WorldWideScience

Sample records for stable complexation ratio

  1. Calculation of equilibrium stable isotope partition function ratios for aqueous zinc complexes and metallic zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Kavner, Abby; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this study is to determine reduced partition function ratios for a variety of species of zinc, both as a metal and in aqueous solutions in order to calculate equilibrium stable isotope partitioning. We present calculations of the magnitude of Zn stable-isotope fractionation ( 66,67,68Zn/ 64Zn) between aqueous species and metallic zinc using measured vibrational spectra (fit from neutron scattering studies of metallic zinc) and a variety of electronic structure models. The results show that the reduced metal, Zn(0), will be light in equilibrium with oxidized Zn(II) aqueous species, with the best estimates for the Zn(II)-Zn(0) fractionation between hexaquo species and metallic zinc being Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 1.6‰ at 25 °C, and Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 0.8‰ between the tetrachloro zinc complex and metallic zinc at 25 °C using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and basis set. To examine the behavior of zinc in various aqueous solution chemistries, models for Zn(II) complex speciation were used to determine which species are thermodynamically favorable and abundant under a variety of different conditions relevant to natural waters, experimental and industrial solutions. The optimal molecular geometries for [Zn(H 2O) 6] 2+, [Zn(H 2O) 6]·SO 4, [ZnCl 4] 2- and [Zn(H 2O) 3(C 3H 5O(COO) 3)] - complexes in various states of solvation, protonation and coordination were calculated at various levels of electronic structure theory and basis set size. Isotopic reduced partition function ratios were calculated from frequency analyses of these optimized structures. Increasing the basis set size typically led to a decrease in the calculated reduced partition function ratios of ˜0.5‰ with values approaching a plateau using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set or larger. The widest range of species were studied at the B3LYP/LAN2DZ/6-31G ∗ level of theory and basis-set size for comparison. Aqueous zinc complexes where oxygen is bound to the metal center tended to have the

  2. Stable Isotope Ratios as Biomarkers of Diet for Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    Diet is a leading modifiable risk factor for chronic disease, but it remains difficult to measure accurately due to the error and bias inherent in self-reported methods of diet assessment. Consequently, there is a pressing need for more objective biomarkers of diet for use in health research. The stable isotope ratios of light elements are a promising set of candidate biomarkers because they vary naturally and reproducibly among foods, and those variations are captured in molecules and tissues with high fidelity. Recent studies have identified valid isotopic measures of short- and long-term sugar intake, meat intake, and fish intake in specific populations. These studies provide a strong foundation for validating stable isotopic biomarkers in the general US population. Approaches to improve specificity for specific foods are needed; for example, by modeling intake using multiple stable isotope ratios or by isolating and measuring specific molecules linked to foods of interest.

  3. Stable Isotope Ratios as Biomarkers of Diet for Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Diane M.

    2016-01-01

    Diet is a leading modifiable risk factor for chronic disease, but it remains difficult to measure accurately due to the error and bias inherent in self-reported methods of diet assessment. Consequently there is a pressing need for more objective biomarkers of diet for use in health research. The stable isotope ratios of light elements are a promising set of candidate biomarkers because they vary naturally and reproducibly among foods, and those variations are captured in molecules and tissues with high fidelity. Recent studies have identified valid isotopic measures of short and long-term sugar intake, meat intake, and fish intake in specific populations. These studies provide a strong foundation for validating stable isotopic biomarkers in the general United States population. Approaches to improve specificity for specific foods are needed, for example, by modeling intake using multiple stable isotope ratios, or by isolating and measuring specific molecules linked to foods of interest. PMID:26048703

  4. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Appenzeller

    Full Text Available Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  5. Stable isotope analysis of white paints and likelihood ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, N; Meier-Augenstein, W; Lucy, D

    2009-06-01

    Architectural paints are commonly found as trace evidence at scenes of crime. Currently the most widely used technique for the analysis of architectural paints is Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). There are, however, limitations to the forensic analysis of white paints, and the ability to discriminate between samples. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been investigated as a potential tool for the analysis of architectural white paints, where no preparation of samples prior to analysis is required. When stable isotope profiles (SIPs) are compared, there appears to be no relationship between paints from the same manufacturer, or between paints of the same type. Unlike existing techniques, IRMS does not differentiate resin samples solely on the basis of modifier or oil-type, but exploits additional factors linked to samples such as geo-location where oils added to alkyd formulations were grown. In combination with the use of likelihood ratios, IRMS shows potential, with a false positive rate of 2.6% from a total of 1275 comparisons.

  6. Variation in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in flight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bellied Sunbird to assess the value of using stable isotopes of feathers in avian dietary studies. Significant variation in δ13C and δ15N isotope values of flight feathers (range = 3.1‰ and 2.7‰, respectively) indicated that the source of carbon (i.e. ...

  7. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , the tuples of cohomology classes on a compact, complex manifold, corresponding to the Chern classes of a complex vector bundle of stable rank. This classification becomes more effective on generalized flag manifolds, where the Lie ...

  8. Stable Isotope Ratio Measurement by NAA for Environmental Source Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gone, Jeckong; Olmez, Ilhan; Ames, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of applying neutron activation analysis to the study of isotopic ratios is to examine whether ratios could be measured that are difficult to determine by other means and that could be used to distinguish between materials from different types of sources. The NAA is a sensitive analytical method for many elements that are typically present in levels too low to measure by other techniques, and because NAA is based on nuclear rather than chemical or physical reactions, the analytical signals from the two isotopes are readily distinguishable

  9. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  10. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Bot, A.; Mirel, V.

    2013-01-01

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ 13 C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures

  11. Stable isotope ratio determination of the origin of vanillin in vanilla extracts and its relationship to vanillin/potassium ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.E.; Alfonso, F.C.; Figert, D.M.; Burggraff, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for isolating vanillin from vanilla extract, followed by stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the amount of natural vanillin contained in adulterated vanilla extracts. After the potassium content is determined, the percent Madagascar and/or Java vanilla beans incorporated into the extract may then be approximated from the vanillin/potassium ratio

  12. Applications of stable Isotope ratios determinations in fruit juice authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdas, Dana Alina; Dehelean, Adriana; Voica, Cezara; Puscas, Romulus

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Adulteration of a product consists in making it impure by fraudulent addition of a foreign or inferior substance. The result is either an alteration of the product and of its quality or a falsification. The falsification is a voluntary act with the intention of abuse. The falsification may be more or less sophisticated and its sophistication as well as its costs increases with the improvement of analytical methods. Vacuum concentration with aroma does not affect the chemical composition of fruit juices and therefore the determination of deuterium (D) and oxygen-18 content in waters is the most confident procedure for differentiating between a natural single strength juice and a juice rediluted from a concentrate. This technique is based on the fact that when absorbed by a plant, the rainwater or the irrigation water is fractionated by evapotranspiration, and enriched in the heavy isotopes (deuterium and oxygen-18) with respect to the light isotope (hydrogen and oxygen-16, respectively). It is known that climatic conditions affect the isotope content of rain waters and therefore that of fruit juices waters: the warmer climate, the higher the deuterium and oxygen-18 contents in water. Rainwater and tap water have nearly the same isotopic content and the water of fruit juices derived from concentrate by dilution with tap water has an isotopic content close to that of tap water. This makes it easy to distinguish diluted concentrates from the isotopically more enriched water of authentic single strength juice. In this study, single strength juice, in Romanian fruits, were investigated by mean of stable isotope measurements (oxygen, hydrogen and carbon) in order to offer a discussion basis for the authenticity of some fruit juices currently available on Romanian market. (authors)

  13. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  14. Insights into Wilson's Warbler migration from analyses of hydrogen stable-isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey F. Kelly; Viorel Atudorei; Zachary D. Sharp; Deborah M. Finch

    2002-01-01

    Our ability to link the breeding locations of individual passerines to migration stopover sites and wintering locations is limited. Stable isotopes of hydrogen contained in bird feathers have recently shown potential in this regard. We measured hydrogen stable-isotope ratios (deltaD) of feathers from breeding, migrating, and wintering Wilson's Warblers. Analyses...

  15. Stable isotope ratios and reforestation potential in Acacia koa populations on Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneka Lawson; Carrie Pike

    2017-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes can be influenced by a multitude of factors including elevation, precipitation rate, season, and temperature. This work examined variability in foliar stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios of koa (Acacia koa) across 17 sites on Hawai'i Island, delineated by elevation and precipitation...

  16. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  17. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry in forensic science and food adulteration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.

    2009-01-01

    Stable Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (SIRMS) is an established technique for the determination of origin of geological, biological, chemical and physio-chemical samples/materials. With the development of highly precise mass spectrometers, the stable isotope ratio determination of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen have gained considerable interest in the fields of forensic science and food authentication. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of lighter elements occur due to fractionation effects, resulting in the finger printing of specific isotope ratio values that are characteristic of the origin, purity, and manufacturing processes of the products and their constituents. Forensic science uses scientific and technical methods to investigate traceable evidence of criminal acts. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry has been applied to numerous aspects of the forensic science. The analysis of explosives such as ammonium nitrate, gun powder and tri-nitro-toluene (TNT), cases of murder, armed robbery, drug smuggling, terrorism, arson and hit and run traffic accidents are a few of them. The main types of geological evidences in such cases are mud, soil, rocks, sand, gravel, dust particles, biological materials, organic particles and anthropogenic components. Stable isotopes are used as tools to corroborate and confirm the evidential leads in the investigation of such crimes. The variation in natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic ratios δ 13 C and δ 15 N can identify links between items found at crime scene with those of suspect. The paper discusses the applications of SIRMS in the field of forensic science and food adulteration research

  18. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper, we study the classification of stable-rank bundles on some compact complex manifolds. First, we extend ... below the results obtained in this case (see Propositions 4.1–4.3 and Theorems 5.1–5.3 for .... In order to prove the converse inclusion, let (c1,...,cp+1) be a (p + 1)-tuple of coho- mology classes ...

  19. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a classification of all rank r complex vector bundles on X, for stable rank r ≥ n/2. A few partial answers to this question are known. For instance, a classical result of. Wu asserts that any couple of cohomology classes (c1,c2) ∈ H2(X, Z) × H4(X, Z) coincides with c(E) for a vector bundle E, on a basis X of dimension less than ...

  20. Association between Nitrogen Stable Isotope Ratios in Human Hair and Serum Levels of Leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Song Vogue; Koh, Sang-Baek; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Bong, Yeon-Sik; Park, Jong-Ku

    2017-10-01

    Stable isotope ratios have been reported to be potential biomarkers of dietary intake and nutritional status. High serum levels of leptin, a hormone which regulates energy metabolism and food intake, are associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about the association between stable isotope ratios and the metabolic risk in humans. We investigated whether the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in hair are associated with serum leptin levels. Hair samples were collected from 399 healthy adults (233 men and 166 women) aged 40 to 70 years of a community-based cohort in Korea and the bulk stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N) were measured for all hair samples. Serum leptin levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. δ 15 N showed positive correlations with serum leptin levels. In multivariate models, increasing δ 15 N were associated with elevated serum leptin levels (defined as ≥ the median values), whereas δ 13 C were not significantly associated with serum leptin levels. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) per 1‰ increase in δ 15 N for an elevated serum leptin level was 1.58 (1.11-2.26). In participants with high body mass index, δ 15 N showed positive associations with serum leptin levels, whereas these associations were not seen in participants with low body mass index. The nitrogen stable isotopic ratio in hair is positively associated with serum leptin levels. The hair δ 15 N could be used as a clinical marker to estimate metabolic risk.

  1. Post-innermost stable circular orbit ringdown amplitudes in extreme mass ratio inspiral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadar, Shahar; Kol, Barak

    2011-01-01

    An extreme mass ratio inspiral consists of two parts: adiabatic inspiral and plunge. The plunge trajectory from the innermost stable circular orbit is special (somewhat independent of initial conditions). We write an expression for its solution in closedform and for the emitted waveform. In particular we extract an expression for the associated black-hole ringdown amplitudes, and evaluate them numerically.

  2. Influence of forest disturbance on stable nitrogen isotope ratios in soil and vegetation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer D. Knoepp; Scott R. Taylor; Lindsay R. Boring; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2015-01-01

    Soil and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratios (15 N) are influenced by atmospheric nitrogen (N) inputs and processes that regulate organic matter (OM) transformation and N cycling. The resulting 15N patterns may be useful for discerning ecosystem differences in N cycling. We studied two ecosystems; longleaf pine wiregrass (...

  3. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Otoliths Differentiate Winter Flounder (Pseudopleuonectes americanus) Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios were measured in otoliths of juvenile winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) collected from 18 nursery areas along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. Samples were obtained during June and July of 2002 from locations tha...

  4. Stable isotape ratios of H, C, N an O in Italian citrus juices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontempo, L.; Caruso, R.; Fiorillo, M.; Gambino, G.L.; Perini, M.; Simoni, M.; Traulo, P.; Wehrens, H.R.M.J.; Gagliano, G.; Camin, F.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios (SIRs) of C, N, H and O have been exensively used in fruit juices quality control (ENV and AOAC methods) to detect added sugar and the watering down of concentrated juice, practices prohibited by European legislation (EU Directive 2012/12). The European Fruit Juice Association

  5. Seasonal Sex Ratio Trend in the European Kestrel : An Evolutionarily Stable Strategy Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pen, I.R.; Weissing, F.J.; Daan, S.

    We present an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) model to analyze selection on seasonal variation in the brood sex ratio, as observed in several species of raptorial birds. The model is specifically tailored to the life history of the European kestrel, and it reflects the maturation time

  6. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

  7. Stable isotope ratio method for the characterisation of the poultry house environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipitytė, Raminta; Mašalaitė, Agnė; Garbaras, Andrius; Mickienė, Rūta; Ragažinskienė, Ona; Baliukonienė, Violeta; Bakutis, Bronius; Šiugždaitė, Jūratė; Petkevičius, Saulius; Maruška, Audrius Sigitas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2017-06-01

    Stable isotope analysis was applied to describe the poultry house environment. The poultry house indoor environment was selected for this study due to the relevant health problems in animals and their caretakers. Air quality parameters including temperature, relative humidity, airflow rate, NH 3 , CO 2 and total suspended particles, as well as mean levels of total airborne bacteria and fungi count, were measured. Carbon isotope ratios ( 13 C/ 12 C) were obtained in size-segregated aerosol particles. The carbon ( 13 C/ 12 C) and nitrogen ( 15 N/ 14 N) isotope ratios were measured in feed, litter, scrapings from the ventilation system, feathers and eggs. Additionally, the distribution of δ 13 C and δ 15 N values in different tissues of the chicken was examined. The airborne bacteria and fungi extracted from the air filters collected from poultry farms were grown in the laboratory in media with known isotope values and measured for stable isotope ratios. Analysis of isotope fractionation between microorganisms and their media indicated the applicability of stable isotope analysis in bulk samples for the identification of source material. The analysed examples imply that stable isotope analysis can be used to examine the indoor environment along with its biology and ecology, and serve as an informative bioanalytical tool.

  8. Global spatial distributions of nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios of modern human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsemann, Frank; Lehn, Christine; Schneider, Sabine; Jackson, Glen; Hill, Sarah; Rossmann, Andreas; Scheid, Nicole; Dunn, Philip J H; Flenker, Ulrich; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2015-11-30

    Natural stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ(15)N) of humans are related to individual dietary habits and environmental and physiological factors. In forensic science the stable isotope ratios of human remains such as hair and nail are used for geographical allocation. Thus, knowledge of the global spatial distribution of human δ(13)C and δ(15)N values is an essential component in the interpretation of stable isotope analytical results. No substantial global datasets of human stable isotope ratios are currently available, although the amount of available (published) data has increased within recent years. We have herein summarised the published data on human global δ(13)C andδ(15)N values (around 3600 samples) and added experimental values of more than 400 additional worldwide human hair and nail samples. In order to summarise isotope ratios for hair and nail samples correction factors were determined. The current available dataset of human stable isotope ratios is biased towards Europe and North America with only limited data for countries in Africa, Central and South America and Southeast Asia. The global spatial distribution of carbon isotopes is related to latitude and supports the fact that human δ(13)C values are dominated by the amount of C4 plants in the diet, either due to direct ingestion as plant food, or by its use as animal feed. In contrast, the global spatial distribution of human δ(15)N values is apparently not exclusively related to the amount of fish or meat ingested, but also to environmental factors that influence agricultural production. There are still a large proportion of countries, especially in Africa, where there are no available data for human carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Although the interpretation of modern human carbon isotope ratios at the global scale is quite possible, and correlates with the latitude, the potential influences of extrinsic and/or intrinsic factors on human nitrogen isotope ratios

  9. Laboratory investigations of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratio data enhance monitoring of CO2 underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Myrttinen, Anssi; Becker, Veith; Nowak, Martin; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data play an important role in monitoring CO2 in the subsurface, for instance during carbon capture and storage (CCS). This includes monitoring of supercritical and gaseous CO2 movement and reactions under reservoir conditions and detection of potential CO2 leakage scenarios. However, in many cases isotope data from field campaigns are either limited due to complex sample retrieval or require verification under controlled boundary conditions. Moreover, experimentally verified isotope fractionation factors are also accurately known only for temperatures and pressures lower than commonly found in CO2 reservoirs (Myrttinen et al., 2012). For this reason, several experimental series were conducted in order to investigate effects of elevated pressures, temperatures and salinities on stable carbon and oxygen isotope changes of CO2 and water. These tests were conducted with a heateable pressure device and with glass or metal gas containers in which CO2 reacted with fluids for time periods of hours to several weeks. The obtained results revealed systematic differences in 13C/12C-distributions between CO2 and the most important dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species under reservoir conditions (CO2(aq), H2CO3 and HCO3-). Since direct measurements of the pH, even immediately after sampling, were unreliable due to rapid CO2 de-gassing, one of the key results of this work is that carbon isotope fractionation data between DIC and CO2 may serve to reconstruct in situ pH values. pH values reconstructed with this approach ranged between 5.5 and 7.4 for experiments with 60 bars and up to 120 °C and were on average 1.4 pH units lower than those measured with standard pH electrodes directly after sampling. In addition, pressure and temperature experiments with H2O and CO2 revealed that differences between the oxygen isotope ratios of both phases depended on temperature, water-gas ratios as well as salt contents of the solutions involved. Such

  10. Technical Note: Calcium and carbon stable isotope ratios as paleodietary indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Amanda D; Crowley, Brooke E; Brown, Shaun T; Wheatley, Patrick V; Moritz, Gillian L; Yit Yu, Fred Tuh; Bernard, Henry; DePaolo, Donald J; Jacobson, Andrew D; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2014-08-01

    Calcium stable isotope ratios are hypothesized to vary as a function of trophic level. This premise raises the possibility of using calcium stable isotope ratios to study the dietary behaviors of fossil taxa and to test competing hypotheses on the adaptive origins of euprimates. To explore this concept, we measured the stable isotope composition of contemporary mammals in northern Borneo and northwestern Costa Rica, two communities with functional or phylogenetic relevance to primate origins. We found that bone collagen δ(13) C and δ(15) N values could differentiate trophic levels in each assemblage, a result that justifies the use of these systems to test the predicted inverse relationship between bioapatite δ(13) C and δ(44) Ca values. As expected, taxonomic carnivores (felids) showed a combination of high δ(13) C and low δ(44) Ca values; however, the δ(44) Ca values of other faunivores were indistinguishable from those of primary consumers. We suggest that the trophic insensitivity of most bioapatite δ(44) Ca values is attributable to the negligible calcium content of arthropod prey. Although the present results are inconclusive, the tandem analysis of δ(44) Ca and δ(13) C values in fossils continues to hold promise for informing paleodietary studies and we highlight this potential by drawing attention to the stable isotope composition of the Early Eocene primate Cantius. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of extractable hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Pizzarello, S.; Cronin, J. R.; Yuen, G. U.

    1991-01-01

    A fairly fool-proof method to ensure that the compounds isolated from meteorites are truly part of the meteorites and not an artifact introduced by exposure to the terrestrial environment, storage, or handling is presented. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios in several of the chemical compounds extracted from the Murchison meteorite were measured. The results obtained by studying the amino acids in this meteorite gave very unusual hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios. The technique was extended to the different classes of hydrocarbons and the hydrocarbons were isolated using a variety of separation techniques. The results and methods used in this investigation are described in this two page paper.

  12. Dietary Heterogeneity among Western Industrialized Countries Reflected in the Stable Isotope Ratios of Human Hair

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization). Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of...

  13. Inter- and intraspecific variation of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in freshwater bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Novais, Adriana; Dias, Ester; Sousa, Ronaldo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater bivalves provide important ecosystem functions and services, yet many of their ecological traits such as feeding mechanisms and resource use are largely ignored. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential overlap in resource use by bivalve species living in sympatry in European freshwater ecosystems. This was accomplished by analyzing the stable isotope ratios of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) values of six bivalve species (five native species plus th...

  14. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of bottled waters of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Gabriel J; Winter, David A; Spero, Howard J; Zierenberg, Robert A; Reeder, Mathew D; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2005-01-01

    Bottled and packaged waters are an increasingly significant component of the human diet. These products are regulated at the regional, national, and international levels, and determining the authenticity of marketing and labeling claims represents a challenge to regulatory agencies. Here, we present a dataset of stable isotope ratios for bottled waters sampled worldwide, and consider potential applications of such data for regulatory, forensic and geochemical standardization applications. The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of 234 samples of bottled water range from -147 per thousand to +15 per thousand and from -19.1 per thousand to +3.0 per thousand, respectively. These values fall within and span most of the normal range for meteoric waters, indicating that these commercially available products represent a source of waters for use as laboratory working standards in applications requiring standardization over a large range of isotope ratios. The measured values of bottled water samples cluster along the global meteoric water line, suggesting that bottled water isotope ratios preserve information about the water sources from which they were derived. Using the dataset, we demonstrate how bottled water isotope ratios provide evidence for substantial evaporative enrichment of water sources prior to bottling and for the marketing of waters derived from mountain and lowland sources under the same name. Comparison of bottled water isotope ratios with natural environmental water isotope ratios demonstrates that on average the isotopic composition of bottled water tends to be similar to the composition of naturally available local water sources, suggesting that in many cases bottled water need not be considered as an isotopically distinct component of the human diet. Our findings suggest that stable isotope ratios of bottled water have the power to distinguish ultimate (e.g., recharge) and proximal (e.g., reservoir) sources of bottled water and constitute a potential

  15. Stable isotope ratios and reforestation potential in Acacia koa populations on Hawai’i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaneka Lawson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes can be influenced by a multitude of factors including elevation, precipitation rate, season, and temperature. This work examined the variability in foliar stable carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N isotope ratios of koa (Acacia koa for 17 sites on Hawai’i Island delineated by elevation and precipitation gradients. Sites were identified and grouped with respect to mean annual precipitation (MAP, mean annual temperature (MAT and position along three elevation ranges. Analysis of the resultant δ13C and δ15N isotope ratios from multiple individuals at these sites indicated that certain sites showed a demonstrated correlation between carbon and/or nitrogen content, isotope ratios, precipitation, and elevation however many sites showed no correlation. We used publicly available temperature and moisture data to help eliminate confounding effects by climatic drivers and capture possible points of contention. At sites where the temperature, precipitation, and elevation data were not significantly different we compared stable isotope information to determine if additional variables could have contributed to the lack of more correlative data. Our results note several areas within the Waiakea Forest Reserve and Volcanoes National Park where, based on isotope results, reforestation efforts could be most successfully initiated.

  16. Platinum stable isotope ratio measurements by double-spike multiple collector ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creech, John; Baker, Joel; Handler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    We present a new technique for the precise determination of platinum (Pt) stable isotope ratios by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) using two different Pt double-spikes ( Pt-Pt and Pt-Pt). Results are expressed relative to the IRMM-010 Pt isotope standard......) can be obtained on Pt stable isotope ratios with either double-spike. Elemental doping tests reveal that double-spike corrected Pt stable isotope ratios are insensitive to the presence of relatively high (up to 10%) levels of matrix elements, although the Pt-Pt double-spike is affected by an isobaric...... interference on Pt from Os. The Pt-Pt double-spike does not use Pt in the double-spike inversion and is unaffected by Os contamination, and is our recommended double-spike for use with natural samples. As part of this study, we re-determined the natural Pt isotopic composition of IRMM-010 by MC-ICPMS using...

  17. A Test of Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratio Process Models in Tree Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, J. S.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes ratios of carbon and oxygen in tree ring cellulose have been used to infer environmental change. Process-based models have been developed to clarify the potential of historic tree ring records for meaningful paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, isotopic variation can be influenced by multiple environmental factors making simplistic interpretations problematic. Recently, the dual isotope approach, where the variation in one stable isotope ratio (e.g. oxygen) is used to constrain the interpretation of variation in another (e.g. carbon), has been shown to have the potential to de-convolute isotopic analysis. However, this approach requires further testing to determine its applicability for paleo-reconstructions using tree-ring time series. We present a study where the information needed to parameterize mechanistic models for both carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios were collected in controlled environment chambers for two species (Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus globulus). The seedlings were exposed to treatments designed to modify leaf temperature, transpiration rates, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Both species were grown for over 100 days under two humidity regimes that differed by 20%. Stomatal conductance was significantly different between species and for seedlings under drought conditions but not between other treatments or humidity regimes. The treatments produced large differences in transpiration rate and photosynthesis. Treatments that effected photosynthetic rates but not stomatal conductance influenced carbon isotope discrimination more than those that influenced primarily conductance. The various treatments produced a range in oxygen isotope ratios of 7 ‰. Process models predicted greater oxygen isotope enrichment in tree ring cellulose than observed. The oxygen isotope ratios of bulk leaf water were reasonably well predicted by current steady-state models. However, the fractional difference between models that

  18. Intergroup variation in stable isotope ratios reflects anthropogenic impact on the Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Mark R; Fuentes, Agustín; Luecke, Ellen; Cortes, John; Shaw, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Interactions with humans impact many aspects of behavior and ecology in nonhuman primates. Because of the complexities of the human-nonhuman primate interface, methods are needed to quantify the effects of anthropogenic interactions, including their intensity and differential impacts between nonhuman primate groups. Stable isotopes can be used to quickly and economically assess intergroup dietary variation, and provide a framework for the development of specific hypotheses about anthropogenic impact. This study uses stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis to examine intraspecific variation in diet between five groups of Barbary macaques, Macaca sylvanus, in the Upper Rock Nature Reserve, Gibraltar. Analysis of hair from 135 macaques showed significant differences in δ(13)C and δ(15)N values between a group with minimal tourist contact and groups that were main tourist attractions. Because we observed no overt physiological or substantial behavioral differences between the groups, feeding ecology is the most likely cause of any differences in stable isotope ratios. Haphazard provisioning by tourists and Gibraltarians is a likely source of dietary variation between groups. Stable isotope analysis and observational data facilitate a deeper understanding of the feeding ecology of the Barbary macaques relevant to the role of an anthropogenic ecology for the species.

  19. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moukhtar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter is presented. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. Particulate matter was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide, was added for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. The second half of the sample was stored in a refrigerator. For samples with concentrations exceeding 1 ng μl−1, the second half of the sample was used for measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    The procedure described in this paper provides a method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter at concentrations as low as 0.3 pg m−3 and for stable isotope ratios with an accuracy of better than ±0.5‰ for concentrations exceeding 100 pg m−3.

    In all atmospheric particulate matter samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol, with concentrations ranging from the low pg m−3 range in rural areas to more than 200 pg m−3 in some samples from a suburban location.

  20. The relationship between carbon stable isotope ratios of hatchling down and egg yolk in Black-headed Gulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.R.J.; Baarspul, T.; Dekkers, T.; Van Tienen, P.

    2004-01-01

    We reconstructed the nutrient source for egg synthesis by sampling Black-headed Gull (Larus ridibundus) eggs for yolk, analyzing their carbon stable isotope ratio, and comparing that to hatchling down. Most of the variation in carbon stable isotope ratio was explained by differences between nests,

  1. Stable isotope ratio analysis of different European raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, currants and strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, M; Giongo, L; Grisenti, M; Bontempo, L; Camin, F

    2018-01-15

    To date the stable isotope ratios of berries have never been extensively explored. In this work the H, C, N and O isotopic ratios of 190 samples of different soft fruits (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and currants) produced in a northern Italian region and at two sites in Romania and Poland collected over three harvest years are presented and discussed. The different soft fruits showed a typical range for one or more isotopic parameters that can be used to verify the authenticity of the fruit composition declared on the label. The δ 13 C and δ 15 N of pulp and the δ 18 O of juice can be considered effective tools for identifying the different geographical origin of fruit. A significant effect of crop cover on juice δ 18 O and fertilisation practices on pulp δ 15 N was demonstrated and must be considered with attention when evaluating data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of the Geographical Origin of All Commercial Hake Species by Stable Isotope Ratio (SIR) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Mónica; Gallardo, José M

    2017-02-08

    The determination of the geographical origin of food products is relevant to comply with the legal regulations of traceability, to avoid food fraud, and to guarantee food quality and safety to the consumers. For these reasons, stable isotope ratio (SIR) analysis using an isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) instrument is one of the most useful techniques for evaluating food traceability and authenticity. The present study was aimed to determine, for the first time, the geographical origin for all commercial fish species belonging to the Merlucciidae family using SIR analysis of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N). The specific results enabled their clear classification according to the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) fishing areas, latitude, and geographical origin in the following six different clusters: European, North African, South African, North American, South American, and Australian hake species.

  3. Reactivity of paraquat with sodium salicylate: formation of stable complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Ferreira, António César Silva; Silva, Artur M S; Afonso, Carlos; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando; Duarte, José Alberto; Carvalho, Félix

    2008-07-30

    Sodium salicylate (NaSAL) has been shown to be a promising antidote for the treatment of paraquat (PQ) poisonings. The modulation of the pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory pathways, as well as the anti-thrombogenic properties of NaSAL are probably essential features for the healing effects provided by this drug. Nevertheless, a possible direct chemical reactivity between PQ and NaSAL is also a putative pathway to be considered, this hypothesis being the ground of the present study. In accordance, it is shown, for the first time that PQ and NaSAL react immediately in aqueous medium and within 2-3 min in the solid state. Photographs and scanning electron photomicrographs indicated that a new chemical entity is formed when both compounds are mixed. This assumption was corroborated by the evaluation of the melting point, and through several analytical techniques, namely ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS), liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS/MS) and infrared spectroscopy, which revealed that stable charge-transfer complexes are formed when PQ is mixed with NaSAL. LC/ESI/MS/MS allowed obtaining the stoichiometry of the charge-transfer complexes. In order to increase resolution, single value decomposition, acting as a filter, showed that the charge-transfer complexes with m/z 483, 643 and 803 correspond to the pseudo-molecular ions, respectively 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 (PQ:NaSAL). In conclusion, these results provided a new and important mechanism of action of NaSAL against the toxicity mediated by PQ.

  4. Reactivity of paraquat with sodium salicylate: Formation of stable complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Guedes de Pinho, Paula; Ferreira, Antonio Cesar Silva; Silva, Artur M.S.; Afonso, Carlos; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remiao, Fernando; Duarte, Jose Alberto; Carvalho, Felix

    2008-01-01

    Sodium salicylate (NaSAL) has been shown to be a promising antidote for the treatment of paraquat (PQ) poisonings. The modulation of the pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory pathways, as well as the anti-thrombogenic properties of NaSAL are probably essential features for the healing effects provided by this drug. Nevertheless, a possible direct chemical reactivity between PQ and NaSAL is also a putative pathway to be considered, this hypothesis being the ground of the present study. In accordance, it is shown, for the first time that PQ and NaSAL react immediately in aqueous medium and within 2-3 min in the solid state. Photographs and scanning electron photomicrographs indicated that a new chemical entity is formed when both compounds are mixed. This assumption was corroborated by the evaluation of the melting point, and through several analytical techniques, namely ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS), liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS/MS) and infrared spectroscopy, which revealed that stable charge-transfer complexes are formed when PQ is mixed with NaSAL. LC/ESI/MS/MS allowed obtaining the stoichiometry of the charge-transfer complexes. In order to increase resolution, single value decomposition, acting as a filter, showed that the charge-transfer complexes with m/z 483, 643 and 803 correspond to the pseudo-molecular ions, respectively 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 (PQ:NaSAL). In conclusion, these results provided a new and important mechanism of action of NaSAL against the toxicity mediated by PQ

  5. Mixing behaviour of WPI-pectin-complexes in meat dispersions: impact of biopolymer ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Schöck, Vanessa; Schmid, Nicole; Majer, Lisa; Herrmann, Kurt; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2017-01-25

    Particulated complexes composed of oppositely charged biopolymers were incorporated into highly concentrated protein matrices as potential fat replacers and structuring agents. A multistep procedure was therefore utilized to generate process-stable complexes, which were subsequently embedded into emulsion-type sausages, whereas macro- and microstructural properties were then assessed. Firstly, stock WPI and sugar beet pectin solutions were mixed under neutral conditions (pH 7) at various biopolymer ratios r (2 : 1, 5 : 1, 8 : 1). Secondly, the pH of the biopolymer mixture was decreased to 3.5 to promote associative complexation. Thirdly, electrostatically attracted biopolymer particles were subjected to a heat treatment (ϑ = 85 °C, 20 min) to enhance their stability against superimposed stresses. Finally, fat-reduced emulsion-type sausages were fabricated containing stable WPI-pectin complexes. The results revealed that the heat treatment increased the pH-stability of the biopolymer complexes. In addition, textural and sensorial analysis demonstrated that the meat products became increasingly soft as the biopolymer ratio r increased. This effect was attributed to thermodynamic incompatibility between meat proteins and beet pectin. The results obtained from this study might have important implications for the fabrication of processed meat products with reduced fat levels.

  6. Dietary heterogeneity among Western industrialized countries reflected in the stable isotope ratios of human hair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano O Valenzuela

    Full Text Available Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization. Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of different dietary patterns and the use of local food products. Here we report isotopic differences among carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope ratios of human hair collected in thirteen Western European countries and in the USA. European hair samples had significantly lower δ(13C values (-22.7 to -18.3‰, and significantly higher δ(15N (7.8 to 10.3‰ and δ(34S (4.8 to 8.3‰ values than samples from the USA (δ(13C: -21.9 to -15.0‰, δ(15N: 6.7 to 9.9‰, δ(34S: -1.2 to 9.9‰. Within Europe, we detected differences in hair δ(13C and δ(34S values among countries and covariation of isotope ratios with latitude and longitude. This geographic structuring of isotopic data suggests heterogeneity in the food resources used by citizens of industrialized nations and supports the presence of different dietary patterns within Western Europe despite globalization trends. Here we showed the potential of stable isotope analysis as a population-wide tool for dietary screening, particularly as a complement of dietary surveys, that can provide additional information on assimilated macronutrients and independent verification of data obtained by those self-reporting instruments.

  7. Stable isotope ratios in freshwater mussel shells as high resolution recorders of riverine environmental variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolich, S.; Kendall, C.; Dettman, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The geochemical record stored in growth increments of freshwater mussel shells reveals annual to sub-annual changes in environmental conditions during the lifetime of the organism. The carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen stable isotope composition of aragonite shells responds to changes in water chemistry, temperature, streamflow, turbidity, growth rate, size, age, and reproduction. The goals of this study are to determine how stable isotopes can be used to reconstruct the conditions in which the mussels lived and to illuminate any vital effects that might obscure the isotopic record of those conditions. Previous research has suggested that annual δ13C values decrease in older freshwater mussel shells due to lower growth rates and greater incorporation of dietary carbon into the shell with increasing age. However, a high-resolution, seasonal investigation of δ13C, δ15N, and δ18O as they relate to organism age has not yet been attempted in freshwater mussels. A total of 28 Unionid mussels of three different species were collected live in 2011 in the Tennessee River near Paducah, Kentucky, USA. In this study, we analyzed the shell nacre and external organic layers for stable carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotope ratios, focusing on growth bands formed between 2006 and 2011. We present a time series of shell δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N values with monthly resolution. We also compare the shell-derived geochemical time series to a time series of the δ13C and δ15N of particulate organic matter, δ13C of DIC, δ18OWater, and water temperature in which the mussels lived. Results show that environmental factors such as water temperature and primary productivity dominate shell chemistry while animal age has little or no effect.

  8. Heavy with child? Pregnancy status and stable isotope ratios as determined from biopsies of humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Casey T; Fleming, Alyson H; Calambokidis, John; Kellar, Nicholas M; Allen, Camryn D; Catelani, Krista N; Robbins, Michelle; Beaulieu, Nicole E; Steel, Debbie; Harvey, James T

    2016-01-01

    Understanding reproductive rates of wild animal populations is crucially important for management and conservation. Assessing pregnancy status of free-ranging cetaceans has historically been difficult; however, recent advances in analytical techniques have allowed the diagnosis of pregnancy from small samples of blubber tissue. The primary objectives of this study were as follows: (i) to test the efficacy of blubber progesterone assays as a tool for diagnosing pregnancy in humpback whales ( Megaptera novaeangliae ); (ii) to estimate the pregnancy rate of humpback whales in Monterey Bay, California; and (iii) to investigate the relationship between stable isotopes and reproductive status of these whales. Progesterone concentrations of female whales fell into two distinct groups, allowing for diagnostic separation of pregnant and non-pregnant individuals. Pregnancy rate varied between years of the study (48.4%% in 2011 and 18.5% in 2012), but fell within the range of other estimates of reproductive success for this population. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were examined to investigate the impacts of pregnancy on these values. Neither δ 15 N nor δ 13 C varied in a consistent way among animals of different sex or reproductive status. The relationship between δ 15 N and δ 13 C was strongly positive for male and non-pregnant female humpbacks; however, no relationship existed for pregnant whales. This difference may be indicative of the effects of pregnancy on δ 15 N, resulting from tissue synthesis and reduced excretion of nitrogenous waste, as well as on δ 13 C through increased mobilization of lipid stores to meet the energetic demands of pregnancy. Ultimately, our results support the use of blubber progesterone assays for diagnosing pregnancy in humpback whales and indicate that, when paired with other approaches (e.g. stable isotope analysis), pregnancy status can be an informative tool for addressing questions about animal physiology, ecology and

  9. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Meredith, Will; Sun, Cheng-Gong; Snape, Colin E.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made. Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations. PMID:19662175

  10. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Sephton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made.Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations.

  11. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  12. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  13. Source Attribution of Cyanides using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Carman, April J.; Moran, James J.

    2016-01-08

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs) are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. In a previous study, anionic impurity profiles developed using high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) were demonstrated as CAS for matching samples from eight potassium cyanide (KCN) stocks to their reported countries of origin. Herein, a larger number of solid KCN stocks (n = 13) and, for the first time, solid sodium cyanide (NaCN) stocks (n = 15) were examined to determine what additional sourcing information can be obtained through anion, carbon stable isotope, and elemental analyses of cyanide stocks by HPIC, isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), respectively. The HPIC anion data was evaluated using the variable selection methods of Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least squares (iPLS), and genetic algorithm-based partial least squares (GAPLS) and the classification methods of partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminate analysis (SVMDA). In summary, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported country of origins resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three country groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries with known solid cyanide factories. Both the anion and elemental CAS are believed to originate from the aqueous alkali hydroxides used in cyanide manufacture. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). The carbon isotope CAS is believed to

  14. What climate information is recorded in stable isotope ratios of wood lignin methoxyl groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank

    2010-05-01

    The stable isotope composition of the bioelements C, O, H and N in plant organic matter is known to be a very powerful for various environmental impacts. Particularly tree rings are suitable for this analysis because they exhibit a "climate archive" with a yearly or even biannual resolution. One of the most determined wood compounds is cellulose which amongst others is used to reconstruct the temperature due to measurement of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Therefore cellulose is converted into cellulose nitrate to eliminate the exchangeable hydroxyl hydrogen or equilibration methods are used. However, a general problem associated with the determination of the stable hydrogen values of marker compounds for the study of climate and environmental conditions is the isolation of the pure compound for analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Exploitation of components of wood as markers, in particular, has been restricted by the very labour intensive and time consuming preparation of samples (e.g. cellulose nitrate). An alternative way to record climate information from tree rings was recently proposed by Keppler et al. (2007) who measured the stable hydrogen values of methoxyl groups in wood. Lignin methoxyl groups are considered to be stable, i.e. the hydrogen atoms of the methoxyl moiety do not exchange with those of plant water during ongoing metabolic reactions in the plant. Thus the initial deuterium content of the methoxyl groups of lignin in woody tissue at formation is retained throughout the lifetime of the tree and in preserved tissue. The methoxyl content of lignin in wood is usually determined by the Zeisel method (Zeisel, 1885) - the reaction between methyl ethers and hydroiodic acid to form methyl iodide. Exploiting this reaction for the measurement of stable hydrogen values of lignin methoxyl groups ensures that during the entire analytical procedure the isotope signal is preserved since no isotopic exchange occurs between the methyl groups and

  15. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  16. Seasonal changes in stable carbon isotope ratios within annual growth rings of Pinus radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walcroft, A.; Silvester, W.; Whitehead, D.; Kelliher, F.

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of photosynthetically assimilated carbon (δ 13 C) is determined by the ratio of the leaf internal CO 2 concentration (c i ) to that of the ambient air (c a ), and so reflects the contribution of both stomatal conductance (g s ) and the rate of photosynthesis (A). Assimilated carbon which is subsequently laid down as wood in annual growth rings may therefore represent a time integrated record of physiological responses by the whole tree to seasonal changes in the environmental variables regulating growth. We analysed the stable carbon isotope composition of Pinus radiata wood collected from two plantation forest sites in New Zealand which differ markedly in temperature, rainfall and soil characteristics. For both sites, discs were cut from the stem of several trees near ground level and whole wood samples were taken from within individual annual growth rings over a number of years. At one site, diameter bands were installed over the 1994 - 1996 growing seasons in order to date precisely the formation of wood during that time. Trees at each site consistently showed a seasonal pattern in the stable isotope composition of wood within individual growth rings. The amplitude of seasonal δ 13 C variation at the wet and dry sites were 1-2 per thousand and 4 per thousand respectively. Mean δ 13 C values from the wet site were 3 per thousand more 13 C depleted than those from the dry site implying lower water-use efficiency (carbon assimilation per unit transpiration). A process-based, model of stomatal conductance and CO 2 assimilation was combined with a soil-water balance model to estimate the average daily leaf-level intercellular CO 2 concentration (c i ). Over two growing seasons at each site there was generally good agreement between mean canopy-level c i derived from the tree-ring δ 13 C data and modelled leaf-level c i levels. Further, the ratio of annual CO 2 assimilation to transpiration estimated by the model for each site

  17. Stable isotope ratio analysis: A potential analytical tool for the authentication of South African lamb meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Sara Wilhelmina; Muller, Magdalena; van der Rijst, Marieta; Hoffman, Louwrens Christiaan

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotope ratios ((13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N) of South African Dorper lambs from farms with different vegetation types were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), to evaluate it as a tool for the authentication of origin and feeding regime. Homogenised and defatted meat of the Longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle of lambs from seven different farms was assessed. The δ(13)C values were affected by the origin of the meat, mainly reflecting the diet. The Rûens and Free State farms had the lowest (p ⩽ 0.05) δ(15)N values, followed by the Northern Cape farms, with Hantam Karoo/Calvinia having the highest δ(15)N values. Discriminant analysis showed δ(13)C and δ(15)N differences as promising results for the use of IRMS as a reliable analytical tool for lamb meat authentication. The results suggest that diet, linked to origin, is an important factor to consider regarding region of origin classification for South African lamb. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stable isotope ratios of H, C, N and O in Italian citrus juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempo, L; Caruso, R; Fiorillo, M; Gambino, G L; Perini, M; Simoni, M; Traulo, P; Wehrens, R; Gagliano, G; Camin, F

    2014-09-01

    Stable isotope ratios (SIRs) of C, N, H and O have been exensively used in fruit juices quality control (ENV and AOAC methods) to detect added sugar and the watering down of concentrated juice, practices prohibited by European legislation (EU Directive 2012/12). The European Fruit Juice Association (AIJN) set some reference guidelines in order to allow the judging of the genuiness of a juice. Moreover, various studies have been carried out to determine the natural variability of SIRs in fruit juices, but none of these has investigated SIRs extensively in authentic citrus juices from Italy. In this work, about 500 citrus juice samples were officially collected in Italy by the Italian Ministry of Agricultural and Forestry Policies from 1998 onwards. (D/H)(I) and (D/H)(II) in ethanol and δ(13) C(ethanol), δ(13) C(pulp), δ(13) C(sugars), δ(18) O(vegetalwater), δ(15) N(pulp), and δ(18) O(pulp) were determined using Site-Specific Natural Isotope Fractionation-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, respectively. The characteristic ranges of variability in SIRs in genuine Italian citrus juice samples are here presented as well as their relationships and compliance with the limits indicated by the AIJN and others proposed in the literature. In particular, the Italian range of values was found to be not completely in agreement with AIJN guidelines, with the risk that genuine juices could be judged as not genuine. Variety seems not to influence SIRs, whereas harvest year and region of origin have some influence on the different ratios, although their data distribution shows overlapping when principal component analysis is applied. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah B Vander Zanden

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H and oxygen (δ18O isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applications using δ2H and, to a lesser extent, δ18O values have demonstrated potential for these elements to provide novel insights in modern food web studies. We explore the advantages and challenges associated with three applications of δ2H and δ18O values in food web studies. First, large δ2H differences between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem end members can permit the quantification of energy inputs and nutrient fluxes between these two sources, with potential applications for determining allochthonous vs. autochthonous nutrient sources in freshwater systems and relative aquatic habitat utilization by terrestrial organisms. Next, some studies have identified a relationship between δ2H values and trophic position, which suggests that this marker may serve as a trophic indicator, in addition to the more commonly used δ15N values. Finally, coupled measurements of δ2H and δ18O values are increasing as a result of reduced analytical challenges to measure both simultaneously and may provide additional ecological information over single element measurements. In some organisms, the isotopic ratios of these two elements are tightly coupled, whereas the isotopic disequilibrium in other organisms may offer insight into the diet and physiology of individuals. Although a coherent framework for interpreting δ2H and δ18O data in the context of food web studies is emerging, many fundamental uncertainties remain. We highlight directions for targeted research that

  20. Potential uses of stable isotope ratios of Sr, Nd, and Pb in geological materials for environmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The ratios of stable isotopes of certain elements in rocks and minerals have strong regional characteristics that are reflected in atmospheric components, in water, and in the living organisms that form Earth's surface environment as well as in agricultural and fishery products. Geologically derived stable isotope ratios can be used as a tracer for the source of many kinds of substances, with current geochemical techniques allowing the precise determination of numerous stable isotope ratios in both natural and manmade objects. This review presents examples of the use of stable isotopes as tracers within diverse dynamic ecosystems, focusing on Sr isotopes but also including examples of Nd and Pb isotopic analysis, and reviewing the potential of this technique for a wide range of environmental research, including determining the geographic origin of food and archeological materials.

  1. Potential uses of stable isotope ratios of Sr, Nd, and Pb in geological materials for environmental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKANO, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The ratios of stable isotopes of certain elements in rocks and minerals have strong regional characteristics that are reflected in atmospheric components, in water, and in the living organisms that form Earth’s surface environment as well as in agricultural and fishery products. Geologically derived stable isotope ratios can be used as a tracer for the source of many kinds of substances, with current geochemical techniques allowing the precise determination of numerous stable isotope ratios in both natural and manmade objects. This review presents examples of the use of stable isotopes as tracers within diverse dynamic ecosystems, focusing on Sr isotopes but also including examples of Nd and Pb isotopic analysis, and reviewing the potential of this technique for a wide range of environmental research, including determining the geographic origin of food and archeological materials. PMID:27302069

  2. Ranking stability and super-stable nodes in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab; Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-07-19

    Pagerank, a network-based diffusion algorithm, has emerged as the leading method to rank web content, ecological species and even scientists. Despite its wide use, it remains unknown how the structure of the network on which it operates affects its performance. Here we show that for random networks the ranking provided by pagerank is sensitive to perturbations in the network topology, making it unreliable for incomplete or noisy systems. In contrast, in scale-free networks we predict analytically the emergence of super-stable nodes whose ranking is exceptionally stable to perturbations. We calculate the dependence of the number of super-stable nodes on network characteristics and demonstrate their presence in real networks, in agreement with the analytical predictions. These results not only deepen our understanding of the interplay between network topology and dynamical processes but also have implications in all areas where ranking has a role, from science to marketing.

  3. Stable isotope ratios indicate diet and habitat use in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeninger, M J; Iwaniec, U T; Glander, K E

    1997-05-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in animal tissue for indicating aspects of species behavioral strategy. We analyzed hair from individuals representing four species of New World monkeys (Alouatta palliata, the mantled howler; Ateles geoffroyi, the spider monkey; Cebus capucinus, the capuchin; and Brachyteles arachnoides, the woolly-spider monkey or muriqui) for delta 13C and delta 15N using previously developed methods. There are no significant differences in either carbon or nitrogen ratios between sexes, sampling year, or year of analysis. Seasonal differences in delta 13C reached a low level of significance but do not affect general patterns. Variation within species was similar to that recorded previously within single individuals. The omega 13C data show a bimodal distribution with significant difference between the means. The two monkey populations living in an evergreen forest were similar to each other and different from the other two monkey populations that inhabited dry, deciduous forests. This bimodal distribution is independent of any particular species' diet and reflects the level of leaf cover in the two types of forest. The delta 15N data display three significantly different modes. The omnivorous capuchins were most positive reflecting a trophic level offset. The spider monkeys and the muriquis were similar to one another and significantly more positive than the howlers. This distribution among totally herbivorous species correlates with the ingestion of legumes by the howler monkey population. In combination, these data indicate that museum-curated primate material can be analyzed to yield information on forest cover and diet in populations and species lacking behavioral data.

  4. Using Lead Concentrations and Stable Lead Isotope Ratios to Identify Contamination Events in Alluvial Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Saint-Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (C10–C50, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and other contaminants (e.g., As, Cd, Cu, Pb were recently discovered on the banks of the Saint-François and Massawippi rivers. Alluvial soils are contaminated over a distance of 100 kilometers, and the level of the contaminated-hydrocarbon layer in the soil profiles is among the highest at the Windsor and Richmond sites. Concentrations of lead and stable lead isotope ratios (204Pb/206Pb, 207Pb/206Pb, 208Pb/206Pb are also used to identify contamination events. The maximum and minimum values detected in soil profiles for arsenic, cadmium, and lead vary from 3.01 to 37.88 mg kg-1 (As, 0.11 to 0.81 mg kg-1 (Cd 12.32 to 149.13 mg kg-1 (Pb, respectively, while the 207Pb/206Pb isotopic ratio values are between 0.8545 and 0.8724 for all the profiles. The highest values of trace elements (As, Pb and Zn were detected in the hydrocarbon layer (C10–C50, most often located at the bottom of the profiles (160, 200, and 220 cm in depth. The various peaks recorded in the soils and the position of the profiles suggest that various contaminants were transported by the river on several occasions and infiltrated the soil matrix or deposited on floodplains during successive floods. Atmospheric particles which entered the river or deposited on riverbanks must also be considered as another source of pollution recorded in soils.

  5. Laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry for enhanced sensitivity and spatial resolution in stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James J; Newburn, Matt K; Alexander, M Lizabeth; Sams, Robert L; Kelly, James F; Kreuzer, Helen W

    2011-05-15

    Stable isotope analysis permits the tracking of physical, chemical, and biological reactions and source materials at a wide variety of spatial scales. We present a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS) method that enables δ(13)C measurement of solid samples at 50 µm spatial resolution. The method does not require sample pre-treatment to physically separate spatial zones. We use laser ablation of solid samples followed by quantitative combustion of the ablated particulates to convert sample carbon into CO(2). Cryofocusing of the resulting CO(2) coupled with modulation in the carrier flow rate permits coherent peak introduction into an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, with only 65 ng carbon required per measurement. We conclusively demonstrate that the measured CO(2) is produced by combustion of laser-ablated aerosols from the sample surface. We measured δ(13)C for a series of solid compounds using laser ablation and traditional solid sample analysis techniques. Both techniques produced consistent isotopic results but the laser ablation method required over two orders of magnitude less sample. We demonstrated that LA-IRMS sensitivity coupled with its 50 µm spatial resolution could be used to measure δ(13) C values along a length of hair, making multiple sample measurements over distances corresponding to a single day's growth. This method will be highly valuable in cases where the δ(13)C analysis of small samples over prescribed spatial distances is required. Suitable applications include forensic analysis of hair samples, investigations of tightly woven microbial systems, and cases of surface analysis where there is a sharp delineation between different components of a sample. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. An Ocean Sediment Core-Top Calibration of Foraminiferal (Cibicides) Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Mix, A. C.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Peterson, C.; Mackensen, A.; Cartapanis, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) measured on calcium carbonate shells of benthic foraminifera (cibicides) from late Holocene sediments (δ13CCib) are compiled and compared with newly updated datasets of contemporary water-column δ13C observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) as the initial core-top calibration of the international Ocean Circulation and CarbonCycling (OC3) project. Using selection criteria based on the spatial distance between samples we find high correlation between δ13CCib and natural (pre-industrial) δ13CDIC, confirming earlier work. However, our analysis reveals systematic differences such as higher (lower) δ13CCib values in the Atlantic (Indian and Pacific) oceans. Regression analyses are impacted by anthropogenic carbon and suggest significant carbonate ion, temperature, and pressure effects, consistent with lab experiments with planktonic foraminifera and theory. The estimated standard error of core-top sediment data is generally σ ~= 0.25 ‰, whereas modern foram data from the South Atlantic indicate larger errors (σ ~= 0.4 ‰).

