set of 1,343 loci as a human campylobacteriosis cgMLST scheme (v1.0), the allelic profiles of which can be assigned to core genome sequence types. The 1,343 loci chosen were a subset of the 1,643 loci identified in the reannotation of the genome sequence of C. jejuni isolate NCTC 11168, chosen as being present in >95% of draft genomes of 2,472 representative United Kingdom campylobacteriosis isolates, comprising 2,207 (89.3%) C. jejuni isolates and 265 (10.7%) C. coli isolates. Validation of the cgMLST scheme was undertaken with 1,478 further high-quality draft genomes, containing 150 or fewer contiguous sequences, from disease isolate collections: 99.5% of these isolates contained ≥95% of the 1,343 cgMLST loci. In addition to the rapid and effective high-resolution analysis of large numbers of diverse isolates, the cgMLST scheme enabled the efficient identification of very closely related isolates from a well-defined single-source campylobacteriosis outbreak. Copyright © 2017 Cody et al.

  5. Structure and electronic properties of mixed (a + c) dislocation cores in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, M. K., E-mail: m.horton11@imperial.ac.uk [Department Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rhode, S. L. [Department Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Moram, M. A. [Department Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-14

    Classical atomistic models and atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of GaN films reveal that mixed (a + c)-type dislocations have multiple different core structures, including a dissociated structure consisting of a planar fault on one of the (12{sup ¯}10) planes terminated by two different partial dislocations. Density functional theory calculations show that all cores introduce localized states into the band gap, which affects device performance.

  6. Structure and electronic properties of mixed (a + c) dislocation cores in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, M. K.; Rhode, S. L.; Moram, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Classical atomistic models and atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of GaN films reveal that mixed (a + c)-type dislocations have multiple different core structures, including a dissociated structure consisting of a planar fault on one of the (12 ¯ 10) planes terminated by two different partial dislocations. Density functional theory calculations show that all cores introduce localized states into the band gap, which affects device performance

  7. Determination of Core-Shell Structures in Pd-Hg Nanoparticles by STEM-EDX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The structural and elemental configuration of a high-performing Pd-Hg electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction to hydrogen peroxide has been studied by means of high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Pd-Hg nanoparticles are shown to have a crystalline core-shell structure, with a Pd...... core and a Pd-Hg ordered alloy shell. The ordered shell is responsible for the high oxygen reduction selectivity to H2O2....

  8. Rapid and high throughput fabrication of high temperature stable structures through PDMS transfer printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, Erik; Freitag, Nathan; Korampally, Venumadhav

    2017-07-01

    We report on a facile and low cost fabrication approach for structures—gratings and enclosed nanochannels, through simple solution processed chemistries in conjunction with nanotransfer printing techniques. The ink formulation primarily consisting of an organosilicate polymeric network with a small percentage of added 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane crosslinker allows one to obtain robust structures that are not only stable towards high temperature processing steps as high as 550 °C but also exhibit exceptional stability against a host of organic solvent washes. No discernable structure distortion was observed compared to the as-printed structures (room temperature processed) when printed structures were subjected to temperatures as high as 550 °C. We further demonstrate the applicability of this technique towards the fabrication of more complex nanostructures such as enclosed channels through a double transfer method, leveraging the exceptional room temperature cross-linking ability of the printed structures and their subsequent resistance to dissolution in organic solvent washes. The exceptional temperature and physico-chemical stability of the nanotransfer printed structures makes this a useful fabrication tool that may be applied as is, or integrated with conventional lithographic techniques for the large area fabrication of functional nanostructures and devices.

  9. Stable 293 T and CHO cell lines expressing cleaved, stable HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers for structural and vaccine studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Matthews, Katie; Kim, Helen J.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Golabek, Michael; de Los Reyes, Kevin; Korzun, Jacob; Yasmeen, Anila; Sanders, Rogier W.; Klasse, Per Johan; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Marozsan, Andre J.; Moore, John P.; Cupo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant soluble, cleaved HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers based on the subtype A BG505 sequence are being studied structurally and tested as immunogens in animals. For these trimers to become a vaccine candidate for human trials, they would need to be made in appropriate

  10. Technical Meeting on Liquid Metal Reactor Concepts: Core Design and Structural Materials. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Liquid metal reactor concept: core design and structural materials” was to present and discuss innovative liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) core designs with special focus on the choice, development, testing and qualification of advanced reactor core structural materials. Main results arising from national and international R&D programmes and projects in the field were reviewed, and new activities to be carried out under the IAEA aegis were identified on the basis of the analysis of current research and technology gaps

  11. Core-Shell Structured Electro- and Magneto-Responsive Materials: Fabrication and Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Jin Choi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-shell structured electrorheological (ER and magnetorheological (MR particles have attracted increasing interest owing to their outstanding field-responsive properties, including morphology, chemical and dispersion stability, and rheological characteristics of shear stress and yield stress. This study covers recent progress in the preparation of core-shell structured materials as well as their critical characteristics and advantages. Broad emphasises from the synthetic strategy of various core-shell particles to their feature behaviours in the magnetic and electric fields have been elaborated.

  12. Structurally stable graphene oxide-based nanofiltration membranes with bioadhesive polydopamine coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chongbin; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jianxin; Yin, Yongheng; Wu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based membranes possess promising potential in liquid separation for its high flux. The state-of-art GO-based membranes need to be supported by a substrate to ensure that the ultra-thin GO layer can withstand transmembrane pressure in practical applications. The interfacial compatibility of this kind of composite membrane remains a great challenge due to the intrinsic difference in chemical/physical properties between the GO sheets and the substrate. In this paper, a structurally stable GO-based composite nanofiltration membrane was fabricated by coupling the mussel-inspired adhesive platform and filtration-assisted assembly of GO laminates. The water flux for the prepared GO-based nanofiltration membrane reached up to 85 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 with a high retention above 95% and 100% for Orange G and Congo Red, respectively. The membrane exhibited highly stable structure owing to the covalent and noncovalent interactions between GO separation layer and dopamine adhesive platform.

  13. A Hollow-Structured Manganese Oxide Cathode for Stable Zn-MnO₂ Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Li, Jianming; Jin, Xu; Han, Yehu; Lin, Yue; Lei, Zhanwu; Wang, Shiyang; Qin, Lianjie; Jiao, Shuhong; Cao, Ruiguo

    2018-05-05

    Aqueous rechargeable zinc-manganese dioxide (Zn-MnO₂) batteries are considered as one of the most promising energy storage devices for large scale-energy storage systems due to their low cost, high safety, and environmental friendliness. However, only a few cathode materials have been demonstrated to achieve stable cycling for aqueous rechargeable Zn-MnO₂ batteries. Here, we report a new material consisting of hollow MnO₂ nanospheres, which can be used for aqueous Zn-MnO₂ batteries. The hollow MnO₂ nanospheres can achieve high specific capacity up to ~405 mAh g −1 at 0.5 C. More importantly, the hollow structure of birnessite-type MnO₂ enables long-term cycling stability for the aqueous Zn-MnO₂ batteries. The excellent performance of the hollow MnO₂ nanospheres should be due to their unique structural properties that enable the easy intercalation of zinc ions.

  14. Ultra-Stable Zero-CTE HoneySiC and H2CMN Mirror Support Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA MSFC, GSFC and JPL are interested in Ultra-Stable Mirror Support Structures for Exoplanet Missions. Telescopes with Apertures of 4-meters or larger and using an...

  15. Morphology, molecular structure, and stable carbon isotopic composition of black carbon (BC) in urban topsoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yutong; Xiao, Qing; Lu, Shenggao

    2018-02-01

    Urban soils contain significant amounts of black carbon (BC) from biomass and fossil fuel combustion and regard to be a pool of BC. BC in urban soils has multiple effects on environmental processes in urban system, such as global climate change, air quality, and public health. Urban topsoil samples (0-10 cm) were collected from Anshan, Liaoning Province, northeast China, which is one of the most important old steel industrial bases in China. The BC in urban topsoils was extracted using the density method. Their chemical composition, morphology, molecular structure, and stable carbon isotopic composition were examined using elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C). Elemental analysis shows that carbon content in the BC of studied soils ranged from 64.5 to 78.4%, with the average more than 70%. The O/C atomic ratio of BC is on average 0.18. The BC particle displays different morphology, including porous spherical, irregular porous fragmentary, and blocky shapes. The porous spherical BC particles has atomic molar O/C ratio determined by SEM-EDS ranging from 0.04 to 0.37. XRD indicates that BC exists in mainly combining with mineral phases hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ), kaolinite (Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 ), quartz (SiO 2 ), and calcite (CaCO 3 ). The FTIR spectra of BC particles show major bands at approximately 3400 cm -1 (O-H), 2920 cm -1 (C = H), 1600 cm -1 (C = C), 1230 cm -1 (C = O), and 1070 cm -1 (C = O). The stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C) of BC ranges from -24.48 to -23.18‰ with the average of -23.79 ± 0.39‰. The concentration of BC in the industrial area is significantly (p fuel combustion. Results indicated that a combination of atomic O/C ratio, porous structure, and stable carbon isotopic (δ 13 C) of BC could reflect effectively the origin of BC

  16. Anisotropic structure of the Inner Core and its uncertainty from transdimensional body-wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, S.; Waszek, L.; Lekic, V.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of body waves and normal modes have revealed strong quasi-hemispheric variations in seismic velocity, anisotropy and attenuation in the inner core. A rigorous mapping of the hemispheric boundaries and smaller scale heterogeneity within the hemispheres is crucial for distinguishing between hypotheses about inner core formation and evolution. However, the relatively sparse and heterogeneous distribution of paths piercing the inner core creates difficulties in constraining the boundaries and sub-hemispheric variations with body wave tomography. Damped tomographic inversions tend to smooth out strong structural gradients and risk carrying the imprint of sparse path coverage, while under-parametrized models can miss pertinent small-scale variations. For these reasons, we apply a probabilistic and transdimensional (THB) tomography method on core-sensitive differential P-wave traveltimes. The THB approach is well-suited to the problem of inner core tomography since 1) it remains parsimonious by allowing the parametrization to be determined the requirements of the data and 2) it preserves sharp boundaries in seismic properties, allowing it to capture both short-wavelength structure and the strong hemispheric dichotomy. Furthermore, the approach yields estimates of uncertainty in isotropic and anisotropic velocity, hemispheric boundary geometry, anisotropy axis and the tradeoffs between these properties. We quantify the effects of mantle heterogeneity with inner core structure and place constraints on inner core dynamics and minerology.

  17. LIGHT-WEIGHT LOAD-BEARING STRUCTURES REINFORCED BY CORE ELEMENTS MADE OF SEGMENTS AND A METHOD OF CASTING SUCH STRUCTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a light-weight load-bearing structure, reinforced by core elements (2) of a strong material constituting one or more compression or tension zones in the structure to be cast, which core (2) is surrounded by or adjacent to a material of less strength compared to the core (2......), where the core (2) is constructed from segments (1) of core elements (2) assembled by means of one or more prestressing elements (4). The invention further relates to a method of casting of light-weight load-bearing structures, reinforced by core elements (2) of a strong material constituting one...... or more compression or tension zones in the structure to be cast, which core (2) is surrounded by or adjacent to a material of less strength compared to the core (2), where the core (2) is constructed from segments (1) of core elements (2) assembled and hold together by means of one or more prestressing...

  18. Effect of surface texture and structure on the development of stable fluvial armors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Stephane; Friedrich, Heide

    2018-04-01

    Stable fluvial armors are found in river systems under conditions of partial sediment transport and limited sediment supply, a common occurrence in nature. Stable armoring is also readily recreated in experimental flumes. Initially, this bed stabilizing phenomenon was examined for different flow discharges and solely related to surface coarsening and bedload transport reduction. The models developed suggest a specific armor composition (i.e., texture) dependent on the parent bed material and formative discharge. Following developments in topographic remote sensing, recent research suggests that armor structure is an important control on bed stability and roughness. In this paper, replicated flume runs during which digital elevation models (DEMs) were collected from both exposed and flooded gravel beds are used to interpret armoring manifestations and to assess their replicability. A range of methodologies was used for the analysis, providing information on (i) surface grain size and orientation, (ii) bed-elevation distributions, (iii) the spatial coherence of the elevations at the grain-scale, (iv) surface slope and aspect, (v) grain imbrication and (vi) the spatial variability in DEM properties. The bed-surface topography was found to be more responsive than bed-material size to changes in flow strength. Our experimental results also provide convincing evidence that gravel-beds' response to water-work during parallel degradation is unique (i.e., replicable) given the formative parameters. Based on this finding, relationships between the armors' properties and formative parameters are proposed, and are supported by adding extensive data from previous research.

  19. The structural second virial coefficient: a spherical-core pair-potential for sulphur hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Deraman; Powles, J.G.; Dore, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron diffraction data for sulphur hexafluoride gas is reanalysed following the same procedure described in our previous paper but using a spherical-core potential which was not considered in that report. The new spherical-core potential, with parameters epsilon/Ksub(B)K = 405, delta/A = 5.042 and α/A = 0.9225, gives a satisfactory fit to both the virial and structural data. There are now three model potentials, a site-site, a LJ 28-7, and this spherical core which all fit the data very well, indeed the core potential reported here fits rather better than the others. The anisotropic site-site potential is still to be preferred on physical grounds but the new core-potential will be useful where an isotopic potential suffices since it is much simpler to use. (author)

  20. Methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured Ruthenium-Palladium nanoparticles: Relationship between structure and electrochemical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Markus; Jurzinsky, Tilman; Ziegenbalg, Dirk; Cremers, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    In this work the relationship between structural composition and electrochemical characteristics of Palladium(Pd)-Ruthenium(Ru) nanoparticles during alkaline methanol oxidation reaction is investigated. The comparative study of a standard alloyed and a precisely Ru-core-Pd-shell structured catalyst allows for a distinct investigation of the electronic effect and the bifunctional mechanism. Core-shell catalysts benefit from a strong electronic effect and an efficient Pd utilization. It is found that core-shell nanoparticles are highly active towards methanol oxidation reaction for potentials ≥0.6 V, whereas alloyed catalysts show higher current outputs in the lower potential range. However, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) experiments reveal that the methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured catalysts proceeds via the incomplete oxidation pathway yielding formaldehyde, formic acid or methyl formate. Contrary, the alloyed catalyst benefits from the Ru atoms at its surface. Those are found to be responsible for high methanol oxidation activity at lower potentials as well as for complete oxidation of CH3OH to CO2 via the bifunctional mechanism. Based on these findings a new Ru-core-Pd-shell-Ru-terrace catalyst was synthesized, which combines the advantages of the core-shell structure and the alloy. This novel catalyst shows high methanol electrooxidation activity as well as excellent selectivity for the complete oxidation pathway.

  1. Structure and thermodynamics of core-softened models for alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munaò, Gianmarco; Urbic, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    The phase behavior and the fluid structure of coarse-grain models for alcohols are studied by means of reference interaction site model (RISM) theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Specifically, we model ethanol and 1-propanol as linear rigid chains constituted by three (trimers) and four (tetramers) partially fused spheres, respectively. Thermodynamic properties of these models are examined in the RISM context, by employing closed formulæ for the calculation of free energy and pressure. Gas-liquid coexistence curves for trimers and tetramers are reported and compared with already existing data for a dimer model of methanol. Critical temperatures slightly increase with the number of CH 2 groups in the chain, while critical pressures and densities decrease. Such a behavior qualitatively reproduces the trend observed in experiments on methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol and suggests that our coarse-grain models, despite their simplicity, can reproduce the essential features of the phase behavior of such alcohols. The fluid structure of these models is investigated by computing radial distribution function g ij (r) and static structure factor S ij (k); the latter shows the presence of a low−k peak at intermediate-high packing fractions and low temperatures, suggesting the presence of aggregates for both trimers and tetramers

  2. Nature of diffraction fringes originating in the core of core-shell nanoparticle Cu/SiO2 and formation mechanism of the structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnaev, A. R.; Kalashnikov, S. V.; Nomoev, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    diffusion of oxygen atoms in certain areas (clusters) with their increased diffusion of oxygen atoms in certain areas (clusters) with their increased number has been suggested [4]. At the same time, there is a boundary between the stable phase of α-Cu and 'pre-precipitations' containing oxygen, but not having the full value oxide: red copper ore, Cu2O (Figure 1b - solvus of suggested metastable phase). In this case, diffraction fringes can be treated as 'pre-precipitations' in the form of Guinier-Preston zones with diffuse interfaces and a stable α-Cu phase.In the second case, all oxygen and silicon after condensation and crystallisation are fixed in the form of amorphous SiO2 on the core surface of copper. As far as there are no atoms of saluted oxygen or silicon in copper, there are no conditions for the formation of non-equilibrium structures. Consequently, the diffraction pattern of nanoparticle cores is not observed (Figure 2a).In the third case, in the presence of quite a large amount of silicon in the stoichiometric drop, the process of copper oxide formation is not possible, because all the oxygen is used for the production of silicon dioxide since the sensitivity of oxygen to silicon is higher than to copper. This can be explained by the difference in Gibbs energy for the oxidising reaction of components. At the temperature of 25 °C it is 29.0 J/(g mol) - for copper, and 80.8 J/(g mol) for silicon. Silicon dioxide occurring due to the oxygen content in copper will be displaced on the surface of the drop in the form of ash, forming the SiO2 shell [24]. The reason lies in the lower specific density of silicon (approximately 2.2 g/cm3) compared to copper (8.92 g/cm3). This is why, in our case, it is appropriate to study the system where there is no influence of oxygen on the crystallisation of the Cu-Si system [5]. In the cores of such nanoparticles, prominent diffraction fringes can be observed in the α-Cu core (Figure 3b).Analysis of the Cu-Si phase diagram

  3. Complete synthetic seismograms based on a spherical self-gravitating Earth model with an atmosphere-ocean-mantle-core structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongjiang; Heimann, Sebastian; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Hansheng; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid method is proposed to calculate complete synthetic seismograms based on a spherically symmetric and self-gravitating Earth with a multilayered structure of atmosphere, ocean, mantle, liquid core and solid core. For large wavelengths, a numerical scheme is used to solve the geodynamic boundary-value problem without any approximation on the deformation and gravity coupling. With decreasing wavelength, the gravity effect on the deformation becomes negligible and the analytical propagator scheme can be used. Many useful approaches are used to overcome the numerical problems that may arise in both analytical and numerical schemes. Some of these approaches have been established in the seismological community and the others are developed for the first time. Based on the stable and efficient hybrid algorithm, an all-in-one code QSSP is implemented to cover the complete spectrum of seismological interests. The performance of the code is demonstrated by various tests including the curvature effect on teleseismic body and surface waves, the appearance of multiple reflected, teleseismic core phases, the gravity effect on long period surface waves and free oscillations, the simulation of near-field displacement seismograms with the static offset, the coupling of tsunami and infrasound waves, and free oscillations of the solid Earth, the atmosphere and the ocean. QSSP is open source software that can be used as a stand-alone FORTRAN code or may be applied in combination with a Python toolbox to calculate and handle Green's function databases for efficient coding of source inversion problems.

  4. Analysis of the resistance to the stable propagation of fissures in structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Villar, Nelson; Aquino, Daniel; Aguera, Francisco; Fierro, Victor; Ansaldi, Andrea; Chomik, Enrique; Iorio, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanic (LEFM) is applied to the analysis of highly resistant materials, with correction for plasticity. For moderately ductile materials, structural analysis and design methodologies based on Elastoplastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) still have to be developed. The J integral is used in EPFM as a parameter to characterize tenacity to the fracture, following the ASTM standard. It is important to obtain J-Resistant curves, since the use of the stable propagation initiation value (J IC ) as failure criteria, leads to results that are too conservative in most design situations. The application of direct methods allows for results under conditions where the standard methods for obtaining the J-Resistant curve are not applicable. This work analyzes the application of direct methods that are alternatives for the standard, in ferritic-perlitic steels used in gas transport pipes. Experimental results are presented with numerical analysis (FEA) for the adjustment of J-Resistant curves (au)

  5. Immobilization of Ni-Pd/core-shell nanoparticles through thermal polymerization of acrylamide on glassy carbon electrode for highly stable and sensitive glutamate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huicheng; Ma, Zhenzhen; Wu, Zhaoyang

    2015-10-08

    The preparation of a persistently stable and sensitive biosensor is highly important for practical applications. To improve the stability and sensitivity of glutamate sensors, an electrode modified with glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)/Ni-Pd/core-shell nanoparticles was developed using the thermal polymerization of acrylamide (AM) to immobilize the synthesized Ni-Pd/core-shell nanoparticles onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Electrochemical data showed that the prepared biosensor had remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward glutamate. Moreover, superior reproducibility and excellent stability were observed (relative average deviation was 2.96% after continuous use of the same sensor for 60 times, and current responses remained at 94.85% of the initial value after 60 d). The sensor also demonstrated highly sensitive amperometric detection of glutamate with a low limit of detection (0.052 μM, S/N = 3), high sensitivity (4.768 μA μM(-1) cm(-2)), and a wide, useful linear range (0.1-500 μM). No interference from potential interfering species such as l-cysteine, ascorbic acid, and l-aspartate were noted. The determination of glutamate levels in actual samples achieved good recovery percentages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigating the Theoretical Structure of the DAS-II Core Battery at School Age Using Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Golay, Philippe; McGill, Ryan J.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2018-01-01

    Bayesian structural equation modeling (BSEM) was used to investigate the latent structure of the Differential Ability Scales-Second Edition core battery using the standardization sample normative data for ages 7-17. Results revealed plausibility of a three-factor model, consistent with publisher theory, expressed as either a higher-order (HO) or a…

  7. Structure and genome organization of AFV2, a novel archaeal lipothrixvirus with unusual terminal and core structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häring, Monika; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Brügger, Kim

    2005-01-01

    A novel filamentous virus, AFV2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus shows structural similarity to lipothrixviruses but differs from them in its unusual terminal and core structures. The double-stranded DNA genome contains 31,787 bp and carries eight open reading frames homologous...

  8. Ioniclike energy structure of neutral core-excited states in free Kr clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peredkov, S.; Sorensen, S.L.; Kivimaeki, A.; Schulz, J.; Maartensson, N.; Oehrwall, G.; Lundwall, M.; Rander, T.; Lindblad, A.; Bergersen, H.; Svensson, S.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of electronic states in krypton clusters is investigated by high-resolution core-level electron spectroscopy. The energy ordering of bulk versus surface 3d -1 np(n>5) core-excited states in neutral clusters is demonstrated to be reversed to the 3d -1 5p level situation. The cluster 3d -1 6p,7p states are proven to be at a lower energy than the corresponding atomic levels. These findings reveal the ioniclike energy structure of the neutral cluster core-excited levels. The phenomenon is explained by a spatial spread of the excited orbitals over the cluster lattice

  9. The formation of a core-periphery structure in heterogeneous financial networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, M.; in 't Veld, D.; Hommes, C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence suggests that financial networks exhibit a core-periphery network structure. This paper aims at giving an explanation for the emergence of such a structure using network formation theory. We propose a simple model of the overnight interbank lending market, in which banks

  10. Exploring the impact of socio-technical core-periphery structures in open source software development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Chintan Amrit; van Hillegersberg, Jos

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we apply the social network concept of core-periphery structure to the socio-technical structure of a software development team. We propose a socio-technical pattern that can be used to locate emerging coordination problems in Open Source projects. With the help of our tool and method

  11. Detection of stable community structures within gut microbiota co-occurrence networks from different human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew A; Bonder, Marc Jan; Kuncheva, Zhana; Zierer, Jonas; Fu, Jingyuan; Kurilshikov, Alexander; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bell, Jordana T; Spector, Tim D; Steves, Claire J

    2018-01-01

    Microbes in the gut microbiome form sub-communities based on shared niche specialisations and specific interactions between individual taxa. The inter-microbial relationships that define these communities can be inferred from the co-occurrence of taxa across multiple samples. Here, we present an approach to identify comparable communities within different gut microbiota co-occurrence networks, and demonstrate its use by comparing the gut microbiota community structures of three geographically diverse populations. We combine gut microbiota profiles from 2,764 British, 1,023 Dutch, and 639 Israeli individuals, derive co-occurrence networks between their operational taxonomic units, and detect comparable communities within them. Comparing populations we find that community structure is significantly more similar between datasets than expected by chance. Mapping communities across the datasets, we also show that communities can have similar associations to host phenotypes in different populations. This study shows that the community structure within the gut microbiota is stable across populations, and describes a novel approach that facilitates comparative community-centric microbiome analyses.

  12. Structural Color Palettes of Core-Shell Photonic Ink Capsules Containing Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Seok; Seo, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Photonic microcapsules with onion-like topology are microfluidically designed to have cholesteric liquid crystals with opposite handedness in their core and shell. The microcapsules exhibit structural colors caused by dual photonic bandgaps, resulting in a rich variety of color on the optical palette. Moreover, the microcapsules can switch the colors from either core or shell depending on the selection of light-handedness. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Green synthesis of the reduced graphene oxide–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposite: A highly efficient and stable solar-light-induced catalyst for organic dye degradation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiha; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Islam, M. Jahurul [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Bora [Department of Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sang Hoon [Department of Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Kyu, E-mail: tkkim@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Green synthesis of RGO–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposites without any surfactant. • Promising candidates as solar light active photocatalyst for dye degradation. • Significant improvement of the photocatalytic activity in RGO wrapped composites. • The best photocatalytic activity to RhB has been attained for CuI–RGO (2 mg mL{sup −1}). - Abstract: Surfactant-free, reduced graphene oxide (RGO)–CuI quasi-shell−core nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using ultra-sonication assisted chemical method at room temperature. The morphologies, structures and optical properties of the CuI and CuI–RGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Morphological and structural analyses indicated that the CuI–RGO core–shell nanocomposites comprise single-crystalline face-centered cubic phase CuI nanostructures, coated with a thin RGO quasi-shell. Photocatalysis experiments revealed that the as-synthesized CuI–RGO nanocomposites exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities and stabilities for photo degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) organic dye under simulated solar light irradiation. The photo degradation ability is strongly affected by the concentration of RGO in the nanocomposites; the highest photodegradation rate was obtained at a graphene loading content of 2 mg mL{sup −1} nanocomposite. The remarkable photocatalytic performance of the CuI–RGO nanocomposites mainly originates from their unique adsorption and electron-accepting and electron-transporting properties of RGO. The present work provides a novel green synthetic route to producing CuI–RGO nanocomposites without toxic solvents or reducing agents, thereby providing highly efficient and stable solar light

  14. Green synthesis of the reduced graphene oxide–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposite: A highly efficient and stable solar-light-induced catalyst for organic dye degradation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jiha; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Islam, M. Jahurul; Seo, Bora; Joo, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Green synthesis of RGO–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposites without any surfactant. • Promising candidates as solar light active photocatalyst for dye degradation. • Significant improvement of the photocatalytic activity in RGO wrapped composites. • The best photocatalytic activity to RhB has been attained for CuI–RGO (2 mg mL −1 ). - Abstract: Surfactant-free, reduced graphene oxide (RGO)–CuI quasi-shell−core nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using ultra-sonication assisted chemical method at room temperature. The morphologies, structures and optical properties of the CuI and CuI–RGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Morphological and structural analyses indicated that the CuI–RGO core–shell nanocomposites comprise single-crystalline face-centered cubic phase CuI nanostructures, coated with a thin RGO quasi-shell. Photocatalysis experiments revealed that the as-synthesized CuI–RGO nanocomposites exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities and stabilities for photo degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) organic dye under simulated solar light irradiation. The photo degradation ability is strongly affected by the concentration of RGO in the nanocomposites; the highest photodegradation rate was obtained at a graphene loading content of 2 mg mL −1 nanocomposite. The remarkable photocatalytic performance of the CuI–RGO nanocomposites mainly originates from their unique adsorption and electron-accepting and electron-transporting properties of RGO. The present work provides a novel green synthetic route to producing CuI–RGO nanocomposites without toxic solvents or reducing agents, thereby providing highly efficient and stable solar light-induced RGO

  15. Hierarchical Mesoporous NiO/MnO2@PANI Core-Shell Microspheres, Highly Efficient and Stable Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Evolution and Reduction Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junkai; Wang, Mingchao; Wang, Wenbo; Miao, Ran; Zhong, Wei; Chen, Sheng-Yu; Poges, Shannon; Jafari, Tahereh; Song, Wenqiao; Liu, Jiachen; Suib, Steven L

    2017-12-13

    We report on the new facile synthesis of mesoporous NiO/MnO 2 in one step by modifying inverse micelle templated UCT (University of Connecticut) methods. The catalyst shows excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability for both the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media after further coating with polyaniline (PANI). For electrochemical performance, the optimized catalyst exhibits a potential gap, ΔE, of 0.75 V to achieve a current of 10 mA cm -2 for the OER and -3 mA cm -2 for the ORR in 0.1 M KOH solution. Extensive characterization methods were applied to investigate the structure-property of the catalyst for correlations with activity (e.g., XRD, BET, SEM, HRTEM, FIB-TEM, XPS, TGA, and Raman). The high electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst closely relates to the good electrical conductivity of PANI, accessible mesoporous structure, high surface area, as well as the synergistic effect of the specific core-shell structure. This work opens a new avenue for the rational design of core-shell structure catalysts for energy conversion and storage applications.

  16. Electronic structure and intersubband magnetoabsorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The electronic structures of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are calculated based on the effective-mass theory, and it is found that the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are strongly mixed, which are very different from the hole states in CdSe or CdS nanowires. In addition, we find the three highest hole states at the Γ point are almost localized in the CdSe core and the energies of the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires can be enhanced greatly when the core radius Rc increases and the total radius R is fixed. The degenerate hole states are split by the magnetic field, and the split energies will increase when |Jh | increases from 1/2 to 7/2, while they are almost not influenced by the change of the core radius Rc. The absorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires at the Γ point are also studied in the magnetic field when the temperature T is considered, and we find there are only two peaks will arise if the core radius Rc and the temperature T increase. The intensity of each optical absorption can be considerably enhanced by increasing the core radius Rc when the temperature T is fixed, it is due to the increase of their optical transition matrix element. Meanwhile, the intensity of each optical absorption can be decreased when the temperature T increases and the core radius Rc is fixed, and this is because the Fermi-Dirac distribution function of the corresponding hole states will increase as the increase of the temperature T.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of dislocation cores in copper: structure and diffusion at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jin

    1989-01-01

    The variation of the core structure of an easy glide dislocation with temperature and its influence on the stacking fault energy (γ) have been investigated for the first time by molecular-dynamics simulation in copper. The calculations have been performed at various temperatures, using an ab-initio pseudo-potential. Our results show that the core of the Shockley partials, into which the perfect edge dislocation dissociates, becomes increasingly extended as temperature increases. However their separation remains constant. The calculated energy values of the infinite extension stacking fault and the ribbon fault between the partials are quite different, but the evolution of the core structure does not affect the temperature dependence of the latter. We have found that a high disorder appears in the core region when temperature increases due to important anharmonicity effects of the atomic vibrations. The core structure remains solid-like for T m (T m : melting point of bulk) in spite of the high disorder. Above T m , the liquid nucleus germinates in the core region, and then propagates into the bulk. In addition we studied the mobility of vacancies and interstitials trapped on the partials. Although fast diffusion is thought to occur exclusively in a pipe surrounding the dislocation core, in the present study a quasi two-dimensional diffusion is observed for both defects not only in the cores but also in the stacking fault ribbon. On the opposite of current assumptions, the activation energy for diffusion is found to be identical for both defects, which may therefore comparably contribute to mass transport along the dislocations. (author) [fr

  18. Structural failure analysis of reactor vessels due to molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    Maintaining structural integrity of the reactor vessel during a postulated core melt accident is an important safety consideration in the design of the vessel. This paper addresses the failure predictions of the vessel due to thermal and pressure loadings from the molten core debris depositing on the lower head of the vessel. Different loading combinations were considered based on a wet or dry cavity and pressurization of the vessel based on operating pressure or atmospheric (pipe break). The analyses considered both short term (minutes) and long term (days) failure modes. Short term failure modes include creep at elevated temperatures and plastic instabilities of the structure. Long term failure modes are caused by creep rupture that lead to plastic instability of the structure. The analyses predict the reactor vessel will remain intact after the core melt has deposited on the lower vessel head

  19. Core/shell structured ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Jing; Tao Xia; Pu Yuan; Zeng Xiaofei; Chen Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by a simple chemical synthesis route. Subsequently, SiO 2 layers were successfully coated onto the surface of ZnO nanoparticles to modify the photocatalytic activity in acidic or alkaline solutions. The obtained particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and zeta potential. It was found that ultrafine core/shell structured ZnO/SiO 2 nanoparticles were successfully obtained. The photocatalytic performance of ZnO/SiO 2 core/shell structured nanoparticles in Rhodamine B aqueous solution at varied pH value were also investigated. Compared with uncoated ZnO nanoparticles, core/shell structured ZnO/SiO 2 nanoparticles with thinner SiO 2 shell possess improved stability and relatively better photocatalytic activity in acidic or alkaline solutions, which would broaden its potential application in pollutant treatment.

  20. Towards hydrochemical PUB - stable vs. heterogeneous NO3 and COD signatures across hydrographic structure and size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecrepont, Stephane; Cudennec, Christophe; Jaffrezic, Anne; de Lavenne, Alban

    2017-04-01

    Towards hydrochemical PUB - stable vs. heterogeneous NO3 and DOC signatures across hydrographic structure and size Ecrepont, S.1Cudennec, C.1 Jaffrézic, A.1 de Lavenne, A.2 1UMR SAS, Agrocampus Ouest, Rennes, France 2 HBAN, Irstea, Antony, France Intensive agriculture is a major disturbing factor for water quality in Brittany, France. Observations of chemical data from 350 catchments over a 15 year period show that the high variability of hydrochemical dynamics between catchments in relation to geographic characteristics and farming practices, decreases with an increase in the catchment size. A stable signature of nitrate and DOC dynamics does emerge for bigger catchments, and was evidenced statistically. We adapted a modified version of the standard deviation formula to calculate an index on mean inter-annual winter nitrate and dissolved organic carbon concentrations to characterize each catchment. The method was applied to the whole sample of catchments, some of them nested, to investigate variation of our new index across scales and regions. Results show an increasing and non-linear relationship between the criterion and the surface, with threshold effects. The stability of the thresholds across river basins in Brittany, and across seasons and years is explored. This emergence relates to the progressive connection of streams with heterogeneous characteristic chemical signatures into a mixing dominant effect. The better assessment of this relationship opens two major perspectives: i) to define a geomorphology-based PUB (Prediction in Ungauged Basins) approach for hydrochemistry; ii) to identify the most critical sub-catchments for mitigating actions in terms of farming and landscape practices towards water quality recovery.

  1. Trophic structure of a coastal fish community determined with diet and stable isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, A J; Collie, J S; Taylor, D L

    2016-09-01

    A combination of dietary guild analysis and nitrogen (δ(15) N) and carbon (δ(13) C) stable-isotope analysis was used to assess the trophic structure of the fish community in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds, an area off southern New England identified for offshore wind energy development. In the autumn of 2009, 2010 and 2011, stomach and tissue samples were taken from 20 fish and invertebrate species for analysis of diet composition and δ(15) N and δ(13) C signatures. The food chain in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds comprises approximately four trophic levels within which the fish community is divided into distinct dietary guilds, including planktivores, benthivores, crustacivores and piscivores. Within these guilds, inter-species isotopic and dietary overlap is high, suggesting that resource partitioning or competitive interactions play a major role in structuring the fish community. Carbon isotopes indicate that most fishes are supported by pelagic phytoplankton, although there is evidence that benthic production also plays a role, particularly for obligate benthivores such as skates Leucoraja spp. This type of analysis is useful for developing an ecosystem-based approach to management, as it identifies species that act as direct links to basal resources as well as species groups that share trophic roles. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Phase behavior and structure of stable complexes between a long polyanion and a branched polycation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, Valentina; Zeghal, Mehdi; Auvray, Loïc; Clemens, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    The association between oppositely charged branched polyethylenimine (BPEI) and polymethacrylic acid (PMA) in the dilute regime is investigated using turbidimetric titration and electrophoretic mobility measurements. The complexation is controlled by tuning continuously the pH-sensitive charge of the polyacid in acidic solution. The formation of soluble and stable positively charged complexes is a cooperative process characterized by the existence of two regimes of weak and strong complexation. In the regime of weak complexation, a long PMA chain overcharged by several BPEI molecules forms a binary complex. As the charge of the polyacid increases, these binary complexes condense at a well defined charge ratio of the mixture to form large positively charged aggregates. The overcharging and the existence of two regimes of complexation are analyzed in the light of recent theories. The structure of the polyelectrolytes is investigated at higher polymer concentration by small angle neutron scattering. Binary complexes of finite size present an open structure where the polyacid chains connecting a small number of BPEI molecules have shrunk slightly. In the condensed complexes, BPEI molecules, wrapped by polyacid chains, form networks of stretched necklaces.

  3. A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid Metal Structures and Electronic Equilibrium - 154041

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0027 A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal Structures and...to 16 Dec 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal...Air Force Research Laboratory for accurately predicting compositions of new amorphous alloys specifically based on aluminium with properties superior

  4. Effect of annealing temperature on the stress and structural properties of Ge core fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziwen; Cheng, Xueli; Xue, Fei; He, Ting; Wang, Tingyun

    2017-09-01

    Effect of annealing temperature on the stress and structural properties of a Ge core fibre via the molten core drawing (MCD) method is investigated using Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results showed that the Raman peak position of the Ge fibre shifted from 297.6 cm-1 to 300.5 cm-1, and the FWHM value decreased from 4.53 cm-1 to 4.31 cm-1, when the annealing is carried out at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C, respectively. For the Ge core annealed at 900 °C, an apparent crystal grain can be seen in the SEM image, and the diffraction peaks of the (3 3 1) plane are generated in the X-ray diffraction spectra. These results show that optimising the annealing temperature allows the release of the residual stress in the Ge core. When the Ge core fibre is annealed at 900 °C, it exhibits the lowest residual stress and the highest crystal quality, and the quality improvement relative to that of the sample annealed at 800 °C is significant. Hence, annealing at around 900 °C can greatly improve the quality of a Ge core fibre. Further performance improvement of the Ge core fibre by annealing techniques can be anticipated.