  7. Meridional distribution and seasonal variation of stable oxygen isotope ratio of precipitation in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Nakamura

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The stable oxygen isotope ratio(δ^O in precipitation is known to have important meridional and seasonal variations, but there are almost no measurements of δ^O in precipitation over polar oceans. The present research took advantage of 4 opportunities for in situ observations in summer and winter at high latitudes in the Southern Ocean. In addition, we analyzed samples of precipitation at Syowa Station in 2008 to obtain year-round data. Based on these data, we consider the meridional and seasonal variations of δ^O in precipitation over the Southern Ocean. In general, δ^O decreases with increasing latitude, and is lower in winter than in summer. The latitude gradient is stronger in winter. At 60°S, δ^O is -5.4‰ and -11.3‰ in summer and winter, respectively, while the corresponding figures at 66°S are -10.5‰ and -20.8‰. These results will help us understand the mechanisms of the salinity distribution and its variation in the Antarctic Ocean.

  8. Disentangling effects of growth and nutritional status on seabird stable isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, J.; Hatch, Shyla A.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that an individual's physiology affects its carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures, obscuring a signal often assumed to be only a reflection of diet and foraging location. We examined effects of growth and moderate food restriction on red blood cell (RBC) and feather ??15N and ??13C in rhinoceros auklet chicks (Cerorhinca monocerata), a piscivorous seabird. Chicks were reared in captivity and fed either control (75 g/day; n = 7) or ~40% restricted (40 g/day; n = 6) amounts of high quality forage fish. We quantified effects of growth on isotopic fractionation by comparing ??15N and ??13C in control chicks to those of captive, non-growing subadult auklets (n = 11) fed the same diet. To estimate natural levels of isotopic variation, we also collected blood from a random sample of free-living rhinoceros auklet adults and chicks in the Gulf of Alaska (n = 15 for each), as well as adult feather samples (n = 13). In the captive experiment, moderate food restriction caused significant depletion in ??15N of both RBCs and feathers in treatment chicks compared to control chicks. Growth also induced depletion in RBC ??15N, with chicks exhibiting lower ??15N when they were growing the fastest. As growth slowed, ??15N increased, resulting in an overall pattern of enrichment over the course of the nestling period. Combined effects of growth and restriction depleted ??15N in chick RBCs by 0.92???. We propose that increased nitrogen-use efficiency is responsible for 15N depletion in both growing and food-restricted chicks. ??15N values in RBCs of free-ranging auklets fell within a range of only 1.03???, while feather ??15N varied widely. Together, our captive and field results suggest that both growth and moderate food restriction can affect stable isotope ratios in an ecologically meaningful way in RBCs although not feathers due to greater natural variability in this tissue. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Assessing connectivity of estuarine fishes based on stable isotope ratio analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzka, Sharon Z.

    2005-07-01

    Assessing connectivity is fundamental to understanding the population dynamics of fishes. I propose that isotopic analyses can greatly contribute to studies of connectivity in estuarine fishes due to the high diversity of isotopic signatures found among estuarine habitats and the fact that variations in isotopic composition at the base of a food web are reflected in the tissues of consumers. Isotopic analysis can be used for identifying nursery habitats and estimating their contribution to adult populations. If movement to a new habitat is accompanied by a shift to foods of distinct isotopic composition, recent immigrants and residents can be distinguished based on their isotopic ratios. Movement patterns thus can be reconstructed based on information obtained from individuals. A key consideration is the rate of isotopic turnover, which determines the length of time that an immigrant to a given habitat will be distinguishable from a longtime resident. A literature survey indicated that few studies have measured turnover rates in fishes and that these have focused on larvae and juveniles. These studies reveal that biomass gain is the primary process driving turnover rates, while metabolic turnover is either minimal or undetectable. Using a simple dilution model and biomass-specific growth rates, I estimated that young fishes with fast growth rates will reflect the isotopic composition of a new diet within days or weeks. Older or slower-growing individuals may take years or never fully equilibrate. Future studies should evaluate the factors that influence turnover rates in fishes during various stages of the life cycle and in different tissues, as well as explore the potential for combining stable isotope and otolith microstructure analyses to examine the relationship between demographic parameters, movement and connectivity.

  10. Complex cobordism and stable homotopy groups of spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ravenel, Douglas C

    2003-01-01

    Since the publication of its first edition, this book has served as one of the few available on the classical Adams spectral sequence, and is the best account on the Adams-Novikov spectral sequence. This new edition has been updated in many places, especially the final chapter, which has been completely rewritten with an eye toward future research in the field. It remains the definitive reference on the stable homotopy groups of spheres. The first three chapters introduce the homotopy groups of spheres and take the reader from the classical results in the field though the computational aspects

  11. Pyridinophane platform for stable lanthanide(III) complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Goretti; Bastida, Rufina; Macías, Alejandro; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Valencia, Laura

    2013-05-20

    A detailed investigation of the solid state and solution structures of lanthanide(III) complexes with the macrocyclic ligand 2,11,20-triaza[3.3.3](2,6)pyridinophane (TPP) is reported. The solid state structures of 14 different Ln(3+) complexes have been determined using X-ray crystallography. The ligand is coordinating to the Ln(3+) ion by using its six nitrogen atoms, while nitrate or triflate anions and water molecules complete the metal coordination environments. The structure of the complexes in solution has been investigated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as by DFT calculations (TPSSh model) performed in aqueous solution. The structures obtained from these calculations for the complexes with the lightest Ln(3+) ions (La-Sm) are in very good agreement with those determined by the analysis of the Ln(3+)-induced paramagnetic shifts. A structural change occurs across the lanthanide series at Sm(3+); the complexes of the large Ln(3+) ions (La-Nd) are chiral due to the nonplanar conformation of the macrocycle, and present effective C3v symmetries in solution as a consequence of a fast interconversion of two enantiomeric forms with C3 symmetry. The activation free energy for this enantiomerization process, as estimated by using DFT calculations, amounts to 33.0 kJ·mol(-1). The TPP ligand in the complexes of the heaviest Ln(3+) ions (Eu-Lu) presents a half-chair conformation, which results in C(s) symmetries in solution.

  12. Complexation of DNA with ruthenium organometallic compounds: the high complexation ratio limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despax, Stéphane; Jia, Fuchao; Pfeffer, Michel; Hébraud, Pascal

    2014-06-14

    Interactions between DNA and ruthenium organometallic compounds are studied by using visible light absorption and circular dichroism measurements. A titration technique allowing for the absolute determination of the advancement degree of the complexation, without any assumption about the number of complexation modes is developed. When DNA is in excess, complexation involves intercalation of one of the organometallic compound ligands between DNA base pairs. But, in the high complexation ratio limit, where organometallic compounds are in excess relative to the DNA base pairs, a new mode of interaction is observed, in which the organometallic compound interacts weakly with DNA. The weak interaction mode, moreover, develops when all the DNA intercalation sites are occupied. A regime is reached in which one DNA base pair is linked to more than one organometallic compound.

  13. Complex interferometry potential in case of sufficiently stable diagnostic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalal, M.

    2016-06-01

    Classical interferometry is one of the key methods among active optical diagnostics. Its more advanced version, which allows recording and subsequent reconstruction of up to three sets of data using just one data object —a complex interferogram—was developed in the past and became known as complex interferometry. Employing this diagnostics, not only the usual phase shift, but also the amplitude of the probing beam as well as the fringe contrast (leading directly to the phase shift time derivative) can be reconstructed simultaneously from such a complex interferogram. In this paper it will be demonstrated that even in the case of a not particularly good diagnostic beam quality these three quantities can be reconstructed with a high degree of accuracy provided both the diagnostic beam as well as the corresponding optical line feature a reasonable stability. Such stability requirement is important as in an ideal case four shots need to be gradually recorded (one by one): the signal complex interferogram, the reference interferogram as well as the intensity structures of the signal and reference part of the diagnostic beam. Two examples of complex interferograms obtained in experiments will be analyzed: the laser produced plasma (spark in the air) and the high pressure gas jet. A general ray-tracing based iterative algorithm will be outlined in order to increase a precision of the index of refraction spatial profile taking into account refraction effects (omitted in the Abel inversion) and employing the original reconstructed phase shift and amplitude.

  14. Emerging techniques in vegetable oil analysis using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes, Christopher

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available As the practice of vegetable oil adulteration becomes more sophisticated, the possibility to subvert detection using established techniques such as capillary gas chromatography is increasing. One of the most powerful techniques to be used in food authenticity studies is stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (SIRMS which utilises differences in the natural abundance of the stable isotopes of the ‘light’ bio-elements hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, oxygen and sulfur to detect food fraud. SIRMS has found application in the authentication of a wide range of foodstuffs, including fruit juices, wines, spirits, honey and to detect the adulteration of flavour compounds with synthetic analogues. This papers reviews the current state-of-the-art for the authentication of vegetable oils using SIRMS and highlights emergent techniques such as compound- and position specific-isotope mass spectrometry. These latter developments offer the potential to provide more rapid and improved detection of the economic adulteration of vegetable oils.A medida que la práctica de la adulteración de aceites vegetales se hace más sofisticada, las posibilidades de evitar la detección utilizando técnicas tradicionales como la cromatografía de gases en columna capilar aumentan. Una de las técnicas más poderosas que más se utilizan en los estudios de autentificación de alimentos es la espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas, que utiliza diferencias en la abundancia natural de isótopos estables de elementos ligeros biológicos hidrógeno, nitrógeno, carbón, oxigeno y azufre para detectar fraude en los alimentos. La espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas ha encontrado aplicación en la autentificación de una amplia gama de alimentos, incluyendo zumos de frutas, vinos, bebidas alcohólicas de alta graduación, miel, y en la detección de la adulteración de los compuestos aromáticos con sus análogos de origen sintético. Este trabajo

  15. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah B Vander Zanden; David X Soto; Gabriel J Bowen; Keith A Hobson; Keith A Hobson

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicat...

  16. Expanding the Isotopic Toolbox: Applications of Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratios to Food Web Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Zanden, Hannah B.; Soto, David X.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicatio...

  17. High individual repeatability and population differentiation in stable isotope ratios in winter-grown collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis feathers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjernquist, M.B.; Veen, T.; Font, L.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2009-01-01

    For migrants, we often lack complete information of their spatial distribution year round. Here, we used stable carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen isotope ratios extracted from feathers grown at the wintering sites of the long-distance migratory collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis, to study how

  18. The quality control of fruit juices by using the stable isotope ratios and trace metal elements concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, D. A.; Dehelean, A.; Puscas, R.; Cristea, G.; Tusa, F.; Voica, C.

    2012-02-01

    In the last years, a growing number of research articles detailing the use of natural abundance light stable isotopes variations and trace metal elements concentration as geographic "tracers" to determine the provenance of food have been published. These investigations exploit the systematic global variations of stable hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in (combination) relation with trace metal element concentrations. The trace metal elements content of plants and also their light stable isotopic ratios are mainly related to the geological and pedoclimatic characteristics of the site of growth. The interpretation of such analysis requires an important number of data for authentic natural juices regarding the same seasonal and regional origin, because the isotopic analysis parameters of fruit juices show remarkable variability depending on climatologically factors. In this work was mesured H, C, O stable isotope ratios and the concentrations of 16 elements (P, K, Mg, Na, Ca, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Pb, Co, As, Cd, Mn, Fe and Hg) from 12 single strength juices. The natural variations that appear due to different environmental and climatic conditions are presented and discussed.

  19. Stable assembly of HIV-1 export complexes occurs cotranscriptionally

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawroth, Isabel; Mueller, Florian; Basyuk, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 Rev protein mediates export of unspliced and singly spliced viral transcripts by binding to the Rev response element (RRE) and recruiting the cellular export factor CRM1. Here, we investigated the recruitment of Rev to the transcription sites of HIV-1 reporters that splice either post......- or cotranscriptionally. In both cases, we observed that Rev localized to the transcription sites of the reporters and recruited CRM1. Rev and CRM1 remained at the reporter transcription sites when cells were treated with the splicing inhibitor Spliceostatin A (SSA), showing that the proteins associate with RNA prior...... to or during early spliceosome assembly. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed that Rev and CRM1 have similar kinetics as the HIV-1 RNA, indicating that Rev, CRM1, and RRE-containing RNAs are released from the site of transcription in one single export complex. These results suggest...

  20. Analytical techniques in biomedical stable isotope applications : (isotope ratio) mass spectrometry or infrared spectrometry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellaard, F; Elzinga, H

    2005-01-01

    An overview is presented of biomedical applications of stable isotopes in general, but mainly focused on the activities of the Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases of the University Medical Center Groningen. The aims of metabolic studies in the areas of glucose, fat, cholesterol and

  1. Postmortem study of stable carbon isotope ratios in human cerebellar DNA: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slatkin, D.N.; Irsa, A.P.; Friedman, L.

    1978-01-01

    It is observed that 13 C/ 12 C ratios in tissue specimens removed postmortem in the United States and Canada are significantly different from corresponding ratios in European specimens. On the basis of this information, measurements of carbon isotope ratios in DNA isolated from cerebella of native-born and European-born North Americans are in progress with the goal of estimating the average lifetime rate of DNA turnover in human neurons. Preliminary results from twenty postmortem examinations are consistent with the hypothesis that a significant proportion of human cerebellar DNA is renewed during the lifetime of an individual

  2. New approaches for stable isotope ratio measurements. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report includes a summary of discussions at the meeting and contributions on isotope applications in a range of specific biogeochemical fields using the new analytical techniques. It is expected to serve as a useful reference for researchers and laboratory managers who plan to develop or apply state-of-the-art stable isotope techniques. Individual contributions contained in this book have been indexed separately

  3. Comparison of stable carbon isotope ratios in the whole wood, cellulose and lignin of Oak tree-rings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loader, NJ

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available isotope ratios in the whole wood, cellulose and lignin of oak tree-rings N.J. Loadera;C3, I. Robertsona;b, D. McCarrolla a Environmental Dynamics Institute, Department of Geography, University of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK b... for hardwoods such as oak (Schweingruber and Bri?a, 1996). Several studies have demonstrated the potential of tree-ring stable isotope ratios for high-resolu- tion climatic reconstruction, using a variety of both hardwood and softwood species (Mc...

  4. Comparison of cellulose extraction methods for analysis of stable-isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Louise E; Macfarlane, Craig

    2005-05-01

    The Jayme-Wise and diglyme-HCl methods for extracting cellulose from plant material for stable-isotope analysis differ considerably in ease of use, with the latter requiring significantly less time and specialized equipment. However, the diglyme-HCl method leaves a small lignin residue in the crude cellulose that may affect stable-isotope values, whereas alpha-cellulose produced by the Jayme-Wise method is relatively pure. We examined whether adding a bleaching step to the diglyme-HCl method could produce cellulose of comparable purity to alpha-cellulose by comparing the yield, percent carbon, and carbon (delta13C) and oxygen (delta18O) stable isotope ratios of the two celluloses. We tested each method on the wood of five species that differ in ease of delignification, Eucalyptus maculata Hook., E. botryoides Sm., E. resinifera Sm., Pinus pinaster Ait. and Callitris glaucophylla J. Thompson & L.A.S. Johnson, as well as the foliage of C. glaucophylla. For hardwoods such as the eucalypts, the diglyme-HCl method without bleaching produced cellulose with delta13C and delta18O ratios similar to alpha-cellulose. For the softwood, C. glaucophylla, 3 h of bleaching with acidified chlorite following treatment with diglyme-HCl produced cellulose with delta13C and delta18O ratios similar to alpha-cellulose. Bleached and unbleached crude celluloses and alpha-cellulose of P. pinaster were similar in delta18O, but not delta13C. Both types of crude cellulose produced from the foliage of C. glaucophylla had significantly different isotope ratios from alpha-cellulose. Overall, the diglyme-HCl method, with or without bleaching, appears to be a simple, fast method for extracting alpha-cellulose from hardwoods for stable-isotope analyses, but its suitability for softwoods and foliage needs to be evaluated depending on the species.

  5. Fractionation, concentration and flow: A model coupling stable isotope ratios to fluid travel time and chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2014-12-01

    From the point of infiltration to the point of discharge, the chemical signature imparted to fluid flowing through catchments represents the weathering flux from the landscape. The magnitude of this flux is linked to both the time water spends in the system and the time required for reactions to influence fluid chemistry. The ratio of these characteristic times is often represented as a Damköhler number (Da), which links the parameters governing reactivity and flow. Stable isotope ratios are now commonly applied to identify and even quantify the processes and rates of primary mineral weathering, secondary mineral formation and biogeochemical cycling within catchments. Here, we derive a series of fractionation-discharge relationships for a variety of governing chemical rate laws utilizing Da coefficients. These equations can be used to isolate and quantify the effects of (1) fluid travel time distributions and (2) chemical weathering efficiency on observed stable isotope ratios. The analytical solutions are verified against multi-component reactive transport simulations of stable isotope fractionation in homogeneous and spatially correlated heterogeneous flow fields using the CrunchTope code and evaluated against field observations. We demonstrate that for an irreversible reaction, the relationship between stable isotope enrichment and reactant concentration obeys a Rayleigh-type model across a wide range of reaction rates. However, this relationship is violated when a heterogeneous travel time distribution is considered. This observation highlights an important discrepancy in the commonly assumed relationship between fractionation and concentration for irreversible reactions. We further extend our derivation to consider isotope fractionation associated with a reversible reaction (i.e. a kinetically controlled approach to equilibrium) in a steady-state flow field. Due to the dependence of the observed isotope ratio on the flow rate, kinetic enrichment and

  6. Homogeneous diet of contemporary Japanese inferred from stable isotope ratios of hair

    OpenAIRE

    Soichiro Kusaka; Eriko Ishimaru; Fujio Hyodo; Takashi Gakuhari; Minoru Yoneda; Takakazu Yumoto; Ichiro Tayasu

    2016-01-01

    The globalization of food production and distribution has homogenized human dietary patterns irrespective of geography, but it is uncertain how far this homogenization has progressed. This study investigated the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the scalp hair of 1305 contemporary Japanese and found values of -19. 4 ± 0. 6‰ and 9. 4 ± 0. 6‰ (mean ± SD), respectively. Within Japan, the inter-regional differences for both isotope ratios was less than 1‰, which indicates low dietary heteroge...

  7. Homogeneous diet of contemporary Japanese inferred from stable isotope ratios of hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Soichiro; Ishimaru, Eriko; Hyodo, Fujio; Gakuhari, Takashi; Yoneda, Minoru; Yumoto, Takakazu; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The globalization of food production and distribution has homogenized human dietary patterns irrespective of geography, but it is uncertain how far this homogenization has progressed. This study investigated the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the scalp hair of 1305 contemporary Japanese and found values of −19.4 ± 0.6‰ and 9.4 ± 0.6‰ (mean ± SD), respectively. Within Japan, the inter-regional differences for both isotope ratios was less than 1‰, which indicates low dietary heterogeneity among prefectural divisions. The carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of the hair showed a significant correlation with the results of questionnaires on self-reported dietary habits. The carbon isotope ratios from Japan were lower than those in samples from the USA but higher than those in samples from Europe. These differences stem from the varying dietary proportions of food products originally derived from C3 and C4 plants. The dietary variation of Japan is as small as those of Europe and USA and smaller than those of some Asian countries. These results indicate that dietary homogeneity has progressed in Japan, which may indicate the influence from the spread of the Western-style diet and food globalization, although dietary heterogeneity among countries is still preserved. PMID:27616586

  8. Tracing the Pb origin using stable Pb isotope ratios in sediments of Liaodong Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ningjing; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Aimei; He, Lianhua; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jihua; Shi, Xuefa; Ma, Deyi

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the source of Pb within Liaodong Bay. Sixty surface sediment samples covering the entire Liaodong Bay were measured for total Pb, Cu, and Zn concentrations and Pb isotopic compositions (207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb). Pb in northern (Section I) and southwestern (Section III) Liaodong Bay is impacted by anthropogenic sources, including coal combustion, vehicle emissions, and Pb ores. However, Pb in southern Liaodong Bay (Section II) is predominately from natural sources. While the Pb isotopic composition in some Section I sites suggests there are various anthropogenic sources of Pb, its enrichment factors are low. This indicates that the stable Pb isotopic composition is more sensitive to anthropogenic Pb inputs. Based on total concentration and enrichment factors, Cu and Zn in Liaodong Bay are mainly derived from natural process, except in the Jinzhou Gulf.

  9. Stable carbon isotope ratio profiling of illicit testosterone preparations--domestic and international seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Lance; Cawley, Adam; Drury, Jason; Edey, Claire; Hasick, Nicole; Goebel, Catrin

    2014-10-01

    Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is now established as a robust and mature analytical technique for the doping control of endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids in human sport. It relies on the assumption that the carbon isotope ratios of naturally produced steroids are significantly different to synthetically manufactured testosterone or testosterone prohormones used in commercial medical or dietary supplement products. Recent publications in this journal have highlighted the existence of black market testosterone preparations with carbon isotope ratios within the range reported for endogenous steroids (i.e. δ(13) C ≥ -25.8 ‰). In this study, we set out to profile domestic and international law enforcement seizures of illicit testosterone products to monitor the prevalence of 'enriched' substrates--which if administered to human subjects would be considered problematic for the use of current GC-C-IRMS methodologies for the doping control of testosterone in sport. The distribution of δ(13) C values for this illicit testosterone sample population (n = 283) ranged from -23.4 ‰ to -32.9 ‰ with mean and median of -28.6 ‰--comparable to previous work. However, only 13 out of 283 testosterone samples (4.6 %) were found to display δ(13) C values ≥ -25.8 ‰, confirming that in the vast majority of cases of illicit testosterone administration, current GC-C-IRMS doping control procedures would be capable of confirming misuse. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Trends and problems on the studies by stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry for verifying the geographical origin of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenaga, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The multi-stable isotopic analysis method has employed to solve food authenticity problems. Stable isotope ratio of the light elements such as H, C, N, and O in food samples (e.g., rice, beef, and eel) were precisely analyzed by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Those samples were mainly taken from four different countries; Japan, United States of America, Australia, and China as comparison. All the rice samples were grown in the presence of either natural and or artificial fertilizer. The beef samples were taken from three different countries; Japan, United States of America, and Australia. Imported beef samples were also presented from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan, and compared with a correlation equation. The eel samples were taken from the three different countries and areas; Japan, China, and Taiwan. δX values showing some differences, all the Japanese food samples were clearly distinctive from the United States of America, Australia, China, and Taiwan samples. The results may be explained by the regional differences in isotope signatures of the climate, utilized nutrition, and/or quality of irrigation water among the farming countries. The statistical distinction could be one of the useful metrics to extract the food samples (rice, meat, fish, etc.) grown in Japan from those grown in the other countries. The dynamics analysis studies on stable isotopic behavior (i.e., Isotopomics) in human metabolism may be looking forward to establish a new science in near future. (author)

  11. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios of bone collagen reflect marine and terrestrial components of prehistoric human diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeninger, M.J.; DeNiro, M.J.; Tauber, H.

    1983-01-01

    delta 15 N values of bone collagen from Eskimos and from Northwst Coast Indians dependent on salmon fishing are about 10 per mil more positive than those from agriculturalists in historic times. Among prehistoric humans, two groups dependent on marine food sources show bone collagen delta 15 N values that are 4 to 6 per mil more positive than those from two agricultural groups. The nitrogen isotope ratios of bone collagen from prehistoric inhabitants of Bahamas are anomalously low for reasons that relate to the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in coral reefs

  12. On the cross-sensitivity between water vapor mixing ratio and stable isotope measurements of in-situ analyzers

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing amount of water vapor stable isotope data collected using in-situ instrumentation. A number of papers have characterized the performance of these in-situ analyzers and suggested methods for calibrating raw measurements. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic measurements on the mixing ratio has been shown to be a major uncertainty and a variety of techniques have been suggested to characterize this inaccuracy. However, most of these are based on relating isotopic ratios to water vapor mixing ratios from in-situ analyzers when the mixing ratio is varied and the isotopic composition kept constant. An additional correction for the span of the isotopic ratio scale is then applied by measuring different isotopic standards. Here we argue that the water vapor cross-sensitivity arises from different instrument responses (span and offset) of the parent H2O isotope and the heavier isotopes, rather than spectral overlap that could cause a true variation in the isotopic ratio with mixing ratio. This is especially relevant for commercial laser optical instruments where absorption lines are well resolved. Thus, the cross-sensitivity determined using more conventional techniques is dependent on the isotopic ratio of the standard used for the characterization, although errors are expected to be small. Consequently, the cross-sensitivity should be determined by characterizing the span and zero offset of each isotope mixing ratio. In fact, this technique makes the span correction for the isotopic ratio redundant. In this work we model the impact of changes in the span and offset of the heavy and light isotopes and illustrate the impact on the cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor. This clearly shows the importance of determining the zero offset for the two isotopes. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor is then characterized by determining the instrument response for the individual isotopes for a

  13. Toward a simple, repeatable, non-destructive approach to measuring stable-isotope ratios of water within tree stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulerson, S.; Volkmann, T.; Pangle, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional methodologies for measuring ratios of stable isotopes within the xylem water of trees involve destructive coring of the stem. A recent approach involves permanently installed probes within the stem, and an on-site assembly of pumps, switching valves, gas lines, and climate-controlled structure for field deployment of a laser spectrometer. The former method limits the possible temporal resolution of sampling, and sample size, while the latter may not be feasible for many research groups. We present results from initial laboratory efforts towards developing a non-destructive, temporally-resolved technique for measuring stable isotope ratios within the xylem flow of trees. Researchers have used direct liquid-vapor equilibration as a method to measure isotope ratios of the water in soil pores. Typically, this is done by placing soil samples in a fixed container, and allowing the liquid water within the soil to come into isotopic equilibrium with the headspace of the container. Water can also be removed via cryogenic distillation or azeotropic distillation, with the resulting liquid tested for isotope ratios. Alternatively, the isotope ratios of the water vapor can be directly measured using a laser-based water vapor isotope analyzer. Well-established fractionation factors and the isotope ratios in the vapor phase are then used to calculate the isotope ratios in the liquid phase. We propose a setup which would install a single, removable chamber onto a tree, where vapor samples could non-destructively and repeatedly be taken. These vapor samples will be injected into a laser-based isotope analyzer by a recirculating gas conveyance system. A major part of what is presented here is in the procedure of taking vapor samples at 100% relative humidity, appropriately diluting them with completely dry N2 calibration gas, and injecting them into the gas conveyance system without inducing fractionation in the process. This methodology will be helpful in making

  14. Lead exposure in raptors from Japan and source identification using Pb stable isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Chihiro; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakata, Hokuto; Saito, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yukiko; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Nomiyama, Kei; Hayashi, Terutake; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2017-11-01

    Lead (Pb) poisoning is widespread among raptors and water birds. In Japan, fragments of Pb ammunition are still found in endangered eagles although more than 10 years have passed since legislation regarding use of Pb ammunition was introduced. This study was performed to investigate Pb exposure in raptors from various locations in Japan. We measured hepatic and renal Pb concentrations and hepatic Pb isotope ratios of Steller's sea eagles (Haliaeetus pelagicus), white-tailed sea eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla), golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), and 13 other species (total 177 individuals) that were found dead, as well as blood samples from three eagles found in a weakened state during 1993-2015 from Hokkaido (northern part), Honshu (the main island), and Shikoku (a southern island) of Japan. In the present study in Hokkaido, one quarter of the sea eagles showed a high Pb concentration, suggesting exposure to abnormally high Pb levels and Pb poisoning. Pb isotope ratios indicated that endangered Steller's sea eagle and white-tailed sea eagle were poisoned by Pb ammunition that was used illegally in Hokkaido. In other areas of Japan, both surveillance and regulations were less extensive than in Hokkaido, but Pb poisoning in raptors was also noted. Therefore, Pb poisoning is still a serious problem in raptors in various areas of Japan due to accidental ingestion of materials containing Pb, especially Pb ammunition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Monocyte to HDL ratio in prediction of BMS restenosis in subjects with stable and unstable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, Derya; Turak, Osman; Yayla, Çağrı; Ozcan, Fırat; Tok, Duran; Çağlı, Kumral

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to assess the predictive role of the preprocedural circulating monocyte to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio (MHR) on the occurrence of stent restenosis (SR) in patients with stable and unstable angina pectoris undergoing successful bare-metal stenting (BMS). Between February 2008 and June 2014, a total of 831 patients with stable and unstable angina pectoris who underwent successful BMS were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. Left ventricular ejection fraction and laboratory data were also noted. In the receiver operating characteristics curve analysis, MHR >14 had 71% sensitivity and 69% specificity in predicting SR. Our study results show that preprocedural MHR is an independent predictor of SR in this patient population.

  16. VARYING STABLE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIOS OF DIFFERENT COASTAL MARSH PLANTS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH WASTEWATER NITROGEN AND LAND USE IN NEW ENGLAND, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of coastal biota have been used as indicators of sources of anthropogenic nitrogen. In this study the relationships of the stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of salt marsh plants, Iva frutescens (L.), Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex Steud, Spar...

  17. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios in Atmospheric VOC across the Asian Summer Monsoon Anticyclone obtained during the OMO-ASIA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebsbach, Marc; Koppmann, Ralf; Meisehen, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The automated high volume air sampling system (MIRAH) has been deployed during the atmospheric measurement campaign OMO-ASIA (Oxidation Mechanism Observations) with the German High Altitude - Long-range research aircraft (HALO) in July and August 2015. The intensive measurement period with base stations in Paphos (Cyprus) and Gan (Maldives) focussed on oxidation processes and air pollution chemistry downwind of the South Asia summer monsoon anticyclone, a pivot area critical for air quality and climate change, both regionally and worldwide. The measurement region covered the Eastern Mediterranean region, the Arabian Peninsula, Egypt, and the Arabian Sea. In total 194 air samples were collected on 17 flights in a height region from 3 km up to 15 km. The air samples were analysed for stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC with GC-C-IRMS in the laboratory afterwards. We determined stable carbon isotope ratios and mixing ratios of several aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, and aromatics. The large extent of the investigated area allowed for encountering air masses with different origin, characteristic, and atmospheric processing, e.g. Mediterranean air masses, crossing of polluted filaments and remnants of the Asian monsoon outflow, split of the Asian monsoon anticyclone. In this presentation we will show first results and interpretations supported by HYSPLIT backward trajectories.

  18. Investigation of the origin of ephedrine and methamphetamine by stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry: a Japanese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Y; Urano, Y; Nagano, T

    2005-01-01

    Illicit drug abuse is a serious global problem that can only be solved through international cooperation. In Asian countries, the abuse of methamphetamine is one of the most pressing problems. To assist in the control of methamphetamine, the authors investigated in detail the character of ephedrine, which is a key precursor for the illicit manufacture of methamphetamine. Commercial ephedrine is produced by one of three methods: (a) extraction from Ephedra plants, (b) full chemical synthesis or (c) via a semi-synthetic process involving the fermentation of sugar, followed by amination. Although chemically there is no difference between ephedrine samples from different origins (natural, synthetic or semi-synthetic), scientific and analytical tools such as drug-characterization and impurity-profiling programmes may provide valuable information for law enforcement and regulatory activities as part of precursor control strategies. During the research under discussion in the present article, in addition to classical impurity profiling of manufacturing by-products, the use of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry was investigated for determining the origin of the ephedrine that had been used as a precursor in seized methamphetamine samples. The results of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio (delta13C and delta15N) analysis of samples of crystalline methamphetamine seized in Japan suggested that the drug had been synthesized from either natural or semi-synthetic ephedrine and not from synthetic ephedrine. Stable isotope ratio analysis is expected to be a useful tool for tracing the origins of seized methamphetamine. It has attracted much interest from precursor control authorities in Japan and the East Asian region and may prove useful in the international control of precursors.

  19. G protein-coupled receptors form stable complexes with inwardly rectifying potassium channels and adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Natalie; Ethier, Nathalie; Oak, James N; Pei, Lin; Liu, Fang; Trieu, Phan; Rebois, R Victor; Bouvier, Michel; Hebert, Terence E; Van Tol, Hubert H M

    2002-11-29

    A large number of studies have demonstrated co-purification or co-immunoprecipitation of receptors with G proteins. We have begun to look for the presence of effector molecules in these receptor complexes. Co-expression of different channel and receptor permutations in COS-7 and HEK 293 cells in combination with co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the dopamine D(2) and D(4), and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (beta(2)-AR) form stable complexes with Kir3 channels. The D(4)/Kir3 and D(2) receptor/Kir3 interaction does not occur when the channel and receptor are expressed separately and mixed prior to immunoprecipitation, indicating that the interaction is not an artifact of the experimental protocol and reflects a biosynthetic event. The observed complexes are stable in that they are not disrupted by receptor activation or modulation of G protein alpha subunit function. However, using a peptide that binds Gbetagamma (betaARKct), we show that Gbetagamma is critical for dopamine receptor-Kir3 complex formation, but not for maintenance of the complex. We also provide evidence that Kir3 channels and another effector, adenylyl cyclase, are stably associated with the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor and can be co-immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antibodies. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have shown that in living cells under physiological conditions, beta(2)AR interacts directly with Kir3.1/3.4 and Kir3.1/3.2c heterotetramers as well as with adenylyl cyclase. All of these interactions are stable in the presence of receptor agonists, suggesting that these signaling complexes persist during signal transduction. In addition, we provide evidence that the receptor-effector complexes are also found in vivo. The observation that several G protein-coupled receptors form stable complexes with their effectors suggests that this arrangement might be a general feature of G protein-coupled signal transduction.

  20. Modelling of the flow of stable air over a complex region

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholtz, MT

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of stable air over a general region of complex topography and non-uniform surface temperature has been investigated. In order to gain further understanding of the motion of surface air, it was necessary to study the vertical structure...

  1. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ 18 O and δ 2 H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ 18 O and δ 2 H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source

  2. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M. [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  3. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Cordea, D. V.; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Mihaiu, M.

    2013-11-01

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ18O and δ2H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ18O and δ2H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  4. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog) during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC). An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range) were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  5. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010 using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC. An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  6. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in marine organic matters of the coastal ecosystem in Ubatuba, southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Y.; Wada, E.

    1994-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of the biota, sediment and land soil were surveyed in a coastal ecosystem near Ubatuba, southern Brazil. The phytoplankton and microzooplankton, fecal pellets of salpas, and zooplankton showed similar carbon isotope ratios (ca-21.0%), indicating that they thrive on similar carbon sources. The benthic animals showed a slightly higher carbon isotope ratio which can be attributed both to a trophic level enrichment effect and the result of a mixed food source which includes seaweeds. Three leaves found on the sea bottom showed the lowest carbon isotope ratio, i.e. the typical C3 plant value (-26.0%). Since all marine biota collected in this region showed higher carbon isotope rations than the leaves, those leaves carried into the sea are, apparently, not a significant carbon source for direct consumption and enter in the food web after decomposition. The nitrogen isotope rations of zooplankton and benthic animals had a slightly higher value than those of fecal pallets of salpas, indicating trophic level enrichment. (author). 28 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  7. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  8. Precedent fluctuation of serum hs-CRP to albumin ratios and mortality risk of clinically stable hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Chang Hwang

    Full Text Available A high sensitivity C-reactive protein to albumin ratio (hs-CRP/Alb predicts mortality risk in patients with acute kidney injury. However, it varies dynamically. This study was conducted to evaluate whether a variation of this marker was associated with long-term outcome in clinically stable hemodialysis (HD patients.hs-CRP/Alb was checked bimonthly in 284 clinically stable HD outpatients throughout all of 2008. Based on the "slope" of trend equation derived from 5-6 hs-CRP/alb ratios for each patient, the total number of patients was divided into quartiles--Group 1: β≦ -0.13, n = 71; group 2: β>-0.13≦0.003; n = 71, group 3: β>0.003≦0.20; and group 4: β>0.20, n = 71. The observation period was from January 1, 2009 to August 31, 2012.Group 1+4 showed a worse long-term survival (p = 0.04 and a longer 5-year hospitalization stay than Group 2+3 (38.7±44.4 vs. 16.7±22.4 days, p<0.001. Group 1+4 were associated with older age (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.01-1.05 and a high prevalence of congestive heart failure (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.00-4.11. Standard deviation (SD of hs-CRP/Alb was associated with male sex (β = 0.17, p = 0.003, higher Davies co-morbidity score (β = 0.16, p = 0.03, and baseline hs-CRP (β = 0.39, p<0.001. Patients with lower baseline and stable trend of hs-CRP/Alb had a better prognosis. By multivariate Cox proportional methods, SD of hs-CRP/alb (HR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08 rather than baseline hs-CRP/Alb was an independent predictive factor for long-term mortality after adjusting for sex and HD vintage.Clinically stable HD patients with a fluctuating variation of hs-CRP/Alb are characterized by old age, and more co-morbidity, and they tend to have longer subsequent hospitalization stay and higher mortality risk.

  9. Detailed assessment of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangju; Xiao, Honglang; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lixin; Cheng, Guodong; Zhou, Maoxian; Yin, Li; McCabe, Matthew F

    2011-10-30

    As an alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), the isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) approach has the advantage of low cost, continuous measurement and the capacity for field-based application for the analysis of the stable isotopes of water. Recent studies have indicated that there are potential issues of organic contamination of the spectral signal in the IRIS method, resulting in incorrect results for leaf samples. To gain a more thorough understanding of the effects of sample type (e.g., leaf, root, stem and soil), sample species, sampling time and climatic condition (dry vs. wet) on water isotope estimates using IRIS, we collected soil samples and plant components from a number of major species at a fine temporal resolution (every 2 h for 24-48 h) across three locations with different climatic conditions in the Heihe River Basin, China. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the extracted water from these samples were measured using both an IRMS and an IRIS instrument. The results show that the mean discrepancies between the IRMS and IRIS approaches for δ(18) O and δD, respectively, were: -5.6‰ and -75.7‰ for leaf water; -4.0‰ and -23.3‰ for stem water; -3.4‰ and -28.2‰ for root water; -0.5‰ and -6.7‰ for xylem water; -0.06‰ and -0.3‰ for xylem flow; and -0.1‰ and 0.3‰ for soil water. The order of the discrepancy was: leaf > stem ≈ root > xylem > xylem flow ≈ soil. In general, species of the same functional types (e.g., woody vs. herbaceous) within similar habitats showed similar deviations. For different functional types, the differences were large. Sampling at nighttime did not remove the observed deviations. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The correlation between lymphocyte/monocyte ratio and coronary collateral circulation in stable coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtul, Alparslan; Duran, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Coronary collateral circulation (CCC) has an important impact on cardiovascular prognosis and well-developed CCC is associated with better clinical outcomes. We investigated whether lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR) has an association with CCC in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD). The study population consisted of 245 patients with SCAD. Patients were classified into a poor CCC group (Rentrop grades 0/1, n = 87), or good CCC group (Rentrop grades 2/3, n = 158). LMR values were significantly higher in patients with good CCC than in those with poor CCC (4.41 ± 1.58 vs 2.76 ± 1.10; p 3.38 (OR 4.637; p = 0.004), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (OR 0.810, p SCAD patients.

  11. Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  12. The application of stable carbon isotope ratios as water quality indicators in coastal areas of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, R.M.; Mashiatullah, A.; Javed, T.; Tasneem, M.A.; Sajjad, M.I.; Saleem, M.; Khan, S.H.; Rizvi, S.H.N.; Siddiqui, S.A.; Qari, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ 13 C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC), total inorganic and organic carbon in bottom sediments, as well as sea plants in polluted water sources, non-polluted Karachi Sea water and pollution recipients are used to elaborate pollution scenario of shallow marine environment off Karachi coast. These results are supplemented with stable isotope composition of nitrogen (δ 15 N) in seaweeds and mangroves, toxic/trace metal concentration in sea-bottom sediments, total Coliform bacterial population, electrical conductivity, temperature and turbidity. Isotopic data shows that the mangrove ecosystem and the tidal fluctuations play a key role in controlling contamination inventories in shallow sea water off Karachi coast, specifically the Manora Channel. The Karachi harbour zone is found to be the most heavily polluted marine site in Manora channel during high as well as low tide regimes. Significant concentrations of toxic metals such as Pb, Ni, Cr, Zn, V, U are observed in off-shore sediments of Karachi coast. The results show that sewage and industrial wastes are the main sources of heavy metal pollution in Karachi harbour, Manora Channel exit zone and the southeast coast. However, as compared to other coastal areas, the Karachi coast is moderately polluted. Studies suggest incorporation of quick remedial measures to combat pollution in shallow marine environments off Karachi Coast. (author)

  13. Relation of ABO blood groups to coronary lesion complexity in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ahmet; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Kurt, Mustafa; Işık, Turgay; Kaya, Yasemin; Günaydın, Zeki Yüksel; Aksakal, Enbiya

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between ABO blood groups and complexity of coronary lesions assessed by SYNTAX score (SS) in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Our cross-sectional and observational study population consisted of 559 stable CAD patients. From all patients, ABO blood group was determined and the SS was calculated as low SYNTAX score (0-22), intermediate SYNTAX (23-32) score and high SYNTAX score (>32). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test, ANOVA, or Kruskal-Wallis test and chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the independent predictors of high SS. The analysis between the SS tertiles revealed that the frequency of non-O blood group was significantly higher in the upper SS tertiles (56.2% vs. 75.9 vs. 80.2%, pABO blood groups and complexity of angiographic CAD.

  14. Determination of the geographical origin of green coffee by principal component analysis of carbon, nitrogen and boron stable isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Francesca; Guillou, Claude G; Reniero, Fabiano; Ballarin, Luciano; Cantagallo, Maria I; Wieser, Michael; Iyer, Sundaram S; Héberger, Károly; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2005-01-01

    In this study we show that the continental origin of coffee can be inferred on the basis of coupling the isotope ratios of several elements determined in green beans. The combination of the isotopic fingerprints of carbon, nitrogen and boron, used as integrated proxies for environmental conditions and agricultural practices, allows discrimination among the three continental areas producing coffee (Africa, Asia and America). In these continents there are countries producing 'specialty coffees', highly rated on the market that are sometimes mislabeled further on along the export-sale chain or mixed with cheaper coffees produced in other regions. By means of principal component analysis we were successful in identifying the continental origin of 88% of the samples analyzed. An intra-continent discrimination has not been possible at this stage of the study, but is planned in future work. Nonetheless, the approach using stable isotope ratios seems quite promising, and future development of this research is also discussed. (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C W; Schierbeek, Henk; Houtekamer, Marco; van Engeland, Tom; Derrien, Delphine; Stal, Lucas J; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2015-07-15

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ(13)C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although LC/IRMS is expected to be more accurate and precise, no direct comparison has been reported. GC/IRMS with the aldonitrile penta-acetate (ANPA) derivatisation method was compared with LC/IRMS without derivatisation. A large number of glucose standards and a variety of natural samples were analysed for five neutral carbohydrates at natural abundance as well as at (13)C-enriched levels. Gas chromatography/chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (GC/CIMS) was applied to check for incomplete derivatisation of the carbohydrate, which would impair the accuracy of the GC/IRMS method. The LC/IRMS technique provided excellent precision (±0.08‰ and ±3.1‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively) for the glucose standards and this technique proved to be superior to GC/IRMS (±0.62‰ and ±19.8‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively). For GC/IRMS measurements the derivatisation correction and the conversion of carbohydrates into CO2 had a considerable effect on the measured δ(13)C values. However, we did not find any significant differences in the accuracy of the two techniques over the full range of natural δ(13)C abundances and (13)C-labelled glucose. The difference in the performance of GC/IRMS and LC/IRMS diminished when the δ(13)C values were measured in natural samples, because the chromatographic performance and background correction became critical factors, particularly for LC/IRMS. The derivatisation of carbohydrates for the GC/IRMS method was complete. Although both LC/IRMS and GC/IRMS are reliable techniques for compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of carbohydrates (provided that derivatisation is complete and the

  16. Detection of prostate cancer with complexed PSA and complexed/total PSA ratio - is there any advantage?

    OpenAIRE

    Strittmatter F; Stieber P; Nagel D; Füllhase C; Walther S; Stief CG; Waidelich R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the performance of total PSA (tPSA), the free/total PSA ratio (f/tPSA), complexed PSA (cPSA) and the complexed/total PSA ratio (c/tPSA) in prostate cancer detection. Methods Frozen sera of 442 patients have been analysed for tPSA, free PSA (fPSA) and cPSA. 131 patients had prostate cancer and 311 patients benign prostatic hyperplasia. Results Differences in the distribution of the biomarkers were seen as follows: tPSA, cPSA and c/tPSA were significantly higher i...

  17. Constraints on infants' musical rhythm perception: effects of interval ratio complexity and enculturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Erin E; Soley, Gaye; Levine, Rachel S

    2011-07-01

    Effects of culture-specific experience on musical rhythm perception are evident by 12 months of age, but the role of culture-general rhythm processing constraints during early infancy has not been explored. Using a habituation procedure with 5- and 7-month-old infants, we investigated effects of temporal interval ratio complexity on discrimination of standard from novel musical patterns containing 200-ms disruptions. Infants were tested in three ratio conditions: simple (2:1), which is typical in Western music, complex (3:2), which is typical in other musical cultures, and highly complex (7:4), which is relatively rare in music throughout the world. Unlike adults and older infants, whose accuracy was predicted by familiarity, younger infants were influenced by ratio complexity, as shown by their successful discrimination in the simple and complex conditions but not in the highly complex condition. The findings suggest that ratio complexity constrains rhythm perception even prior to the acquisition of culture-specific biases. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Stable incorporation versus dynamic exchange of β subunits in a native Ca2+ channel complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiglio, Marta; Di Biase, Valentina; Tuluc, Petronel; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2013-05-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are multi-subunit membrane proteins that transduce depolarization into cellular functions such as excitation-contraction coupling in muscle or neurotransmitter release in neurons. The auxiliary β subunits function in membrane targeting of the channel and modulation of its gating properties. However, whether β subunits can reversibly interact with, and thus differentially modulate, channels in the membrane is still unresolved. In the present study we applied fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-tagged α1 and β subunits expressed in dysgenic myotubes to study the relative dynamics of these Ca(2+) channel subunits for the first time in a native functional signaling complex. Identical fluorescence recovery rates of both subunits indicate stable interactions, distinct recovery rates indicate dynamic interactions. Whereas the skeletal muscle β1a isoform formed stable complexes with CaV1.1 and CaV1.2, the non-skeletal muscle β2a and β4b isoforms dynamically interacted with both α1 subunits. Neither replacing the I-II loop of CaV1.1 with that of CaV2.1, nor deletions in the proximal I-II loop, known to change the orientation of β relative to the α1 subunit, altered the specific dynamic properties of the β subunits. In contrast, a single residue substitution in the α interaction pocket of β1aM293A increased the FRAP rate threefold. Taken together, these findings indicate that in skeletal muscle triads the homologous β1a subunit forms a stable complex, whereas the heterologous β2a and β4b subunits form dynamic complexes with the Ca(2+) channel. The distinct binding properties are not determined by differences in the I-II loop sequences of the α1 subunits, but are intrinsic properties of the β subunit isoforms.

  19. A versatile method for stable carbon isotope analysis of carbohydrates by high-performance liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Van Breugel, P.; Houtekamer, M.J.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a method to analyze stable carbon isotope (13C/12C) ratios in a variety of carbohydrates using high-performance liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS). The chromatography is based on strong anion-exchange columns with low strength NaOH eluents. An eluent

  20. Laser-based measurements of 18O/16O stable isotope ratios (δ18O in wine samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Manish Gupta,1 J Brian Leen,1 Elena Simone Franklin Berman,1 Aldo Ciambotti2 1Los Gatos Research, Mountain View, CA, USA; 2Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Centro di Ricerca per l'Enologia, Asti, Italy Abstract: Wine counterfeiting is an international, multi-billion dollar issue, with some estimates suggesting that up to 5% of wines sold at auctions or secondary markets are fraudulent. Isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS measurements of the 18O/16O stable isotope ratio (δ18O of water-in-wine have been used for wine authentication; however, these analyses are time-consuming and costly. In this preliminary study, off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS is used to quantify δ18O in wines. This laser-based method has been extensively used to study water isotopes for hydrological and medical applications. Recently, the development of a spectral contaminant identifier (SCI has extended the application of these OA-ICOS analyzers to contaminated water samples (eg, plant, soil, and leaf waters. Here, we utilize OA-ICOS with the SCI to characterize wine samples (9%–15% ethanol, and show that the laser-based instrument provides a δ18O measurement precision of ±0.07‰ (1σ and agrees with IRMS to within ±0.63‰ (1σ. Moreover, by training the SCI on isotopically-characterized wines, the agreement with IRMS improves to within ±0.30‰ (1σ. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated by measuring watered and mixed wines. The method presented here can be readily extended to address other food authentication applications. Keywords: wine isotopes, wine fraud, counterfeit wines, OA-ICOS

  1. Statistical methods for improving verification of claims of origin for Italian wines based on stable isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dordevic, N.; Wehrens, R.; Postma, G.J.; Buydens, L.M.C.; Camin, F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The assessment of claims of origin is of enormous economic importance for DOC and DOCG wines. ► The official method is based on univariate statistical tests of H, C and O isotopic ratios. ► We consider 5220 Italian wine samples collected in the period 2000–2010. ► Multivariate statistical analysis leads to much better specificity and easier detection of false claims of origin. ► In the case of multi-modal data, mixture modelling provides additional improvements. - Abstract: Wine derives its economic value to a large extent from geographical origin, which has a significant impact on the quality of the wine. According to the food legislation, wines can be without geographical origin (table wine) and wines with origin. Wines with origin must have characteristics which are essential due to its region of production and must be produced, processed and prepared, exclusively within that region. The development of fast and reliable analytical methods for the assessment of claims of origin is very important. The current official method is based on the measurement of stable isotope ratios of water and alcohol in wine, which are influenced by climatic factors. The results in this paper are based on 5220 Italian wine samples collected in the period 2000–2010. We evaluate the univariate approach underlying the official method to assess claims of origin and propose several new methods to get better geographical discrimination between samples. It is shown that multivariate methods are superior to univariate approaches in that they show increased sensitivity and specificity. In cases where data are non-normally distributed, an approach based on mixture modelling provides additional improvements.

  2. Determination of origin of ephedrine used as precursor for illicit methamphetamine by carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Naoki; Makino, Yukiko; Sekita, Setsuko; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2004-07-15

    The sale of ephedrine, one of the precursors of methamphetamine, is strictly controlled and monitored in various countries to prevent the production of illicit methamphetamine. There are three kinds of production scheme for ephedrine manufacture, and it is very useful for precursor control to investigate the origin of ephedrine used for the synthesis of illicit methamphetamine. By means of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS), we investigated the origin of ephedrine based on the delta(13)C and delta(15)N values. The various origins of ephedrine (biosynthetic, semisynthetic, or synthetic) could be discriminated clearly by using these values. The delta(15)N values of synthetic ephedrine were more negative than those of ephedrine from other sources. By the repeated distillation of methylamine in our laboratory, we confirmed that this could be due to isotope separation during distillation for the purification of methylamine used for ephedrine synthesis. The values for ephedrine used as the precursor were well-correlated with those for methamphetamine synthesized from it. This drug characterization analysis should be useful to illuminate the origin of the precursors used for clandestine methamphetamine and to trace the diversion of medicinal ephedrine for illicit manufacture of methamphetamine.

  3. Stable carbon isotope ratios and intrinsic water-use efficiency of Miocene fossil leaves compared to modern congeners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, J.D.; Zhang, J.; Rember, W.C.; Jennings, D.; Larson, P. (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Miocene fossil leaves of forest trees were extracted from the Clarkia, Idaho fossil beds and their stable carbon isotope ratios were analyzed. Fossils had higher lignin concentrations and lower cellulose concentrations that modern leaves due to diagenesis and the HF used to extract the fossils. Therefore, [delta][sup 13]C of extracted fossil lignin was compared to that of modern lignin. Fossil lignin [delta][sup 13]C was significantly different from that of congeneric modern leaves (paired t-test, P<0.0001), but was 1.9% less negative. Gymnosperms (Metasequoia, Taxodium) were less negative than angiosperms (e.g., Magnolia, Quercus, Acer, Persea), but no difference between evergreen and deciduous species was detected. Using published estimates of the concentration and [delta][sup 13]C of atmospheric CO[sub 2] during the Miocene was estimated the CO[sub 2] partial pressure gradient across the stomata (intrinsic water-use efficiency). Intrinsic water-use efficiency was at least 70% higher during this past [open quotes]greenhouse[close quotes] period than at present.