  5. High-resolution probing of inner core structure with seismic interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Hsin-Hua

    2015-12-23

    © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Increasing complexity of Earth\\'s inner core has been revealed in recent decades as the global distribution of seismic stations has improved. The uneven distribution of earthquakes, however, still causes a biased geographical sampling of the inner core. Recent developments in seismic interferometry, which allow for the retrieval of core-sensitive body waves propagating between two receivers, can significantly improve ray path coverage of the inner core. In this study, we apply such earthquake coda interferometry to 1846 USArray stations deployed across the U.S. from 2004 through 2013. Clear inner core phases PKIKP2 and PKIIKP2 are observed across the entire array. Spatial analysis of the differential travel time residuals between the two phases reveals significant short-wavelength variation and implies the existence of strong structural variability in the deep Earth. A linear N-S trending anomaly across the middle of the U.S. may reflect an asymmetric quasi-hemispherical structure deep within the inner core with boundaries of 99°W and 88°E.

  6. Development of an RF accelerating structure loaded with multi-ring magnetic cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yuichi; Kageyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Ichiro; Yamashita, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    In order to upgrade the J-PARC rings (RCS and MR) for more beam powers, the existing accelerating structures for both rings need to be improved for better performance especially in the long-term reliability. As a solution for this purpose, we have proposed a new accelerating structure loaded with multi-ring core modules. Each core module consists of three ring FINEMET cores with different radial sizes concentrically arranged and sandwiched between two glass epoxy plates with flow channels grooved on the surfaces. The Fe-based FINEMET cores are to be cooled with the turbulent flow of Fluorinert (chemically inert perfluorinated liquid). Therefore, the cores need neither impregnation nor coating with epoxy resin for anti corrosion. A half-gap cavity loaded with three core modules, which is a minimum configuration for the performance test, is under fabrication. Additionally, a high efficient solid state RF amplifier is under development. Thirty two amplifier modules, each of which is a push-pull class-D amplifier driven by power MOSFET hybrids, are combined to deliver RF power up to 60 kW (peak power with a duty factor of 50%) at frequencies 1.7 ± 0.2MHz. The amplitude of the RF output can be modulated by changing the voltage across the drain and source of the power MOSFET in proportion to the wave envelope. This paper reports the recent status of our R and D activities. (author)

  7. Direct Observation of Dislocation Core Structures in CdTe/GaAs(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGibbon, A J; Pennycook, S J; Angelo, J E

    1995-07-28

    A strategy is presented for determining sublattice polarity at defects in compound semiconductors. Core structures of 60-degree and Lomer dislocations in the CdTe/GaAs(001) system have been obtained by the application of maximum-entropy analysis to Z-contrast images (Z is atomic number) obtained in a 300-kilovolt scanning transmission electron microscope. Sixty-degree dislocations were observed to be of the glide type, whereas in the case of Lomer dislocations, both a symmetric (Hornstra-like) core and an unexpected asymmetric structure made up of a fourfold ring were seen.

  8. Effect of vanadium contamination on the framework and micropore structure of ultra stable Y-zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, U J; Xu, B; Ullah, Rooh; Yan, Z

    2016-02-01

    Y-zeolites are the main component of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst for conversion of crude petroleum to products of high demand including transportation fuel. We investigated effects of vanadium which is present as one of the impurities in FCC feedstock on the framework and micropore structure of ultra-stable (US) Y-zeolite. The zeolite samples were prepared and characterized using standard techniques including: (1) X-ray diffraction, (2) N2 adsorption employing non local density functional theory method, NLDFT, (3) Transmittance and Pyridine FTIR, (4) Transmittance electron microscopy (TEM), and (5) (27)Al and (29)Si MAS-NMR. Results revealed that in the presence of steam, vanadium caused excessive evolution of non inter-crystalline mesopores and structural damage. The evolved mesopore size averaged about 25.0nm at 0.5wt.% vanadium loading, far larger than mesopore size in zeolitic materials with improved hydrothermal stability and performance for FCC catalyst. A mechanism of mesopore formation based on accelerated dealumination has been proposed and discussed. Vanadium immobilization experiments conducted to mitigate vanadium migration into the framework clearly showed vanadium is mobile at reaction conditions. From the results, interaction of vanadium with the passivator limits and decreases mobility and activity of vanadium into inner cavities of the zeolite capable of causing huge structure breakdown and acid sites destruction. This study therefore deepens insight into the causes of alteration in activity and selectivity of vanadium contaminated catalyst and hints on a possible mechanism of passivation in vanadium passivated FCC catalyst. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An analysis of reactor structural response to fuel sodium interaction in a hypothetical core disruptive accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Tashiro, M.; Sasanuma, K.; Nagashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    This study shows the effect of constraints around FSI zone on FSI phenomena and deformations of reactor structures. SUGAR-PISCES code system has been developed to evaluate the phenomena of FSI and the response of reactor structure. SUGAR calculates the phenomena of FSI. PISCES, developed by Physics International Company in U.S.A., calculates the dynamic response of reactor structure in two-dimensional, time-dependent finite-difference Lagrangian model. The results show that the peak pressure and energy by FSI and the deformation of reactor structures are about twice in case of FSI zone surrounding by blanket than by coolant. The FSI phenomena highly depend on the reactor structure and the realistic configuration around core must be considered for analyzing hypothetical core disruptive accident. This work was supported by a grant from Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (auth.)

  10. The Structure and Dark Halo Core Properties of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, A.

    2015-08-01

    The structure and dark matter halo core properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are investigated. A double-isothermal (DIS) model of an isothermal, non-self-gravitating stellar system embedded in an isothermal dark halo core provides an excellent fit to the various observed stellar surface density distributions. The stellar core scale length a* is sensitive to the central dark matter density ρ0,d. The maximum stellar radius traces the dark halo core radius {r}c,d. The concentration c* of the stellar system, determined by a King profile fit, depends on the ratio of the stellar-to-dark-matter velocity dispersion {σ }*/{σ }d. Simple empirical relationships are derived that allow us to calculate the dark halo core parameters ρ0,d, {r}c,d, and σd given the observable stellar quantities σ*, a*, and c*. The DIS model is applied to the Milky Way’s dSphs. All dSphs closely follow the same universal dark halo scaling relations {ρ }0,d× {r}c,d={75}-45+85 M⊙ pc-2 that characterize the cores of more massive galaxies over a large range in masses. The dark halo core mass is a strong function of core radius, {M}c,d˜ {r}c,d2. Inside a fixed radius of ˜400 pc the total dark matter mass is, however, roughly constant with {M}d=2.6+/- 1.4× {10}7 M⊙, although outliers are expected. The dark halo core densities of the Galaxy’s dSphs are very high, with {ρ }0,d ≈ 0.2 M⊙ pc-3. dSphs should therefore be tidally undisturbed. Evidence for tidal effects might then provide a serious challenge for the CDM scenario.

  11. Structure and optical properties of cored wurtzite (Zn,Mg)O heteroepitaxial nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Y.W.; Abernathy, C.; Pruessner, K.; Sigmund, W.; Norton, D.P.; Overberg, M.; Ren, F.; Chisholm, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis, structure, and optical properties of one-dimensional heteroepitaxial cored (Zn,Mg)O semiconductor nanowires grown by a catalyst-driven molecular beam epitaxy technique are discussed. The structures form spontaneously in a Zn, Mg and O 2 /O 3 flux, consisting of a single crystal, Zn-rich Zn 1-x Mg x O(x 1-y Mg y O(y>>0.02) sheath. High resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy shows core diameters as small as 4 nm. The cored structure forms spontaneously under constant flux due to a bimodal growth mechanism in which the core forms via bulk like vapor-liquid-solid growth, while the outer sheath grows as a heteroepitaxial layer. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence shows a slight blueshift in the near band edge peak, which is attributed to a few percent Mg doping in the nanoscale ZnO core. The catalyst-driven molecular beam epitaxy technique provides for site-specific nanorod growth on arbitrary substrates

  12. An approach to development of structural design criteria for highly irradiated core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of the fast breeder reactor presents novel challenges in structural design and materials engineering. For instance, the core components of these reactors experience high energy neutron irradiation at elevated temperature, which causes significant time-dependent changes in material behaviour, such as a progressive loss of ductility. New structural design criteria are needed to extend elevated temperature design-by-analysis to account for these changes. Alloys best able to cope with the demands of the core operating environment are being explored and their structural behaviour characterized. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an approach used in the development of core component structural design criteria. To do this, several design rules, plus brief rationale, from draft RDT Standards F9-7, -8 and -9 will be presented. These recently completed standards ('Structural Design Guidelines for Breeder Reactor Core Components') were prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy and represent a consensus among most organizations participating in the U.S. breeder program. (author)

  13. Connecting traces of galaxy evolution: the missing core mass-morphological fine structure relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfini, P.; Bitsakis, T.; Zezas, A.; Duc, P.-A.; Iodice, E.; González-Martín, O.; Bruzual, G.; González Sanoja, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Deep exposure imaging of early-type galaxies (ETGs) are revealing the second-order complexity of these objects, which have been long considered uniform, dispersion-supported spheroidals. `Fine structure' features (e.g. ripples, plumes, tidal tails, rings) as well as depleted stellar cores (i.e. central light deficits) characterize a number of massive ETG galaxies, and can be interpreted as the result of galaxy-galaxy interactions. We discuss how the time-scale for the evolution of cores and fine structures are comparable, and hence it is expected that they develop in parallel after the major interaction event which shaped the ETG. Using archival data, we compare the `depleted stellar mass' (i.e. the mass missing from the depleted stellar core) against the prominence of the fine structure features, and observe that they correlate inversely. This result confirms our expectation that, while the supermassive black hole (SMBH) binary (constituted by the SMBHs of the merger progenitors) excavates the core via three-body interactions, the gravitational potential of the newborn galaxy relaxes, and the fine structures fade below detection levels. We expect the inverse correlation to hold at least within the first Gyr from the merger which created the SMBH binary; after then, the fine structure evolves independently.

  14. Elastic stability of cylindrical shells with soft elastic cores: Biomimicking natural tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Gebran Nizar

    1994-01-01

    Thin walled cylindrical shell structures are widespread in nature: examples include plant stems, porcupine quills, and hedgehog spines. All have an outer shell of almost fully dense material supported by a low density, cellular core. In nature, all are loaded in combination of axial compression and bending: failure is typically by buckling. Natural structures are often optimized. Here we have analyzed the elastic buckling of a thin cylindrical shell supported by an elastic core to show that this structural configuration achieves significant weight saving over a hollow cylinder. The results of the analysis are compared with data from an extensive experimental program on uniaxial compression and four point bending tests on silicone rubber shells with and without compliant foam cores. The analysis describes the results of the mechanical tests well. Characterization of the microstructures of several natural tubular structures with foamlike cores (plant stems, quills, and spines) revealed them to be close to the optimal configurations predicted by the analytical model. Biomimicking of natural cylindrical shell structures and evolutionary design processes may offer the potential to increase the mechanical efficiency of engineering cylindrical shells.

  15. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Fuente, Asunción; Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Di Francesco, James

    2014-01-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  16. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fuente, Asunción [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bontemps, Sylvain [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 355, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  17. High-precision dual-inlet IRMS measurements of the stable isotopes of CO2 and the N2O / CO2 ratio from polar ice core samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Bauska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An important constraint on mechanisms of past carbon cycle variability is provided by the stable isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric carbon dioxide (δ13C-CO2 trapped in polar ice cores, but obtaining very precise measurements has proven to be a significant analytical challenge. Here we describe a new technique to determine the δ13C of CO2 at very high precision, as well as measuring the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios. In this method, ancient air is extracted from relatively large ice samples (~400 g with a dry-extraction "ice grater" device. The liberated air is cryogenically purified to a CO2 and N2O mixture and analyzed with a microvolume-equipped dual-inlet IRMS (Thermo MAT 253. The reproducibility of the method, based on replicate analysis of ice core samples, is 0.02‰ for δ13C-CO2 and 2 ppm and 4 ppb for the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios, respectively (1σ pooled standard deviation. Our experiments show that minimizing water vapor pressure in the extraction vessel by housing the grating apparatus in a ultralow-temperature freezer (−60 °C improves the precision and decreases the experimental blank of the method to −0.07 ± 0.04‰. We describe techniques for accurate calibration of small samples and the application of a mass-spectrometric method based on source fragmentation for reconstructing the N2O history of the atmosphere. The oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 is also investigated, confirming previous observations of oxygen exchange between gaseous CO2 and solid H2O within the ice archive. These data offer a possible constraint on oxygen isotopic fractionation during H2O and CO2 exchange below the H2O bulk melting temperature.

  18. Improved Fabrication of Ceramic Matrix Composite/Foam Core Integrated Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    2009-01-01

    The use of hybridized carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) fabric to reinforce ceramic matrix composite face sheets and the integration of such face sheets with a foam core creates a sandwich structure capable of withstanding high-heatflux environments (150 W/cm2) in which the core provides a temperature drop of 1,000 C between the surface and the back face without cracking or delamination of the structure. The composite face sheet exhibits a bilinear response, which results from the SiC matrix not being cracked on fabrication. In addition, the structure exhibits damage tolerance under impact with projectiles, showing no penetration to the back face sheet. These attributes make the composite ideal for leading edge structures and control surfaces in aerospace vehicles, as well as for acreage thermal protection systems and in high-temperature, lightweight stiffened structures. By tailoring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a carbon fiber containing ceramic matrix composite (CMC) face sheet to match that of a ceramic foam core, the face sheet and the core can be integrally fabricated without any delamination. Carbon and SiC are woven together in the reinforcing fabric. Integral densification of the CMC and the foam core is accomplished with chemical vapor deposition, eliminating the need for bond-line adhesive. This means there is no need to separately fabricate the core and the face sheet, or to bond the two elements together, risking edge delamination during use. Fibers of two or more types are woven together on a loom. The carbon and ceramic fibers are pulled into the same pick location during the weaving process. Tow spacing may be varied to accommodate the increased volume of the combined fiber tows while maintaining a target fiber volume fraction in the composite. Foam pore size, strut thickness, and ratio of face sheet to core thickness can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties. The anticipated CTE for the hybridized composite is managed by

  19. Exploration of stable compounds, crystal structures, and superconductivity in the Be-H system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyin Yu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles variable-composition evolutionary methodology, we explored the high-pressure structures of beryllium hydrides between 0 and 400 GPa. We found that BeH2 remains the only stable compound in this pressure range. The pressure-induced transformations are predicted as I b a m → P 3 ̄ m 1 → R 3 ̄ m → C m c m → P 4 / n m m , which occur at 24, 139, 204 and 349 GPa, respectively. P 3 ̄ m 1 and R 3 ̄ m structures are layered polytypes based on close packings of H atoms with Be atoms filling all octahedral voids in alternating layers. Cmcm and P4/nmm contain two-dimensional triangular networks with each layer forming a kinked slab in the ab-plane. P 3 ̄ m 1 and R 3 ̄ m are semiconductors while Cmcm and P4/nmm are metallic. We have explored superconductivity of both metal phases, and found large electron-phonon coupling parameters of λ = 0.63 for Cmcm with a Tc of 32.1-44.1 K at 250 GPa and λ = 0.65 for P4/nmm with a Tc of 46.1-62.4 K at 400 GPa. The dependence of Tc on pressure indicates that Tc initially increases to a maximum of 45.1 K for Cmcm at 275 GPa and 97.0 K for P4/nmm at 365 GPa, and then decreases with increasing pressure for both phases.

  20. Current and historical drivers of landscape genetic structure differ in core and peripheral salamander populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Y Dudaniec

    Full Text Available With predicted decreases in genetic diversity and greater genetic differentiation at range peripheries relative to their cores, it can be difficult to distinguish between the roles of current disturbance versus historic processes in shaping contemporary genetic patterns. To address this problem, we test for differences in historic demography and landscape genetic structure of coastal giant salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus in two core regions (Washington State, United States versus the species' northern peripheral region (British Columbia, Canada where the species is listed as threatened. Coalescent-based demographic simulations were consistent with a pattern of post-glacial range expansion, with both ancestral and current estimates of effective population size being much larger within the core region relative to the periphery. However, contrary to predictions of recent human-induced population decline in the less genetically diverse peripheral region, there was no genetic signature of population size change. Effects of current demographic processes on genetic structure were evident using a resistance-based landscape genetics approach. Among core populations, genetic structure was best explained by length of the growing season and isolation by resistance (i.e. a 'flat' landscape, but at the periphery, topography (slope and elevation had the greatest influence on genetic structure. Although reduced genetic variation at the range periphery of D. tenebrosus appears to be largely the result of biogeographical history rather than recent impacts, our analyses suggest that inherent landscape features act to alter dispersal pathways uniquely in different parts of the species' geographic range, with implications for habitat management.

  1. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified

  2. Structural evaluation for the core sampling trucks, RMCS operations, 200 Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report evaluates the structural adequacy and the integrity of the existing core sampling trucks to withstand impact should the trucks drop off the ramp, either onto the soft ground or onto a non-yielding surface due to operational error, wind, or earthquake. The report also addresses if the allowable tank dome load will be exceeded by the addition of the impact load

  3. A simple approach to the construction of the core structure present

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A convenient route for the synthesis of oxacyclobutapentalene, the tricyclic bridged core structure present in bioactive marine diterpene bielschowskysin and the polyketide hippolachnin A, is reported. The key steps involve ring closing metathesis of a triene derived from D-mannitol to produce selectively the dihydrofuran ...

  4. Structural and magnetic properties of multi-core nanoparticles analysed using a generalised numerical inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, P.; Bogart, L. K.; Posth, O.; Szczerba, W.; Rogers, S. E.; Castro, A.; Nilsson, L.; Zeng, L. J.; Sugunan, A.; Sommertune, J.; Fornara, A.; González-Alonso, D.; Barquín, L. Fernández; Johansson, C.

    2017-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of magnetic multi-core particles were determined by numerical inversion of small angle scattering and isothermal magnetisation data. The investigated particles consist of iron oxide nanoparticle cores (9 nm) embedded in poly(styrene) spheres (160 nm). A thorough physical characterisation of the particles included transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Their structure was ultimately disclosed by an indirect Fourier transform of static light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering data of the colloidal dispersion. The extracted pair distance distribution functions clearly indicated that the cores were mostly accumulated in the outer surface layers of the poly(styrene) spheres. To investigate the magnetic properties, the isothermal magnetisation curves of the multi-core particles (immobilised and dispersed in water) were analysed. The study stands out by applying the same numerical approach to extract the apparent moment distributions of the particles as for the indirect Fourier transform. It could be shown that the main peak of the apparent moment distributions correlated to the expected intrinsic moment distribution of the cores. Additional peaks were observed which signaled deviations of the isothermal magnetisation behavior from the non-interacting case, indicating weak dipolar interactions. PMID:28397851

  5. Fluid-structure coupled dynamic response of PWR core barrel during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, M.W.; Zhang, Y.G.; Shi, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is engaged in the Fluid-Structure Interaction LOCA analysis of the core barrel of PWR. The analysis is performed by a multipurpose computer code SANES. The FSI inside the pressure vessel is treated by a FEM code including some structural and acoustic elements. The transient in the primary loop is solved by a two-phase flow code. Both codes are coupled one another. Some interesting conclusions are drawn. (author)

  6. Synthesis and properties MFe2O4 (M = Fe, Co) nanoparticles and core-shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelenich, O. V.; Solopan, S. O.; Greneche, J. M.; Belous, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Individual Fe3-xO4 and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, as well as Fe3-xO4/CoFe2O4 core/shell structures were synthesized by the method of co-precipitation from diethylene glycol solutions. Core/shell structure were synthesized with CoFe2O4-shell thickness of 1.0, 2.5 and 3.5 nm. X-ray diffraction patterns of individual nanoparticles and core/shell are similar and indicate that all synthesized samples have a cubic spinel structure. Compares Mössbauer studies of CoFe2O4, Fe3-xO4 nanoparticles indicate superparamagnetic properties at 300 K. It was shown that individual magnetite nanoparticles are transformed into maghemite through oxidation during the synthesis procedure, wherein the smallest nanoparticles are completely oxidized while a magnetite core does occur in the case of the largest nanoparticles. The Mössbauer spectra of core/shell nanoparticles with increasing CoFe2O4-shell thickness show a gradual decrease in the relative intensity of the quadrupole doublet and significant decrease of the mean isomer shift value at both RT and 77 K indicating a decrease of the superparamagnetic relaxation phenomena. Specific loss power for the prepared ferrofluids was experimentally calculated and it was determined that under influence of ac-magnetic field magnetic fluid based on individual CoFe2O4 and Fe3-xO4 particles are characterized by very low heating temperature, when magnetic fluids based on core/shell nanoparticles demonstrate higher heating effect.

  7. Parameter studies to determine sensitivity of slug impact loads to properties of core surrounding structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvildys, J.

    1985-01-01

    A sensitivity study of the HCDA slug impact response of fast reactor primary containment to properties of core surrounding structures was performed. Parameters such as the strength of the radial shield material, mass, void, and compressibility properties of the gas plenum material, mass of core material, and mass and compressibility properties of the coolant were used as variables to determine the magnitude of the slug impact loads. The response of the reactor primary containment and the partition of energy were also given. A study was also performed using water as coolant to study the difference in slug impact loads

  8. Coercivity enhancement in Ce-Fe-B based magnets by core-shell grain structuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ce-based R2Fe14B (R= rare-earth nano-structured permanent magnets consisting of (Ce,Nd2Fe14B core-shell grains separated by a non-magnetic grain boundary phase, in which the relative amount of Nd to Ce is higher in the shell of the magnetic grain than in its core, were fabricated by Nd-Cu infiltration into (Ce,Nd2Fe14B hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity values of infiltrated core-shell structured magnets are superior to those of as-hot-deformed magnets with the same overall Nd content. This is attributed to the higher value of magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the shell phase in the core-shell structured infiltrated magnets compared to the homogeneous R2Fe14B grains of the as-hot-deformed magnets, and to magnetic isolation of R2Fe14B grains by the infiltrated grain boundary phase. First order reversal curve (FORC diagrams suggest that the higher anisotropy shell suppresses initial magnetization reversal at the edges and corners of the R2Fe14B grains.

  9. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. 2. Replacement of upper core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushiki, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiromichi; Okuda, Eiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Jun; Oota, Katsu; Kawahara, Hirotaka; Takamatsu, Misao; Nagai, Akinori; Okawa, Toshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, it was confirmed that the top of the irradiation test sub-assembly of MARICO-2 (material testing rig with temperature control) had bent onto the in-vessel storage rack as an obstacle and had damaged the upper core structure (UCS) in 2007. As a part of the restoration work, UCS replacement was begun at March 24, 2014 and was completed at December 17. In-vessel repair (including observation) for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) is distinct from that for light water reactors and necessitates independent development. Application of developed in-vessel repair techniques to operation and maintenance of SFRs enhanced their safety and integrity. There is little UCS replacement experience in the world and this experience and insights, which were accumulated in the replacement work of in-vessel large structure (UCS) used for more than 30 years, are expected to improve the in-vessel repair techniques in SFRs. (author)

  10. On the core structure and mobility of the {010} and {011-bar } dislocations in B2 structure YAg and YCu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Zhi, Wu; Shao-Feng, Wang; Rui-Ping, Liu

    2009-01-01

    Dislocations are thought to be the principal mechanism of high ductility of the novel B2 structure intermetallic compounds YAg and YCu. In this paper, the edge dislocation core structures of two primary slip systems {010} and {011-bar 1} for YAg and YCu are presented theoretically within the lattice theory of dislocation. The governing dislocation equation is a nonlinear integro-differential equation and the variational method is applied to solve the equation. Peierls stresses for {010} and {011-bar 1} slip systems are calculated taking into consideration the contribution of the elastic strain energy. The core width and Peierls stress of a typical transition-metal aluminide NiAl is also reported for the purpose of verification and comparison. The Peierls stress of NiAl obtained here is in agreement with numerical results, which verifies the correctness of the results obtained for YAg and YCu. Peierls stresses of the {011-bar 1} slip system are smaller than those of {010} for the same intermetallic compounds originating from the smaller unstable stacking fault energy. The obvious high unstable stacking fault energy of NiAl results in a larger Peierls stress than those of YAg and YCu although they have the same B2 structure. The results show that the core structure and Peierls stress depend monotonically on the unstable stacking fault energy. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  11. Orientation of aromatic residues in amyloid cores: Structural insights into prion fiber diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, Anna

    2014-11-17

    Structural conversion of one given protein sequence into different amyloid states, resulting in distinct phenotypes, is one of the most intriguing phenomena of protein biology. Despite great efforts the structural origin of prion diversity remains elusive, mainly because amyloids are insoluble yet noncrystalline and therefore not easily amenable to traditional structural-biology methods. We investigate two different phenotypic prion strains, weak and strong, of yeast translation termination factor Sup35 with respect to angular orientation of tyrosines using polarized light spectroscopy. By applying a combination of alignment methods the degree of fiber orientation can be assessed, which allows a relatively accurate determination of the aromatic ring angles. Surprisingly, the strains show identical average orientations of the tyrosines, which are evenly spread through the amyloid core. Small variations between the two strains are related to the local environment of a fraction of tyrosines outside the core, potentially reflecting differences in fibril packing.

  12. Development of visual inspection technology for HTTR core support graphite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, So; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Masuma, Yoshitaka; Miki, Toshiya.

    1996-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is now constructing the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which employs a visual inspection of core support graphite structure, as an inservice inspection (ISI). In this inspection, TV camera will be used to investigate the alignment and integrity of the structure. Therefore, the ISI system, a combination of radiation tolerant TV camera and graphic processing system, is developed and examined its detectability and viewing angles using a simulated hot plenum of HTTR, which has artificial defects. As a result of a series of tests, it was confirmed that this system satisfied the requirements and was quite applicable for the ISI system of HTTR core support graphite structure. In addition, further improvement of the system, like a remote control procedure, will be investigated. (author)

  13. Fabrication of sub-micrometric metallic hollow-core structures by laser interference lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Noemi; Tavera, Txaber [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra) Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Rodriguez, Ainara [CIC Microgune, Paseo Mikeletegi 48, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Ellman, Miguel; Ayerdi, Isabel; Olaizola, Santiago M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra) Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrays of hollow-core sub-micrometric structures are fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser interference lithography is used for the pattering of the resist sacrificial layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The removal of the sacrificial layer gives rise to metallic channels with a maximum crosssectional area of 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These structures can be used in nanofluidics. - Abstract: This work presents the fabrication of hollow-core metallic structures with a complete laser interference lithography (LIL) process. A negative photoresist is used as sacrificial layer. It is exposed to the pattern resulting from the interference of two laser beams, which produces a structure of photoresist lines with a period of 600 nm. After development of the resist, platinum is deposited on the samples by DC sputtering and the resist is removed with acetone. The resulting metallic structures consist in a continuous platinum film that replicates the photoresist relief with a hollow core. The cross section of the channels is up to 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2}. The fabricated samples are characterized by FESEM and FIB. This last tool helps to provide a clear picture of the shape and size of the channels. Conveniently dimensioned, this array of metallic submicrometric channels can be used in microfluidic or IC cooling applications.

  14. Fabrication of sub-micrometric metallic hollow-core structures by laser interference lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez, Noemí; Tavera, Txaber; Rodríguez, Ainara; Ellman, Miguel; Ayerdi, Isabel; Olaizola, Santiago M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Arrays of hollow-core sub-micrometric structures are fabricated. ► Laser interference lithography is used for the pattering of the resist sacrificial layer. ► The removal of the sacrificial layer gives rise to metallic channels with a maximum crosssectional area of 0.1 μm 2 . ► These structures can be used in nanofluidics. - Abstract: This work presents the fabrication of hollow-core metallic structures with a complete laser interference lithography (LIL) process. A negative photoresist is used as sacrificial layer. It is exposed to the pattern resulting from the interference of two laser beams, which produces a structure of photoresist lines with a period of 600 nm. After development of the resist, platinum is deposited on the samples by DC sputtering and the resist is removed with acetone. The resulting metallic structures consist in a continuous platinum film that replicates the photoresist relief with a hollow core. The cross section of the channels is up to 0.1 μm 2 . The fabricated samples are characterized by FESEM and FIB. This last tool helps to provide a clear picture of the shape and size of the channels. Conveniently dimensioned, this array of metallic submicrometric channels can be used in microfluidic or IC cooling applications.

  15. UNVEILING THE DETAILED DENSITY AND VELOCITY STRUCTURES OF THE PROTOSTELLAR CORE B335

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei, E-mail: yasutaka.kurono@nao.ac.jp [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-10

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r){proportional_to}r {sup -p} and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p Almost-Equal-To 2 for r {approx}> 4000 AU and p Almost-Equal-To 1.5 for r {approx}< 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of {approx}1.0 km s{sup -1} over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, and suggest a small inward velocity, v{sub r{>=}r{sub i{sub n{sub f}}}}{approx}0 km s{sup -1} in the outer core at {approx}> 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  16. A stretch of residues within the protease-resistant core is not necessary for prion structure and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Montesino, Carola; Sizun, Christina; Moudjou, Mohammed; Herzog, Laetitia; Reine, Fabienne; Igel-Egalon, Angelique; Barbereau, Clément; Chapuis, Jérôme; Ciric, Danica; Laude, Hubert; Béringue, Vincent; Rezaei, Human; Dron, Michel

    2017-01-02

    Mapping out regions of PrP influencing prion conversion remains a challenging issue complicated by the lack of prion structure. The portion of PrP associated with infectivity contains the α-helical domain of the correctly folded protein and turns into a β-sheet-rich insoluble core in prions. Deletions performed so far inside this segment essentially prevented the conversion. Recently we found that deletion of the last C-terminal residues of the helix H2 was fully compatible with prion conversion in the RK13-ovPrP cell culture model, using 3 different infecting strains. This was in agreement with preservation of the overall PrP C structure even after removal of up to one-third of this helix. Prions with internal deletion were infectious for cells and mice expressing the wild-type PrP and they retained prion strain-specific characteristics. We thus identified a piece of the prion domain that is neither necessary for the conformational transition of PrP C nor for the formation of a stable prion structure.

  17. Supplemental materials for the ICDP-USGS Eyreville A, B, and C core holes, Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Core-box photographs, coring-run tables, and depth-conversion files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, C.T.; Edwards, L.E.; Malinconico, M.L.; Powars, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    During 2005-2006, the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program and the U.S. Geological Survey drilled three continuous core holes into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure to a total depth of 1766.3 m. A collection of supplemental materials that presents a record of the core recovery and measurement data for the Eyreville cores is available on CD-ROM at the end of this volume and in the GSA Data Repository. The supplemental materials on the CD-ROM include digital photographs of each core box from the three core holes, tables of the three coring-run logs, as recorded on site, and a set of depth-conversion programs. In this chapter, the contents, purposes, and basic applications of the supplemental materials are briefly described. With this information, users can quickly decide if the materials will apply to their specific research needs. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  18. THE DEPENDENCE OF PRESTELLAR CORE MASS DISTRIBUTIONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE PARENTAL CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parravano, Antonio; Sánchez, Néstor; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2012-01-01

    The mass distribution of prestellar cores is obtained for clouds with arbitrary internal mass distributions using a selection criterion based on the thermal and turbulent Jeans mass and applied hierarchically from small to large scales. We have checked this methodology by comparing our results for a log-normal density probability distribution function with the theoretical core mass function (CMF) derived by Hennebelle and Chabrier, namely a power law at large scales and a log-normal cutoff at low scales, but our method can be applied to any mass distributions representing a star-forming cloud. This methodology enables us to connect the parental cloud structure with the mass distribution of the cores and their spatial distribution, providing an efficient tool for investigating the physical properties of the molecular clouds that give rise to the prestellar core distributions observed. Simulated fractional Brownian motion (fBm) clouds with the Hurst exponent close to the value H = 1/3 give the best agreement with the theoretical CMF derived by Hennebelle and Chabrier and Chabrier's system initial mass function. Likewise, the spatial distribution of the cores derived from our methodology shows a surface density of companions compatible with those observed in Trapezium and Ophiucus star-forming regions. This method also allows us to analyze the properties of the mass distribution of cores for different realizations. We found that the variations in the number of cores formed in different realizations of fBm clouds (with the same Hurst exponent) are much larger than the expected root N statistical fluctuations, increasing with H.

  19. In Vitro-Assembled Alphavirus Core-Like Particles Maintain a Structure Similar to That of Nucleocapsid Cores in Mature Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Chipman, Paul R.; Hong, Eunmee M.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    In vitro-assembled core-like particles produced from alphavirus capsid protein and nucleic acid were studied by cryoelectron microscopy. These particles were found to have a diameter of 420 Å with 240 copies of the capsid protein arranged in a T=4 icosahedral surface lattice, similar to the nucleocapsid core in mature virions. However, when the particles were subjected to gentle purification procedures, they were damaged, preventing generation of reliable structural information. Similarly, pu...

  20. Examination of Below-Ground Structure and Soil Respiration Rates of Stable and Deteriorating Salt Marshes in Jamaica Bay (NY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan imaging is currently being used to examine below-ground peat and root structure in cores collected from salt marshes of Jamaica Bay, part of the Gateway National Recreation Area (NY). CAT scans or Computer-Aided Tomography scans use X-ray equipment to produce multiple i...

  1. A core competency-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) can predict future resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenstein, Joshua; Heron, Sheryl; Santen, Sally; Shayne, Philip; Ander, Douglas

    2010-10-01

    This study evaluated the ability of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) administered in the first month of residency to predict future resident performance in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. Eighteen Postgraduate Year 1 (PGY-1) residents completed a five-station OSCE in the first month of postgraduate training. Performance was graded in each of the ACGME core competencies. At the end of 18 months of training, faculty evaluations of resident performance in the emergency department (ED) were used to calculate a cumulative clinical evaluation score for each core competency. The correlations between OSCE scores and clinical evaluation scores at 18 months were assessed on an overall level and in each core competency. There was a statistically significant correlation between overall OSCE scores and overall clinical evaluation scores (R = 0.48, p competencies of patient care (R = 0.49, p competencies. An early-residency OSCE has the ability to predict future postgraduate performance on a global level and in specific core competencies. Used appropriately, such information can be a valuable tool for program directors in monitoring residents' progress and providing more tailored guidance. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. More Than Filaments and Cores: Statistical Study of Structure Formation and Dynamics in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, How-Huan; Goodman, Alyssa

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade, multiple attempts at understanding the connection between filaments and star forming cores have been made using observations across the entire epectrum. However, the filaments and the cores are usually treated as predefined--and well-defined--entities, instead of structures that often come at different sizes, shapes, with substantially different dynamics, and inter-connected at different scales. In my dissertation, I present an array of studies using different statistical methods, including the dendrogram and the probability distribution function (PDF), of structures at different size scales within nearby molecular clouds. These structures are identified using observations of different density tracers, and where possible, in the multi-dimensional parameter space of key dynamic properties--the LSR velocity, the velocity dispersion, and the column density. The goal is to give an overview of structure formation in nearby star-forming clouds, as well as of the dynamics in these structures. I find that the overall statistical properties of a larger structure is often the summation/superposition of sub-structures within, and that there could be significant variations due to local physical processes. I also find that the star formation process within molecular clouds could in fact take place in a non-monolithic manner, connecting potentially merging and/or transient structures, at different scales.

  3. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wei; Sun Zhendong; Li Fengsheng; Chen Kai; Liu Tianyu; Liu Jialing; Zhou Tianle; Guo Rui

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3 O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail. - Research Highlights: → Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method.→ The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3 O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA).→ 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides the abundant functional groups.

  4. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Wei, E-mail: climentjw@126.co [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun Zhendong; Li Fengsheng [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Chen Kai; Liu Tianyu; Liu Jialing [Department of Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhou Tianle [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Guo Rui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail. - Research Highlights: Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides the abundant functional groups.

  5. Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Sandwich Structures with Additively Manufactured Polymer Lattice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew J.; Al Rifaie, Mohammed; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2018-05-01

    Sandwich panel structures are widely used in aerospace, marine, and automotive applications because of their high flexural stiffness, strength-to-weight ratio, good vibration damping, and low through-thickness thermal conductivity. These structures consist of solid face sheets and low-density cellular core structures, which are traditionally based upon honeycomb folded-sheet topologies. The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing process allow lattice core configurations to be designed with improved mechanical properties. In this work, the sandwich core is comprised of lattice truss structures (LTS). Two different LTS designs are 3D-printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and are tested under low-velocity impact loads. The absorption energy and the failure mechanisms of lattice cells under such loads are investigated. The differences in energy-absorption capabilities are captured by integrating the load-displacement curve found from the impact response. It is observed that selective placement of vertical support struts in the unit-cell results in an increase in the absorption energy of the sandwich panels.