  4. Reconstructing the diets of Greek Byzantine populations (6th-15th centuries AD) using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbou, Chryssi; Fuller, Benjamin T; Garvie-Lok, Sandra J; Richards, Michael P

    2011-12-01

    Documentary evidence and artistic representations have traditionally served as the primary sources of information about Byzantine diet. According to these sources, Byzantine diet was based on grain (primarily wheat and barley), oil, and wine, supplemented with legumes, dairy products, meat, and marine resources. Here, we synthesize and compare the results of stable isotope ratio analyses of eight Greek Byzantine populations (6th-15th centuries AD) from throughout Greece. The δ(13) C and δ(15) N values are tightly clustered, suggesting that all of these populations likely consumed a broadly similar diet. Both inland and coastal Byzantine populations consumed an essentially land-based C(3) diet, significant amounts of animal protein, and possibly some C(4) plants, while no evidence of a general dependence on low-δ(15) N legumes was observed. One interesting result observed in the isotopic data is the evidence for the consumption of marine protein at both coastal sites (a reasonable expectation given their location) and for some individuals from inland sites. This pattern contrasts with previous isotopic studies mainly on prehistoric Greek populations, which have suggested that marine species contributed little, or not at all, to the diet. The possibility that fasting practices contributed to marine protein consumption in the period is discussed, as are possible parallels with published isotope data from western European medieval sites. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry and physical comparison for the forensic examination of grip-seal plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erica; Carter, James F; Hill, Jenny C; Morton, Carolyn; Daeid, Niamh Nic; Sleeman, Richard

    2008-05-20

    Plastic bags are frequently used to package drugs, explosives and other contraband. There exists, therefore, a requirement in forensic casework to compare bags found at different locations. This is currently achieved almost exclusively by the use of physical comparisons such as birefringence patterns. This paper discusses some of the advantages and shortcomings of this approach, and presents stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) as a supplementary tool for effecting comparisons of this nature. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic data are presented for sixteen grip-seal plastic bags from a wide range of sources, in order to demonstrate the range of values which is likely to be encountered. Both isotopic and physical comparison (specifically birefringence) techniques are then applied to the analysis of rolls of bags from different manufacturing lots from a leading manufacturer. Both approaches are able to associate bags from a common production batch. IRMS can be applied to small fragments which are not amenable to physical comparisons, and is able to discriminate bags which could be confused using birefringence patterns alone. Similarly, in certain cases birefringence patterns discriminate bags with similar isotopic compositions. The two approaches are therefore complementary. When more than one isotopically distinct region exists within a bag (e.g. the grip-seal is distinct from the body) the ability to discriminate and associate bags is greatly increased.

  6. Highly active and stable oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na⁺ pump complex for structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Michio; Li, Xiaodan

    2015-11-01

    The oxaloacetate decarboxylase primary Na(+) pump (Oad) produces energy for the surviving of some pathogenic bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Oad composes of three subunits: Oad-α, a biotinylated soluble subunit and catalyzes the decarboxylation of oxaloacetate; Oad-β, a transmembrane subunit and functions as a Na(+) pump; and Oad-γ, a single transmembrane α-helical anchor subunit and assembles Oad-α/β/γ complex. The molecular mechanism of Oad complex coupling the exothermic decarboxylation to generate the Na(+) electrochemical gradient remains unsolved. Our biophysical and biochemical studies suggested that the stoichiometry of Oad complex from Vibrio cholerae composed of α, β, γ in 4:2:2 stoichiometry not that of 4:4:4. The high-resolution structure determination of the Oad complex would reveal the energetic transformation mechanism from the catalytical soluble α subunit to membrane β subunit. Sufficient amount stable, conformational homogenous and active Oad complex with the right stoichiometry is the prerequisite for structural analysis. Here we report an easy and reproducible protocol to obtain high quantity and quality Oad complex protein for structural analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatial and temporal complexities of reproductive behavior and sex ratios: a case from parasitic insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Dittmar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sex ratios are important empirical data in predicting sex allocation strategy and selection in populations. Therefore, they should be sampled at crucial developmental steps before and after parental investment. In parasites with free-living (off-host developmental stages the timing and method of sampling is not trivial, because ecological niches are frequently poorly known. Consequently, information is scarce for sex ratios of these parasites between conception and sexual maturity. Often, only data from adult parasites are available, which usually were collected from the parasite's hosts. Generally, these ratios are assumed to represent operational sex ratios. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We here report three years of empirical data on population sex differentials from a bat ectoparasite (Trichobius frequens with off-host developmental stages. At emergence these parasites exhibit a significant and seasonally stable female biased sex ratio. This bias is lost in the adult population on the roosting host, which shows sex ratios at equality. This is best explained by a behaviorally driven, sex-dependent mortality differential. Because consistently only subsets of females are available to mate, the operational sex ratio in the population is likely male biased. Host capture experiments throughout the day show a statistically significant, but temporary male excess in bat flies on foraging bats. This phenomenon is partly driven by the diurnal rhythms of female larviposition, and partly due to parasites remaining in the bat roost during foraging. Because most previous research in bat flies is based only on foraging bats, female contributions to physical sex ratios have been underestimated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results highlight the importance of detailed natural history observations, and emphasize that ignoring the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of reproduction in any organism will lead to significant empirical sampling errors

  8. Spatial and temporal complexities of reproductive behavior and sex ratios: a case from parasitic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Katharina; Morse, Solon; Gruwell, Matthew; Mayberry, Jason; DiBlasi, Emily

    2011-05-10

    Sex ratios are important empirical data in predicting sex allocation strategy and selection in populations. Therefore, they should be sampled at crucial developmental steps before and after parental investment. In parasites with free-living (off-host) developmental stages the timing and method of sampling is not trivial, because ecological niches are frequently poorly known. Consequently, information is scarce for sex ratios of these parasites between conception and sexual maturity. Often, only data from adult parasites are available, which usually were collected from the parasite's hosts. Generally, these ratios are assumed to represent operational sex ratios. We here report three years of empirical data on population sex differentials from a bat ectoparasite (Trichobius frequens) with off-host developmental stages. At emergence these parasites exhibit a significant and seasonally stable female biased sex ratio. This bias is lost in the adult population on the roosting host, which shows sex ratios at equality. This is best explained by a behaviorally driven, sex-dependent mortality differential. Because consistently only subsets of females are available to mate, the operational sex ratio in the population is likely male biased. Host capture experiments throughout the day show a statistically significant, but temporary male excess in bat flies on foraging bats. This phenomenon is partly driven by the diurnal rhythms of female larviposition, and partly due to parasites remaining in the bat roost during foraging. Because most previous research in bat flies is based only on foraging bats, female contributions to physical sex ratios have been underestimated. Our results highlight the importance of detailed natural history observations, and emphasize that ignoring the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of reproduction in any organism will lead to significant empirical sampling errors of sex ratios, and may obscure operational sex ratios.

  9. Water-stable fac-{TcO₃}⁺ complexes - a new field of technetium chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braband, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The development of technetium chemistry has been lagging behind that of its heavier congener rhenium, primarily because the inherent radioactivity of all Tc isotopes has limited the number of laboratories that can study the chemistry of this fascinating element. Although technetium is an artificial element, it is not rare. Significant amounts of the isotope (99)Tc are produced every day as a fission byproduct in nuclear power plants. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of (99)Tc is essential to avoid its release into the environment. In this article the chemistry of technetium at its highest oxidation state (+VII) is reviewed with a special focus on recent developments which make water-stable complexes of the general type [TcO(3)(tacn-R)](+) (tacn-R = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane or derivatives) accessible. Complexes containing the fac-{TcO(3)}(+) core display a unique reactivity. In analogy to [OsO(4)] and [RuO(4)], complexes containing the fac-{TcO(3)}(+) core undergo with alkenes metal-mediated, vicinal cis-dihydroxylation reactions (alkene-glycol interconversion) in water via a (3+2)-cycloaddition reaction. Therefore, water-stable fac-{(99m)TcO(3)}(+) complexes pave the way for a new labeling strategy for radiopharmaceutical applications, based on (3+2)-cycloaddition reactions. This new concept for the labeling of biomolecules with small [(99m)TcO(3)(tacn-R)](+)-type complexes by way of a (3+2)-cycloaddition with alkenes is discussed in detail. The herein reported developments in high-valent technetium chemistry create a new field of research with this artificial element. This demonstrates the potential of fundamental research to provide new impetus of innovation for the development of new methods for radiopharmaceutical applications.

  10. A Stable Coordination Complex of Rh(IV) in an N,O-Donor Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Shashi B. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Shopov, Dimitar Y. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Sharninghausen, Liam S. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Vinyard, David J. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Mercado, Brandon Q. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Brudvig, Gary W. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Crabtree, Robert H. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect

    2015-12-10

    We describe facial and meridional isomers of [RhIII(pyalk)3], as well as meridional [RhIV(pyalk)3]+ {pyalk =2-(2-pyridyl)-2-propanoate}, the first coordination complex in an N,O-donor environment to show a clean, reversible RhIII/IV redox couple and to have a stable Rh(IV) form, which we characterize by EPR and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as X-ray crystallography. The unprecedented stability of the Rh(IV) species is ascribed to the exceptional donor strength of the ligands, their oxidation resistance, and the meridional coordination geometry.

  11. Distribution tactics for success in turbulent versus stable environments: A complexity theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bruce Mason

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the external environment influences the choice of distribution tactics. Since businesses and markets are complex adaptive systems, using complexity theory to understand such environments is necessary, but it has not been widely researched. A qualitative case method using in-depth interviews investigated four successful, versus less successful, companies in turbulent versus stable environments. The results tentatively confirmed that the more successful company, in a turbulent market, sees distribution activities as less important than other aspects of the marketing mix, but uses them to stabilise customer relationships and to maintain distribution processes. These findings can benefit marketers by emphasising a new way to consider place activities. How marketers can be assisted, and suggestions for further research, are provided.

  12. Distribution tactics for success in turbulent versus stable environments: A complexity theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bruce Mason

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the external environment influences the choice of distribution tactics. Since businesses and markets are complex adaptive systems, using complexity theory to understand such environments is necessary, but it has not been widely researched. A qualitative case method using in-depth interviews investigated four successful, versus less successful, companies in turbulent versus stable environments. The results tentatively confirmed that the more successful company, in a turbulent market, sees distribution activities as less important than other aspects of the marketing mix, but uses them to stabilise customer relationships and to maintain distribution processes. These findings can benefit marketers by emphasising a new way to consider place activities. How marketers can be assisted, and suggestions for further research, are provided.

  13. Indefinitely stable iron(IV) cage complexes formed in water by air oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomyn, Stefania; Shylin, Sergii I.; Bykov, Dmytro; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Bon, Volodymyr; Fritsky, Igor O.

    2017-01-01

    In nature, iron, the fourth most abundant element of the Earth's crust, occurs in its stable forms either as the native metal or in its compounds in the +2 or +3 (low-valent) oxidation states. High-valent iron (+4, +5, +6) compounds are not formed spontaneously at ambient conditions, and the ones obtained synthetically appear to be unstable in polar organic solvents, especially aqueous solutions, and this is what limits their studies and use. Here we describe unprecedented iron(IV) hexahydrazide clathrochelate complexes that are assembled in alkaline aqueous media from iron(III) salts, oxalodihydrazide and formaldehyde in the course of a metal-templated reaction accompanied by air oxidation. The complexes can exist indefinitely at ambient conditions without any sign of decomposition in water, nonaqueous solutions and in the solid state. We anticipate that our findings may open a way to aqueous solution and polynuclear high-valent iron chemistry that remains underexplored and presents an important challenge.

  14. Very stable high molecular mass multiprotein complex with DNase and amylase activities in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, Svetlana E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Verkhovod, Timofey D; Buneva, Valentina N; Sedykh, Sergey E; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-01-01

    For breastfed infants, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of proteins, peptides, antibodies, and other components promoting neonatal growth and protecting infants from viral and bacterial infection. It has been proposed that most biological processes are performed by protein complexes. Therefore, identification and characterization of human milk components including protein complexes is important for understanding the function of milk. Using gel filtration, we have purified a stable high molecular mass (~1000 kDa) multiprotein complex (SPC) from 15 preparations of human milk. Light scattering and gel filtration showed that the SPC was stable in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2 but dissociated efficiently under the conditions that destroy immunocomplexes (2 M MgCl2 , 0.5 M NaCl, and 10 mM DTT). Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. The relative content of the individual SPCs varied from 6% to 25% of the total milk protein. According to electrophoretic and mass spectrometry analysis, all 15 SPCs contained lactoferrin (LF) and α-lactalbumin as major proteins, whereas human milk albumin and β-casein were present in moderate or minor amounts; a different content of IgGs and sIgAs was observed. All SPCs efficiently hydrolyzed Plasmid supercoiled DNA and maltoheptaose. Some freshly prepared SPC preparations contained not only intact LF but also small amounts of its fragments, which appeared in all SPCs during their prolonged storage; the fragments, similar to intact LF, possessed DNase and amylase activities. LF is found in human epithelial secretions, barrier body fluids, and in the secondary granules of leukocytes. LF is a protein of the acute phase response and nonspecific defense against different types of microbial and viral infections. Therefore, LF complexes with other proteins may be important for its functions not only in human milk. Copyright © 2014

  15. Methanogenic pathways in Alaskan peatlands at different trophic levels with evidence from stable isotope ratios and metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, X.; Langford, L.; Chanton, J.; Roth, S.; Schaefer, J.; Barkay, T.; Hines, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    To better constrain the large uncertainties in emission fluxes, it is necessary to improve the understanding of methanogenic pathways in northern peatlands with heterogeneous surface vegetation and pH. Surface vegetation is an excellent indicator of porewater pH, which heavily influences the microbial communities in peatlands. Stable C isotope ratios (d13C) have been used as a robust tool to distinguish methanogenic pathways, especially in conjunction with metagenomic analysis of the microbial communities. To link surface vegetation species compositions, pH, microbial communities, and methanogenic pathways, 15 peatland sites were studied in Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska in the summer of 2014. These sites were ordinated using multiple factor analysis into 3 clusters based on pH, temp, CH4 and volatile fatty acid production rates, d13C values, and surface vegetation composition. In the ombrotrophic group (pH 3.3), various Sphagna species dominanted, but included shrubs Ledum decumbens and Eriophorum vaginatum. Primary fermentation rates were slow with no CH4 detected. The fen cluster (pH 5.3) was dominated by various Carex species, and CH4 production rates were lower than those in the intermediate cluster but more enriched in 13C (-49‰). Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens. In the intermediate trophic level (pH 4.7), Sphagnum squarrosum and Carex aquatilis were abundant. The same methanogens as in fen cluster also dominated this group, but with higher abundances, which, in part, lead to the higher CH4 production rates in this cluster. The syntrophs Syntrophobacter and Pelobacter were also more abundant than the fen sites, which may explain the d13CH4 values that were the lighetest among the three clusters (-54‰). The high methanogenic potential in the intermediate trophic sites warrant further study since they are not only present in large areas currently, but also represent the transient stage during the evolution from bog to fen in

  16. Effects of lipid extraction on stable isotope ratios in avian egg yolk: Is arithmetic correction a reliable alternative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppel, S.; Federer, R.N.; O'Brien, D. M.; Powell, A.N.; Hollmén, Tuula E.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies of nutrient allocation to egg production in birds use stable isotope ratios of egg yolk to identify the origin of nutrients. Dry egg yolk contains >50% lipids, which are known to be depleted in 13C. Currently, researchers remove lipids from egg yolk using a chemical lipid-extraction procedure before analyzing the isotopic composition of protein in egg yolk. We examined the effects of chemical lipid extraction on ??13C, ??15N, and ??34S of avian egg yolk and explored the utility of an arithmetic lipid correction model to adjust whole yolk ??13C for lipid content. We analyzed the dried yolk of 15 captive Spectacled Eider (Somateriafischeri) and 20 wild King Eider (S. spectabilis) eggs, both as whole yolk and after lipid extraction with a 2:1 chloroform:methanol solution. We found that chemical lipid extraction leads to an increase of (mean ?? SD) 3.3 ?? 1.1% in ??13C, 1.1 ?? 0.5% in ??15N, and 2.3 ?? 1.1% in ??34S. Arithmetic lipid correction provided accurate values for lipid-extracted S13C in captive Spectacled Eiders fed on a homogeneous high-quality diet. However, arithmetic lipid correction was unreliable for wild King Eiders, likely because of their differential incorporation of macronutrients from isotopically distinct environments during migration. For that reason, we caution against applying arithmetic lipid correction to the whole yolk ??13C of migratory birds, because these methods assume that all egg macronutrients are derived from the same dietary sources. ?? 2010 The American Ornithologists' Union.

  17. Stable isotope ratio analysis of breastfeeding and weaning practices of children from medieval Fishergate House York, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Nicole M

    2013-11-01

    Rib collagen of 51 juveniles and 11 adult females from the late medieval Fishergate House cemetery site (York, UK) were analyzed using nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the weaning age for this population and to reconstruct diet. The juveniles' ages ranged from fetal to 5-6 years, while the females were of reproductive age. Previous researchers suggested that the children from Fishergate House might have been weaned later than the medieval British norm of 2 years, based on a mortality peak at 4-6 years of age. The results show weaning was complete by 2 years of age, agreeing with previous British weaning studies. The adult female δ(15) N values have a mean of 11.4‰ ± 1.1‰ and the δ(13) C values have a mean of -19.4‰ ± 0.4‰. These findings are consistent with previous isotopic studies of female diet in York during this period, though slightly lower. The weaned juvenile nitrogen values were found to be higher than the adult females (12.4‰ ± 1.0‰ for δ(15) N and -19.7‰ ± 0.5‰ for δ(13) C), which might indicate a dependence on higher trophic level proteins such as marine fish or pork. Marine fish is considered a high status food and children are considered low-status individuals at this time, making this a particularly interesting finding. Weaning does not appear to coincide with peak mortality, suggesting environment factors may be playing a larger role in child mortality at Fishergate House. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Spatial variation of the stable nitrogen isotope ratio of woody plants along a topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Liu, Feng; Wu, X Ben; Archer, Steven R; Hallmark, C Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Variation in the stable N isotope ratio (delta15N) of plants and soils often reflects the influence of environment on the N cycle. We measured leaf delta15N and N concentration ([N]) on all individuals of Prosopis glandulosa (deciduous tree legume), Condalia hookeri (evergreen shrub), and Zanthoxylum fagara (evergreen shrub) present within a belt transect 308 m long x 12 m wide in a subtropical savanna ecosystem in southern Texas, USA in April and August 2005. Soil texture, gravimetric water content (GWC), total N and delta15N were also measured along the transect. At the landscape scale, leaf delta15N was negatively related to elevation for all the three species along this topoedaphic sequence. Changes in soil delta15N, total N, and GWC appeared to contribute to this spatial pattern of leaf delta15N. In lower portions of the landscape, greater soil N availability and GWC are associated with relatively high rates of both N mineralization and nitrification. Both soil delta15N and leaf [N] were positively correlated with leaf delta15N of non-N2 fixing plants. Leaf delta15N of P. glandulosa, an N2-fixing legume, did not correlate with leaf [N]; the delta15N of P. glandulosa's leaves were closer to atmospheric N2 and significantly lower than those of C. hookeri and Z. fagara. Additionally, at smaller spatial scales, a proximity index (which reflected the density and distance of surrounding P. glandulosa trees) was negatively correlated with leaf delta15N of C. hookeri and Z. fagara, indicating the N2-fixing P. glandulosa may be important to the N nutrition of nearby non-N2-fixing species. Our results indicate plant 15N natural abundance can reflect the extent of N retention and help us better understand N dynamics and plant-soil interactions at ecosystem and landscape scales.

  19. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Schierbeek, H.; Houtekamer, M.; van Engeland, T.; Derrien, D.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ13C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence,

  20. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Schierbeek, H.; Houtekamer, M.; van Engeland, T.; Derrien, D.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2015-01-01

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of d13C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although

  1. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C. W.; Schierbeek, Henk; Houtekamer, Marco; van Engeland, Tom; Derrien, Delphine; Stal, Lucas J.; Boschker, Henricus T. S.

    2015-01-01

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ(13)C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although

  2. Diet and habitat of the saiga antelope during the late Quaternary using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgensen, Jonathan; Drucker, Dorothée G.; Stuart, Anthony J.; Schneider, Matthias; Buuveibaatar, Bayarbaatar; Bocherens, Hervé

    2017-03-01

    Saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) is one of the typical late Pleistocene species of the cold and arid mammoth steppe that covered a large area of northern hemisphere. The species is currently endangered and persists only in small areas of Central Asian steppe and desert ecosystems. The investigation of the ecology of the Pleistocene saiga using stable isotope ratios (δ13C, δ15N) aimed to decipher how different their diet and habitat were from those observed nowadays in relict populations. Up to 76 samples of bone collagen of ancient saiga from Western Europe, Siberia and Eastern Beringia were analysed and compared with 52 samples of hair and bone collagen of modern specimens from Kazahkstan, Russia and Mongolia. The δ13C values of the ancient saiga do not exhibit a clear trend over time. They cover the same range of values as the modern ones, from a C3-dominated to a C3-C4-dominated mixed diet (including probably Chenopodiaceae). In contrast, the δ15N values of fossil saigas are more variable and lower on average than the extant ones. The lowest δ15N values of ancient saiga are found around the Last Glacial Maximum, reflecting the influence of the cold conditions at that time. On the other hand, fossil saiga occupying the same regions as the historical and modern populations exhibit high δ15N values similar to the modern ones, confirming ecological continuity over time. Modern saiga is thus occupying just one of its potential diverse habitats they used in the past. Therefore, the extant saiga is not a refugee species confined to a suboptimal habitat. During the late Pleistocene, the saiga occupied a separate niche compared with the other ungulates of the mammoth steppe. However, this species could also adapt to a lichen-dominated diet normally seen in reindeer, leading to an isotopic overlap between the two species in south-western France and Alaska around the Last Glacial Maximum. This adaptation allowed a geographical expansion that does not correspond to a

  3. A comparison between wet canopy evaporation estimated by stable isotope ratios of water and canopy interception measured by water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeki; Hattori, Shohei; Uemura, Ryu

    2017-04-01

    Some papers proved that canopy interception is proportional to rainfall not only on a rain event basis but also on an hourly basis (e.g. Murakami, 2006, J. Hydrol.; Saito et al., 2013, J. Hydrol.). However, theoretically, evaporation does not depend on rainfall amount. These results are enigmatic and we need to reevaluate wet canopy evaporation. We measured gross rainfall and net rainfall in a plastic Christmas tree stand with a height of 165 cm placed on a 180-cm square tray as described in Murakami and Toba (2013, Hydrol. Res. Lett.). The measurement was conducted outside under natural rainfall. We also estimated wet canopy evaporation using stable isotope ratios of water. During a rain event, we manually sampled gross and net rainwater on an hourly basis. Evaporation was calculated using the difference between the δ18O (or δ2H) values in gross and net rainfall using isotope fractionation factor. Total gross rainfall in a target rain event in October, 2014, was 28.0 mm and net rainfall (discharge from the tray) was 22.7 mm, i.e. canopy interception was 5.3 mm (18.9% of gross rainfall). The δ18O (or δ2H) value in net rainfall was higher than that in gross rainfall because of fractionation by evaporation on wet canopy surface. Hourly evaporation calculated by the values of δ18O varied from 2% to 24% of gross rainfall, and the weighted average by hourly gross rainfall was 5.2% of gross rainfall. Further, we estimated rainfall interception using a tank model (Yoshida et al., 1993) assuming constant evaporation rate, i.e. 20% of gross rainfall. Total net rainfall calculated by the model was 23.1 mm, i.e. calculated canopy interception was 4.9 mm (17.5% of gross rainfall). Then, keeping the parameters of the model, we simulated net rainfall using hourly surface evaporation obtained by the δ18O values. Calculated net rainfall was 25.6 mm, i.e. wet canopy evaporation was only 2.4 mm (8.6% of gross rainfall). So far, possible explanation of the discrepancy between

  4. Concord grape pomace polyphenols complexed to soy protein isolate are stable and hypoglycemic in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopchand, Diana E; Kuhn, Peter; Krueger, Christian G; Moskal, Kristin; Lila, Mary Ann; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-11-27

    Polyphenols extracted from Concord grape pomace were stabilized by complexation to soy protein isolate (SPI) to produce grape polyphenol-SPI complex (GP-SPI) containing 5% or 10% grape polyphenols. LC-MS and MALDI-TOF analysis showed that a broad range of phytochemicals were present in the grape pomace extract. Anthocyanins and total polyphenols in the GP-SPI complex were stable after a 16-week incubation at 37 °C but were reduced by up 60% in dried grape pomace extract. Compared to vehicle (236 ± 34 mg/dL), a single dose of 300 mg/kg GP-SPI (184 ± 32 mg/dL) or 500 mg/kg GP-SPI (177 ± 28 mg/dL) having 5% grape polyphenols significantly lowered blood glucose in obese and hyperglycemic C57BL/6 mice 6 h after administration. GP-SPI allows the capture of grape pomace polyphenols in a protein-rich food matrix and may be useful as a functional food ingredient for the management of blood glucose levels.

  5. Organic Reference Materials for Hydrogen, Carbon, and Nitrogen Stable Isotope-Ratio Measurements : Caffeines, n-Alkanes, Fatty Acid Methyl Esters, Glycines, L-Valines, Polyethylenes, and Oils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmelrnann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Fong, Jon; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F.; Toman, Blaza; Ackermann, Annika; Assonov, Sergey; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T.; Brejcha, Ramona; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Darwish, Tamim; Elsner, Martin; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Groeing, Manfred; Helie, Jean-Francois; Herrero-Martin, Sara; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Sauer, Peter E.; Sessions, Alex L.; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    An international project developed, quality-tested, and determined isotope-delta values of 19 new organic reference materials (RMs) for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements, in addition to analyzing pre-existing RMs NBS 22 (oil), IAEA-CH-7 (polyethylene foil), and

  6. Ratio of total-to-selective extinction in the Taurus dark cloud complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrba, F.J.; Rydgren, A.E.; Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD)

    1985-01-01

    UBVRI and JHK photometry, as well as spectral classifications are presented for seven reddened early-type field stars that are observed through the Taurus dark cloud complex. The ratio of total-to-selective extinction is derived for each star by the color-difference method. For six stars with absolute magnitudes in violet of more than 1.7 and less than 3.2 mag, a normal ratio R of total-to-selective extinction of about 3.1 is found. The mildly anomalous R value of about 3.5 for the well-studied star HD 29647 was also confirmed. The results provide further evidence that the interstellar extinction law in the Taurus dark cloud complex is basically normal for lines of sight with absolute magnitudes in violet of less than 3 mag. 24 references

  7. New glyme-cyclic imide lithium salt complexes as thermally stable electrolytes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takashi; Hachida, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazuki; Tachikawa, Naoki; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    New glyme-Li salt complexes were prepared by mixing equimolar amounts of a novel cyclic imide lithium salt LiN(C 2F 4S 2O 4) (LiCTFSI) and a glyme (triglyme (G3) or tetraglyme (G4)). The glyme-Li salt complexes, [Li(G3)][CTFSI] and [Li(G4)][CTFSI], are solid and liquid, respectively, at room temperature. The thermal stability of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is much higher than that of pure G4, and the vapor pressure of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is negligible at temperatures lower than 100 °C. Although the viscosity of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is high (132.0 mPa s at 30 °C), because of its high molar concentration (ca. 3 mol dm -3), its ionic conductivity at 30 °C is relatively high, i.e., 0.8 mS cm -1, which is slightly lower than that of a conventional organic electrolyte solution (1 mol dm -3 LiTFSI dissolved in propylene carbonate). The self-diffusion coefficients of a Li + cation, a CTFSI - anion, and a glyme molecule were measured by the pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR method (PGSE-NMR). The ionicity (dissociativity) of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] at 30 °C is ca. 0.5, as estimated from the PGSE-NMR diffusivity measurements and the ionic conductivity measurements. Results of linear sweep voltammetry revealed that [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is electrochemically stable in an electrode potential range of 0-4.5 V vs. Li/Li +. The reversible deposition-stripping behavior of lithium was observed by cyclic voltammetry. The [LiCoO 2|[Li(G4)][CTFSI]|Li metal] cell showed a stable charge-discharge cycling behavior during 50 cycles, indicating that the [Li(G4)][CTFSI] complex is applicable to a 4 V class lithium secondary battery.

  8. Variation in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in flight feathers of a moulting White-bellied Sunbird Cinnyris talatala

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Symes, CT

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors measured d13C and d15N isotope signatures in flight feathers of a White-bellied Sunbird to assess the value of using stable isotopes of feathers in avian dietary studies. Significant variation in d13C and d15N isotope values of flight...

  9. Tracing anthropogenic Hg and Pb input using stable Hg and Pb isotope ratios in sediments of the central Portuguese Margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mil-Holmens, M.; Blum, J.; Canário, J.; Caetano, M.; Costa, A.M.; Lebreiro, S.M.; Trancoso, M.; Richter, T.O.; de Stigter, H.; Johnson, M.; Branco, V.; Cesário, R.; Mouro, F.; Mateus, M.; Boer, W.; Melo, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Three short marine sediment cores from the Cascais Submarine Canyon (CSC; cores 252-32 and 252-35) and the Estremadura Spur (core 252-16) on the central Portuguese Margin were analysed for Hg, Pb, Al, and Mn concentrations, and both Pb and Hg stable isotope compositions, in order to reconstruct

  10. On the interconnection of stable protein complexes: inter-complex hubs and their conservation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Concettina

    2015-01-01

    Protein complexes are key molecular entities that perform a variety of essential cellular functions. The connectivity of proteins within a complex has been widely investigated with both experimental and computational techniques. We developed a computational approach to identify and characterise proteins that play a role in interconnecting complexes. We computed a measure of inter-complex centrality, the crossroad index, based on disjoint paths connecting proteins in distinct complexes and identified inter-complex hubs as proteins with a high value of the crossroad index. We applied the approach to a set of stable complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Homo sapiens. Just as done for hubs, we evaluated the topological and biological properties of inter-complex hubs addressing the following questions. Do inter-complex hubs tend to be evolutionary conserved? What is the relation between crossroad index and essentiality? We found a good correlation between inter-complex hubs and both evolutionary conservation and essentiality.

  11. Pheromones of three ambrosia beetles in the Euwallacea fornicatus species complex: ratios and preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam F. Cooperband

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Three cryptic species in the Euwallacea fornicatus species complex were reared in laboratory colonies and investigated for the presence of pheromones. Collections of volatiles from combinations of diet, fungus, beetles, and galleries from polyphagous shot hole borer (Euwallacea sp. #1 revealed the presence of 2-heneicosanone and 2-tricosanone only in the presence of beetles, regardless of sex. Subsequent examination of volatiles from the other two species, tea shot hole borer (Euwallacea sp. #2 and Kuroshio shot hole borer (Euwallacea sp. #5, revealed these two ketones were present in all three species but in different ratios. In dual choice olfactometer behavioral bioassays, mature mated females were strongly attracted to a synthetic binary blend of ketones matching their own natural ratios. However, females in each species were repelled by ketone blends in ratios corresponding to the other two species. Males of each species responded similarly to females when presented with ratios matching their own or the other two species. The presence of these compounds in the three beetle species, in ratios unique to each species, and their strong species-specific attraction and repellency, suggests they are pheromones. The ecological function of these pheromones is discussed. In addition to the pheromones, the previously known attractant (1S,4R-p-menth-2-en-1-ol (also known as quercivorol was discovered in the presence of the fungal symbionts, but not in association with the beetles. Quercivorol was tested in a dual-choice olfactometer and was strongly attractive to all three species. This evidence suggests quercivorol functions as a kairomone for members of the E. fornicatus species complex, likely produced by the symbiotic fungi.

  12. High-temperature pyrolysis/gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry: simultaneous measurement of the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon in cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Ewan J; Loader, Neil J; McCarroll, Danny; Young, Giles H F; Robertson, Iain; Heaton, Timothy H E; Gagen, Mary H; Warham, Joseph O

    2012-01-30

    Stable isotope analysis of cellulose is an increasingly important aspect of ecological and palaeoenvironmental research. Since these techniques are very costly, any methodological development which can provide simultaneous measurement of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose deserves further exploration. A large number (3074) of tree-ring α-cellulose samples are used to compare the stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) produced by high-temperature (1400°C) pyrolysis/gas chromatography (GC)/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with those produced by combustion GC/IRMS. Although the two data sets are very strongly correlated, the pyrolysis results display reduced variance and are strongly biased towards the mean. The low carbon isotope ratios of tree-ring cellulose during the last century, reflecting anthropogenic disturbance of atmospheric carbon dioxide, are thus overestimated. The likely explanation is that a proportion of the oxygen atoms are bonding with residual carbon in the reaction chamber to form carbon monoxide. The 'pyrolysis adjustment', proposed here, is based on combusting a stratified sub-sample of the pyrolysis results, across the full range of carbon isotope ratios, and using the paired results to define a regression equation that can be used to adjust all the pyrolysis measurements. In this study, subsamples of 30 combustion measurements produced adjusted chronologies statistically indistinguishable from those produced by combusting every sample. This methodology allows simultaneous measurement of the stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen using high-temperature pyrolysis, reducing the amount of sample required and the analytical costs of measuring them separately. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Compatibility of preparatory procedures for the analysis of cortisol concentrations and stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N) ratios: a test on brown bear hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergiel, Agnieszka; Hobson, Keith A.; Janz, David M.; Cattet, Marc; Selva, Nuria; Kapronczai, Luciene; Gryba, Chantel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The measurement of naturally occurring glucocorticoids and stable isotopes of several elements has gained importance in wildlife studies in recent decades and opened a myriad of ecological applications. Cortisol and stable isotopes equilibrate in animal tissues over periods of integration related to the growth rate of the tissue, providing information reflecting systemic cortisol secretion and dietary intake. Sample preparation shares the common step of first cleaning the sample of external contamination. However, it is not well understood how different solvents used in sample preparation affect isotopic and cortisol values, and whether it is safe to follow the same procedures for both measures to optimize analyses of the same sample. We conducted an experiment to compare different preparation protocols for the analysis of cortisol concentrations and stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios in hair. Hair samples from 12 brown bears (Ursus arctos) were each divided into five aliquots; two aliquots were rinsed with a 2:1 chloroform:methanol (v/v) mixture with one aliquot ground prior to cortisol analysis and the other left intact for stable isotope analyses; two aliquots were washed with methanol with one aliquot ground prior to cortisol analysis and the other left intact for stable isotope analyses; and one aliquot washed with methanol and ground prior to stable isotope analyses. The cortisol, δ13C and δ15N values remained consistent following all treatments. Our results indicate that hair samples rinsed with a 2:1 chloroform:methanol mixture or washed with methanol can be used for both types of analyses. Further, hair that has been ground in a standard hair cortisol procedure can also be used for stable isotope analysis. This information is important for improving laboratory efficiency and compatibility of procedures used for wildlife physiological ecology studies where concurrent measurements of cortisol and stable isotopes in hair are

  14. Stable Isotope Ratio and Elemental Profile Combined with Support Vector Machine for Provenance Discrimination of Oolong Tea (Wuyi-Rock Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-xiao Lou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focused on an effective method to discriminate the geographical origin of Wuyi-Rock tea by the stable isotope ratio (SIR and metallic element profiling (MEP combined with support vector machine (SVM analysis. Wuyi-Rock tea (n=99 collected from nine producing areas and non-Wuyi-Rock tea (n=33 from eleven nonproducing areas were analysed for SIR and MEP by established methods. The SVM model based on coupled data produced the best prediction accuracy (0.9773. This prediction shows that instrumental methods combined with a classification model can provide an effective and stable tool for provenance discrimination. Moreover, every feature variable in stable isotope and metallic element data was ranked by its contribution to the model. The results show that δ2H, δ18O, Cs, Cu, Ca, and Rb contents are significant indications for provenance discrimination and not all of the metallic elements improve the prediction accuracy of the SVM model.

  15. Seasonal variation in marine C:N:P stoichiometry: can the composition of seston explain stable Redfield ratios?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Frigstad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seston is suspended particulate organic matter, comprising a mixture of autotrophic, heterotrophic and detrital material. Despite variable proportions of these components, marine seston often exhibits relatively small deviations from the Redfield ratio (C:N:P = 106:16:1. Two time-series from the Norwegian shelf in Skagerrak are used to identify drivers of the seasonal variation in seston elemental ratios. An ordination identified water mass characteristics and bloom dynamics as the most important drivers for determining C:N, while changes in nutrient concentrations and biomass were most important for the C:P and N:P relationships. There is no standardized method for determining the functional composition of seston and the fractions of POC, PON and PP associated with phytoplankton, therefore any such information has to be obtained by indirect means. In this study, a generalized linear model was used to differentiate between the live autotrophic and non-autotrophic sestonic fractions, and for both stations the non-autotrophic fractions dominated with respective annual means of 76 and 55%. This regression model approach builds on assumptions (e.g. constant POC:Chl-a ratio and the robustness of the estimates were explored with a bootstrap analysis. In addition the autotrophic percentage calculated from the statistical model was compared with estimated phytoplankton carbon, and the two independent estimates of autotrophic percentage were comparable with similar seasonal cycles. The estimated C:nutrient ratios of live autotrophs were, in general, lower than Redfield, while the non-autotrophic C:nutrient ratios were higher than the live autotrophic ratios and above, or close to, the Redfield ratio. This is due to preferential remineralization of nutrients, and the P content mainly governed the difference between the sestonic fractions. Despite the seasonal variability in seston composition and the generally low contribution of autotrophic

  16. Variation of strontium stable isotope ratios and origins of strontium in Japanese vegetables and comparison with Chinese vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Keisuke; Nakano, Takanori; Shin, Ki-Cheol; Izawa, Atsunobu; Morita, Sakie

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the utility of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio for determining the geographical provenance of vegetables, we compared 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios and Sr concentrations in five vegetable species grown in Japan and China, and we also examined the relationships between 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios in vegetables, the soil-exchangeable pool, irrigation water, and fertilizer from 20 Japanese agricultural areas. The vegetable 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios in Japan were similar for all species within a given agricultural area, but tended to be low in northeast Japan and high in southwest Japan. The median 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio in Japanese vegetables was similar to that in fertilizer, suggesting that in addition to rock-derived Sr, vegetables contain Sr derived from fertilizers. In most cases, the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for the Japanese and Chinese vegetables differed by approximately 0.710. Linear discriminant analysis using both 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and the Sr concentration allowed more accurate discrimination between vegetables from the two countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient estimators for likelihood ratio sensitivity indices of complex stochastic dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Rey-Bellet, Luc [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    We demonstrate that centered likelihood ratio estimators for the sensitivity indices of complex stochastic dynamics are highly efficient with low, constant in time variance and consequently they are suitable for sensitivity analysis in long-time and steady-state regimes. These estimators rely on a new covariance formulation of the likelihood ratio that includes as a submatrix a Fisher information matrix for stochastic dynamics and can also be used for fast screening of insensitive parameters and parameter combinations. The proposed methods are applicable to broad classes of stochastic dynamics such as chemical reaction networks, Langevin-type equations and stochastic models in finance, including systems with a high dimensional parameter space and/or disparate decorrelation times between different observables. Furthermore, they are simple to implement as a standard observable in any existing simulation algorithm without additional modifications.

  18. Varying stable nitrogen isotope ratios of different coastal marsh plants and their relationships with wastewater nitrogen and land use in New England, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigand, Cathleen; McKinney, Richard A; Cole, Marci L; Thursby, Glen B; Cummings, Jean

    2007-08-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratios of some biota have been used as indicators of sources of anthropogenic nitrogen. In this study the relationships of the stable nitrogen isotope ratios of marsh plants, Iva frutescens (L.), Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex Steud, Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl, Spartina alterniflora Loisel, Ulva lactuca (L.), and Enteromorpha intestinalis (L.) with wastewater nitrogen and land development in New England are described. Five of the six plant species (all but U. lactuca) showed significant relationships of increasing delta (15)N values with increasing wastewater nitrogen. There was a significant (P land in the watershed. The delta (15)N of P. australis and I. frustescens is apparently an indicator of local inputs near the upland border, while the delta (15)N of Spartina relates with the integrated, watershed-sea nitrogen inputs.

  19. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on gas exchange and stable isotope ratio of δ13C, δ15N of leymus chinensis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Weiqi; Wang Guoan; Li Xiaolin

    2008-01-01

    Leymus chinensis, one of dominant species in Inner Mongolia grassland, was selected to evaluate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on plant gas change parameters and stable isotope ratio in pot culture. The plant was inoculated with two mycorrhizal fungi, Glomus intraradices and Glomus claroidum, and the uninoculated plant was used as the control check. On the 45th , 60th , 75th days after sowing, gas exchange parameters and stable isotope ratio were measured. The results showed that AM infection promoted phosphoms content, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate of Leymus chinensis, reduced host δ 15 N, however, it did not influence host intrinsic water using efficiency and δ 13 C. It was the growth time that significantly affected the gas exchange and stable isotope ratio of δ 13 C and δ 15 N. And the interaction of inoculation and growth time also influenced on the net photosynthetic rate, δ 13 C and δ 15 N of the host. Stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate were always changed the same direction by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi causing no significant difference between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plant. AMF absorbed nitrogen and accumulated δ 15 N, thus, it transformed less 15 N into the host, and as a result, the mycorrhizal plant had lower δ 15 N. Therefore, the results gave a new way and reference to know of the grass balance of carbon gain and water cost and the nitrogen cycle in grassland. (authors)

  20. The movement ecology of the straw-colored fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, in sub-Saharan Africa assessed by stable isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Gonzalo; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Peel, Alison J; Scharf, Anne K; Voigt, Christian C

    2012-01-01

    Flying foxes (Pteropodidae) are key seed dispersers on the African continent, yet their migratory behavior is largely unknown. Here, we studied the movement ecology of the straw-colored fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, and other fruit bats by analyzing stable isotope ratios in fur collected from museum specimens. In a triple-isotope approach based on samples of two ecologically similar non-migratory pteropodids, we first confirmed that a stable isotope approach is capable of delineating between geographically distinct locations in Sub-Saharan Africa. A discriminant function analysis assigned 84% of individuals correctly to their capture site. Further, we assessed how well hydrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(2)H) of fur keratin collected from non-migratory species (n = 191 individuals) records variation in δ(2)H of precipitation water in sub-Saharan Africa. Overall, we found positive, negative and no correlations within the six studied species. We then developed a reduced major axis regression equation based on individual data of non-migratory species to predict where potentially migratory E. helvum (n = 88) would come from based on their keratin δ(2)H. Across non-migratory species, δ(2)H of keratin and local water correlated positively. Based on the isoscape origin model, 22% of E. helvum were migratory, i.e. individuals had migrated over at least 250 km prior to their capture. Migratory individuals came from locations at a median distance of about 860 km from the collection site, four even from distances of at least 2,000 km. Ground-truthing of our isoscape origin model based on keratin δ(2)H of extant E. helvum (n = 76) supported a high predictive power of assigning the provenance of African flying foxes. Our study highlights that stable isotope ratios can be used to explain the migratory behavior of flying foxes, even on the isotopically relatively homogenous African continent, and with material collected by museums many decades or more than a century ago.

  1. Electrostatic interactions between polyglutamic acid and polylysine yields stable polyion complex micelles for deoxypodophyllotoxin delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yutong Wang,1–3,* Liping Huang,1,2,* Yan Shen,1,2,* Lidan Tang,1,2,4 Runing Sun,1,5 Di Shi,6 Thomas J Webster,6 Jiasheng Tu,1,2 Chunmeng Sun1,2 1Center for Research Development and Evaluation of Pharmaceutical Excipients and Generic Drugs, China Pharmaceutical University, 2State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, 3Department of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, 4Changzhou Second People’s Hospital, Changzhou, 5School of Engineering, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 6Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: To achieve enhanced physical stability of poly(ethylene glycol-poly(D,L-lactide polymeric micelles (PEG-PDLLA PMs, a mixture of methoxy PEG-PDLLA-polyglutamate (mPEG-PDLLA-PLG and mPEG-PDLLA-poly(L-lysine (mPEG-PDLLA-PLL copolymers was applied to self-assembled stable micelles with polyion-stabilized cores. Prior to micelle preparation, the synthetic copolymers were characterized by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and infrared spectroscopy (IR, and their molecular weights were calculated by 1H-NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. Dialysis was used to prepare PMs with deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images showed that DPT polyion complex micelles (DPT-PCMs were spherical, with uniform distribution and particle sizes of 36.3±0.8 nm. In addition, compared with nonpeptide-modified DPT-PMs, the stability of DPT-PCMs was significantly improved under various temperatures. In the meantime, the pH sensitivity induced by charged peptides allowed them to have a stronger antitumor effect and a pH-triggered release profile. As a result, the dynamic characteristic of DPT-PCM was retained, and high biocompatibility of DPT-PCM was observed in an in vivo study. These results

  2. Seasonal dynamics of stable isotopes and element ratios in authigenic calcites during their precipitation and dissolution, Sacrower See (northeastern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd ZOLITSCHKA

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal evolution of chemical and physical water properties as well as particle fluxes was monitored in Sacrower See (northeastern Germany during two consecutive years (Oct 2003 - Oct 2005. Additonally, we measured δ18O and δ13C as well as Sr:Ca and Mg:Ca ratios of authigenic calcites that were collected in sequencing sediment traps in order to disentangle environmental and climatic factors controlling these parameters. In particular, our aim was to find out if element ratios and the isotopic composition of calcites reflect changes in water and air temperatures. Lake water is highly enriched in 18O (-1.3 to -2.5‰ VSMOW with an evaporative increase of 0.6‰ during summer. Values are 5-6‰ more positive than groundwater values and 4-5‰ more positive than long-term weighted annual means of precipitation. During spring and summer, high amounts of dissolved phosphate cause eutrophic conditions and calcite precipitation in isotopic disequilibrium. Measured values are depleted in 18O by 2 to 10‰ compared to calculated equilibrium values. Resuspension and partial dissolution of calcite in the water column contribute to this isotopic divergence in summer and autumn as δ18Oca and δ13C values increased in the hypolimnion during this time. Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios are altered by dissolution as well. In the hypolimnion these ratios were higher than in the epilimnion. Another reason for the huge deviation between measured and theoretical δ18Oca values during summer is the occurrence of large amounts of Phacotus lenticularis in the carbonate fraction. High amounts of Phacotus lead to more negative δ18Oca and more positive δ13C values. Several characteristics of δ18Oca and δ13C are also reflected by Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios and isotopic composition of oxygen and carbon were influenced by the onset and stability of stratification. Especially the earlier onset of stratification in 2005 caused higher sediment fluxes and more positive carbon and

  3. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of pelagic zooplankton elucidate ecohydrographic features in the oligotrophic Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Kürten, Benjamin

    2015-11-10

    Although zooplankton occupy key roles in aquatic biogeochemical cycles, little is known about the pelagic food web and trophodynamics of zooplankton in the Red Sea. Natural abundance stable isotope analysis (SIA) of carbon (δ13C) and N (δ15N) is one approach to elucidating pelagic food web structures and diet assimilation Integrating the combined effects of ecological processes and hydrography, ecohydrographic features often translate into geographic patterns in δ13C and δ15N values at the base of food webs. This is due, for example, to divergent 15N abundances in source end-members (deep water sources: high δ15N, diazotrophs: low δ15N). Such patterns in the spatial distributions of stable isotope values were coined isoscapes. Empirical data of atmospheric, oceanographic, and biological processes, which drive the ecohydrographic gradients of the oligotrophic Red Sea, are under-explored and some rather anticipated than proven. Specifically, five processes underpin Red Sea gradients: a) monsoon-related intrusions of nutrient-rich Indian Ocean water; b) basin scale thermohaline circulation; c) mesoscale eddy activity that causes up-welling of deep water nutrients into the upper layer; d) the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen (N2) by diazotrophs; and e) the deposition of aerosol-derived N. This study assessed relationships between environmental samples (nutrients, chlorophyll a), oceanographic data (temperature, salinity, current velocity [ADCP]), particulate organic matter (POM), and net-phytoplankton, with the δ13C and δ15N values of zooplankton collected in spring 2012 from 16°28’ to 26°57’N along the central axis of the Red Sea. The δ15N of bulk POM and most zooplankton taxa increased from North (Duba) to South (Farasan). The potential contribution of deep water nutrient-fueled phytoplankton, POM, and diazotrophs varied among sites. Estimates suggested higher diazotroph contributions in the North, a greater contribution of POM in the South

  4. Letter Report: Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Analysis of B-Complex Perched Water Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nims, Megan K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saunders, Danielle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Fine-grained sediments associated with the Cold Creek Unit at Hanford have caused the formation of a perched water aquifer in the deep vadose zone at the B Complex area, which includes waste sites in the 200-DV-1 Operable Unit and the single-shell tank farms in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY. High levels of contaminants, such as uranium, technetium-99, and nitrate, make this aquifer a continuing source of contamination for the groundwater located a few meters below the perched zone. Analysis of deuterium (2H) and 18-oxygen (18O) of nine perched water samples from three different wells was performed. Samples represent time points from hydraulic tests performed on the perched aquifer using the three wells. The isotope analyses showed that the perched water had δ2H and δ18O ratios consistent with the regional meteoric water line, indicating that local precipitation events at the Hanford site likely account for recharge of the perched water aquifer. Data from the isotope analysis can be used along with pumping and recovery data to help understand the perched water dynamics related to aquifer size and hydraulic control of the aquifer in the future.

  5. A complex symbol signal-to-noise ratio estimator and its performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents an algorithm for estimating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals that contain data on a downconverted suppressed carrier or the first harmonic of a square-wave subcarrier. This algorithm can be used to determine the performance of the full-spectrum combiner for the Galileo S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) mission by measuring the input and output symbol SNR. A performance analysis of the algorithm shows that the estimator can estimate the complex symbol SNR using 10,000 symbols at a true symbol SNR of -5 dB with a mean of -4.9985 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2454 dB, and these analytical results are checked by simulations of 100 runs with a mean of -5.06 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2506 dB.

  6. In-vessel co-composting of horse stable bedding waste and blood meal at different C/N ratios: process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jonathan W C; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Zhao, Zhenyong; Karthikeyana, Obuli P; Yu, Shuk Man; Law, Alex C W; Chung, Patricia C P

    2012-12-01

    Abattoir blood meal is rich in nitrogen and its potential as a co-composting material for horse stable bedding waste was evaluated at two C/N ratios -32 (LBM, low blood meal) and 16 (HBM, high blood meal) - to improve the nutrient contents of the final compost. The mix was composted for 7 days in a 10 tonne/day in-vessel composter and cured aerobically. After 56 days ofcomposting, the ammoniacal-N, CO2 evolution rate and C/N ratio of both LBM and HBM were within the guideline values; however, delayed decomposition and lower seed germination index were observed with HBM. In addition, HBM resulted in 84% loss of the initial ammoniacal-N. Almost similar organic decompositions, 62.4% and 59.6% with LBM and HBM, respectively, were achieved. However, a stable compost product can be obtained within 6-7 weeks with LBM, whereas >8 weeks were required for HBM composting. Therefore, co-composting at the C/N ratio of 32 is recommended to achieve odour-free and faster composting.

  7. A versatile method for stable carbon isotope analysis of carbohydrates by high-performance liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschker, H T S; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T C W; van Breugel, P; Houtekamer, M; Middelburg, J J

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a method to analyze stable carbon isotope ((13)C/(12)C) ratios in a variety of carbohydrates using high-performance liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS). The chromatography is based on strong anion-exchange columns with low strength NaOH eluents. An eluent concentration of 1 mM resulted in low background signals and good separation of most of the typical plant neutral carbohydrates. We also show that more strongly bound carbohydrates such as acidic carbohydrates can be separated by inclusion of NO(3) (-) as an inorganic pusher ion in the eluent. Analyses of neutral carbohydrate concentrations and their stable carbon isotope ratios are shown for plant materials and marine sediment samples both at natural abundance and for (13)C-enriched samples. The main advantage of HPLC/IRMS analysis over traditional gas chromatography based methods is that no derivatization is needed resulting in simple sample treatment and improved accuracy and reproducibility.