  6. Consensus conference on core radiological parameters to describe lumbar stenosis - an initiative for structured reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Winklhofer, Sebastian F.X. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Deyo, Richard A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Jarvik, Jeffrey G. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Porchet, Francois [Schulthess Klinik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Steurer, Johann [University Hospital Zurich, Horten Center for patient oriented research and knowledge transfer, Zurich (Switzerland); Collaboration: On behalf of the LSOS working group

    2014-12-15

    To define radiological criteria and parameters as a minimum standard in a structured radiological report for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to identify criteria and parameters for research purposes. All available radiological criteria and parameters for LSS were identified using systematic literature reviews and a Delphi survey. We invited to the consensus meeting, and provided data, to 15 internationally renowned experts from different countries. During the meeting, these experts reached consensus in a structured and systematic discussion about a core list of radiological criteria and parameters for standard reporting. We identified a total of 27 radiological criteria and parameters for LSS. During the meeting, the experts identified five of these as core items for a structured report. For central stenosis, these were ''compromise of the central zone'' and ''relation between fluid and cauda equina''. For lateral stenosis, the group agreed that ''nerve root compression in the lateral recess'' was a core item. For foraminal stenosis, we included ''nerve root impingement'' and ''compromise of the foraminal zone''. As a minimum standard, five radiological criteria should be used in a structured radiological report in LSS. Other parameters are well suited for research. (orig.)

  7. Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Sandwich Structures with Additively Manufactured Polymer Lattice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew J.; Al Rifaie, Mohammed; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2018-04-01

    Sandwich panel structures are widely used in aerospace, marine, and automotive applications because of their high flexural stiffness, strength-to-weight ratio, good vibration damping, and low through-thickness thermal conductivity. These structures consist of solid face sheets and low-density cellular core structures, which are traditionally based upon honeycomb folded-sheet topologies. The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing process allow lattice core configurations to be designed with improved mechanical properties. In this work, the sandwich core is comprised of lattice truss structures (LTS). Two different LTS designs are 3D-printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and are tested under low-velocity impact loads. The absorption energy and the failure mechanisms of lattice cells under such loads are investigated. The differences in energy-absorption capabilities are captured by integrating the load-displacement curve found from the impact response. It is observed that selective placement of vertical support struts in the unit-cell results in an increase in the absorption energy of the sandwich panels.

  8. Solutions for the stable roommates problem with payments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biró, Péter; Bomhoff, M.J.; Golovach, Petr A.; Kern, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The stable roommates problem with payments has as input a graph G = (V , E ) with an edge weighting w : E → R≥0 and the problem is to find a stable solution. By pinpointing a relationship to the accessibility of the coalition structure core of matching games, we give a constructive proof for showing

  9. Stable lead isotopic characterisation of the historical record of environmental lead contamination in dated freshwater lake sediment cores from northern and central Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eades, L.J.; Farmer, J.G. [Environmental Chemistry Unit, Department of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, EH9 3JJ, Scotland Edinburgh (United Kingdom); MacKenzie, A.B. [Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, East Kilbride, G75 0QF, Scotland Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kirika, A.; Bailey-Watts, A.E. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, EH26 0QB, Scotland Penicuik (United Kingdom)

    2002-06-20

    Sediment cores from three Scottish freshwater lakes, Loch Ness in the remote north and Loch Lomond and the Lake of Menteith, much closer to the heavily populated and industrialised central belt, were analysed for 210Pb, 137Cs, Pb and stable Pb isotopic composition (206Pb/207Pb). The radionuclide data were used to establish chronologies for the Loch Ness and Loch Lomond cores, but a chronology could not be developed for the Lake of Menteith core, in which the surface sediment had been subject to intense mixing. Although Pb concentrations generally started increasing during the mid-17th Century, a small peak occurred for Loch Ness in the early 16th Century, perhaps attributable to the influence of medieval mining and smelting in mainland Europe. Temporal trends in the pattern of Pb accumulation were similar for Loch Ness and both sites in Loch Lomond, with 40-50% of the anthropogenic Pb deposited prior to the 20th Century. Fluxes of anthropogenic Pb to the lake sediments peaked during the 1950s at all locations where chronologies could be established. The 5-fold increase in anthropogenic Pb inventory for the southern basin of Loch Lomond relative to Loch Ness reflected geographical proximity to the main polluting sources. The 206Pb/207Pb data for anthropogenic Pb in the sediments from Loch Ness and Loch Lomond exhibited largely similar trends related to five different time periods. Pre-1820, the 206Pb/207Pb ratio was close to that for coal (1.181). From 1820 to 1900, a fairly constant 206Pb/207Pb ratio of 1.17 probably resulted from a combination of emissions from the smelting of indigenous Pb ore (1.170) and coal burning (1.181) in Scotland, and industrial activity to the south in England, where Australian Pb of characteristically low 206Pb/207Pb ratio (1.04) was already in use. From 1901 to 1930, the 206Pb/207Pb ratio declined by <0.01, due to the increasing influence of Australian Pb. From 1931 to 1975/1985, the 206Pb/207Pb ratio of anthropogenic Pb declined by a

  10. Stable lead isotopic characterisation of the historical record of environmental lead contamination in dated freshwater lake sediment cores from northern and central Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eades, L J; Farmer, J G; MacKenzie, A B; Kirika, A; Bailey-Watts, A E

    2002-06-20

    Sediment cores from three Scottish freshwater lakes, Loch Ness in the remote north and Loch Lomond and the Lake of Menteith, much closer to the heavily populated and industrialised central belt were analysed for 210Pb, 137Cs, Pb and stable Pb isotopic composition (206Pb/207Pb). The radionuclide data were used to establish chronologies for the Loch Ness and Loch Lomond cores, but a chronology could not be developed for the Lake of Menteith core, in which the surface sediment had been subject to intense mixing. Although Pb concentrations generally started increasing during the mid-17th Century, a small peak occurred for Loch Ness in the early 16th Century, perhaps attributable to the influence of medieval mining and smelting in mainland Europe. Temporal trends in the pattern of Pb accumulation were similar for Loch Ness and both sites in Loch Lomond, with 40-50% of the anthropogenic Pb deposited prior to the 20th Century. Fluxes of anthropogenic Pb to the lake sediments peaked during the 1950s at all locations where chronologies could be established. The 5-fold increase in anthropogenic Pb inventory for the southern basin of Loch Lomond relative to Loch Ness reflected geographical proximity to the main polluting sources. The 206Pb/207Pb data for anthropogenic Pb in the sediments from Loch Ness and Loch Lomond exhibited largely similar trends related to five different time periods. Pre-1820, the 206Pb/207Pb ratio was close to that for coal (1.181). From 1820 to 1900, a fairly constant 206Pb/207Pb ratio of approximately 1.17 probably resulted from a combination of emissions from the smelting of indigenous Pb ore (1.170) and coal burning (1.181) in Scotland, and industrial activity to the south in England, where Australian Pb of characteristically low 206Pb/207Pb ratio (1.04) was already in use. From 1901 to 1930, the 206Pb/207Pb ratio declined by <0.01, due to the increasing influence of Australian Pb. From 1931 to 1975/1985, the 206Pb/207Pb ratio of anthropogenic Pb

  11. Effect of Fuel Structure Materials on Radiation Source Term in Reactor Core Meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Ha, Kwang Soon

    2014-01-01

    The fission product (Radiation Source) releases from the reactor core into the containment is obligatorily evaluated to guarantee the safety of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) under the hypothetical accident involving a core meltdown. The initial core inventory is used as a starting point of all radiological consequences and effects on the subsequent results of accident assessment. Hence, a proper evaluation for the inventory can be regarded as one of the most important part over the entire procedure of accident analysis. The inventory of fission products is typically evaluated on the basis of the uranium material (e.g., UO2 and USi2) loaded in nuclear fuel assembly, except for the structure materials such as the end fittings, grids, and some kinds of springs. However, the structure materials are continually activated by the neutrons generated from the nuclear fission, and some nuclides of them (e.g., 14 C and 60 Co) can significantly influence on accident assessment. During the severe core accident, the structure components can be also melted with the melting points of temperature relatively lower than uranium material. A series of the calculation were performed by using ORIGEN-S module in SCALE 6.1 package code system. The total activity in each part of structure materials was specifically analyzed from these calculations. The fission product inventory is generally evaluated based on the uranium materials of fuel only, even though the structure components of the assembly are continually activated by the neutrons generated from the nuclear fission. In this study, the activation calculation of the fuel structure materials was performed for the initial source term assessment in the accident of reactor core meltdown. As a result, the lower end fitting and the upper plenum greatly contribute to the total activity except for the cladding material. The nuclides of 56 Mn, '5 1 Cr, 55 Fe, 58 Co, 54 Mn, and 60 Co are analyzed to mainly effect on the activity. This result

  12. Cryo-EM Structure of the TOM Core Complex from Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausewein, Thomas; Mills, Deryck J; Langer, Julian D; Nitschke, Beate; Nussberger, Stephan; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2017-08-10

    The TOM complex is the main entry gate for protein precursors from the cytosol into mitochondria. We have determined the structure of the TOM core complex by cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM). The complex is a 148 kDa symmetrical dimer of ten membrane protein subunits that create a shallow funnel on the cytoplasmic membrane surface. In the core of the dimer, the β-barrels of the Tom40 pore form two identical preprotein conduits. Each Tom40 pore is surrounded by the transmembrane segments of the α-helical subunits Tom5, Tom6, and Tom7. Tom22, the central preprotein receptor, connects the two Tom40 pores at the dimer interface. Our structure offers detailed insights into the molecular architecture of the mitochondrial preprotein import machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Standard Test Method for Water Absorption of Core Materials for Structural Sandwich Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the relative amount of water absorption by various types of structural core materials when immersed or in a high relative humidity environment. This test method is intended to apply to only structural core materials; honeycomb, foam, and balsa wood. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Understanding twinning nucleation and dislocation core structure through interscale hybrid method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Ben; Zhang, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    The variety of emerging simulation methods and improved computational power advance the understanding in nanometals as a good compensation of the experiments. In this paper, the first principle methods are discussed, especially as a useful combination of the classical molecular dynamics, to overc......, to overcome the disadvantages of the latter method. Two examples are given as: the nucleation of the {10-12} deformation twinning in magnesium, and the screw dislocation core structure with/without hydrogen in tungsten....

  15. Influence of high dose irradiation on core structural and fuel materials in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) periodically organizes meeting to discuss and review important aspects of fast reactor technology. The fifth meeting held in Obninsk, Russian Federation, 16-19 June 1997, was devoted to the influence of high dose irradiation on the mechanical properties of reactor core structural and fuel materials. The proceedings includes the papers submitted at this meeting each with a separate abstract

  16. Gap state related blue light emitting boron-carbon core shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Thakur, Anup

    2016-01-01

    Boron-carbon core shell structures have been synthesized by solvo-thermal synthesis route. The synthesized material is highly pure. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the reduction of reactants in to boron and carbon. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the shell is uniform with average thickness of 340 nm. Photo luminescence studies showed that the material is blue light emitting with CIE color coordinates: x=0.16085, y=0.07554.

  17. Uniform formation of Au coated polystyrene core-shell structure using metallization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoungseob; Koo, Jonghyun; Roh, Yonghan, E-mail: yhroh@skku.edu

    2011-08-01

    There are several methods for the fabrication of core-shell particles, including chemical reduction and self-assembly. In this study, the chemical reduction method was used to fabricate 100 nm, Au-coated polystyrene nanoparticles. The formation of the gold layer was based on the increase of gold coverage by the reaction with aniline and HAuCl{sub 4}. This method allowed for efficient control of the gold coverage and led to relatively stable products. The formation of Au clusters on the surface of the 100 nm polystyrene beads was characterized by scanning electron microscope and high resolution tunneling electron microscope. As a result, the Au-coated nanoparticles can be used in various applications such as surface plasmon resonators, drug delivery systems and electronic optical devices.

  18. Seismic velocity and attenuation structures at the top 400 km of the inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W.; Wen, L.; Niu, F.

    2002-12-01

    Recent seismic studies reveal an ``east-west" hemispherical difference in seismic velocity and attenuation in the top of the inner core [Niu and Wen, 2001, Wen and Niu, 2002]. The PKiKP-PKIKP observations they used only allowed them to constrain the seismic structure in the top 80 km of the inner core. The question now arises as such to what depth this hemispherical difference persists. To answer this question, we combine the PKiKP-PKIKP dataset and the PKPbc-PKIKP observations at the distance range of 147o-160o to study seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the top 400 km of the inner core along the ``equatorial paths" (the paths whose ray angles > 35o from the polar direction). We select PKPbc-PKIKP waveforms from recordings in the Global Seismic Network (GSN) and several dense regional seismic arrays. We choose recordings for events from 1990 to 2000 with simple source time functions, so only those of intermediate and deep earthquakes are used. The observed PKPbc-PKIKP differential travel times and PKIKP/PKPbc amplitude ratios exhibit an ``east-west" hemispherical difference. The PKPbc-PKIKP travel time residuals are about 0.7 second larger for those sampling the ``eastern" hemisphere than those sampling the ``western" hemisphere. The PKIKP/PKPbc amplitude ratios are generally smaller for those sampling the ``eastern" hemisphere. We construct two seismic velocity and attenuation models, with one for each ``hemisphere", by iteratively modeling the observed PKiKP-PKIKP waveforms, the PKPbc-PKIKP differential travel times and the PKIKP/PKPbc amplitude ratios. For the ``eastern" hemisphere, the observations indicate that the E1 velocity gradient and Q structure, inferred from the PKiKP-PKIKP observations sampling the top 80 km of the inner core, extend at least to 230 km inside the inner core. A change of velocity gradient and Q value is required in the deeper portion of the inner core. For the ``western" hemisphere, on the other hand, W2 velocity gradient

  19. Insert Design and Manufacturing for Foam-Core Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lares, Alan

    Sandwich structures have been used in the aerospace industry for many years. The high strength to weight ratios that are possible with sandwich constructions makes them desirable for airframe applications. While sandwich structures are effective at handling distributed loads such as aerodynamic forces, they are prone to damage from concentrated loads at joints or due to impact. This is due to the relatively thin face-sheets and soft core materials typically found in sandwich structures. Carleton University's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Project Team has designed and manufactured a UAV (GeoSury II Prototype) which features an all composite sandwich structure fuselage structure. The purpose of the aircraft is to conduct geomagnetic surveys. The GeoSury II Prototype serves as the test bed for many areas of research in advancing UAV technologies. Those areas of research include: low cost composite materials manufacturing, geomagnetic data acquisition, obstacle detection, autonomous operations and magnetic signature control. In this thesis work a methodology for designing and manufacturing inserts for foam-core sandwich structures was developed. The results of this research work enables a designer wishing to design a foam-core sandwich airframe structure, a means of quickly manufacturing optimized inserts for the safe introduction of discrete loads into the airframe. The previous GeoSury II Prototype insert designs (v.1 & v.2) were performance tested to establish a benchmark with which to compare future insert designs. Several designs and materials were considered for the new v.3 inserts. A plug and sleeve design was selected, due to its ability to effectively transfer the required loads to the sandwich structure. The insert material was chosen to be epoxy, reinforced with chopped carbon fibre. This material was chosen for its combination of strength, low mass and also compatibility with the face-sheet material. The v.3 insert assembly is 60% lighter than the

  20. Identification of Protein Complexes Using Weighted PageRank-Nibble Algorithm and Core-Attachment Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Wang, Jianxin; Zhao, Bihai; Wang, Lusheng

    2015-01-01

    Protein complexes play a significant role in understanding the underlying mechanism of most cellular functions. Recently, many researchers have explored computational methods to identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. One group of researchers focus on detecting local dense subgraphs which correspond to protein complexes by considering local neighbors. The drawback of this kind of approach is that the global information of the networks is ignored. Some methods such as Markov Clustering algorithm (MCL), PageRank-Nibble are proposed to find protein complexes based on random walk technique which can exploit the global structure of networks. However, these methods ignore the inherent core-attachment structure of protein complexes and treat adjacent node equally. In this paper, we design a weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm which assigns each adjacent node with different probability, and propose a novel method named WPNCA to detect protein complex from PPI networks by using weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm and core-attachment structure. Firstly, WPNCA partitions the PPI networks into multiple dense clusters by using weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm. Then the cores of these clusters are detected and the rest of proteins in the clusters will be selected as attachments to form the final predicted protein complexes. The experiments on yeast data show that WPNCA outperforms the existing methods in terms of both accuracy and p-value. The software for WPNCA is available at "http://netlab.csu.edu.cn/bioinfomatics/weipeng/WPNCA/download.html".

  1. Structural, evolutionary and genetic analysis of the histidine biosynthetic "core" in the genus Burkholderia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Russo, Edda; Fondi, Marco; Emiliani, Giovanni; Frandi, Antonio; Brilli, Matteo; Pastorelli, Roberta; Fani, Renato

    2009-12-01

    In this work a detailed analysis of the structure, the expression and the organization of his genes belonging to the core of histidine biosynthesis (hisBHAF) in 40 newly determined and 13 available sequences of Burkholderia strains was carried out. Data obtained revealed a strong conservation of the structure and organization of these genes through the entire genus. The phylogenetic analysis showed the monophyletic origin of this gene cluster and indicated that it did not undergo horizontal gene transfer events. The analysis of the intergenic regions, based on the substitution rate, entropy plot and bendability suggested the existence of a putative transcription promoter upstream of hisB, that was supported by the genetic analysis that showed that this cluster was able to complement Escherichia colihisA, hisB, and hisF mutations. Moreover, a preliminary transcriptional analysis and the analysis of microarray data revealed that the expression of the his core was constitutive. These findings are in agreement with the fact that the entire Burkholderiahis operon is heterogeneous, in that it contains "alien" genes apparently not involved in histidine biosynthesis. Besides, they also support the idea that the proteobacterial his operon was piece-wisely assembled, i.e. through accretion of smaller units containing only some of the genes (eventually together with their own promoters) involved in this biosynthetic route. The correlation existing between the structure, organization and regulation of his "core" genes and the function(s) they perform in cellular metabolism is discussed.

  2. Organic-Inorganic Hydrophobic Nanocomposite Film with a Core-Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A method to prepare novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite films was proposed by a site-specific polymerization process. The inorganic part, the core of the nanocomposite, is a ternary SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles, which is grafted with methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane (KH570, and wrapped by fluoride and siloxane polymers. The synthesized samples are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, contact angle meter (CA, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results indicate that the novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite with a core-shell structure was synthesized successfully. XRD analysis reveals the nanocomposite film has an amorphous structure, and FTIR analysis indicates the nanoparticles react with a silane coupling agent (methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane KH570. Interestingly, the morphology of the nanoparticle film is influenced by the composition of the core. Further, comparing with the film synthesized by silica nanoparticles, the film formed from SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles has higher hydrophobic performance, i.e., the contact angle is greater than 101.7°. In addition, the TEM analysis reveals that the crystal structure of the particles can be changed at high temperatures.

  3. Control of core structure in MgB{sub 2} wire through tailoring boron powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Minoru, E-mail: maeda.minoru70@nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Uchiyama, Daisuke [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Ma, Zongqing [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Shahabuddin, Mohammed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Kim, Jung Ho, E-mail: jhk@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia)

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • The typical void structure in the wire is obtained by using large-sized B powder. • In contrast, void alignment can be achieved by using fine B powder. • The sintering at lower temperatures improves the critical current density in fields. - Abstract: A common fabrication process for MgB{sub 2} wire, namely, the in situ powder-in-tube process, forms numerous voids within the wire core, and void formation cannot be completely avoided. The orientation is, however, known to be aligned more or less along the current-flow direction when ductile coarse magnesium powder is used as a precursor, and further tailoring approaches could open up the way to improving the transport critical current density. Herein, we have used boron powders with different particle sizes, in combination with the coarse magnesium powder, and evaluated their size effects on the phase composition, microstructure, and transport properties. A mixture of the coarse magnesium powder with large-sized boron powder in the wire core, after cold working and sintering, forms a granular morphology. In contrast, an aligned core appears during the reduction process for wire which is prepared by using fine boron powder. The sintering process, especially at a low temperature, where magnesium evaporation hardly occurs, yields an aligned structure, mainly consisting of MgB{sub 2} phase, along the wire direction. These findings demonstrate that the initial size of the starting materials is critical for the tailored structure.

  4. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  5. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, Ondřej; Ječná, K.; Leigh, M. B.; Macková, Martina; Macek, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 12 (2009), s. 3611-3619 ISSN 0048-9697 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2B08031 Program:2B Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA-based stable isotope probing * microbial diversity * bioremediation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2009

  6. Water-resistant, monodispersed and stably luminescent CsPbBr3/CsPb2Br5 core-shell-like structure lead halide perovskite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bo; Song, Pengjie; Cao, Jingyue; Zhao, Suling; Shen, Zhaohui; Gao, Di; Liang, Zhiqin; Xu, Zheng; Song, Dandan; Xu, Xurong

    2017-11-01

    Lead halide perovskite materials are thriving in optoelectronic applications due to their excellent properties, while their instability due to the fact that they are easily hydrolyzed is still a bottleneck for their potential application. In this work, water-resistant, monodispersed and stably luminescent cesium lead bromine perovskite nanocrystals coated with CsPb2Br5 were obtained using a modified non-stoichiometric solution-phase method. CsPb2Br5 2D layers were coated on the surface of CsPbBr3 nanocrystals and formed a core-shell-like structure in the synthetic processes. The stability of the luminescence of the CsPbBr3 nanocrystals in water and ethanol atmosphere was greatly enhanced by the photoluminescence-inactive CsPb2Br5 coating with a wide bandgap. The water-stable enhanced nanocrystals are suitable for long-term stable optoelectronic applications in the atmosphere.

  7. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  8. Crystal structure of core streptavidin determined from multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, W.A.; Paehler, A.; Smith, J.L.; Satow, Y.; Merritt, E.A.; Phizackerley, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional crystal structure of the biotin-binding core of streptavidin has been determined at 3.1-angstrom resolution. The structure was analyzed from diffraction data measured at three wavelengths from a single crystal of the selenobiotinyl complex with streptavidin. Streptavidin is a tetramer with subunits arrayed in D 2 symmetry. Each protomer is an 8-stranded β-barrel with simple up-down topology. Biotin molecules are bound at one end of each barrel. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) procedures for macromolecular crystallography and provides a basis for detailed study of biotin-avidin interactions

  9. Analysis of forces on core structures during a loss-of-coolant accident. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, D.P.; Vilim, R.B.; Wang, C.H.; Meyer, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    There are several design requirements related to the emergency core cooling which would follow a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). One of these requirements is that the core must retain a coolable geometry throughout the accident. A possible cause of core damage leading to an uncoolable geometry is the action of forces on the core and associated support structures during the very early (blowdown) stage of the LOCA. An equally unsatisfactory design result would occur if calculated deformations and failures were so extensive that the geometry used for calculating the next stages of the LOCA (refill and reflood) could not be known reasonably well. Subsidiary questions involve damage preventing the operation of control assemblies and loss of integrity of other needed safety systems. A reliable method of calculating these forces is therefore an important part of LOCA analysis. These concerns provided the motivation for the study. The general objective of the study was to review the state-of-the-art in LOCA force determination. Specific objectives were: (1) determine state-of-the-art by reviewing current (and projected near future) techniques for LOCA force determination, and (2) consider each of the major assumptions involved in force determination and make a qualitative assessment of their validity

  10. Effect of Ni Core Structure on the Electrocatalytic Activity of Pt-Ni/C in Methanol Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Linkov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Methanol oxidation catalysts comprising an outer Pt-shell with an inner Ni-core supported on carbon, (Pt-Ni/C, were prepared with either crystalline or amorphous Ni core structures. Structural comparisons of the two forms of catalyst were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and methanol oxidation activity compared using CV and chronoamperometry (CA. While both the amorphous Ni core and crystalline Ni core structures were covered by similar Pt shell thickness and structure, the Pt-Ni(amorphous/C catalyst had higher methanol oxidation activity. The amorphous Ni core thus offers improved Pt usage efficiency in direct methanol fuel cells.

  11. The influence of anisotropy on the core structure of Shockley partial dislocations within FCC materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajewski, B. A.; Hunter, A.; Luscher, D. J.; Beyerlein, I. J.

    2018-01-01

    Both theoretical and numerical models of dislocations often necessitate the assumption of elastic isotropy to retain analytical tractability in addition to reducing computational load. As dislocation based models evolve towards physically realistic material descriptions, the assumption of elastic isotropy becomes increasingly worthy of examination. We present an analytical dislocation model for calculating the full dissociated core structure of dislocations within anisotropic face centered cubic (FCC) crystals as a function of the degree of material elastic anisotropy, two misfit energy densities on the γ-surface ({γ }{{isf}}, {γ }{{usf}}) and the remaining elastic constants. Our solution is independent of any additional features of the γ-surface. Towards this pursuit, we first demonstrate that the dependence of the anisotropic elasticity tensor on the orientation of the dislocation line within the FCC crystalline lattice is small and may be reasonably neglected for typical materials. With this approximation, explicit analytic solutions for the anisotropic elasticity tensor {B} for both nominally edge and screw dislocations within an FCC crystalline lattice are devised, and employed towards defining a set of effective isotropic elastic constants which reproduce fully anisotropic results, however do not retain the bulk modulus. Conversely, Hill averaged elastic constants which both retain the bulk modulus and reasonably approximate the dislocation core structure are employed within subsequent numerical calculations. We examine a wide range of materials within this study, and the features of each partial dislocation core are sufficiently localized that application of discrete linear elasticity accurately describes the separation of each partial dislocation core. In addition, the local features (the partial dislocation core distribution) are well described by a Peierls-Nabarro dislocation model. We develop a model for the displacement profile which depends upon

  12. Method of magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. Experimental measurements for geologic structures determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delrive, C.

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of the safety of a deep geologic repository for dangerous materials requires the knowledge of the interstitial system of the surrounding host rock. A method is proposed for the determination of geologic structures (in particular fractures) from the magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated using a SQUID magneto-gradient meter. A measurement tool using a new magnetic susceptibility captor and a testing bench have been developed. This tool allows the measurement of rocks with a magnetic susceptibility greater than 10 -5 SI units and can generate magnetic susceptibility maps with 4 x 4 mm 2 pixels. A magnetic visibility criterion has been defined which allows to foresee if a structure is visible or not. According to the measurements done, it is shown that any centimeter-scale structure with a sufficient magnetic contrast (20%) with respect to the matrix is visible. Therefore, the dip and the orientation of such structure can be determined with a 3 degree and a 5 degree precision, respectively. The position of the structure along the core axis is known with a 4 mm precision. On the other hand, about half of the magnetic contrasts observed do not correspond to the visual analyses and can be explained by very small variations of the mineralogic composition. This last point offers some interesting ways for future research using magnetic susceptibility mapping. (J.S.). 31 refs., 90 figs., 18 tabs., 2 photos., 6 appends

  13. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte structure showed good chemical stability in both CO2 and H2O atmosphere, indicating that the BZPY layers effectively protect the inner BCY electrolyte, while the BCY electrolyte alone decomposed completely under the same conditions. Fuel cell prototypes fabricated with the sandwiched electrolyte achieved a relatively high performance of 185 mW cm- 2 at 700 C, with a high electrolyte film conductivity of 4 × 10- 3 S cm- 1 at 600 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  14. High-resolution C and O stable isotope geochemistry of the early Aptian OAE1a at Cau (Prebetic Zone, Spain): Preliminary results from sediment core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro Ruiz-Ortiz, Pedro; Aguado, Roque; Castro, José Manuel; Gallego, David; de Gea, Ginés Alfonso; Jarvis, Ian; Molina, José Miguel; Nieto, Luis Miguel; Pancost, Richard; Quijano, María Luisa; Reolid, Matías; Rodriguez, Rafael; Skelton, Peter; Weisser, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    correlation with previously defined and worldwide recognized C-isotope segments of Menegatti et al. [2]. Along with the C-isotope stratigraphy, correlated with previous biostratigraphic and geochemical data from outcrop studies, profiles of magnetic susceptibility data (measured from the core in the laboratory) and geophysical log profiles measured down-hole, are presented. Preliminary sedimentological analyses of the core have been completed, with a focus on lithology and sedimentary structures, including ichnofacies of bioturbated levels. The facies association is dominated by dark marlstones, displaying a cyclic vertical organization. These results confirm and refine previous data, and will be the base for ongoing analytical studies at a high-resolution scale, covering geochemical, biostratigraphic, sedimentological, ichnological and cyclostratigraphic analyses of the core. Acknowledgements: This work is a contribution of the research project CGL2014-55274-P (Gov. of Spain) and Research Group RNM-200 (PAIDI-JA). [1] Robinson et al. (2017). Sedimentology, 64, 1-15 [2] Menegatti et al. (1998). Paleoceanography 13, 530-545. [3] Gea et al. (2003) Palaeo3. 200, 207-219. [4] Quijano et al. (2012). Palaeo3. 365-366, 276-293. [5] Naafs et al. (2016). Nat. Geosc. 9 (2), 135-139. [6] Ruiz-Ortiz et al. (2016). Sci. Dril. 21, 41-46.

  15. Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles study by first principle: The structural, magnetic and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hai-Xia [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Xiao-Xu [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Computing Center, Beijing 100094 (China); Hu, Yao-Wen [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Song, Hong-Quan; Huo, Jin-Rong; Li, Lu [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Qian, Ping, E-mail: ustbqianp@163.com [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Song, Yu-Jun [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles of around 72 atoms have been investigated by the density functional theory, revealing proving for the first time that the core-shell structure exhibits a shrinkage phenomenon from outer shell in agreement with the other studies in literatures. Our calculations predict that the Ag@ZnO core-shell structure is a ferromagnetic spin polarized state, and the magnetism mainly stems from the spin splitting of 2p electrons of O atoms. In addition, the total and partial DOS of Ag@ZnO indicate that the nanostructure is a half-metallic nanoparticle and has the characters of the p-type semiconductor. Furthermore, the optical properties calculations show that the absorption edge of Ag@ZnO have a red shift and good photocatalysis compare to that of the bulk ZnO. These results of the Ag@ZnO core-shell structure obtain a well agreement with the experimental measurement. - Graphical abstract: Geometric structure of (a) Ag@ZnO core-shell nanostructure; (b) the core of Ag; (c) the shell of ZnO The core-shell nanoparticle Ag@ZnO contains Ag inner core of radius of 4 Å and ZnO outer shell with thickness of 2 Å. Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles of around 72 atoms have been proved for the first time that the core-shell structure exhibit a shrinkage phenomenon from outer shell. Our calculations predict that the Ag@ZnO core-shell structure is a half-metallic nanoparticle and has the characters of the p-type semiconductor. The absorption edge of Ag@ZnO have a red shift and get good photo-catalysis compare to that of the bulk ZnO.

  16. Effects of Core Softness and Bimodularity of Fibreglass Layers on Flexural Stiffness of Polymer Sandwich Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šuba Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of the flexural stiffness of the sandwich structures based on fibreglass and polymeric foams. The influence of geometrical and material parameters on the resulting effective flexural stiffness of the sandwich structure is being studied experimentally, analytically and by using FEM models. The effective modulus of elasticity of the sandwich-structured element is being studied and its theoretical and model dependencies on the flexibility of the foam core and bimodularity of the fibreglass layers are being investigated. The achieved results are compared with the experimentally observed values. This study shows that it is necessary to pay special attention to the issue of flexural stiffness of the walls when designing sandwich shell products in order to prevent possible failures in the practical applications of these types of structures.

  17. The impact of core-shell nanotube structures on fracture in ceramic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xin; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun; Sheldon, Brian W.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used to create ceramic nanocomposites with improved fracture toughness. In the present work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to deposit thin oxide layers on MWCNTs. These core-shell structures were then used to create nanocomposites by using a polymer derived ceramic (PDC) to produce the matrix. Variations in both the initial MWCNT structure and the oxide layers led to substantial differences in fiber-pullout behavior. Single tube pullout tests also showed that the oxide coatings led to stronger bonding with the ceramic matrix. With high defect density MWCNTs, this led to shorter pull-out lengths which is consistent with the conventional understanding of fracture in ceramic matrix composites. However, with low defect density MWCNTs longer pullout lengths were observed with the oxide layers. To interpret the different trends that were observed, we believe that the ALD coatings should not be viewed simply as a means of altering the interfacial properties. Instead, the coated MWCNTs should be viewed as more complex core-shell fibers where both interface and internal properties can be controlled with the ALD layers. - Graphical abstract: Fracture properties of core-shell nanotubes reinforced ceramic nanocomposites.

  18. Structure and stability of nickel/nickel oxide core-shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Addato, S; Grillo, V; Valeri, S; Frabboni, S; Altieri, S; Tondi, R

    2011-01-01

    The results of a combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) study of Ni nanoparticles (NP), before and after oxidation, are presented. An experimental set-up was realized for the preparation and study of pre-formed NP films, concentrating the attention on Ni NP in the diameter range between 4 and 8 nm. The XPS data were taken in situ from NPs after different stages of oxidation, including controlled dosing of O 2 gas in the experimental system and exposure to the atmosphere. The Ni 2p structure is a combination of spectra from metallic Ni in the NP core and from the oxide shell. The signal from the NP core was observed even for samples after exposure to air. From the comparison of HR-TEM experimental images with theoretical simulations, it was found that the Ni NP core has a regular multitwinned icosahedral structure, composed of single-crystal tetrahedra with (111) faces. The NiO phase is clearly observed forming islands on the NP surface.

  19. Structure and stability of nickel/nickel oxide core-shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Addato, S; Grillo, V; Valeri, S; Frabboni, S [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Altieri, S; Tondi, R, E-mail: sergio.daddato@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy)

    2011-05-04

    The results of a combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) study of Ni nanoparticles (NP), before and after oxidation, are presented. An experimental set-up was realized for the preparation and study of pre-formed NP films, concentrating the attention on Ni NP in the diameter range between 4 and 8 nm. The XPS data were taken in situ from NPs after different stages of oxidation, including controlled dosing of O{sub 2} gas in the experimental system and exposure to the atmosphere. The Ni 2p structure is a combination of spectra from metallic Ni in the NP core and from the oxide shell. The signal from the NP core was observed even for samples after exposure to air. From the comparison of HR-TEM experimental images with theoretical simulations, it was found that the Ni NP core has a regular multitwinned icosahedral structure, composed of single-crystal tetrahedra with (111) faces. The NiO phase is clearly observed forming islands on the NP surface.

  20. Heysham II/Torness power stations: Seismic qualification of core structures and boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    For the advanced gas cooled reactors at Heysham II and Torness the seismic qualification of the core and support structures and boilers posed special problems. In each case the response was highly non-linear due to impacting. Within the core itself there are many thousands of degrees of freedom each dominated by impacting during the seismic event and these impact forces are transmitted to the support structure. The boilers, although supported and located in the design case by linear systems, have their motion during the seismic event controlled by seismic restraints and other components which introduce substantial impacting during seismic excitation. For both these important components a substantial programme of testing was carried out to validate an analysis approach. This testing and correlation with analysis is described in detail for both components. In the case of the core the qualification was based upon a non-linear code AGRCORE which was specifically developed to handle the large number of impact degrees of freedom for this component. The implementation of this code is also described together with a brief summary of results. The boiler analysis was ultimately carried out using conventional finite difference codes and the implementation of these together with a summary of results is also presented. (author). 13 figs, 1 tab

  1. An Analysis of Reactor Structural Response to Fuel Sodium Interaction in a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Tashiro, M.; Sasanuma, K.; Nagashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    This study shows the effect of constraints around FSI zone on FSI phenomena and deformations of reactor structures. SUGAR-PISCES code system has been developed to evaluate the phenomena of FSI and the response of reactor structure. SUGAR calculates the phenomena of FSI. PISCES, developed by Physics International Company in U.S.A, calculates the dynamic response of reactor structure in two-dimensional, time-dependent finite-difference Lagrangian model. The results show that the peak pressure and energy by FSI and the deformation of reactor structures are about twice in case of FSI zone surrounding by blanket than by coolant. The FSI phenomena highly depend on the reactor structure and the realistic configuration around core must be considered for analyzing hypothetical core disruptive accident. In conclusion: FSI phenomena depend highly on constraints around FSI zone, so that the constraints must be dealt with realistically in analytical models. Although a two-dimensional model is superior to a quasi-two-dimensional model. The former needs long calculation time, so it is very expensive using in parametric study. Therefore, it is desirable that the two-dimensional model is used in the final study of reactor design and the quasi-two-dimensional model is used in parametric study. The blanket affects on the acoustic pressure and the deformations of radial structures, but affects scarcely on the upper vessel deformation. The blanket also affects on the mechanical work largely. The core barrel gives scarcely the effects on pressure in single phase but gives highly the effects on pressure in two-phase and deformation of reactor structures in this study. For studying the more realistic phenomena of FSI in the reactor design, the following works should be needed. (i) Spatial Distribution of FSI Region Spatial and time-dependent distribution of fuel temperature and molten fuel fraction must be taken in realistic simulation of accident condition. To this purpose, the code will

  2. A review of MAAP4 code structure and core T/H model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yong Mann; Park, Soo Yong

    1998-03-01

    The modular accident analysis program (MAAP) version 4 is a computer code that can simulate the response of LWR plants during severe accident sequences and includes models for all of the important phenomena which might occur during accident sequences. In this report, MAAP4 code structure and core thermal hydraulic (T/H) model which models the T/H behavior of the reactor core and the response of core components during all accident phases involving degraded cores are specifically reviewed and then reorganized. This reorganization is performed via getting the related models together under each topic whose contents and order are same with other two reports for MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5 to be simultaneously published. Major purpose of the report is to provide information about the characteristics of MAAP4 core T/H models for an integrated severe accident computer code development being performed under the one of on-going mid/long-term nuclear developing project. The basic characteristics of the new integrated severe accident code includes: 1) Flexible simulation capability of primary side, secondary side, and the containment under severe accident conditions, 2) Detailed plant simulation, 3) Convenient user-interfaces, 4) Highly modularization for easy maintenance/improvement, and 5) State-of-the-art model selection. In conclusion, MAAP4 code has appeared to be superior for 3) and 4) items but to be somewhat inferior for 1) and 2) items. For item 5), more efforts should be made in the future to compare separated models in detail with not only other codes but also recent world-wide work. (author). 17 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  3. TiN/VN composites with core/shell structure for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shanmu; Chen, Xiao [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Gu, Lin [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808577 (Japan); Zhou, Xinhong [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266101 (China); Wang, Haibo; Liu, Zhihong; Han, Pengxian; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Li [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Cui, Guanglei, E-mail: cuigl@qibebt.ac.cn [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Chen, Liquan [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Vanadium and titanium nitride nanocomposite with core-shell structure was prepared. {yields} TiN/VN composites with different V:Ti molar ratios were obtained. {yields} TiN/VN composites can provide promising electronic conductivity and favorable capacity storage. -- Abstract: TiN/VN core-shell composites are prepared by a two-step strategy involving coating of commercial TiN nanoparticles with V{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O sols followed by ammonia reduction. The highest specific capacitance of 170 F g{sup -1} is obtained when scanned at 2 mV s{sup -1} and a promising rate capacity performance is maintained at higher voltage sweep rates. These results indicate that these composites with good electronic conductivity can deliver a favorable capacity performance.