  8. Combined Stable Carbon Isotope and C/N Ratios as Indicators of Source and Fate of Organic Matter in the Bang Pa kong River Estuary, Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonphakdee, Thanomsak; Kasai, Akihide; Fujiwara, Tateki; Sawangwong, Pichan; Cheevaporn, Voravit

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Stable carbon isotopes and C/N ratios of particulate organic matter (POM) in suspended solids and surficial sediment were used to define the spatial and temporal variability in an anthropogenic tropical river estuary, the Bang Pa kong River Estuary. Samples were taken along salinity gradients during the four different river discharges in the beginning, high river discharge and at the end of the wet season, and low river discharge during the dry season. The values of [C/N]a ratio and d13C in the river estuary revealed significant differences from those of the offshore station. Conservative behaviors of [C/N]a and d13C in the estuary during the wet season indicated major contribution of terrigenous C3 plants derived OM. By contrast, during the dry season, marine input mainly dominated OM contribution with an evidence of anthropogenic input to the estuary. These compositions of the bulk sedimentary OM were dominated by paddy rice soils and marine derived OM during the wet and dry seasons, respectively. These results show that the combined stable carbon isotopes and C/N ratios can be used to identify the source and fate of OM even in a river estuary. This tool will be useful to achieve sustainable management in coastal zone

  9. Experimental study of the complexation of silicon and germanium with aqueous organic species: implications for germanium and silicon transport and Ge/Si ratio in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Schott, Jacques

    1998-11-01

    The stability of aqueous complexes formed by Si and Ge with carboxylic acids (acetic, salicylic, oxalic, citric, tartaric) and phenols (phenol and catechol) has been investigated from 25 to 90°C via solubility and potentiometric measurements. Results show that Ge forms stable complexes with the di- and tricarboxylic acids and catechol, but that Si forms much weaker complexes with these ligands. Analysis of our results and of available literature data on Ge complexes formed with other types of aqueous organic species demonstrates that Ge forms complexes of chelate type with the following functional groups: (1) carboxylic in acid solutions (1 ≤ pH ≤ 6), (2) di-phenolic hydroxyls in neutral and basic solutions (pH ≥ 6), and (3) alcoholic hydroxyls in very basic solutions (pH ≥ 10). Conversely, Si forms very weak complexes with these compounds. Stability constants generated in this study for Ge- and Si-organic species have been used to approximate Ge and Si complexing with humic acids which possess the same organic functional groups as those used in this study. Our calculations show that Si-humic acid complexes are negligible in most natural waters. In contrast, the presence of humic acids can considerably affect Ge speciation in aqueous solution. For example, at pH ≥ 6 in a solution containing and 0.1 μg/L of Ge and 20 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Ge-humic acid complexes account for more than 95% of total aqueous Ge. These results can explain the increase of the Ge/Si ratio in organic-rich surficial waters. Ge-organic matter complexation should be thus taken into account when using Ge/Si ratios measured in surface waters and biogenic opals to estimate chemical-weathering intensity and Ge and Si global fluxes.

  10. Formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with diethylaminoethyl dextran: charge ratio and molar mass effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cerf, Didier; Pepin, Anne Sophie; Niang, Pape Momar; Cristea, Mariana; Karakasyan-Dia, Carole; Picton, Luc

    2014-11-26

    The formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) between carboxymethyl pullulan and DEAE Dextran, was investigated, in dilute solution, with emphasis on the effect of charge density (molar ratio or pH) and molar masses. Electrophoretic mobility measurements have evidenced that insoluble PECs (neutral electrophoretic mobility) occurs for charge ratio between 0.6 (excess of polycation) and 1 (stoichiometry usual value) according to the pH. This atypical result is explained by the inaccessibility of some permanent cationic charge when screened by pH dependant cationic ones (due to the Hoffman alkylation). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicates an endothermic formation of PEC with a binding constant around 10(5) L mol(-1). Finally asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation coupled on line with static multi angle light scattering (AF4/MALS) evidences soluble PECs with very large average molar masses and size around 100 nm, in agreement with scrambled eggs multi-association between various polyelectrolyte chains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of dissolved nutrients dispersal derived from offshore fish-farm using nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ 15N) in macroalgal bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, T.; Ruiz, J. M.; Pérez, M.; Ruiz, M.

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the dispersal of wastes from offshore fish farms was evaluated by analyzing nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ 15N) in macroalgae incubated in the water column at sites located at an increasing distance from the fish cages. Bioassays were performed at three fish farms situated in separate localities with different nutritional conditions (Canary Islands, Murcia and Catalonia) and varying in size, species of fish reared and annual production. Macroalgal bioassays were carried out in two different directions (DI and DII) and they were replicated at each distance in order to evaluate the effect of small-scale variability on the spatial extent of fish farm wastes. The results obtained with δ 15N contribute to a better understanding of the application of nitrogen stable isotopes ratios in macroalgae as an effective bioindicator for tracing the dispersion of offshore fish farm wastes, and demonstrate that fish farm wastes can be traced even over distances of some km from the pollution source. In the Canary Islands, the maximum distance obtained for detection of fish farm wastes was between 450 and 700 m. Of the three installations studied, Murcia presented the greatest distance for detection of fish farm waste influence, ranging from between 1550 and 2450 m, whilst in Catalonia this distance was less than 120 m. In Catalonia, the results were masked by the influence of other sources of nitrogen, and thus fish farm wastes were detected at more reduced distances than expected. These results confirm that fish farm wastes can be traced using the nitrogen stable isotope ratios of macroalgae and that this method can also be useful for identifying areas of potential risk to some sensitive ecosystems, and as an early signal that changes in the community structure might occur.

  12. Authenticity testing of environment-friendly Korean rice (Oryza sativa L.) using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Park, Sung-Kyu; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; An, Min-Jeong; Lee, Ji-Hee; Oh, Yong-Taek; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2017-11-01

    The increasing demand for organic foods creates, in turn, a pressing need for the development of more accurate tools for the authentication of organic food in order to ensure both fair trade and food safety. This study examines the feasibility of δ 13 C and δ 15 N analyses as potential tools for authentication of environment-friendly rice sold in Korea. δ 13 C and δ 15 N examination in different rice grains showed that environment-friendly rice can be successfully distinguished from conventional rice. No multi-residue pesticides were detected in the examined rice samples, including conventional rice. This study demonstrates the complementary feasibility of δ 13 C and δ 15 N analyses for the authentication of environment-friendly rice sold in Korea in cases where pesticide residue analysis alone is insufficient for discrimination of organic and conventional rice. In future, complementary analyses including compound-specific isotope ratio analysis might be employed for improving the reliability of organic authentication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation between the synthetic origin of methamphetamine samples and their {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C stable isotope ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billault, Isabelle [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France)]. E-mail: Isabelle.Billault@univ-nantes.fr; Courant, Frederique [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Pasquereau, Leo [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Derrien, Solene [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Robins, Richard J. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Naulet, Norbert [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France)

    2007-06-12

    The active ingredient of ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methyldioxyphenylisopropylamine (MDMA) can be manufactured by a number of easy routes from simple precursors. We have synthesised 45 samples of MDMA following the five most common routes using N-precursors from 12 different origins and three different precursors for the aromatic moiety. The {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N contents of both the precursors and the MDMA samples derived therefrom were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). We show that within-pathway correlation between the {sup 15}N content of the precursor and that of the derived MDMA can be strong but that no general pattern of correlation can be defined. Rather, it is evident that the {delta} {sup 15}N values of MDMA are strongly influenced by a combination of the {delta} {sup 15}N values of the source of nitrogen used, the route by which the MDMA is synthesised, and the experimental conditions employed. Multivariate analysis (PCA) based on the {delta} {sup 15}N values of the synthetic MDMA and of the {delta} {sup 15}N and {delta} {sup 13}C values of the N-precursors leads to good discrimination between the majority of the reaction conditions tested.

  14. Scavenging ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krey, P.W.; Toonkel, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Total 90 Sr fallout is adjusted for dry deposition, and scavenging ratios are calculated at Seattle, New York, and Fayetteville, Ark. Stable-lead scavenging ratios are also presented for New York. These ratios show large scatter, but average values are generally inversely proportional to precipitation. Stable-lead ratios decrease more rapidly with precipitation than do those of 90 Sr, a decrease reflecting a lesser availability of lead to the scavenging processes

  15. Interactions between HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the downstream template strand in stable complexes with primer-template.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiriya Rutvisuttinunt

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT forms stable ternary complexes in which RT is bound tightly at fixed positions on the primer-template (P/T. We have probed downstream interactions between RT and the template strand in the complex containing the incoming dNTP (+1 dNTP*RT*P/T complex and in the complex containing the pyrophosphate analog, foscarnet (foscarnet*RT*P/T complex.UV-induced cross-linking between RT and the DNA template strand was most efficient when a bromodeoxyuridine residue was placed in the +2 position (the first template position downstream from the incoming dNTP. Furthermore, formation of the +1 dNTP*RT*P/T complex on a biotin-containing template inhibited binding of streptavidin when biotin was in the +2 position on the template but not when the biotin was in the +3 position. Streptavidin pre-bound to a biotin residue in the template caused RT to stall two to three nucleotides upstream from the biotin residue. The downstream border of the complex formed by the stalled RT was mapped by digestion with exonuclease RecJ(F. UV-induced cross-linking of the complex formed by the pyrophosphate analog, foscarnet, with RT and P/T occurred preferentially with bromodeoxyuridine in the +1 position on the template in keeping with the location of RT one base upstream in the foscarnet*RT*P/T complex (i.e., in the pre-translocation position.For +1 dNTP*RT*P/T and foscarnet*RT*P/T stable complexes, tight interactions were observed between RT and the first unpaired template nucleotide following the bound dNTP or the primer terminus, respectively.

  16. The Overbite Complexity: How The Vertical Position, Tooth-Size Ratios And Other Factors Affect Occlusion and Overbites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Merle E; Nguyen, Thai Vinh

    2015-01-01

    This article explains the complexity of overbites and how to diagnose pre-treatment occlusions to finish orthodontic cases with stable, long lasting occlusion and proper overbites. It explains the changes that occur when overbites deepen and how to correct to proper overbite positions.

  17. Value of digit ratio 2D:4D, a biomarker of prenatal hormone exposure, is stable across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Magdalena; Marcinkowska, Urszula M; Jasienska, Grazyna

    2017-07-01

    Digit ratio (2D:4D) is used as a marker of prenatal hormone exposure and, consequently, as a predictor of many characteristics throughout a woman's lifespan. A previous study has suggested that values of 2D:4D vary across menstrual cycles and further questioned the reliability of a single measurement of 2D:4D among cycling women, while another study failed to confirm these results. However, these studies estimated the timing of cycle phases based on a date of menstruation reported by participants and also had small sample sizes. For our study, we evaluated potential changes in 2D:4D values across a menstrual cycle in a group of women among whom the phases of the menstrual cycle were determined by hormonal (luteinizing hormone based) ovulation tests. We studied 32 naturally cycling women aged 22-37 from rural Poland. Lengths of second and fourth digits were measured based on scans of both hands taken three times (i.e. in the follicular phase, peri-ovulatory phase and luteal phase of the cycle) for each participant. No differences in 2D:4D value across the menstrual cycle were detected either when right-hand, left-hand, and mean 2D:4D for both hands were analysed, nor when difference in the 2D:4D value between hands (D left-right ) was evaluated. We documented that 2D:4D is independent of the phase of the menstrual cycle and these findings suggest that among naturally cycling women, a value of 2D:4D can be reliably obtained from measurements taken during any day of the menstrual cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial enterotypes, inferred by the prevotella-to-bacteroides ratio, remained stable during a 6-month randomized controlled diet intervention with the new nordic diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Licht, Tine Rask; Poulsen, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the human gut microbiota can be divided into enterotypes based on the abundance of specific bacterial groups; however, the biological significance and stability of these enterotypes remain unresolved. Here, we demonstrated that subjects (n = 62) 18 to 65 years old...... with central obesity and components of metabolic syndrome could be grouped into two discrete groups simply by their relative abundance of Prevotella spp. divided by Bacteroides spp. (P/B ratio) obtained by quantitative PCR analysis. Furthermore, we showed that these groups remained stable during a 6-month......, controlled dietary intervention, where the effect of consuming a diet in accord with the new Nordic diet (NND) recommendations as opposed to consuming the average Danish diet (ADD) on the gut microbiota was investigated. In this study, subjects (with and without stratification according to P/B ratio) did...

  19. Using stable isotopes and C:N ratios to examine the life-history strategies and nutritional sources of larval lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, T M; Bauer, J E

    2016-02-01

    Natural abundance stable-isotope analysis (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) and C:N ratios were used to study the ammocoete phase of two common non-parasitic lamprey species (least brook lamprey Lampetra aepyptera and American brook lamprey Lethenteron appendix) in two tributaries of the Ohio River (U.S.A.). The C:N ratios suggest that each species employs different lipid accumulation strategies to support its metamorphosis and recruitment into an adult animal. Ammocoete δ(13)C values generally increased with increasing C:N values. In contrast to δ(13)C, ammocoete δ(15)N values were weakly related to the total length (LT) in L. aepyptera, but positively correlated to both LT and C:N ratios in L. appendix. In L. appendix, C:N also correlated positively with LT, and presumably age. A Bayesian mixing model using δ(13)C and δ(15)N was used to estimate nutritional subsidies of different potential food resources to ammocoetes at each site. The models suggested that although nutritional subsidies to ammocoetes varied as a function of site, ammocoetes were generally reliant on large contributions (42-62% at three sites) from aquatic plants. Contributions from aquatic sediment organic matter were also important at all sites (32-63%) for ammocoetes, with terrestrially derived plant materials contributing smaller amounts (4-33%). These findings provide important insights into the feeding ecology and nutrition of two species of lampreys. They also suggest that similar and other quantitative approaches are required to (1) fully understand how the observed stable-isotopes ratios are established in ammocoetes and (2) better assess ammocoete nutritional subsidies in different natal streams. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Meta-analysis of amino acid stable nitrogen isotope ratios for estimating trophic position in marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens M; Popp, Brian N; Winder, Monika

    2015-07-01

    Estimating trophic structures is a common approach used to retrieve information regarding energy pathways, predation, and competition in complex ecosystems. The application of amino acid (AA) compound-specific nitrogen (N) isotope analysis (CSIA) is a relatively new method used to estimate trophic position (TP) and feeding relationships in diverse organisms. Here, we conducted the first meta-analysis of δ(15)N AA values from measurements of 359 marine species covering four trophic levels, and compared TP estimates from AA-CSIA to literature values derived from food items, gut or stomach content analysis. We tested whether the AA trophic enrichment factor (TEF), or the (15)N enrichment among different individual AAs is constant across trophic levels and whether inclusion of δ(15)N values from multiple AAs improves TP estimation. For the TEF of glutamic acid relative to phenylalanine (Phe) we found an average value of 6.6‰ across all taxa, which is significantly lower than the commonly applied 7.6‰. We found that organism feeding ecology influences TEF values of several trophic AAs relative to Phe, with significantly higher TEF values for herbivores compared to omnivores and carnivores, while TEF values were also significantly lower for animals excreting urea compared to ammonium. Based on the comparison of multiple model structures using the metadata of δ(15)N AA values we show that increasing the number of AAs in principle improves precision in TP estimation. This meta-analysis clarifies the advantages and limitations of using individual δ(15)N AA values as tools in trophic ecology and provides a guideline for the future application of AA-CSIA to food web studies.

  1. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frostick, A.; Bollhoefer, A.; Parry, D.

    2011-01-01

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic 206 Pb/ 207 Pb and 208 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  2. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostick, A., E-mail: Alison.Frostick@cdu.edu.au [Charles Darwin University, School of Environment and Life Sciences, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Bollhoefer, A. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Parry, D. [AIMS, PO Box 41775, Casuarina NT 0811 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  3. The feasibility of assessing the diets of minke whale ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata) in the East Sea through fatty acid composition in blubber and stable isotopic ratio of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ah-Ra; Ju, Se-Jong; Choi, Seok-Gwan; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-09-01

    To track the diet of minke whale ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata) in the East Sea (Japan Sea), a conjoint analysis of fatty acids and C and N stable isotopes was performed on blubber and skin from the whale and its potential prey. The total lipid content in the blubber of minke whales ranged from 37.9% to 82.7% of wet mass (mean ± SD, 63.1 ± 17.2%), with triacylglycerols being the dominant lipids (96.9%-99.2% of total lipids). The lipid and fatty acid (FA) contents were systematically stratified throughout the depth of the blubber layers; contents of the dominant monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs), including 18:1ω9 and 16:1ω7, increased from the innermost layer to the outermost layer, whereas contents of saturated FAs (SFAs) and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) were higher in the innermost layer than in the outermost layer. This stratification is related to the different physiological roles of the blubber layers; e.g., thermoregulation, streaming, and buoyancy. A comparison of the FA compositions of the innermost layer of minke whales with those of potential prey indicates that FA compositions in the whales are similar to those of Pacific herring. In addition, stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) suggest that minke whale and Pacific herring have the same or similar diets. Therefore, the diets of minke whale from the East Sea (Japan Sea) could be inferred from information on the diet of the Pacific herring, although FA compositions and stable isotope ratios for Pacific herring would not exactly reflect the whale's diet. Although the very limited number of samples was used in this study, our preliminary findings are very promising to help understand the feeding ecology of minke whales in the East Sea (Japan Sea).

  4. Phosphorescent Pt(II) and Pd(II) Complexes for Efficient, High-Color-Quality, and Stable OLEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetham, Tyler; Li, Guijie; Li, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are leading candidates for next-generation displays and solid-state lighting technologies. Much of the academic and commercial pursuits in phosphorescent OLEDs have been dominated by Ir(III) complexes. Over the past decade recent developments have enabled square planar Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes to meet or exceed the performance of Ir complexes in many aspects. In particular, the development of N-heterocyclic carbene-based emitters and tetradentate cyclometalated Pt and Pd complexes have significantly improved the emission efficiency and reduced their radiative lifetimes making them competitive with the best reported Ir complexes. Furthermore, their unique and diverse molecular design possibilities have enabled exciting photophysical attributes including narrower emission spectra, excimer -based white emission, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence. These developments have enabled the fabrication of efficient and "pure" blue OLEDs, single-doped white devices with EQEs of over 25% and high CRI, and device operational lifetimes which show early promise that square planar metal complexes can be stable enough for commercialization. These accomplishments have brought Pt complexes to the forefront of academic research. The molecular design strategies, photophysical characteristics, and device performance resulting from the major advancements in emissive Pt and Pd square planar complexes are discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Extremely stable soluble high molecular mass multi-protein complex with DNase activity in human placental tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya E Burkova

    Full Text Available Human placenta is an organ which protects, feeds, and regulates the grooving of the embryo. Therefore, identification and characterization of placental components including proteins and their multi-protein complexes is an important step to understanding the placenta function. We have obtained and analyzed for the first time an extremely stable multi-protein complex (SPC, ∼ 1000 kDa from the soluble fraction of three human placentas. By gel filtration on Sepharose-4B, the SPC was well separated from other proteins of the placenta extract. Light scattering measurements and gel filtration showed that the SPC is stable in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2, acetonitrile, guanidinium chloride, and Triton in high concentrations, but dissociates efficiently in the presence of 8 M urea, 50 mM EDTA, and 0.5 M NaCl. Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. According to SDS-PAGE and MALDI mass spectrometry data, this complex contains many major glycosylated proteins with low and moderate molecular masses (MMs 4-14 kDa and several moderately abundant (79.3, 68.5, 52.8, and 27.2 kDa as well as minor proteins with higher MMs. The SPC treatment with dithiothreitol led to a disappearance of some protein bands and revealed proteins with lower MMs. The SPCs from three placentas efficiently hydrolyzed plasmid supercoiled DNA with comparable rates and possess at least two DNA-binding sites with different affinities for a 12-mer oligonucleotide. Progress in study of placental protein complexes can promote understanding of their biological functions.

  6. Pyridine and phosphonate containing ligands for stable lanthanide complexation. An experimental and theoretical study to assess the solution structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato-Iglesias, Marta; Balogh, Edina; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tóth, Eva; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez Blas, Teresa

    2006-12-07

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the stability and solution structure of lanthanide complexes with two novel ligands containing pyridine units and phosphonate pendant arms on either ethane-1,2-diamine (L2) or cyclohexane-1,2-diamine (L3) backbones. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the protonation constants of the ligands and the stability constants of the complexes with Gd(III) and the endogenous metal ions Zn(II) and Cu(II). While the stability constant of the GdL2 complex is too high to be determined by direct pH-potentiometric titrations, the cyclohexyl derivative GdL3 has a lower and assessable stability (log K(GdL3)=17.62). Due to the presence of the phosphonate groups, various protonated species can be detected up to pH approximately 8 for both ligands and all metal ions studied. The molecular clusters [Ln(L)(H2O)](3-).19H2O (Ln=La, Nd, Ho or Lu; L=L2 or L3) were characterized by theoretical calculations at the HF level. Our calculations provide two minimum energy geometries where the ligand adopts different conformations: twist-wrap (tw), in which the ligand wraps around the metal ion by twisting the pyridyl units relative to each other, and twist-fold (tf), where the slight twisting of the pyridyl units is accompanied by an overall folding of the two pyridine units towards one of the phosphonate groups. The relative free energies of the tw and tf conformations of [Ln(L)(H2O)]3- (L=L2, L3) complexes calculated in aqueous solution (C-PCM) by using the B3LYP model indicate that the tw form is the most stable one along the whole lanthanide series for the complexes of L3, while for those of L2 only the Gd(III) complex is more stable in the tf conformation by ca. 0.5 kcal mol-1. 1H NMR studies of the Eu(III) complex of L3 show the initial formation of the tf complex in aqueous solution, which slowly converts to the thermodynamically stable tw form. The structures calculated for the Nd(III) complexes are in reasonably

  7. Methylamphetamine synthesis: does an alteration in synthesis conditions affect the δ(13) C, δ(15) N and δ(2) H stable isotope ratio values of the product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salouros, Helen; Collins, Michael; Cawley, Adam; Longworth, Mitchell

    2012-05-01

    Conventional chemical profiling of methylamphetamine has long been employed by national forensic laboratories to determine the synthetic route and where possible the precursor chemicals used in its manufacture. This laboratory has been studying the use of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analysis as a complementary technique to conventional chemical profiling of fully synthetic illicit drugs such as methylamphetamine. As part of these investigations the stable carbon (δ(13) C), nitrogen (δ(15) N), and hydrogen (δ(2) H) isotope values in the precursor chemicals of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine and the resulting methylamphetamine end-products have been measured to determine the synthetic origins of methylamphetamine. In this study, results are presented for δ(13) C, δ(15) N, and δ(2) H values in methylamphetamine synthesized from ephedrine and pseudoephedrine by two synthetic routes with varying experimental parameters. It was demonstrated that varying parameters, such as stoichiometry, reaction temperature, reaction time, and reaction pressure, had no effect on the δ(13) C, δ(15) N, and δ(2) H isotope values of the final methylamphetamine product, within measurement uncertainty. Therefore the value of the IRMS technique in identifying the synthetic origin of precursors, such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, is not compromised by the potential variation in synthetic method that is expected from one batch to the next, especially in clandestine laboratories where manufacture can occur without stringent quality control of reactions. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Estimation of different source contributions to sediment organic matter in an agricultural-forested watershed using end member mixing analyses based on stable isotope ratios and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, Morgane; Kim, Min-Seob; Ock, Giyoung; Hong, Seongjin; Cho, Jinwoo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Hur, Jin

    2018-03-15

    The two popular source tracing tools of stable isotope ratios (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to estimate the relative source contributions to sediment organic matter (SeOM) at five different river sites in an agricultural-forested watershed (Soyang Lake watershed), and their capabilities for the source assignment were compared. Bulk sediments were used for the stable isotopes, while alkaline extractable organic matter (AEOM) from sediments was used to obtain fluorescent indices for SeOM. Several source discrimination indices were fully compiled for a range of the SeOM sources distributed in the catchments of the watershed, which included soils, forest leaves, crop (C3 and C4) and riparian plants, periphyton, and organic fertilizers. The relative source contributions to the river sediment samples were estimated via end member mixing analysis (EMMA) based on several selected discrimination indices. The EMMA based on the isotopes demonstrated that all sediments were characterized by a medium to a high contribution of periphyton ranging from ~30% to 70% except for one site heavily affected by forest and agricultural fields with relatively high contributions of terrestrial materials. The EMMA based on fluorescence parameters, however, did not show similar results with low contributions from forest leaf and periphyton. The characteristics of the studied watershed were more consistent with the source contributions determined by the isotope ratios. The discrepancy in the EMMA capability for source assignments between the two analytical tools can be explained by the limited analytical window of fluorescence spectroscopy for non-fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) and the inability of AEOM to represent original bulk particulate organic matter (POM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of the turbulence in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J.; Zhang, L.; Yuan, G.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate determination of surface turbulent fluxes in a stable boundary layer is of great practical importance in weather prediction and climate simulations, as well as applications related to air pollution. To gain an insight into the characteristics of turbulence in a stable boundary layer over the complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, we analyzed the data from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). We proposed a method to identify and efficiently isolate nonstationary motions from turbulence series, and examined the characteristics of nonstationary motions (nonstationary motions refer to gusty events on a greater scale than local shear-generated turbulence). The occurrence frequency of nonstationary motions was found to depend on the mean flow, being more frequent in weak wind conditions and vanishing when the wind speed, U, was greater than 3.0 m s-1. When U exceeded the threshold value of 1.0 m s-1 for the gradient Richardson number Ri ≤ 0.3 and 1.5 m s-1 for Ri > 0.3, local shear-generated turbulence depended systematically on U with an average rate of 0.05 U. However, for the weak wind condition, neither the mean wind speed nor the stability was an important factor for local turbulence. Under the weak wind stable condition, affected by topography-induced nonstationary motions, the local turbulence was anisotropic with a strong horizontal fluctuation and a weak vertical fluctuation, resulting in weakened heat mixing in the vertical direction and stronger un-closure of energy. These findings accessed the validity of similarity theory in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain, and revealed one reason for the stronger un-closure of energy in the night.

  10. TIME-VARYING MULTIPRODUCT HEDGE RATIO ESTIMATION IN THE SOYBEAN COMPLEX: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredo, Mark R.; Garcia, Philip; Leuthold, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    In developing optimal hedge ratios for the soybean processing margin, many authors have illustrated the importance of considering the interactions between the cash and futures prices for soybeans, soybean oil, and soybean meal. Conditional as well as time-varying hedge ratios have been examined, but in the case of multiproduct time-varying hedge ratios, the difficulty in estimation has been found to often outweigh any improvement in hedging effectiveness. This research examines the hedging ef...

  11. A stable gold(i)-enyne species obtained by alkyne carboauration in a complex rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, Jéssica; Blanco, M Carmen; Laguna, Antonio; Naumov, Panče; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2017-08-15

    An unprecedented tetranuclear gold derivative with unusual gold-enyne moieties is prepared by a mild and neat rearrangement of a dinuclear gold complex with a bridging bis(diphenylphosphino)alkyne and terminal alkynyl ligands. The complex originates as a consequence of an intramolecular addition of the AuC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CTol fragment to the internal diphosphine triple bond Ph 2 PC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh 2 . The crystal structure of the tetranuclear complex shows a dinuclear metallacycle with a very short AuAu bond interaction and bridging phosphino-enyne ligands. This disposition clearly stabilises the elusive vinyl gold species omnipresent as intermediates in gold-catalysed reactions.

  12. Destruction of chemical warfare agent simulants by air and moisture stable metal NHC complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, Catherine; Notman, Stuart; Arnold, Polly L

    2018-02-20

    The cooperative effect of both NHC and metal centre has been found to destroy chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Choice of both the metal and NHC is key to these transformations as simple, monodentate N-heterocyclic carbenes in combination with silver or vanadium can promote stoichiometric destruction, whilst bidentate, aryloxide-tethered NHC complexes of silver and alkali metals promote breakdown under mild heating. Iron-NHC complexes generated in situ are competent catalysts for the destruction of each of the three targetted CWA simulants.

  13. Leaf and root pectin methylesterase activity and 13C/12C stable isotopic ratio measurements of methanol emissions give insight into methanol production in Lycopersicon esculentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Patricia Yoshino; Giebel, Brian M; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo O'Reilly; Li, Lei; Timko, Michael P; Swart, Peter K; Riemer, Daniel D; Mak, John E; Lerdau, Manuel T

    2011-09-01

    Plant production of methanol (MeOH) is a poorly understood aspect of metabolism, and understanding MeOH production in plants is crucial for modeling MeOH emissions. Here, we have examined the source of MeOH emissions from mature and immature leaves and whether pectin methylesterase (PME) activity is a good predictor of MeOH emission. We also investigated the significance of below-ground MeOH production for mature leaf emissions. We present measurements of MeOH emission, PME activity, and MeOH concentration in mature and immature tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). We also present stable carbon isotopic signatures of MeOH emission and the pectin methoxyl pool. Our results suggest that below-ground MeOH production was not the dominant contributor to daytime MeOH emissions from mature and immature leaves. Stable carbon isotopic signatures of mature and immature leaf MeOH were similar, suggesting that they were derived from the same pathway. Foliar PME activity was related to MeOH flux, but unexplained variance suggested PME activity could not predict emissions. The data show that MeOH production and emission are complex and cannot be predicted using PME activity alone. We hypothesize that substrate limitation of MeOH synthesis and MeOH catabolism may be important regulators of MeOH emission. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Feeding ecology and phylogenetic structure of a complex neotropical termite assemblage, revealed by nitrogen stable isotope ratios

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bourguignon, T.; Šobotník, Jan; Lepoint, G.; Martin, J. M.; Hardy, O. J.; Dejean, A.; Roisin, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2011), s. 261-269 ISSN 0307-6946 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : diet diversity * feeding groups * Isoptera * phylogenetic autocorrelation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.995, year: 2011

  15. The promyelocytic leukemia gene product (PML) forms stable complexes with the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcalay, M; Tomassoni, L; Colombo, E

    1998-01-01

    by the expression of PML-RAR alpha. We report that PML colocalizes with the nonphosphorylated fraction of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) within nuclear bodies and that pRB is delocalized by PML-RAR alpha expression. Both PML and PML-RAR alpha form complexes with the nonphosphorylated form of pRB in vivo...

  16. Stable isotope ratios of the atmospheric CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O in Tokai-mura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porntepkasemsan, Boonsom; Andoh, Mariko A.; Amano, Hikaru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    This report presents the results and interpretation of stable isotope ratios of the atmospheric CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O from a variety of sources in Tokai-mura. The seasonal changes of {delta}{sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {delta}{sup 15}N{sub 2}O were determined under in-situ conditions in four sampling sites and one control site. Such measurements are expected to provide a useful means of estimating the transport mechanisms of the three trace gases in the environment. These isotopic signatures were analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS, Micromass Isoprime). Our data showed the significant seasonal fluctuation in the Hosoura rice paddy during the entire growing season in 1999. Possible causes for the variation are postulated. Additional measurements on soil properties and on organic {delta}{sup 13}C in rice plant are suggested. Cited outstanding original papers are summarized in the references. (author)

  17. Stable dipole solitons and soliton complexes in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with periodically modulated nonlinearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, M. E., E-mail: gloriouslair@gmail.com, E-mail: galfimov@yahoo.com; Alfimov, G. L., E-mail: gloriouslair@gmail.com, E-mail: galfimov@yahoo.com [National Research University of Electronic Technology MIET, Zelenograd, Moscow 124498 (Russian Federation); Malomed, Boris A., E-mail: malomed@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Laboratory of Nonlinear-Optical Informatics, ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    We develop a general classification of the infinite number of families of solitons and soliton complexes in the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii/nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a nonlinear lattice pseudopotential, i.e., periodically modulated coefficient in front of the cubic term, which takes both positive and negative local values. This model finds direct implementations in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics. The most essential finding is the existence of two branches of dipole solitons (DSs), which feature an antisymmetric shape, being essentially squeezed into a single cell of the nonlinear lattice. This soliton species was not previously considered in nonlinear lattices. We demonstrate that one branch of the DS family (namely, which obeys the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion) is stable, while unstable DSs spontaneously transform into stable fundamental solitons (FSs). The results are obtained in numerical and approximate analytical forms, the latter based on the variational approximation. Some stable bound states of FSs are found too.

  18. Post-weaning diet in archaeological human populations: A meta-analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of child skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutaya, Takumi

    2017-11-01

    Childhood is a unique stage in human life history, in which subadults have completed their weaning process but are still dependent on older individuals for survival. Although the importance of food provisioning during childhood has been intensively discussed, childhood diet in the past has rarely been studied in a systematic manner. In this study, a meta-analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of post-weaning children (PWC) in Holocene human populations around the world is presented. The isotope ratios of PWC were standardized with those of adult females and males in the same population, and they were analyzed in terms of the difference in subsistence. Results of this study indicate that diets of PWC and adults were generally similar (most differences were within the range of ±1‰), which is consistent with the universal feature of food provisioning to PWC in humans. In hunter-gatherer populations, there is no significant difference between PWC and adult isotope ratios. In non-hunter-gatherer populations, however, PWC probably consumed significantly larger proportions of foods from lower trophic levels than did the adults, and such foods would be terrestrial C 3 plants. Potential factors relating to the dietary differences among PWC and adults are presented from a perspective of balance between food provisioning and self-acquisition by PWC. Significant isotopic differences between PWC and adults in non-hunter-gatherer populations revealed in this study have implications for declined health during the subsistence transition in Holocene, isotopic studies using human tooth enamel, and "δ 15 N dip" of subadults after weaning. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evolutionary Search for Globally Optimal Stable Multicycles in Complex Systems with Inventory Couplings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Skowron

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This note is devoted to multiperiodically operated complex system with inventory couplings transferring waste products from some subsystems as useful components to other subsystems. The flexibility of the inventory couplings is used to force each of the subsystems with its own period and to exploit its particular dynamic properties. This enhances the performance of the complex system endowed with many recycling loops, which reduce the amount of waste products endangering the natural environment. The subsystems are characterized by generalized populations composed of the individuals (the cycles, each of them encompasses its period, its initial state, its local control, and its inventory interaction. An evolutionary optimization algorithm employing such generalized populations coordinated on the basis of the inventory interaction constraints is developed. It includes the stability requirements imposed on the cyclic control processes connected with particular subsystems. The algorithm proposed is applied to the global multiperiodic optimization of some interconnected chemical production processes.

  20. Rapid presumptive identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex by radiometric determination of heat stable urease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandy, J.H.; Pruden, E.L.; Cox, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    Simple and rapid Bactec methodologies for the determination of neat (unaltered) and heat stable urease activity of mycobacteria are presented. Clinical isolates (63) and stock cultures (32)--consisting of: M. tuberculosis (19), M. bovis (5), M. kansasii (15), M. marinum (4), M. simiae (3), M. scrofulaceum (16), M. gordonae (6), M. szulgai (6), M. flavescens (1), M. gastri (1), M. intracellulare (6), M. fortuitum-chelonei complex (12), and M. smegmatis (1)--were tested for neat urease activity by Bactec radiometry. Mycobacterial isolates (50-100 mg wet weight) were incubated at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with microCi14C-urea. Urease-positive mycobacteria gave Bactec growth index (GI) values greater than 100 units, whereas urease-negative species gave values less than 10 GI units. Eighty-three isolates possessing neat urease activity were heated at 80 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by incubation at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with 1 microCi14C-urea. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex demonstrated heat-stable urease activity (GI more than 130 units) and could be distinguished from mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT), which gave GI values equal to or less than 40 units

  1. Highly Manufacturable Deep (Sub-Millimeter) Etching Enabled High Aspect Ratio Complex Geometry Lego-Like Silicon Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2017-02-01

    A highly manufacturable deep reactive ion etching based process involving a hybrid soft/hard mask process technology shows high aspect ratio complex geometry Lego-like silicon electronics formation enabling free-form (physically flexible, stretchable, and reconfigurable) electronic systems.

  2. How do soil types affect stable isotope ratios of 2H and 18O under evaporation: A Fingerprint of the Niipele subbasin of the Cuvelai - Etosha basin, Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaj, Marcel; Beyer, Matthias; Hamutoko, Josefina; Uugulu, Shoopi; Wanke, Heike; Koeniger, Paul; Kuells, Christoph; Lohe, Christoph; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Northern Namibia is a region with high population growth, limited water resources and a transboundary aquifer system where groundwater recharge and groundwater flow processes are not well understood. This study is an interdisciplinary approach within the frame of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management) to improve the understanding of links between hydrological, geochemical and ecological processes to locate areas that contribute to recharge a shallow aquifer system in the Cuvelai-Etosha basin. Results of a field campaign are presented, conducted in November 2013 which is the first of a series planned between the years 2013 and 2016. Soil samples were taken in the semi-arid subbasin of the Cuvelai Etosha surface water basin before the rainy season. Potential evaporation, temperature measurements and infiltration tests were performed at two sites with different soil characteristics. Soil samples were taken under natural conditions to a maximum depth of 4 meters. Additionally to environmental isotope signals (stable isotopes 2H, and 18O and water of known isotopic composition (local groundwater) has been applied to the same plots. Soil samples were taken to a depth of 1 m with an interval of 10 cm after 24 and 48 hours for an investigation of evaporation impact on stable isotope ratios. The soil water is extracted cryogenically from the soil samples in the laboratory and subsequently analyzed using a Picarro L2120-i cavity-ringdown (CRD) water vapor analyzer after vaporization. Results of the direct measurement of different soil types indicate that evaporation from a saturated soil can exceed potential evaporation from an open water surface1. This implies, alternative methods are needed for the determination of evaporation which will be discussed here. 1Brutsaert W.; Parlanget M.B. (1998): Hydrologic cycle explains the evaporation paradox. In: Nature (396), p. 30.

  3. Raf-1 forms a stable complex with Mek1 and activates Mek1 by serine phosphorylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, W; Alessandrini, A; Crews, C M; Erikson, R L

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant Mek1 and Raf-1 proteins produced in Sf9 cells undergo a tight association both in vivo and in vitro, which apparently does not depend on additional factors or the kinase activity of Mek1 or Raf-1. The complex can be disrupted by two polyclonal antibodies raised against Raf-1 peptides. Coinfection with Raf-1 activates Mek1 > 150-fold, and coinfection with Raf-1 and Mek1 activates Erk1 approximately 90-fold. The activation of Mek1 by Raf-1 involves only serine phosphorylation, which...

  4. Integration as the basis of stable and dynamic development of enterprises in agroindustrial complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ivanovich Ogorodnikov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of market relations in Russian economy generates an objective need to address a number of problems in the relationship between agroundustrial complex organizations in connection with privatization, liberalization of prices and imbalances in the existing inter-industry production and economic relations that negatively affect the results of their economic activities. Because of the flagrant violations of the replenishment process, a diverse range of connections and relationships between producers and processors was broken. The major direction of lifting agricultural economy in this situation is the development of cooperatives and agroindustrial integration. In addition, the formation of large integrated complexes demonstrates high efficiency and rapid development, which is the basis of agroindustrial sector in many developed countries. The increase of competition forces business entities to combine capabilities and mutually beneficial cooperation in the struggle for the strengthening of market positions. Thus, increasing the degree of integration in the agricultural sector helps to get out of the protracted crisis and move more quickly to the innovations.

  5. Denudation rates and the degree of chemical weathering in the Ganga River basin from ratios of meteoric cosmogenic 10Be to stable 9Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Waliur; Wittmann, Hella; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2017-07-01

    The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be, precipitated from the atmosphere, to the stable nuclide 9Be, released by silicate weathering, was measured in suspended sediment of the Ganga River basin to determine denudation rates, degrees of weathering, and sediment storage in the floodplain. The 10Be precipitated and the 9Be released are carried to ca. 90% by amorphous and to 10% by crystalline Fe-hydroxides, as revealed by chemical extractions, whereas the dissolved Be transport is negligible due to the river pH of 8. Resulting 10Be/9Be ratios increase from 0.75 ×10-9 for the northern and Himalaya-draining rivers to 1.7 ×10-9 in the downstream basin. The increase in 10Be/9Be ratios results from two compounding effects: with 1) average denudation rates decrease from 0.5 mm yr-1 in the Himalayas to 0.17 mm yr-1 for the Ganga main stem in the lowlands, 2) the southern tributaries draining the low-relief craton contribute sediment with a ratio of 2.0 ×10-9, corresponding to a denudation rate of 0.03 mm yr-1. We find that at the spatial scale of the entire basin, the atmospheric delivery flux of 10Be equals its sedimentary export flux. Hence fluxes can be considered to be at steady state and radioactive decay of 10Be during sediment storage is not discernible. The lack of a resolvable increase in 10Be concentration during sediment transfer along the floodplain stretch furthermore suggests that the sediment transfer time is indeed short. We also cannot resolve any additional release of silicate-bound 9Be there, testifying to the lower degree of weathering there. When multiplied with the basin area the 10Be/9Be-derived denudation rate of 0.14 mm yr-1 corresponds to a sediment flux of 350 Mt yr-1 which is in good agreement with gauging-derived sediment fluxes (ca. 400 Mt yr-1). Because they integrate over the entire basin, denudation rates from 10Be/9Be are lower than floodplain-corrected denudation rates from in situ cosmogenic 10Be that reflect the rates of the

  6. Identifying apparent local stable isotope equilibrium in a complex non-equilibrium system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuyang; Cao, Xiaobin; Wang, Jianwei; Bao, Huiming

    2018-02-28

    Although being out of equilibrium, biomolecules in organisms have the potential to approach isotope equilibrium locally because enzymatic reactions are intrinsically reversible. A rigorous approach that can describe isotope distribution among biomolecules and their apparent deviation from equilibrium state is lacking, however. Applying the concept of distance matrix in graph theory, we propose that apparent local isotope equilibrium among a subset of biomolecules can be assessed using an apparent fractionation difference (|Δα|) matrix, in which the differences between the observed isotope composition (δ') and the calculated equilibrium fractionation factor (1000lnβ) can be more rigorously evaluated than by using a previous approach for multiple biomolecules. We tested our |Δα| matrix approach by re-analyzing published data of different amino acids (AAs) in potato and in green alga. Our re-analysis shows that biosynthesis pathways could be the reason for an apparently close-to-equilibrium relationship inside AA families in potato leaves. Different biosynthesis/degradation pathways in tubers may have led to the observed isotope distribution difference between potato leaves and tubers. The analysis of data from green algae does not support the conclusion that AAs are further from equilibrium in glucose-cultured green algae than in the autotrophic ones. Application of the |Δα| matrix can help us to locate potential reversible reactions or reaction networks in a complex system such as a metabolic system. The same approach can be broadly applied to all complex systems that have multiple components, e.g. geochemical or atmospheric systems of early Earth or other planets. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A new isotopic reference material for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope-ratio measurements of water - USGS50 Lake Kyoga Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Mukwaya, Christine; Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M

    2015-11-15

    As a result of the need for isotopic reference waters having high δ(2) HVSMOW-SLAP and δ(18) OVSMOW-SLAP values for daily use, especially for tropical and equatorial-zone freshwaters, a new secondary isotopic reference material for international distribution was prepared from water collected from Lake Kyoga, Uganda. This isotopic reference lakewater was filtered through a membrane with 0.2-µm pore size, homogenized, loaded into glass ampoules that were sealed with a torch and autoclaved to eliminate biological activity, and measured by dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. This reference material is available in a case of 144 glass ampoules each containing 5 mL of water. The δ(2) H and δ(18) O values of this reference material are +32.8 ± 0.4 and +4.95 ± 0.02 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1 ‰), respectively, relative to VSMOW, on scales normalized such that the δ(2) H and δ(18) O values of SLAP reference water are, respectively, -428 and -55.5 mUr. Each uncertainty is an estimated expanded uncertainty (U = 2uc ) about the reference value that provides an interval that has about a 95 % probability of encompassing the true value. This isotopic reference material, designated as USGS50, is intended as one of two reference waters for daily normalization of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analysis of water with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer, of use especially for isotope-hydrology laboratories analyzing freshwater samples from equatorial and tropical regions. Published in 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. High-precision dual-inlet IRMS measurements of the stable isotopes of CO2 and the N2O / CO2 ratio from polar ice core samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Bauska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An important constraint on mechanisms of past carbon cycle variability is provided by the stable isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric carbon dioxide (δ13C-CO2 trapped in polar ice cores, but obtaining very precise measurements has proven to be a significant analytical challenge. Here we describe a new technique to determine the δ13C of CO2 at very high precision, as well as measuring the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios. In this method, ancient air is extracted from relatively large ice samples (~400 g with a dry-extraction "ice grater" device. The liberated air is cryogenically purified to a CO2 and N2O mixture and analyzed with a microvolume-equipped dual-inlet IRMS (Thermo MAT 253. The reproducibility of the method, based on replicate analysis of ice core samples, is 0.02‰ for δ13C-CO2 and 2 ppm and 4 ppb for the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios, respectively (1σ pooled standard deviation. Our experiments show that minimizing water vapor pressure in the extraction vessel by housing the grating apparatus in a ultralow-temperature freezer (−60 °C improves the precision and decreases the experimental blank of the method to −0.07 ± 0.04‰. We describe techniques for accurate calibration of small samples and the application of a mass-spectrometric method based on source fragmentation for reconstructing the N2O history of the atmosphere. The oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 is also investigated, confirming previous observations of oxygen exchange between gaseous CO2 and solid H2O within the ice archive. These data offer a possible constraint on oxygen isotopic fractionation during H2O and CO2 exchange below the H2O bulk melting temperature.

  9. Signal-to-Noise ratio and design complexity based on Unified Loss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taguchi's quality loss function for larger-the-better performance characteristics uses a reciprocal transformation to compute quality loss. This paper suggests that reciprocal transformation unnecessarily complicates and may distort results. Examples of this distortion include the signal-to-noise ratio based on mean squared ...

  10. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in marine zooplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerleau, Corinne; Stern, Gary A.; Pućko, Monika; Foster, Karen L.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Fortier, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as “keystone” species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ 15 N and lower δ 13 C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. - Highlights: • Assessment of Pan-Arctic variability in zooplankton Hg concentrations • Increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea • Zooplankton plays a central role in the Hg pathway within Arctic marine food webs.

  11. Heavy metals (As, Hg and V) and stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in fish from Yellow River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Guijian; Yuan, Zijiao; Liu, Houqi; Lam, Paul K S

    2018-02-01

    The Yellow River Estuary is a significant fishery, but at present there are few studies about the concentrations of arsenic (As), mercury (Hg) and vanadium (V) in fish from this area, which might cause potential health risk to fish consumers. The aim of this study was to research on the accumulation and potential sources of heavy metals in the fish of the Yellow River Estuary. Arsenic, Hg, V and stable isotope ratios (δ 15 N and δ 13 C) in 11 species of 129 fish were analyzed. Results showed that the concentrations of As and Hg were all lower than the guideline levels established by international organizations and legal limits by several countries. The mean concentrations of V in samples in this study were significantly higher than the results of previous studies on other regions. Arsenic, Hg and V significantly differed across species (PHg, which could be explained by the positive correlation between Hg concentrations and δ 15 N in fish. Through estimation of daily intake of inorganic As (iAs), Hg and V via fish consumption, the heavy metal contamination level of fish samples fell in an acceptable range, indicating no potentially hazardous for human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Enhanced Intramolecular Energy Transfer and Strengthened ff Luminescence of a Stable Helical Eu Complex in Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yuki; Ishii, Ayumi; Inazuka, Yudai; Yajima, Naho; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Hasegawa, Miki

    2018-01-24

    The luminescence of a Eu complex (EuL) is enhanced by stabilization of the coordination structure in highly viscous ionic liquids. The EuL was found to maintain a stable single helical structure both in organic solvents and in the ionic liquids [BMIM][PF₆] and [EMIM][PF₆]. A colorless solution of EuL dissolved in [BMIM][PF₆] exhibits bright red luminescence with a quantum yield of 32.3%, a value that is much higher than that in acetonitrile (12%). Estimated rate constants for the energy relaxation pathway indicate that the energy transfer efficiency is enhanced in [BMIM][PF₆] as a result of the suppression of molecular fluctuations in the ligands. Additionally, a highly luminescent helical structure is preserved in [EMIM][PF₆] up to 120 °C.

  13. Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Forms a Stable Complex with the Fusion Protein gB in Virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Vanarsdall

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a ubiquitous virus that is a major pathogen in newborns and immunocompromised or immunosuppressed patients. HCMV infects a wide variety of cell types using distinct entry pathways that involve different forms of the gH/gL glycoprotein: gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128-131 as well as the viral fusion glycoprotein, gB. However, the minimal or core fusion machinery (sufficient for cell-cell fusion is just gH/gL and gB. Here, we demonstrate that HCMV gB and gH/gL form a stable complex early after their synthesis and in the absence of other viral proteins. gH/gL can interact with gB mutants that are unable to mediate cell-cell fusion. gB-gH/gL complexes included as much as 16-50% of the total gH/gL in HCMV virus particles. In contrast, only small amounts of gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128-131 complexes were found associated with gB. All herpesviruses express gB and gH/gL molecules and most models describing herpesvirus entry suggest that gH/gL interacts with gB to mediate membrane fusion, although there is no direct evidence for this. For herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 it has been suggested that after receptor binding gH/gL binds to gB either just before, or coincident with membrane fusion. Therefore, our results have major implications for these models, demonstrating that HCMV gB and gH/gL forms stable gB-gH/gL complexes that are incorporated virions without receptor binding or membrane fusion. Moreover, our data is the best support to date for the proposal that gH/gL interacts with gB.

  14. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) in marine zooplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerleau, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.pomerleau@umanitoba.ca [Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Kivioq 2, Nuuk 3900, Greenland (Denmark); Stern, Gary A.; Pućko, Monika [Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Foster, Karen L. [Foster Environmental, Peterborough, ON K9J 8L2 (Canada); Macdonald, Robie W. [Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Sidney, BC V8L 4B2 (Canada); Fortier, Louis [Québec-Océan, Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as “keystone” species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ{sup 15}N and lower δ{sup 13}C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. - Highlights: • Assessment of Pan-Arctic variability in zooplankton Hg concentrations • Increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea • Zooplankton plays a central role in the Hg pathway within Arctic marine food webs.

  15. Quantity ratio stability of complexes of lanthanide ions with aminopolycarboxylic acids when adding the second molecule of ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkova, S.B.; Poluehktov, N.S.; Danilkovich, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in stability of lanthanide (Ln) complexes when the second molecule of ligand (Lig) is added, are considered, using the ratios, which have been previously derived, that correlate properties of Ln trivalent ions or their compounds with the number of f-electrons (Nsub(F)), and with spin S and orbital L quantum numbers of their ground states: lgKsub(Ln)=lgKsub(La)+αNsub(F)+βxS+γ'xLsub(1-6) (γ''Lsub(8-13)) On the basis of calculated values of correlation coefficients α, β, γ' and γ'' the change in the complex stability from LnLig to LnLig 2 , in which interaction of spin and orbital angular momenta of Ln 3+ and ligand donor atom can produce both stabilizing and destabilizing effect on the complex stability, has been explained. The interaction is different for aminopolycarbonic acid of different dentate nature

  16. The Search for Meteorites with Complex Exposure Histories Among Ordinary Chondrites with Low 3HE/21NE Ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welton, K C; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W

    2001-01-01

    In calculating cosmic-ray exposure ages of meteorites it is generally assumed that the meteoroids were expelled from a shielded position within their parent body and then experienced a single stage exposure before colliding with Earth. The combination of noble gas and radionuclide measurements in several large meteorites, such as Jilin and Bur Ghelaui, have revealed complex exposure histories: i.e. an initial exposure on the surface of an asteroid (or within meter-sized meteoroid), followed by a second exposure as a smaller object. In fact, orbital dynamics calculations predicted that at least 30% of the meteorites arriving on Earth experienced two- or multiple-stage exposure histories [1]. More recently, after the recognition that the Yarkovsky effect plays an important role in delivering meteorites from the asteroid belt to Earth-crossing orbits, it was confirmed that complex exposure histories should be common [2]. Nevertheless, despite the ability to measure a wide range of radionuclides with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), only a few meteorites with complex exposure histories have been identified [e.g. 3,4]. The question is whether the relatively paucity of complex exposure histories is real or have we simply overlooked complex-exposure histories. In this work we focus on meteorites with low 3 He/ 21 Ne ratios, since it is known that most meteorites with complex exposure histories have relatively low 3 He/ 21 Ne ratios, i.e. the 3 He/ 21 Ne ratio is below the ''Bern-line''. Several hypotheses have been suggested for these low 3 He/ 21 Ne ratios, including solar heating in low-perihelion orbits, shock-related diffusion of He during the collision that ejected the meteoroid, or an artifact of high shielding conditions [4]. The first two hypotheses seem to be supported by low radiogenic 4 He concentrations in samples with low 3 He, whereas Monte Carlo calculations have shown that some of the low 3 He/ 21 Ne ratios may be due to high shielding conditions in

  17. The effect of varying the number of contributors on likelihood ratios for complex DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benschop, Corina C G; Haned, Hinda; Jeurissen, Loes; Gill, Peter D; Sijen, Titia

    2015-11-01

    Interpretation of DNA mixtures with three or more contributors, defined here as high order mixtures, is difficult because of the inevitability of allele sharing. Allele sharing complicates the estimation of the number of contributors, which is an important parameter to assess the probative value. Consequently, these mixtures may not be deemed suitable for interpretation and reporting. In this study, we generated three-, four- and five-person mixtures with little or no drop-out and with varying levels of allele sharing. For these DNA mixtures we computed likelihood ratios (LRs) using the LRmix model, and always using persons of interest that are true contributors. We assessed the influence of different scenarios on the LR, and used (1) the true or an incorrect number of contributors, (2) zero, one or two anchored individuals and (3) an equal number of contributors under Hp and Hd or an extra contributor under Hd. It was shown that the LR varied considerably when the hypotheses used an incorrect number of contributors, especially when individuals were anchored under the hypotheses. Overall, when analysing high order mixtures, there may occur a transition from LR greater than one to less than one if an incorrect number of contributors is conditioned. This is a result of allele sharing among the multiple contributors rather than allele drop-out, since this study only utilised samples with little or no drop-out. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Uric Acid/Creatinine Ratios in Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients: Are These Parameters Efficient Predictors of Patients at Risk for Exacerbation and/or Severity of Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus Kocak, Nagihan; Sasak, Gulsah; Aka Akturk, Ulku; Akgun, Metin; Boga, Sibel; Sengul, Aysun; Gungor, Sinem; Arinc, Sibel

    2016-11-03

    BACKGROUND Serum uric acid (sUA) levels were previously found to be correlated with hypoxic states. We aimed to determine the levels of sUA and sUA/creatinine ratios in stable COPD patients and to evaluate whether sUA level and sUA/creatinine ratio can be used as predictors of exacerbation risk and disease severity. MATERIAL AND METHODS This cross-sectional study included stable COPD patients and healthy controls. The sUA levels and sUA/creatinine ratios in each group were evaluated and their correlations with the study parameters were investigated. ROC analyses for exacerbation risk and disease severity were reported. RESULTS The study included 110 stable COPD patients and 52 healthy controls. The mean sUA levels and sUA/creatinine ratios were significantly higher in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls. The most common comorbidities in COPD patients were hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease. While sUA levels were significantly higher in patients with hypertension (p=0.002) and malignancy (p=0.033), sUA/creatinine ratios was higher in patients with malignancy (p=0.004). The ROC analyses indicated that sUA/creatinine ratios can be more useful than sUA levels in predicting exacerbation risk (AUC, 0.586 vs. 0.426) and disease severity (AUC, 0.560 vs. 0.475) especially at higher cut-off values, but with low specificity. CONCLUSIONS Our study suggested that sUA levels and sUA/creatinine ratios increased in patients with stable COPD, especially among patients with certain comorbidities compared to healthy controls. At higher cut-off values, sUA levels and especially sUA/creatinine ratios, might be useful in predicting COPD exacerbation risk and disease severity. Also, their association with comorbidities, especially with malignancy and hypertension, may benefit from further investigation.