  4. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Sun, Zhendong; Li, Fengsheng; Chen, Kai; Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Jialing; Zhou, Tianle; Guo, Rui

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail.

  5. Core structure of screw dislocations in Fe from first-principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventelon, L.

    2008-11-01

    The various methods appropriate for the simulation of dislocations within first-principles calculations have been set up, improved and compared between them. They have been applied to study screw dislocations in body-centered cubic iron using the SIESTA code. A non-degenerate core structure is obtained; its detailed analysis reveals a dilatation effect. Taking it into account in an anisotropic elasticity model, allows explaining the cell-size dependence of the energetics, obtained within the dipole approach. The Peierls potential obtained in ab initio suggests that the metastable core configuration at halfway position in the Peierls barrier, predicted by empirical potential, does not exist. We show how to construct tri-periodic cells optimized to study kinked dislocations. Using empirical potential, we demonstrate the feasibility of ab initio calculations of Peierls stress and kink formation. (author)

  6. Application of Continuous and Structural ARMA modeling for noise analysis of a BWR coupled core and plant instability event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demeshko, M.; Dokhane, A.; Washio, T.; Ferroukhi, H.; Kawahara, Y.; Aguirre, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the first application of a novel CSARMA method. • We analyze the instability occurred in a Swiss BWR plant during power ascension. • Benchmarked the results against STP analysis. • The CSARMA results are consistent with the background physics and the STP results. • The instability was caused by disturbances in the pressure control system. - Abstract: This paper presents a first application of a novel Continuous and Structural Autoregressive Moving Average (CSARMA) modeling approach to BWR noise analysis. The CSARMA approach derives a unique representation of the system dynamics by more robust and reliable canonical models as basis for signal analysis in general and for reactor diagnostics in particular. In this paper, a stability event that occurred in a Swiss BWR plant during power ascension phase is analyzed as well as the time periods that preceded and followed the event. Focusing only on qualitative trends at this stage, the obtained results clearly indicate a different dynamical state during the unstable event compared to the two other stable periods. Also, they could be interpreted as pointing out a disturbance in the pressure control system as primary cause for the event. To benchmark these findings, the frequency-domain based signal transmission-path (STP) method is also applied. And with the STP method, we obtained similar relationships as mentioned above. This consistency between both methods can be considered as being a confirmation that the event was caused by a pressure control system disturbance and not induced by the core. Also, it is worth noting that the STP analysis failed to catch the relations among the processes during the stable periods, that were clearly indicated by the CSARMA method, since the last uses more precise models as basis

  7. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, S.; Ordonez, E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Open cell metallic foam core sandwich panel structures are of interest for application in spacecraft micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields due to their novel form and advantageous structural and thermal performance. Repeated shocking as a result of secondary impacts upon individual foam ligaments during the penetration process acts to raise the thermal state of impacting projectiles ; resulting in fragmentation, melting, and vaporization at lower velocities than with traditional shielding configurations (e.g. Whipple shield). In order to characterize the protective capability of these structures, an extensive experimental campaign was performed by the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility, the results of which are reported in this paper. Although not capable of competing against the protection levels achievable with leading heavy shields in use on modern high-risk vehicles (i.e. International Space Station modules), metallic foam core sandwich panels are shown to provide a substantial improvement over comparable structural panels and traditional low weight shielding alternatives such as honeycomb sandwich panels and metallic Whipple shields. A ballistic limit equation, generalized in terms of panel geometry, is derived and presented in a form suitable for application in risk assessment codes.

  8. Growth of InAs/InP core-shell nanowires with various pure crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Heurlin, Magnus; Wernersson, Lars-Erik; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2012-07-20

    We have studied the epitaxial growth of an InP shell on various pure InAs core nanowire crystal structures by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The InP shell is grown on wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB), and {111}- and {110}-type faceted ZB twin-plane superlattice (TSL) structures by tuning the InP shell growth parameters and controlling the shell thickness. The growth results, particularly on the WZ nanowires, show that homogeneous InP shell growth is promoted at relatively high temperatures (∼500 °C), but that the InAs nanowires decompose under the applied conditions. In order to protect the InAs core nanowires from decomposition, a short protective InP segment is first grown axially at lower temperatures (420-460 °C), before commencing the radial growth at a higher temperature. Further studies revealed that the InP radial growth rate is significantly higher on the ZB and TSL nanowires compared to WZ counterparts, and shows a strong anisotropy in polar directions. As a result, thin shells were obtained during low temperature InP growth on ZB structures, while a higher temperature was used to obtain uniform thick shells. In addition, a schematic growth model is suggested to explain the basic processes occurring during the shell growth on the TSL crystal structures.

  9. Structure of magnetic particles studied by small angle neutron scattering. [Magnetic colloid particles in stable liquid dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebula, D J; Charles, S W; Popplewell, J

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this note is to show how the use of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can provide fundamental information on the structure of magnetic colloid particles in stable liquid dispersion. A more detailed account elaborating the use of the technique to provide fundamental information on interactions will appear later. This contribution contains some principal results on particle structure. The technique of SANS provides a very sensitive means of measuring particle size by measuring the scattered neutron intensity, I(Q), as a function of scattered wave vector, Q.

  10. Fluid structure interaction studies on acoustic load response of light water nuclear reactor core internals under blowdown condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses Lemuel Raj, G.; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic load evaluation within two phase medium and the related fluid-structure interaction analysis in case of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for light water reactor systems is an important inter-disciplinary area. The present work highlights the development of a three-dimensional finite element code FLUSHEL to analyse LOCA induced depressurization problems for Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) core barrel and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shroud. With good comparison obtained between prediction made by the present code and the experimental results of HDR-PWR test problem, coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis of core shroud of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) is presented for recirculation line break. It is shown that the acoustic load induced stresses in the core shroud are small and downcomer acoustic cavity modes are decoupled with the shell multi-lobe modes. Thus the structural integrity of TAPS core shroud for recirculation line break induced acoustic load is demonstrated. (author)

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis to construct a core collection from a large Capsicum germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hea-Young; Ro, Na-Young; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Jo, Jinkwan; Ha, Yeaseong; Jung, Ayoung; Han, Ji-Woong; Venkatesh, Jelli; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-11-14

    Conservation of genetic diversity is an essential prerequisite for developing new cultivars with desirable agronomic traits. Although a large number of germplasm collections have been established worldwide, many of them face major difficulties due to large size and a lack of adequate information about population structure and genetic diversity. Core collection with a minimum number of accessions and maximum genetic diversity of pepper species and its wild relatives will facilitate easy access to genetic material as well as the use of hidden genetic diversity in Capsicum. To explore genetic diversity and population structure, we investigated patterns of molecular diversity using a transcriptome-based 48 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large germplasm collection comprising 3,821 accessions. Among the 11 species examined, Capsicum annuum showed the highest genetic diversity (H E  = 0.44, I = 0.69), whereas the wild species C. galapagoense showed the lowest genetic diversity (H E  = 0.06, I = 0.07). The Capsicum germplasm collection was divided into 10 clusters (cluster 1 to 10) based on population structure analysis, and five groups (group A to E) based on phylogenetic analysis. Capsicum accessions from the five distinct groups in an unrooted phylogenetic tree showed taxonomic distinctness and reflected their geographic origins. Most of the accessions from European countries are distributed in the A and B groups, whereas the accessions from Asian countries are mainly distributed in C and D groups. Five different sampling strategies with diverse genetic clustering methods were used to select the optimal method for constructing the core collection. Using a number of allelic variations based on 48 SNP markers and 32 different phenotypic/morphological traits, a core collection 'CC240' with a total of 240 accessions (5.2 %) was selected from within the entire Capsicum germplasm. Compared to the other core collections, CC240 displayed higher

  12. The application of mechanical desktop in the design of the reactor core structure of China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang Ruifeng

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional parameterization design method is introduced to the design of reactor core structure for China advanced research reactor. Based on the modeling and dimension variable driving of the main parts as well as the modification of dimension variable, the preliminary design and modification of reactor core is carried out with high design efficiency and quality as well as short periods

  13. Localization of Stable and Chaotic Nonpropagating Structures in Nonlinear Mesoscopic Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Alan Barry

    Recent developments in the study of non-linear localized states, especially non-propagating ones, are outlined. Theoretical models of linear and nonlinear states in a lattice of coupled pendulums and related systems are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to those states which can be described by the Nonlinear Schrodinger equation as well as states where two modes can coexist and states exhibiting chaos. Measurement of localized stable and chaotic states in a 35 site physical pendulum lattice is reported. Various measurement techniques that were used are explained. States that were measured include the tanh profile or kink soliton, and the corresponding uniform state in the wavelength 2 mode, a similar soliton and uniform state in the wavelength 4 mode, a domain wall between the wavelength 2 and 4 modes and a domain wall between a chaotic state and the wavelength 2 mode. Amplitude profiles were measured for the stable kink and domain wall states and smooth curves were obtained by dividing the kink states by the corresponding uniform states. Return maps were measured for two sites in the chaotic domain wall. Simulation of a chaotic domain wall in a 50 site numerical lattice is reported. This system has the advantage that its parameters can be modified much more easily than those of the physical lattice. An attempt is made at quantifying the level of chaos as a function of lattice site with fractal dimension calculations on return maps embedded in a three dimensional space. The drive plane of the chaotic domain wall is mapped out in the drive amplitude - drive frequency plane. Transitions to various stable and quasiperiodic domain walls are noted.

  14. Low-Temperature Crystal Structures of the Hard Core Square Shoulder Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gabriëlse

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, the stability of complex structures in colloidal systems is enhanced by a competition between different length scales. Inspired by recent experiments on nanoparticles coated with polymers, we use Monte Carlo simulations to explore the types of crystal structures that can form in a simple hard-core square shoulder model that explicitly incorporates two favored distances between the particles. To this end, we combine Monte Carlo-based crystal structure finding algorithms with free energies obtained using a mean-field cell theory approach, and draw phase diagrams for two different values of the square shoulder width as a function of the density and temperature. Moreover, we map out the zero-temperature phase diagram for a broad range of shoulder widths. Our results show the stability of a rich variety of crystal phases, such as body-centered orthogonal (BCO lattices not previously considered for the square shoulder model.

  15. The core structures of transformation dislocations at TiAl/Ti3Al interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penisson, J.M.; Loubradou, M.; Derder, C.; Bonnet, R.

    1993-01-01

    A Ti-40%Al alloy is investigated using High Resolution Electron Microscopy. The alloy structure consists mainly of alternate lamellae of γ(TiAl, L1 0 structure) and α 2 (Ti 3 Al, DO 19 structure) phases. These lamellae are parallel to each other and the interfaces between them are flat and parallel to the densest planes of the crystals. It is found that, among the variety of interfacial dislocations relieving the misfit, some have cores involving four (111) planes in height. The elastic displacement fields around these interfacial ledges, compared with the experimental atomic positions determined from HREM images, are in agreement with Burgers vector contents 1/6 left angle 112 right angle . (orig.)

  16. Effects of lower plenum flow structure on core inlet flow of ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shun; Abe, Yutaka; Kaneko, Akiko; Watanabe, Fumitoshi; Tezuka, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of coolant flow structure at a lower plenum of an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) in which there are many structures is very important in order to improve generating power. Although the simulation results by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes can predict such complicated flow in the lower plenum, it is required to establish the database of flow structure in lower plenum of ABWR experimentally for the benchmark of the CFD codes. In the model of the lower plenum, we measured velocity profiles with LDV and PIV. And differential pressure of constructed model is measured with differential pressure instrument. It was identified that the velocity and differential pressure profiles also showed the tendency to be flat in the core inlet. Moreover, vortexes were observed around side entry orifice by PIV measurement. (author)

  17. Stable single longitudinal mode erbium-doped silica fiber laser based on an asymmetric linear three-cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Ting; Yan Feng-Ping; Li Qi; Peng Wan-Jing; Feng Su-Chun; Tan Si-Yu; Wen Xiao-Dong

    2013-01-01

    We present a stable linear-cavity single longitudinal mode (SLM) erbium-doped silica fiber laser. It consists of four fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) directly written in a section of photosensitive erbium-doped fiber (EDF) to form an asymmetric three-cavity structure. The stable SLM operation at a wavelength of 1545.112 nm with a 3-dB bandwidth of 0.012 nm and an optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) of about 60 dB is verified experimentally. Under laboratory conditions, the performance of a power fluctuation of less than 0.05 dB observed from the power meter for 6 h and a wavelength variation of less than 0.01 nm obtained from the optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) for about 1.5 h are demonstrated. The gain fiber length is no longer limited to only several centimeters for SLM operation because of the excellent mode-selecting ability of the asymmetric three-cavity structure. The proposed scheme provides a simple and cost-effective approach to realizing a stable SLM fiber laser. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Structurally Stable Attractive Nanoscale Emulsions with Dipole-Dipole Interaction-Driven Interdrop Percolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyounghee; Gong, Gyeonghyeon; Cuadrado, Jonas; Jeon, Serim; Seo, Mintae; Choi, Hong Sung; Hwang, Jae Sung; Lee, Youngbok; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Kim, Jin Woong

    2017-03-28

    This study introduces an extremely stable attractive nanoscale emulsion fluid, in which the amphiphilic block copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL), is tightly packed with lecithin, thereby forming a mechanically robust thin-film at the oil-water interface. The molecular association of PEO-b-PCL with lecithin is critical for formation of a tighter and denser molecular assembly at the interface, which is systematically confirmed by T 2 relaxation and DSC analyses. Moreover, suspension rheology studies also reflect the interdroplet attractions over a wide volume fraction range of the dispersed oil phase; this results in a percolated network of stable drops that exhibit no signs of coalescence or phase separation. This unique rheological behavior is attributed to the dipolar interaction between the phosphorylcholine groups of lecithin and the methoxy end groups of PEO-b-PCL. Finally, the nanoemulsion system significantly enhances transdermal delivery efficiency due to its favorable attraction to the skin, as well as high diffusivity of the nanoscale emulsion drops. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Role of core support material in veneer failure of brittle layer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ilja; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Lawn, Brian R

    2007-07-01

    A study is made of veneer failure by cracking in all-ceramic crown-like layer structures. Model trilayers consisting of a 1 mm thick external glass layer (veneer) joined to a 0.5 mm thick inner stiff and hard ceramic support layer (core) by epoxy bonding or by fusion are fabricated for testing. The resulting bilayers are then glued to a thick compliant polycarbonate slab to simulate a dentin base. The specimens are subjected to cyclic contact (occlusal) loading with spherical indenters in an aqueous environment. Video cameras are used to record the fracture evolution in the transparent glass layer in situ during testing. The dominant failure mode is cone cracking in the glass veneer by traditional outer (Hertzian) cone cracks at higher contact loads and by inner (hydraulically pumped) cone cracks at lower loads. Failure is deemed to occur when one of these cracks reaches the veneer/core interface. The advantages and disadvantages of the alumina and zirconia core materials are discussed in terms of mechanical properties-strength and toughness, as well as stiffness. Consideration is also given to the roles of interface strength and residual thermal expansion mismatch stresses in relation to the different joining methods. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Very Deep inside the SN 1987A Core Ejecta: Molecular Structures Seen in 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Indebetouw, R.; Chevalier, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gabler, M.; Janka, H.-Th. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fransson, C.; Lundqvist, P. [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, Alba Nova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Spyromilio, J. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Burrows, D. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cigan, P.; Gomez, H. L.; Matsuura, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Gaensler, B. M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Kirshner, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Larsson, J. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); McCray, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Park, S. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, 108 Science Hall, Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Roche, P., E-mail: francisco.abellan@uv.es [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-06-20

    Most massive stars end their lives in core-collapse supernova explosions and enrich the interstellar medium with explosively nucleosynthesized elements. Following core collapse, the explosion is subject to instabilities as the shock propagates outward through the progenitor star. Observations of the composition and structure of the innermost regions of a core-collapse supernova provide a direct probe of the instabilities and nucleosynthetic products. SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of very few supernovae for which the inner ejecta can be spatially resolved but are not yet strongly affected by interaction with the surroundings. Our observations of SN 1987A with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array are of the highest resolution to date and reveal the detailed morphology of cold molecular gas in the innermost regions of the remnant. The 3D distributions of carbon and silicon monoxide (CO and SiO) emission differ, but both have a central deficit, or torus-like distribution, possibly a result of radioactive heating during the first weeks (“nickel heating”). The size scales of the clumpy distribution are compared quantitatively to models, demonstrating how progenitor and explosion physics can be constrained.

  1. Very Deep inside the SN 1987A Core Ejecta: Molecular Structures Seen in 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Indebetouw, R.; Chevalier, R.; Gabler, M.; Janka, H.-Th.; Fransson, C.; Lundqvist, P.; Spyromilio, J.; Burrows, D. N.; Cigan, P.; Gomez, H. L.; Matsuura, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Kirshner, R.; Larsson, J.; McCray, R.; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, S.; Roche, P.

    2017-01-01

    Most massive stars end their lives in core-collapse supernova explosions and enrich the interstellar medium with explosively nucleosynthesized elements. Following core collapse, the explosion is subject to instabilities as the shock propagates outward through the progenitor star. Observations of the composition and structure of the innermost regions of a core-collapse supernova provide a direct probe of the instabilities and nucleosynthetic products. SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of very few supernovae for which the inner ejecta can be spatially resolved but are not yet strongly affected by interaction with the surroundings. Our observations of SN 1987A with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array are of the highest resolution to date and reveal the detailed morphology of cold molecular gas in the innermost regions of the remnant. The 3D distributions of carbon and silicon monoxide (CO and SiO) emission differ, but both have a central deficit, or torus-like distribution, possibly a result of radioactive heating during the first weeks (“nickel heating”). The size scales of the clumpy distribution are compared quantitatively to models, demonstrating how progenitor and explosion physics can be constrained.

  2. Spatially resolved electronic structure inside and outside the vortex cores of a high-temperature superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, V. F.; Sigmund, E. E.; Eschrig, M.; Bachman, H. N.; Halperin, W. P.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Moulton, W. G.

    2001-10-01

    Puzzling aspects of high-transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors include the prevalence of magnetism in the normal state and the persistence of superconductivity in high magnetic fields. Superconductivity and magnetism generally are thought to be incompatible, based on what is known about conventional superconductors. Recent results, however, indicate that antiferromagnetism can appear in the superconducting state of a high-Tc superconductor in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Magnetic fields penetrate a superconductor in the form of quantized flux lines, each of which represents a vortex of supercurrents. Superconductivity is suppressed in the core of the vortex and it has been suggested that antiferromagnetism might develop there. Here we report the results of a high-field nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) imaging experiment in which we spatially resolve the electronic structure of near-optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ inside and outside vortex cores. Outside the cores, we find strong antiferromagnetic fluctuations, whereas inside we detect electronic states that are rather different from those found in conventional superconductors.

  3. STYCA, a computer program in the dynamic structural analysis of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Macedo, L.V. da; Breyne Salvagni, R. de

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for the dynamic structural analysis of a PWR core is presented, impacts between fuel assemblies may occur because of the existence of gaps between them. Thus, the problem is non-linear and an spectral analysis is avoided. A time-history response analysis is necessary. The Modal Superposition Method with the Duhamel integral was used in order to solve the problem. An algorithm of solution and also results obtained with the STYCA computer program, developed on the basis of what was proposed here, are presented. (author)

  4. Dynamic structural analysis for assemblies of fuel elements in the core of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Macedo, L.V. da.

    1991-01-01

    It is presented a procedure for the dynamic structural analysis of a PWR core. Impacts between fuel assemblies may occur because of the existence of gaps between them. Thus, the problem is non-linear and an spectral analysis is avoided. It is necessary a time-history response analysis. The Modal Superposition Method with the Duhamel integral was used in order to solve the problem. It is presented an algorithm of solution and also results obtained with the STYCA computer program, developed in the basis of what was proposed here. (author)

  5. Particle swarm optimization of the stable structure of tetrahexahedral Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tun-Dong; Fan, Tian-E [Center for Cloud Computing and Big Data, Department of Automation, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Shao, Gui-Fang, E-mail: gfshao@xmu.edu.cn [Center for Cloud Computing and Big Data, Department of Automation, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Ji-Wen [Center for Cloud Computing and Big Data, Department of Automation, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wen, Yu-Hua [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-08-14

    Bimetallic nanoparticles, enclosed by high-index facets, have great catalytic activity and selectivity owing to the synergy effects of high-index facets and the electronic structures of alloy. In this paper, a discrete particle swarm optimization algorithm was employed to systematically investigate the structural stability and features of tetrahexahedral Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with high-index facets. Different Pt/Ag, Pt/Cu, Pt/Pd atom ratios and particle sizes were considered in this work. The simulation results reveal that these alloy nanoparticles exhibit considerably different structural characteristics. Pt–Ag nanoparticles tend to form Pt–Ag core–shell structure. Pt–Cu nanoparticles are preferred to take multi-shell structure with Cu on the outer surface while Pt–Pd nanoparticles present a mixing structure in the interior and Pd-dominated surface. Atomic distribution and bonding characteristics were applied to further characterize the structural features of Pt-based nanoparticles. This study provides an important insight into the structural stability and features of Pt-based nanoparticles with different alloys. - Highlights: • We explore the structural stability of Pt-based alloy NPs by a discrete PSO. • Our study discovers the different structural characteristics for Pt-based NPs. • Alloy composition and size have important effects on the surface segregation. • Our work shows strong phase separation for Pt–Ag NPs while weak for Pt–Pd NPs.

  6. Particle swarm optimization of the stable structure of tetrahexahedral Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tun-Dong; Fan, Tian-E; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zheng, Ji-Wen; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles, enclosed by high-index facets, have great catalytic activity and selectivity owing to the synergy effects of high-index facets and the electronic structures of alloy. In this paper, a discrete particle swarm optimization algorithm was employed to systematically investigate the structural stability and features of tetrahexahedral Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with high-index facets. Different Pt/Ag, Pt/Cu, Pt/Pd atom ratios and particle sizes were considered in this work. The simulation results reveal that these alloy nanoparticles exhibit considerably different structural characteristics. Pt–Ag nanoparticles tend to form Pt–Ag core–shell structure. Pt–Cu nanoparticles are preferred to take multi-shell structure with Cu on the outer surface while Pt–Pd nanoparticles present a mixing structure in the interior and Pd-dominated surface. Atomic distribution and bonding characteristics were applied to further characterize the structural features of Pt-based nanoparticles. This study provides an important insight into the structural stability and features of Pt-based nanoparticles with different alloys. - Highlights: • We explore the structural stability of Pt-based alloy NPs by a discrete PSO. • Our study discovers the different structural characteristics for Pt-based NPs. • Alloy composition and size have important effects on the surface segregation. • Our work shows strong phase separation for Pt–Ag NPs while weak for Pt–Pd NPs

  7. Role of wall-attached structures in the interface of the quiescent core region in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jongmin; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The effects of low- and high-speed structures on the interface of the quiescent core region are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent pipe flow. The quiescent core region is a uniform momentum zone located at the center of the pipe flow, which contains the highest streamwise momentum with a low level of turbulence. The interface of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. In the vicinity of the interface of the quiescent core region, the streamwise velocity changes abruptly. The abrupt jump in velocity causes an increase of the velocity gradient. The interface of the quiescent core region is similar to the laminar superlayer in turbulent/non-turbulent interface. The interface of the quiescent core region contains the low- and high-speed structures. They can be classified into wall-attached and detached structures depending on the distance between the structures and the wall. The influence of the detached structures accounted for most of the number of detected structures is negligible due to its small volume. Conversely, the wall-attached structures adjacent to the interface have a huge influence on the statistical amount of the interface, such as entrainment characteristics. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  8. Impact on breeding rate of different Molten Salt reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiwei; Mei Longwei; Cai Xiangzhou; Chen Jingen; Guo Wei; Jiang Dazhen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has several advantages over the other Generation IV reactor. Referred to the French CNRS research and compared to the fast reactor, super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor type is slightly lower and beading rate reaches 1.002. Purpose: The aim is to explore the best conversion zone layout scheme in the super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor. This study can make nuclear fuel as one way to solve the energy problems of mankind in future. Methods: Firstly, SCALE program is used for molten salt reactor graphite channel, molten salt core structure, control rods, graphite reflector and layer cladding structure. And the SMART modules are used to record the important actinides isotopes and their related reaction values of each reaction channel. Secondly, the thorium-uranium conversion rate is calculated. Finally, the better molten salt reactor core optimum layout scheme is studied comparing with various beading rates. Results: Breading zone layout scheme has an important influence on the breading rate of MSR. Central graphite channels in the core can get higher neutron flux irradiation. And more 233 Th can convert to 233 Pa, which then undergoes beta decay to become 233 U. The graphite in the breading zone gets much lower neutron flux irradiation, so the life span of this graphite can be much longer than that of others. Because neutron flux irradiation in the uranium molten salt graphite has nearly 10 times higher than the graphite in the breading zone, it has great impact on the thorium-uranium conversion rates. For the super epithermal neutron spectrum molten salt reactors, double salt design cannot get higher thorium-uranium conversion rates. The single molten salt can get the same thorium-uranium conversion rate, meanwhile it can greatly extend the life of graphite in the core. Conclusions: From the analysis of calculation results, Blanket breeding area in different locations in the core can change the breeding rates of thorium

  9. What does determine the sign of core in Magnetic Flux Rope structures of the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily examines the key factors being involved in precisely determining the sign of the core field in a magnetic flux rope (MFR like structure embedded in the tailward plasma flow associated with the Earth's magnetotail. Magnetic flux ropes are frequently detected by satellites moving smoothly northwards (upwards or southwards (downwards and crossing almost the whole plasma sheet; the sign of the rope's core is associated with the local tail's motion: If the tail is bending to an upward or downward direction, then the sign of the rope's core, being essentially an intense By deviation, will be positive or negative correspondingly. On the basis of this observational finding, a major question concerns the mechanism by which the tail's motion is dictated. The reconnection process acting in the tail will obviously produce symmetric structures of MFRs (with respect to the neutral sheet plane; therefore, the detected organized asymmetry may be an additional indication in the whole magnetotail' s dynamics. Moreover, we discuss the issue of the core's sign in cases without any significant magnetotail's motion. A model interpreting the diagnosed behavior is introduced: Once a tailward ion jet is produced in a thinned plasma sheet, it might form clockwise or counterclockwise ion vortices (i.e., loop-like ion currents providing the "magnetic core" with the appropriate sign. The crucial role of the interplanetary By deviation of the magnetic field (IMF is scrutinized and taken into account. The whole model is tested under the condition of long-lasting extraordinary events characterized by a persistent-intense By deviation with a duration up to 34 min. This work, based on Geotail single-satellite measurements, is not a statistical one; it is a first approach allowing the reconstruction of measurements in the whole range of the magnetotail's deflections, from negligible up to stronger significant magnetotail movements, and should be therefore

  10. Stable isotopes provide insight into population structure and segregation in eastern North Atlantic sperm whales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrell, Asunción; Velásquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly......, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted....

  11. Nonlinear Thermo-mechanical Finite Element Analysis of Polymer Foam Cored Sandwich Structures including Geometrical and Material Nonlinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Taher, Siavash Talebi

    In this paper, polymer foam cored sandwich structures with fibre reinforced composite face sheets subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads will be analysed using the commercial FE code ABAQUS® incorporating both material and geometrical nonlinearity. Large displacements and rotations...

  12. Analysis of core-periphery organization in protein contact networks reveals groups of structurally and functionally critical residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Arnold Emerson; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-10-01

    The representation of proteins as networks of interacting amino acids, referred to as protein contact networks (PCN), and their subsequent analyses using graph theoretic tools, can provide novel insights into the key functional roles of specific groups of residues. We have characterized the networks corresponding to the native states of 66 proteins (belonging to different families) in terms of their core-periphery organization. The resulting hierarchical classification of the amino acid constituents of a protein arranges the residues into successive layers - having higher core order - with increasing connection density, ranging from a sparsely linked periphery to a densely intra-connected core (distinct from the earlier concept of protein core defined in terms of the three-dimensional geometry of the native state, which has least solvent accessibility). Our results show that residues in the inner cores are more conserved than those at the periphery. Underlining the functional importance of the network core, we see that the receptor sites for known ligand molecules of most proteins occur in the innermost core. Furthermore, the association of residues with structural pockets and cavities in binding or active sites increases with the core order. From mutation sensitivity analysis, we show that the probability of deleterious or intolerant mutations also increases with the core order. We also show that stabilization centre residues are in the innermost cores, suggesting that the network core is critically important in maintaining the structural stability of the protein. A publicly available Web resource for performing core-periphery analysis of any protein whose native state is known has been made available by us at http://www.imsc.res.in/ ~sitabhra/proteinKcore/index.html.

  13. Sonochemical synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of air-stable Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; He Quanguo; Chen Hong; Tang Jianxin; Nie Libo

    2007-01-01

    Air-stable nanoparticles of Fe 3 O 4 /Au were prepared via sonolysis of a solution mixture of hydrogen tetrachloroaureate(III) trihydrate (HAuCl 4 ) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with further drop-addition of sodium citrate. The Fe 3 O 4 /Au nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Nanoparticles of Fe 3 O 4 /Au obtained under appropriate conditions possess a very high saturation magnetization of about 63 emu g -1 and their average diameter is about 30 nm

  14. High cycle fatigue analysis of vortex suppression plate and secondary core support structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Guohong; Li Yuan; Zhao Feiyun; Feng Shaodong; Yu Hao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactor internals are important equipment s in the reactor coolant system, its structure design needs high reliability in the entire lifetime, Reactor internals have occurred breakdown and the damage event due to flow induced vibrations in the domestic and foreign nuclear power plants, which make immediate influence on reactor safe operation and economic efficiency. Purpose: In this work, the dynamic response of reactor internals-vortex suppression plate and secondary core support structure (SCSS) under the loading from pump induced vibrations and flow induced vibrations are studied. Methods: Based on the finite element model of SCSS, Spectrum analysis and the harmonious analysis are performed, in order to get the response of the structure under flow induced vibrations. Then, the high fatigue of the structure is assessed according to the ASME B and PV Code. Results: The results indicate that alternate stresses of all the components satisfy the limiting value in the correlative requirements. Conclusions: The structure of SCSS could bear the vibration induced from the flow and the pump, and the method used in this article provides the reference for other reactor internals structure analysis like this. (authors)

  15. Genetic Structure and Selection of a Core Collection for Long Term Conservation of Avocado in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Luis F.; Machida-Hirano, Ryoko; Borrayo, Ernesto; Cortés-Cruz, Moisés; Espíndola-Barquera, María del Carmen; Heredia García, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Mexico, as the center of origin of avocado (Persea americama Mill.), harbors a wide genetic diversity of this species, whose identification may provide the grounds to not only understand its unique population structure and domestication history, but also inform the efforts aimed at its conservation. Although molecular characterization of cultivated avocado germplasm has been studied by several research groups, this had not been the case in Mexico. In order to elucidate the genetic structure of avocado in Mexico and the sustainable use of its genetic resources, 318 avocado accessions conserved in the germplasm collection in the National Avocado Genebank were analyzed using 28 markers [9 expressed sequence tag-Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) and 19 genomic SSRs]. Deviation from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium and high inter-locus linkage disequilibrium were observed especially in drymifolia, and guatemalensis. Total averages of the observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.59 and 0.75, respectively. Although clear genetic differentiation was not observed among 3 botanical races: americana, drymifolia, and guatemalensis, the analyzed Mexican population can be classified into two groups that correspond to two different ecological regions. We developed a core-collection by K-means clustering method. The selected 36 individuals as core-collection successfully represented more than 80% of total alleles and showed heterozygosity values equal to or higher than those of the original collection, despite its constituting slightly more than 10% of the latter. Accessions selected as members of the core collection have now become candidates to be introduced in cryopreservation implying a minimum loss of genetic diversity and a back-up for existing field collections of such important genetic resources. PMID:28286510

  16. Fluid structure interaction in LMFBR cores modelling by an homogenization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.

    1988-01-01

    The upper plenum of the internals of PWR, the steam generator bundle, the nuclear reactor core, may be schematically represented by a beam bundle immersed in a fluid. The dynamical study of such a system needs to take into account fluid structure interaction. A refined model at the scale of the tubes can be used but leads to a very difficult problem to solve even on the largest computers. The homogenization method allows to have an approximation of the fluid structure interaction for the global behaviour of the bundle. It consists of replacing the heterogeneous physical medium (tubes and fluid) by an equivalent homogeneous medium whose characteristics are determined from the resolution of a set of problems on the elementary cell. The aim of this paper is to present the main steps of the determination of this equivalent medium in the case of small displacements (acoustic behaviour of the fluid). Then an application to LMFBR core geometry has been realised, which shows the lowering effect on eigenfrequencies due to the fluid. Some comparisons with test results will be presented. 6 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the SNR-upper-core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the upper-core (UCS) during a HCDA of a LMFBR. The experiments were designed to verify some of the thermal-hydraulic models in SIMMER-II. Four different liquids were used to simulate the flashing U0 2 ; and numerous parameter variations were made regarding initial pressure, temperature, and configurations of the test apparatus. The experiments showed the large effect of the heat transfer in the UCS and the relatively small effect of friction. The reduction in final kinetic energy by the presence of the UCS is shown as a function of the initial pressure and the temperature difference between core and UCS. Calculations with SIMMER-II for the wide range of experiments produced results for the kinetic energy within a factor of 2 of the experimental results without changing the crucial input parameters. The minimum droplet size during the flashing process and the structure-side heat transfer coefficient were determined to be the crucial and most sensitive parameters. This reflects deficiencies in modeling of both the flashing process and the transient heat conduction in the structure. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Rich club analysis in the Alzheimer's disease connectome reveals a relatively undisturbed structural core network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Nir, Talia M; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Bernstein, Matt A; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion imaging can assess the white matter connections within the brain, revealing how neural pathways break down in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We analyzed 3-Tesla whole-brain diffusion-weighted images from 202 participants scanned by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-50 healthy controls, 110 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 42 AD patients. From whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We tested whether AD disrupts the "rich club" - a network property where high-degree network nodes are more interconnected than expected by chance. We calculated the rich club properties at a range of degree thresholds, as well as other network topology measures including global degree, clustering coefficient, path length, and efficiency. Network disruptions predominated in the low-degree regions of the connectome in patients, relative to controls. The other metrics also showed alterations, suggesting a distinctive pattern of disruption in AD, less pronounced in MCI, targeting global brain connectivity, and focusing on more remotely connected nodes rather than the central core of the network. AD involves severely reduced structural connectivity; our step-wise rich club coefficients analyze points to disruptions predominantly in the peripheral network components; other modalities of data are needed to know if this indicates impaired communication among non rich club regions. The highly connected core was relatively preserved, offering new evidence on the neural basis of progressive risk for cognitive decline. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. An enhanced sine dwell method as applied to the Galileo core structure modal survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenneth S.; Trubert, Marc

    1990-01-01

    An incremental modal survey performed in 1988 on the core structure of the Galileo spacecraft with its adapters with the purpose of assessing the dynamics of the new portions of the structure is considered. Emphasis is placed on the enhancements of the sine dwell method employed in the test. For each mode, response data is acquired at 32 frequencies in a narrow band enclosing the resonance, utilizing the SWIFT technique. It is pointed out that due to the simplicity of the data processing involved, the diagnostic and modal-parameter data is available within several minutes after data acquisition; however, compared with straight curve-fitting approaches, the method requires more time for data acquisition.

  20. Core Mediator structure at 3.4 Å extends model of transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Kayo; Schneider, Thomas R; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-05-11

    Mediator is a multiprotein co-activator that binds the transcription pre-initiation complex (PIC) and regulates RNA polymerase (Pol) II. The Mediator head and middle modules form the essential core Mediator (cMed), whereas the tail and kinase modules play regulatory roles. The architecture of Mediator and its position on the PIC are known, but atomic details are limited to Mediator subcomplexes. Here we report the crystal structure of the 15-subunit cMed from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 3.4 Å resolution. The structure shows an unaltered head module, and reveals the intricate middle module, which we show is globally required for transcription. Sites of known Mediator mutations cluster at the interface between the head and middle modules, and in terminal regions of the head subunits Med6 (ref. 16) and Med17 (ref. 17) that tether the middle module. The structure led to a model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cMed that could be combined with the 3.6 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the core PIC (cPIC). The resulting atomic model of the cPIC-cMed complex informs on interactions of the submodules forming the middle module, called beam, knob, plank, connector, and hook. The hook is flexibly linked to Mediator by a conserved hinge and contacts the transcription initiation factor IIH (TFIIH) kinase that phosphorylates the carboxy (C)-terminal domain (CTD) of Pol II and was recently positioned on the PIC. The hook also contains residues that crosslink to the CTD and reside in a previously described cradle. These results provide a framework for understanding Mediator function, including its role in stimulating CTD phosphorylation by TFIIH.

  1. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  2. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Leigh, Mary Beth; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based molecular techniques permit the comprehensive determination of microbial diversity but generally do not reveal the relationship between the identity and the function of microorganisms. The first direct molecular technique to enable the linkage of phylogeny with function is DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP). Applying this method first helped describe the utilization of simple compounds, such as methane, methanol or glucose and has since been used to detect microbial communities active in the utilization of a wide variety of compounds, including various xenobiotics. The principle of the method lies in providing 13C-labeled substrate to a microbial community and subsequent analyses of the 13C-DNA isolated from the community. Isopycnic centrifugation permits separating 13C-labeled DNA of organisms that utilized the substrate from 12C-DNA of the inactive majority. As the whole metagenome of active populations is isolated, its follow-up analysis provides successful taxonomic identification as well as the potential for functional gene analyses. Because of its power, DNA-SIP has become one of the leading techniques of microbial ecology research. But from other point of view, it is a labor-intensive method that requires careful attention to detail during each experimental step in order to avoid misinterpretation of results.

  3. Core-Shell Structuring of Pure Metallic Aerogels towards Highly Efficient Platinum Utilization for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Hübner, René; Sasaki, Kotaro; Zhang, Yuanzhe; Su, Dong; Ziegler, Christoph; Vukmirovic, Miomir B; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Adzic, Radoslav R; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2018-03-05

    The development of core-shell structures remains a fundamental challenge for pure metallic aerogels. Here we report the synthesis of Pd x Au-Pt core-shell aerogels composed of an ultrathin Pt shell and a composition-tunable Pd x Au alloy core. The universality of this strategy ensures the extension of core compositions to Pd transition-metal alloys. The core-shell aerogels exhibited largely improved Pt utilization efficiencies for the oxygen reduction reaction and their activities show a volcano-type relationship as a function of the lattice parameter of the core substrate. The maximum mass and specific activities are 5.25 A mg Pt -1 and 2.53 mA cm -2 , which are 18.7 and 4.1 times higher than those of Pt/C, respectively, demonstrating the superiority of the core-shell metallic aerogels. The proposed core-based activity descriptor provides a new possible strategy for the design of future core-shell electrocatalysts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  5. Optimal design for crosstalk analysis in 12-core 5-LP mode homogeneous multicore fiber for different lattice structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dablu; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2018-03-01

    12-Core 5-LP mode homogeneous multicore fibers have been proposed for analysis of inter-core crosstalk and dispersion, with four different lattice structures (circular, 2-ring, square lattice, and triangular lattice) having cladding diameter of 200 μm and a fixed cladding thickness of 35 μm. The core-to-core crosstalk impact has been studied numerically with respect to bending radius, core pitch, transmission distance, wavelength, and core diameter for all 5-LP modes. In anticipation of further reduction in crosstalk levels, the trench-assisted cores have been incorporated for all respective designs. Ultra-low crosstalk (-138 dB/100 km) has been achieved through the triangular lattice arrangement, with trench depth Δ2 = -1.40% for fundamental (LP01) mode. It has been noted that the impact of mode polarization on crosstalk behavior is minor, with difference in crosstalk levels between two polarized spatial modes as ≤0.2 dB. Moreover, the optimized cladding diameter has been obtained for all 5-LP modes for a target value of crosstalk of -50 dB/100 km, with all the core arrangements. The dispersion characteristic has also been analyzed with respect to wavelength, which is nearly 2.5 ps/nm km at operating wavelength 1550 nm. The relative core multiplicity factor (RCMF) for the proposed design is obtained as 64.

  6. Assessment of core structural materials and surveillance programme of research reactors. Report of the consultants meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    A series of presentations on the assessment of core structural components and materials at their facilities were given by the experts. The different issues related to degradation mechanisms were discussed. The outputs include a more thorough understanding of the specific challenges related to Research Reactors (RRs) as well as proposals for activities which could assist RR organizations in their efforts to address the issues involved. The experts recommend that research reactor operators consider implementation of surveillance programs for materials of core structural components, as part of ageing management program (TECDOC-792 and DS-412). It is recognised by experts that adequate archived structural material data is not available for many RRs. Access to this data and extension of existing material databases could help many operating organisations extend the operation of their RRs. The experts agreed that an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) on Assessment of Core Structural Materials should be organised in December 2009 (IAEA HQ Vienna). The proposed objectives of the TM are: (i) exchange of detailed technical information on the assessment and ageing management of core structural materials, (ii) identification of materials of interest for further investigation, (iii) proposal for a new IAEA CRP on Assessment of Core Structural Materials, and (iv) identification of RRs prepared to participate in proposed CRP. Based on the response to a questionnaire prepared for the 2008 meeting of the Technical Working Group for Research Reactors, the number of engineering capital projects related to core structural components is proportionally lower than those related to,for example, I and C or electrical power systems. This implies that many operating research reactors will be operating longer using their original core structural components and justifies the assessment and evaluation programmes and activities proposed in this report. (author)

  7. Genetic diversity and structure of core collection of winter mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) developed by genomic SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Bin; Li, Jing; Yang, Zhu L

    2018-01-01

    A core collection is a subset of an entire collection that represents as much of the genetic diversity of the entire collection as possible. The establishment of a core collection for crops is practical for efficient management and use of germplasm. However, the establishment of a core collection of mushrooms is still in its infancy, and no established core collection of the economically important species Flammulina velutipes has been reported. We established the first core collection of F. velutipes , containing 32 strains based on 81 genetically different F. veltuipes strains. The allele retention proportion of the core collection for the entire collection was 100%. Moreover, the genetic diversity parameters (the effective number of alleles, Nei's expected heterozygosity, the number of observed heterozygosity, and Shannon's information index) of the core collection showed no significant differences from the entire collection ( p  > 0.01). Thus, the core collection is representative of the genetic diversity of the entire collection. Genetic structure analyses of the core collection revealed that the 32 strains could be clustered into 6 groups, among which groups 1 to 3 were cultivars and groups 4 to 6 were wild strains. The wild strains from different locations harbor their own specific alleles, and were clustered stringently in accordance with their geographic origins. Genetic diversity analyses of the core collection revealed that the wild strains possessed greater genetic diversity than the cultivars. We established the first core collection of F. velutipes in China, which is an important platform for efficient breeding of this mushroom in the future. In addition, the wild strains in the core collection possess favorable agronomic characters and produce unique bioactive compounds, adding value to the platform. More attention should be paid to wild strains in further strain breeding.

  8. Development of in-service inspection system for core support graphite structures in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumita, Junya; Hanawa, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Ishihara, Masahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Visual inspection of core support graphite structures using TV camera as in-service inspection and measurement of material characteristics using surveillance test specimens are planned in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm structural integrity of the core support graphite structures. For the visual inspection, in-service inspection system developed from September 1996 to June 1998, and pre-service inspection using the system was carried out. As the result of the pre-service inspection, it was validated that high quality of visual inspection with TV camera can be carried out, and also structural integrity of the core support graphite structures at the initial stage of the HTTR operation was confirmed. (author)

  9. Results and Prospects of Development of Works on Structural Core Materials for Russian Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitina, A.A.; Ageev, V.S.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M.V.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Tselishchev, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    The strategy of development of atomic energy in Russia in the first half of XXI century contemplates construction and putting in operation of fast reactors of new generation with different types of coolant: sodium (BN-800, BN-1200, MBIR), lead (BREST-OD-300) and lead-bismuth eutectic (SVBR-100). For assurance of the working capacity of reactors that are under construction and achievement of economically reasonable burn-up of nuclear fuel the structural core materials with necessary level of radiation resistance, heat resistance, corrosion resistance to products of fuel fission, corrosion resistance in coolant and in water must be developed and justified. For sodium cooled reactors the key challenge is creation of radiation resistant and heat resistant cladding materials, which must ensure the achievement of damage doses at least 140 dpa. The solution of this problem is provided by phased use as cladding materials of austenitic steels ChS68 and EK164 (maximum damage doses ~ 92 and ~110-115 dpa, respectively), precipitation-hardening heat resistant ferritic-martensitic steels EK181 and ChS139 (maximum damage dose ~140 dpa) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels (maximum damage dose more than 140 dpa). For development of core materials for reactors with lead and lead-bismuth eutectic coolants the most serious challenge is corrosion resistance of materials in coolant. Therefore at present time a very wide range of works on study of corrosion resistance of candidate materials is carrying out. As the basic material for the cladding tubes is considered a ferritic-martensitic steel EP823 with high silicon content. In this report the main results of works on justification of the working capacity of materials of different classes in respect to use it in cores of operating and prospective fast reactors with different types of coolant and prospects of further development of works are presented. (author)

  10. Magnetic properties of Co-ferrite-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles having a core/shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petchsang, N.; Pon-On, W.; Hodak, J.H.; Tang, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic properties of Co-ferrite-doped hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles of composition Ca 10-3x Fe 2x Co x (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 (where x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5% mole) are studied. Transmission electron microscope micrograms show that the 90 nm size nanoparticles annealed at 1250 o C have a core/shell structure. Their electron diffraction patterns show that the shell is composed of the hydroxyapatite and the core is composed of the Co-ferrite, CoFe 2 O 4 . Electron spin resonance measurements indicate that the Co 2+ ions are being substituted into the Ca(1) sites in HAP lattice. X-ray diffraction studies show the formation of impurity phases as higher amounts of the Fe 3+ /Co 2+ ions which are substituted into the HAP host matrix. The presence of two sextets (one for the A-site Fe 3+ and the other for the B-site Fe 3+ ) in the Moessbauer spectrum for all the doped samples clearly indicates that the CoFe 2 O 4 .cores are in the ferromagnetic state. Evidence of the impurity phases is seen in the appearance of doublet patterns in the Moessbauer spectrums for the heavier-doped (x=0.4 and 0.5) specimens. The decrease in the saturation magnetizations and other magnetic properties of the nanoparticles at the higher doping levels is consistent with some of the Fe 3+ and Co 2+ which being used to form the CoO and Fe 2 O 3 impurity phase seen in the XRD patterns.

  11. Dynamic structural response of reactor-core subassemblies (hexcans) due to accident overpressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall. (author)

  12. The loadings and strength of nuclear power plant structures in core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varpasuo, P.

    1994-01-01

    The reactor cavity of VVER-91 NPP is a thick-walled, cylindrical reinforced concrete structure. In case of molten core-water reaction during the severe reactor accident the load carrying capacity of the cavity structure is of interest against the short impulse type loading caused by the steam explosion phenomenon. The assumed size of the impulse was 20 kPa-s and the duration was 10 ms. This investigation was divided in several phases. First, the elastic response of the cavity was determined using the ABAQUS code. Next, the static response of the cavity was evaluated using elasto-plastic properties of reinforcement and concrete and also taking into account the cracking of the concrete. This analysis was done with the aid of ABAQUS/STANDARD and ANSYS codes and the obtained results agreed reasonably with each other. In order to obtain a qualitative picture of the behaviour of the structure under the impulse load a simplified single degree of freedorn model was developed. The hoop reinforcement of the cavity was taken as an elasto-plastic spring and the wall concrete acted as a mass. Using this model the suitable amount of hoop reinforcement was determined. In next phase, the dynamic analysis of the structure was attempted using elasto-plastic material properties and concrete cracking. (13 refs., 57 figs.)

  13. Dynamic structural response of reactor-core subassemblies (hexcans) due to accident overpressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall

  14. Structural response of reactor-core hexcan subassemblies subjected to dynamic overpressurization under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall

  15. Late Quaternary lake-level changes constrained by radiocarbon and stable isotope studies on sediment cores from Lake Titicaca, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Harold D.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Southon, John R.; Seltzer, Geoffrey O.; Mucciarone, David A.; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Baker, Paul A.

    2003-09-01

    We present and compare AMS- 14C geochronologies for sediment cores recovered from Lake Titicaca, South America. Radiocarbon dates from three core sites constrain the timing of late Quaternary paleoenvironmental changes in the Central Andes and highlight the site-specific factors that limit the radiocarbon geochronometer. With the exception of mid-Holocene sediments, all cores are generally devoid of macrophyte fragments, thus bulk organic fractions are used to build core chronologies. Comparisons of radiocarbon results for chemically defined fractions (bulk decalcified, humate, humin) suggest that ages derived from all fractions are generally coherent in the post-13,500 yr BP time interval. In the pre-13,500 yr BP time interval, ages derived from humate extracts are significantly younger (300-7000 years) than ages from paired humin residues. Gross age incoherencies between paired humate and humin sub-fractions in pre-13,500 yr BP sediments from all core sites probably reflect the net downward migration of humates. Ages derived from bulk decalcified fractions at our shallow water (90 m) and deep water (230 m) core sites consistently fall between ages derived from humate and humin sub-fractions in the pre-13,500 yr BP interval, reflecting that the bulk decalcified fraction is predominantly a mixture of humate and humin sub-fractions. Bulk decalcified ages from the pre-13,500 yr BP interval at our intermediate depth core site (150 m) are consistently older than humate (youngest) and humin sub-fractions. This uniform, reproducible pattern can be explained by the mobilization of a relatively older organic sub-fraction during and after the re-acidification step following the alkaline treatment of the bulk sediment. The inferred existence of this 'alkali-mobile, acid-soluble' sub-fraction implies a different depositional/post-depositional history that is potentially associated with a difference in source material. While internally consistent geochronologies can be

  16. Highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings based on gradient structure design and fast regeneration from physical damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zao; Liu, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Guan, Zisheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic PET film was fabricated by dip-coating way. • The gradient structure is beneficial to both hydrophobicity and transparency. • The superhydrophobic PET film after physical damage can quickly regain by one-step spary. • The fabrication method is available for various substrates and large-scale production. - Abstract: Optical transparency, mechanical flexibility, and fast regeneration are important factors to expand the application of superhydrophobic surfaces. Herein, we fabricated highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings through a novel gradient structure design by versatile dip-coating of silica colloid particles (SCPs) and diethoxydimethysiliane cross-linked silica nanoparticles (DDS-SNPs) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and glass, followed by the modification of octadecyltrichlorosiliane (OTCS). When the DDS concentration reached 5 wt%, the modified SCPs/DDS-SNPs coating exhibited a water contact angle (WCA) of 153° and a sliding angle (SA) <5°. Besides, the average transmittance of this superhydrophobic coating on PET film and glass was increased by 2.7% and 1% in the visible wavelength, respectively. This superhydrophobic coating also showed good robustness and stability against water dropping impact, ultrasonic damage, and acid solution. Moreover, the superhydrophobic PET film after physical damage can quickly regain the superhydrophobicity by one-step spray regenerative solution of dodecyltrichlorosilane (DTCS) modified silica nanoparticles at room temperature. The demonstrated method for the preparation and regeneration of superhydrophobic coating is available for different substrates and large-scale production at room temperature.

  17. Atomic-scale structure and properties of highly stable antiphase boundary defects in Fe3O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Keith P; Hofer, Florian; Gilks, Daniel; Lazarov, Vlado K; Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-12-10

    The complex and intriguing properties of the ferrimagnetic half metal magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) are of continuing fundamental interest as well as being important for practical applications in spintronics, magnetism, catalysis and medicine. There is considerable speculation concerning the role of the ubiquitous antiphase boundary (APB) defects in magnetite, however, direct information on their structure and properties has remained challenging to obtain. Here we combine predictive first principles modelling with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to unambiguously determine the three-dimensional structure of APBs in magnetite. We demonstrate that APB defects on the {110} planes are unusually stable and induce antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent domains providing an explanation for the magnetoresistance and reduced spin polarization often observed. We also demonstrate how the high stability of the {110} APB defects is connected to the existence of a metastable bulk phase of Fe 3 O 4 , which could be stabilized by strain in films or nanostructures.

  18. Structural models of the different trimers present in the core of phycobilisomes from Gracilaria chilensis based on crystal structures and sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Dagnino-Leone

    Full Text Available Phycobilisomes (PBS are accessory light harvesting protein complexes that directionally transfer energy towards photosystems. Phycobilisomes are organized in a central core and rods radiating from it. Components of phycobilisomes in Gracilaria chilensis (Gch are Phycobiliproteins (PBPs, Phycoerythrin (PE, and Phycocyanin (PC in the rods, while Allophycocyanin (APC is found in the core, and linker proteins (L. The function of such complexes depends on the structure of each component and their interaction. The core of PBS from cyanobacteria is mainly composed by cylinders of trimers of α and β subunits forming heterodimers of Allophycocyanin, and other components of the core including subunits αII and β18. As for the linkers, Linker core (LC and Linker core membrane (LCM are essential for the final emission towards photoreaction centers. Since we have previously focused our studies on the rods of the PBS, in the present article we investigated the components of the core in the phycobilisome from the eukaryotic algae, Gracilaria chilensis and their organization into trimers. Transmission electron microscopy provided the information for a three cylinders core, while the three dimensional structure of Allophycocyanin purified from Gch was determined by X-ray diffraction method and the biological unit was determined as a trimer by size exclusion chromatography. The protein sequences of all the components of the core were obtained by sequencing the corresponding genes and their expression confirmed by transcriptomic analysis. These subunits have seldom been reported in red algae, but not in Gracilaria chilensis. The subunits not present in the crystallographic structure were modeled to build the different composition of trimers. This article proposes structural models for the different types of trimers present in the core of phycobilisomes of Gch as a first step towards the final model for energy transfer in this system.

  19. Advances on the analysis of fast reactor core and coolant circuit structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livolant, M.; Imazu, A.; Chang, Y.W.; Eggen, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    For the 10th SMiRT Conference, it has been decided to make general reviews of the accomplishments throughout the conferences. The aim of this paper is to make such a review in the field of fast reactor core and coolant circuit structures, which is now fully treated in division E. That was not true in the past: at the earliest conferences up to the 5th, the division E dealt with accidental studies among which the hypothetical core disruptive accident was the most important. So, to cover the subject from the first SMiRT to now, it has been necessary to search into all the past division in order to recover the studies fitting into the scope of the present division E. This has allowed a table showing the number of presented papers on the various topics at the SMiRT conferences to be set up (table I). Then, some significant topics have been studied in detail, highlighting the main accomplishments, but trying also to point out the shortcomings and the work still to be done, in view of the present state of art

  20. Polypyrrole shell@3D-Ni metal core structured electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gao-Feng; Su, Yu-Zhi; Kuang, Pan-Yong; Liu, Zhao-Qing; Chen, Dao-Yi; Wu, Xu; Li, Nan; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2015-03-16

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanometal films serving as current collectors have attracted much interest recently owing to their promising application in high-performance supercapacitors. In the process of the electrochemical reaction, the 3D structure can provide a short diffusion path for fast ion transport, and the highly conductive nanometal may serve as a backbone for facile electron transfer. In this work, a novel polypyrrole (PPy) shell@3D-Ni-core composite is developed to enhance the electrochemical performance of conventional PPy. With the introduction of a Ni metal core, the as-prepared material exhibits a high specific capacitance (726 F g(-1) at a charge/discharge rate of 1 A g(-1)), good rate capability (a decay of 33% in Csp with charge/discharge rates increasing from 1 to 20 A g(-1)), and high cycle stability (only a small decrease of 4.2% in Csp after 1000 cycles at a scan rate of 100 mV s(-1)). Furthermore, an aqueous symmetric supercapacitor device is fabricated by using the as-prepared composite as electrodes; the device demonstrates a high energy density (≈21.2 Wh kg(-1)) and superior long-term cycle ability (only 4.4% and 18.6% loss in Csp after 2000 and 5000 cycles, respectively). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Structure analysis and core community detection of embodied resources networks among regional industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xijun; Dong, Yanbo; Wu, Yuying; Wei, Guodan; Xing, Lizhi; Yan, Jia

    2017-08-01

    To address the double pressure of scarce resources and regional industrial isomorphism, this paper applied the concepts of exergy and embodied resources based on economic input-output (I-O) data. We constructed the embodied resources networks among the regional industries of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (also known as Jing-Jin-Ji) in China. We analyzed the rules of embodied resources consumption in the area's industries, identified the core community structures, and studied the characteristics of industrial homogeneity through regional comparisons. The results showed that the dependence on scarce resources of industrial operations in Beijing was less than in Jin-Ji, while the dependence on finance, technology, information, and other service resources in Beijing was higher than in Jin-Ji. The I-O efficiency of embodied resources among industries and the agglomeration of correlation relationships in industries with large embodied resources were higher than in Jin-Ji. The industrial coincidence degree in the ;bridge; industries and in the core community in Jin-Ji was higher than in Jing-Jin and Jing-Ji, which means the industrial homogeneous competition of Jin-Ji was higher, too. This study makes a significant contribution toward promoting the dislocation development of regional industries, accelerating the coordination of resources, and reducing homogeneity competition.

  2. Estimation of photonic band gap in the hollow core cylindrical multilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Ritesh Kumar; Singh, Vivek

    2018-04-01

    The propagation characteristic of two hollow core cylindrical multilayer structures having high and low refractive index contrast of cladding regions have been studied and compared at two design wavelengths i.e. 1550 nm and 632.8 nm. With the help of transfer matrix method a relation between the incoming light wave and outgoing light wave has been developed using the boundary matching technique. In high refractive index contrast, small numbers of layers are sufficient to provide perfect band gap in both design wavelengths. The spectral position and width of band gap is highly depending on the optical path of incident light in all considered cases. For sensing application, the sensitivity of waveguide can be obtained either by monitoring the width of photonic band gap or by monitoring the spectral shift of photonic band gap. Change in the width of photonic band gap with the core refractive index is larger in high refractive index contrast of cladding materials. However, in the case of monitoring the spectral shift of band gap, the obtained sensitivity is large for low refractive index contrast of cladding materials and further it increases with increase of design wavelength.

  3. Dislocations in AlGaN: Core Structure, Atom Segregation, and Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massabuau, Fabien C-P; Rhode, Sneha L; Horton, Matthew K; O'Hanlon, Thomas J; Kovács, András; Zielinski, Marcin S; Kappers, Menno J; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Humphreys, Colin J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2017-08-09

    We conducted a comprehensive investigation of dislocations in Al 0.46 Ga 0.54 N. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the atomic structure and atom distribution at the dislocation core have been examined. We report that the core configuration of dislocations in AlGaN is consistent with that of other materials in the III-Nitride system. However, we observed that the dissociation of mixed-type dislocations is impeded by alloying GaN with AlN, which is confirmed by our experimental observation of Ga and Al atom segregation in the tensile and compressive parts of the dislocations, respectively. Investigation of the optical properties of the dislocations shows that the atom segregation at dislocations has no significant effect on the intensity recorded by cathodoluminescence in the vicinity of the dislocations. These results are in contrast with the case of dislocations in In 0.09 Ga 0.91 N where segregation of In and Ga atoms also occurs but results in carrier localization limiting non-radiative recombination at the dislocation. This study therefore sheds light on why InGaN-based devices are generally more resilient to dislocations than their AlGaN-based counterparts.

  4. A fiber-optic sensor based on no-core fiber and Faraday rotator mirror structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Heng; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Songling; Wang, Fang; Liu, Yufang

    2018-05-01

    An optical fiber sensor based on the single-mode/no-core/single-mode (SNS) core-offset technology along with a Faraday rotator mirror structure has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A transverse optical field distribution of self-imaging has been simulated and experimental parameters have been selected under theoretical guidance. Results of the experiments demonstrate that the temperature sensitivity of the sensor is 0.0551 nm/°C for temperatures between 25 and 80 °C, and the correlation coefficient is 0.99582. The concentration sensitivity of the device for sucrose and glucose solutions was found to be as high as 12.5416 and 6.02248 nm/(g/ml), respectively. Curves demonstrating a linear fit between wavelength shift and solution concentration for three different heavy metal solutions have also been derived on the basis of experimental results. The proposed fiber-optic sensor design provides valuable guidance for the measurement of concentration and temperature.

  5. Measuring stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in ice by means of laser spectrometry : The Bolling transition in the Dye-3 (south Greenland) ice core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trigt, R. van; Meijer, H.A.J.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A.E.; Johnsen, S.J.; Kerstel, E.R.Th.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first application of a new technique in ice-core research, based on direct absorption infrared laser spectrometry (LS), for measuring H-2 O-17 and O-18 isotope ratios. The data are used to calculate the deuterium excess d (defined as delta(2)H - 8delta(18)O) for a section of the

  6. Structural changes, market concentration and vertical integration: would they lead to more stable markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmassebi, H.

    1991-01-01

    This communication is concerned with three major developments that are likely to have significant impact on the future structure of world oil markets: oil company mergers and acquisitions, shift of exploration and production activity from the United States to overseas, and joint venture agreements between producing countries and oil companies aimed at further downstream integration by OPEC. The last two developments are likely to contribute substantially to price and market stability in the future

  7. Structural changes, market concentration and vertical integration: would they lead to more stable markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahmassebi, H.

    This communication is concerned with three major developments that are likely to have significant impact on the future structure of world oil markets: oil company mergers and acquisitions, shift of exploration and production activity from the United States to overseas, and joint venture agreements between producing countries and oil companies aimed at further downstream integration by OPEC. The last two developments are likely to contribute substantially to price and market stability in the future.

  8. Cerebral vascular structure in the motor cortex of adult mice is stable and is not altered by voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Robert H; Dougherty, Sarah E; Linden, David J

    2017-12-01

    The cerebral vasculature provides blood flow throughout the brain, and local changes in blood flow are regulated to match the metabolic demands of the active brain regions. This neurovascular coupling is mediated by real-time changes in vessel diameter and depends on the underlying vascular network structure. Neurovascular structure is configured during development by genetic and activity-dependent factors. In adulthood, it can be altered by experiences such as prolonged hypoxia, sensory deprivation and seizure. Here, we have sought to determine whether exercise could alter cerebral vascular structure in the adult mouse. We performed repeated in vivo two-photon imaging in the motor cortex of adult transgenic mice expressing membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein in endothelial cells (tyrosine endothelial kinase 2 receptor (Tie2)-Cre:mTmG). This strategy allows for high-resolution imaging of the vessel walls throughout the lifespan. Vascular structure, as measured by capillary branch point number and position, segment diameter and length remained stable over a time scale of months as did pericyte number and position. Furthermore, we compared the vascular structure before, during, and after periods of voluntary wheel running and found no alterations in these same parameters. In both running and control mice, we observed a low rate of capillary segment subtraction. Interestingly, these rare subtraction events preferentially remove short vascular loops.

  9. Interactions between tetrathiafulvalene units in dimeric structures – the influence of cyclic cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixin Jiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of cyclic and acyclic acetylenic scaffolds bearing two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF units was prepared by different metal-catalyzed coupling reactions. The bridge separating the two TTF units was systematically changed from linearly conjugated ethyne, butadiyne and tetraethynylethene (trans-substituted units to a cross-conjugated tetraethynylethene unit, placed in either acyclic or cyclic arrangements. The cyclic structures correspond to so-called radiaannulenes having both endo- and exocyclic double bonds. Interactions between two redox-active TTF units in these molecules were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, UV–vis–NIR and EPR absorption spectroscopical methods of the electrochemically generated oxidized species. The electron-accepting properties of the acetylenic cores were also investigated electrochemically.

  10. FFTF irradiation of fracture mechanics specimens for out-of-core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.C.

    1978-09-01

    The National Program Plan has established data requirements for out-of-core structures for FBRs. Significant FFTF irradiation space with moderate gamma heating levels is required to irradiate relatively large fracture mechanics specimens to total neutron fluences ranging between 5 x 10 21 and 5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 and temperatures which range between 400 0 C (750 0 F) and 650 0 C (1200 0 F). Priority 1 data on stainless steel welds requires a test volume of 7443 cm 3 (454 in 3 ). Priority 2 data on 304 and 316 SS and Inconel 718 materials and Inconel 718 welds requires 2760 cm 3 (168 in 3 ). Priority 3 data on stainless steels, other nickel-base alloys, and ferritics requires 33,118 cm 3 (2021 in 3 ). Priority 4 data at elevated temperatures on stainless steels, other nickel-base alloys and ferritics requires 69,182 cm 3

  11. Effect of neutron radiation on mechanical properties of permanent near core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Several hundred specimens have been tested in order to assess the effects of low dose neutron radiation ( 0 C and ductility and toughness are primary design concerns, the changes provoked, by doses up to 1.3 dpa, in overall mechanical properties of welded joints are small. For upper core structure, where the operating temperature is about 550 0 C and fatigue and creep resistance are major design needs, the changes induced, through formation of up to about 2 appm helium, in conventional fatigue properties or fatigue with short hold times are negligible. With increasing hold time, intergranular rupture in irradiated specimens is enhanced but the limited number of tests does not allow definite conclusions to be drawn. 53 refs, 3 tabs, 9 figs

  12. Review of the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code structure and core T/H model before core damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, See Darl; Kim, Dong Ha

    1998-04-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code is being developed at the INEL under the primary sponsorship of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. NRC. As The current time, the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code is the result of merging the RELAP5/MOD3 and SCDAP models. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, core, fission product released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. Major purpose of the report is to provide information about the characteristics of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 core T/H models for an integrated severe accident computer code being developed under the mid/long-term project. This report analyzes the overall code structure which consists of the input processor, transient controller, and plot file handler. The basic governing equations to simulate the thermohydraulics of the primary system are also described. As the focus is currently concentrated in the core, core nodalization parameters of the intact geometry and the phenomenological subroutines for the damaged core are summarized for the future usage. In addition, the numerical approach for the heat conduction model is investigated along with heat convection model. These studies could provide a foundation for input preparation and model improvement. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  13. Simulation of the thermalhydraulic behavior of a molten core within a structure, with the three dimensions three components TOLBIAC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, B.; Moreau, G.M.; Pigny S. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (France)

    1995-09-01

    The TOLBIAC code is devoted to the simulation of the behavior of a molten core within a structure (pressure vessel of core catcher), taking into account the relative position of the core components, the wall ablation and the crust formation. The code is briefly described: 3D model, physical properties and constitutive laws. wall ablation and crust model. Two results are presented: the simulation of the COPO experiment (natural convection with water in a 1/2 scale elliptic pressure vessel), and the simulation of the behavior of a corium in a PWR pressure vessel, with ablation and crust formation.

  14. Structure of hybrid organic-inorganic sols for the preparation of hydrothermally stable membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castricum, H.L.; Sah, A; Blank, D.H.A.; Ten Elshof, J.E. [Inorganic Materials Science, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Geenevasen, J.A.J. [Van ' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 166, 1018 WV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kreiter, R.; Vente, J.F. [ECN Energy Efficiency in the Industry, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    A procedure for the preparation of hybrid sols for the synthesis of organic-inorganic microporous materials and thin film membranes is reported. We describe silane reactivity and sol structure for acid-catalysed colloidal sols from mixtures of either tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and methyltriethoxysilane (MTES), or bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTESE) and MTES. Early-stage hydrolysis and condensation rates of the individual silane precursors were followed with 29Si liquid NMR and structural characteristics of more developed sols were studied with Dynamic Light Scattering. Condensation was found to proceed at more or less similar rates for the different precursors. Homogeneously mixed hybrid colloids can therefore be formed from precursor mixtures. The conditions of preparation under which clear sols with low viscosity could be formed from BTESE/MTES were determined. These sols were synthesised at moderate water/silane and acid/silane ratios and could be applied for the coating of defect-free microporous membranes for molecular separations under hydrothermal conditions.

  15. The Analysis of Surrounding Structure Effect on the Core Degradation Progress with COMPASS Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Son, Dong Gun; Kim, Jong Tae; Park, Rae Jun; Kim, Dong Ha [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In line with the importance of severe accident analysis after Fukushima accident, the development of integrated severe accident code has been launched by the collaboration of three institutes in Korea. KAERI is responsible to develop modules related to the in-vessel phenomena, while other institutes are to the containment and severe accident mitigation facility, respectively. In the first phase, the individual severe accident module has been developed and the construction of integrated analysis code is planned to perform in the second phase. The basic strategy is to extend the design basis analysis codes of SPACE and CAP, which are being validated in Korea for the severe accident analysis. In the first phase, KAERI has targeted to develop the framework of severe accident code, COMPASS (COre Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software), covering the severe accident progression in a vessel from a core heat-up to a vessel failure as a stand-alone fashion. In order to analyze the effect of surrounding structure, the melt progression has been compared between the central zone and the most outer zone under the condition of constant radial power peaking factor. Figure 2 and 3 shows the fuel element temperature and the clad mass at the central zone, respectively. Due to the axial power peaking factor, the axial node No.3 has the highest temperature, while the top and bottom nodes have the lowest temperature. When the clad temperature reaches to the Zr melting temperature (2129.15K), the Zr starts to melt. The axial node No.2 reaches to the fuel melting temperature about 5000 sec and the molten fuel relocates to the node No.1, which results to the blockage of flow area in node No.1. The blocked flow area becomes to open about 6100 sec due to the molten ZrO{sub 2} mass relocation to core support plate. Figure 4 and 5 shows the fuel element temperature and the clad mass at the most outer zone, respectively. It is shown that the fuel temperature increase more slowly

  16. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  17. Structure of the protein core of the glypican Dally-like and localization of a region important for hedgehog signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Sung; Saunders, Adam M.; Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Beachy, Philip A.; Leahy, Daniel J. (Stanford-MED); (JHU)

    2011-09-20

    Glypicans are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that modulate the signaling of multiple growth factors active during animal development, and loss of glypican function is associated with widespread developmental abnormalities. Glypicans consist of a conserved, approximately 45-kDa N-terminal protein core region followed by a stalk region that is tethered to the cell membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The stalk regions are predicted to be random coil but contain a variable number of attachment sites for heparan sulfate chains. Both the N-terminal protein core and the heparan sulfate attachments are important for glypican function. We report here the 2.4-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal protein core region of the Drosophila glypican Dally-like (Dlp). This structure reveals an elongated, {alpha}-helical fold for glypican core regions that does not appear homologous to any known structure. The Dlp core protein is required for normal responsiveness to Hedgehog (Hh) signals, and we identify a localized region on the Dlp surface important for mediating its function in Hh signaling. Purified Dlp protein core does not, however, interact appreciably with either Hh or an Hh:Ihog complex.

  18. Large Scale Chromosome Folding Is Stable against Local Changes in Chromatin Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the link between small-scale chromatin structure and large-scale chromosome folding during interphase is a prerequisite for understanding transcription. Yet, this link remains poorly investigated. Here, we introduce a simple biophysical model where interphase chromosomes are described in terms of the folding of chromatin sequences composed of alternating blocks of fibers with different thicknesses and flexibilities, and we use it to study the influence of sequence disorder on chromosome behaviors in space and time. By employing extensive computer simulations, we thus demonstrate that chromosomes undergo noticeable conformational changes only on length-scales smaller than 105 basepairs and time-scales shorter than a few seconds, and we suggest there might exist effective upper bounds to the detection of chromosome reorganization in eukaryotes. We prove the relevance of our framework by modeling recent experimental FISH data on murine chromosomes.

  19. The clustered nucleus-cluster structures in stable and unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freer, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The subject of clustering has a lineage which runs throughout the history of nuclear physics. Its attraction is the simplification of the often uncorrelated behaviour of independent particles to organized and coherent quasi-crystalline structures. In this review the ideas behind the development of clustering in light nuclei are investigated, mostly from the stand-point of the harmonic oscillator framework. This allows a unifying description of alpha-conjugate and neutron-rich nuclei, alike. More sophisticated models of clusters are explored, such as antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. A number of contemporary topics in clustering are touched upon; the 3α-cluster state in 12 C, nuclear molecules and clustering at the drip-line. Finally, an understanding of the 12 C+ 12 C resonances in 24 Mg, within the framework of the theoretical ideas developed in the review, is presented

  20. Core and Valence Structures in K beta X-ray Emission Spectra of Chromium Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Deluigi, Maria; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Lopez-Diaz, Gaston; Tirao, German; Stutz, Guillermo; Riveros de la Vega, Jose

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the core and valence transitions in chromium in a series of materials with a number of different ligands and including the oxidation states: Cr-II, Cr-III, Cr-IV, and Cr-VI. To study the core-to-core transitions we employ the CTM4XAS program and investigate the shapes, widths,

  1. Free energy and structure of dislocation cores in two-dimensional crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bladon, P.B.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The nature of the melting transition in two dimensions is critically dependent on the core energy of dislocations. In this paper, we report calculations of the core free energy and the core size of dislocations in two-dimensional solids of systems interacting via square well, hard disk, and r-12

  2. Bacterioplankton communities of Crater Lake, OR: Dynamic changes with euphotic zone food web structure and stable deep water populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, E.; Vergin, K.L.; Larson, G.L.; Giovannoni, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of bacterial and archaeal species in Crater Lake plankton varies dramatically over depth and with time, as assessed by hybridization of group-specific oligonucleotides to RNA extracted from lakewater. Nonmetric, multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of relative bacterial phylotype densities revealed complex relationships among assemblages sampled from depth profiles in July, August and September of 1997 through 1999. CL500-11 green nonsulfur bacteria (Phylum Chloroflexi) and marine Group I crenarchaeota are consistently dominant groups in the oxygenated deep waters at 300 and 500 m. Other phylotypes found in the deep waters are similar to surface and mid-depth populations and vary with time. Euphotic zone assemblages are dominated either by ??-proteobacteria or CL120-10 verrucomicrobia, and ACK4 actinomycetes. MDS analyses of euphotic zone populations in relation to environmental variables and phytoplankton and zooplankton population structures reveal apparent links between Daphnia pulicaria zooplankton population densities and microbial community structure. These patterns may reflect food web interactions that link kokanee salmon population densities to community structure of the bacterioplankton, via fish predation on Daphnia with cascading consequences to Daphnia bacterivory and predation on bacterivorous protists. These results demonstrate a stable bottom-water microbial community. They also extend previous observations of food web-driven changes in euphotic zone bacterioplankton community structure to an oligotrophic setting. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  3. Longitudinal tests of competing factor structures for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: traits, ephemeral artifacts, and stable response styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W; Scalas, L Francesca; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2010-06-01

    Self-esteem, typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), is one of the most widely studied constructs in psychology. Nevertheless, there is broad agreement that a simple unidimensional factor model, consistent with the original design and typical application in applied research, does not provide an adequate explanation of RSE responses. However, there is no clear agreement about what alternative model is most appropriate-or even a clear rationale for how to test competing interpretations. Three alternative interpretations exist: (a) 2 substantively important trait factors (positive and negative self-esteem), (b) 1 trait factor and ephemeral method artifacts associated with positively or negatively worded items, or (c) 1 trait factor and stable response-style method factors associated with item wording. We have posited 8 alternative models and structural equation model tests based on longitudinal data (4 waves of data across 8 years with a large, representative sample of adolescents). Longitudinal models provide no support for the unidimensional model, undermine support for the 2-factor model, and clearly refute claims that wording effects are ephemeral, but they provide good support for models positing 1 substantive (self-esteem) factor and response-style method factors that are stable over time. This longitudinal methodological approach has not only resolved these long-standing issues in self-esteem research but also has broad applicability to most psychological assessments based on self-reports with a mix of positively and negatively worded items.