  19. Cardio-Thoracic Ratio Is Stable, Reproducible and Has Potential as a Screening Tool for HIV-1 Related Cardiac Disorders in Resource Poor Settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanif Esmail

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are common in HIV-1 infected persons in Africa and presentation is often insidious. Development of screening algorithms for cardiovascular disorders appropriate to a resource-constrained setting could facilitate timely referral. Cardiothoracic ratio (CTR on chest radiograph (CXR has been suggested as a potential screening tool but little is known about its reproducibility and stability. Our primary aim was to evaluate the stability and the inter-observer variability of CTR in HIV-1 infected outpatients. We further evaluated the prevalence of cardiomegaly (CTR≥0.5 and its relationship with other risk factors in this population.HIV-1 infected participants were identified during screening for a tuberculosis vaccine trial in Khayelitsha, South Africa between August 2011 and April 2012. Participants had a digital posterior-anterior CXR performed as well as history, examination and baseline observations. CXRs were viewed using OsiriX software and CTR calculated using digital callipers.450 HIV-1-infected adults were evaluated, median age 34 years (IQR 30-40 with a CD4 count 566/mm3 (IQR 443-724, 70% on antiretroviral therapy (ART. The prevalence of cardiomegaly was 12.7% (95% C.I. 9.6%-15.8%. CTR was calculated by a 2nd reader for 113 participants, measurements were highly correlated r = 0.95 (95% C.I. 0.93-0.97 and agreement of cardiomegaly substantial κ = 0.78 (95% C.I 0.61-0.95. CXR were repeated in 51 participants at 4-12 weeks, CTR measurements between the 2 time points were highly correlated r = 0.77 (95% C.I 0.68-0.88 and agreement of cardiomegaly excellent κ = 0.92 (95% C.I. 0.77-1. Participants with cardiomegaly had a higher median BMI (31.3; IQR 27.4-37.4 versus 26.9; IQR 23.2-32.4; p<0.0001 and median systolic blood pressure (130; IQR 121-141 versus 125; IQR 117-135; p = 0.01.CTR is a robust measurement, stable over time with substantial inter-observer agreement. A prospective study evaluating utility of CXR to

  20. A new method for precise determination of iron, zinc and cadmium stable isotope ratios in seawater by double-spike mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, Tim M.; Rosenberg, Angela D.; Adkins, Jess F.; John, Seth G.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ‘Metal-free’ seawater doped with varying concentrations of ‘zero’ isotope standards, processed through our simultaneous method, and then analyzed by double spike MC-ICPMS for Fe, Zn and Cd isotope ratios. All values were determined within 2 σ error (error bars shown) of zero. -- Highlights: •The first simultaneous method for isotopic analysis of Fe, Zn and Cd in seawater. •Designed for 1 L samples, a 1–20 fold improvement over previous methods. •Low blanks and high precision allow measurement of low concentration samples. •Small volume and fast processing are ideal for high-resolution large-scale studies. •Will facilitate investigation of marine trace-metal isotope cycling. -- Abstract: The study of Fe, Zn and Cd stable isotopes (δ 56 Fe, δ 66 Zn and δ 114 Cd) in seawater is a new field, which promises to elucidate the marine cycling of these bioactive trace metals. However, the analytical challenges posed by the low concentration of these metals in seawater has meant that previous studies have typically required large sample volumes, highly limiting data collection in the oceans. Here, we present the first simultaneous method for the determination of these three isotope systems in seawater, using Nobias PA-1 chelating resin to extract metals from seawater, purification by anion exchange chromatography, and analysis by double spike MC-ICPMS. This method is designed for use on only a single litre of seawater and has blanks of 0.3, 0.06 and <0.03 ng for Fe, Zn and Cd respectively, representing a 1–20 fold reduction in sample size and a 4–130 decrease in blank compared to previously reported methods. The procedure yields data with high precision for all three elements (typically 0.02–0.2‰; 1σ internal precision), allowing us to distinguish natural variability in the oceans, which spans 1–3‰ for all three isotope systems. Simultaneous extraction and purification of three metals makes this method ideal for high

  1. Stable Isotope Evidence for a Complex Fluid Evolution of the Northwestern British Columbia Coast Ranges Related to Terrane Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moertle, J.; Holk, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotope geochemistry reveals a complex fluid evolution for the Western Metamorphic Belt (WMB), Coast Ranges Batholith (CRB), Central Gneiss Complex (CGC) and Coast Ranges Megalineament (CRM). These fluids are a product of a complex tectonic history related to terrane accretion that includes oblique convergence, metamorphism, magmatism, and orogenic collapse. From W-to-E, these fluid systems are as follows. High-pressure greenschist-to-amphibolite facies metasedimentary rocks of the WMB record variable mineral δD (-61 to -104‰) and δ18O (e.g., quartz +9.6 to +13.4‰) values with multiple minerals in apparent isotopic equilibrium (T ~ 450-550°C) suggest a low W/R system dominated by metamorphic fluids. Variable and non-equilibrium δD (-53 to -143‰) and δ18O (e.g., biotite +2.3 to +5.3‰) values from diorites of the Quottoon pluton affected by the ductile CRM suggest a complex evolution that involved both metamorphic and meteoric-hydrothermal fluids in this dextral shear zone; these results differ from those 300 km along strike to the north that documented only metamorphic fluids in the CRM (Goldfarb et al., 1988). Our data and those of Magaritz and Taylor (1976) from granulite facies metasediments of the CGC and plutons of the western CRB reveal homogeneous δD values (-62 to -78‰) and a restricted range of δ18O values (e.g., quartz +8.5 to +11.5‰) with all minerals in equilibrium at T > 570°C indicate a system dominated by magmatic fluids. Calculated whole-rock δ18O values (~ +7‰) for the Quottoon pluton and CRB intrusive rocks suggest a mantle origin for these magmas. Reinterpretation of very low δD (< -150‰) and quartz-feldspar δ18O pairs that display extreme disequilibrium (feldspar δ18O values as low as -5‰) from the Ponder pluton, eastern CRB, and Hazelton Group point reveals that the major meteoric-hydrothermal system that affected these rocks was related to Eocene detachment faulting along the Shames Lake fault system, a

  2. Intra-lake stable isotope ratio variation in selected fish species and their possible carbon sources in Lake Kyoga (Uganda): implications for aquatic food web studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbabazi, D.; Makanga, B.; Orach-Meza, F.; Hecky, R.E.; Balirwa, J.S.; Ogutu-Ohwayo, R.; Verburg, P.H.; Chapman, L.; Muhumuza, E.

    2010-01-01

    The stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta 15N) and carbon (delta 13C) provide powerful tools for quantifying trophic relationships and carbon flow to consumers in food webs; however, the isotopic signatures of organisms vary within a lake. Assessment of carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures in a

  3. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable isotopic ratios of planktonic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ahmad, S.M.; Patil, D.J.; Rao, P.S.; Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rajagopalan, G.

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of the planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene d18O amplitude of 2.1% which is consistent...

  4. Inert and stable erbium(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins bearing aryl-ether dendron for optical amplification: synthesis and emission enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Buem; Kim, Yong Hee; Nah, Min Kook; Kim, Hwan Kyu

    2005-01-01

    We have developed novel inert and stable erbium (Er)(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins for optical amplification. The functionalized metalloporphyrin ligands have been designed and synthesized to provide enough coordination sites for the formation of inert and stable 9-coordinated Er(III)-cored complexes. Er 3+ ions were encapsulated by the metalloporphyrin ligands, such as Zn(II)- and Pt(II)-porphyrins. The near-infrared (IR) emission intensity of Er 3+ ion is much stronger in the Er(III)-cored complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin than Er(III)-cored complex based on Zn(II)-porphyrin. Furthermore, we have incorporated a G2-aryl-ether functionalized dendron into the Er(III)-cored complex, yielding an Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex bearing the Pt(II)-porphyrin. The Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex shows the stronger near-IR emission intensity than the corresponding complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin by seven times in solid state. The lifetimes of the emission band of Pt(II)-porphyrin ligands in the visible region were found to be 30 and 40 μs for the Er(III)-cored complex and the Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin in deoxygenated THF solution samples, respectively. Also, in both cases, the sensitized luminescence intensity is increased in deoxygenated solution. Therefore, it indicates that the energy transfer from the metalloporphyrins to Er 3+ ions takes places through the triplet state. In this paper, the synthesis and photophysical properties of novel Er(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins and Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex based on metalloporphyrin will be discussed

  5. Experimental and numerical study of atmospheric turbulence and dispersion in stable conditions and in near field at a complex site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed in order to study pollutants dispersion at a complex site with a focus on stable conditions, which are still challenging for numerical modelling. This experimental program is being conducted at the SIRTA site in a southern suburb of Paris and consists in measuring, in near field, the turbulence and the pollutants dispersion. The aim of this program is to characterize the fine structure of turbulence and associated dispersion through high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. Then, these measurements allow to validate and improve the performance of CFD simulation for turbulence and dispersion in a heterogeneous field. The instrumental set up includes 12 ultrasonic anemometers measuring continuously wind velocity and temperature at 10 Hz, and 6 photo-ionization detectors (PIDs) measuring gas concentration at 50 Hz during tracer tests. Intensive observations periods (IOPs) with gas releases have been performed since March 2012.First of all, a detailed study of flow on the site is made, because it must be characterised and properly simulated before attempting to simulate the pollutants dispersion. This study is based on two years of continuous measurements and on measurements performed during IOPs. Turbulence strong anisotropy in the surface layer is characterized by calculating variances, integral length scales and power spectra of the three wind velocity components. Propagation of turbulent structures between sensors has been characterized with velocity correlations. Energy spectra show several slopes in different frequency regions. Also, data analyses show impact of terrain heterogeneity on the measurements. The forest to the north of experimental field modifies wind velocity and direction for a large northerly sector. It induces a strong directional wind shear and a wind deceleration below the forest height. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code Code-Saturne in RANS mode with a standard κ

  6. Experimental and numerical study of atmospheric turbulence and dispersion in stable conditions and in near field at a complex site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed in order to study pollutants dispersion at a complex site with a focus on stable conditions, which are still challenging for numerical modelling. This experimental program is being conducted at the SIRTA site in a southern suburb of Paris and consists in measuring, in near field, the turbulence and the pollutants dispersion. The aim of this program is to characterize the fine structure of turbulence and associated dispersion through high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. Then, these measurements allow to validate and improve the performance of CFD simulation for turbulence and dispersion in a heterogeneous field. The instrumental set up includes 12 ultrasonic anemometers measuring continuously wind velocity and temperature at 10 Hz, and 6 photo-ionization detectors (PIDs) measuring gas concentration at 50 Hz during tracer tests. Intensive observations periods (IOPs) with gas releases have been performed since March 2012. First of all, a detailed study of flow on the site is made, because it must be characterised and properly simulated before attempting to simulate the pollutants dispersion. This study is based on two years of continuous measurements and on measurements performed during IOPs. Turbulence strong anisotropy in the surface layer is characterized by calculating variances, integral length scales and power spectra of the three wind velocity components. Propagation of turbulent structures between sensors has been characterized with velocity correlations. Energy spectra show several slopes in different frequency regions. Also, data analyses show impact of terrain heterogeneity on the measurements. The forest to the north of the experimental field modifies wind velocity and direction for a large northerly sector. It induces a strong directional wind shear and a wind deceleration below the forest height. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code, Code-Saturne, in RANS mode with a standard k

  7. Circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution for scalar transmissibility functions. Part III: Application to statistical modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wang-Ji; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2018-01-01

    This study applies the theoretical findings of circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution Yan and Ren (2016) [1,2] to transmissibility-based modal analysis from a statistical viewpoint. A probabilistic model of transmissibility function in the vicinity of the resonant frequency is formulated in modal domain, while some insightful comments are offered. It theoretically reveals that the statistics of transmissibility function around the resonant frequency is solely dependent on 'noise-to-signal' ratio and mode shapes. As a sequel to the development of the probabilistic model of transmissibility function in modal domain, this study poses the process of modal identification in the context of Bayesian framework by borrowing a novel paradigm. Implementation issues unique to the proposed approach are resolved by Lagrange multiplier approach. Also, this study explores the possibility of applying Bayesian analysis in distinguishing harmonic components and structural ones. The approaches are verified through simulated data and experimentally testing data. The uncertainty behavior due to variation of different factors is also discussed in detail.

  8. Role of the ratio of biopolyelectrolyte persistence length to nanoparticle size in the structural tuning of electrostatic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Carn, Florent; Boué, François; Buhler, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of nanoparticles of given size R induced by addition of a polymer strongly depends on its degree of rigidity. This is shown here on a large variety of silica nanoparticle self-assemblies obtained by electrostatic complexation with carefully selected oppositely charged biopolyelectrolytes of different rigidity. The effective rigidity is quantified by the total persistence length LT representing the sum of the intrinsic (Lp) and electrostatic (Le) polyelectrolyte persistence length, which depends on the screening, i.e., on ionic strength due to counterions and external salt concentrations. We experimentally show that the ratio LT/R is the main tuning parameter that controls the fractal dimension Df of the nanoparticles' self-assemblies, which is determined using small-angle neutron scattering: (i) For LT/R nanoparticles in excess, hence ramified structures with Df˜2 . (ii) For 0.3 nanoparticles), in good agreement with computer simulations. (iii) For LT/R >1 ,Le is strongly increased due to the absence of salt and repulsions between nanoparticles cannot be compensated for by the polyelectrolyte wrapping, which allows a spacing between nanoparticles and the formation of one-dimensional pearl necklace complexes. (iv) Finally, electrostatic screening, i.e., ionic strength, turned out to be a reliable way of controlling Df and the phase diagram behavior. It finely tunes the short-range interparticle potential, resulting in larger fractal dimensions at higher ionic strength.

  9. Expanding the Therapeutic Potential of the Iron Chelator Deferasirox in the Development of Aqueous Stable Ti(IV) Anticancer Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Rosas, Sergio A; Vázquez-Salgado, Alexandra M; Rivero, Kennett I; Negrón, Lenny J; Delgado, Yamixa; Benjamín-Rivera, Josué A; Vázquez-Maldonado, Angel L; Parks, Timothy B; Munet-Colón, Charlene; Tinoco, Arthur D

    2017-07-17

    The recent X-ray structure of titanium(IV)-bound human serum transferrin (STf) exhibiting citrate as a synergistic anion reveals a difference in Ti(IV) coordination versus iron(III), the metal endogenously delivered by the protein to cells. This finding enriches our bioinspired drug design strategy for Ti(IV)-based anticancer therapeutics, which applies a family of Fe(III) chelators termed chemical transferrin mimetic (cTfm) ligands to inhibit Fe bioavailability in cancer cells. Deferasirox, a drug used for iron overload disease, is a cTfm ligand that models STf coordination to Fe(III), favoring Fe(III) binding versus Ti(IV). This metal affinity preference drives deferasirox to facilitate the release of cytotoxic Ti(IV) intracellularly in exchange for Fe(III). An aqueous speciation study performed by potentiometric titration from pH 4 to 8 with micromolar levels of Ti(IV) deferasirox at a 1:2 ratio reveals exclusively Ti(deferasirox) 2 in solution. The predominant complex at pH 7.4, [Ti(deferasirox) 2 ] 2- , exhibits the one of the highest aqueous stabilities observed for a potent cytotoxic Ti(IV) species, demonstrating little dissociation even after 1 month in cell culture media. UV-vis and 1 H NMR studies show that the stability is unaffected by the presence of biomolecular Ti(IV) binders such as citrate, STf, and albumin, which have been shown to induce dissociation or regulate cellular uptake and can alter the activity of other antiproliferative Ti(IV) complexes. Kinetic studies on [Ti(deferasirox) 2 ] 2- transmetalation with Fe(III) show that a labile Fe(III) source is required to induce this process. The initial step of this process occurs on the time scale of minutes, and equilibrium for the complete transmetalation is reached on a time scale of hours to a day. This work reveals a mechanism to deliver Ti(IV) compounds into cells and trigger Ti(IV) release by a labile Fe(III) species. Cellular studies including other cTfm ligands confirm the Fe(III) depletion

  10. Thermally stable and high ON/OFF ratio non-volatile memory devices based on poly(triphenylamine) with pendent PCBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Jia-Hao; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2014-04-28

    High ON/OFF ratio electrically bistable non-volatile WORM memory devices were prepared based on poly(triphenylamine) with different amounts of pendent PCBM. With the introduction of 10 wt% PCBM into P-TPA via covalent bonding, a memory device with low switching-ON voltage (0.9 V) and high ON/OFF ratio (10(9)) could be obtained. The device performance remained satisfactory under the heating condition up to 100 °C which is beneficial to maintain device stability for computer application when other components produce heat.

  11. Stable carbon isotope ratios as indicators of marine versus terrestrial inputs to the diets of wild and captive tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cree, A.; Cartland-Shaw, L.; Tyrrell, C.; Lyon, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis was used to examine feeding relationships of wild tuatara on Stephens Island and captive tuatara in New Zealand institutions. We first measured delta 13 C in three food items of wild tuatara. Pectoral muscle of fairy prions (a seabird eaten seasonally by tuatara) was significantly enriched in 13 C compared with whole bodies of wild insects (darkling beetles and tree weta). Values for delta 13 C in blood cells varied significantly among wild tuatara of different life-history stages. Male tuatara were more enriched in 13 C than were females or juveniles, suggesting that males prey more heavily on seabirds. Insect foods of captive tuatara varied dramatically in delta/sup 13/C; this is attributed to differential consumption of plant material derived from the C 3 and C 4 photosynthetic pathways. Blood cells from four different groups of captive tuatara differed significantly in delta 13 C. This was perhaps related to assimilation of insects with different delta 13 C values, and cannot be attributed to differences in seabird predation as captive tuatara do not have access to seabirds. For wild tuatara on Stephens Island, stable carbon isotope analysis provides support for the dietary information available from behavioural observations, gut analyses and measurements of plasma composition. (author). 47 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  12. Combining functional weed ecology and crop stable isotope ratios to identify cultivation intensity: a comparison of cereal production regimes in Haute Provence, France and Asturias, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaard, Amy; Hodgson, John; Nitsch, Erika; Jones, Glynis; Styring, Amy; Diffey, Charlotte; Pouncett, John; Herbig, Christoph; Charles, Michael; Ertuğ, Füsun; Tugay, Osman; Filipovic, Dragana; Fraser, Rebecca

    This investigation combines two independent methods of identifying crop growing conditions and husbandry practices-functional weed ecology and crop stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis-in order to assess their potential for inferring the intensity of past cereal production systems using archaeobotanical assemblages. Present-day organic cereal farming in Haute Provence, France features crop varieties adapted to low-nutrient soils managed through crop rotation, with little to no manuring. Weed quadrat survey of 60 crop field transects in this region revealed that floristic variation primarily reflects geographical differences. Functional ecological weed data clearly distinguish the Provence fields from those surveyed in a previous study of intensively managed spelt wheat in Asturias, north-western Spain: as expected, weed ecological data reflect higher soil fertility and disturbance in Asturias. Similarly, crop stable nitrogen isotope values distinguish between intensive manuring in Asturias and long-term cultivation with minimal manuring in Haute Provence. The new model of cereal cultivation intensity based on weed ecology and crop isotope values in Haute Provence and Asturias was tested through application to two other present-day regimes, successfully identifying a high-intensity regime in the Sighisoara region, Romania, and low-intensity production in Kastamonu, Turkey. Application of this new model to Neolithic archaeobotanical assemblages in central Europe suggests that early farming tended to be intensive, and likely incorporated manuring, but also exhibited considerable variation, providing a finer grained understanding of cultivation intensity than previously available.

  13. Relation between stable isotope ratios in human red blood cells and hair: implications for using the nitrogen isotope ratio of hair as a biomarker of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Sarah H; Kristal, Alan R; Boyer, Bert B; King, Irena B; Metzgar, Jordan S; O'Brien, Diane M

    2009-12-01

    The nitrogen isotope ratio (expressed as delta(15)N) of red blood cells (RBCs) is highly correlated with the RBC long-chain omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in Yup'ik Eskimos. Because delta(15)N can also be measured in hair samples, it could provide a noninvasive, retrospective biomarker for EPA and DHA intakes. We investigated the agreement between delta(15)N in hair and RBCs and then evaluated the relations between hair delta(15)N and RBC EPA and DHA. We also assessed the agreement in carbon isotope ratios (delta(13)C) between hair and RBCs, because delta(13)C has been proposed as a dietary biomarker in other populations. We assessed relations between hair and RBC delta(15)N and delta(13)C in a community-based sample of 144 Yup'ik Eskimos and examined the correlations between delta(15)N and RBC EPA and DHA in a subset of these participants (n = 44). We showed a 1:1 relation with good agreement between hair and RBC delta(15)N (r = 0.91) and delta(13)C (r = 0.87). Hair isotope ratios were greater than RBC ratios by 1.5 per thousand for delta(15)N and by 2.3 per thousand for delta(13)C. There were strong correlations between hair delta(15)N and RBC EPA and DHA (r = 0.83 and 0.84, respectively). These results support the use of hair delta(15)N values as a biomarker of EPA and DHA intakes. Because hair collection is noninvasive and the samples require no special processing, studies of EPA and DHA intakes in large populations could use biomarkers rather than self-reports to assess these fatty acids.

  14. Stable sulphur isotope ratios in the moss species Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. and Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. from the Kielce area (south-central Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Dolegowska, S.; Halas, S.; Trembaczowski, A. [Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Stable sulphur isotope determinations were performed on 18 moss samples collected at nine sites in forested areas of the city of Kielce. The {delta}{sup 34} S of Hylocomium splendens varied from 4.4 to 7.1%, whereas the {delta}{sup 34} S of Pleurozium schreberi was in the range of 3.7-9.1%. The Holy Cross Mountains mosses display a positive delta S-34 signature of airborne SO{sub 2} and sulphates of anthropogenic origin, which is characteristic for this part of Europe. Some spatial variations in the {delta}{sup 34}S of mosses are due to the interactions that occur between coal combustion emissions with diverse isotopic imprints, variations in wind direction and topographic features combined with biological fractionation.

  15. Validation of SmartRank: A likelihood ratio software for searching national DNA databases with complex DNA profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benschop, Corina C G; van de Merwe, Linda; de Jong, Jeroen; Vanvooren, Vanessa; Kempenaers, Morgane; Kees van der Beek, C P; Barni, Filippo; Reyes, Eusebio López; Moulin, Léa; Pene, Laurent; Haned, Hinda; Sijen, Titia

    2017-07-01

    Searching a national DNA database with complex and incomplete profiles usually yields very large numbers of possible matches that can present many candidate suspects to be further investigated by the forensic scientist and/or police. Current practice in most forensic laboratories consists of ordering these 'hits' based on the number of matching alleles with the searched profile. Thus, candidate profiles that share the same number of matching alleles are not differentiated and due to the lack of other ranking criteria for the candidate list it may be difficult to discern a true match from the false positives or notice that all candidates are in fact false positives. SmartRank was developed to put forward only relevant candidates and rank them accordingly. The SmartRank software computes a likelihood ratio (LR) for the searched profile and each profile in the DNA database and ranks database entries above a defined LR threshold according to the calculated LR. In this study, we examined for mixed DNA profiles of variable complexity whether the true donors are retrieved, what the number of false positives above an LR threshold is and the ranking position of the true donors. Using 343 mixed DNA profiles over 750 SmartRank searches were performed. In addition, the performance of SmartRank and CODIS were compared regarding DNA database searches and SmartRank was found complementary to CODIS. We also describe the applicable domain of SmartRank and provide guidelines. The SmartRank software is open-source and freely available. Using the best practice guidelines, SmartRank enables obtaining investigative leads in criminal cases lacking a suspect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of trace element concentrations and stable lead, uranium and thorium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS in NORM and NORM-polluted sample leachates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, J.L., E-mail: ppmasb@us.es [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EPS, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Villa, M. [Servicio de Radioisotopos, Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 4b, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, ETS de Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Hurtado, S. [Servicio de Radioisotopos, Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 4b, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, ETS de Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2012-02-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polluted sediment and NORM samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An efficient yet fast process allowing multi-parametric determinations in <3 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace element concentrations, Pb, Th and U isotope ratios with a single instrument. - Abstract: This work focuses on the monitoring of the potential pollution in scenarios that involve NORM-related industrial activities (environmental or in-door scenarios). The objective was to develop a method to determine extent and origin of the contamination, suitable for monitoring (i.e. simple, fast and economical) and avoiding the use of too many different instruments. It is presented a radiochemical method that allows the determination of trace element concentrations and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb/{sup 208}Pb, {sup 238}U/{sup 234}U and {sup 232}Th/{sup 230}Th isotope ratios using a single sample aliquot and a single instrument (ICP-QMS). Eichrom UTEVA{sup Registered-Sign} extraction chromatography minicolumns were used to separate uranium and thorium in sample leachates. Independent ICP-MS determinations of uranium and thorium isotope ratios were carried out afterwards. Previously a small aliquot of the leachate was used for the determination of trace element concentrations and lead isotope ratios. Several radiochemical arrangements were tested to get maximum performances and simplicity of the method. The performances of the method were studied in terms of chemical yields of uranium and thorium and removal of the potentially interfering elements. The established method was applied to samples from a chemical industry and sediments collected in a NORM-polluted scenario. The results obtained from our method allowed us to infer not only the extent, but also the sources of the contamination in the area.

  17. Determination of trace element concentrations and stable lead, uranium and thorium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS in NORM and NORM-polluted sample leachates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, J.L.; Villa, M.; Hurtado, S.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Polluted sediment and NORM samples. ► An efficient yet fast process allowing multi-parametric determinations in 206 Pb/ 207 Pb/ 208 Pb, 238 U/ 234 U and 232 Th/ 230 Th isotope ratios using a single sample aliquot and a single instrument (ICP-QMS). Eichrom UTEVA ® extraction chromatography minicolumns were used to separate uranium and thorium in sample leachates. Independent ICP-MS determinations of uranium and thorium isotope ratios were carried out afterwards. Previously a small aliquot of the leachate was used for the determination of trace element concentrations and lead isotope ratios. Several radiochemical arrangements were tested to get maximum performances and simplicity of the method. The performances of the method were studied in terms of chemical yields of uranium and thorium and removal of the potentially interfering elements. The established method was applied to samples from a chemical industry and sediments collected in a NORM-polluted scenario. The results obtained from our method allowed us to infer not only the extent, but also the sources of the contamination in the area.

  18. Acute multi-sgRNA knockdown of KEOPS complex genes reproduces the microcephaly phenotype of the stable knockout zebrafish model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Jobst-Schwan

    Full Text Available Until recently, morpholino oligonucleotides have been widely employed in zebrafish as an acute and efficient loss-of-function assay. However, off-target effects and reproducibility issues when compared to stable knockout lines have compromised their further use. Here we employed an acute CRISPR/Cas approach using multiple single guide RNAs targeting simultaneously different positions in two exemplar genes (osgep or tprkb to increase the likelihood of generating mutations on both alleles in the injected F0 generation and to achieve a similar effect as morpholinos but with the reproducibility of stable lines. This multi single guide RNA approach resulted in median likelihoods for at least one mutation on each allele of >99% and sgRNA specific insertion/deletion profiles as revealed by deep-sequencing. Immunoblot showed a significant reduction for Osgep and Tprkb proteins. For both genes, the acute multi-sgRNA knockout recapitulated the microcephaly phenotype and reduction in survival that we observed previously in stable knockout lines, though milder in the acute multi-sgRNA knockout. Finally, we quantify the degree of mutagenesis by deep sequencing, and provide a mathematical model to quantitate the chance for a biallelic loss-of-function mutation. Our findings can be generalized to acute and stable CRISPR/Cas targeting for any zebrafish gene of interest.

  19. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer–chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) is responsible for non-quantitative H2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer–Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems.

  20. Observations of atmospheric methane and its stable isotope ratio (δ13C) over the East Arctic seas from the ship cruises in the autumn of 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratova, Natalia; Skorokhod, Andrey; Belikov, Igor; Semiletov, Igor; Berezina, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas after water vapor and carbon dioxide (CO2) which has an integral radiative effect on the contemporary terrestrial climatic system. The methane radiative effect is 20 times as strong as carbon dioxide per unit mole. Taking into account the characteristic life time of the greenhouse gases molecules in the atmosphere, the methane global warming potential at the 100-year time interval is 20 times higher than the CO2 potential. Atmospheric CH4 mixing ratio and the changes in the methane 13C:12C ratio (reported the changes relative to a reference ratio and denoted as δ13C-CH4 and reported , in units of per mil) were measured from aboard the research vessel Akademik M.A. Lavrentiev from September to November 2016 in the Laptev, East Siberian and Chukchi Seas and as well as the North Pacific and the Sea of Japan. The measurements were made performed using a Cavity-Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) from Picarro™ (model G2132-i). Together with methane concentrations of other trace gases (CO2, NO, NO2, O3) were measured. Air was sampled from an inlet at the front of the deck at 11 meters above sea level. A significant increase in methane concentration over the shelf areas of the Arctic seas and in the deltas of the large Siberian rivers is revealed in the expeditions. The measurements have confirmed the possibility of the formation of extreme methane concentrations (above 3 ppm) in the air over the areas of methane seeps of the Eastern shelf of the Arctic Ocean. The present study allowed to identify the sources of atmospheric methane in the Arctic. The measurements were compared with the surface methane data from the NOAA/ESRL arctic sites and the Tiksi station located on the shore of the Laptev Sea.

  1. Identification of Bottled Zam Zam Water in Malaysian Market using Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotobe Ratios (δ2H and δ18O)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roslanzairi Mostapa; Abdul Kadir Ishak; Kamaruzaman Mohamad; Rohaimah Demanah

    2014-01-01

    The water drawn from the well of Zam Zam is believed by the adherents of Islam to be blessed and capable of treating a variety of ailments. The water originates from a well in an alluvium area, located in Mecca, Saudi Arabia and has been in use since 4000 years ago. Due to the religious significance of the water drawn from this well, bottled versions are very popular among Malaysians. Unfortunately, this disproportionate popularity may entice some unscrupulous dealers to engage in fraudulent behaviour, such as selling ordinary water purported to be Zam Zam water. This unethical practice might very well pose a physical and economical hazard to consumers. Therefore, for the purpose of this preliminary study, five samples of Zam Zam bottled water from different brands were purchased and analyzed using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS). For comparison purpose, four samples of zam zam water from Mecca, and two more types of water samples originating from Malaysian were also analyzed, namely, bottled drinking water and tap water. The sources of these water samples are from groundwater and surface water (river), respectively. Results of hydrogen (ε 2 H) and oxygen (ε 18 O) isotope ratios of zam zam water from mecca are in the range of -13.62 % to -10.60 %, and -2.17 % to 0.06 %, respectively, while the hydrogen (ε 2 H) and oxygen (δ 18 O) isotope ratios of five samples from the bottled Zam Zam water are within the range of -50.74 % to -7.95 % to -5.39 %, respectively. The results from the measured values of all the water samples, and might be immensely useful for the purpose of regulatory monitoring of bottled water products. (author)

  2. Consistent predictable patterns in the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of animal proteins consumed by modern humans in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Lesley A; Valenzuela, Luciano O; Bowen, Gabriel J; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2011-12-30

    Published datasets of proteinaceous animal tissues suggest that co-variation between amino acid hydrogen (δ²H) and oxygen (δ¹⁸O) isotope ratios is a common feature in systems where isotopic variation is driven by geographic or temporal variation in the δ²H and δ¹⁸O values of environmental water. This has led to the development of models relating tissue δ²H and δ¹⁸O values to those of water, with potential application in a number of fields. However, the strength and ubiquity of the influence of environmental water on protein isotope ratios across taxonomic groups, and thus the relevance of predictive models, is an open question. Here we report strong co-variation of δ²H and δ¹⁸O values across a suite of terrestrial and aquatic animal meats purchased in American food markets, including beef, poultry (chicken and turkey), chicken eggs, pork, lamb, freshwater fish, and marine fish. Significant isotope co-variation was not found for small collections of marine bivalves and crustaceans. These results imply that isotopic signals from environmental water were propagated similarly through most of the diverse natural and human-managed foodwebs represented by our samples. Freshwater fish had the largest variation in δ²H and δ¹⁸O values, with ranges of 121‰ and 19.2‰, respectively, reflecting the large isotopic variation in environmental freshwaters. In contrast marine animals had the smallest variation for both δ²H (7‰ range, crustaceans) and δ¹⁸O (3.0‰ range, bivalves) values. Known-origin beef samples demonstrated direct relationships between the variance of environmental water isotope ratios and that of collected meats.

  3. A new method for precise determination of iron, zinc and cadmium stable isotope ratios in seawater by double-spike mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tim M; Rosenberg, Angela D; Adkins, Jess F; John, Seth G

    2013-09-02

    The study of Fe, Zn and Cd stable isotopes (δ(56)Fe, δ(66)Zn and δ(114)Cd) in seawater is a new field, which promises to elucidate the marine cycling of these bioactive trace metals. However, the analytical challenges posed by the low concentration of these metals in seawater has meant that previous studies have typically required large sample volumes, highly limiting data collection in the oceans. Here, we present the first simultaneous method for the determination of these three isotope systems in seawater, using Nobias PA-1 chelating resin to extract metals from seawater, purification by anion exchange chromatography, and analysis by double spike MC-ICPMS. This method is designed for use on only a single litre of seawater and has blanks of 0.3, 0.06 and <0.03 ng for Fe, Zn and Cd respectively, representing a 1-20 fold reduction in sample size and a 4-130 decrease in blank compared to previously reported methods. The procedure yields data with high precision for all three elements (typically 0.02-0.2‰; 1σ internal precision), allowing us to distinguish natural variability in the oceans, which spans 1-3‰ for all three isotope systems. Simultaneous extraction and purification of three metals makes this method ideal for high-resolution, large-scale endeavours such as the GEOTRACES program. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spring-Summer Temperatures Since AD 1780 Reconstructed from Stable Oxygen Isotope Ratios in White Spruce Tree-Rings from the Mackenzie Delta, Northwestern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Trevor J.; Pisaric, Michael F. J.; Field, Robert D.; Kokelj, Steven V.; Edwards, Thomas W. D.; deMontigny, Peter; Healy, Richard; LeGrande, Allegra N.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude delta(exp 18)O archives deriving from meteoric water (e.g., tree-rings and ice-cores) can provide valuable information on past temperature variability, but stationarity of temperature signals in these archives depends on the stability of moisture source/trajectory and precipitation seasonality, both of which can be affected by atmospheric circulation changes. A tree-ring delta(exp 18)O record (AD 1780-2003) from the Mackenzie Delta is evaluated as a temperature proxy based on linear regression diagnostics. The primary source of moisture for this region is the North Pacific and, thus, North Pacific atmospheric circulation variability could potentially affect the tree-ring delta(exp 18)O-temperature signal. Over the instrumental period (AD 1892-2003), tree-ring delta(exp 18)O explained 29% of interannual variability in April-July minimum temperatures, and the explained variability increases substantially at lower-frequencies. A split-period calibration/verification analysis found the delta(exp 18)O-temperature relation was time-stable, which supported a temperature reconstruction back to AD 1780. The stability of the delta(exp 18)O-temperature signal indirectly implies the study region is insensitive to North Pacific circulation effects, since North Pacific circulation was not constant over the calibration period. Simulations from the NASA-GISS ModelE isotope-enabled general circulation model confirm that meteoric delta(exp 18)O and precipitation seasonality in the study region are likely insensitive to North Pacific circulation effects, highlighting the paleoclimatic value of tree-ring and possibly other delta(exp 18)O records from this region. Our delta(exp 18)O-based temperature reconstruction is the first of its kind in northwestern North America, and one of few worldwide, and provides a long-term context for evaluating recent climate warming in the Mackenzie Delta region.

  5. Stable carbon isotope ratios of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and glyoxal in marine aerosols from the western North Pacific: Long-term trends in Chichijima Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.

    2012-12-01

    Dicarboxylic acids such as oxalic, malonic and succinic acids are the most abundant water-soluble organic compound class in aerosols. To better understand the source and photochemical processes of water-soluble organic aerosols in the remote marine aerosols, we measured stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds using a GC/IR/MS technique. The aerosol samples were collected in 2001-2011 at a remote island, Chichijima (27°04'E; 142°13'N) in the western North Pacific. Here we present decadal variations of the isotopic composition of dicarboxylic acids (C2-C9), ketoacids (C2-C8) and glyoxal in summertime aerosols (June, July and August). The molecular distributions of diacids were characterized by the predominance of oxalic (C2) acid followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids. Oxalic acid showed higher δ13C values than other species ranging from -18‰ to -2‰ with no clear decadal trend. In contrast, C3 and C4 diacids showed δ13C values of -24 to -5‰ and -40 to -12‰ with a decadal decline. Glyoxal (-60 to -10‰) and ωC7 acid (-34 to -12‰) also showed lower values toward 2011. However, azelaic acid (C9) (-32 to -24‰) stayed relatively constant throughout the observation period. We will discuss the detailed isotopic compositions of these organic species in terms of the photochemical aging and processing in the western North Pacific and the changes in the sources and source regions.

  6. The Prestudy for Studying Inorganic Nutrient Metabolism in Humans : the Aplication of ICP-MS for Determination of Stable Isotope Ratio of Fe and Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukihati; Sumadjo

    2001-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of isotope ratio of Fe and Zn by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mass spectrometer was operated in low resolution mode to provide maximal sensitivity. Typical conditions for operations were: plasma power 0.85 k W, reflected power 56 Fe/ 54 Fe, 57 Fe/ 54 Fe, 58 Fe/ 54 Fe, dan 64 Zn/ 67 Zn, 66 Zn/ 67 Zn, 68 Zn/ 67 Zn, 70 Zn/ 67 Zn measured by ICP-MS showed a good level of agreement with TIMS (thermal ionization mass spectrometry). This method was prepared for studying the absorption and/or metabolism of inorganic nutrients in humans. (author)

  7. Combination of sugar analysis and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry to detect the use of artificial sugars in royal jelly production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wytrychowski, Marine; Daniele, Gaëlle; Casabianca, Hervé

    2012-05-01

    The effects of feeding bees artificial sugars and/or proteins on the sugar compositions and (13)C isotopic measurements of royal jellies (RJs) were evaluated. The sugars fed to the bees were two C4 sugars (cane sugar and maize hydrolysate), two C3 sugars (sugar beet, cereal starch hydrolysate), and honey. The proteins fed to them were pollen, soybean, and yeast powder proteins. To evaluate the influence of the sugar and/or protein feeding over time, samples were collected during six consecutive harvests. (13)C isotopic ratio measurements of natural RJs gave values of around -25 ‰, which were also seen for RJs obtained when the bees were fed honey or C3 sugars. However, the RJs obtained when the bees were fed cane sugar or corn hydrolysate (regardless of whether they were also fed proteins) gave values of up to -17 ‰. Sugar content analysis revealed that the composition of maltose, maltotriose, sucrose, and erlose varied significantly over time in accordance with the composition of the syrup fed to the bees. When corn and cereal starch hydrolysates were fed to the bees, the maltose and maltotriose contents of the RJs increased up to 5.0 and 1.3 %, respectively, compared to the levels seen in authentic samples (i.e., samples obtained when the bees were fed natural food: honey and pollen) that were inferior to 0.2% and not detected, respectively. The sucrose and erlose contents of natural RJs were around 0.2 %, whereas those in RJs obtained when the bees were fed cane or beet sugar were as much as 4.0 and 1.3 %, respectively. The combination of sugar analysis and (13)C isotopic ratio measurements represents a very efficient analytical methodology for detecting (from early harvests onward) the use of C4 and C3 artificial sugars in the production of RJ.

  8. The use of natural abundance stable isotopic ratios to indicate the presence of oxygen-containing chemical linkages between cellulose and lignin in plant cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youping; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Farquhar, Graham D; Hocart, Charles H

    2010-06-01

    Qualitative and quantitative understanding of the chemical linkages between the three major biochemical components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) of plant cell walls is crucial to the understanding of cell wall structure. Although there is convincing evidence for chemical bonds between hemicellulose and lignin and the absence of chemical bonds between hemicellulose and cellulose, there is no conclusive evidence for the presence of covalent bonds between cellulose and lignin. This is caused by the lack of selectivity of current GC/MS-, NMR- and IR-based methods for lignin characterisation as none of these techniques directly targets the possible ester and ether linkages between lignin and cellulose. We modified the widely-accepted "standard" three-step extraction method for isolating cellulose from plants by changing the order of the steps for hemicellulose and lignin removal (solubilisation with concentrated NaOH and oxidation with acetic acid-containing NaClO(2), respectively) so that cellulose and lignin could be isolated with the possible chemical bonds between them intact. These linkages were then cleaved with NaClO(2) reagent in aqueous media of contrasting (18)O/(16)O ratios. We produced cellulose with higher purity (a lower level of residual hemicellulose and no detectable lignin) than that produced by the "standard" method. Oxidative artefacts may potentially be introduced at the lignin removal stage; but testing showed this to be minimal. Cellulose samples isolated from processing plant-derived cellulose-lignin mixtures in media of contrasting (18)O/(16)O ratios were compared to provide the first quantitative evidence for the presence of oxygen-containing ester and ether bonds between cellulose and lignin in Zea mays leaves. However, no conclusive evidence for the presence or lack of similar bonds in Araucaria cunninghamii wood was obtained. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Increase in soil stable carbon isotope ratio relates to loss of organic carbon: results from five long-term bare fallow experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menichetti, Lorenzo; Houot, Sabine; van Oort, Folkert

    2015-01-01

    and covering a latitudinal range of 11°. The bare fallow soils lost 33–65 % of their initial SOC content and showed a mean annual δ13C increase of 0.008–0.024 ‰. The 13C enrichment could be related empirically to SOC losses by a Rayleigh distillation equation. A more complex mechanistic relationship was also...... examined. The overall estimate of the fractionation coefficient (ε) was −1.2 ± 0.3 ‰. This coefficient represents an important input to studies of long-term SOC dynamics in agricultural soils that are based on variations in 13C natural abundance. The variance of ε may be ascribed to site characteristics...... some impact on isotope abundance and fractionation....

  10. A thermally stable and sterically unprotected terminal electrophilic phosphinidene complex of cobalt and its conversion to an eta(1)-phosphirene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; Sterenberg, Brian T; Udachin, Konstantin A; Carty, Arthur J

    2003-03-05

    The terminal chloroaminophosphido complex [Co(CO)3(PPh3){P(Cl)NiPr2}] is formed via reaction of K[Co(CO)4] with iPr2NPCl2 in the presence of triphenylphosphine. Chloride abstraction by aluminum trichloride leads to the first terminal phosphinidene complex of cobalt, [Co(CO)3(PPh3)(PNiPr2)][AlCl4]. The electrophilicity of the phosphinidene was demonstrated by its reaction with diphenylacetylene to form the phosphirene complex [Co(CO)3(PPh3){P(NiPr2)C(Ph)C(Ph)}][AlCl4].

  11. A critical examination of the possible application of zinc stable isotope ratios in bivalve mollusks and suspended particulate matter to trace zinc pollution in a tropical estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Daniel; Machado, Wilson; Weiss, Dominik; Mulholland, Daniel S; Boaventura, Geraldo R; Viers, Jerome; Garnier, Jeremie; Dantas, Elton L; Babinski, Marly

    2017-07-01

    The application of zinc (Zn) isotopes in bivalve tissues to identify zinc sources in estuaries was critically assessed. We determined the zinc isotope composition of mollusks (Crassostrea brasiliana and Perna perna) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) in a tropical estuary (Sepetiba Bay, Brazil) historically impacted by metallurgical activities. The zinc isotope systematics of the SPM was in line with mixing of zinc derived from fluvial material and from metallurgical activities. In contrast, source mixing alone cannot account for the isotope ratios observed in the bivalves, which are significantly lighter in the contaminated metallurgical zone (δ 66 Zn JMC  = +0.49 ± 0.06‰, 2σ, n = 3) compared to sampling locations outside (δ 66 Zn JMC  = +0.83 ± 0.10‰, 2σ, n = 22). This observation suggests that additional factors such as speciation, bioavailability and bioaccumulation pathways (via solution or particulate matter) influence the zinc isotope composition of bivalves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Observations of atmospheric methane and its stable isotope ratio (δ13C) over the Arctic seas from ship cruises in the summer and autumn of 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorokhod, Andrey; Belikov, Igor; Pankratova, Natalia; Novigatsky, Alexander; Thompson, Rona

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. The Arctic has significant sources of CH4, such as from wetlands and possibly also from methane hydrates, which may act as a positive feedback on the climate system. Despite significant efforts in establishing a network of ground-based CH4 observations in the Arctic zone, there is still a lack of measurements over the Arctic Ocean and sub-polar seas. From 21 July to 9 October 2015, concentrations of CH4 and CO2, as well as of the 13C:12C isotopic ratio in CH4, i.e., δ13C, were measured in the marine boundary layer from aboard the Research Vessel "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh" by the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology. Measurements were made using a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy instrument from Picarro™ (model G2132-i). The cruises covered a vast area including the North Atlantic up to 70°N, the Baltic, North, Norwegian, Greenland, Barents, White, Kara and Laptev Seas. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first measurements of their type made in these regions. Concentrations of CH4 typically had low variations (in the range of a few ppb) in the open sea but relatively large variations (of the order of 100 ppb) were recorded near and during stops in ports. High variability of atmospheric CH4 was also registered near the delta of the Lena River in the Laptev Sea, which has been suggested to be a large CH4 reservoir and where bubbles rising through the water column have been observed. The obtained set of δ13CCH4 is characterized by significant range of the measured values varying from open Atlantic to polluted regions near large sea ports. The Keeling plot analyses were implemented to study possible CH4 sources according to its isotopic signature. Footprint analyses are presented for the shipboard observations, as well as comparisons to simulated CH4 concentrations and δ13C using the Lagrangian transport model, FLEXPART. This work has been carried-out with the financial support of

  13. A thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) method developed for estimating the stoichiometric ratio of solid-state {alpha}-cyclodextrin-based inclusion complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yuxiang; Wang, Jinpeng; Bashari, Mohanad; Hu, Xiuting [The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Feng, Tao [School of Perfume and Aroma Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China); Xu, Xueming [The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Jin, Zhengyu, E-mail: jinlab2008@yahoo.com [The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Tian, Yaoqi, E-mail: yqtian@jiangnan.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We develop a TGA method for the measurement of the stoichiometric ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A series of formulas are deduced to calculate the stoichiometric ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four {alpha}-CD-based inclusion complexes were successfully prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed method is applicable. - Abstract: An approach mainly based on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was developed to evaluate the stoichiometric ratio (SR, guest to host) of the guest-{alpha}-cyclodextrin (Guest-{alpha}-CD) inclusion complexes (4-cresol-{alpha}-CD, benzyl alcohol-{alpha}-CD, ferrocene-{alpha}-CD and decanoic acid-{alpha}-CD). The present data obtained from Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy showed that all the {alpha}-CD-based inclusion complexes were successfully prepared in a solid-state form. The stoichiometric ratios of {alpha}-CD to the relative guests (4-cresol, benzyl alcohol, ferrocene and decanoic acid) determined by the developed method were 1:1, 1:2, 2:1 and 1:2, respectively. These SR data were well demonstrated by the previously reported X-ray diffraction (XRD) method and the NMR confirmatory experiments, except the SR of decanoic acid with a larger size and longer chain was not consistent. It is, therefore, suggested that the TGA-based method is applicable to follow the stoichiometric ratio of the polycrystalline {alpha}-CD-based inclusion complexes with smaller and shorter chain guests.

  14. Highly Chemo- and Stereoselective Transfer Semihydrogenation of Alkynes Catalyzed by a Stable, Well-defined Manganese(II) Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Brzozowska, Aleksandra

    2018-03-30

    The first example of manganese catalyzed semihydrogenation of internal alkynes to (Z)-alkenes using ammonia borane as a hydrogen donor is reported. The reaction is catalyzed by a pincer complex of the earth abundant manganese(II) salt in the absence of any additives, base or super hydride. The ammonia borane smoothly reduces the manganese pre-catalyst [Mn(II)-PNP][Cl]2 to the catalytically active species [Mn(I)-PNP]-hydride in the triplet spin state. This manganese hydride is highly stabilized by complexation with the alkyne substrate. Computational DFT analysis studies of the reaction mechanism rationalizes the origin of stereoselectivity towards formation of (Z)-alkenes.

  15. Increasing volume and complexity of pediatric epilepsy surgery with stable seizure outcome between 2008 and 2014: A nationwide multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Carmen; Specchio, Nicola; Guerrini, Renzo; Tassi, Laura; De Masi, Salvatore; Cardinale, Francesco; Pellacani, Simona; De Palma, Luca; Battaglia, Domenica; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Didato, Giuseppe; Freri, Elena; Consales, Alessandro; Nozza, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Cesaroni, Elisabetta; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Esposito, Vincenzo; Giulioni, Marco; Tinuper, Paolo; Colicchio, Gabriella; Rocchi, Raffaele; Rubboli, Guido; Giordano, Flavio; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Marras, Carlo Efisio; Cossu, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess common practice in pediatric epilepsy surgery in Italy between 2008 and 2014. A survey was conducted among nine Italian epilepsy surgery centers to collect information on presurgical and postsurgical evaluation protocols, volumes and types of surgical interventions, and etiologies and seizure outcomes in pediatric epilepsy surgery between 2008 and 2014. Retrospective data on 527 surgical procedures were collected. The most frequent surgical approaches were temporal lobe resections and disconnections (133, 25.2%) and extratemporal lesionectomies (128, 24.3%); the most frequent etiologies were FCD II (107, 20.3%) and glioneuronal tumors (105, 19.9%). Volumes of surgeries increased over time independently from the age at surgery and the epilepsy surgery center. Engel class I was achieved in 73.6% of patients (range: 54.8 to 91.7%), with no significant changes between 2008 and 2014. Univariate analyses showed a decrease in the proportion of temporal resections and tumors and an increase in the proportion of FCDII, while multivariate analyses revealed an increase in the proportion of extratemporal surgeries over time. A higher proportion of temporal surgeries and tumors and a lower proportion of extratemporal and multilobar surgeries and of FCD were observed in low (epilepsy surgery in Italy between 2008 and 2014, associated with a stable seizure outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stable isotope ratio measurements of Cu and Zn in mineral dust (bulk and size fractions) from the Taklimakan Desert and the Sahel and in aerosols from the eastern tropical North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuofei; Weiss, Dominik J; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Kreissig, Katharina; Sun, Youbin; Baker, Alex R; Formenti, Paola

    2013-09-30

    Accurate characterization of the stable isotope composition of Cu and Zn in major global mineral dust sources and in aerosols is central to the application of these isotope systems to the studies of global geochemical processes and cycles. We test here for the first time Cu and Zn isotope ratios within a well-defined source-receptor setting on the continent-ocean interface and determine the isotope composition of (i) bulk surface soil dust samples from the Sahel region, (ii) individual size fractions of surface dust samples from the Taklimakan Desert, and (iii) aerosols collected in the equatorial eastern North Atlantic region. This is achieved reducing the blank contribution during the ion exchange step using small resin and acid volumes and using a second ion exchange passage to purify the Cu fraction. We find no significant correlation between size fractions and isotope ratios in the two samples analyzed from the Taklimakan Desert. Mass balance calculations suggest that isotope ratios of bulk samples are within the analytical precision of the Sahel surface soil dust suggesting important non-crustal sources, in line with calculated enrichment factors, and possibly of anthropogenic origin. Using previously reported δ(66)Zn values for anthropogenic emission from Europe, preliminary calculations suggest that up to 55% of Zn arriving at the sampling points in the equatorial eastern North Atlantic region could be of anthropogenic origin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigations of the ratios of stable carbon isotopes in atmospheric relevant VOC using simulation and field experiments; Untersuchungen der Verhaeltnisse stabiler Kohlenstoffisotope in atmosphaerisch relevanten VOC in Simulations- und Feldexperimenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spahn, Holger

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) play an important role in the regional and global atmospheric chemistry. The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the analysis of the ratios of stable carbon isotopes ({delta}({sup 13}C) analysis) in atmospheric VOCs. At first, the state of the art of this analytical technique is described. For the first time {delta}({sup 13}C) values of different monoterpenes have been determined in the investigation of vegetable emissions at a plant chamber. By means of the oxidation of {beta}-pinene by ozone in an aerosol chamber, the kinetic isotope effect of this reaction was determined. In southern Germany, air samples for the {delta}({sup 13}C) analysis were collected using a zeppelin. This enables a height-resolved measurement of {delta}({sup 13}C) values. Based on these measurements, the average photochemical age for methanol, toluene and p-xylene at different heights was calculated.