  4. Stable isotope evidence of long-term changes in North Sea food web structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Christensen, Jens Tang

    2008-01-01

    coast. Porpoises collected after ~1960 had significantly lower d15N than porpoises collected earlier. This change in d15N implies that fundamental changes in food web structure in, or nutrient availability to, the North Sea have taken place over the last ~150 yr and that most of the change occurred over......, been feeding at a lower trophic level than during the preceding century, i.e. animals from lower trophic levels may now be more dominant than they were prior to the middle of the 20th century. There is no a priori reason to suspect that a change in isotope distributions at the base of the food web has...... occurred during this period and we have not been able to find material that would allow us to test the assumption that there has been no temporal development of d15N at the lowest levels of the food web. Thus, we cannot eliminate the possibility that the change in d15N in harbour porpoise skeletons...

  5. Peculiarities of the fundamental mode structure in stable-resonator lasers upon spatially inhomogeneous amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunkov, Mikhail V; Kostryukov, P V; Telegin, L S; Tunkin, V G; Yakovlev, D V

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fundamental mode of a laser is calculated by the iteration Fox-Li method in the case of inhomogeneous unsaturated amplification produced by axially symmetric longitudinal pumping. The calculation is performed for different parameters g 1 and g 2 of the resonator within the entire stability region. It is shown that in the case of inhomogeneous amplification, the fundamental mode considerably deviates from the Gaussian mode of an empty resonator only in the so-called critical configurations of the resonator, when the quantity [arccos(g 1 g 2 ) 1/2 ]/π is zero or takes a number of values expressed by irreducible fractions m/n. For the Fresnel number N F = 9, configurations with m/n = 1/2, 2/5, 3/8, 1/3, 3/10, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/8, and 1/10 are pronounced. As N F increases, the number of critical configurations increases. The expansion in a system of Laguerre-Gaussian beams shows that the fundamental mode in critical configurations is formed by a set of beams with certain radial indices p phased in the active medium. (resonators. modes)

  6. Stable isotopes indicate population structuring in the southwest Atlantic population of right whales (Eubalaena australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Vighi

    Full Text Available From the early 17th century to the 1970s southern right whales, Eubalaena australis, were subject to intense exploitation along the Atlantic coast of South America. Catches along this coast recorded by whalers originally formed a continuum from Brazil to Tierra del Fuego. Nevertheless, the recovery of the population has apparently occurred fragmentarily, and with two main areas of concentration, one off southern Brazil (Santa Catarina and another off central Argentina (Peninsula Valdés. This pattern suggests some level of heterogeneity amongst the population, which is apparently contradicted by records that traced individuals moving throughout the whole geographical extension covered by the species in the Southwest Atlantic. To test the hypothesis of the potential occurrence of discrete subpopulations exploiting specific habitats, we investigated N, C and O isotopic values in 125 bone samples obtained from whaling factories operating in the early 1970s in southern Brazil (n=72 and from contemporary and more recent strandings occurring in central Argentina (n=53. Results indicated significant differences between the two sampling areas, being δ13C and δ18O values significantly higher in samples from southern Brazil than in those from central Argentina. This variation was consistent with isotopic baselines from the two areas, indicating the occurrence of some level of structure in the Southwest Atlantic right whale population and equally that whales more likely feed in areas commonly thought to exclusively serve as nursing grounds. Results aim at reconsidering of the units currently used in the management of the southern right whale in the Southwest Atlantic Ocean. In the context of the current die-off affecting the species in Peninsula Valdés, these results also highlight the necessity to better understand movements of individuals and precisely identify their feeding areas.

  7. Synthesis, structure and topological analysis of glycine templated highly stable cadmium sulfate framework: A New Lewis Acid catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Avijit Kumar

    2018-04-01

    One new open-framework two-dimensional layer, [Cd(NH3CH2COO)(SO4)], I, has been synthesized using amino acid as templating agent. Single crystal structural analysis shows that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic cell with non-centrosymmetric space group P21, a = 4.9513(1) Å, b = 7.9763(2) Å, c = 8.0967(2) Å, β = 105.917(1)° and V = 307.504(12) Å3. The compound has connectivity between the Cd-centers and the sulfate units forming a two-dimensional layer structure. Sulfate unit is coordinated to metal center with η3, μ4 mode possessing a coordination free oxygen atom. The zwitterionic form of glycine molecule is present in the structure bridging with two metal centers through μ2-mode by carboxylate oxygens. The topological analysis reveals that the two-dimensional network is formed with a novel 4- and 6-connected binodal net of (32,42,52)(34,44,54,63) topology. Although one end of the glycine molecule is free from coordination, the structure is highly stable up to 350 °C. Strong N-H⋯ O hydrogen bonding interactions play an important role in the stabilization and formation of three-dimensional supramolecular structure. The cyanosilylation of imines using the present compounds as heterogeneous catalyst indicates good catalytic behavior. The present study illustrates the usefulness of the amino acid for the structure building in less studied sulfate based framework materials as well as designing of new heterogeneous catalysts for the broad application. The compound has also been characterized through elemental analysis, PXRD, IR, SEM and TG-DT studies.

  8. Synthesis and in vitro transfection efficiency of spermine-based cationic lipids with different central core structures and lipophilic tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyomtham, Nattisa; Apiratikul, Nuttapon; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Opanasopit, Praneet; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2015-02-01

    Twelve spermine-based cationic lipids with four different central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) and three hydrophobic tails (lauric acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid) were synthesized. The liposomes containing lipids and DOPE showed moderate to good in vitro DNA delivery into HeLa cells. GFP expression experiments revealed that liposomes composed of lipids with 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency under serum-free condition. Whereas, lipid with 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl core structure showed highest transfection under 10% serum condition. Moreover, the liposomes and lipoplexes composted of these cationic lipids exhibited low cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Fabrication of Core-Shell Structural SiO2@H3[PM12O40] Material and Its Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a natural tree grain template and sol-gel technology, the heterogeneous catalytic materials based on polyoxometalate compounds H3[PM12O40] encapsulating SiO2: SiO2@H3[PM12O40] (SiO2@PM12, M = W, Mo with core-shell structure had been prepared. The structure and morphology of the core-shell microspheres were characterized by the XRD, IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis absorbance, and SEM. These microsphere materials can be used as heterogeneous catalysts with high activity and stability for catalytic wet air oxidation of pollutant dyes safranine T (ST at room condition. The results show that the catalysts have excellent catalytic activity in treatment of wastewater containing 10 mg/L ST, and 94% of color can be removed within 60 min. Under different cycling runs, it is shown that the catalysts are stable under such operating conditions and the leaching tests show negligible leaching effect owing to the lesser dissolution.

  10. The structure of mAG, a monomeric mutant of the green fluorescent protein Azami-Green, reveals the structural basis of its stable green emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Tatsuki; Yamamura, Akihiro; Kameda, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Kou; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of a monomeric mutant of Azami-Green (mAG) from G. fascicularis was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. Monomeric Azami-Green (mAG) from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis is the first known monomeric green-emitting fluorescent protein that is not a variant of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP). These two green fluorescent proteins are only 27% identical in their amino-acid sequences. mAG is more similar in its amino-acid sequence to four fluorescent proteins: Dendra2 (a green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein), Dronpa (a bright-and-dark reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein), KikG (a tetrameric green-emitting fluorescent protein) and Kaede (another green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein). To reveal the structural basis of stable green emission by mAG, the 2.2 Å crystal structure of mAG has been determined and compared with the crystal structures of avGFP, Dronpa, Dendra2, Kaede and KikG. The structural comparison revealed that the chromophore formed by Gln62-Tyr63-Gly64 (QYG) and the fixing of the conformation of the imidazole ring of His193 by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts involving His193, Arg66 and Thr69 are likely to be required for the stable green emission of mAG. The crystal structure of mAG will contribute to the design and development of new monomeric fluorescent proteins with faster maturation, brighter fluorescence, improved photostability, new colours and other preferable properties as alternatives to avGFP and its variants

  11. Transition behavior of asymmetric polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) films: A stable hexagonally modulated layer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sungmin; Koo, Kyosung; Kim, Kyunginn; Ahn, Hyungju; Lee, Byeongdu; Park, Cheolmin; Ryu, Du Yeol

    2015-03-09

    The phase transitions in the films of an asymmetric polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) were investigated by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared with the sequential transitions in the bulk, hexagonally perforated layer (HPL) – gyroid (GYR) – disorder (DIS) upon heating, the transitions in film geometry were dramatically changed with decreasing thickness due to the growing preferential interactions from substrate, resulting in a thickness-dependent transition diagram including four different morphologies of hexagonally modulated layer (HML), coexisting (HML and GYR), GYR, and DIS. Particularly in the films ≤10Lo, where Lo is d-spacing at 150 °C, a stable HML structure was identified even above the order-to-disorder transition (ODT) temperature of the bulk, which was attributed to the suppressed compositional fluctuations by the enhanced substrate interactions.

  12. In-medium no-core shell model for ab initio nuclear structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebrerufael, Eskendr

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we merge two successful ab initio nuclear-structure methods, the no-core shell model (NCSM) and the multi-reference in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG), to define a novel many-body approach for the comprehensive description of ground and excited states of closed- and open-shell medium-mass nuclei. Building on the key advantages of the two methods - the decoupling of excitations at the many-body level in the IM-SRG, and the exact diagonalization in the NCSM applicable up to medium-light nuclei - their combination enables fully converged no-core calculations for an unprecedented range of nuclei and observables at moderate computational cost. The efficiency and rapid model-space convergence of the new approach make it ideally suited for ab initio studies of ground and low-lying excited states of nuclei up to the medium-mass regime. Interactions constructed within the framework of chiral effective field theory provide an excellent opportunity to describe properties of nuclei from first principles, i.e., rooted in quantum chromodynamics, they overcome the lack of predictive power of phenomenological potentials. The hard core of these interactions causes strong short-range correlations, which we soften by using the similarity-renormalization-group transformation that accelerates the model-space convergence of many-body calculations. Three-nucleon effects, which are mandatory for the correct description of bulk properties of nuclei, are included in our calculations by using the normal-ordered two-body approximation, which has been shown to be sufficient to capture the main effects of the three-nucleon interaction. Using these interactions, we analyze energies of ground and excited states in the carbon and oxygen isotopic chains, where conventional NCSM calculations are still feasible and provide an important benchmark. Furthermore, we study the Hoyle state in 12 C - a three-alpha cluster state that cannot be converged in standard NCSM

  13. Impact of Nonfullerene Acceptor Core Structure on the Photophysics and Efficiency of Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alamoudi, Maha

    2018-03-02

    Small-molecule “nonfullerene” acceptors are promising alternatives to fullerene (PC61/71BM) derivatives often used in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells; yet, the efficiency-limiting processes and their dependence on the acceptor structure are not clearly understood. Here, we investigate the impact of the acceptor core structure (cyclopenta-[2,1-b:3,4-b′]dithiophene (CDT) versus indacenodithiophene (IDTT)) of malononitrile (BM)-terminated acceptors, namely CDTBM and IDTTBM, on the photophysical characteristics of BHJ solar cells. Using PCE10 as donor polymer, the IDTT-based acceptor achieves power conversion efficiencies (8.4%) that are higher than those of the CDT-based acceptor (5.6%) because of a concurrent increase in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage. Using (ultra)fast transient spectroscopy we demonstrate that reduced geminate recombination in PCE10:IDTTBM blends is the reason for the difference in short-circuit currents. External quantum efficiency measurements indicate that the higher energy of interfacial charge-transfer states observed for the IDTT-based acceptor blends is the origin of the higher open-circuit voltage.

  14. Core-Shell Double Gyroid Structure Formed by Linear ABC Terpolymer Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Ségolène; Aissou, Karim; Mumtaz, Muhammad; Telitel, Siham; Pécastaings, Gilles; Wirotius, Anne-Laure; Brochon, Cyril; Cloutet, Eric; Fleury, Guillaume; Hadziioannou, Georges

    2018-05-01

    The synthesis and self-assembly in thin-film configuration of linear ABC triblock terpolymer chains consisting of polystyrene (PS), poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP), and polyisoprene (PI) are described. For that purpose, a hydroxyl-terminated PS-b-P2VP (45 kg mol -1 ) building block and a carboxyl-terminated PI (9 kg mol -1 ) are first separately prepared by anionic polymerization, and then are coupled via a Steglich esterification reaction. This quantitative and metal-free catalyst synthesis route reveals to be very interesting since functionalization and purification steps are straightforward, and well-defined terpolymers are produced. A solvent vapor annealing (SVA) process is used to promote the self-assembly of frustrated PS-b-P2VP-b-PI chains into a thin-film core-shell double gyroid (Q 230 , space group: Ia3¯d) structure. As terraces are formed within PS-b-P2VP-b-PI thin films during the SVA process under a CHCl 3 vapor, different plane orientations of the Q 230 structure ((211), (110), (111), and (100)) are observed at the polymer-air interface depending on the film thickness. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Fabrication and Testing of Durable Redundant and Fluted-Core Joints for Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yung; Splinter, Scott C.; Tarkenton, Chris; Paddock, David A.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; Stukus, Donald J.; McCarville, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures is an essential component of future space technologies. While NASA is working toward providing an entirely new capability for human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit, the objective of this project is to design, fabricate, analyze, and test a NASA patented durable redundant joint (DRJ) and a NASA/Boeing co-designed fluted-core joint (FCJ). The potential applications include a wide range of sandwich structures for NASA's future launch vehicles. Three types of joints were studied -- splice joint (SJ, as baseline), DRJ, and FCJ. Tests included tension, after-impact tension, and compression. Teflon strips were used at the joint area to increase failure strength by shifting stress concentration to a less sensitive area. Test results were compared to those of pristine coupons fabricated utilizing the same methods. Tensile test results indicated that the DRJ design was stiffer, stronger, and more impact resistant than other designs. The drawbacks of the DRJ design were extra mass and complex fabrication processes. The FCJ was lighter than the DRJ but less impact resistant. With barely visible but detectable impact damages, all three joints showed no sign of tensile strength reduction. No compression test was conducted on any impact-damaged sample due to limited scope and resource. Failure modes and damage propagation were also studied to support progressive damage modeling of the SJ and the DRJ.

  16. Core genome conservation of Staphylococcus haemolyticus limits sequence based population structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline; Klingenberg, Claus; Hanssen, Anne-Merethe; Fredheim, Elizabeth Aarag; Francois, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Flægstad, Trond; Sollid, Johanna Ericson

    2012-06-01

    The notoriously multi-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus is an emerging pathogen causing serious infections in immunocompromised patients. Defining the population structure is important to detect outbreaks and spread of antimicrobial resistant clones. Currently, the standard typing technique is pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this study we describe novel molecular typing schemes for S. haemolyticus using multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis. Seven housekeeping genes (MLST) and five VNTR loci (MLVF) were selected for the novel typing schemes. A panel of 45 human and veterinary S. haemolyticus isolates was investigated. The collection had diverse PFGE patterns (38 PFGE types) and was sampled over a 20 year-period from eight countries. MLST resolved 17 sequence types (Simpsons index of diversity [SID]=0.877) and MLVF resolved 14 repeat types (SID=0.831). We found a low sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the isolates in three (MLST) and one (MLVF) clonal complexes, respectively. Taken together, neither the MLST nor the MLVF scheme was suitable to resolve the population structure of this S. haemolyticus collection. Future MLVF and MLST schemes will benefit from addition of more variable core genome sequences identified by comparing different fully sequenced S. haemolyticus genomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Nonfullerene Acceptor Core Structure on the Photophysics and Efficiency of Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alamoudi, Maha; Khan, Jafar Iqbal; Firdaus, Yuliar; Wang, Kai; Andrienko, Denis; Beaujuge, Pierre; Laquai, Fré dé ric

    2018-01-01

    Small-molecule “nonfullerene” acceptors are promising alternatives to fullerene (PC61/71BM) derivatives often used in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells; yet, the efficiency-limiting processes and their dependence on the acceptor structure are not clearly understood. Here, we investigate the impact of the acceptor core structure (cyclopenta-[2,1-b:3,4-b′]dithiophene (CDT) versus indacenodithiophene (IDTT)) of malononitrile (BM)-terminated acceptors, namely CDTBM and IDTTBM, on the photophysical characteristics of BHJ solar cells. Using PCE10 as donor polymer, the IDTT-based acceptor achieves power conversion efficiencies (8.4%) that are higher than those of the CDT-based acceptor (5.6%) because of a concurrent increase in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage. Using (ultra)fast transient spectroscopy we demonstrate that reduced geminate recombination in PCE10:IDTTBM blends is the reason for the difference in short-circuit currents. External quantum efficiency measurements indicate that the higher energy of interfacial charge-transfer states observed for the IDTT-based acceptor blends is the origin of the higher open-circuit voltage.

  18. Natural Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Review on Potential for Corrugated Core of Sandwich Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusoh A.F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers, characterized by sustainability, have gained a considerable attention in recent years, due to their advantages of environmental acceptability and commercial viability. In this paper, the characterization of natural fibers including the mechanical properties and alkalization of fibers is presented. Most recent study had gone through the mercerization process to improve the toughness of natural fibers; which is a well-known hydrophilic material. Traditional reinforcement method was commonly used to fabricate a natural fiber composite such as hand lay-up and mold press due to its convenience in terms of time and cost. Also, different kind of matrix material used in different kind of natural fibers gave high impact on the tensile and flexural test result. By selecting appropriate chemical treatment, matrix material and fabrication method, the tensile and flexural test gives different results and findings. As most researchers tend to use metals to create corrugated cores for sandwich structure, it is possible to develop this structure using natural fibers such as kenaf, wood dust, and other natural fibers.

  19. Hegemonic Decline, West European Unification, and the Future Structure of the Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Bornschier

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper queries the applicability of hegemonic cycle theories to the emerging structure in the core of the world political economy and argues that we are likely, following this period of relative decline in American hegemony, to witness the emergence of hegemonic social practices in the absence, however, of a hegemonic state. Contrasting new beginnings with past patterns, we will suggest arguments why history will not be repeated. Drawing on our research on the Single European Act (SEA, we argue that the bargain struck between the Commission of the European Union and West European transnational corporations, which culminated in the SEA, represents more than a decisive step towards economic and political union. We see it, more significantly, as embodying Europe's response to its declining position through an attempt to articulate a new societal model capable of successfully replacing the disarticulated post-WWII Keynesian social-welfare model, and of competing with the Japanese and American societal models. In the future, it is very unlikely that power among the actors in the Triad will be so unevenly distributed as to permit the rise of a new hegemonic state. While it would seem, judging from historical experience, that the presence of a hegemonic state was functionally necessary for the establishment of hegemonic social practices in the core, we argue that another mechanism has now moved to the forefront. Due to pressures generated through increasing economic globalization, linked to demands associated with the quest for legitimacy on the part of democratic governments, we foresee, following a period of increased economic competition, the convergence of social practices around a single societal model.

  20. New stable isotope records of sediment cores from the SE Arabian Sea - Inferences on the variations in monsoon regime during the late Quaternery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.

    , Vidyanagar 671 123, India We reconstruct here the changes in regional hydr o- graphy related to the fluctuations in Indian mo n soons du r ing the late Quaternary based on the stable isotope composition of the foraminifers and organic matter in three... value du r ing the early Holocene for the eastern Arabian Sea 21 . The SW monsoon intensity was very weak and the dry NE mo n soon was the dominant feature during the LGM in the Ar a bian Sea 3 . The cool winds of the north - easterly winter...

  1. GrowYourIC: A Step Toward a Coherent Model of the Earth's Inner Core Seismic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleis, Marine; Waszek, Lauren; Day, Elizabeth A.

    2017-11-01

    A complex inner core structure has been well established from seismic studies, showing radial and lateral heterogeneities at various length scales. Yet no geodynamic model is able to explain all the features observed. One of the main limits for this is the lack of tools to compare seismic observations and numerical models successfully. We use here a new Python tool called GrowYourIC to compare models of inner core structure. We calculate properties of geodynamic models of the inner core along seismic raypaths, for random or user-specified data sets. We test kinematic models which simulate fast lateral translation, superrotation, and differential growth. We explore first the influence on a real inner core data set, which has a sparse coverage of the inner core boundary. Such a data set is however able to successfully constrain the hemispherical boundaries due to a good sampling of latitudes. Combining translation and rotation could explain some of the features of the boundaries separating the inner core hemispheres. The depth shift of the boundaries, observed by some authors, seems unlikely to be modeled by a fast translation but could be produced by slow translation associated with superrotation.

  2. Formation of ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles by sol-gel method: An approach to modify surface chemistry for stable and enhanced green emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Rupali, E-mail: rupalimishra@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Nanophosphor Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Yadav, Raghvendra S.; Pandey, Avinash C. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Nanophosphor Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Sanjay, Sharda. S. [Department of Chemistry, Ewing Christian College, Allahabad (India); Dar, Chitra [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2010-03-15

    We report the formation of highly stable and luminescent ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles by simple introduction of cadmium salt in the initial precursor solution, used to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles by sol-gel route. The cadmium to zinc salt concentration ratio has been also varied to control the growth of ZnO nanoparticles at the smaller particle size. Formation of ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanostructure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). UV-vis absorption spectroscopy exhibits blue-shift in absorption edge on increasing cadmium concentrations. The photoluminescence emission spectra showed the remarkably stable and enhanced visible (green) emission from suspended ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles in comparison to bare ZnO nanoparticles. It is postulated that Cd(OH){sub 2} layer at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles prevents the agglomeration of nanoparticles and efficiently assists the trapping of hole at the surface site, a first step necessary for visible emission. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) also supports our assumption about surface chemistry.

  3. Electrodeposited Structurally Stable V2O5 Inverse Opal Networks as High Performance Thin Film Lithium Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; Geaney, Hugh; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2015-12-09

    High performance thin film lithium batteries using structurally stable electrodeposited V2O5 inverse opal (IO) networks as cathodes provide high capacity and outstanding cycling capability and also were demonstrated on transparent conducting oxide current collectors. The superior electrochemical performance of the inverse opal structures was evaluated through galvanostatic and potentiodynamic cycling, and the IO thin film battery offers increased capacity retention compared to micron-scale bulk particles from improved mechanical stability and electrical contact to stainless steel or transparent conducting current collectors from bottom-up electrodeposition growth. Li(+) is inserted into planar and IO structures at different potentials, and correlated to a preferential exposure of insertion sites of the IO network to the electrolyte. Additionally, potentiodynamic testing quantified the portion of the capacity stored as surface bound capacitive charge. Raman scattering and XRD characterization showed how the IO allows swelling into the pore volume rather than away from the current collector. V2O5 IO coin cells offer high initial capacities, but capacity fading can occur with limited electrolyte. Finally, we demonstrate that a V2O5 IO thin film battery prepared on a transparent conducting current collector with excess electrolyte exhibits high capacities (∼200 mAh g(-1)) and outstanding capacity retention and rate capability.

  4. Efficient approach for simulating response of multi-body structure in reactor core subjected to seismic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongkun; Cen Song; Wang Haitao; Cheng Huanyu

    2012-01-01

    An efficient 3D approach is proposed for simulating the complicated responses of the multi-body structure in reactor core under seismic loading. By utilizing the rigid-body and connector functions of the software Abaqus, the multi-body structure of the reactor core is simplified as a mass-point system interlinked by spring-dashpot connectors. And reasonable schemes are used for determining various connector coefficients. Furthermore, a scripting program is also complied for the 3D parametric modeling. Numerical examples show that, the proposed method can not only produce the results which satisfy the engineering requirements, but also improve the computational efficiency more than 100 times. (authors)

  5. Focused library with a core structure extracted from natural products and modified: application to phosphatase inhibitors and several biochemical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Go; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-05-19

    Synthesis of a focused library is an important strategy to create novel modulators of specific classes of proteins. Compounds in a focused library are composed of a common core structure and different diversity structures. In this Account, we describe our design and synthesis of libraries focused on selective inhibitors of protein phosphatases (PPases). We considered that core structures having structural and electronic features similar to those of PPase substrates, phosphate esters, would be a reasonable choice. Therefore, we extracted core structures from natural products already identified as PPase inhibitors. Since many PPases share similar active-site structures, such phosphate-mimicking core structures should interact with many enzymes in the same family, and therefore the choice of diversity structures is pivotal both to increase the binding affinity and to achieve specificity for individual enzymes. Here we present case studies of application of focused libraries to obtain PPase inhibitors, covering the overall process from selection of core structures to identification and evaluation of candidates in the focused libraries. To synthesize a library focused on protein serine-threonine phosphatases (PPs), we chose norcantharidin as a core structure, because norcantharidin dicarboxylate shows a broad inhibition profile toward several PPs. From the resulting focused library, we identified a highly selective PP2B inhibitor, NCA-01. On the other hand, to find inhibitors of dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs), we chose 3-acyltetronic acid extracted from natural product RK-682 as a core structure, because its structure resembles the transition state in the dephosphorylation reaction of DSPs. However, a highly selective inhibitor was not found in the resulting focused library. Furthermore, an inherent drawback of compounds having the highly acidic 3-acyltetronic acid as a core structure is very weak potency in cellulo, probably due to poor cell membrane

  6. Whiter, brighter, and more stable cellulose paper coated with TiO2 /SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Lorch, Mark; Sajedin, Seyed Mani; Kelly, Stephen M; Kornherr, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    To inhibit the photocatalytic degradation of organic material supports induced by small titania (TiO2 ) nanoparticles, four kinds of TiO2 nanoparticles, that is, commercial P25-TiO2 , commercial rutile phase TiO2 , rutile TiO2 nanorods and rutile TiO2 spheres, prepared from TiCl4 , were coated with a thin, but dense, coating of silica (SiO2 ) using a conventional sol-gel technique to form TiO2 /SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles. These core/shell particles were deposited and fixed as a very thin coating onto the surface of cellulose paper samples by a wet-chemistry polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer approach. The TiO2 /SiO2 nanocoated paper samples exhibit higher whiteness and brightness and greater stability to UV-bleaching than comparable samples of blank paper. There are many potential applications for this green chemistry approach to protect cellulosic fibres from UV-bleaching in sunlight and to improve their whiteness and brightness. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Core-Shell-Structured Copolyaniline-Coated Polymeric Nanoparticle Suspension and Its Viscoelastic Response under Various Electric Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Jae Moon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Semi-conducting poly(n-methylaniline (PNMA-coated poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA composite nanoparticles were synthesized using cross-linked and grafted PMMA particles as a core, and then, the PNMA shell was coated via chemical oxidative polymerization on the surface of modified PMMA nanoparticles. Their electroresponsive electrorheological characteristics when dispersed in silicone were confirmed under applied electric fields using a rotational rheometer, focusing on their viscoelastic response. Using a frequency sweep test, the frequency dependence of both the storage and loss moduli was confirmed to increase upon increasing the electric field, with a stable plateau regime over the entire angular frequency range.

  8. Decorin core protein (decoron) shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E

    2009-09-15

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e(1) bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1) bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  9. Decorin core protein (decoron shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM. With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein and binding sites in the d and e(1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1 bands. This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  10. Immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on magnetic fluorescent core-shell-structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jun, E-mail: hjun@whut.edu.cn; Liu, Huichao; Zhang, Peipei; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Mengshi; Ding, Liyun

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic fluorescent core-shell structured nanoparticles, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, were prepared. Cholesterol oxidase (COD) was immobilized on their surface to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles. Optimal immobilization was achieved with 2.5% (v/v) APTES, 2.0% (v/v) GA, 10 mg COD (in 15 mg carrier) and solution pH of 7.0. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles showed maximal catalytic activity at pH 7.0 and 50 °C. The thermal, storage and operational stabilities of COD were improved greatly after its immobilization. After the incubation at 50 °C for 5 h, the nanoparticles and free COD retained 80% and 46% of its initial activity, respectively. After kept at 4 °C for 30 days, the nanoparticles and free COD maintained 86% and 65% of initial activity, respectively. The nanoparticles retained 71% of its initial activity after 7 consecutive operations. Since Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles contained tris(2,2-bipyridyl)dichloro-ruthenium(II) hexahydrate (Ru(bpy){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}) and were optical sensitive to oxygen in solution, it might be used as the sensing material and has the application potential in multi parameter fiber optic biosensor based on enzyme catalysis and oxygen consumption. - Highlights: • COD was immobilized on magnetic fluorescent core-shell structured nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles were optical sensitive to oxygen in water solution. • The nanoparticles have remarkable improved stability compared with free COD. • The nanoparticles can probably be used in multi parameter fiber optic Biosensor.

  11. ROLE OF NEUTRALS IN CORE FUELING AND PEDESTAL STRUCTURE IN H-MODE DIII-D DISCHARGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WOLF, NS; PETRIE, TW; PORTER, GD; ROGNLIEN, TD; GROEBNER, RJ; MAKOWSKI, MA

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 ROLE OF NEUTRALS IN CORE FUELING AND PEDESTAL STRUCTURE IN H-MODE DIII-D DISCHARGES. The 2-D fluid code UEDGE was used to analyze DIII-D experiments to determine the role of neutrals in core fueling, core impurities, and also the H-mode pedestal structure. The authors compared the effects of divertor closure on the fueling rate and impurity density of high-triangularity, H-mode plasmas. UEDGE simulations indicate that the decrease in both deuterium core fueling (∼ 15%-20%) and core carbon density (∼ 15%-30%) with the closed divertor compared to the open divertor configuration is due to greater divertor screening of neutrals. They also compared UEDGE results with a simple analytic model of the H-mode pedestal structure. The model predicts both the width and gradient of the transport barrier in n e as a function of the pedestal density. The more sophisticated UEDGE simulations of H-mode discharges corroborate the simple analytic model, which is consistent with the hypothesis that fueling processes play a role in H-mode transport barrier formation

  12. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangyue, E-mail: wangxiangyue1986@163.com [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 15.5}B{sub 7} alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores. - Highlights: • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores were prepared with low core loss. • Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the core loss. • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores exhibited a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. • The softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  13. Structural Control of InP/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots Enables High-quality White LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Melikov, Rustamzhon; Mohammadi Aria, Mohammed; Bahmani Jalali, Houman; Ow-Yang, Cleva; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-05-30

    Herein, we demonstrate that the structural and optical control of InP-based quantum dots can lead to high-performance LEDs. Zinc sulphide (ZnS) shells passivate the InP quantum dot core and increase the quantum yield in green-emitting quantum dots by 13-fold and red-emitting quantum dots by 8-fold. The optimised quantum dots are integrated in the liquid-state to eliminate aggregation induced emission quenching and we fabricated white LEDs with warm, neutral, and cool white appearance by the down-conversion mechanism. The quantum dot-functionalized white LEDs achieve luminous efficiency up to 14.7 lm/W and colour-rendering index up to 80. The structural and optical control of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots enable 23-fold enhancement in luminous efficiency of white LEDs compared to ones containing only QDs of InP core. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Trophic structure and mercury distribution in a Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) food web using stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie, Raphael A.; Hebert, Craig E.; Rail, Jean-Francois; Braune, Birgit M.; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Hill, Laura G.; Lean, David R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Even at low concentrations in the environment, mercury has the potential to biomagnify in food chains and reaches levels of concern in apex predators. The aim of this study was to relate the transfer of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in a Gulf of St. Lawrence food web to the trophic structure, from primary consumers to seabirds, using stable nitrogen (δ 15 N) and carbon (δ 13 C) isotope analysis and physical environmental parameters. The energy reaching upper trophic level species was principally derived from pelagic primary production, with particulate organic matter (POM) at the base of the food chain. We developed a biomagnification factor (BMF) taking into account the various prey items consumed by a given predator using stable isotope mixing models. This BMF provides a more realistic estimation than when using a single prey. Lipid content, body weight, trophic level and benthic connection explained 77.4 and 80.7% of the variation in THg and MeHg concentrations, respectively in this food web. When other values were held constant, relationships with lipid and benthic connection were negative whereas relationships with trophic level and body weight were positive. Total Hg and MeHg biomagnified in this food web with biomagnification power values (slope of the relationship with δ 15 N) of 0.170 and 0.235, respectively on wet weight and 0.134 and 0.201, respectively on dry weight. Values of biomagnification power were greater for pelagic and benthopelagic species compared to benthic species whereas the opposite trend was observed for levels at the base of the food chain. This suggests that Hg would be readily bioavailable to organisms at the base of the benthic food chain, but trophic transfer would be more efficient in each trophic level of pelagic and benthopelagic food chains.

  15. Transition metal atoms absorbed on MoS2/h-BN heterostructure: stable geometries, band structures and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanbing; Huang, Zongyu; Liu, Huating; He, Chaoyu; Xue, Lin; Qi, Xiang; Zhong, Jianxin

    2018-06-15

    We have studied the stable geometries, band structures and magnetic properties of transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) atoms absorbed on MoS2/h-BN heterostructure systems by first-principles calculations. By comparing the adsorption energies, we find that the adsorbed transition metal (TM) atoms prefer to stay on the top of Mo atoms. The results of the band structure without spin-orbit coupling (SOC) interaction indicate that the Cr-absorbed systems behave in a similar manner to metals, and the Co-absorbed system exhibits a half-metallic state. We also deduce that the V-, Mn-, Fe-absorbed systems are semiconductors with 100% spin polarization at the HOMO level. The Ni-absorbed system is a nonmagnetic semiconductor. In contrast, the Co-absorbed system exhibits metallic state, and the bandgap of V-absorbed system decreases slightly according to the SOC calculations. In addition, the magnetic moments of all the six TM atoms absorbed on the MoS2/h-BN heterostructure systems decrease when compared with those of their free-standing states.

  16. Reinforcement of Natural Rubber with Core-Shell Structure Silica-Poly(Methyl Methacrylate Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghuang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly performing natural rubber/silica (NR/SiO2 nanocomposite with a SiO2 loading of 2 wt% was prepared by combining similar dissolve mutually theory with latex compounding techniques. Before polymerization, double bonds were introduced onto the surface of the SiO2 particles with the silane-coupling agent. The core-shell structure silica-poly(methyl methacrylate, SiO2-PMMA, nanoparticles were formed by grafting polymerization of MMA on the surface of the modified SiO2 particles via in situ emulsion, and then NR/SiO2 nanocomposite was prepared by blending SiO2-PMMA and PMMA-modified NR (NR-PMMA. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results show that PMMA has been successfully introduced onto the surface of SiO2, which can be well dispersed in NR matrix and present good interfacial adhesion with NR phase. Compared with those of pure NR, the thermal resistance and tensile properties of NR/SiO2 nanocomposite are significantly improved.

  17. Application of core structural design guidelines in conceptual fuel pin design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, M.R.; Stephen, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes an application of the Draft RDT Standards F9-7, -8, and -9 to conceptual design of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) fuel pins. The Standards are being developed to provide guidelines for structural analysis and design of the FBR core components which have limited ductility at high fluences and are not addressed by the prevalent codes. The development is guided by a national working group sponsored by the Division of Reactor Researcch and Technology of the Department of Energy. The development program summarized in the paper includes establishment of design margins consistent with the test data and component performance requirements, and application of the design rules in various design activities. The application program insures that the quantities required for proper application of the design rules are available from the analysis methods and test data, and that the use of the same design rules in different analysis tools used at different stages of a component design producees consistent results. This is illustrated in the paper by application of the design rules in the analysis methods developed for conceptual and more detailed designs of an FBR fuel pin

  18. The core structure of a Frank dislocation in Ni3(Al,Nb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, R.; Loubradou, M.; Derder, C.; Catana, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the core structures of dislocations in L1 2 crystals, in view of understanding the anomalous yield behavior of strength with increasing temperature. Theoretical approaches have been proposed for explaining the dissociations of these dislocations, and experimental evidences have been reported for such dissociations using either the weak beam technique or more recently the HRTEM (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy) technique. Recent HRTEM results show that for Ni 3 A1 the partial dislocations 1/2 left-angle 110 right-angle which limit an APB (Antiphase Boundary) lying on (001) are only split over 0.1 - 0.3 nm along (111) planes, producing very high energy CSF's (Complex Stacking Faults) which limit an SISF (superlattice Intrinsic Stacking Fault) extended on a (111) plane. Concerning the 1/2 left-angle 111 right-angle Frank dislocation, which limits an SESF (Superlattice Extrinsic Stacking Fault), there are no reported results yet. Let us note, however, that for aluminum HRTEM images of Frank dislocation loops have been studied. This lack of information in the L1 2 crystals motivated the present HRTEM study

  19. Mechanical design philosophy for the graphite components of the core structure of an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, E.