  18. Reconstruction of floral changes during deposition of the Miocene Embalut coal from Kutai Basin, Mahakam Delta, East Kalimantan, Indonesia by use of aromatic hydrocarbon composition and stable carbon isotope ratios of organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widodo, S.; Bechtel, A.; Anggayana, K.; Puttmann, W. [University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    The distribution of aromatic hydrocarbons and stable carbon isotope ratios of organic matter in a series of nine Miocene Embalut coal samples obtained from nine coal seams of Kutai Basin, East Kalimantan, Indonesia were studied. The rank of the Embalut coals ranged from lignites to low rank sub-bituminous coals (0.36-0.50% Rr), based on measurements of huminite reflectance. The aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of all coal samples were dominated by cadalene in the lower boiling point range and picene derivatives in the higher boiling point range of the gas chromatograms. Cadalene can be attributed to the contribution of Dipterocarpaceae and various hydrated picenes to the contribution of additional angiosperms to the coal forming vegetation. The picenes originate from {alpha}- and {beta}-amyrin. However, in some coal samples minor amounts of simonellite and retene were also detected which argues for an additional contribution of gymnosperms (conifers) to coal forming vegetation preferentially in the Middle Miocene and at the beginning of the Late Miocene. The results of stable carbon isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C in most of the coal samples are consistent with their origin from angiosperms {delta}{sup 13}C between -27.09, and -28.0%). During the Miocene the climate of Mahakam Delta was not uniformly moist and cooler than the present day climate. This would have been favourable for the growth of conifers, especially in the montane forests. The contribution of conifers to the Embalut coals might be a result of the cool Middle/Late Miocene climate during peat accumulation in the Kutai Basin.

  19. Prediction of radiation ratio and sound transmission of complex extruded panel using wavenumber domain Unite element and boundary element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H; Ryue, J; Thompson, D J; Müller, A D

    2016-01-01

    Recently, complex shaped aluminium panels have been adopted in many structures to make them lighter and stronger. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of these complex panels has been of interest for many years but conventional finite element and boundary element methods are not efficient to predict their performance at higher frequencies. Where the cross-sectional properties of the panels are constant in one direction, wavenumber domain numerical analysis can be applied and this becomes more suitable for panels with complex cross-sectional geometries. In this paper, a coupled wavenumber domain finite element and boundary element method is applied to predict the sound radiation from and sound transmission through a double-layered aluminium extruded panel, having a typical shape used in railway carriages. The predicted results are compared with measured ones carried out on a finite length panel and good agreement is found. (paper)

  20. Study and validity of {sup 13}C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and {sup 2}H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotte, J.F. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Casabianca, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Lheritier, J. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Perrucchietti, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Sanglar, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Waton, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France)]. E-mail: mf.grenier-loustalot@sca.cnrs.fr

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The {delta} {sup 13}C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H){sub I} ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C{sub 4} syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C{sub 4} syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying.

  1. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotte, J.F.; Casabianca, H.; Lheritier, J.; Perrucchietti, C.; Sanglar, C.; Waton, H.; Grenier-Loustalot, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The δ 13 C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H) I ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C 4 syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C 4 syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying

  2. Dynamic reorganization of chromatin structure and selective DNA demethylation prior to stable enhancer complex formation during differentiation of primary hematopoietic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagoh, Hiromi; Melnik, Svitlana; Lefevre, Pascal; Chong, Suyinn; Riggs, Arthur D; Bonifer, Constanze

    2004-04-15

    In order to gain insights in the true molecular mechanisms involved in cell fate decisions, it is important to study the molecular details of gene activation where such decisions occur, which is at the level of the chromatin structure of individual genes. In the study presented here we addressed this issue and examined the dynamic development of an active chromatin structure at the chicken lysozyme locus during the differentiation of primary myeloid cells from transgenic mouse bone marrow. Using in vivo footprinting we found that stable enhancer complex assembly and high-level gene expression are late events in cell differentiation. However, even before the onset of gene expression and stable transcription factor binding, specific chromatin alterations are observed. This includes changes in DNA topology and the selective demethylation of CpG dinucleotides located in the cores of critical transcription factor binding sites, but not in flanking DNA. These results firmly support the idea that epigenetic programs guiding blood cell differentiation are engraved into the chromatin of lineage-specific genes and that such chromatin changes are implemented before cell lineage specification.

  3. Mechanism of HIV reverse transcriptase inhibition by zinc: formation of a highly stable enzyme-(primer-template) complex with profoundly diminished catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenstermacher, Katherine J; DeStefano, Jeffrey J

    2011-11-25

    Several physiologically relevant cations including Ca(2+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) have been shown to inhibit HIV reverse transcriptase (RT), presumably by competitively displacing one or more Mg(2+) ions bound to RT. We analyzed the effects of Zn(2+) on reverse transcription and compared them to Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Using nucleotide extension efficiency as a readout, Zn(2+) showed significant inhibition of reactions with 2 mM Mg(2+), even when present at only ∼5 μM. Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) were also inhibitory but at higher concentrations. Both Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) (but not Ca(2+)) supported RT incorporation in the absence of Mg(2+) with Mn(2+) being much more efficient. The maximum extension rates with Zn(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+) were ∼0.1, 1, and 3.5 nucleotides per second, respectively. Zinc supported optimal RNase H activity at ∼25 μM, similar to the optimal for nucleotide addition in the presence of low dNTP concentrations. Surprisingly, processivity (average number of nucleotides incorporated in a single binding event with enzyme) during reverse transcription was comparable with Zn(2+) and Mg(2+), and single RT molecules were able to continue extension in the presence of Zn(2+) for several hours on the same template. Consistent with this result, the half-life for RT-Zn(2+)-(primer-template) complexes was 220 ± 60 min and only 1.7 ± 1 min with Mg(2+), indicating ∼130-fold more stable binding with Zn(2+). Essentially, the presence of Zn(2+) promotes the formation of a highly stable slowly progressing RT-(primer-template) complex.

  4. Complex-based OCT angiography algorithm recovers microvascular information better than amplitude- or phase-based algorithms in phase-stable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjiang; Song, Shaozhen; Li, Yuandong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2018-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is increasingly becoming a popular inspection tool for biomedical imaging applications. By exploring the amplitude, phase and complex information available in OCT signals, numerous algorithms have been proposed that contrast functional vessel networks within microcirculatory tissue beds. However, it is not clear which algorithm delivers optimal imaging performance. Here, we investigate systematically how amplitude and phase information have an impact on the OCTA imaging performance, to establish the relationship of amplitude and phase stability with OCT signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), time interval and particle dynamics. With either repeated A-scan or repeated B-scan imaging protocols, the amplitude noise increases with the increase of OCT SNR; however, the phase noise does the opposite, i.e. it increases with the decrease of OCT SNR. Coupled with experimental measurements, we utilize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate the performance of amplitude-, phase- and complex-based algorithms for OCTA imaging, the results of which suggest that complex-based algorithms deliver the best performance when the phase noise is  animal models and human retina to verify the findings from the MC model through assessing the OCTA performance metrics of vessel connectivity, image SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio. We show that for all the metrics assessed, the complex-based algorithm delivers better performance than either the amplitude- or phase-based algorithms for both the repeated A-scan and the B-scan imaging protocols, which agrees well with the conclusion drawn from the MC simulations.

  5. Synthesis and X-ray Crystal Structure of a Stable cis-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinoethene Monodentate Thiolate Platinum Complex and TGA Studies of its Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaz Rodrigo H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The stable Pt(II complex [Pt(SPh2(dppen (4, (dppen, Ph2PCH=CHPPh2 was obtained from [PtCl(SPh2(SnPh3cod] (1 (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene by reductive elimination reaction of SnClPh3 and substitution of the cod ligand by the diphosphine, albeit in low yields. Yields of 80% were obtained when [Pt(SPh2cod] (3 was used as the starting material instead. The viability of these reactions was suggested by a TG study, performed on the starting materials. Complex 4 was characterized by multinuclear NMR (195Pt, 31P, ¹H and 13C and IR spectroscopies and elemental analysis. The molecular structure, solved by an X-ray diffraction study, exhibted a slightly distorted square-planar geometry and short C=C and Pt-P bond distances which were interpreted in terms of a p interaction between the double bond and the metal-ligand bond, as observed for other diphosphine compounds described previously.

  6. Water-soluble and photo-stable silver(I) dicarboxylate complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline ligands: Antimicrobial and anticancer chemotherapeutic potential, DNA interactions and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Laura; Dixit, Vidya; Assad, Letícia O N; Ribeiro, Thales P; Queiroz, Daniela D; Kellett, Andrew; Casey, Alan; Colleran, John; Pereira, Marcos D; Rochford, Garret; McCann, Malachy; O'Shea, Denis; Dempsey, Rita; McClean, Siobhán; Kia, Agnieszka Foltyn-Arfa; Walsh, Maureen; Creaven, Bernadette; Howe, Orla; Devereux, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The complexes [Ag2(OOC-(CH2)n-COO)] (n=1-10) (1-10) were synthesised and reacted with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) to yield derivatives formulating as [Ag2(phen)x(OOC-(CH2)y-COO)]·zH2O (x=2 or 3; y=1-10; z=1-4) (11-20) which are highly water-soluble and photo-stable in aqueous solution. The phen derivatives 11-20 exhibit chemotherapeutic potential against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and against cisplatin-sensitive breast (MCF-7) and resistant ovarian (SKOV-3) cancer cell lines. Cyclic voltammetric analysis and DNA binding and intercalation studies indicate that the mechanism of action of 11-20 is significantly different to that of their silver(I) dicarboxylate precursors and they do not induce DNA damage or ROS generation in mammalian cells. The representative complexes 9 and 19 (containing the undecanedioate ligand) were both found to significantly reduce superoxide and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in the yeast S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 proteins of cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly reveals a stable complex formation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Anwar

    Full Text Available Iron-Sulfur (Fe-S proteins are involved in many biological functions such as electron transport, photosynthesis, regulation of gene expression and enzymatic activities. Biosynthesis and transfer of Fe-S clusters depend on Fe-S clusters assembly processes such as ISC, SUF, NIF, and CIA systems. Unlike other eukaryotes which possess ISC and CIA systems, amitochondriate Entamoeba histolytica has retained NIF & CIA systems for Fe-S cluster assembly in the cytosol. In the present study, we have elucidated interaction between two proteins of E. histolytica CIA system, Cytosolic Fe-S cluster deficient 1 (Cfd1 protein and Nucleotide binding protein 35 (Nbp35. In-silico analysis showed that structural regions ranging from amino acid residues (P33-K35, G131-V135 and I147-E151 of Nbp35 and (G5-V6, M34-D39 and G46-A52 of Cfd1 are involved in the formation of protein-protein complex. Furthermore, Molecular dynamic (MD simulations study suggested that hydrophobic forces surpass over hydrophilic forces between Nbp35 and Cfd1 and Van-der-Waal interaction plays crucial role in the formation of stable complex. Both proteins were separately cloned, expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by affinity column chromatography. Physical interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 proteins was confirmed in vitro by co-purification of recombinant Nbp35 with thrombin digested Cfd1 and in vivo by pull down assay and immunoprecipitation. The insilico, in vitro as well as in vivo results prove a stable interaction between these two proteins, supporting the possibility of its involvement in Fe-S cluster transfer to target apo-proteins through CIA machinery in E. histolytica. Our study indicates that initial synthesis of a Fe-S precursor in mitochondria is not necessary for the formation of Cfd1-Nbp35 complex. Thus, Cfd1 and Nbp35 with the help of cytosolic NifS and NifU proteins can participate in the maturation of non-mitosomal Fe-S proteins

  8. The sources and evolution of mineralising fluids in iron oxide-copper-gold systems, Norrbotten, Sweden: Constraints from Br/Cl ratios and stable Cl isotopes of fluid inclusion leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, S. A.; Smith, M. P.

    2009-10-01

    We have analysed the halogen concentrations and chlorine stable isotope composition of fluid inclusion leachates from three spatially associated Fe-oxide ± Cu ± Au mineralising systems in Norrbotten, Sweden. Fluid inclusions in late-stage veins in Fe-oxide-apatite deposits contain saline brines and have a wide range of Br/Cl molar ratios, from 0.2 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -3.1‰ to -1.0‰. Leachates from saline fluid inclusions from the Greenstone and Porphyry hosted Cu-Au prospects have Br/Cl ratios that range from 0.2 to 0.5 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -5.6‰ to -1.3‰. Finally, the Cu-Au deposits hosted by the Nautanen Deformation Zone (NDZ) have Br/Cl molar ratios from 0.4 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values that range from -2.4‰ to +0.5‰, although the bulk of the data fall within 0‰ ± 0.5‰. The Br/Cl ratios of leachates are consistent with the derivation of salinity from magmatic sources or from the dissolution of halite. Most of the isotopic data from the Fe-oxide-apatite and Greenstone deposits are consistent with a mantle derived source of the chlorine, with the exception of the four samples with the most negative values. The origin of the low δ 37Cl values in these samples is unknown but we suggest that there may have been some modification of the Cl-isotope signature due to fractionation between the mineralising fluids and Cl-rich silicate assemblages found in the alteration haloes around the deposits. If such a process has occurred then a modified crustal source of the chlorine for all the samples cannot be ruled out although the amount of fractionation necessary to generate the low δ 37Cl values would be significantly larger. The source of Cl in the NDZ deposits has a crustal signature, which suggests the Cl in this system may be derived from (meta-) evaporites or from input from crustal melts such as granitic pegmatites of the Lina Suite.

  9. A likelihood ratio-based method to predict exact pedigrees for complex families from next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Verena; Kamphans, Tom; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N; Krawitz, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technology considerably changed the way we screen for pathogenic mutations in rare Mendelian disorders. However, the identification of the disease-causing mutation amongst thousands of variants of partly unknown relevance is still challenging and efficient techniques that reduce the genomic search space play a decisive role. Often segregation- or linkage analysis are used to prioritize candidates, however, these approaches require correct information about the degree of relationship among the sequenced samples. For quality assurance an automated control of pedigree structures and sample assignment is therefore highly desirable in order to detect label mix-ups that might otherwise corrupt downstream analysis. We developed an algorithm based on likelihood ratios that discriminates between different classes of relationship for an arbitrary number of genotyped samples. By identifying the most likely class we are able to reconstruct entire pedigrees iteratively, even for highly consanguineous families. We tested our approach on exome data of different sequencing studies and achieved high precision for all pedigree predictions. By analyzing the precision for varying degrees of relatedness or inbreeding we could show that a prediction is robust down to magnitudes of a few hundred loci. A java standalone application that computes the relationships between multiple samples as well as a Rscript that visualizes the pedigree information is available for download as well as a web service at www.gene-talk.de CONTACT: heinrich@molgen.mpg.deSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Theoretical insights into the structures and mechanical properties of HMX/NQ cocrystal explosives and their complexes, and the influence of molecular ratios on their bonding energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Chen, Shu-Sen; Ren, Fu-de

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) methods were employed to study the binding energies and mechanical properties of selected crystal planes of 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane (HMX)/nitroguanidine (NQ) cocrystals at different molecular molar ratios. The densities and detonation velocities of the cocrystals at different molar ratios were estimated. The intermolecular interaction and bond dissociation energy (BDE) of the N-NO2 bond in the HMX:NQ (1:1) complex were calculated using the B3LYP, MP2(full) and M06-2X methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(2df,2p) basis sets. The results indicated that the HMX/NQ cocrystal prefers cocrystalizing in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the cocrystallization is dominated by the (0 2 0) and (1 0 0) facets. The K, G, and E values of the ratio of 1:1 are smaller than those of the other ratios, and the 1:1 cocrystal has the best ductility. The N-NO2 bond becomes stronger upon the formation of the intermolecular H-bonding interaction and the sensitivity of HMX decreases in the cocrystal. This sensitivity change in the HMX/NQ cocrystal originates not only from the formation of the intermolecular interaction but also from the increment of the BDE of N-NO2 bond in comparison with isolated HMX. The HMX/NQ (1:1) cocrystal exhibits good detonation performance. Reduced density gradient (RDG) reveals the nature of cocrystallization. Analysis of the surface electrostatic potential further confirmed that the sensitivity decreases in complex (or cocrystal) in comparison with that in isolated HMX.

  11. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  12. The physical properties of giant molecular cloud complexes in the outer Galaxy - Implications for the ratio of H2 column density to (C-12)O intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodroski, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The physical properties of 35 giant molecular cloud complexes in the outer Galaxy were derived from the Goddard-Columbia surveys of the Galactic plane region (Dame et al., 1987). The spatial and radial velocity boundaries for the individual cloud complexes were estimated by analyzing the spatial and velocity structure of emission features in the (C-12)O surveys, and the distance to each cmplex was determined kinematically on the assumption of a flat rotation curve. The ratio of the H2 column density to the (C-12)O intensity for the outer Galaxy complexes was found to be about 6.0 x 10 to the 20th molecules/sq cm K per km/sec, which is by a factor of 2-3 greater than the value derived by other auhtors for the inner Galaxy complexes. This increase in the H2 column density/(C-12)O intensity with the distance from with the Galactic center is consistent with predictions of the optically thick cloudlet model of giant molecular cloud complexes.

  13. Investigation of production method, geographical origin and species authentication in commercially relevant shrimps using stable isotope ratio and/or multi-element analyses combined with chemometrics: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortea, Ignacio; Gallardo, José M

    2015-03-01

    Three factors defining the traceability of a food product are production method (wild or farmed), geographical origin and biological species, which have to be checked and guaranteed, not only in order to avoid mislabelling and commercial fraud, but also to address food safety issues and to comply with legal regulations. The aim of this study was to determine whether these three factors could be differentiated in shrimps using stable isotope ratio analysis of carbon and nitrogen and/or multi-element composition. Different multivariate statistics methods were applied to different data subsets in order to evaluate their performance in terms of classification or predictive ability. Although the success rates varied depending on the dataset used, the combination of both techniques allowed the correct classification of 100% of the samples according to their actual origin and method of production, and 93.5% according to biological species. Even though further studies including a larger number of samples in each group are needed in order to validate these findings, we can conclude that these methodologies should be considered for studies regarding seafood product authenticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Variations in Os isotope ratios of pyrrhotite as a result of water-rock and magma-rock interaction: Constraints from Virginia Formation-Duluth Complex contact zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Curtis D.; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi

    2010-08-01

    Os isotope ratios in pyrrhotite-bearing pelitic rocks of the ˜1.85 Ga Virginia Formation are variable, with perturbations linked to the emplacement of the ˜1.1 Ga Duluth Complex. Pyrrhotite in footwall rocks of the contact aureole show evidence for a mixing event at 1.1 Ga involving a low 187Os/ 188Os fluid. However, because rocks with perturbed pyrrhotite Os isotope ratios occur 1½ km or more from the Duluth Complex, the fluid is unlikely to have been of magmatic origin. Fluid inclusions in layer-parallel quartz veins provide evidence of the involvement of a boiling fluid at temperatures between ˜300 and 400 °C. Analyses of fluid inclusions via LA-ICP-MS show that the fluids contain up to 1.7 wt% Na, 1.1 wt% K, 4330 ppm Fe, 2275 ppm Zn, and 415 ppm Mg. The veins also contain pyrite or pyrrhotite, plus minor amounts of chalcopyrite, bornite, pentlandite, and sphalerite. The Re-Os isotopic ratios of pyrite from the veins indicate that they crystallized from low 187Os/ 188Os fluids (pyrite to pyrrhotite, and where time-integrated water-rock ratios in the aureole were high enough to provide a supply of Os. Troctolitic and gabbroic rocks of the Partridge River Intrusion, Duluth Complex, are characterized by Os isotope ratios that are indicative of variable degrees of crustal contamination ( γOs values of ˜0-543). Xenoliths of carbonaceous and sulfidic pelitic rocks of the Virginia Formation found in the igneous rocks provide evidence that Os was released by organic matter and pyrite in the sedimentary rocks and assimilated by mantle-derived magma. However, residual pyrrhotite produced as a result of pyrite breakdown in the xenoliths is characterized by 187Os/ 188Os ratios that are much lower than anticipated and similar to those of pyrrhotite in the contact aureole. The Os exchange and addition shown by pyrrhotite in the xenoliths highlight an unusual cycle of Re-Os liberation during devolatilization, kerogen maturation, and pyrite to pyrrhotite conversion

  15. On the wedding of certain dynamical processes in disordered complex materials to the theory of stable (Lévy) distribution functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montroll, Elliott W.; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    We review and comment on styles of applied mathematics before exhibiting our own in regard to relating the theory of Lévy's stable distributions to dynamic processes in complex disordered materials. Lévy's probability distributions have long tails, infinite moments and elegant scaling properties. Our first example connects intermittant currents in certain xerographic films to a Lévy distribution of waiting times for the jumping of charges out of a distribution of deep traps. We then extend our analysis from transport to electron-hole recombination reactions in amorphous materials. A Lévy distribution of first passage times appears both in this recombination problem as well as in the dielectric relaxation phenomena described by the Williams-Watts formula. Lastly, the most famous scaling problem, "1/f noise", is shown to be related to a log-normal distribution of relaxation times. We derive the log-normal distribution in a generic fashion and show it to be a limiting form of a Lévy distribution.

  16. Isotope effects associated with the preparation and methylation of fatty acids by boron trifluoride in methanol for compound-specific stable hydrogen isotope analysis via gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivall, David; Berstan, Robert; Bull, Ian D; Evershed, Richard P

    2012-05-30

    Compound-specific stable hydrogen isotope analysis of fatty acids is being used increasingly as a means of deriving information from a diverse range of materials of archaeological, geological and environmental interest. Preparative steps required prior to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analysis have the potential to alter determined δD values and hence must be accounted for if accurate δD values for target compounds are to be obtained. Myristic, palmitic, stearic, arachidic and behenic saturated fatty acids were derivatised to their respective fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), using 14% (w/v) boron trifluoride in methanol then analysed by gas chromatography/thermal conversion/IRMS (GC/TC/IRMS). FAMEs generated from fatty acid sodium salts of unknown δD values were then used to test a correction factor determined for this method of derivatisation. Derivatisation was found to alter the hydrogen isotopic composition of FAMEs although this effect was reproducible and can be accounted for. The difference between the mean corrected and mean bulk δD values was always less than 6.7 ‰. Extraction of saturated fatty acids and acyl lipids from samples, subsequent hydrolysis, then separation on a solid-phase extraction cartridge, was found to alter the determined δD values by less than one standard deviation. Overall, it has been shown that for natural abundance hydrogen isotope determinations, the isolation and derivatisation of extracted fatty acids alters the determined δD values only by a numerical increment comparable with the experimental error. This supports the use of the described analytical protocol as an effective means of determining fatty acid δD values by GC/TC/IRMS. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. New organic reference materials for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements: caffeines, n-alkanes, fatty acid methyl esters, glycines, L-valines, polyethylenes, and oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Fong, Jon; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F.; Toman, Blaza; Ackermann, Annika; Assonov, Sergey; Aerts-Bijma, Anita; Brejcha, Ramona; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Darwish, Tamim; Elsner, Martin; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Gröning, Manfred; Hélie, Jean-François; Herrero-Martín, Sara; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Sauer, Peter E.; Sessions, Alex L.; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    An international project developed, quality-tested, and determined isotope−δ values of 19 new organic reference materials (RMs) for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements, in addition to analyzing pre-existing RMs NBS 22 (oil), IAEA-CH-7 (polyethylene foil), and IAEA-600 (caffeine). These new RMs enable users to normalize measurements of samples to isotope−δ scales. The RMs span a range of δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values from −210.8 to +397.0 mUr or ‰, for δ13CVPDB-LSVEC from −40.81 to +0.49 mUr and for δ15NAir from −5.21 to +61.53 mUr. Many of the new RMs are amenable to gas and liquid chromatography. The RMs include triads of isotopically contrasting caffeines, C16 n-alkanes, n-C20-fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), glycines, and l-valines, together with polyethylene powder and string, one n-C17-FAME, a vacuum oil (NBS 22a) to replace NBS 22 oil, and a 2H-enriched vacuum oil. A total of 11 laboratories from 7 countries used multiple analytical approaches and instrumentation for 2-point isotopic normalization against international primary measurement standards. The use of reference waters in silver tubes allowed direct normalization of δ2H values of organic materials against isotopic reference waters following the principle of identical treatment. Bayesian statistical analysis yielded the mean values reported here. New RMs are numbered from USGS61 through USGS78, in addition to NBS 22a. Because of exchangeable hydrogen, amino acid RMs currently are recommended only for carbon- and nitrogen-isotope measurements. Some amino acids contain 13C and carbon-bound organic 2H-enrichments at different molecular sites to provide RMs for potential site-specific isotopic analysis in future studies.

  18. Stable isotope ratio (13C/12C) mass spectrometry to evaluate carbon sources and sinks: changes and trends during the decomposition of vegetal debris from eucalyptus clone plantations (NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, I.; Cabaneiro, A.

    2014-02-01

    Vegetal debris is known to participate in key soil processes such as the formation of soil organic matter (OM), also being a potential source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. However, its contribution to the isotopic composition of both the soil OM and the atmospheric carbon dioxide is not clear yet. Hence, the main objective of the present research is to understand the isotopic 13C changes and trends that take place during the successive biodegradative stages of decomposing soil organic inputs. By incubating bulk plant tissues for several months under laboratory controlled conditions, the kinetics of the CO2 releases and shifts in the 13C natural abundance of the solid residues were investigated using litter samples coming from forest plantations with a different clone (Anselmo: 1st clonal generation attained by morphological selection and Odiel: 2nd clonal generation genetically obtained) of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. developed over granitic or schistic bedrocks and located in northwestern Spain. Significant isotopic variations with time were observed, probably due to the isotopically heterogeneous composition of these complex substrates in conjunction with the initial selective consumption of more easily degradable 13C-differentiated compounds during the first stages of the biodegradation, while less available or recalcitrant litter components were decomposed at later stages of biodegradation, generating products that have their own specific isotopic signatures. These results, which significantly differ depending on the type of clone, suggest that caution must be exercised when interpreting carbon isotope studies (at natural abundance levels) since perturbations associated with the quality or chemical composition of the organic debris from different terrestrial ecosystems can have an important effect on the carbon stable isotope dynamics.

  19. Vehicle emissions of greenhouse gases and related tracers from a tunnel study: : CO: CO2, N2O: CO2, CH4: CO2, O2: CO2 ratios, and the stable isotopes 13C and 18O in CO2 and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, Maria Elena; Vollmer, M. K.; Jordan, A.; Brand, W. A.; Pathirana, S. L.; Rothe, M.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of CO2, CO, N2O and CH4 mole fractions, O2/N2 ratios and the stable isotopes 13C and 18O in CO2 and CO have been performed in air samples from the Islisberg highway tunnel (Switzerland). The molar CO : CO2 ratios, with an average of (4.15 ± 0.34) ppb:ppm, are lower than reported in

  20. A method and example of seismically imaging near‐surface fault zones in geologically complex areas using Vp, Vs, and their ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Goldman, Mark R.; Sickler, Robert R.; Criley, Coyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of near‐surface (vadose zone and slightly below) fault locations and geometries is important because assessment of ground rupture, strong shaking, geologic slip rates, and rupture histories occurs at shallow depths. However, seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths can be difficult due to near‐surface complexities, such as weathering, groundwater saturation, massive (nonlayered) rocks, and vertically layered strata. Combined P‐ and S‐wave seismic‐refraction tomography data can overcome many of the near‐surface, fault‐zone seismic‐imaging problems because of differences in the responses of elastic (bulk and shear) moduli of P and S waves to shallow‐depth, fault‐zone properties. We show that high‐resolution refraction tomography images of P‐ to S‐wave velocity ratios (VP/VS) can reliably identify near‐surface faults. We demonstrate this method using tomography images of the San Andreas fault (SAF) surface‐rupture zone associated with the 18 April 1906 ∼M 7.9 San Francisco earthquake on the San Francisco peninsula in California. There, the SAF cuts through Franciscan mélange, which consists of an incoherent assemblage of greywacke, chert, greenstone, and serpentinite. A near‐vertical zone (∼75° northeast dip) of high P‐wave velocities (up to 3000  m/s), low S‐wave velocities (∼150–600  m/s), high VP/VS ratios (4–8.8), and high Poisson’s ratios (0.44–0.49) characterizes the main surface‐rupture zone to a depth of about 20 m and is consistent with nearby trench observations. We suggest that the combined VP/VSimaging approach can reliably identify most near‐surface fault zones in locations where many other seismic methods cannot be applied.

  1. Evaluation of Ground-Water and Boron Sources by Use of Boron Stable-Isotope Ratios, Tritium, and Selected Water-Chemistry Constituents near Beverly Shores, Northwestern Indiana, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, Paul M.; Fitzpatrick, John A.; Watson, Lee R.; Kay, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of boron greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 900 ?g/L removal action level (RAL) standard were detected in water sampled by the USEPA in 2004 from three domestic wells near Beverly Shores, Indiana. The RAL regulates only human-affected concentrations of a constituent. A lack of well logs and screened depth information precluded identification of whether water from sampled wells, and their boron sources, were from human-affected or natural sources in the surficial aquifer, or associated with a previously defined natural, confined aquifer source of boron from the subtill or basal sand aquifers. A geochemically-based classification of the source of boron in ground water could potentially determine the similarity of boron to known sources or mixtures between known sources, or classify whether the relative age of the ground water predated the potential sources of contamination. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USEPA, investigated the use of a geochemical method that applied boron stable isotopes, and concentrations of boron, tritium, and other constituents to distinguish between natural and human-affected sources of boron in ground water and thereby determine if the RAL was applicable to the situation. Boron stable-isotope ratios and concentrations of boron in 17 ground-water samples and tritium concentrations in 9 ground-water samples collected in 2004 were used to identify geochemical differences between potential sources of boron in ground water near Beverly Shores, Indiana. Boron and d11B analyses for this investigation were made on unacidified samples to assure consistency of the result with unacidified analyses of d11B values from other investigations. Potential sources of boron included surficial-aquifer water affected by coal-combustion products (CCP) or domestic-wastewater, upward discharge of ground water from confined aquifers, and unaffected water from the surficial aquifer that was distant

  2. Covalent co-immobilization of heparin/laminin complex that with different concentration ratio on titanium surface for selectively direction of platelets and vascular cells behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Junying, E-mail: chenjy@263.net; Huang, Nan

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Extracellular matrix inspired surface modification with fibronectin, heparin and VEGF to construct a favorable microenvironment for selectively anticoagulant and promote endothelialization. • Take the advantage of specific intermolecular interaction, the bioactivity of above biomolecules was more efficiently maintained in compared with the common used covalent immobilization method. • Poly-l-lysine was used as a novel interlayer for surface amination, and in comparison, PLL coating was more feasible and the degradation product had no harm to human body. - Abstract: Surface biofunctional modification of coronary artery stent to improve the hemocompatibility and selectively accelerate endothelium regeneration but prevent restenosis have been become a new hotspot. For this, a novel method was developed in this work by co-immobilization of Ln and heparin complex on poly-L-lysine modified Ti surface. Take the advantage of the specific interaction between Ln and heparin, Ln and heparin complexes with different concentration ratios were set up for creating different exposure density of these two types of biomolecules. According to biocompatibility evaluation results, the Hep/Ln complexes modified surface displayed less platelet adhesion and activation. Especially, on L(150)H and L(200)H surface, the AT III binding quantity, APTT value and anti-coagulation property of modified surface were significantly promoted. Furthermore, the adherent density and proliferation activity of ECs and EPCs were positively correlated with Ln concentration. Notably, the proliferation of both ECs and EPCs on L(100)H, L(150)H and L(200)H surface were greatly promoted. Another hand, the proliferation activity of SMCs was significantly inhibited on Hep/Ln modified surfaces, which was considered mainly due to the inhibitory effect of heparin to SMCs. According to the existing results, this study demonstrated that in a certain range of heparin and laminin concentration ratio

  3. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  4. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  5. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  6. Heart-cutting two-dimensional gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in complex groundwater and gas-phase samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsin, Violaine; Buscheck, Timothy E; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2017-04-07

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is increasingly used to evaluate the origin and fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the environment. However, as samples often contain a complex mixture of compounds and the method requires a full chromatographic separation, it can be challenging to obtain accurate and precise isotope values. In this study, in order to develop a method to analyze carbon isotopes in benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in complex environmental samples, a two-dimensional heart-cutting gas chromatograph (GC) was hyphenated to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The focus was placed on benzene and toluene, which are the main compounds of concern in contaminated sites. A full separation for BTEX was successfully achieved using a 60m polar column in the first dimension and a 30m non-polar column in the second dimension. Accuracy and precision of carbon isotope measurements of standards were not impacted by the new setup compared to classic one-dimensional (1D) GC-C-IRMS. For benzene and toluene, precision remained very good (≤0.2‰) for concentrations comprised between 5 and 20μg/L. A high matrix load did not influence the precision and accuracy of isotope measurements. The method was tested on several samples from two different field sites. For all samples tested, full chromatographic baseline resolution was achieved for benzene and toluene. Spatial variability of isotopes values linked to biodegradation was evidenced for one field site. This new 2D-GC-C-IRMS method will broaden the spectrum of samples suitable for isotope analysis and will be therefore able to give new insights into attenuation processes of BTEX in contaminated sites or source fingerprinting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 3-D Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Complex Fiber Geometry RaFC Materials with High Volume Fraction and High Aspect Ratio based on ABAQUS PYTHON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, BoCheng

    2011-12-01

    Organic and inorganic fiber reinforced composites with innumerable fiber orientation distributions and fiber geometries are abundantly available in several natural and synthetic structures. Inorganic glass fiber composites have been introduced to numerous applications due to their economical fabrication and tailored structural properties. Numerical characterization of such composite material systems is necessitated due to their intrinsic statistical nature, which renders extensive experimentation prohibitively time consuming and costly. To predict various mechanical behavior and characterizations of Uni-Directional Fiber Composites (UDFC) and Random Fiber Composites (RaFC), we numerically developed Representative Volume Elements (RVE) with high accuracy and efficiency and with complex fiber geometric representations encountered in uni-directional and random fiber networks. In this thesis, the numerical simulations of unidirectional RaFC fiber strand RVE models (VF>70%) are first presented by programming in ABAQUS PYTHON. Secondly, when the cross sectional aspect ratios (AR) of the second phase fiber inclusions are not necessarily one, various types of RVE models with different cross sectional shape fibers are simulated and discussed. A modified random sequential absorption algorithm is applied to enhance the volume fraction number (VF) of the RVE, which the mechanical properties represents the composite material. Thirdly, based on a Spatial Segment Shortest Distance (SSSD) algorithm, a 3-Dimentional RaFC material RVE model is simulated in ABAQUS PYTHON with randomly oriented and distributed straight fibers of high fiber aspect ratio (AR=100:1) and volume fraction (VF=31.8%). Fourthly, the piecewise multi-segments fiber geometry is obtained in MATLAB environment by a modified SSSD algorithm. Finally, numerical methods including the polynomial curve fitting and piecewise quadratic and cubic B-spline interpolation are applied to optimize the RaFC fiber geometries

  8. Synergistic effect of signaling from receptors of soluble platelet agonists and outside-in signaling in formation of a stable fibrinogen-integrin αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Ivan; Shenkman, Boris; Savion, Naphtali

    2015-01-01

    Thrombus formation in the injured vessel wall is a highly complex process involving various blood-born components that go through specific temporal and spatial changes as observed by intravital videomicroscopy. Platelets bind transiently to the developing thrombus and may either become stably incorporated into or disengage from the thrombus. The aim of the present study was to reveal the processes involved in the formation of a stable thrombus. Platelet-rich plasma and washed platelets were studied by the aggregometer. The aggregate stability was challenged by eptifibatide. Platelet Triton-insoluble fraction was prepared and the actin and αIIb content in the cytoskeleton was analyzed by western blot. Maximal actin polymerization is achieved 1min after platelet activation while maximal αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton association requires 5 to 10min of activation and fibrinogen-mediated platelet-to-platelet bridging. Thus, actin polymerization is dependent on platelet activation and requires neither αIIbβ3 integrin occupation nor platelet aggregation. Formation of a stable aggregate requires platelet activation for more than 1min, complete increase in actin cytoskeleton fraction and partial association of αIIbβ3 with the actin cytoskeleton. However, direct αIIbβ3 activation is not sufficient for cytoskeleton complex formation. Thus, stable αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interaction, representing stable aggregate, is achieved after more than 1min agonist activation, involving inside-out and outside-in signaling but not after direct integrin activation, involving only outside-in signaling. Formation of a stable fibrinogen-αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex is the result of the combined effect of platelet stimulation by soluble agonists, activation of αIIbβ3, fibrinogen binding and platelet-to-platelet bridging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatial variability of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope ratios in an Arctic marine food web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Joan Holst; Hedeholm, Rasmus Berg; Sünksen, Kaj

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) were used to examine trophic structures in an arctic marine food web at small and large spatial scales. Twelve species, from primary consumers to Greenland shark, were sampled at a large spatial scale near the west and east coasts of Greenland...

  10. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers.In this article, we explore this ...

  11. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  12. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as “encoding and decoding” processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells

  13. CmRBP50 protein phosphorylation is essential for assembly of a stable phloem-mobile high-affinity ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pingfang; Ham, Byung-Kook; Lucas, William J

    2011-07-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that play crucial roles in RNA processing for gene regulation. The angiosperm sieve tube system contains a unique population of transcripts, some of which function as long-distance signaling agents involved in regulating organ development. These phloem-mobile mRNAs are translocated as RNP complexes. One such complex is based on a phloem RBP named Cucurbita maxima RNA-binding protein 50 (CmRBP50), a member of the polypyrimidine track binding protein family. The core of this RNP complex contains six additional phloem proteins. Here, requirements for assembly of this CmRBP50 RNP complex are reported. Phosphorylation sites on CmRBP50 were mapped, and then coimmunoprecipitation and protein overlay studies established that the phosphoserine residues, located at the C terminus of CmRBP50, are critical for RNP complex assembly. In vitro pull-down experiments revealed that three phloem proteins, C. maxima phloem protein 16, C. maxima GTP-binding protein, and C. maxima phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-like protein, bind directly with CmRBP50. This interaction required CmRBP50 phosphorylation. Gel mobility-shift assays demonstrated that assembly of the CmRBP50-based protein complex results in a system having enhanced binding affinity for phloem-mobile mRNAs carrying polypyrimidine track binding motifs. This property would be essential for effective long-distance translocation of bound mRNA to the target tissues.

  14. New insight from noble gas and stable isotopes of geothermal/hydrothermal fluids at Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex: Boiling steam separation and water-rock interaction at shallow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulleau, Emilie; Tardani, Daniele; Sano, Yuji; Takahata, Naoto; Vinet, Nicolas; Bravo, Francisco; Muñoz, Carlos; Sanchez, Juan

    2016-12-01

    We measured noble gas and stable isotopes of the geothermal and hydrothermal fluids of the Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex (CCVC), one of the most important geothermal systems in Argentina/Chile, in order to provide new insights into fluid circulation and origin. With the exception of Anfiteatro and Chancho-co geothermal systems, mantle-derived helium dominates in the CCVC fluids, with measured 3He/4He ratios up to 7.86Ra in 2015. Their positive δ15N is an evidence for subducted sediment-derived nitrogen, which is commonly observed in subduction settings. Both He-N2-Ar composition and positive correlation between δD-H2O and δ18O-H2O suggest that the fluids from Anfiteatro and Chancho-co (and partly from Pucon-Mahuida as well, on the southern flank of Copahue volcano) represent a meteoric water composition with a minor magmatic contribution. The Ne, Kr and Xe isotopic compositions are entirely of atmospheric origin, but processes of boiling and steam separation have led to fractionation of their elemental abundances. We modeled the CCVC fluid evolution using Rayleigh distillation curves, considering an initial air saturated geothermal water (ASGW) end-member at 250 and 300 °C, followed by boiling and steam separation at lower temperatures (from 200 °C to 150 °C). Between 2014 and 2015, the CCVC hydrogen and oxygen isotopes shifted from local meteoric water-dominated to andesitic water-dominated signature. This shift is associated with an increase of δ13C values and Stotal, HCl and He contents. These characteristics are consistent with a change in the gas ascent pathway between 2014 and 2015, which in turn induced higher magmatic-hydrothermal contribution in the fluid signature. The composition of the magmatic source of the CCVC fluids is: 3He/4He = 7.7Ra, δ15N = + 6‰, and δ13C = - 6.5‰. Mixing models between air-corrected He and N suggest the involvement of 0.5% to 5% of subducted sediments in the magmatic source. The magmatic sulfur isotopic

  15. Using a combination of radiogenic and stable isotopes coupled with hydrogeochemistry, limnometrics and meteorological data in hydrological research of complex underground mine-pit lake systems: The case of Cueva de la Mora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-España, J.; Diez Ercilla, M.; Pérez Cerdán, F.; Yusta, I.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents a combination of radiogenic and stable isotopes (3H, 2H and 18O on pit lake water, and 34S on dissolved sulfate) coupled with bathymetric, meteorological and limnometric investigations, and detailed hydrogeochemical studies to decipher the flooding history and hydrological dynamics of a meromictic and deeply stratified pit lake in SW Spain. The application of these combined techniques has been specially succesful considering the complexity of the studied system, which includes a substantial number of horizontal galleries, shafts and large rooms physically connected to the pit lake. Specific conductance and temperature profiles have depicted a physical structure of the water body which includes four monimolimnetic layers of increasing density with depth. This internal configuration includes m-scale layers separated by sharp transional zones and is rarely observed in natural, fresh water bodies and most other pit lakes. The tritium abundance of the different layers indicate that the deepest water consists in strongly acidified and metal-laden meteoric water infiltrated in the mine system soon after the mine closure in 1971-72. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of the different layers reflect a sharp stratification with increasing evaporative influence towards the lake surface. The combination of tritium data with the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of the different layers suggests a model of pit lake formation with an initial stage of flooding (with entrance of highly metal- and sulfate-loaded mine drainage from the underlying mine galleries) that deeply determined the physical structure and meromictic nature of the lake. After reaching the present water level and morphology, the stagnant, anoxic part of pit lake seems to have remained chemically and isotopically unmodified during its 40 year-old history. Although the pit lake receives significant water input during autumn and winter (which in turn provoke significant volumetric increases

  16. Effects of dietary energy density and digestible protein:energy ratio on de novo lipid synthesis from dietary protein in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) quantified with stable isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, Kim Schøn; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Holm, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    to trace the metabolic fate of dietary protein, 1·8% fishmeal was replaced with isotope-labelled whole protein (.98% 13C). The experiment was divided into a growth period lasting 89 d, growing fish from approximately 140 to 350 g, followed by a 3 d period feeding isotope-enriched diets. Isotope ratio MS...

  17. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  18. Stable interaction between the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complex Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC) and DNA polymerase {epsilon} is mediated by the cohesion-specific subunits, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takeshi; Takano, Ryuji; Takeo, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Rina; Ogawa, Kaori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2010-11-05

    One of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complexes, Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC), is involved in sister chromatid cohesion. To examine its relationship with factors involved in DNA replication, we performed a proteomics analysis of Ctf18-interacting proteins. We found that Ctf18 interacts with a replicative DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ε (pol ε). Co-immunoprecipitation with recombinant Ctf18-RFC and pol ε demonstrated that their binding is direct and mediated by two distinct interactions, one weak and one stable. Three subunits that are specifically required for cohesion in yeast, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8, formed a trimeric complex (18-1-8) and together enabled stable binding with pol ε. The C-terminal 23-amino acid stretch of Ctf18 was necessary for the trimeric association of 18-1-8 and was required for the stable interaction. The weak interaction was observed with alternative loader complexes including Ctf18-RFC(5), which lacks Dcc1 and Ctf8, suggesting that the common loader structures, including the RFC small subunits (RFC2-5), are responsible for the weak interaction. The two interaction modes, mediated through distinguishable structures of Ctf18-RFC, both occurred through the N-terminal half of pol ε, which includes the catalytic domain. The addition of Ctf18-RFC or Ctf18-RFC(5) to the DNA synthesis reaction caused partial inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Thus, Ctf18-RFC has multiple interactions with pol ε that promote polymorphic modulation of DNA synthesis. We propose that their interaction alters the DNA synthesis mode to enable the replication fork to cooperate with the establishment of cohesion.

  19. Stable Isotope (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S) Analysis and Satellite Telemetry Depict the Complexity of Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Diets in Southwest Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, A.; Watts, D. E.; Cohn, B. R.; Spencer, P.; Mangipane, B.; Welker, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Throughout Alaska, gray wolves (Canis lupus) are a top predator of large ungulates. While they primarily rely on ungulates such as moose (Alces alces) and caribou (Rangifer tarandus) as food, they are opportunistic and use alternative resources. The variation and supplemental protein sources in wolf diet has not been studied extensively on live animals currently using the landscape. With large seasonal influxes of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus sp.) into Alaska, terrestrial carnivore use of marine species is of particular interest. Using stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S) analysis of wolf guard hair and blood, this study aims to determine the proportion of marine derived nutrients (MDN) in the diet of wolf packs within and surrounding Lake Clark National Park and Preserve and Alaska Peninsula and Becharof National Wildlife Refuges in Southwest Alaska. Satellite telemetry from the animals sampled facilitates quantification of landscape use patterns in correspondence with isotopic traits. Wolf pack territories within and surrounding the Lake Clark region appear to vary in spatial extent and in availability of MDN, such as salmon. Initial analysis shows that two packs with smaller home ranges, centrally located around areas with greater salmon availability, have enriched δ15N values compared to packs that have larger home ranges not centralized around salmon spawning waters. This pattern of isotopic enrichment is found in red blood cells, blood serum and hair, representing diets over different time scales. The enrichment in both blood and hair indicates a sustained use of MDN over the previous six to nine months. In the Lake Clark region, simple mixing model estimates suggest that up to 30% of wolf pack diets may be from marine sources. In contrast, packs with larger home ranges and less access to salmon have stable isotope values representative of a terrestrial diet.

  20. Major histocompatibility complex class I peptide presentation after Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection assessed via stable isotope tagging of the B27-presented peptide repertoire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringrose, Jeffrey H.; Meiring, Hugo D.; Speijer, Dave; Feltkamp, Theodorus E. W.; van Els, Cecile A. C. M.; de Jong, Ad P. J. M.; Dankert, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) induced by infection with several gram-negative bacteria is strongly associated with expression of the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B27. It is thought that due to the intracellular lifestyle of ReA-inducing bacteria, bacterial fragments can be

  1. Integrating a Smartphone and Molecular Modeling for Determining the Binding Constant and Stoichiometry Ratio of the Iron(II)-Phenanthroline Complex: An Activity for Analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Camilo de L. M.; Silva, Se´rgio R. B.; Vieira, Davi S.; Lima, Ka´ssio M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The binding constant and stoichiometry ratio for the formation of iron(II)-(1,10-phenanthroline) or iron(II)-o-phenanthroline complexes has been determined by a combination of a low-cost analytical method using a smartphone and a molecular modeling method as a laboratory experiment designed for analytical and physical chemistry courses. Intensity…

  2. 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO): In Vitro Formation of Highly Stable Lanthanide Complexes Translates into Efficacious In Vivo Europium Decorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Ng Pak Leung, Clara; Daleo, Anthony; Kullgren, Birgitta; Prigent, Anne-Laure; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2011-07-13

    The spermine-based hydroxypyridonate octadentate chelator 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) was investigated for its ability to act as an antennae that sensitizes the emission of Sm{sup III}, Eu{sup III}, and Tb{sup III} in the Visible range (Φ{sub tot} = 0.2 - 7%) and the emission of Pr{sup III}, Nd{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, and Yb{sup III} in the Near Infra-Red range, with decay times varying from 1.78 μs to 805 μs at room temperature. The particular luminescence spectroscopic properties of these lanthanide complexes formed with 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) were used to characterize their respective solution thermodynamic stabilities as well as those of the corresponding La{sup III}, Gd{sup III}, Dy{sup III}, Ho{sup III}, Er{sup III}, Tm{sup III}, and Lu{sup III} complexes. The remarkably high affinity of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) for lanthanide metal ions and the resulting high complex stabilities (pM values ranging from 17.2 for La{sup III} to 23.1 for Yb{sup III}) constitute a necessary but not sufficient criteria to consider this octadentate ligand an optimal candidate for in vivo metal decorporation. The in vivo lanthanide complex stability and decorporation capacity of the ligand were assessed, using the radioactive isotope {sup 152}Eu as a tracer in a rodent model, which provided a direct comparison with the in vitro thermodynamic results and demonstrated the great potential of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) as a therapeutic metal chelating agent.

  3. Redox Activity of Oxo-Bridged Iridium Dimers in an N,O-Donor Environment: Characterization of Remarkably Stable Ir(IV,V) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shashi Bhushan; Shopov, Dimitar Y; Sharninghausen, Liam S; Stein, Christopher J; Mercado, Brandon Q; Balcells, David; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Reiher, Markus; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2017-07-19

    Chemical and electrochemical oxidation or reduction of our recently reported Ir(IV,IV) mono-μ-oxo dimers results in the formation of fully characterized Ir(IV,V) and Ir(III,III) complexes. The Ir(IV,V) dimers are unprecedented and exhibit remarkable stability under ambient conditions. This stability and modest reduction potential of 0.99 V vs NHE is in part attributed to complete charge delocalization across both Ir centers. Trends in crystallographic bond lengths and angles shed light on the structural changes accompanying oxidation and reduction. The similarity of these mono-μ-oxo dimers to our Ir "blue solution" water-oxidation catalyst gives insight into potential reactive intermediates of this structurally elusive catalyst. Additionally, a highly reactive material, proposed to be a Ir(V,V) μ-oxo species, is formed on electrochemical oxidation of the Ir(IV,V) complex in organic solvents at 1.9 V vs NHE. Spectroelectrochemistry shows reversible conversion between the Ir(IV,V) and proposed Ir(V,V) species without any degradation, highlighting the exceptional oxidation resistance of the 2-(2-pyridinyl)-2-propanolate (pyalk) ligand and robustness of these dimers. The Ir(III,III), Ir(IV,IV) and Ir(IV,V) redox states have been computationally studied both with DFT and multiconfigurational calculations. The calculations support the stability of these complexes and provide further insight into their electronic structures.

  4. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of mathematical biology. Our attraction to another body increases if the body is sym- metrical and in proportion. If a face or a structure is in pro- ... his practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery, and he developed a mask using the concept of golden ratio. The mask is called the. Marquardt beauty mask (Figure 1) [1]. Keywords.

  5. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. → Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. → Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  6. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Rustin, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.rustin@inserm.fr [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  7. Synthesis and stereochemical assignments of diastereomeric Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff base with (R)-2-(N-{2-[N-alkyl-N-(1-phenylethyl)amino]acetyl}amino)benzophenone; a case of configurationally stable stereogenic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Hiroki; Resch, Daniel; Li, Hengguang; Ojima, Iwao; Takeda, Ryosuke; Aceña, José Luis; Soloshonok, Vadim A

    2014-01-01

    A family of chiral ligands derived from α-phenylethylamine and 2-aminobenzophenone were prepared by alkylation of the nitrogen atom. Upon reaction with glycine and a Ni(II) salt, these ligands were transformed into diastereomeric complexes, as a result of the configurational stability of the stereogenic nitrogen atom. Different diastereomeric ratios were observed depending on the substituent R introduced in the starting ligand, and stereochemical assignments were based on X-ray analysis, along with NMR studies and optical rotation measurements.