    1987-01-01

    Parallel to the layout and design of the graphite components for THTRs and the succeeding high temperature reactor projects, the design methods for graphite components have been improved over the years. The aim of this works is to develop the design methods which take into account both the particular properties of graphite and the particular functions of the components. Because of the close relation ship between materials and design codes, this development work has progressed with the development, testing and qualification of German reactor graphite. In this paper, the experience in this field of Hochtemperatur Reaktorbau GmbH and the results of the work and approach to the design problems are reported. The example of a HTR 500 design for a 550 MWe power station is taken up, and the core structure is explained. The graphite components are divided into three classes according to the stress limits. The loading of these components is reviewed. The aim of the design is not the complete avoidance of failure, but to avoid the failure of a single component from leading to a disadvantageous consequence which is not allowable. The classification of loading events, Weibull statistics and maximum allowable stress, the formation of the permissible stress, the assessment of stress due to multiaxial loading and so on are described. (Kako, I.)

  20. Nucleoporins as components of the nuclear pore complex core structure and Tpr as the architectural element of the nuclear basket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Sandra; Thyberg, Johan; Björkroth, Birgitta; Rackwitz, Hans-Richard; Cordes, Volker C

    2004-09-01

    The vertebrate nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a macromolecular assembly of protein subcomplexes forming a structure of eightfold radial symmetry. The NPC core consists of globular subunits sandwiched between two coaxial ring-like structures of which the ring facing the nuclear interior is capped by a fibrous structure called the nuclear basket. By postembedding immunoelectron microscopy, we have mapped the positions of several human NPC proteins relative to the NPC core and its associated basket, including Nup93, Nup96, Nup98, Nup107, Nup153, Nup205, and the coiled coil-dominated 267-kDa protein Tpr. To further assess their contributions to NPC and basket architecture, the genes encoding Nup93, Nup96, Nup107, and Nup205 were posttranscriptionally silenced by RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells, complementing recent RNAi experiments on Nup153 and Tpr. We show that Nup96 and Nup107 are core elements of the NPC proper that are essential for NPC assembly and docking of Nup153 and Tpr to the NPC. Nup93 and Nup205 are other NPC core elements that are important for long-term maintenance of NPCs but initially dispensable for the anchoring of Nup153 and Tpr. Immunogold-labeling for Nup98 also results in preferential labeling of NPC core regions, whereas Nup153 is shown to bind via its amino-terminal domain to the nuclear coaxial ring linking the NPC core structures and Tpr. The position of Tpr in turn is shown to coincide with that of the nuclear basket, with different Tpr protein domains corresponding to distinct basket segments. We propose a model in which Tpr constitutes the central architectural element that forms the scaffold of the nuclear basket.

  1. Structural improvement of unliganded simian immunodeficiency virus gp120 core by normal-mode-based X-ray crystallographic refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaorui; Lu, Mingyang; Poon, Billy K.; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2009-01-01

    The structural model of the unliganded and fully glycosylated simian immunodeficiency virus gp120 core determined to 4.0 Å resolution was substantially improved using a recently developed normal-mode-based anisotropic B-factor refinement method. The envelope protein gp120/gp41 of simian and human immunodeficiency viruses plays a critical role in viral entry into host cells. However, the extraordinarily high structural flexibility and heavy glycosylation of the protein have presented enormous difficulties in the pursuit of high-resolution structural investigation of some of its conformational states. An unliganded and fully glycosylated gp120 core structure was recently determined to 4.0 Å resolution. The rather low data-to-parameter ratio limited refinement efforts in the original structure determination. In this work, refinement of this gp120 core structure was carried out using a normal-mode-based refinement method that has been shown in previous studies to be effective in improving models of a supramolecular complex at 3.42 Å resolution and of a membrane protein at 3.2 Å resolution. By using only the first four nonzero lowest-frequency normal modes to construct the anisotropic thermal parameters, combined with manual adjustments and standard positional refinement using REFMAC5, the structural model of the gp120 core was significantly improved in many aspects, including substantial decreases in R factors, better fitting of several flexible regions in electron-density maps, the addition of five new sugar rings at four glycan chains and an excellent correlation of the B-factor distribution with known structural flexibility. These results further underscore the effectiveness of this normal-mode-based method in improving models of protein and nonprotein components in low-resolution X-ray structures

  2. "Hot cores" in proteins: Comparative analysis of the apolar contact area in structures from hyper/thermophilic and mesophilic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossa Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide variety of stabilizing factors have been invoked so far to elucidate the structural basis of protein thermostability. These include, amongst the others, a higher number of ion-pairs interactions and hydrogen bonds, together with a better packing of hydrophobic residues. It has been frequently observed that packing of hydrophobic side chains is improved in hyperthermophilic proteins, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. In this work, protein crystal structures from hyper/thermophilic organisms and their mesophilic homologs have been compared, in order to quantify the difference of apolar contact area and to assess the role played by the hydrophobic contacts in the stabilization of the protein core, at high temperatures. Results The construction of two datasets was carried out so as to satisfy several restrictive criteria, such as minimum redundancy, resolution and R-value thresholds and lack of any structural defect in the collected structures. This approach allowed to quantify with relatively high precision the apolar contact area between interacting residues, reducing the uncertainty due to the position of atoms in the crystal structures, the redundancy of data and the size of the dataset. To identify the common core regions of these proteins, the study was focused on segments that conserve a similar main chain conformation in the structures analyzed, excluding the intervening regions whose structure differs markedly. The results indicated that hyperthermophilic proteins underwent a significant increase of the hydrophobic contact area contributed by those residues composing the alpha-helices of the structurally conserved regions. Conclusion This study indicates the decreased flexibility of alpha-helices in proteins core as a major factor contributing to the enhanced termostability of a number of hyperthermophilic proteins. This effect, in turn, may be due to an increased number of buried methyl groups in

  3. Ductile all-cellulose nanocomposite films fabricated from core-shell structured cellulose nanofibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Per A; Berglund, Lars A; Wågberg, Lars

    2014-06-09

    Cellulosic materials have many desirable properties such as high mechanical strength and low oxygen permeability and will be an important component in a sustainable biomaterial-based society, but unfortunately they often lack the ductility and formability offered by petroleum-based materials. This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of nanocomposite films made of core-shell modified cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) surrounded by a shell of ductile dialcohol cellulose, created by heterogeneous periodate oxidation followed by borohydride reduction of the native cellulose in the external parts of the individual fibrils. The oxidation with periodate selectively produces dialdehyde cellulose, and the process does not increase the charge density of the material. Yet the modified cellulose fibers could easily be homogenized to CNFs. Prior to film fabrication, the CNF was shown by atomic force microscopy to be 0.5-2 μm long and 4-10 nm wide. The films were fabricated by filtration, and besides uniaxial tensile testing at different relative humidities, they were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and oxygen permeability. The strength-at-break at 23 °C and 50% RH was 175 MPa, and the films could, before rupture, be strained, mainly by plastic deformation, to about 15% and 37% at 50% RH and 90% RH, respectively. This moisture plasticization was further utilized to form a demonstrator consisting of a double-curved structure with a nominal strain of 24% over the curvature. At a relative humidity of 80%, the films still acted as a good oxygen barrier, having an oxygen permeability of 5.5 mL·μL/(m(2)·24 h·kPa). These properties indicate that this new material has a potential for use as a barrier in complex-shaped structures and hence ultimately reduce the need for petroleum-based plastics.

  4. Crystal structure of Earth's inner core: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, S. G.; Schultz, A. J.; Zurek, E.; Kofke, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Since the detection of the Earth's solid inner core (IC) by Lehmann in 1936, its composition and crystal structure (which are essential to understand Earth's evolution) have been controversial. While seismological measurements (e.g. PREM) can give a robust estimation of the density, pressure, and elasticity of the IC, they cannot be directly used to determine its composition and/or crystal structure. Experimentally, reaching the extreme IC conditions ( 330 GPa and 6000 K) and getting reliable measurements is very challenging. First-principles calculations provide a viable alternative that can work as a powerful investigative tool. Although several attempts have been made to assess phase stability at IC conditions computationally, they often use a low level of theory for electronic structure (e.g., classical force-field), adopt approximate methods (e.g., quasiharmonic approximation, fixed hcp-c/a), or do not consider finite-size effects. The study of phase stability using accurate first-principles methods is hampered in part by the difficulty of computing the free energy (FE), the central thermodynamic quantity that determines stability, while including anharmonic and finite-size effects. Additional difficulty related to the IC in particular is introduced by the dynamical instability of one of the IC candidate structures (bcc) at low temperature. Recently [1-3], we introduced a novel method (denoted as "harmonically mapped averaging", or HMA) to efficiently measure anharmonic properties (e.g. FE, pressure, elastic modulus) by molecular simulation, yielding orders of magnitude CPU speedup compared to conventional methods. We have applied this method to the hcp candidate phase of iron at the IC conditions, obtaining first-principles anharmonic FE values with unprecedented accuracy and precision [4]. We have now completed and report HMA calculations to assess the phase stability of all IC candidate phases (fcc/hcp/bcc). This knowledge is the prerequisite for

  5. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poidevin, Frédérick [UCL, KLB, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Chapin, Edward L. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canãda, Madrid (Spain); Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Korotkov, Andrei L. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Olmi, Luca, E-mail: fpoidevin@iac.es [Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Box 23343, UPR station, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  6. Ionic core–shell dendrimers with a polycationic core: structural aspects and host–guest binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Coevering, R.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The structural aspects and host–guest binding properties of ionic core–shell dendrimers [1]Br8 and [2]Br4, which bear a polycationic core and a neutral shell of Fréchet-type poly(benzyl aryl ether) dendrons, have been investigated by means of dendritic wedges [3]Br2 and [4]Br, that resemble one of

  7. Nanospheres with a smectic hydrophobic core and an amorphous PEG hydrophilic shell: structural changes and implications for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, N. Sanjeeva [New Jersey Center for Biomaterials; Rutgers; The State University of New Jersey; Piscataway; USA; Zhang, Zheng [New Jersey Center for Biomaterials; Rutgers; The State University of New Jersey; Piscataway; USA; Borsadia, Siddharth [New Jersey Center for Biomaterials; Rutgers; The State University of New Jersey; Piscataway; USA; Kohn, Joachim [New Jersey Center for Biomaterials; Rutgers; The State University of New Jersey; Piscataway; USA

    2018-01-01

    The structural changes in nanospheres with a crystalline core and an amorphous diffuse shell were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-, medium-, and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, MAXS and WAXS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  8. Functional organization of the Sm core in the crystal structure of human U1 snRNP.

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, G.; Trowitzsch, S.; Kastner, B.; Lührmann, R.; Wahl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein initiates the assembly of the spliceosome. Here, the structure of the natively purified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle reveals the core Sm protein ring and its interactions with the Sm site in the small nuclear RNA.

  9. Relating the structural strength of concrete sewer pipes and material properties retrieved from core samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanic, N.; Langeveld, J.G.; Salet, Theo; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2016-01-01

    Drill core samples are taken in practice for an analysis of the material characteristics of concrete pipes in order to improve the quality of the decision-making on rehabilitation actions. Earlier research has demonstrated that core sampling is associated with a significant uncertainty. In this

  10. Functional and structural analysis of photosystem II core complexes from spinach with high oxygen evolution capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Elisabeth; Irrgang, Klaus-D.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Renger, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving photo system II core complexes were prepared from spinach by solubilizing photosystem II membrane fragments with dodecyl-β-D-maltoside. The core complexes consist of the intrinsic 47-kDa, 43-kDa, D1 and D2 polypeptides, the two subunits of cytochrome b559 and the extrinsic 33-kDa

  11. Basic data for surveillance test on core support graphite structures for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Ishihara, Masahiro; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2007-02-01

    Both of the visual inspection by a TV camera and the measurement of material properties by surveillance test on core support graphite structures are planned for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm their structural integrity and characteristics. The surveillance test is aimed to investigate the change of material properties by aging effects such as fast neutron irradiation and oxidation. The obtained data will be used not only for evaluating the structural integrity of the core support graphite structures of the HTTR but also for design of advanced Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) discussed at generation IV international forum. This report describes the initial material properties of surveillance specimens before installation and installed position of surveillance specimens in the HTTR. (author)

  12. Utilization of local area network technology and decentralized structure for nuclear reactor core temperature monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, M.; Peirano, F.

    1986-01-01

    The present system concerns Superphenix type reactors. It is a new version of system for monitoring the reactor core temperatures. It has been designed to minimize the cost and the wiring complexity because of the large number of channels (800). For this, equipments are arranged on the roof slab of the reactor with a single link to the control room; from which the name Integrated Treatment of Core Temperatures: TITC 1500 and the natural choice of a distributed system. This system monitors permanently the thermal state of the core a Superphenix type reactor. This monitoring system aims at detecting anomalies of core temperature rise, releasing automatic shutdown (safety), and providing to the monitoring systems not concerned safety the information concerning the core [fr

  13. Method Of Bonding A Metal Connection To An Electrode Including A Core Having A Fiber Or Foam Type Structure For An Electrochemical Cell, An

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustau, Marie-Therese; Verhoog, Roelof; Precigout, Claude

    1996-09-24

    A method of bonding a metal connection to an electrode including a core having a fiber or foam-type structure for an electrochemical cell, in which method at least one metal strip is pressed against one edge of the core and is welded thereto under compression, wherein, at least in line with the region in which said strip is welded to the core, which is referred to as the "main core", a retaining core of a type analogous to that of the main core is disposed prior to the welding.

  14. Trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico revealed by gut content and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain-Counts, Jennifer P.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Ross, Steve W.

    2017-01-01

    Mesopelagic fishes represent an important component of the marine food web due to their global distributions, high abundances and ability to transport organic material throughout a large part of the water column. This study combined stable isotope (SIAs) and gut content analyses (GCAs) to characterize the trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the North-Central Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, this study examined whether mesopelagic fishes utilized chemosynthetic energy from cold seeps. Specimens were collected (9–25 August 2007) over three deep (>1,000 m) cold seeps at discrete depths (surface to 1,503 m) over the diurnal cycle. GCA classified 31 species (five families) of mesopelagic fishes into five feeding guilds: piscivores, large crustacean consumers, copepod consumers, generalists and mixed zooplanktivores. However, these guilds were less clearly defined based on stable isotope mixing model (MixSIAR) results, suggesting diets may be more mixed over longer time periods (weeks–months) and across co-occurring species. Copepods were likely important for the majority of mesopelagic fishes, consistent with GCA (this study) and previous literature. MixSIAR results also identified non-crustacean prey items, including salps and pteropods, as potentially important prey items for mesopelagic fishes, including those fishes not analysed in GCA (Sternoptyx spp. and Melamphaidae). Salps and other soft-bodied species are often missed in GCAs. Mesopelagic fishes had δ13C results consistent with particulate organic matter serving as the baseline organic carbon source, fueling up to three trophic levels. Fishes that undergo diel vertical migration were depleted in 15N relative to weak migrators, consistent with depth-specific isotope trends in sources and consumers, and assimilation of 15N-depleted organic matter in surface waters. Linear correlations between fish size and δ15N values suggested ontogenetic changes in fish diets for several species. While there was

  15. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  16. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  17. Polymersomes, smaller than you think: ferrocene as a TEM probe to determine core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, A. H.; Dalton, P. D.; Newman, T. A.

    2010-01-01

    By incorporating ferrocene into the hydrophobic membrane of PEG-b-PCL polymersome nanoparticles it is possible to selectively visualize their core using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Two different sizes of ferrocene-loaded polymersomes with mean hydrodynamic diameters of approximately 40 and 90 nm were prepared. Image analysis of TEM pictures of these polymersomes found that the mean diameter of the core was 4-5 times smaller than the mean hydrodynamic diameter. The values obtained also allow the surface diameter and internal volume of the core to be calculated.

  18. Liquid structure as a guide for phase stability in the solid state: Discovery of a stable compound in the Au-Si alloy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasci, Emre S.; Sluiter, Marcel H.F.; Pasturel, Alain; Villars, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    A new crystalline ground state was discovered in the Au-Si system through first-principles electronic structure calculations. The new structure was found using the experimentally and theoretically determined local atomic structure in the liquid as a guide for the solid state. Local atomic structure in the liquid was matched with that for all known crystal structures as compiled in the Pauling File structural database. The best matching crystalline structures were then explicitly calculated using first-principles methods. Most candidate crystal structures were found to be close, but above the enthalpy of a composition weighted average of the face-centered cubic Au and diamond structure Si terminal phases, but one crystal structure was more stable than the terminal phases by about 10 meV atom -1 at T = 0 K. As first-principles simulations of local structure are feasible for most liquid alloys, the present methodology is applicable to other alloys lying near a eutectic composition.

  19. Structurally Deformed MoS2 for Electrochemically Stable, Thermally Resistant, and Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yen-Chang; Lu, Ang-Yu; Lu, Ping; Yang, Xiulin; Jiang, Chang-Ming; Mariano, Marina; Kaehr, Brian; Lin, Oliver; Taylor, André ; Sharp, Ian D.; Li, Lain-Jong; Chou, Stanley S.; Tung, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The emerging molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) offers intriguing possibilities for realizing a transformative new catalyst for driving the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the trade-off between catalytic activity and long-term stability represents a formidable challenge and has not been extensively addressed. This study reports that metastable and temperature-sensitive chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) can be made into electrochemically stable (5000 cycles), and thermally robust (300 °C) while maintaining synthetic scalability and excellent catalytic activity through physical-transformation into 3D structurally deformed nanostructures. The dimensional transition enabled by a high throughput electrohydrodynamic process provides highly accessible, and electrochemically active surface area and facilitates efficient transport across various interfaces. Meanwhile, the hierarchically strained morphology is found to improve electronic coupling between active sites and current collecting substrates without the need for selective engineering the electronically heterogeneous interfaces. Specifically, the synergistic combination of high strain load stemmed from capillarity-induced-self-crumpling and sulfur (S) vacancies intrinsic to chemical exfoliation enables simultaneous modulation of active site density and intrinsic HER activity regardless of continuous operation or elevated temperature. These results provide new insights into how catalytic activity, electrochemical-, and thermal stability can be concurrently enhanced through the physical transformation that is reminiscent of nature, in which properties of biological materials emerge from evolved dimensional transitions.

  20. Highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings based on gradient structure design and fast regeneration from physical damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zao; Liu, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Guan, Zisheng

    2015-12-01

    Optical transparency, mechanical flexibility, and fast regeneration are important factors to expand the application of superhydrophobic surfaces. Herein, we fabricated highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings through a novel gradient structure design by versatile dip-coating of silica colloid particles (SCPs) and diethoxydimethysiliane cross-linked silica nanoparticles (DDS-SNPs) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and glass, followed by the modification of octadecyltrichlorosiliane (OTCS). When the DDS concentration reached 5 wt%, the modified SCPs/DDS-SNPs coating exhibited a water contact angle (WCA) of 153° and a sliding angle (SA) glass was increased by 2.7% and 1% in the visible wavelength, respectively. This superhydrophobic coating also showed good robustness and stability against water dropping impact, ultrasonic damage, and acid solution. Moreover, the superhydrophobic PET film after physical damage can quickly regain the superhydrophobicity by one-step spray regenerative solution of dodecyltrichlorosilane (DTCS) modified silica nanoparticles at room temperature. The demonstrated method for the preparation and regeneration of superhydrophobic coating is available for different substrates and large-scale production at room temperature.

  1. Structurally Deformed MoS2 for Electrochemically Stable, Thermally Resistant, and Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yen-Chang

    2017-10-12

    The emerging molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) offers intriguing possibilities for realizing a transformative new catalyst for driving the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the trade-off between catalytic activity and long-term stability represents a formidable challenge and has not been extensively addressed. This study reports that metastable and temperature-sensitive chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) can be made into electrochemically stable (5000 cycles), and thermally robust (300 °C) while maintaining synthetic scalability and excellent catalytic activity through physical-transformation into 3D structurally deformed nanostructures. The dimensional transition enabled by a high throughput electrohydrodynamic process provides highly accessible, and electrochemically active surface area and facilitates efficient transport across various interfaces. Meanwhile, the hierarchically strained morphology is found to improve electronic coupling between active sites and current collecting substrates without the need for selective engineering the electronically heterogeneous interfaces. Specifically, the synergistic combination of high strain load stemmed from capillarity-induced-self-crumpling and sulfur (S) vacancies intrinsic to chemical exfoliation enables simultaneous modulation of active site density and intrinsic HER activity regardless of continuous operation or elevated temperature. These results provide new insights into how catalytic activity, electrochemical-, and thermal stability can be concurrently enhanced through the physical transformation that is reminiscent of nature, in which properties of biological materials emerge from evolved dimensional transitions.

  2. Magnetic model for a horse-spleen ferritin with a three-phase core structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J.H.; Eom, T.W. [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center, Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y.P., E-mail: yplee@hanyang.ac.kr [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center, Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, J.Y. [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E.H. [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The increasing interests in magnetic nanoparticles has prompted research on ferritin, which is naturally a well-defined iron-storage protein in most living organisms. However, the exact magnetic behavior of ferritin is not well understood, because the crystal structures of ferritin and ferrihydrite, its major component, are not fully understood. Briefly, we discuss the previous magnetization models of ferritin and ferrihydrite and we present a new model ({Sigma}3L) of the initial magnetization of ferritin, considering its different phases. The new model includes three Langevin-function terms, which represent three different magnetic moments provided by the likely hydroxide and oxide mineral phases in ferritin. Compared to previous models, our simple model fits the experimental data 12 times better in terms of the sum of least squares. The magnetic independence of each component supports the multi-phase compositional model of the mineral core of horse-spleen ferritin. This {Sigma}3L model gives a quantization of the amounts of the different phases within horse-spleen ferritins that matches other published experimental data: 60-80% ferrihydrite, 15-25% maghemite/magnetite, and 1-10% hematite. - Highlights: > We present a new model ({Sigma}3L) of the initial magnetization of ferritin, considering its different phases. > New model includes three Langevin-function terms, which represent three different magnetic moments provided by ferritin phases. > Compared to previous models, our simple model fits the experimental data 12 times better in terms of the sum of least square. > The magnetic independence of each component supports that ferritin and ferrihydrite are composed of different phases.

  3. Meisoindigo, but not its core chemical structure indirubin, inhibits zebrafish interstitial leukocyte chemotactic migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Baixin; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Deng, Xu; Gu, Lijuan; Wang, Qiongyu; Zeng, Zhi; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Qingping; Wang, Yueying

    2017-12-01

    Inflammatory disease is a big threat to human health. Leukocyte chemotactic migration is required for efficient inflammatory response. Inhibition of leukocyte chemotactic migration to the inflammatory site has been shown to provide therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory diseases. Our study was designed to discover effective and safe compounds that can inhibit leukocyte chemotactic migration, thus providing possible novel therapeutic strategy for treating inflammatory diseases. In this study, we used transgenic zebrafish model (Tg:zlyz-EGFP line) to visualize the process of leukocyte chemotactic migration. Then, we used this model to screen the hit compound and evaluate its biological activity on leukocyte chemotactic migration. Furthermore, western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of the hit compound on the AKT or ERK-mediated pathway, which plays an important role in leukocyte chemotactic migration. In this study, using zebrafish-based chemical screening, we identified that the hit compound meisoindigo (25 μM, 50 μM, 75 μM) can significantly inhibit zebrafish leukocyte chemotactic migration in a dose-dependent manner (p = 0.01, p = 0.0006, p migration (p = 0.43). Furthermore, our results unexpectedly showed that indirubin, the core structure of meisoindigo, had no significant effect on zebrafish leukocyte chemotactic migration (p = 0.6001). Additionally, our results revealed that meisoindigo exerts no effect on the Akt or Erk-mediated signalling pathway. Our results suggest that meisoindigo, but not indirubin, is effective for inhibiting leukocyte chemotactic migration, thus providing a potential therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory diseases.

  4. Structural and catalytic characterization of a thermally stable and acid-stable variant of human carbonic anhydrase II containing an engineered disulfide bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Christopher D.; Habibzadegan, Andrew [University of Florida, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N. [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, Robert, E-mail: rmckenna@ufl.edu [University of Florida, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structure of the disulfide-containing HCAII (dsHCAII) has been solved to 1.77 Å resolution and revealed that successful oxidation of the cysteine bond was achieved while also retaining desirable active-site geometry. The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to bicarbonate and a proton. Recently, there has been industrial interest in utilizing CAs as biocatalysts for carbon sequestration and biofuel production. The conditions used in these processes, however, result in high temperatures and acidic pH. This unfavorable environment results in rapid destabilization and loss of catalytic activity in CAs, ultimately resulting in cost-inefficient high-maintenance operation of the system. In order to negate these detrimental industrial conditions, cysteines at residues 23 (Ala23Cys) and 203 (Leu203Cys) were engineered into a wild-type variant of human CA II (HCAII) containing the mutation Cys206Ser. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the disulfide-containing HCAII (dsHCAII) was solved to 1.77 Å resolution and revealed that successful oxidation of the cysteine bond was achieved while also retaining desirable active-site geometry. Kinetic studies utilizing the measurement of {sup 18}O-labeled CO{sub 2} by mass spectrometry revealed that dsHCAII retained high catalytic efficiency, and differential scanning calorimetry showed acid stability and thermal stability that was enhanced by up to 14 K compared with native HCAII. Together, these studies have shown that dsHCAII has properties that could be used in an industrial setting to help to lower costs and improve the overall reaction efficiency.

  5. Supplementary Material for Finding the Stable Structures of N1-xWX with an Ab-initio High-Throughput Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Supplementary material for “Finding the stable structures of N1−xWX with an ab - initio high-throughput approach” Michael J. Mehl∗ Center for...AND SUBTITLE Supplementary Material for ’Finding the Stable Structures of N1-xWX with an ab - initio High-throughput Approach’ 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and J. Hafner, Ab initio molecular dynamics for open-shell transition metals, Phys. Rev. B 48, 13115–13118 (1993). 2 G. Kresse and J. Hafner, Ab initio

  6. Microbial communities of the Lemon Creek Glacier show subtle structural variation yet stable phylogenetic composition over space and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Springer Sheik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are geologically important yet transient ecosystems that support diverse, biogeochemically significant microbial communities. During the melt season glaciers undergo dramatic physical, geochemical and biological changes that exert great influence on downstream biogeochemical cycles. Thus, we sought to understand the temporal melt-season dynamics of microbial communities and associated geochemistry at the terminus of Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG in coastal southern Alaska. Due to late season snowfall, sampling of LCG occurred in three interconnected areas: proglacial Lake Thomas, the lower glacial outflow stream and the glacier’s terminus. LCG associated microbial communities were phylogenetically diverse and varied by sampling location. However, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at all sampling locations. Strict anaerobic groups such as methanogens, SR1, and OP11 were also recovered from glacier outflows, indicating anoxic conditions in at least some portions of the LCG subglacial environment. Microbial community structure was significantly correlated with sampling location and sodium concentrations. Microbial communities sampled from terminus outflow waters exhibited day-to-day fluctuation in taxonomy and phylogenetic similarity. However, these communities were not significantly different from randomly constructed communities from all three sites. These results indicate that glacial outflows share a large proportion of phylogenetic overlap with downstream environments and that the observed significant shifts in community structure are driven by changes in relative abundance of different taxa, and not complete restructuring of communities. We conclude that LCG glacial discharge hosts a diverse and relatively stable microbiome that shifts at fine taxonomic scales in response to geochemistry and likely water residence time.

  7. Stable genetic structure and connectivity in pollution-adapted and nearby pollution-sensitive populations of Fundulus heteroclitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancani, Leann M.; Flight, Patrick A.; Nacci, Diane E.; Rand, David M.; Crawford, Douglas L.; Oleksiak, Marjorie F.

    2018-01-01

    Populations of the non-migratory estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus inhabiting the heavily polluted New Bedford Harbour (NBH) estuary have shown inherited tolerance to local pollutants introduced to their habitats in the past 100 years. Here we examine two questions: (i) Is there pollution-driven selection on the mitochondrial genome across a fine geographical scale? and (ii) What is the pattern of migration among sites spanning a strong pollution gradient? Whole mitochondrial genomes were analysed for 133 F. heteroclitus from seven nearby collection sites: four sites along the NBH pollution cline (approx. 5 km distance), which had pollution-adapted fish, as well as one site adjacent to the pollution cline and two relatively unpolluted sites about 30 km away, which had pollution-sensitive fish. Additionally, we used microsatellite analyses to quantify genetic variation over three F. heteroclitus generations in both pollution-adapted and sensitive individuals collected from two sites at two different time points (1999/2000 and 2007/2008). Our results show no evidence for a selective sweep of mtDNA in the polluted sites. Moreover, mtDNA analyses revealed that both pollution-adapted and sensitive populations harbour similar levels of genetic diversity. We observed a high level of non-synonymous mutations in the most polluted site. This is probably associated with a reduction in Ne and concomitant weakening of purifying selection, a demographic expansion following a pollution-related bottleneck or increased mutation rates. Our demographic analyses suggest that isolation by distance influences the distribution of mtDNA genetic variation between the pollution cline and the clean populations at broad spatial scales. At finer scales, population structure is patchy, and neither spatial distance, pollution concentration or pollution tolerance is a good predictor of mtDNA variation. Lastly, microsatellite analyses revealed stable population structure over the last

  8. Mars Internal Structure: Seismic Predictions for Core Phase Arrivals in Anticipation of the InSight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R. C.; Banerdt, W. B.; Lognonne, P. H.; Hempel, S.; Panning, M. P.; Schmerr, N. C.; Garcia, R.; Shiro, B.; Gudkova, T.

    2016-12-01

    We present a methodology to constrain the seismic structure of the Martian core in preparation for the return of data from the InSight mission. Expected amplitudes for marsquakes assuming a medium seismicity model support the likely observation of core reflections of P and S energy for events with magnitude greater than MW 4.5. For the mission duration, we would expect to record on the order of 10 events of at least this magnitude. Our method predicts the ray density of core reflected (PcP, ScS) and transmitted (PKP, SKS) phases for various core sizes with core-mantle boundary depths between 1650 and 2100 km. Ray density is defined as the fraction of rays in a small source-receiver interval normalized by the total number of rays over a great circle slice through the planet. The ray density of a given phase is scaled by predicted amplitudes calculated considering attenuation, geometric spreading and reflection/transmission coefficients at discontinuities along the ray path. Maximum PcP/ScS amplitudes are expected at epicentral distances of 40-100 degrees. Thus, if present, strong seismicity in the Hellas and Tharsis region may facilitate core detection. For events with MW above 4.5, ScS and SKS signals are expected to lie above the lander noise, but PcP and PKP signals may barely be visible. The resolution of these phases can be improved by applying stacking techniques to account for expected background noise, scattering, and interfering seismic phases. These techniques were successfully applied to Apollo seismograms to infer the radial structure of the lunar core. Even if source depth and location have large uncertainties during a single-station mission to Mars, different phases can be distinguished by their slownesses. Prior to the summation of the traces of individual events, signals are aligned to a reference phase, e.g. the PcP onset assuming various core radii. A maximum in signal coherency corresponds to the best fitting core radius. In the case of lunar

  9. Core/Shell Structure of TiO2-Coated MWCNTs for Thermal Protection for High-Temperature Processing of Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Angélica Ardila Rodriguez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of metal matrix composites with elevated mechanical properties depends largely on the reinforcing phase properties. Due to the poor oxidation resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs as well as their high reactivity with molten metal, the processing conditions for the production of MWCNT-reinforced metal matrix composites may be an obstacle to their successful use as reinforcement. Coating MWCNTs with a ceramic material that acts as a thermal protection would be an alternative to improve oxidation stability. In this work, MWCNTs previously functionalized were coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2 layers of different thicknesses, producing a core-shell structure. Heat treatments at three different temperatures (500°C, 750°C, and 1000°C were performed on coated nanotubes in order to form a stable metal oxide structure. The MWCNT/TiO2 hybrids produced were evaluated in terms of thermal stability. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Raman spectroscopy (RS, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were performed in order to investigate TiO2-coated MWCNT structure and thermal stability under oxidative atmosphere. It was found that the thermal stability of the TiO2-coated MWCNTs was dependent of the TiO2 layer morphology that in turn depends on the heat treatment temperature.

  10. Experimental and numerical analysis of fluid - structure interaction effects in a fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Forni, M.; Melloni, R.; Paoluzzi, R.; Bonacina, G.; Castoldi, A.; Zola, M.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic experiments in air and water (simulating liquid sodium) were performed by ISMES, on behalf of ENEA, on various core element groups of the Italian PEC fast reactor. Bundles of one, seven and nineteen mock-ups reproducing fuel, reflecting and neutron shield elements in full scale were analysed on shaking tables. Tests concerned both groups of equal elements and mixed configurations which corresponded to real core parts. The effects of PEC core-restraint ring were also studied. Seismic excitations of up to 2.5 g were applied to core diagrid. Test results were analysed by use of the one-dimensional program CORALIE and the two-dimensional program CLASH. The study allowed the fluid effects in the PEC core to be evaluated; it also contributed to validation of the above mentioned programs for their general use for fast reactor core analysis. This paper presents the main features of the experimental and the numerical studies and reports comparisons between calculations and measurements. (author)

  11. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  12. An affected core drives network integration deficits of the structural connectome in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Váša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is a genetic disease known to lead to cerebral structural alterations, which we study using the framework of the macroscopic white-matter connectome. We create weighted connectomes of 44 patients with 22q11DS and 44 healthy controls using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and perform a weighted graph theoretical analysis. After confirming global network integration deficits in 22q11DS (previously identified using binary connectomes, we identify the spatial distribution of regions responsible for global deficits. Next, we further characterize the dysconnectivity of the deficient regions in terms of sub-network properties, and investigate their relevance with respect to clinical profiles. We define the subset of regions with decreased nodal integration (evaluated using the closeness centrality measure as the affected core (A-core of the 22q11DS structural connectome. A-core regions are broadly bilaterally symmetric and consist of numerous network hubs — chiefly parietal and frontal cortical, as well as subcortical regions. Using a simulated lesion approach, we demonstrate that these core regions and their connections are particularly important to efficient network communication. Moreover, these regions are generally densely connected, but less so in 22q11DS. These specific disturbances are associated to a rerouting of shortest network paths that circumvent the A-core in 22q11DS, “de-centralizing” the network. Finally, the efficiency and mean connectivity strength of an orbito-frontal/cingulate circuit, included in the affected regions, correlate negatively with the extent of negative symptoms in 22q11DS patients, revealing the clinical relevance of present findings. The identified A-core overlaps numerous regions previously identified as affected in 22q11DS as well as in schizophrenia, which approximately 30–40% of 22q11DS patients develop.

  13. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  14. Charge order-superfluidity transition in a two-dimensional system of hard-core bosons and emerging domain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Panov, Yu. D.; Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    We have used high-performance parallel computations by NVIDIA graphics cards applying the method of nonlinear conjugate gradients and Monte Carlo method to observe directly the developing ground state configuration of a two-dimensional hard-core boson system with decrease in temperature, and its evolution with deviation from a half-filling. This has allowed us to explore unconventional features of a charge order—superfluidity phase transition, specifically, formation of an irregular domain structure, emergence of a filamentary superfluid structure that condenses within of the charge-ordered phase domain antiphase boundaries, and formation and evolution of various topological structures.

  15. Controllable dielectric and electrical performance of polymer composites with novel core/shell-structured conductive particles through biomimetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dan; Tian, Ming; Wang, Wencai; Li, Dongdong; Li, Runyuan; Liu, Haoliang; Zhang, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Conductive core/shell-structured particles were synthesized by biomimetic method. ► These particles with silica/poly(dopamine)/silver core and poly(dopamine) shell. ► Dielectric composites were prepared with resulted particles and silicone elastomer. ► The dielectric properties of the composites can be controlled by shell thickness. ► This biomimetic method is simple, nontoxic, efficient and easy to control. - Abstract: Novel silica/poly(dopamine)/silver (from inner to outer) (denoted as SiO 2 /PDA/Ag) conductive micro-particles were first synthesized by biomimetic poly(dopamine) coating. These micro-particles were then coated with a poly(dopamine) layer to form core/shell-structured particles, with silica/poly(dopamine)/silver core and poly(dopamine) shell (denoted as SiO 2 /PDA/Ag/PDA). This multilayer core/shell micro-particles were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope. Polymer composites were then prepared by mechanical blending of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and the core/shell-structured particles. It was found that the silver layer and the poly(dopamine) shell had good adhesion with substrate and they kept intact even under violent shearing stress during mechanical mixing. The effect of the thickness of outermost poly(dopamine) shell as well as the loading amount of this filler on the dielectric and electrical properties of the composites was further studied. The results showed that the dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity of the composites decreased with increasing shell thickness (10–53 nm) at the same loading level. And the maximal dielectric constant of composites was achieved in the composites filled with SiO 2 /PDA/Ag/PDA (with 10–15 nm PDA shell) particles, which was much larger than that of the composite filled with SiO 2 /PDA/Ag particles without insulative PDA shell. At the same time, the composites can change

  16. Facile Synthesis of Yolk/Core-Shell Structured TS-1@Mesosilica Composites for Enhanced Hydroxylation of Phenol

    KAUST Repository

    Zou, Houbing

    2015-12-14

    © 2015 by the authors. In the current work, we developed a facile synthesis of yolk/core-shell structured TS-1@mesosilica composites and studied their catalytic performances in the hydroxylation of phenol with H2O2 as the oxidant. The core-shell TS-1@mesosilica composites were prepared via a uniform coating process, while the yolk-shell TS-1@mesosilica composite was prepared using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin (RF) middle-layer as the sacrificial template. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 sorption, Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FT-IR) UV-Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characterization results showed that these samples possessed highly uniform yolk/core-shell structures, high surface area (560–700 m2 g−1) and hierarchical pore structures from oriented mesochannels to zeolite micropores. Importantly, owing to their unique structural properties, these composites exhibited enhanced activity, and also selectivity in the phenol hydroxylation reaction.