  8. The P/N (Positive-to-Negative Links) Ratio in Complex Networks-A Promising In Silico Biomarker for Detecting Changes Occurring in the Human Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanshan Sam

    2017-10-11

    Relatively little progress in the methodology for differentiating between the healthy and diseased microbiomes, beyond comparing microbial community diversities with traditional species richness or Shannon index, has been made. Network analysis has increasingly been called for the task, but most currently available microbiome datasets only allows for the construction of simple species correlation networks (SCNs). The main results from SCN analysis are a series of network properties such as network degree and modularity, but the metrics for these network properties often produce inconsistent evidence. We propose a simple new network property, the P/N ratio, defined as the ratio of positive links to the number of negative links in the microbial SCN. We postulate that the P/N ratio should reflect the balance between facilitative and inhibitive interactions among microbial species, possibly one of the most important changes occurring in diseased microbiome. We tested our hypothesis with five datasets representing five major human microbiome sites and discovered that the P/N ratio exhibits contrasting differences between healthy and diseased microbiomes and may be harnessed as an in silico biomarker for detecting disease-associated changes in the human microbiome, and may play an important role in personalized diagnosis of the human microbiome-associated diseases.

  9. A High Molar Extinction Coefficient Ru(II Complex Functionalized with cis-Dithiocyanato-bis-(9-anthracenyl-10-(2-methyl-2-butenoic acid-1,10-phenanthroline: Potential Sensitizer for Stable Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale O. Adeloye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New heteroleptic ruthenium(II complex was formulated as [Ru(L12(NCS2], where L1 = 9-anthracenyl-10-(2-methyl-2-butenoic acid-1,10-phenanthroline was synthesized and its photophysical properties were studied and compared to previously reported analogue complex containing no anthracene moiety [Ru(L22(NCS2], L2 = (2-methyl-2-butenoic acid-1,10-phenanthroline. The two complexes though exhibit very strong molar extinction coefficient values; however, [Ru(L12(NCS2] shows better characteristic broad and intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT absorption band and higher molar absorptivity coefficient at (λmax=522 nm, ε=6.60×104 M−1 cm−1 than that of [Ru(L22(NCS2] complex, (λmax=446 nm, ε=4.82×104 M−1 cm−1. At room temperature, long wavelength emissions with strong intensity ratio centered at 660 nm were recorded for [Ru(L12(NCS2] complex with a bathochromic shift (λem=700 nm for [Ru(L22(NCS2] complex. It was shown that the luminescence wavelength characteristic of the complexes may be a function relating to the increasing length of π-conjugation and/or molecular weight. A preliminary cyclic voltammetry of [Ru(L12(NCS2] complex also exhibits good electroredox activity with oxidation potential of about 1.04 V, significantly better than other Ru(II polypyridine complexes containing bidentate ligands.

  10. Heat Shock Protein member A2 forms a stable complex with angiotensin converting enzyme and protein disulfide isomerase A6 in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromfield, Elizabeth G; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, Robert John; Nixon, Brett

    2016-02-01

    Given the importance of the chaperone Heat Shock Protein A2 (HSPA2) in the regulation of male fertility, this study aimed to identify and characterize additional proteins that may rely on the activity of this chaperone in human spermatozoa. In view of the findings in this study we propose that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and protein disulfide isomerase A6 (PDIA6) are novel interacting proteins of HSPA2 and that this multimeric complex may participate in key elements of the fertilization cascade. The molecular chaperone HSPA2 plays a pivotal role in the remodelling of the sperm surface during capacitation. Indeed, human spermatozoa that are deficient in HSPA2 protein expression lack the ability to recognize human oocytes, resulting in repeated IVF failure in a clinical setting. Moreover, our recent work has shown that defective HSPA2 function induced by oxidative stress leads to the aberrant surface expression of one of its interacting proteins, arylsulfatase A, and thus contributes to a loss of sperm-zona pellucida adhesion. Human spermatozoa were collected from fertile donors, capacitated and prepared for Blue Native Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) analysis. Protein complexes resolved via BN-PAGE were excised and their constituents were identified using mass spectrometry. The interactions between ACE, PDIA6 and HSPA2 were then confirmed using immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays and the localization of these proteins was assessed in isolated spermatozoa and commercially available human testis tissue sections. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of ACE was performed to assess the role of ACE in human sperm capacitation. Herein we have identified ACE and PDIA6 as potential HSPA2-interacting proteins and shown that this assemblage resides in membrane raft microdomains located in the peri-acrosomal region of the sperm head. Additionally, the surface expression of PDIA6, but not ACE, was shown to be dynamically regulated during sperm

  11. Stable X chromosome inactivation involves the PRC1 Polycomb complex and requires histone MACROH2A1 and the CULLIN3/SPOP ubiquitin E3 ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Lund, Anders H; van der Stoop, Petra

    2005-01-01

    protein BMI1 and the variant histone MACROH2A. We find that in addition to MACROH2A, PRC1 is recruited to the inactivated X chromosome in somatic cells in a highly dynamic, cell cycle-regulated manner. Importantly, RNAi-mediated knock-down of CULLIN3 or SPOP results in loss of MACROH2A1 from...... the inactivated X chromosome (Xi), leading to reactivation of the Xi in the presence of inhibitors of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. Likewise, Xi reactivation is also seen on MacroH2A1 RNAi under these conditions. Hence, we propose that the PRC1 complex is involved in the maintenance of X chromosome...

  12. Hospitals with greater diversities of physiologically complex procedures do not achieve greater surgical growth in a market with stable numbers of such procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Lubarsky, David A

    2018-01-30

    Although having a large diversity of types of procedures has a substantial operational impact on the surgical suites of hospitals, the strategic importance is unknown. In the current study, we used longitudinal data for all hospitals and patient ages in the State of Florida to evaluate whether hospitals with greater diversity of types of physiologically complex major therapeutic procedures (PCMTP) also had greater rates of surgical growth. Observational cohort study. 1479 combinations of hospitals in the State of Florida and fiscal years, 2008-2015. The types of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedures studied were PCMT, defined as: a) major therapeutic procedure; b) >7 American Society of Anesthesiologists base units; and c) performed during a hospitalization with a Diagnosis Related Group with a mean length of stay ≥4.0days. The number of procedures of each type of PCMTP commonly performed at each hospital was calculated by taking 1/Herfindahl index (i.e., sum of the squares of the proportions of all procedures of each type of PCMTP). Over the 8 successive years studied, there was no change in the number of PCMTP being performed (Kendall's τ b =-0.014±0.017 [standard error], P=0.44; N=1479 hospital×years). Busier and larger hospitals commonly performed more types of PCMTP, respectively categorized based on performed PCMTP (τ=0.606±0.017, Pmarket, the unique contributions of each large teaching hospital performing many different types of PCMTP needs to be considered relative to the combined capabilities of other hospitals in its region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  14. Synthesis and stereochemical assignments of diastereomeric Ni(II complexes of glycine Schiff base with (R-2-(N-{2-[N-alkyl-N-(1-phenylethylamino]acetyl}aminobenzophenone; a case of configurationally stable stereogenic nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Moriwaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A family of chiral ligands derived from α-phenylethylamine and 2-aminobenzophenone were prepared by alkylation of the nitrogen atom. Upon reaction with glycine and a Ni(II salt, these ligands were transformed into diastereomeric complexes, as a result of the configurational stability of the stereogenic nitrogen atom. Different diastereomeric ratios were observed depending on the substituent R introduced in the starting ligand, and stereochemical assignments were based on X-ray analysis, along with NMR studies and optical rotation measurements.

  15. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R.; Bebawy, Lories I.; Shokry, Rafeek F.; Abbas, Samah S.

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL- 1 for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  16. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R; Bebawy, Lories I; Shokry, Rafeek F; Abbas, Samah S

    2016-03-15

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL(-1) for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Stable isotope ratio measurements in atmospheric sulfate studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Holt, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric sulfate has been determined by a number of workers and the results interpreted in terms of contributing sources and mechanisms of origin. A correlation between the /sup 18/O enrichment of atmospheric water and airborne particulate sulfate has been observed. Laboratory preparations of sulfate made from sulfur dioxide by two sets of sequential reactions, hydrolysis followed by oxidation and oxidation followed by hydrolysis, yielded products of distinguishable oxygen-isotope composition. Oxygen isotopic analysis of simultaneously collected field samples of ambient sulfate, sulfur dioxide, and water vapor indicated seasonal trends for all of the major constituents of atmospheric sulfation processes. Some isotopic data were also obtained on precipitation and precipitation sulfates. Field results suggest that ambient sulfates collected in the area of Argonne correpond more closely in oxygen isotope composition to a sulfate molecule containing two oxygens originating from sulfur dioxide, one oxygen from air and one oxygen from condensed-phased atmospheric water, SO/sub s/O/sub s/O/sub cw/O/sup 2 -//sub a/, than to the molecule SO/sub s/O/sub s/O/sub wv/O/sup 2//sub a/ in which one oxygen originates from vapor-phase atmospheric water.

  18. H, C, and O Stable Isotope Ratios of Passito Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Matteo; Rolle, Luca; Franceschi, Pietro; Simoni, Marco; Torchio, Fabrizio; Di Martino, Vincenzo; Marianella, Rosa Maria; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Camin, Federica

    2015-07-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of the grape withering process occurring during the production of Italian passito wines on the variability of the (D/H)I, (D/H)II, δ(13)C, and δ(18)O of wine ethanol and the δ(18)O of wine water. The production of PDO Erbaluce di Caluso Passito in five different cellars in Piedmont (Italy) was considered in two successive years. Moreover, samples of 17 different traditional Italian passito wines taken at different stages of maturation were taken into account. We found that the δ(18)O of must and wine water and the δ(18)O of ethanol decrease in the case of passito wines produced in northern and central Italy using postharvest drying of the grapes in dedicated ventilated or unventilated fruit drying rooms (fruttaio), during autumn-winter. For passito wines produced in southern Italy, where the main technique involves withering on the plant (en plein air), δ(18)O tends to increase. The (DH)I of wine ethanol did not change during withering, whereas the (DH)II and δ(13)C values changed slightly, but without any clear trend. Particular attention must be therefore paid in the evaluation of the δ(18)O data of passito wines for fraud detection.

  19. Stable isotope ratio measurements in atmospheric sulfate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Holt, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric sulfate has been determined by a number of workers and the results interpreted in terms of contributing sources and mechanisms of origin. A correlation between the 18 O enrichment of atmospheric water and airborne particulate sulfate has been observed. Laboratory preparations of sulfate made from sulfur dioxide by two sets of sequential reactions, hydrolysis followed by oxidation and oxidation followed by hydrolysis, yielded products of distinguishable oxygen-isotope composition. Oxygen isotopic analysis of simultaneously collected field samples of ambient sulfate, sulfur dioxide, and water vapor indicated seasonal trends for all of the major constituents of atmospheric sulfation processes. Some isotopic data were also obtained on precipitation and precipitation sulfates. Field results suggest that ambient sulfates collected in the area of Argonne correpond more closely in oxygen isotope composition to a sulfate molecule containing two oxygens originating from sulfur dioxide, one oxygen from air and one oxygen from condensed-phased atmospheric water, SO/sub s/O/sub s/O/sub cw/O 2- /sub a/, than to the molecule SO/sub s/O/sub s/O/sub wv/O 2 /sub a/ in which one oxygen originates from vapor-phase atmospheric water

  20. Stable carbon isotope ratios from archaeological charcoal as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hall, G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available and wetter to colder and drier and finally becoming warmer and drier. The isotope data is consistent with this reconstruction. The results from this series of experiments indicate that it is possible to obtain meaningful palaeoenvironmental information from δ...

  1. Manuring and stable nitrogen isotope ratios in cereals and pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Heaton, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of animal manure application on the δ15N values of a broad range of crops (cereals and pulses), under a range of manuring levels/regimes and at a series of locations extending from northwest Europe to the eastern Mediterranean. We included both agricultural field ex...... of these observations has fundamental implications for archaeobotanical interpretation of δ15N values as evidence of land use practices and (together with analysis of bone collagen/tooth enamel in potential consumers) palaeodiet....

  2. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  3. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeremy E; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-13

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ(44)Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ(26)Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ(26)Mg, δ(13)C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ(26)Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this (26)Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a (26)Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ(26)Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ(26)Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages.

  4. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ44Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ26Mg, δ13C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ26Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this 26Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a 26Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ26Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ26Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages. PMID:25535375

  5. Can We Untangle the Weather? Stable Water Isotope Controls on the Juneau Icefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihle, A. C.; Keenan, E.; Yong, C.; Bridgers, S. L.; Markle, B. R.; Hamel, J.; Klein, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Stable water isotopes in snow and ice provide a reliable proxy for past weather and climate. However, untangling weather and climate signals from water isotopes on the Juneau Icefield, Alaska, has proven difficult due to consistent summer melt and rain. The Juneau Icefield is a large glaciated region consisting of complex terrain and sharp climatic gradients. Here we study how topographic steepness and elevation influence stable water isotope ratios on the Juneau Icefield using vertical snowpit profiles collected from water year 2017's snowpack. As terrain steepens, we expect gradients in isotope ratios to intensify. In addition, we aim to determine how post-depositional metamorphism, particularly precipitation, affects water isotope ratios. We anticipate rain events to increase the proportion of heavy water isotopes. Lastly, we compare model output and remote sensing observations of storm origin to vertical stratigraphy of stable isotope ratios in the snowpack in order to determine if it is possible to use isotopes to identify past storm tracks on the Juneau Icefield. Snowpack isotope stratigraphy ratios can likely be linked to seasonal trends of storm characteristics. Given this enhanced understanding of how stable water isotopes behave on the Juneau Icefield, we contribute to the understanding of past weather and climate, both here and elsewhere, and explore the possibility for future deep ice cores on the Juneau Icefield.

  6. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  7. The Reactivity of Stable Metallacyclobutenes and Vinylcarbenes

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Ryan Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 1. Historical Development of Stable Metallacyclobutenes Fred Tebbe and co-workers synthesized the first stable metallacyclobutene complexes in the late 1970’s by treatment of an intermediate titanium methylene species – later popularized as the “Tebbe reagent” – with acetylenes. Robert Grubbs at Caltech further studied this system, using it to detail a degenerate metathesis reaction and to isolate a metallacyclobutane complex – which was implicated in the emerging field of alkene meta...

  8. Stable isotope ratios of marijuana. I. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes describe growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jason B; Hurley, Janet M; Ehleringer, James R

    2009-01-01

    There remains significant uncertainty in illicit marijuana cultivation. We analyzed the delta(13)C and delta(15)N of 508 domestic samples from known U.S.A. counties, 31 seized from a single location, 5 samples grown in Mexico and Colombia, and 10 northwest border seizures. For a subset, inflorescences and leaves were analyzed separately. These data revealed a strong correspondence, with inflorescences having slightly higher delta(13)C and delta(15)N values than leaves. A framework for interpreting these results is introduced and evaluated. Samples identified as outdoor-grown by delta(13)C were generally recorded as such by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). DEA-classified indoor-grown samples had the most negative delta(13)C values, consistent with indoor cultivation, although many were also in the outdoor-grown domain. Delta(15)N indicated a wide range of fertilizers across the dataset. Samples seized at the single location suggested multiple sources. Northwest border delta(13)C values suggested indoor growth, whereas for the Mexican and Colombian samples they indicated outdoor growth.

  9. Two stable steady states in the Hodgkin-Huxley axons

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, K.; Matsumoto, G.

    1983-01-01

    Two stable steady states were found in the numerical solution of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations for the intact squid axon bathed in potassium-rich sea water with an externally applied inward current. Under the conditions the two stable steady-states exist, the Hodgkin-Huxley equations have a complex bifurcation structure including, in addition to the two stable steady-states, a stable limit cycle, two unstable equilibrium points, and one asymptotically stable equilibrium point. It was also conc...

  10. Periodicity of the stable isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, J C A

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all stable (non-radioactive) isotopes are formally interrelated as the products of systematically adding alpha particles to four elementary units. The region of stability against radioactive decay is shown to obey a general trend based on number theory and contains the periodic law of the elements as a special case. This general law restricts the number of what may be considered as natural elements to 100 and is based on a proton:neutron ratio that matches the golden ratio, characteristic of biological and crystal growth structures. Different forms of the periodic table inferred at other proton:neutron ratios indicate that the electronic configuration of atoms is variable and may be a function of environmental pressure. Cosmic consequences of this postulate are examined. (author)

  11. Spectrophotometry mole ratio and continuous variation experiments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For spectrophotometric determinations of various metal (M) to ligand (L) ratio's in dithizonato metal complexes this reagent provides a versatile alternative for undergraduate chemistry practicals that is cost-effective, yielding repeatable results. The mole-ratio method yield a ratio of 1M : 1L for the silver dithizonate complex ...

  12. Kinetic stable Cr isotopic fractionation between aqueous Cr(III)-Cl-H2O complexes at 25 °C: Implications for Cr(III) mobility and isotopic variations in modern and ancient natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babechuk, Michael G.; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Reitter, Elmar; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-02-01

    dissolution of two Cr(III)-Cl solids (dried NIST SRM979 standard and commercial CrCl3·6H2O salt) in 0.01 M HCl (pH ≈ 2). The ε53/52Cr(CrCl2+/CrCl2+) for the CrCl2+ to CrCl2+ reaction is -0.19‰ (SRM979) and -0.38‰ (salt) and the ε53/52Cr(Cr3+/CrCl2+) for the CrCl2+ to Cr3+ reaction is consistent for both experiments at -0.49‰ (SRM979) and -0.51‰ (salt). Experiments where SRM979 is dissolved in 0.1 and 1 M HCl for a longer aging period provide preliminary evidence that the Cr3+/CrCl2+ Cr(III) isotopic fractionation scales with HCl concentration (transformation rate). Chromium(III) dissolved in 6 M HCl and aged 5 months still yields an inter-species Cr isotope distribution that is apparently inherited from kinetic effects (light Cr isotopes in Cr3+), attesting to the slow development of inter-species isotopic equilibrium, which instead predicts progressively heavier Cr isotopes from CrCl2+ to CrCl2+ to Cr3+. The kinetic Cr(III) isotopic fractionation documented herein is proposed to be relevant to understanding systems where aqueous Cr(III)-Cl species may be temporarily stable (e.g., metamorphic and hydrothermal systems or lateritic weathering). Further, the complexation of Cr(III) with other ligands (e.g., CO32-, organics), combined with additional kinetic effects of Cr(III) potentially occurring in soils or sediment, must be explored prior to establishing the significance of empirical stable Cr isotope signatures in marine and continental environments. Further understanding of non-redox effects may lead to stable Cr isotopes developing as a proxy for system pH or ligand chemistry.

  13. Elemental ratios for characterization of quantum-dots populations in complex mixtures by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation on-line coupled to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Miranda, Mario; Fernandez-Arguelles, Maria T; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-08-11

    Separation and identification of nanoparticles of different composition, with similar particle diameter, coexisting in heterogeneous suspensions of polymer-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have been thoroughly assessed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled on-line to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) detectors. Chemical characterization of any previously on-line separated nanosized species was achieved by the measurement of the elemental molar ratios of every element involved in the synthesis of the QDs, using inorganic standards and external calibration by flow injection analysis (FIA). Such elemental molar ratios, strongly limited so far to pure single nanoparticles suspensions, have been achieved with adequate accuracy by coupling for the first time an ICP-QQQ instrument to an AF4 system. This hyphenation turned out to be instrumental to assess the chemical composition of the different populations of nanoparticles coexisting in the relatively complex mixtures, due to its capabilities to detect the hardly detectable elements involved in the synthesis. Interestingly such information, complementary to that obtained by fluorescence, was very valuable to detect and identify unexpected nanosized species, present at significant level, produced during QDs synthesis and hardly detectable by standard approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  15. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  16. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  17. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  18. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  19. Alterations in serum growth hormone (GH)/GH dependent ternary complex components (IGF-I, IGFBP-3, ALS, IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio) and the influence of these alterations on growth pattern in female rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyaman, P; Ocal, G; Berberoğlu, M; Evliyaoğlu, O; Aycan, Z; Cetinkaya, E; Bulca, Y; Ersöz, G; Akar, N

    2004-06-01

    Normal growth in children is regulated to a great extent through the actions of the GH/IGF-I axis, a system consisting of GH and its mediators (ternary complex) that modulate growth in many tissues. The ternary complex (IGF-I/IGFBP-3/ALS) provides an acute regulatory mechanism in which IGF-I may be mobilized from the circulating reservoir of 150 kDa complexes to the tissues. Acute exercise is known to be a stimulus for GH secretion. The beneficial effects of scheduled exercise on body composition are also well established. However, the impact of strenuous exercise on the pubertal development of child athletes is still not well understood. The first goal of this study was to assess the acute effects of high intensity exercise training on GH-dependent ternary complex components in female rhythmic gymnasts compared to age-matched healthy female controls with normal physical activity. The second goal was to explore the influence of these exercise-induced changes on skeletal and pubertal growth in the same group prospectively over a period of 4 years. Seventeen female rhythmic gymnasts, aged 11.4 +/- 0.9 years, who had 10 h per week intense exercise for at least 4 months volunteered to participate in this study. Anthropometric measurement of height (Height SDS for chronological age [HtSDS(CA)], parentally adjusted height, predicted adult height), bone age and weight (BMI) were made using standard techniques in gymnasts and controls (aged 12.5 +/- 3.0 years, n = 12). Gymnasts were followed up to 4 years to observe growth velocity and pubertal progression. In order to determine the acute impact of exercise on levels of GH and GH-dependent ternary complex component (IGF-I, IGFBP-3, ALS, IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio), blood samples were obtained from gymnasts after a routine 2-h high-intensity training program and then after a 2-day rest period. These results were compared with age-matched controls with no scheduled sports activity. Despite the significant increment in serum

  20. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  1. Low-peak-to-average power ratio and low-complexity asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing uplink transmission scheme for long-reach passive optical network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Qiao, Yaojun

    2015-09-01

    In this Letter, we propose a discrete Hartley transform (DHT)-spread asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (DHT-S-ACO-OFDM) uplink transmission scheme in which the multiplexing/demultiplexing process also uses the DHT algorithm. By designing a simple encoding structure, the computational complexity of the transmitter can be reduced from O(Nlog(2)(N)) to O(N). At the probability of 10(-3), the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of 2-ary pulse amplitude modulation (2-PAM)-modulated DHT-S-ACO-OFDM is approximately 9.7 dB lower than that of 2-PAM-modulated conventional ACO-OFDM. To verify the feasibility of the proposed scheme, a 4-Gbit/s DHT-S-ACO-OFDM uplink transmission scheme with a 1∶64 way split has been experimentally implemented using 100-km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) for a long-reach passive optical network (LR-PON).

  2. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  3. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to i...

  4. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  5. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  6. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  7. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  8. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  9. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  10. Faster and Simpler Approximation of Stable Matchings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Paluch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We give a 3 2 -approximation algorithm for finding stable matchings that runs in O(m time. The previous most well-known algorithm, by McDermid, has the same approximation ratio but runs in O(n3/2m time, where n denotes the number of people andm is the total length of the preference lists in a given instance. In addition, the algorithm and the analysis are much simpler. We also give the extension of the algorithm for computing stable many-to-many matchings.

  11. A High Molar Extinction Coefficient Ru(II) Complex Functionalized with cis-Dithiocyanato-bis-(9-anthracenyl-10-(2-methyl-2-butenoic acid)-1,10-phenanthroline): Potential Sensitizer for Stable Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Adeloye, Adewale O.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    New heteroleptic ruthenium(II) complex was formulated as [Ru(L1)2(NCS)2], where L1 = 9-anthracenyl-10-(2-methyl-2-butenoic acid)-1,10-phenanthroline was synthesized and its photophysical properties were studied and compared to previously reported analogue complex containing no anthracene moiety [Ru(L2)2(NCS)2], L2 = (2-methyl-2-butenoic acid)-1,10-phenanthroline. The two complexes though exhibit very strong molar extinction coefficient values; however, [Ru(L1)2(NCS)2] shows better characteris...

  12. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include food sources for animals, water sources for plants, pollution sources...

  13. Microwave gallium-68 radiochemistry for kinetically stable bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: structural investigations and cellular uptake under hypoxia† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 1001632–1001634. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c5dt02537k Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arrowsmith, Rory L.; Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Twyman, Frazer; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Botchway, Stanley W.; Dilworth, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the microwave synthesis of several bis(thiosemicarbazones) and the rapid gallium-68 incorporation to give the corresponding metal complexes. These proved kinetically stable under ‘cold’ and ‘hot’ biological assays and were investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and radioactive cell retention studies under normoxia and hypoxia. 68Ga complex retention was found to be 34% higher in hypoxic cells than in normoxic cells over 30 min, further increasing to 53% at 120 min. Our data suggests that this class of gallium complexes show hypoxia selectivity suitable for imaging in living cells and in vivo tests by microPET in nude athymic mice showed that they are excreted within 1 h of their administration. PMID:26583314

  14. Curious Sex Ratios and Cytoplasmic Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sure should exist for sexual species to maintain a stable 1: 1 ratio of females to males. ... in a population which reproduces sexually, every individual will carry and transmit the genes of one father and one ... Now consider a newly mutated gene (capable of being transmitted by both males and females) that causes carriers to ...

  15. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  16. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  17. Financial Key Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  18. Modelling stable water isotopes: Status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of stable water isotopes H2 18O and HDO within various parts of the Earth’s hydrological cycle has clearly improved our understanding of the interplay between climatic variations and related isotope fractionation processes. In this article key principles and major research results of stable water isotope modelling studies are described. Emphasis is put on research work using explicit isotope diagnostics within general circulation models as this highly complex model setup bears many resemblances with studies using simpler isotope modelling approaches.

  19. Substrate-induced stable enzyme-inhibitor complex formation allows tight binding of novel 2-aminopyrimidin-4(3H)-ones to drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuele, Alberta; Facchini, Marcella; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Artico, Marino; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of 5-alkyl-2-(N,N-disubstituted)amino-6-(2,6-difluorophenylalkyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (F(2)-N,N-DABOs). These compounds are highly active against both wild-type HIV-1 and the K103N, Y181C, and Y188L mutant strains. Herein we present novel 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenylalkyl)-N,N-DABO (2-Cl-6-F-N,N-DABO) derivatives and investigate the molecular basis for their high-affinity binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Our results show that the new compounds display higher association rates than the difluoro derivatives toward wild-type HIV-1 RT or drug-resistant RT mutant forms. We also show that they preferentially associate to either the free enzyme or the enzyme-nucleic acid binary complex, and that this binding is stabilized upon formation of the ternary complex between HIV-1 RT and both the nucleic acid and nucleotide substrates. Interestingly, one compound showed dissociation rates from the ternary complex with RT mutants K103N and Y181I 10-20-fold slower than from the corresponding complex with wild-type RT.

  20. Multistep Redox Sequences of Azopyridyl (L) Bridged Reaction Centres in Stable Radical Complex Ions {(.mu.-L)[MCl(.eta.5-C5Me5)]2}.+, M = Rh or Ir: Spectroelectrochemistry and High-frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantz, S.; Reinhardt, R.; Greulich, S.; Wanner, M.; Fiedler, Jan; Duboc-Toia, C.; Kaim, W.

    č. 18 (2003), s. 3370-3375 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0821; GA MŠk OC D15.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : EPR spectroscopy * radical complex ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.908, year: 2003

  1. Formulation of stable protein powders by supercritical fluid drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jovanović, N.

    2007-01-01

    Protein pharmaceuticals are potent drugs for the treatment of several chronic and life-threatening diseases. However, the complex and sensitive nature of protein molecules requires special attention in the development of stable dosage forms. Developing stable aqueous protein formulations is often a

  2. The status of applying stable isotope in the studies of environmental science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Zhipeng; Zhang Liwen; Zhu Tan; Feng Yinchang

    2007-01-01

    The stable isotope composition is characteristic in the pollution source, and it is relatively fixed in the process of transferring and reaction. At present the precise analysis result of stable isotope ratio can be obtained easily. So the stable isotopes can be applied to the pollution affair arbitration and source study. The concept and analytical method of stable isotopes are introduced. The research status of the stable isotopes in the field of environmental science and the isotope fractionation is reviewed. (authors)

  3. Nuclear fuel, mass balances, conversion ratio, doubling time, and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1976-11-01

    Information on the performance aspects of nuclear power plants is presented concerning conversion ratio, criticality, primitive economic analysis, stable breeder-converter industry, doubling time, breeder industry economic benefit, defining nuclear fuel, recommendations, and uncertainty

  4. The Stable Diiron (2.5) Complex Ion [(NC).sub.5./sub.Fe(ć-tz)Fe(CN).sub.5./sub.].sup.5-./sup., tz=1,2,4,5-Tetrazine, and Its Neighboring Oxidation States

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glöckle, M.; Kaim, W.; Klein, A.; Roduner, E.; Hübner, G.; Záliš, Stanislav; Slageren van, J.; Renz, F.; Gütlich, P.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 10 (2001), s. 2256-2262 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D14.20; GA MŠk OC D15.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : mixed valent compound * diiron tetrazine complex * spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2001

  5. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  6. Stable Treemaps via Local Moves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondag, Max; Speckmann, Bettina; Verbeek, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Treemaps are a popular tool to visualize hierarchical data: items are represented by nested rectangles and the area of each rectangle corresponds to the data being visualized for this item. The visual quality of a treemap is commonly measured via the aspect ratio of the rectangles. If the data changes, then a second important quality criterion is the stability of the treemap: how much does the treemap change as the data changes. We present a novel stable treemapping algorithm that has very high visual quality. Whereas existing treemapping algorithms generally recompute the treemap every time the input changes, our algorithm changes the layout of the treemap using only local modifications. This approach not only gives us direct control over stability, but it also allows us to use a larger set of possible layouts, thus provably resulting in treemaps of higher visual quality compared to existing algorithms. We further prove that we can reach all possible treemap layouts using only our local modifications. Furthermore, we introduce a new measure for stability that better captures the relative positions of rectangles. We finally show via experiments on real-world data that our algorithm outperforms existing treemapping algorithms also in practice on either visual quality and/or stability. Our algorithm scores high on stability regardless of whether we use an existing stability measure or our new measure.

  7. Structure of stable degeneration of K3 surfaces into pairs of rational elliptic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    F-theory/heterotic duality is formulated in the stable degeneration limit of a K3 fibration on the F-theory side. In this note, we analyze the structure of the stable degeneration limit. We discuss whether stable degeneration exists for pairs of rational elliptic surfaces. We demonstrate that, when two rational elliptic surfaces have an identical complex structure, stable degeneration always exists. We provide an equation that systematically describes the stable degeneration of a K3 surface i...

  8. Application of Performance Ratios in Portfolio Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Kresta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cornerstone of modern portfolio theory was established by pioneer work of Harry Markowitz. Based on his mean-variance framework, Sharpe formulated his well-known Sharpe ratio aiming to measure the performance of mutual funds. The contemporary development in computer’s computational power allowed to apply more complex performance ratios, which take into account also higher moments of return probability distribution. Although these ratios were proposed to help the investors to improve the results of portfolio optimization, we empirically demonstrated in our paper that this may not necessarily be true. On the historical dataset of DJIA components we empirically showed that both Sharpe ratio and MAD ratio outperformed Rachev ratio. However, for Rachev ratio we assumed only one level of parameters value. Different set-ups of parameters may provide different results and thus further analysis is certainly required.

  9. Reproducibility of isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, D.

    1981-01-01

    The use of an accelerator as part of a mass spectrometer has improved the sensitivity for measuring low levels of long-lived radionuclides by several orders of magnitude. However, the complexity of a large tandem accelerator and beam transport system has made it difficult to match the precision of low energy mass spectrometry. Although uncertainties for accelerator measured isotope ratios as low as 1% have been obtained under favorable conditions, most errors quoted in the literature for natural samples are in the 5 to 20% range. These errors are dominated by statistics and generally the reproducibility is unknown since the samples are only measured once

  10. Split degenerate states and stable p+ip phases from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Zhang-Yu; Zeng, Hui [Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Pan, Qiyuan [Hunan Normal Univ., Key Lab. of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Dept. of Physics, Changsha (China); Zeng, Hua-Bi [Yangzhou University, College of Physics Science and Technology, Yangzhou, Jiangsu (China); National Central University, Department of Physics, Chungli (China)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, we investigate the p+ip superfluid phases in the complex vector field holographic p-wave model. We find that in the probe limit, the p+ip phase and the p-wave phase are equally stable, hence the p and ip orders can be mixed with an arbitrary ratio to form more general p+λip phases, which are also equally stable with the p-wave and p+ip phases. As a result, the system possesses a degenerate thermal state in the superfluid region. We further study the case on considering the back-reaction on the metric, and we find that the degenerate ground states will be separated into p-wave and p+ip phases, and the p-wave phase is more stable. Finally, due to the different critical temperature of the zeroth order phase transitions from p-wave and p+ip phases to the normal phase, there is a temperature region where the p+ip phase exists but the p-wave phase does not. In this region we find the stable holographic p+ip phase for the first time. (orig.)

  11. Stable isotope switching (SIS): a new stable isotope probing (SIP) approach to determine carbon flow in the soil food web and dynamics in organic matter pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxfield, P J; Dildar, N; Hornibrook, E R C; Stott, A W; Evershed, R P

    2012-04-30

    Recent advances in stable isotope probing (SIP) have allowed direct linkage of microbial population structure and function. This paper details a new development of SIP, Stable Isotope Switching (SIS), which allows the simultaneous assessment of carbon (C) uptake, turnover and decay, and the elucidation of soil food webs within complex soils or sedimentary matrices. SIS utilises a stable isotope labelling approach whereby the (13)C-labelled substrate is switched part way through the incubation to a natural abundance substrate. A (13)CH(4) SIS study of landfill cover soils from Odcombe (Somerset, UK) was conducted. Carbon assimilation and dissimilation processes were monitored through bulk elemental analysis isotope ratio mass spectrometry and compound-specific gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry, targeting a wide range of biomolecular components including: lipids, proteins and carbohydrates. Carbon assimilation by primary consumers (methanotrophs) and sequential assimilation into secondary (Gram-negative and -positive bacteria) and tertiary consumers (Eukaryotes) was observed. Up to 45% of the bacterial membrane lipid C was determined to be directly derived from CH(4) and at the conclusion of the experiment ca. 50% of the bulk soil C derived directly from CH(4) was retained within the soil. This is the first estimate of soil organic carbon derived from CH(4) and it is comparable with levels observed in lakes that have high levels of benthic methanogenesis. SIS opens the way for a new generation of SIP studies aimed at elucidating total C dynamics (incorporation, turnover and decay) at the molecular level in a wide range of complex environmental and biological matrices. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Difference and ratio plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Holmskov, U; Bro, Peter

    1995-01-01

    hitherto unnoted differences between controls and patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. For this we use simple, but unconventional, graphic representations of the data, based on difference plots and ratio plots. Differences between patients with Burkitt's lymphoma...... and systemic lupus erythematosus from another previously published study (Macanovic, M. and Lachmann, P.J. (1979) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 38, 274) are also represented using ratio plots. Our observations indicate that analysis by regression analysis may often be misleading....

  13. Stable isotope analysis of dynamic lipidomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Joost; Bailey, Andrew P; Koster, Grielof; Gould, Alex P; Postle, Anthony D

    2017-08-01

    Metabolic pathway flux is a fundamental element of biological activity, which can be quantified using a variety of mass spectrometric techniques to monitor incorporation of stable isotope-labelled substrates into metabolic products. This article contrasts developments in electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the measurement of lipid metabolism with more established gas chromatography mass spectrometry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodologies. ESI-MS combined with diagnostic tandem MS/MS scans permits the sensitive and specific analysis of stable isotope-labelled substrates into intact lipid molecular species without the requirement for lipid hydrolysis and derivatisation. Such dynamic lipidomic methodologies using non-toxic stable isotopes can be readily applied to quantify lipid metabolic fluxes in clinical and metabolic studies in vivo. However, a significant current limitation is the absence of appropriate software to generate kinetic models of substrate incorporation into multiple products in the time domain. Finally, we discuss the future potential of stable isotope-mass spectrometry imaging to quantify the location as well as the extent of lipid synthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: BBALIP_Lipidomics Opinion Articles edited by Sepp Kohlwein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Introducing fecal stable isotope analysis in primate weaning studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsema, Laurie J

    2012-10-01

    This research investigates the potential of a new, noninvasive method for determining age of weaning among primates using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in feces. Analysis of stable isotope ratios in body tissues is a well-established method in archeology and ecology for reconstructing diet. This is the first study to investigate weaning in primates using fecal stable isotope ratios. Diets of a single François' langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) mother-infant pair at the Toledo Zoo are reconstructed using this technique to track changes in infant suckling behavior over the weaning period. Stable isotope ratios in feces are sampled instead of more traditional samples such as bone or hair to enable daily, noninvasive snapshots of weaning status. Isotopic assessments of weaning status are compared to visual assessments to identify any discordance between the two. Three measurements documented the transition from breast milk to solid foods: stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C), stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ(15)N), and nitrogen content of feces (%N). It appears that solid foods were introduced at approximately 2 months of infant age, but that nursing continued into the 12th month, when sample collection ceased. Stable isotope data exposed a much longer weaning period than what was expected based on previously published data for captive langurs, and clarified visual estimates of weaning status. This reflects the method's sensitivity to suckling at night and ability to distinguish actual nursing from comfort nursing. After testing this method with zoo animals, it can readily be applied among wild populations. An isotopic approach to weaning provides a new, accurate, and biologically meaningful assessment of interbirth intervals, and facilitates a better understanding of mother-infant interactions. Both of these outcomes are critical for developing successful conservation strategies for captive and wild primates. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Radioisotope trithiol complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisson, Silvia S.; Cutler, Cathy S.; Degraffenreid, Anthony J.

    2016-08-30

    The present invention is directed to a series of stable radioisotope trithiol complexes that provide a simplified route for the direct complexation of radioisotopes present in low concentrations. In certain embodiments, the complex contains a linking domain configured to conjugate the radioisotope trithiol complex to a targeting vector. The invention is also directed to a novel method of linking the radioisotope to a trithiol compound to form the radioisotope trithiol complex. The inventive radioisotope trithiol complexes may be utilized for a variety of applications, including diagnostics and/or treatment in nuclear medicine.

  16. Dynamical attraction to stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Albert M.; Talet, Marina

    2012-01-01

    We apply dynamical ideas within probability theory, proving an almost-sure invariance principle in log density for stable processes. The familiar scaling property (self-similarity) of the stable process has a stronger expression, that the scaling flow on Skorokhod path space is a Bernoulli flow. We prove that typical paths of a random walk with i.i.d. increments in the domain of attraction of a stable law can be paired with paths of a stable process so that, after applying a non-random regula...

  17. Managing Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable oligomer-metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable oligomer-metal complexes of copper(II), nickel(II), zinc(II) and cobalt(II) derived from oligo- p - nitrophenylazomethinephenol. ... Based on half degradation temperature parameters Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were more resistant than the others. KEY WORDS: Oligomer metal ...

  19. Potential support ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    , the prospective potential support ratio usually focuses on the current mortality schedule, or period life expectancy. Instead, in this paper we look at the actual mortality experienced by cohorts in a population, using cohort life tables. We analyse differences between the two perspectives using mortality models......, historical data, and forecasted data. Cohort life expectancy takes future mortality improvements into account, unlike period life expectancy, leading to a higher prospective potential support ratio. Our results indicate that using cohort instead of period life expectancy returns around 0.5 extra younger...

  20. IsoBank – Stable isotope ecology in the age of ‘Big Data’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes ratios provide valuable information to fish biologists working in a diverse range of fields: e.g. ecologists, population biologists and fishery managers. Ecologists take advantage of stable isotope ratios to provide information on the diet and migration history of consumers or when a...

  1. Inclusion Complex of Zerumbone with Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Induces Apoptosis in Liver Hepatocellular HepG2 Cells via Caspase 8/BID Cleavage Switch and Modulating Bcl2/Bax Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabilah Muhammad Nadzri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Zerumbone (ZER isolated from Zingiber zerumbet was previously encapsulated with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD to enhance ZER’s solubility in water, thus making it highly tolerable in the human body. The anticancer effects of this new ZER-HPβCD inclusion complex via apoptosis cell death were assessed in this study for the first time in liver hepatocellular cells, HepG2. Apoptosis was ascertained by morphological study, nuclear stain, and sub-G1 cell population accumulation with G2/M arrest. Further investigations showed the release of cytochrome c and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, proving mitochondrial dysfunction upon the ZER-HPβCD treatment as well as modulating proapoptotic and anti-apototic Bcl-2 family members. A significant increase in caspase 3/7, caspase 9, and caspase 8 was detected with the depletion of BID cleaved by caspase 8. Collectively, these results prove that a highly soluble inclusion complex of ZER-HPβCD could be a promising anticancer agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in humans.

  2. The rectilinear Steiner ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PO de Wet

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The rectilinear Steiner ratio was shown to be 3/2 by Hwang [Hwang FK, 1976, On Steiner minimal trees with rectilinear distance, SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, 30, pp. 104– 114.]. We use continuity and introduce restricted point sets to obtain an alternative, short and self-contained proof of this result.

  3. The Reference Return Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Faber Frandsen, Tove

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new journal impact measure called The Reference Return Ratio (3R). Unlike the traditional Journal Impact Factor (JIF), which is based on calculations of publications and citations, the new measure is based on calculations of bibliographic investments (references) and returns...

  4. Stable transfection of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J; Henney, H R

    1997-03-01

    The promoter activity of an Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene was analyzed in its homologous system. A modified calcium phosphate transfection method using a neomycin marker vector was developed to achieve highly efficient transfection of the Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene into Acanthamoeba cells. In this transfection procedure, the calcium phosphate-DNA complex was formed gradually in the medium during incubation with cells and precipitated on the cells. The crucial factors for obtaining efficient transfection were the pH (6.95) of the transfection buffer used for the calcium phosphate precipitation and the amount (25 micrograms/96-well tissue culture plate) and form (circular) of transfecting DNA. Under these conditions, Acanthamoeba isolate 1B6 was transfected at an efficiency of about 40% with the constructed vector pOPSBU, a pOP13CAT-based polyubiquitin gene incorporated neomycin resistance vector. Acanthamoeba polyphaga was transfected at an efficiency of about 10% with this vector. Transfection of both Acanthamoeba strains appeared to result in low copy plasmid integration (about two copies per cell are suggested). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays showed that the promoter of the Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene in the constructed vector was especially strong in A. polyphaga, thus the pOPSBU-Acanthamoeba system may be useful for the construction of cDNA expression libraries, as well as for the expression of cloned genes.

  5. Improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in oxygen sensitive emission from hybrid Langmuir–Blodgett films of amphiphilic iridium complexes with the exfoliated nanosheets using a metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Ryotaro; Yamada, Tetsuya; Yudate, Shinji; Kadowaki, Kazunori; Sato, Hisako

    2018-03-01

    Cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes are attracting extensive attention due to their high emission properties in the visible region. Oxygen sensitive photoluminescence (PL) emissions from single- and multi-layered Ir(III) Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films are measured. The single-layered LB film on a non-aluminum coated glass substrate shows oxygen sensitive PL emission but its intensity is very weak. In contrast, the multi-layered LB film shows higher intensity but their oxygen sensitivity is lower than that of the single-layered sample. To break the trade-off between intensity and sensitivity, PL characteristics from the LB film on an aluminum-coated glass substrate are investigated. The PL emission from the LB film on the metal layer show higher intensity and good oxygen sensitivity. The mechanism of the emission enhancement is also discussed in this paper.

  6. Trophic structure in a seabird host-parasite food web: insights from stable isotope analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gómez-Díaz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ecological studies on food webs rarely include parasites, partly due to the complexity and dimensionality of host-parasite interaction networks. Multiple co-occurring parasites can show different feeding strategies and thus lead to complex and cryptic trophic relationships, which are often difficult to disentangle by traditional methods. We analyzed stable isotope ratios of C ((13C/(12C, delta(13C and N ((15N/(14N, delta(15N of host and ectoparasite tissues to investigate trophic structure in 4 co-occurring ectoparasites: three lice and one flea species, on two closely related and spatially segregated seabird hosts (Calonectris shearwaters. delta(13C isotopic signatures confirmed feathers as the main food resource for the three lice species and blood for the flea species. All ectoparasite species showed a significant enrichment in delta(15N relatively to the host tissue consumed (discrimination factors ranged from 2 to 5 per thousand depending on the species. Isotopic differences were consistent across multiple host-ectoparasite locations, despite of some geographic variability in baseline isotopic levels. Our findings illustrate the influence of both ectoparasite and host trophic ecology in the isotopic structuring of the Calonectris ectoparasite community. This study highlights the potential of stable isotope analyses in disentangling the nature and complexity of trophic relationships in symbiotic systems.

  7. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2005-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. (author). 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Stable patterns for fourth-order parabolic equations

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, J. B.; Vandervorst, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    We consider fourth-order parabolic equations of gradient type. For the sake of simplicity, the analysis is carried out for the specific equation $u\\sb t=-\\gamma\\ u\\sb {xxxx}+\\beta u\\sb {xx}-F\\sp \\prime(u)$ with $(t,x)\\in (0,\\infty)\\times(0, L)$ and $\\gamma,\\beta>0$ and where $F(u)$ is a bistable potential. We study its stable equilibria as a function of the ratio $\\gamma/beta\\sp 2$. As the ratio $\\gamma/beta\\sp 2$ crosses an explicit threshold value, the number of stable ...

  9. Production of yeastolates for uniform stable isotope labelling in eukaryotic cell culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egorova-Zachernyuk, T.A.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Pistorius, A.M.A.; Grip, W.J. de

    2009-01-01

    Preparation of stable isotope-labelled yeastolates opens up ways to establish more cost-effective stable isotope labelling of biomolecules in insect and mammalian cell lines and hence to employ higher eukaryotic cell lines for stable isotope labelling of complex recombinant proteins. Therefore, we

  10. Difference and ratio plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Holmskov, U; Bro, Peter

    1995-01-01

    11111onglutinin-binding assay (KgBa) has gained widespread use for the detection of circulating immune complexes. A recent paper questioned the interpretation of the results obtained by this method and the validity of the assay (Holmskov et al. (1992) J. Immunol. Methods 148, 225). We now present...

  11. Stable isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botter, F.; Molinari, Ph.; Dirian, G.

    1964-01-01

    circulates. Studies are going forward to increase the separation factor of the cascade by using an auxiliary gas. Isotopic Exchange: A series of experiments has been performed to determine the isotopic separation factor between a lithium amalgam and an organic solvent containing a lithium salt. The various parameters which may enter into this exchange were studied: the influence of the type of solvent (the two solvents used were dimethylformamide and tetrahydrofurane), of the temperature, of the concentration and of the nature of the associated halogen. Solutions of Li metal and liquid NH 3 were studied also. A number of tests were carried out to see whether there was a difference between the isotopic compositions of the Li present in the two liquid layers obtained by the dissolution of Li metal in ammonia. No difference was observed between the Li isotopic ratios in the two phases. This was also true in the case of a layer of of Li in liquid NH 3 and a layer of Li I in a similar solvent. Electromigration: The method of counter current electro Migration in fused salts is a powerful isotopic enrichment technique. It can be used successfully to separate the isotopes of elements with strongly metallic character. In the case of alkalis, small quantities of isotopically pure 7 Li have been obtained, while the enrichment factors obtained for potassium are of the order of 10. With regard to the alkaline earths, it has been possible to produce small quantities of calcium enriched 5 times in 46 Ca. However considerable technological difficulties rise up in the way of production on a semi-industrial scale. (authors) [fr

  12. What can Fe stable isotopes tell us about magmas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausberg, Niklas

    The majority of the Earth’s crust is formed by magmas, and understanding their production and differentiation is important to interpret the geologic rock record. A powerful tool to investigate magmatic processes is the distribution of the stable isotopes of the major redox-sensitive element...... the differentiation of magmas from the perspective of Fe stable isotopes, integrated with petrology, by studying igneous rocks and their constituent phases (minerals and glasses) from the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, Thingmuli, Iceland, Pantelleria, Italy, and the Bishop Tuff, USA. The findings are interpreted...... and for more quantitative model of the magmatic processes producing enigmatic stable isotope compositions of rhyolitic and granite magmas....

  13. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an MRE? Is an MRE shelf stable? What foods are packaged in retort packages? What is aseptic ... type of package is used for aseptic processing? What foods are packaged in aseptic packages? Can I microwave ...

  14. Identification and characterization of stable membrane protein complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spelbrink, R.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Many membrane proteins exist as oligomers. Such oligomers play an important role in a broad variety of cellular processes such as ion transport, energy transduction, osmosensing and cell wall synthesis. We developed an electrophoresis-based method of identifying oligomeric membrane proteins that are

  15. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This classification becomes more effective on generalized flag manifolds, where the Lie algebra formalism and concrete integrability conditions describe in constructive terms the Chern classes of a vector bundle. ... Since deceased; Mathematics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA ...

  16. Polymeric nanocapsules ultra stable in complex biological media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar Adolfo; Jäger, Alessandro; Jäger, Eliezer; Štěpánek, Petr; Bologna Alles, A.; Guterres, S. S.; Pohlmann, A. R.; Brynda, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2011), s. 376-381 ISSN 0927-7765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA ČR GAP208/10/1600 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : core / shell nanocapsules * biodegradable * antifouling coating Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.456, year: 2011

  17. Stable complex solitary waves of Sasa Satsuma equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dispersion (TOD), self-steeping (SS) related to Kerr effect and the self frequency shifting via stimulated Raman scattering. It is the last term, which plays an important role in the propagation of distortionless optical pulses over a long distance. But the contribution from the last three terms becomes appreciable only for the very ...

  18. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  19. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  20. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  1. Tau hadronic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    From 64492 selected \\tau-pair events, produced at the Z^0 resonance, the measurement of the tau decays into hadrons from a global analysis using 1991, 1992 and 1993 ALEPH data is presented. Special emphasis is given to the reconstruction of photons and \\pi^0's, and the removal of fake photons. A detailed study of the systematics entering the \\pi^0 reconstruction is also given. A complete and consistent set of tau hadronic branching ratios is presented for 18 exclusive modes. Most measurements are more precise than the present world average. The new level of precision reached allows a stringent test of \\tau-\\mu universality in hadronic decays, g_\\tau/g_\\mu \\ = \\ 1.0013 \\ \\pm \\ 0.0095, and the first measurement of the vector and axial-vector contributions to the non-strange hadronic \\tau decay width: R_{\\tau ,V} \\ = \\ 1.788 \\ \\pm \\ 0.025 and R_{\\tau ,A} \\ = \\ 1.694 \\ \\pm \\ 0.027. The ratio (R_{\\tau ,V} - R_{\\tau ,A}) / (R_{\\tau ,V} + R_{\\tau ,A}), equal to (2.7 \\pm 1.3) \\ \\%, is a measure of the importance of Q...

  2. TATP isotope ratios as influenced by worldwide acetone variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howa, John D; Barnette, Janet E; Chesson, Lesley A; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2018-05-01

    Isotope ratio analysis has been shown to discriminate samples of forensic interest and to link many synthesized and natural materials to their precursors when traditional chemical and physical analyses cannot. Successful application of stable isotope analysis to chemicals of interest requires a background of likely variations in stable isotope ratios; often, this background population can be generated from analysis of possible precursors and the relationships of stable isotopes of precursor(s) to product(s), which may depend on synthesis techniques. Here we measured the carbon ( 13 C/ 12 C) and hydrogen ( 2 H/ 1 H) isotope ratios of the oft-illicitly manufactured explosive triacetone triperoxide, TATP, and one of its precursors, acetone. As acetone is the sole source of carbon and hydrogen to TATP, a survey of acetone from 12 countries was conducted to explore the breadth of 13 C/ 12 C and 2 H/ 1 H variation in the precursor, and therefore, its product. Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios were measured using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) techniques. We observed greater ranges in both C and H isotope ratios of acetone than previously published; we also found that country-of-purchase was a large contributing factor to the observed variation, larger than acetone grade and brand. Following clandestine production methods, we observed that the stable isotope ratios of TATP retained the stable isotope signatures of acetone used in synthesis. We confirmed the robustness of TATP carbon isotope ratios to both recrystallization and time-dependent sublimation, important considerations when faced with the task of practical sampling of potential unexploded TATP from a crime scene. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stable isotopic variation in tropical forest plants for applications in primatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Scott A; Rothman, Jessica M; Chritz, Kendra L; Cerling, Thure E

    2016-10-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a promising tool for investigating primate ecology although nuanced ecological applications remain challenging, in part due to the complex nature of isotopic variability in plant-animal systems. The aim of this study is to investigate sources of carbon and nitrogen isotopic variation at the base of primate food webs that reflect aspects of primate ecology. The majority of primates inhabit tropical forest ecosystems, which are dominated by C3 vegetation. We used stable isotope ratios in plants from Kibale National Park, Uganda, a well-studied closed-canopy tropical forest, to investigate sources of isotopic variation among C3 plants related to canopy stratification, leaf age, and plant part. Unpredictably, our results demonstrate that vertical stratification within the canopy does not explain carbon or nitrogen isotopic variation in leaves. Leaf age can be a significant source of isotopic variation, although the direction and magnitude of this difference is not consistent across tree species. Some plant parts are clearly differentiated in carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition, particularly leaves compared to non-photosynthetic parts such as reproductive parts and woody stem parts. Overall, variation in the isotopic composition of floral communities, plant species, and plant parts demonstrates that stable isotope studies must include analysis of local plant species and parts consumed by the primates under study from within the study area. Am. J. Primatol. 78:1041-1054, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Peak power ratio generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  5. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2014-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author)

  7. Stable isotope geochemistry: definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2015-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  8. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2012-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 89 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2008-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2016-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  12. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2013-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 91 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Assessing Sources of Human Methylmercury Exposure Using Stable Mercury Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Miling; Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new me...