  17. Monin-Obukhov Similarity Functions of the Structure Parameter of Temperature and Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) functions fepsi; and fT, of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), ¿, and the structure parameter of temperature, CT2, were determined for the stable atmospheric surface layer using data gathered in the context of CASES-99. These data cover

  18. Mesoporous coaxial titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinhong; Shang, Chaoqun; Gu, Lin; Dong, Shanmu; Chen, Xiao; Han, Pengxian; Li, Lanfeng; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Zhihong; Xu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yuwei; Cui, Guanglei

    2011-08-01

    In this study, titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures were prepared by the coaxial electrospinning, and subsequently annealed in the ammonia for supercapacitor applications. These core-shell (TiN-VN) fibers incorporated mesoporous structure into high electronic conducting transition nitride hybrids, which combined higher specific capacitance of VN and better rate capability of TiN. These hybrids exhibited higher specific capacitance (2 mV s(-1), 247.5 F g(-1)) and better rate capability (50 mV s(-1), 160.8 F g(-1)), which promise a good candidate for high-performance supercapacitors. It was also revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization that the minor capacitance fade originated from the surface oxidation of VN and TiN.

  19. Nitrite sensing composite systems based on a core-shell emissive-superamagnetic structure: Construction, characterization and sensing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Liu, Liang; Zha, Jianhua; Yuan, Ningyi

    2017-04-01

    Two recyclable nitrite sensing composite samples were designed and constructed through a core-shell structure, with Fe3O4 nanoparticles as core, silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as shell and two rhodamine derivatives as chemosensors, respectively. These samples and their structure were identified with their electron microscopy images, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis. Their nitrite sensing behavior was discussed based on emission intensity quenching, their limit of detection was found as low as 1.2 μM. Further analysis suggested a static sensing mechanism between nitrite and chemosensors through an additive reaction between NO+ and chemosensors. After finishing their nitrite sensing, these composite samples and their emission could be recycled and recovered by sulphamic acid.

  20. DFT study of structure, IR and Raman spectra of the fluorescent "Janus" dendron built from cyclotriphosphazene core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukova, I. I.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Fuchs, S.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2011-11-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the zero generation dendron, possessing five fluorescent dansyl terminal groups, cyclotriphosphazene core, and one carbamate function G0v were studied. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for G0v dendron on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that dendron molecule G0v has a concave lens structure with slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of G0v dendron were interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed. The frequency of ν(N-H) band in the IR spectrum reveal the presence of H-bonds in the G0v dendron.

  1. Layout of PWR in-core instrumentation system tubing and support structure with Bechtel 3D-CADD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Pfeifer, B.W.; Mulay, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    The optimization study of the PWR In-Core Instrumentation System (ICIS) tubing layout and support structure presented an opportunity to utilize the Bechtel 3D-CADD program to perform this task. This paper provides a brief summary of the Bechtel 3D-CADD program development and capabilities and outlines the process of developing and optimizing the ICIS tube layout. Specific aspects relating to the ICIS tube layout criteria, support, alignment, electronic interference check and erection sequence are provided. (orig.)

  2. Statistical analysis on hollow and core-shell structured vanadium oxide microspheres as cathode materials for Lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this data, the statistical analyses of vanadium oxide microspheres cathode materials are presented for the research article entitled “Statistical analyses on hollow and core-shell structured vanadium oxides microspheres as cathode materials for Lithium ion batteries” (Liang et al., 2017 [1]. This article shows the statistical analyses on N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm and morphology vanadium oxide microspheres as cathode materials for LIBs. Keywords: Adsorption-desorption isotherm, Pore size distribution, SEM images, TEM images

  3. Soft-sediment deformation structures in cores from lacustrine slurry deposits of the Late Triassic Yanchang Fm. (central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Renchao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fine-grained autochthonous sedimentation in the deep part of a Late Triassic lake was frequently interrupted by gravity-induced mass flows. Some of these mass flows were so rich in water that they must have represented slurries. This can be deduced from the soft-sediment deformation structures that abound in cores from these lacustrine deposits which constitute the Yanchang Fm., which is present in the Ordos Basin (central China.

  4. The use of standardized patients in the plastic surgery residency curriculum: teaching core competencies with objective structured clinical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Drew; Lee, Gordon

    2011-07-01

    As of 2006, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education had defined six "core competencies" of residency education: interpersonal communication skills, medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice. Objective structured clinical examinations using standardized patients are becoming effective educational tools, and the authors developed a novel use of the examinations in plastic surgery residency education that assesses all six competencies. Six plastic surgery residents, two each from postgraduate years 4, 5, and 6, participated in the plastic surgery-specific objective structured clinical examination that focused on melanoma. The examination included a 30-minute videotaped encounter with a standardized patient actor and a postencounter written exercise. The residents were scored on their performance in all six core competencies by the standardized patients and faculty experts on a three-point scale (1 = novice, 2 = moderately skilled, and 3 = proficient). Resident performance was averaged for each postgraduate year, stratified according to core competency, and scored from a total of 100 percent. Residents overall scored well in interpersonal communications skills (84 percent), patient care (83 percent), professionalism (86 percent), and practice-based learning (84 percent). Scores in medical knowledge showed a positive correlation with level of training (86 percent). All residents scored comparatively lower in systems-based practice (65 percent). The residents reported unanimously that the objective structured clinical examination was realistic and educational. The objective structured clinical examination provided comprehensive and meaningful feedback and identified areas of strengths and weakness for the residents and for the teaching program. The examination is an effective assessment tool for the core competencies and a valuable adjunct to residency training.

  5. Core-shell SrTiO3/graphene structure by chemical vapor deposition for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenye; Bu, Xiuming; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming

    2018-04-01

    Direct growth of high quality graphene on the surface of SrTiO3 (STO) was realized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD), to construct few-layer 'graphene shell' on every STO nanoparticle. The STO/graphene composite shows significantly enhanced UV light photocatalytic activity compared with the STO/rGO reference. Mechanism analysis confirms the role of special core-shell structure and chemical bond (Tisbnd C) for rapid interfacial electron transfer and effective electron-hole separation.

  6. Preparation of core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres as rapid and recyclable adsorbent for anionic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengen; Chen, Zhenhua; Lv, Xinyan; Zhou, Kang; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Xiaohan; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2017-09-01

    Core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres (MSs) were prepared by a facile, one-pot method at room temperature. The adsorbent dosage and adsorption time of the obtained CaCO3 MSs were investigated. The results suggest that these CaCO3 MSs can rapidly and efficiently remove 99-100% of anionic dyes within the first 2 min. The obtained CaCO3 MSs have a high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (211.77 m2 g-1). In addition, the maximum adsorption capacity of the obtained CaCO3 MSs towards Congo red was 99.6 mg g-1. We also found that the core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs have a high recycling capability for removing dyes from water. Our results demonstrate that the prepared core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs can be used as an ideal, rapid, efficient and recyclable adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solution.

  7. Analysis of bacterial core communities in the central Baltic by comparative RNA-DNA-based fingerprinting provides links to structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettar, Ingrid; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-01-01

    Understanding structure-function links of microbial communities is a central theme of microbial ecology since its beginning. To this end, we studied the spatial variability of the bacterioplankton community structure and composition across the central Baltic Sea at four stations, which were up to 450 km apart and at a depth profile representative for the central part (Gotland Deep, 235 m). Bacterial community structure was followed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)- and 16S rRNA gene-based fingerprints using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis. Species composition was determined by sequence analysis of SSCP bands. High similarities of the bacterioplankton communities across several hundred kilometers were observed in the surface water using RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints. In these surface communities, the RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints resulted in very different pattern, presumably indicating large difference between the active members of the community as represented by RNA-based fingerprints and the present members represented by the DNA-based fingerprints. This large discrepancy changed gradually over depth, resulting in highly similar RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints in the anoxic part of the water column below 130 m depth. A conceivable mechanism explaining this high similarity could be the reduced oxidative stress in the anoxic zone. The stable communities on the surface and in the anoxic zone indicate the strong influence of the hydrography on the bacterioplankton community structure. Comparative analysis of RNA- and DNA-based community structure provided criteria for the identification of the core community, its key members and their links to biogeochemical functions.

  8. Structural and magnetic properties of CoO-Pt core-shell nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeleňáková, A.; Zeleňák, V.; Michalik, Štefan; Kováč, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 10 (2014), "104417-1"-"104417-10" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : CoO-Pt core shell nanoparticles * superparamagnetism * superspin glass state * x-ray diffraction * x-ray absorption spectroscopy Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  9. NUCORE - A system for nuclear structure calculations with cluster-core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, C.A.; Abecasis, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Calculation of nuclear energy levels and their electromagnetic properties, modelling the nucleus as a cluster of a few particles and/or holes interacting with a core which in turn is modelled as a quadrupole vibrator (cluster-phonon model). The members of the cluster interact via quadrupole-quadrupole and pairing forces. (orig.)

  10. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  11. GTfold: Enabling parallel RNA secondary structure prediction on multi-core desktops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swenson, M Shel; Anderson, Joshua; Ash, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    achieved significant improvements in runtime, but their implementations were not portable from niche high-performance computers or easily accessible to most RNA researchers. With the increasing prevalence of multi-core desktop machines, a new parallel prediction program is needed to take full advantage...

  12. Investigation on cored-eutectic structure in Ni60/WC composite coatings fabricated by wide-band laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qunshuang, E-mail: maqunshuang@126.com; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan, E-mail: jwang@sdu.edu.cn; Liu, Kun, E-mail: liu_kun@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Perfect composite coatings were fabricated using wide-band laser cladding. • Special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized in Ni60/WC composite coatings. • Cored-eutectic consists of hard carbide compounds and fine lamellar eutectic of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe). • Wear resistance of coating layer was significantly improved due to precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. - Abstract: Ni60 composite coatings reinforced with WC particles were fabricated on the surface of Q550 steel using LDF4000-100 fiber laser device. The wide-band laser and circular beam laser used in laser cladding were obtained by optical lens. Microstructure, elemental distribution, phase constitution and wear properties of different composite coatings were investigated. The results showed that WC particles were partly dissolved under the effect of wide-band fiber laser irradiation. A special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized due to dissolution of WC particles. According to EDS and XRD results, the inside cores were confirmed as carbides of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} enriched in Cr, W and Fe. These complex carbides were primarily separated out in the molten metal when solidification started. Eutectic structure composed of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe) grew around carbides when cooling. Element content of Cr and W is lower at the bottom of cladding layer. In consequence, the eutectic structure formed in this region did not have inside carbides. The coatings made by circular laser beam were composed of dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic carbides, lacking of block carbides. Compared to coatings made by circular laser spot, the cored-eutectic structure formed in wide-band coatings had advantages of well-distribution and tight binding with matrix. The uniform power density and energy distribution and the weak liquid convection in molten pool lead to the unique microstructure evolution in composite coatings made by wide-band laser

  13. Electrical Conductivity of Ni-YSZ Anode for SOFCs According to the Ni Powder Size Variations in Core-shell Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Jin; Jung, Sung-Hun; An, Yong-Tae; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Ji, Mi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Ni-YSZ (Y_2O_3-stabilized ZrO_2) core-shell structures were prepared by a high-speed mixing method, starting from Ni particles of three different average sizes of 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm. The Ni-YSZ core-shell structures prepared using Ni particles of size 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm exhibited dense core, porous core, and random-morphology core, respectively. Subsequently, nano structured cermet anodes were fabricated using the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders. During the formation of cermet, the heat treatment of Ni-YSZ core-shell powder results in the eruption of Ni core out of the YSZ shell layers, thereby facilitating the formation of nano structured Ni-YSZ cermet. Systematic studies indicated that the morphology and electrical conductivity of the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders and the cermet anode varied, depending on the initial particle size of the Ni particles. Of the different samples prepared in this study, the Ni-YSZ cermet prepared using Ni particles of size 0.4 μm showed the highest electrical conductivity at 750 ℃.

  14. Electrical Conductivity of Ni-YSZ Anode for SOFCs According to the Ni Powder Size Variations in Core-shell Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Jin; Jung, Sung-Hun; An, Yong-Tae; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Ji, Mi-Jung [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology (KICET), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Ni-YSZ (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}) core-shell structures were prepared by a high-speed mixing method, starting from Ni particles of three different average sizes of 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm. The Ni-YSZ core-shell structures prepared using Ni particles of size 0.2, 0.4, and 1.8 μm exhibited dense core, porous core, and random-morphology core, respectively. Subsequently, nano structured cermet anodes were fabricated using the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders. During the formation of cermet, the heat treatment of Ni-YSZ core-shell powder results in the eruption of Ni core out of the YSZ shell layers, thereby facilitating the formation of nano structured Ni-YSZ cermet. Systematic studies indicated that the morphology and electrical conductivity of the prepared Ni-YSZ core-shell powders and the cermet anode varied, depending on the initial particle size of the Ni particles. Of the different samples prepared in this study, the Ni-YSZ cermet prepared using Ni particles of size 0.4 μm showed the highest electrical conductivity at 750 ℃.

  15. Structure of a mushy layer under hypergravity with implications for Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Alboussière, Thierry; Bergman, Michael I.; Deguen, Renaud; Labrosse, Stéphane; Lesœur, Germain

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization experiments in the dendritic regime have been carried out in hypergravity conditions (from 1 to 1300 g) from an ammonium chloride solution (NH4Cl and H2O). A commercial centrifuge was equipped with a slip ring so that electric power (needed for a Peltier device and a heating element), temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. Ultrasound measurements (2-6 MHz) were used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. Temperature measurements were used to control a Peltier element extracting heat from the bottom of the setup and to monitor the evolution of crystallization in the mush and in the liquid. A significant increase of solid fraction and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core. This has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in

  16. Stable and High OSNR Compound Linear-Cavity Single-Longitudinal-Mode Erbium-Doped Silica Fiber Laser Based on an Asymmetric Four-Cavity Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Ting; Yan Feng-Ping; Li Qi; Peng Wan-Jing; Feng Su-Chun; Wen Xiao-Dong; Tan Si-Yu; Liu Peng

    2012-01-01

    We propose a stable and high optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) compound linear-cavity single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped silica fiber laser. It consists of three uniform fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and two fiber couplers to form a simple asymmetric four-cavity structure to select the longitudinal mode. The stable SLM operation at the wavelength of 1544.053 nm with a 3 dB bandwidth of 0.014 nm and an OSNR of ∼60 dB was verified experimentally. Under laboratory conditions, a power fluctuation performance of less than 0.05 dB for 5 h and wavelength variation of less than 0.01 nm for about 150 min is demonstrated. Finally, the characteristic of laser output power as a function of pump power is investigated. The proposed system provides a simple and cost-effective approach to realize a stable SLM fiber laser

  17. Geometric and electronic structures of boron(III)-cored dyes tailored by incorporation of heteroatoms into ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Xinyang; Qiu, Feng; Xue, Minzhao; Tregnago, Giulia; Cacialli, Franco; Osella, Silvio; Beljonne, David; Feng, Xinliang

    2015-03-01

    Complexation of a boron atom with a series of bidentate heterocyclic ligands successfully gives rise to corresponding BF2-chelated heteroarenes, which could be considered as novel boron(III)-cored dyes. These dye molecules exhibit planar structures and expanded π-conjugated backbones due to the locked conformation with a boron center. The geometric and electronic structures of these BF2 complexes can be tailored by embedding heteroatoms in the unique modes to form positional isomer and isoelectronic structures. The structure-property relationship is further elucidated by studying the photophysical properties, electrochemical behavior and quantum-chemical calculations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fabrication of Graded Porous and Skin-Core Structure RDX-Based Propellants via Supercritical CO2 Concentration Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weitao; Li, Yuxiang; Ying, Sanjiu

    2015-04-01

    A fabrication process to produce graded porous and skin-core structure propellants via supercritical CO2 concentration profile is reported in this article. It utilizes a partial gas saturation technique to obtain nonequilibrium gas concentration profiles in propellants. Once foamed, the propellant obtains a graded porous or skin-pore structure. This fabrication method was studied with RDX(Hexogen)-based propellant under an SC-CO2 saturation condition. The principle was analyzed and the one-dimensional diffusion model was employed to estimate the gas diffusion coefficient and to predict the gas concentration profiles inside the propellant. Scanning electron microscopy images were used to analyze the effects of partial saturation on the inner structure. The results also suggested that the sorption time and desorption time played an important role in gas profile generation and controlled the inner structure of propellants.

  19. Au@Pd core-shell nanobricks with concave structures and their catalysis of ethanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjin; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Shengchun; Ding, Bingjun; Song, Xiaoping

    2013-10-01

    Au@Pd core-shell nanobricks (CNBs) with concave surfaces and Pd shells with a thickness of approximately 5 nm were synthesized by co-reduction of HAuCl4 and H2 PdCl4 in the presence of Au seeds and Ag ions. These as-synthesized concave CNBs exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity for the electrooxidation of ethanol in alkaline media compared to the commercially-used Pd black. The improved performance of the Au@Pd CNBs can be attributed to the exposed stepped surfaces, high-index facets, and the synergistic effects of the core and shell metals. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Nonlinear seismic analysis of a reactor structure with impact between core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The seismic analysis of the FFTF-PIOTA (Fast Flux Test Facility-Postirradiation Open Test Assembly), subjected to a horizontal DBE (Design Base Earthquake) is presented. The PIOTA is the first in a set of open test assemblies to be designed for the FFTF. Employing the direct method of transient analysis, the governing differential equations describing the motion of the system are set up directly and are implicitly integrated numerically in time. A simple lumped-mass beam model of the FFTF which includes small clearances between core components is used as a ''driver'' for a fine mesh model of the PIOTA. The nonlinear forces due to the impact of the core components and their effect on the PIOTA are computed. 6 references

  1. Characterization of HCoV-229E fusion core: Implications for structure basis of coronavirus membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Cheng; Feng Youjun; Gao Feng; Zhang Qiangmin; Wang Ming

    2006-01-01

    Human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E), a member of group I coronaviruses, has been identified as one of the major viral agents causing respiratory tract diseases in humans for nearly 40 years. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of the membrane fusion mediated by the spike (S) protein of HCoV-229E remains elusive. Here, we report, for the first time, a rationally designed fusion core of HCoV-229E (HR1-SGGRGG-HR2), which was in vitro produced in GST prokaryotic expression system. Multiple lines of experimental data including gel-filtration, chemical cross-linking, and circular diagram (CD) demonstrated that the HCoV-229E fusion core possesses the typical properties of the trimer of coiled-coil heterodimer (six α-helix bundle). 3D structure modeling presents its most-likely structure, similar to those of coronaviruses that have been well-documented. Collectively, HCoV-229E S protein belongs to the type I fusion protein, which is characterized by the existence of two heptad-repeat regions (HR1 and HR2), furthermore, the available knowledge concerning HCoV-229E fusion core may make it possible to design small molecule or polypeptide drugs targeting the membrane fusion, a crucial step of HCoV-229E infection

  2. Structure and Filling Characteristics of Paleokarst Reservoirs in the Northern Tarim Basin, Revealed by Outcrop, Core and Borehole Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Fei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ordovician paleokarst reservoirs in the Tahe oilfield, with burial depths of over 5300 m, experienced multiple phases of geologic processes and exhibit strong heterogeneity. Core testing can be used to analyse the characteristics of typical points at the centimetre scale, and seismic datasets can reveal the macroscopic outlines of reservoirs at the >10-m scale. However, neither method can identify caves, cave fills and fractures at the meter scale. Guided by outcrop investigations and calibrations based on core sample observations, this paper describes the interpretation of high longitudinal resolution borehole images, the identification of the characteristics of caves, cave fills (sedimentary, breccia and chemical fills and fractures in single wells, and the identification of structures and fill characteristics at the meter scale in the strongly heterogeneous paleokarst reservoirs. The paleogeomorphology, a major controlling factor in the distribution of paleokarst reservoirs, was also analysed. The results show that one well can penetrate multiple cave layers of various sizes and that the caves are filled with multiple types of fill. The paleogeomorphology can be divided into highlands, slopes and depressions, which controlled the structure and fill characteristics of the paleokarst reservoirs. The results of this study can provide fundamental meter-scale datasets for interpreting detailed geologic features of deeply buried paleocaves, can be used to connect core- and seismic-scale interpretations, and can provide support for the recognition and development of these strongly heterogeneous reservoirs.

  3. Core@shell@shell structured carbon-based magnetic ternary nanohybrids: Synthesis and their enhanced microwave absorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Erqi; Qi, Xiaosi; Xie, Ren; Bai, Zhongchen; Jiang, Yang; Qin, Shuijie; Zhong, Wei; Du, Youwei

    2018-05-01

    High encapsulation efficiency of core@shell@shell structured carbon-based magnetic ternary nanohybrids have been synthesized in high yield by chemical vapor deposition of acetylene directly over octahedral-shaped Fe2O3 nanoparticles. By controlling the pyrolysis temperature, Fe3O4@Fe3C@carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Fe@Fe3C@CNTs ternary nanohybrids could be selectively produced. The optimal RL values for the as-prepared ternary nanohybrids could reach up to ca. -46.7, -52.7 and -29.5 dB, respectively. The excellent microwave absorption properties of the obtaiend ternary nanohybrids were proved to ascribe to the quarter-wavelength matching model. Moreover, the as-prepared Fe@Fe3C@CNTs ternary nanohybrids displayed remarkably enhanced EM wave absorption capabilities compared to Fe3O4@Fe3C@CNTs due to their excellent dielectric loss abilities, good complementarities between the dielectric loss and the magnetic loss, and high attenuation constant. Generally, this strategy can be extended to explore other categories of core@shell or core@shell@shell structured carbon-based nanohybrids, which is very beneficial to accelerate the advancements of high performance MAMs.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and nitrite ion sensing performance of reclaimable composite samples through a core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Yuqing, Zhao; Cui, Jiantao; Zheng, Qian; Bo, Wang

    2018-02-01

    The following paper reported and discussed a nitrite ion optical sensing platform based on a core-shell structure, using superamagnetic nanoparticles as the core, a silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as the shell and two rhodamine derivatives as probe, respectively. This superamagnetic core made this sensing platform reclaimable after finishing nitrite ion sensing procedure. This sensing platform was carefully characterized by means of electron microscopy images, porous structure analysis, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermal stability analysis. Detailed analysis suggested that the emission of these composite samples was quenchable by nitrite ion, showing emission turn off effect. A static sensing mechanism based on an additive reaction between chemosensors and nitrite ion was proposed. These composite samples followed Demas quenching equation against different nitrite ion concentrations. Limit of detection value was obtained as low as 0.4 μM. It was found that, after being quenched by nitrite ion, these composite samples could be reclaimed and recovered by sulphamic acid, confirming their recyclability.

  5. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  6. Nuclear structure calculations in $^{20}$Ne with No-Core Configuration-Interaction model

    OpenAIRE

    Konieczka, Maciej; Satuła, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Negative parity states in $^{20}$Ne and Gamow-Teller strength distribution for the ground-state beta-decay of $^{20}$Na are calculated for the very first time using recently developed No-Core Configuration-Interaction model. The approach is based on multi-reference density functional theory involving isospin and angular-momentum projections. Advantages and shortcomings of the method are briefly discussed.

  7. Surface, core, and structure modifications of phosphorus-containing dendrimers. Influence on the thermal stability

    OpenAIRE

    Turrin , Cédric-Olivier; Maraval , Valérie; Leclaire , Julien; Dantras , Eric; Lacabanne , Colette; Caminade , Anne-Marie; Majoral , Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    International audience; Three new series of phosphorus-containing dendrimers are described. Their solubility depends on the type of end groups they bear. Perfluoroalkyl chains give dendrimers soluble in chlorofluorocarbons, whereas guanidinium and pyridinium derivatives give watersoluble compounds. The thermal stability of these compounds, as well as of 19 other dendrimers of various generations, having various cores, or various end groups, or branching points is studied. The main feature of ...

  8. Thermal interactions of a molten core debris pool with surrounding structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, L. Jr.; Cheung, F.B.; Farhadieh, R.; Stein, R.P.; Gabor, J.D.; Bingle, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results on individual aspects of the overall problem of the interaction of a large mass of LMFBR core debris with concrete or other materials are reviewed. Results of recent heat transfer experiments with molten UO 2 have indicated the importance of internal thermal radiation and methods to take account of this are developed. Effects of gas release and density difference are considered. The GROWS-2 Code is used to illustrate the effects of various assumptions

  9. Facile synthesis of 3D few-layered MoS2 coated TiO2 nanosheet core-shell nanostructures for stable and high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Zhao, Naiqin; Guo, Lichao; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Li, Jiajun; Liu, Enzuo

    2015-07-01

    Uniform transition metal sulfide deposition on a smooth TiO2 surface to form a coating structure is a well-known challenge, caused mainly due to their poor affinities. Herein, we report a facile strategy for fabricating mesoporous 3D few-layered (glucose as a binder. The core-shell structure has been systematically examined and corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. It is found that the resultant 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2 as a lithium-ion battery anode delivers an outstanding high-rate capability with an excellent cycling performance, relating to the unique structure of 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2. The 3D uniform coverage of few-layered (glucose as a binder. The core-shell structure has been systematically examined and corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. It is found that the resultant 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2 as a lithium-ion battery anode delivers an outstanding high-rate capability with an excellent cycling performance, relating to the unique structure of 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2. The 3D uniform coverage of few-layered (<4 layers) MoS2 onto the TiO2 can remarkably enhance the structure stability and effectively shortens the transfer paths of both lithium ions and electrons, while the strong synergistic effect between MoS2 and TiO2 can significantly facilitate the transport of ions and electrons across the interfaces, especially in the high-rate charge-discharge process. Moreover, the facile fabrication strategy can be easily extended to design other oxide/carbon-sulfide/oxide core-shell materials for extensive applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary SEM, TEM, XPS and EIS analyses. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03334a

  10. Plasma-assisted synthesis and study of structural and magnetic properties of Fe/C core shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, K. P.; Ranot, M.; Choi, C. J.; Kim, H. S.; Chung, K. C.

    2017-07-01

    Pure and carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles with an average diameter of 25 nm were synthesized by using the DC plasma arc discharge method. Fe core nanoparticles were encapsulated with carbon layer, which is acting as protection layer against both oxidation and chemical reaction. The morphology and the Fe/C core/shell structure of the nanoparticles were studied by using field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The x-ray diffraction study showed that the α-Fe phase exists with γ-Fe as an impurity. The studied samples have been interrelated with the variation of saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization and coercive field with the amount of carbon coating. The pure α-Fe sample shows saturation magnetization = 172 emu/g, and coercive field = 150 Oe, on the other hand few layer carbon coated α-Fe sample shows saturation magnetization =169 emu/g with higher coercive field 398 Oe.

  11. Core structure and dynamics of non-Abelian vortices in a biaxial nematic spinor Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgh, Magnus O.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that multiple interaction-dependent defect core structures as well as dynamics of non-Abelian vortices can be realized in the biaxial nematic (BN) phase of a spin-2 atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). An experimentally simple protocol may be used to break degeneracy with the uniaxial nematic phase. We show that a discrete spin-space symmetry in the core may be reflected in a breaking of its spatial symmetry. The discrete symmetry of the BN order parameter leads to non-commuting vortex charges. We numerically simulate reconnection of non-Abelian vortices, demonstrating formation of the obligatory rung vortex. In addition to atomic BECs, non-Abelian vortices are theorized in, e.g., liquid crystals and cosmic strings. Our results suggest the BN spin-2 BEC as a prime candidate for their realization. We acknowledge financial support from the EPSRC.

  12. Research on dual-parameter optical fiber sensor based on thin-core fiber and spherical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhengrong; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Weihua; Xue, Lifang

    2018-04-01

    A novel dual-parameter optical fiber sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed sensor is based on a fiber in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which is fabricated by sandwiching a section of thin-core fiber between two spherical structures made of single-mode fibers. The transmission spectrum exhibits the response of the interference between the core and the different cladding modes. Due to the different wavelength shifts of the two selected dips, the simultaneous measurement of temperature and the surrounding refractive index can be achieved. The measured temperature sensitivities are 0.067 nm/°C and 0.050 nm/°C, and the refractive index sensitivities are  -119.9 nm/RIU and  -69.71 nm/RIU, respectively. In addition, the compact size, simple fabrication and cost-effectiveness of the fiber sensor are also advantages.

  13. Facile synthesis of core-shell Cu2O@ ZnO structure with enhanced photocatalytic H2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Hui; Jiu, Bei-Bei; Gong, Fei-Long; Lu, Kuan; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Hao-Li; Chen, Jun-Li

    2018-05-01

    Core-shell Cu2O@ZnO composites were synthesized successfully based on a one-pot hydrothermal method in the presence of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) surfactant. The Cu2O can be converted to rough core-shell Cu2O@ZnO structure by adjusting the amount of zinc powder added. The as-synthesized Cu2O@ZnO composites exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity and the amount of H2 generated using these composites was 4.5-fold more than that produced with Cu2O cubes. A possible photocatalytic mechanism for the Cu2O@ZnO composites with enhanced photocatalytic activity could be the separation by ZnO of the effective charge carriers.

  14. Plasma-assisted synthesis and study of structural and magnetic properties of Fe/C core shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Shinde

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pure and carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles with an average diameter of 25 nm were synthesized by using the DC plasma arc discharge method. Fe core nanoparticles were encapsulated with carbon layer, which is acting as protection layer against both oxidation and chemical reaction. The morphology and the Fe/C core/shell structure of the nanoparticles were studied by using field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The x-ray diffraction study showed that the α-Fe phase exists with γ-Fe as an impurity. The studied samples have been interrelated with the variation of saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization and coercive field with the amount of carbon coating. The pure α-Fe sample shows saturation magnetization = 172 emu/g, and coercive field = 150 Oe, on the other hand few layer carbon coated α-Fe sample shows saturation magnetization =169 emu/g with higher coercive field 398 Oe.

  15. Geometry of the Nojima fault at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan - I. A simple damage structure inferred from borehole core permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, David A.; Tanaka, Hidemi; Ito, Hisao; Ikeda, Ryuji; Omura, Kentaro; Naka, Hisanobu

    2009-01-01

    The 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-ken Nanbu) earthquake, M = 7.2, ruptured the Nojima fault in southwest Japan. We have studied core samples taken from two scientific drillholes that crossed the fault zone SW of the epicentral region on Awaji Island. The shallower hole, drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ), was started 75 m to the SE of the surface trace of the Nojima fault and crossed the fault at a depth of 624 m. A deeper hole, drilled by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) was started 302 m to the SE of the fault and crossed fault strands below a depth of 1140 m. We have measured strength and matrix permeability of core samples taken from these two drillholes. We find a strong correlation between permeability and proximity to the fault zone shear axes. The half-width of the high permeability zone (approximately 15 to 25 m) is in good agreement with the fault zone width inferred from trapped seismic wave analysis and other evidence. The fault zone core or shear axis contains clays with permeabilities of approximately 0.1 to 1 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (10 to 30 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Within a few meters of the fault zone core, the rock is highly fractured but has sustained little net shear. Matrix permeability of this zone is approximately 30 to 60 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (300 to 1000 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Outside this damage zone, matrix permeability drops below 0.01 microdarcy. The clay-rich core material has the lowest strength with a coefficient of friction of approximately 0.55. Shear strength increases with distance from the shear axis. These permeability and strength observations reveal a simple fault zone structure with a relatively weak fine-grained core surrounded by a damage zone of fractured rock. In this case, the damage zone will act as a high-permeability conduit for vertical and horizontal flow in the plane of the

  16. Construction of 3D Arrays of Cylindrically Hierarchical Structures with ZnO Nanorods Hydrothermally Synthesized on Optical Fiber Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixuan Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With ZnO nanorods hydrothermally synthesized on manually assembled arrays of optical fiber cores, 3D arrays of ZnO nanorod-based cylindrically hierarchical structures with nominal pitch 250 μm or 375 μm were constructed. Based on micrographs of scanning electron microscopy and image processing operators of MATLAB software, the 3D arrays of cylindrically hierarchical structures were quantitatively characterized. The values of the actual diameters, the actual pitches, and the parallelism errors suggest that the process capability of the manual assembling is sufficient and the quality of the 3D arrays of cylindrically hierarchical structures is acceptable. The values of the characteristic parameters such as roughness, skewness, kurtosis, correlation length, and power spectrum density show that the surface morphologies of the cylindrically hierarchical structures not only were affected significantly by Zn2+ concentration of the growth solution but also were anisotropic due to different curvature radii of the optical fiber core at side and front view.

  17. Time-efficient simulations of tight-binding electronic structures with Intel Xeon PhiTM many-core processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hoon; Jeong, Yosang; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Cho, Kyu Nam

    2016-12-01

    Modelling of multi-million atomic semiconductor structures is important as it not only predicts properties of physically realizable novel materials, but can accelerate advanced device designs. This work elaborates a new Technology-Computer-Aided-Design (TCAD) tool for nanoelectronics modelling, which uses a sp3d5s∗ tight-binding approach to describe multi-million atomic structures, and simulate electronic structures with high performance computing (HPC), including atomic effects such as alloy and dopant disorders. Being named as Quantum simulation tool for Advanced Nanoscale Devices (Q-AND), the tool shows nice scalability on traditional multi-core HPC clusters implying the strong capability of large-scale electronic structure simulations, particularly with remarkable performance enhancement on latest clusters of Intel Xeon PhiTM coprocessors. A review of the recent modelling study conducted to understand an experimental work of highly phosphorus-doped silicon nanowires, is presented to demonstrate the utility of Q-AND. Having been developed via Intel Parallel Computing Center project, Q-AND will be open to public to establish a sound framework of nanoelectronics modelling with advanced HPC clusters of a many-core base. With details of the development methodology and exemplary study of dopant electronics, this work will present a practical guideline for TCAD development to researchers in the field of computational nanoelectronics.

  18. Ultrasonic assisted rapid synthesis of high uniform super-paramagnetic microspheres with core-shell structure and robust magneto-chromatic ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenyan, E-mail: wiseyanyan@jit.edu.cn [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of technology, Nanjing (China); Chen, Jiahua [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of technology, Nanjing (China); Wang, Wei [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Inorganic Function Composites, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing (China); Lu, GongXuan [State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Hao, Lingyun [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of technology, Nanjing (China); Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Inorganic Function Composites, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Super-paramagnetic core-shell microspheres were synthesized by ultrasonic assisted routine under low ultrasonic irradiation powers. Compared with conventional routine, ultrasonic effect could not only improve the uniformity of the core-shell structure of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}, but shorten the synthesis time in large scale. Owing to their hydrophilicity and high surface charge, the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} microspheres could be dispersed well in distilled water to form homogeneous colloidal suspension. The suspensions have favorable magneto-chromatic ability that they sensitively exhibit brilliant colorful ribbons by magnetic attraction. The colorful ribbons, which distributed along the magnetic lines, make morphology of the magnetic fields become “visible” to naked eyed. Those colorful ribbons originate from strong magnetic interaction between the microspheres and magnetic fields. Furthermore, the magneto-chromatic performance is reversible as the colorful ribbons vanished rapidly with the removing of magnetic fields. The silica layer effectively enhanced the acid resistance and surface-oxidation resistance of theFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} microspheres, so they could exhibit stable magnetic nature and robust magneto-chromatic property in acid environment. - Graphical abstract: The Graphical abstract shows the sensitive magneto-chromatic ability, the acid resistance ability as well as the magneto-chromatic mechanism of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} suspension. - Highlights: • Sensitive and reversible robust magneto-chromatic property under magnetic attraction. • Morphology of magnetic field “visible” to naked eyes. • Enhance acid resistance and surface-oxidation resistance. • Ultrasonic effect largely shorten the synthesis time of high uniform microspheres.

  19. Ultrasonic assisted rapid synthesis of high uniform super-paramagnetic microspheres with core-shell structure and robust magneto-chromatic ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenyan; Chen, Jiahua; Wang, Wei; Lu, GongXuan; Hao, Lingyun; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2017-01-01

    Super-paramagnetic core-shell microspheres were synthesized by ultrasonic assisted routine under low ultrasonic irradiation powers. Compared with conventional routine, ultrasonic effect could not only improve the uniformity of the core-shell structure of Fe_3O_4@SiO_2, but shorten the synthesis time in large scale. Owing to their hydrophilicity and high surface charge, the Fe_3O_4@SiO_2 microspheres could be dispersed well in distilled water to form homogeneous colloidal suspension. The suspensions have favorable magneto-chromatic ability that they sensitively exhibit brilliant colorful ribbons by magnetic attraction. The colorful ribbons, which distributed along the magnetic lines, make morphology of the magnetic fields become “visible” to naked eyed. Those colorful ribbons originate from strong magnetic interaction between the microspheres and magnetic fields. Furthermore, the magneto-chromatic performance is reversible as the colorful ribbons vanished rapidly with the removing of magnetic fields. The silica layer effectively enhanced the acid resistance and surface-oxidation resistance of theFe_3O_4@SiO_2 microspheres, so they could exhibit stable magnetic nature and robust magneto-chromatic property in acid environment. - Graphical abstract: The Graphical abstract shows the sensitive magneto-chromatic ability, the acid resistance ability as well as the magneto-chromatic mechanism of the Fe_3O_4 and Fe_3O_4@SiO_2 suspension. - Highlights: • Sensitive and reversible robust magneto-chromatic property under magnetic attraction. • Morphology of magnetic field “visible” to naked eyes. • Enhance acid resistance and surface-oxidation resistance. • Ultrasonic effect largely shorten the synthesis time of high uniform microspheres.