  14. Theoretical Investigation of Inclusion Complex between Omeprazole Enantiomers and Carboxymethyl-β-Cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadji, S.; Sundari, C. D. D.; Ramdhani, M. A.; Umam, A. B. K.; Ivansyah, A. L.

    2018-01-01

    Host-guest inclusion complexes between R/S-Omeprazole (R/S-OME) enantiomers with Carboxymethyl-β-Cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) is proposed to predicts the separation of its enantiomers that considering the interaction energy and inclusion geometry. The inclusion complex structures were built into two orientations i.e. 1: 1 and 2: 1 as the ratio of host to guest. All structures were optimized by two methods i.e. molecular mechanic docking and quantum semi empiric PM3. Based on the value of binding energy obtained from the computational modelling, it was found that inclusion complex of S-Omeprazole with Carboxymethyl-β-Cyclodextrin (S-OME/CM-β-CD) is more stable than the inclusion complex of R-Omeprazole with Carboxymethyl-β-Cyclodextrin (R-OME/CM-β-CD). Moreover, R/S-Omeprazole can form stable inclusion complexes with Carboxymethyl-β-Cyclodextrin by the ratio of host: guest equal to 2: 1. Other thermodynamic parameter values, i.e. Enthalpy (ΔH), Entropy (ΔS), and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) show that the inclusion complex of S-OME/CM-β-CD is more exothermic, more spontaneous, and preferably formed when compared to inclusion complex of R-OME/CM-β-CD. In addition, the formation of the R/S-OME inclusion complex with Carboxymethyl-β-Cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) is an enthalpy driven process based on these values.

  15. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  16. Non-traditional Stable Isotope Systematics of Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O. J.

    2009-05-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges is one of the fundamental processes controlling the chemistry of the oceans and the altered oceanic crust. Past studies have demonstrated the complexity and diversity of seafloor hydrothermal systems and have highlighted the importance of subsurface environments in controlling the composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralization types. Traditionally, the behavior of metals in seafloor hydrothermal systems have been investigated by integrating results from laboratory studies, theoretical models, mineralogy and fluid and mineral chemistry. Isotope ratios of various metals and metalloids, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Sb have recently provided new approaches for the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. Despite these initial investigations, the cause of the isotopic variability of these elements remains poorly constrained. We have little understanding of the isotope variations between vent types (black or white smokers) as well as the influence of source rock composition (basalt, felsic or ultrabasic rocks) and alteration types. Here, I will review and present new results of metal isotope systematics of seafloor hydrothermal systems, in particular: (1) determination of empirical isotope fractionation factors for Zn, Fe and Cu-isotopes through isotopic analysis of mono-mineralic sulfide grains lining the internal chimney wall in contact with hydrothermal fluid; (2) comparison of Fe- and Cu-isotope signatures of vent fluids from mid- oceanic and back-arc hydrothermal fields, spanning wide ranges of pH, temperature, metal concentrations and contributions of magmatic fluids enriched in SO2. Ultimately, the use of complementary non-traditional stable isotope systems may help identify and constrain the complex interactions between fluids,minerals, and organisms in seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  17. STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY OF MASSIVE ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurij K. Vasil’chuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises stable-isotope research on massive ice in the Russian and North American Arctic, and includes the latest understanding of massive-ice formation. A new classification of massive-ice complexes is proposed, encompassing the range and variabilityof massive ice. It distinguishes two new categories of massive-ice complexes: homogeneousmassive-ice complexes have a similar structure, properties and genesis throughout, whereasheterogeneous massive-ice complexes vary spatially (in their structure and properties andgenetically within a locality and consist of two or more homogeneous massive-ice bodies.Analysis of pollen and spores in massive ice from Subarctic regions and from ice and snow cover of Arctic ice caps assists with interpretation of the origin of massive ice. Radiocarbon ages of massive ice and host sediments are considered together with isotope values of heavy oxygen and deuterium from massive ice plotted at a uniform scale in order to assist interpretation and correlation of the ice.

  18. From Fibonacci Sequence to the Golden Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fiorenza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the well-known characterization of the Golden ratio as limit of the ratio of consecutive terms of the Fibonacci sequence, and we give an explanation of this property in the framework of the Difference Equations Theory. We show that the Golden ratio coincides with this limit not because it is the root with maximum modulus and multiplicity of the characteristic polynomial, but, from a more general point of view, because it is the root with maximum modulus and multiplicity of a restricted set of roots, which in this special case coincides with the two roots of the characteristic polynomial. This new perspective is the heart of the characterization of the limit of ratio of consecutive terms of all linear homogeneous recurrences with constant coefficients, without any assumption on the roots of the characteristic polynomial, which may be, in particular, also complex and not real.

  19. Energy Profit Ratio Compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    We need more oil energy to take out oil under the ground. Limit resources make us consider other candidates of energy source instead of oil. Electricity shall be the main role more and more like electric vehicles and air conditioners so we should consider electricity generation ways. When we consider what kind of electric power generation is the best or suitable, we should not only power generation plant but whole process from mining to power generation. It is good way to use EPR, Energy Profit Ratio, to analysis which type is more efficient and which part is to do research and development when you see the input breakdown analysis. Electricity by the light water nuclear power plant, the hydrogen power plant and the geothermal power plant are better candidates from EPR analysis. Forecasting the world primly energy supply in 2050, it is said that the demand will be double of the demand in 2000 and the supply will not be able to satisfy the demand in 2050. We should save 30% of the demand and increase nuclear power plants 3.5 times more and recyclable energy like hydropower plants 3 times more. When the nuclear power plants are 3.5 times more then uranium peak will come and we will need breed uranium. I will analysis the EPR of FBR. Conclusion: A) the EPR of NPS in Japan is 17.4 and it is the best of all. B) Many countries will introduce new nuclear power plants rapidly may be 3.5 times in 2050. C) Uranium peak will happen around 2050. (author)

  20. Stable isotope views on ecosystem function: challenging or challenged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resco, Víctor; Querejeta, José I.; Ogle, Kiona; Voltas, Jordi; Sebastià, Maria-Teresa; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Linares, Juan C.; Moreno-Gutiérrez, Cristina; Herrero, Asier; Carreira, José A.; Torres-Cañabate, Patricia; Valladares, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotopes and their potential for detecting various and complex ecosystem processes are attracting an increasing number of scientists. Progress is challenging, particularly under global change scenarios, but some established views have been challenged. The IX meeting of the Spanish Association of Terrestrial Ecology (AAET, Úbeda, 18–22 October 2009) hosted a symposium on the ecology of stable isotopes where the linear mixing model approach of partitioning sinks and sources of carbon and water fluxes within an ecosystem was challenged, and new applications of stable isotopes for the study of plant interactions were evaluated. Discussion was also centred on the need for networks that monitor ecological processes using stable isotopes and key ideas for fostering future research with isotopes. PMID:20015858

  1. Uniform Silicon Isotope Ratios Across the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Nathaniel N.; Morris, Mark R.; Young, Edward D.

    2017-04-01

    We report the relative abundances of the three stable isotopes of silicon, 28Si, 29Si, and 30Si, across the Galaxy using the v=0,J=1\\to 0 transition of silicon monoxide. The chosen sources represent a range in Galactocentric radii ({R}{GC}) from 0 to 9.8 kpc. The high spectral resolution and sensitivity afforded by the Green Bank Telescope permit isotope ratios to be corrected for optical depths. The optical-depth-corrected data indicate that the secondary-to-primary silicon isotope ratios {}29{Si}{/}28{Si} and {}30{Si}{/}28{Si} vary much less than predicted on the basis of other stable isotope ratio gradients across the Galaxy. Indeed, there is no detectable variation in Si isotope ratios with {R}{GC}. This lack of an isotope ratio gradient stands in stark contrast to the monotonically decreasing trend with {R}{GC} exhibited by published secondary-to-primary oxygen isotope ratios. These results, when considered in the context of the expectations for chemical evolution, suggest that the reported oxygen isotope ratio trends, and perhaps those for carbon as well, require further investigation. The methods developed in this study for SiO isotopologue ratio measurements are equally applicable to Galactic oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen isotope ratio measurements, and should prove useful for future observations of these isotope systems.

  2. Effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste. Part 3, Distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, Pu, and Am onto 33 absorbers from four variations of a 3:1 dilution of Hanford complexant concentrate (CC) simulant: Part 4, The effects of varying dilution ratios on the distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, Pu, and Am onto 12 absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at USDOE facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions during decades of storage. Objective of this study was to measure effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on sorption of Sr, Cs, Tc, Pu and Am onto 33 absorbers that in the absence of these organic compounds offer high sorption of these elements. The elements were in a generic simulant for Hanford complexant concentrate supernate that initially contained six organic complexants: EDTA, HEDTA, NTA, citrate, gluconate, and iminodiacetate. This simulant was tested as prepared and after gamma-irradiation to approximately 34 Mrads. Two other variations consisted of the unirradiated and irradiated simulants after treatment at 450C and 15,000 psi in a hydrothermal organic-destruction process. These experiments were conducted with a 3:1 water-to-simulant dilution of each of the four simulant variations. To determine effects of varying dilution ratios on the sorption of these five elements from the unirradiated and gamma-irradiated simulants that were not treated with the hydrothermal process, we measured their distribution from a 1:1 dilution, using 1 M NaOH as the diluent, onto the 12 best-performing absorbers. We then measured the sorption of these five elements from solutions having diluent-simulant ratios of 0, 0.5, 2.0, and 3.0 onto the three absorbers that performed best for sorbing Sr, Pu and Am from the 1:1 dilution. For each of 900 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients (Kd values) twice for each period for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about absorber stability and sorption kinetics. The 5400 measured Kd values indicate that the sorption of Sr, Pu, and Am is significantly decreased by the organic complexants in these simulant solutions, whereas the sorption of Cs and Tc is much less affected.

  3. Radiation-stable polyolefin compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekers, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions of olefinic polymers suitable for high energy radiation treatment. In particular, the invention relates to olefinic polymer compositions that are stable to sterilizing dosages of high energy radiation such as a gamma radiation. Stabilizers are described that include benzhydrol and benzhydrol derivatives; these stabilizers may be used alone or in combination with secondary antioxidants or synergists

  4. Monitoring of stable glaucoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Holtzer-Goor (Kim); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); H.G. Lemij (Hans); T. Plochg; E. van Sprundel (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA high workload for ophthalmologists and long waiting lists for patients challenge the organization of ophthalmic care. Tasks that require less specialized skills, like the monitoring of stable (well controlled) glaucoma patients could be substituted from ophthalmologists to other

  5. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  6. Application of stable isotope to breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yasuto

    1988-01-01

    Needles to say, radioisotopes have good characteristics as a tracer for examining biological functions. In fact, scyntigraphy is widely used over Japan. It is true, however, that there are some difficulties in applying radioisotopes to humans. Thus, greater attention began to be attracted to stable isotopes in the late 1960s, because these substances can be used for infants and pregnant women. They can be stored for a long period of time since they do not suffer damping as in the case of radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a tracer, stable isotopes can provide structural-chemical information including the position of isotope labels, and the mass and atomic composition of fragment ions. Such techniques as NMR spectroscopy is employed for this purpose. The method is currently used to perform examinations of congenital metabolic disorders. The carbon isotopes of 13 C and 14 C are used for breath test. Compounds labeled with these isotopes are administered and their ratio to the total CO 2 in breath is measured to diagnose diseases. In the early 1970s, 13 C has come into use for breath test. Similar breath test is applied to diagnosis of the bacterial overgrowth syndrome and ileal dysfunction syndrome. (Nogami, K.)

  7. Incorporating stable isotopes into a multidisciplinary framework to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through its ability to address complex ecological questions and the possibility of analysing large sample sizes to understand population-level processes, the use of stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) has grown rapidly in recent years. Importantly, it is now becoming an accepted tool to derive data for conservation and ...

  8. Copper stable isotopes to trace copper behavior in wetland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2014-05-20

    Wetlands are reactive zones of the landscape that can sequester metals released by industrial and agricultural activities. Copper (Cu) stable isotope ratios (δ(65)Cu) have recently been used as tracers of transport and transformation processes in polluted environments. Here, we used Cu stable isotopes to trace the behavior of Cu in a stormwater wetland receiving runoff from a vineyard catchment (Alsace, France). The Cu loads and stable isotope ratios were determined in the dissolved phase, suspended particulate matter (SPM), wetland sediments, and vegetation. The wetland retained >68% of the dissolved Cu and >92% of the SPM-bound Cu, which represented 84.4% of the total Cu in the runoff. The dissolved Cu became depleted in (65)Cu when passing through the wetland (Δ(65)Cuinlet-outlet from 0.03‰ to 0.77‰), which reflects Cu adsorption to aluminum minerals and organic matter. The δ(65)Cu values varied little in the wetland sediments (0.04 ± 0.10‰), which stored >96% of the total Cu mass within the wetland. During high-flow conditions, the Cu flowing out of the wetland became isotopically lighter, indicating the mobilization of reduced Cu(I) species from the sediments and Cu reduction within the sediments. Our results demonstrate that the Cu stable isotope ratios may help trace Cu behavior in redox-dynamic environments such as wetlands.

  9. Arterial-alveolar oxygen partial pressure ratio: a theoretical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, J P; Percival, C J; Annat, G; Rousselet, B; Motin, J

    1986-02-01

    The relationship between the arterial-alveolar oxygen partial pressure ratio (PaO2/PAO2) and different fractions of inspired oxygen (FIO2) was studied using a bicompartmental computer model. PaO2/PAO2 was found to be less stable than in previous clinical works probably because the venous admixture varied with changes in the FIO2.

  10. Climatic and geographical dependence of the H, C and O stable isotope ratios of Italian wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camin, Federica; Dordevic, Nikola; Wehrens, Ron; Neteler, Markus; Delucchi, Luca; Postma, Geert; Buydens, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Correlation matrix between (D/H) 1 , (D/H) 2 , δ 13 C and δ 18 O parameters of wine (4000 samples) and the climatic and geographical characteristics of the areas of origin. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between wine isotopic data and climate and geography. • We considered (D/H) 1 , (D/H) 2 and δ 13 C of ethanol and δ 18 O of water of 4000 wines. • δ 18 O, followed by (D/H) 1 , had the strongest relationship with climate and location. • The dominant variables were latitude, δ 18 O and δ 2 H of precipitation and temperature. • Relationships and models may be used to predict the isotopic composition of wine. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the relationship between (D/H) 1, (D/H) 2 and δ 13 C of ethanol and δ 18 O of water in wine, and variables describing the climate and the geography of the production area, using exploratory visualisation tools, regression analysis and linear modelling. For the first time, a large amount of data (around 4000 wine samples collected over 11 years in Italy) and all the official isotopic parameters, as well as a large number of significant climatic and geographical descriptors (date of harvest, latitude, longitude, elevation, distance from the sea, amount of precipitation, maximum daily temperature, minimum daily temperature, mean daily temperature, δ 18 O and δ 2 H of precipitation) were considered. δ 18 O, followed by (D/H) 1 , was shown to have the strongest relationship with climate and location. The dominant variables were latitude, with a negative relationship, δ 18 O and δ 2 H of precipitation and temperature, both with positive relationships. The identified correlations and models could be used to predict the isotopic composition of authentic wines, offering increased possibilities for detecting fraud and mislabelling

  11. Niche differentiation among neotropical soldierless soil-feeding termites revealed by stable isotope ratios

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bourguignon, T.; Šobotník, Jan; Lepoint, G.; Martin, J. M.; Roisin, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2009), s. 2038-2043 ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Anoplotermes * Termitidae * Isoptera * resource partitioning Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.978, year: 2009

  12. Assessing diet in savanna herbivores using stable carbon isotope ratios of faeces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Codron

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In African savannas, browse-based resources (@3 plants are isotopically distinct from grasses (@4 plants. The carbon isotopic composition of the basic plant diet is recorded in animal tissues. Mammal faeces are a readily accessible, non-invasive, sample material for temporally resolved dietary reconstructions. Faeces, however, include both undigested plant matter and waste, hence accuracy of dietary calculations could potentially be compromised by shifts in plant isotopic values related to seasonal or spatial differences, or by variability in the isotopic differences between faeces and diet. A controlled feeding study of four ungulate species showed a small, consistent difference between diet and faeces of-0.9 o, irrespective of whether the diet was @3 or C4-based. Results from faeces oftaxa known to be pure grazers, pure browsers, and mixed-feeders from the Kruger National Park were entirely consistent with their diets, but the accuracy of dietary reconstructions is enhanced with data from local plant communities.

  13. Measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons and halocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderweg, A.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831980

    2012-01-01

    Within the realm of volatile organic compounds, hydrocarbons and halocarbons form a sizable proportion of carbon input to the atmosphere. Within these compound categories, the light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC, two to seven carbon atoms) and monocarbon halocarbons have a special place as these

  14. Climatic and geographical dependence of the H, C and O stable isotope ratios of Italian wine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camin, Federica, E-mail: federica.camin@fmach.it [Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, via Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all' Adige (Italy); Dordevic, Nikola [Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, via Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all' Adige (Italy); Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wehrens, Ron; Neteler, Markus; Delucchi, Luca [Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, via Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all' Adige (Italy); Postma, Geert; Buydens, Lutgarde [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Correlation matrix between (D/H){sub 1}, (D/H){sub 2}, δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 18}O parameters of wine (4000 samples) and the climatic and geographical characteristics of the areas of origin. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between wine isotopic data and climate and geography. • We considered (D/H){sub 1}, (D/H){sub 2} and δ{sup 13}C of ethanol and δ{sup 18}O of water of 4000 wines. • δ{sup 18}O, followed by (D/H){sub 1}, had the strongest relationship with climate and location. • The dominant variables were latitude, δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H of precipitation and temperature. • Relationships and models may be used to predict the isotopic composition of wine. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the relationship between (D/H){sub 1,} (D/H){sub 2} and δ{sup 13}C of ethanol and δ{sup 18}O of water in wine, and variables describing the climate and the geography of the production area, using exploratory visualisation tools, regression analysis and linear modelling. For the first time, a large amount of data (around 4000 wine samples collected over 11 years in Italy) and all the official isotopic parameters, as well as a large number of significant climatic and geographical descriptors (date of harvest, latitude, longitude, elevation, distance from the sea, amount of precipitation, maximum daily temperature, minimum daily temperature, mean daily temperature, δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H of precipitation) were considered. δ{sup 18}O, followed by (D/H){sub 1}, was shown to have the strongest relationship with climate and location. The dominant variables were latitude, with a negative relationship, δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H of precipitation and temperature, both with positive relationships. The identified correlations and models could be used to predict the isotopic composition of authentic wines, offering increased possibilities for detecting fraud and mislabelling.

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratios of lipid biomarkers and their applications in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolosa, I.; Mora, S. de

    2001-01-01

    Studies on the distribution of lipid biomarkers in the environment help elucidate biogeochemical processes, but recent findings have significantly reduced the specificity of some biomarkers. The analytical development of Gas Chromatography-Combustion-IRMS (GC-C-IRMS) allows the determination of the δ 13 C of specific biomarkers, thereby improving the veracity of source apportionment. In this report, we present a brief description of the analytical approach for sample preparation and carbon isotope measurements of individual biomarkers. Selected examples of the applications in the use of GC-C-IRMS for biomarker source elucidation in the marine environment and potential applications to paleoclimatological studies are reviewed. (author)

  16. A universal carbonate ion effect on stable oxygen isotope ratios in unicellular planktonic calcifying organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ziveri, P.; Thoms, S.; Probert, I.; Geisen, M.; Langer, H.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of calcium carbonate of planktonic calcifying organisms is a key tool for reconstructing both past seawater temperature and salinity. The calibration of paloeceanographic proxies relies in general on empirical relationships derived from field experiments on extant species. Laboratory experiments have more often than not revealed that variables other than the target parameter influence the proxy signal, which makes proxy c...

  17. Stable isotope ratio measurements on highly enriched water samples by means of laser spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Trigt, R; Kerstel, E.R.T.; Visser, GH; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using laser spectrometry (LS) to analyze isotopically highly enriched water samples (i.e., delta H-2 less than or equal to 15000 parts per thousand, delta O-18 less than or equal to 1200 parts per thousand), as often used in the biomedical doubly labeled water (DLW)

  18. Stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of sinking particles and sediments from the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaye-Haake, G.; Lahajnar, N.; Emeis, K.-Ch.; Unger, D; Rixen, T.; Suthhof, A.; Ramaswamy, V.; Schulz, H.; Paropkari, A.L.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Ittekkot, V.

    (15)N values in Arabian Sea particulate matter and surface sediments. Delta sup(15)N minima in the northern Bay of Bengal are caused by input of terrestrial organic matter as well as depleted nitrate from rivers. Delta sup(15)N is about 8 ppt...

  19. Mechanisms behind the stabilizing action of cellulose nanofibrils in wet-stable cellulose foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervin, Nicholas Tchang; Johansson, Erik; Benjamins, Jan-Willem; Wågberg, Lars

    2015-03-09

    The principal purpose of the investigation was to clarify the mechanisms behind the stabilizing action of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) in wet-stable cellulose foams. Following the basic theories for particle-stabilized foams, the investigation was focused on how the surface energy of the stabilizing CNF particles, their aspect ratio and charge density, and the concentration of CNF particles at the air-water interface affect the foam stability and the mechanical properties of a particle-stabilized air-liquid interface. The foam stability was evaluated from how the foam height changed over time, and the mechanical properties of the interface were evaluated as the complex viscoelastic modulus of the interface using the pendant drop method. The most important results and conclusions are that CNFs can be used as stabilizing particles for aqueous foams already at a concentration as low as 5 g/L. The major reasons for this were the small dimensions of the CNF and their high aspect ratio, which is important for gel-formation and the complex viscoelastic modulus of the particle-filled air-water interface. The influence of the aspect ratio was also demonstrated by a much higher foam stability of foams stabilized with CNFs than of foams stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) with the same chemical composition. The charge density of the CNFs affects the level of liberation within larger aggregates and hence also the number of contact points at the interface and the gel formation and complex viscoelastic modulus of the air-water interface. The charges also result in a disjoining pressure related to the long-range repulsive electrostatic pressure between particle-stabilized bubbles and hence contribute to foam stability.

  20. BASIN TCP Stable Isotope Composition of CO2 in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports stable isotope ratio data of CO2 (13C/12C and 18O/16O) associated with photosynthetic and respiratory exchanges across the...

  1. LBA-ECO CD-02 Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen Stable Isotopes in Organic Material, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports the measurement of stable carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotope ratios in organic material (plant, litter and soil samples) in forest canopy...

  2. LBA-ECO CD-02 Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen Stable Isotopes in Organic Material, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports the measurement of stable carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotope ratios in organic material (plant, litter and soil samples) in forest...

  3. BASIN TCP Stable Isotope Composition of CO2 in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports stable isotope ratio data of CO2 (13C/12C and 18O/16O) associated with photosynthetic and respiratory exchanges across the biosphere-atmosphere...

  4. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (BRAZIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  5. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (URUGUAY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  6. Do stable carbon isotopes of brown coal woods record changes in Lower Miocene palaeoecology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole, I.J.; Dolezych, M.; Kool, J.; Burgh, J. van der; Bergen, P.F. van

    2006-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of fossil wood from the Miocene brown coal deposits in former East Germany are compared with palaeobotanical and sedimentological data to test the use of stable isotopes in determining palaeoenvironment. Significant differences in the chemical composition of samples

  7. Toward Practical Secure Stable Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazi M. Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stable Matching (SM algorithm has been deployed in many real-world scenarios including the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP and financial applications such as matching of suppliers and consumers in capital markets. Since these applications typically involve highly sensitive information such as the underlying preference lists, their current implementations rely on trusted third parties. This paper introduces the first provably secure and scalable implementation of SM based on Yao’s garbled circuit protocol and Oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our scheme can securely compute a stable match for 8k pairs four orders of magnitude faster than the previously best known method. We achieve this by introducing a compact and efficient sub-linear size circuit. We even further decrease the computation cost by three orders of magnitude by proposing a novel technique to avoid unnecessary iterations in the SM algorithm. We evaluate our implementation for several problem sizes and plan to publish it as open-source.

  8. Towards stable acceleration in LINACS

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A D

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-stable and -reproducible high-energy particle beams with short bunches are needed in novel linear accelerators and, in particular, in the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. A passive beam phase stabilization system based on a bunch compression with a negative transfer matrix element R56 and acceleration at a positive off-crest phase is proposed. The motivation and expected advantages of the proposed scheme are outlined.

  9. Analytical system for stable carbon isotope measurements of low molecular weight (C2-C6 hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present setup, testing and initial results from a new automated system for stable carbon isotope ratio measurements on C2 to C6 atmospheric hydrocarbons. The inlet system allows analysis of trace gases from air samples ranging from a few liters for urban samples and samples with high mixing ratios, to many tens of liters for samples from remote unpolluted regions with very low mixing ratios. The centerpiece of the sample preparation is the separation trap, which is used to separate CO2 and methane from the compounds of interest. The main features of the system are (i the capability to sample up to 300 l of air, (ii long term (since May 2009 operational δ13C accuracy levels in the range 0.3–0.8 ‰ (1-σ, and (iii detection limits of order 1.5–2.5 ngC (collected amount of substance for all reported compounds. The first application of this system was the analysis of 21 ambient air samples taken during 48 h in August 2009 in Utrecht, the Netherlands. Results obtained are generally in good agreement with those from similar urban ambient air studies. Short sample intervals allowed by the design of the instrument help to illustrate the complex diurnal behavior of hydrocarbons in an urban environment, where diverse sources, dynamical processes, and chemical reactions are present.

  10. Properties of aqueous dispersion of chitosan and chondroitin sulfate complex derived from aquatic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikov V. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of production of chondroitin sulfate, chitosan and polyelectrolyte complexes based on them received from the local marine raw materials is relevant from the point of view of developing a comprehensive waste-free technology for natural raw materials processing. The objects of study are chitosan derived from the shell of the Kamchatka crab Paralithodes camtschaticus and chondroitin sulfate derived from cartilage of salmon Salmon salar. To determine the surface tension of polyelectrolyte complex solutions and dispersions the Wilhelmy method has been used, the effective radius of particle dispersion has been calculated by light scattering, measurements of effective viscosity have been carried out under shear deformation. The conditions of formation, surface and rheological properties of the chitosan and chondroitin sulfate complex extracted from aquatic organisms in the Barents Sea have been studied. Obtaining conditions and molar ratios of these polyelectrolytes in which the aqueous dispersion of the complex remains stable for a long time have been established. It has been found that by addition of chondroitin sulfate solution to chitosan solution in molar ratios of 1 : 3; 1 : 6 the dispersion of the polyelectrolyte complex stable for 2 to 3 days has been formed. The polyelectrolyte complex dispersions behave as non-Newtonian pseudoplastic liquid. When the molar ratio of the mixed solution is 1 : 1 (regardless of the sequence of mixing suspension of the polyelectrolyte complex has been formed, then there is precipitation. Equilibrium surface tension of the aqueous dispersion of the polyelectrolyte complex is higher than that of solutions of chondroitin sulfate and chitosan. The effective radius of particles in the complex dispersion has been determined. The effective radius of the particles in the complex dispersion depends on the molar ratio of chondroitin sulfate : chitosan. A qualitative scheme of formation of polyelectrolyte

  11. Metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Jan G

    2015-03-03

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals in natural systems is often accompanied by stable isotope fractionation which can now be measured due to recent analytical advances. In consequence, a new research field has emerged over the last two decades, complementing the traditional stable isotope systems (H, C, O, N, S) with many more elements across the periodic table (Li, B, Mg, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, W, Pt, Hg, Tl, U) which are being explored and potentially applicable as novel geochemical tracers. This review presents the application of metal stable isotopes as source and process tracers in environmental studies, in particular by using mixing and Rayleigh model approaches. The most important concepts of mass-dependent and mass-independent metal stable isotope fractionation are introduced, and the extent of natural isotopic variations for different elements is compared. A particular focus lies on a discussion of processes (redox transformations, complexation, sorption, precipitation, dissolution, evaporation, diffusion, biological cycling) which are able to induce metal stable isotope fractionation in environmental systems. Additionally, the usefulness and limitations of metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry are discussed and future perspectives presented.

  12. Application of enriched stable isotopes as tracers in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stürup, Stefan; Hansen, Helle Rüsz; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The application of enriched stable isotopes of minerals and trace elements as tracers in biological systems is a rapidly growing research field that benefits from the many new developments in inorganic mass spectrometric instrumentation, primarily within inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry...... (ICP-MS) instrumentation, such as reaction/collision cell ICP-MS and multicollector ICP-MS with improved isotope ratio measurement and interference removal capabilities. Adaptation and refinement of radioisotope tracer experiment methodologies for enriched stable isotope experiments......, and the development of new methodologies coupled with more advanced compartmental and mathematical models for the distribution of elements in living organisms has enabled a broader use of enriched stable isotope experiments in the biological sciences. This review discusses the current and future uses of enriched...

  13. High precision and stable structures for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Da Mota Silva, S; Hauviller, Claude

    1999-01-01

    The central detectors used in High Energy Physics Experiments require the use of light and stable structures capable of supporting delicate and precise radiation detection elements. These structures need to be highly stable under environmental conditions where external vibrations, high radiation levels, temperature and humidity gradients should be taken into account. Their main design drivers are high dimension and dynamic stability, high stiffness to mass ratio and large radiation length. For most applications, these constraints lead us to choose Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics ( CFRP) as structural element. The construction of light and stable structures with CFRP for these applications can be achieved by careful design engineering and further confirmation at the prototyping phase. However, the experimental environment can influence their characteristics and behavior. In this case, theuse of adaptive structures could become a solution for this problem. We are studying structures in CFRP with bonded piezoel...

  14. Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, A., E-mail: anton.wallner@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights (Australia); Melber, K. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Ott, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Joh.-J.-Becherweg 27, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-15

    Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of {sup 198}Pt/{sup 195}Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction.

  15. Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.; Melber, K.; Merchel, S.; Ott, U.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of 198 Pt/ 195 Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction.

  16. Stable Hemiaminals: 2-Aminopyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kwiecień

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stable hemiaminals can be obtained in the one-pot reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine and nitrobenzaldehyde derivatives. Ten new hemiaminals have been obtained, six of them in crystal state. The molecular stability of these intermediates results from the presence of both electron-withdrawing nitro groups as substituents on the phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring, so no further stabilisation by intramolecular interaction is required. Hemiaminal molecules possess a tetrahedral carbon atom constituting a stereogenic centre. As the result of crystallisation in centrosymmetric space groups both enantiomers are present in the crystal structure.

  17. Organic synthesis with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daub, G.H.; Kerr, V.N.; Williams, D.L.; Whaley, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Some general considerations concerning organic synthesis with stable isotopes are presented. Illustrative examples are described and discussed. The examples include DL-2-amino-3-methyl- 13 C-butanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-valine- 13 C 3 ); methyl oleate-1- 13 C; thymine-2,6- 13 C 2 ; 2-aminoethanesulfonic- 13 C acid (taurine- 13 C); D-glucose-6- 13 C; DL-2-amino-3-methylpentanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-isoleucine- 13 C 2 ); benzidine- 15 N 2 ; and 4-ethylsulfonyl-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide- 15 N

  18. Stable agents for imaging investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofe, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns highly stable compounds useful in preparing technetium 99m based scintiscanning exploration agents. The compounds of this invention include a pertechnetate reducing agent or a solution of oxidized pertechnetate and an efficient proportion, sufficient to stabilize the compounds in the presence of oxygen and of radiolysis products, of ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of this acid. The invention also concerns a perfected process for preparing a technetium based exploration agent, consisting in codissolving the ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of such an acid and a pertechnetate reducing agent in a solution of oxidized pertechnetate [fr

  19. Canonical, stable, general mapping using context schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Adam M; Rosen, Yohei; Haussler, David; Paten, Benedict

    2015-11-15

    Sequence mapping is the cornerstone of modern genomics. However, most existing sequence mapping algorithms are insufficiently general. We introduce context schemes: a method that allows the unambiguous recognition of a reference base in a query sequence by testing the query for substrings from an algorithmically defined set. Context schemes only map when there is a unique best mapping, and define this criterion uniformly for all reference bases. Mappings under context schemes can also be made stable, so that extension of the query string (e.g. by increasing read length) will not alter the mapping of previously mapped positions. Context schemes are general in several senses. They natively support the detection of arbitrary complex, novel rearrangements relative to the reference. They can scale over orders of magnitude in query sequence length. Finally, they are trivially extensible to more complex reference structures, such as graphs, that incorporate additional variation. We demonstrate empirically the existence of high-performance context schemes, and present efficient context scheme mapping algorithms. The software test framework created for this study is available from https://registry.hub.docker.com/u/adamnovak/sequence-graphs/. anovak@soe.ucsc.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. 26 S proteasomes function as stable entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Tanaka, Keiji

    2002-01-01

    , shuttles between a free state and the 26-S proteasome, bringing substrate to the complex. However, S5a was not found in the free state in HeLa cells. Besides, all subunits in PA700, including S5a, exchanged at similar low rates. It therefore seems that 26-S proteasomes function as stable entities during...... dissociate and reassemble during initiation of protein degradation in a ternary complex with the substrate, as in the dissociation-reassembly cycles found for ribosomes and the chaperonin GroEL/GroES. Here we followed disassembly and assembly of 26-S proteasomes in cell extracts as the exchange of PA700...... subunits between mouse and human 26-S proteasomes. Compared to the rate of proteolysis in the same extract, the disassembly-reassembly cycle was much too slow to present an obligatory step in a degradation cycle. It has been suggested that subunit S5a (Mcb1, Rpn10), which binds poly-ubiquitin substrates...

  1. Stable isotope utilization for research on human nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjeux, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of nutritional molecule metabolism research, this paper presents the various stable isotopes used as labels for biological molecules, the reasons for their application in human nutritional study (mainly because of their non toxicity) and the various analysis methods (isotope ratio mass spectrometry, coupled gaseous chromatography and mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance). Several application examples in nutrition research are then discussed: metabolic conversion measurement for a molecule into its different metabolites, energetic losses. 23 refs

  2. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  3. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  4. Stable cosmology in chameleon bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji; Oliosi, Michele; Watanabe, Yota

    2018-02-01

    The recently proposed chameleonic extension of bigravity theory, by including a scalar field dependence in the graviton potential, avoids several fine-tunings found to be necessary in usual massive bigravity. In particular it ensures that the Higuchi bound is satisfied at all scales, that no Vainshtein mechanism is needed to satisfy Solar System experiments, and that the strong coupling scale is always above the scale of cosmological interest all the way up to the early Universe. This paper extends the previous work by presenting a stable example of cosmology in the chameleon bigravity model. We find a set of initial conditions and parameters such that the derived stability conditions on general flat Friedmann background are satisfied at all times. The evolution goes through radiation-dominated, matter-dominated, and de Sitter eras. We argue that the parameter space allowing for such a stable evolution may be large enough to encompass an observationally viable evolution. We also argue that our model satisfies all known constraints due to gravitational wave observations so far and thus can be considered as a unique testing ground of gravitational wave phenomenologies in bimetric theories of gravity.

  5. Laboratory and field methods for stable isotope analysis in human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsema, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA; carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen) of human tissues offers a means for assessing diet among living humans. Stable isotope ratios of broad categories of food and drink food vary systematically, and stable isotope ratios in consumer tissues represent a composite of the isotopic ratios of food and drink consumed during an individual's life. Isotopic evidence for diet is independent of errors in informant recall, and accrues during time periods when researchers are absent. Beyond diet reconstruction, tissue stable isotope ratios are sensitive to excursions from homeostasis, such as starvation and rapid growth. Because of their relationship to diet, geographic location, hydration, and nutritional status, stable isotope signatures in human tissues offer a window into human biocultural adaptations, past and present. This article describes methods for SIA that may be usefully applied in studies of living humans, with emphasis placed on carbon and nitrogen. Some of the ecological, physiological, and evolutionary applications of stable isotope data among living humans are discussed. By incorporating SIA in research, human biologists facilitate a productive dialog with bioarchaeologists, who routinely use stable isotope evidence, mingling different perspectives on human biology and behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Formation of Polyelectrolyte Complex Colloid Particles between Chitosan and Pectin with Different Degree of Esterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Sun, Hongyuan; He, Jieyu

    2017-12-01

    The effects of degree of esterification, pectin/chitosan ratio and pH on the formation of polyelectrolyte complex colloid particles between chitosan (CS) and pectin (PE) were investigated. Low methoxyl pectin (LPE) was achieved by de-esterifying high methoxyl pectin (HPE) with pectin methyl esterase. Turbidity titration and colorimetric method was used to determine the stability of complex colloid particles. The structure and morphology of complex particles were characterized by FTIR and TEM. When pectin solution was dropped into chitosan solution, complex colloidal dispersion was stable as PE/CS mass ratio was no more than 3:2. Colloidal particles of HPE-CS complex coagulated at larger ratio of PE/CS than LPE-CS. The maximum complex occurred at pH 6.1 for HPE-CS and pH 5.7 for LPE-CS, and decreasing pH leaded to the dissociation of complex particles. Electrostatic interactions between carboxyl groups on pectin and amino groups on chitosan were confirmed by FTIR. Colloidal particle sizes ranged from about 100 nm to 400 nm with spherical shape.

  7. Synthesis and catalytic properties of a heterogeneous palladium-polymer complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasadkina, E.N.; Rozhdestvenskaya, I.D.

    1978-05-01

    By reacting a copolymer of 2-dimethylamino-1-butyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate (10:6 weight ratio) with an aqueous ethanol solution of potassium palladochloride at 25/sup 0/C and 19% Pd-polymer weight ratio, a cross-linked polymeric complex with 4-15% Pd was obtained, containing a coordinationally unsaturated nitrogen atom in a side chain and one chlorine ion per gram-atom of palladium; it was thermally stable up to > 400/sup 0/C and insoluble in organic solvents. In contrast to the previously studied palladium-polyamide complex, this complex showed high catalytic activities in hydrogenation at ambient conditions of unsaturated carboxylic acids and their esters, unsaturated hydrocarbons, Schiff bases, and aromatic nitrocompounds dissolved in polar solvents, including selective hydrogenation of dienes to monoolefins.

  8. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-09-01

    The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is important for quite different application fields (e.g. for isotope ratio measurements of stable isotopes in nature, especially for the investigation of isotope variation in nature or age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic elements in the nuclear industry, quality assurance of fuel material, for reprocessing plants, nuclear material accounting and radioactive waste control, for tracer experiments using stable isotopes or long-lived radionuclides in biological or medical studies). Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which used to be the dominant analytical technique for precise isotope ratio measurements, is being increasingly replaced for isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS due to its excellent sensitivity, precision and good accuracy. Instrumental progress in ICP-MS was achieved by the introduction of the collision cell interface in order to dissociate many disturbing argon-based molecular ions, thermalize the ions and neutralize the disturbing argon ions of plasma gas (Ar+). The application of the collision cell in ICP-QMS results in a higher ion transmission, improved sensitivity and better precision of isotope ratio measurements compared to quadrupole ICP-MS without the collision cell [e.g., for 235U/238U approximately 1 (10 microg x L(-1) uranium) 0.07% relative standard deviation (RSD) vs. 0.2% RSD in short-term measurements (n = 5)]. A significant instrumental improvement for ICP-MS is the multicollector device (MC-ICP-MS) in order to obtain a better precision of isotope ratio measurements (with a precision of up to 0.002%, RSD). CE- and HPLC-ICP-MS are used for the separation of isobaric interferences of long-lived radionuclides and stable isotopes by determination of spallation nuclide abundances in an irradiated tantalum target.

  9. Behavioural and electroantennogram responses of the stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans L.) to plant essential oils and their mixtures with attractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu, Trung Tran; Jung, JeWon; Kim, Soon-Il; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kwon, Hyung Wook

    2014-01-01

    Insect olfactory organs possess many olfactory receptor neurons, which detect many different sets of odorants in nature. In order to feed on blood meals, stable flies locate host animals and humans using chemical cues such as 1-octen-3-ol and butyric acid. In the present study, behavioural and electroantennogram (EAG) response patterns to repellent volatiles from essential oils (EOs) of Zanthoxylum piperitum and Z. armatum in combination with the attractants were investigated. Components of the EOs such as cuminaldehyde, citronellal, neral, linalool, linalool oxide, terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole, and piperitone induced remarkable repellent behaviours in the stable fly. EAG responses in the fly antenna to these chemicals showed a dose-dependent manner. The patterns of behavioural and EAG responses were significantly altered depending on the ratios of 1-octen-3-ol or butyric acid to the EOs or compounds in the air mixtures. The present study demonstrated that the Zanthoxylum EOs decreased the levels of response of flight behaviours of the stable fly towards host volatile compounds. The combinations of odorant mixtures of the attractants with the EOs and their components affect the representation of behavioural and EAG responses of the flies. The summation and integration patterns of olfactory responses measured by the EAG indicated that the peripheral olfactory networks in antennae could process the odorant complexity of different odorant mixtures between attractants and repellents. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Stable isotopes as tracers for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, A.; Bartolo, D. de; Cantone, M.C.; Zilker, T.; Greim, H.; Roth, P.; Werner, E.

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of internal dose after incorporation of radionuclides requires as input data the knowledge of the uptake into the systemic circulation, the distribution and retention in selected organs, the excretion pathways. Realistic biokinetic models are needed for reliable estimates, correct interpretation of bioassay measurements, appropriate decision-making in radiological emergencies. For many radionuclides, however, the biokinetic models currently recommended are often generic, with very few specific parameters, due to the lack of experimental human data. The use of stable isotopes as tracers enables to determine important biokinetic parameters such as the fractional uptake, the clearance from the transfer compartment, the excretion patterns under experimentally controlled conditions. The subjects investigated are not exposed to any radiation risk, so this technique enables to obtain biokinetic information also for sensitive groups of the population, such as children or pregnant women, and to determine age- and gender-specific model parameters. Sophisticated analytical method, able to discriminate and quantitate different isotopes of the same element in complex matrices such as biological fluids, have to be purposely developed and optimized. Activation analysis and mass spectrometry are the most proper techniques of choice. Experiments were conducted with molybdenum, tellurium, ruthenium and zirconium. Activation analysis with protons, thermal ionization mass spectrometry and inductively coupled mass spectrometry were employed for the determination of stable isotopes of these elements in blood plasma and urine samples. Several deviations from the predictions of the ICRP models were observed. For example, modifications to the current model for molybdenum have been suggested on the basis of these results. The dose coefficients to the target regions calculated with this proposed model are even of one order of magnitude different than the ICRP estimates

  11. Holes at High Blowing Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip M. Ligrani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented which describe the development and structure of flow downstream of a single row of holes with compound angle orientations producing film cooling at high blowing ratios. This film cooling configuration is important because similar arrangements are frequently employed on the first stage of rotating blades of operating gas turbine engines. With this configuration, holes are spaced 6d apart in the spanwise direction, with inclination angles of 24 degrees, and angles of orientation of 50.5 degrees. Blowing ratios range from 1.5 to 4.0 and the ratio of injectant to freestream density is near 1.0. Results show that spanwise averaged adiabatic effectiveness, spanwise-averaged iso-energetic Stanton number ratios, surveys of streamwise mean velocity, and surveys of injectant distributions change by important amounts as the blowing ratio increases. This is due to injectant lift-off from the test surface just downstream of the holes.

  12. Stable rotating dipole solitons in nonlocal media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Skupin, Stefan; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2006-01-01

    We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons.......We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons....

  13. Ginseng authenticity testing by measuring carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotope compositions that differ based on cultivation land and organic fertilizer type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Lee, Taek-Jun; Oh, Yong-Taek; Ghimire, Bimal Kumar; Jang, In-Bae; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2017-04-01

    The natural ratios of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and sulfur (S) stable isotopes can be varied in some specific living organisms owing to various isotopic fractionation processes in nature. Therefore, the analysis of C, N, and S stable isotope ratios in ginseng can provide a feasible method for determining ginseng authenticity depending on the cultivation land and type of fertilizer. C, N, and S stable isotope composition in 6-yr-old ginseng roots (Jagyeongjong variety) was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The type of cultivation land and organic fertilizers affected the C, N, and S stable isotope ratio in ginseng ( p  authenticity depending on cultivation conditions.

  14. Humic substances in natural waters and their complexation with trace metals and radionuclides: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Livermore, D.; Seitz, M.G.

    1985-07-01

    Dissolved humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) occur in surface waters and groundwaters in concentrations ranging from less than 1 mg(C)/L to more than 100 mg(C)/L. Humic substances are strong complexing agents for many trace metals in the environment and are also capable of forming stable soluble complexes or chelates with radionuclides. Concentrations of humic materials as low as 1 mg(C)/L can produce a detectable increase in the mobility of some actinide elements by forming soluble complexes that inhibit sorption of the radionuclides onto rock materials. The stability of trace metal- or radionuclide-organic complexes is commonly measured by an empirically determined conditional stability constant (K'), which is based on the ratio of complexed metal (radionuclide) in solution to the product concentration of uncomplexed metal and humic complexant. Larger values of stability constants indicate greater complex stability. The stability of radionuclide-organic complexes is affected both by concentration variables and envionmental factors. In general, complexing is favored by increased of radionuclide, increased pH, and decreased ionic strength. Actinide elements are generally most soluble in their higher oxidation states. Radionuclides can also form stable, insoluble complexes with humic materials that tend to reduce radionuclide mobility. These insoluble complexes may be radionuclide-humate colloids that subsequently precipitate from solution, or complexes of radionuclides and humic substances that sorb to clay minerals or other soil particulates strongly enough to immobilize the radionuclides. Colloid formation appears to be favored by increased radionuclide concentration and lowered pH; however, the conditions that favor formation of insoluble complexes that sorb to particulates are still poorly understood. 129 refs., 25 figs., 19 tabs

  15. Is there a stable isotope evidence for the CO 2 fertiliser effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose extracted from annual growth rings (covering the time period 1980-1993) in an oak tree from Kalamazoo, SW Michigan provide a basis to investigate at a physiological level how the fertilization effect may operate. The carbon isotope ratios show that the intercellular ...

  16. Stable isotope composition of environmental water and food products as a tracer of origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchnicki, R.; Owczarczyk, A.; Soltyk, W.

    2004-01-01

    The paper is the review of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT) activity in application of stable isotope ratios (especially D/H and 18 O/ 16 O) for environmental studies and food origin control. INCT has at disposal since 1998, a high class instrument - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer, Delta Plus, Finnigan MAT, Germany - suitable to perform such measurements. (author)

  17. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.; Yukalova, E. P.; Henry, J.-Y.; Cobb, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  18. Theory of stable allocations II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish Royal Academy awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics to Lloyd Shapley and Alvin Roth, for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design. These two American researchers worked independently from each other, combining basic theory and empirical investigations. Through their experiments and practical design they generated a flourishing field of research and improved the performance of many markets. Shapley provided the fundamental theoretical contribution to this field of research, whereas Roth, a professor at the Harvard University in Boston, developed and upgraded these theoretical investigations by applying them to the American market of medical doctors. Namely, their research helps explain the market processes at work, for instance, when doctors are assigned to hospitals, students to schools and human organs for transplant to recipients.

  19. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  20. A 3-dimensional in vitro model of epithelioid granulomas induced by high aspect ratio nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurt Robert H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most common causes of granulomatous inflammation are persistent pathogens and poorly-degradable irritating materials. A characteristic pathological reaction to intratracheal instillation, pharyngeal aspiration, or inhalation of carbon nanotubes is formation of epithelioid granulomas accompanied by interstitial fibrosis in the lungs. In the mesothelium, a similar response is induced by high aspect ratio nanomaterials, including asbestos fibers, following intraperitoneal injection. This asbestos-like behaviour of some engineered nanomaterials is a concern for their potential adverse health effects in the lungs and mesothelium. We hypothesize that high aspect ratio nanomaterials will induce epithelioid granulomas in nonadherent macrophages in 3D cultures. Results Carbon black particles (Printex 90 and crocidolite asbestos fibers were used as well-characterized reference materials and compared with three commercial samples of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Doses were identified in 2D and 3D cultures in order to minimize acute toxicity and to reflect realistic occupational exposures in humans and in previous inhalation studies in rodents. Under serum-free conditions, exposure of nonadherent primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages to 0.5 μg/ml (0.38 μg/cm2 of crocidolite asbestos fibers or MWCNTs, but not carbon black, induced macrophage differentiation into epithelioid cells and formation of stable aggregates with the characteristic morphology of granulomas. Formation of multinucleated giant cells was also induced by asbestos fibers or MWCNTs in this 3D in vitro model. After 7-14 days, macrophages exposed to high aspect ratio nanomaterials co-expressed proinflammatory (M1 as well as profibrotic (M2 phenotypic markers. Conclusions Induction of epithelioid granulomas appears to correlate with high aspect ratio and complex 3D structure of carbon nanotubes, not with their iron content or surface area. This model

  1. RATIO_TOOL - SOFTWARE FOR COMPUTING IMAGE RATIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    Geological studies analyze spectral data in order to gain information on surface materials. RATIO_TOOL is an interactive program for viewing and analyzing large multispectral image data sets that have been created by an imaging spectrometer. While the standard approach to classification of multispectral data is to match the spectrum for each input pixel against a library of known mineral spectra, RATIO_TOOL uses ratios of spectral bands in order to spot significant areas of interest within a multispectral image. Each image band can be viewed iteratively, or a selected image band of the data set can be requested and displayed. When the image ratios are computed, the result is displayed as a gray scale image. At this point a histogram option helps in viewing the distribution of values. A thresholding option can then be used to segment the ratio image result into two to four classes. The segmented image is then color coded to indicate threshold classes and displayed alongside the gray scale image. RATIO_TOOL is written in C language for Sun series computers running SunOS 4.0 and later. It requires the XView toolkit and the OpenWindows window manager (version 2.0 or 3.0). The XView toolkit is distributed with Open Windows. A color monitor is also required. The standard distribution medium for RATIO_TOOL is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. An electronic copy of the documentation is included on the program media. RATIO_TOOL was developed in 1992 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Sun, SunOS, and OpenWindows are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories.

  2. Uptake and distribution of 137Cs, stable Cs and K in rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Hirofumi; Hasegawa, Hidenao

    2003-01-01

    The uptake and distributions of 137 Cs, stable Cs and K were determined for rice plant components, including polished rice, rice bran, hulls, leaves, stems, and roots. The distribution of 137 Cs in polished rice and rice bran was similar to that of stable Cs, while that of K was different. The concentration ratios of Cs/K in leaves increased in older leaf blade positions, which meant that the translocation rate of stable Cs, was slower than that of K. At harvest the dry weight of polished rice accounted for 34% of the entire rice plant, while the distributions of stable Cs in the polished rice and the non-edible parts were 7 and 93%, respectively. These findings suggest that the transfer and distribution of stable Cs in rice plants are different from those of K, and the behavior of stable Cs provides a useful analogue in predicting the fate of 137 Cs in an agricultural environment. (author)

  3. Preservation of terrestrial plant biomarkers from Nachukui Formation sediments and their viability for stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, E.; Uno, K. T.; Polissar, P. J.; Lepre, C. J.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary records from the Turkana Basin in eastern Africa provide a unique opportunity to compare a high-resolution record of climate and terrestrial vegetation with important changes in the record of human evolution. Molecular biomarkers from terrestrial vegetation can yield stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and carbon that reflect ancient climate and vegetation. However, the preservation of long-chain plant wax biomarkers in these paleosol, fluvial, and lacustrine sediments is not known, and this preservation must be studied to establish their utility for molecular stable isotope studies. We investigated leaf wax biomarkers in Nachukui Formation sediments deposited between 2.3 and 1.7 Ma to assess biomarker preservation. We analyzed n alkane and n alkanoic acid concentrations and, where suitable, molecular carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios. Molecular abundance distributions show a great deal of variance in biomarker preservation and plant-type source as indicated by the carbon preference index and average chain length. This variation suggests that some samples are suitable for isotopic analysis, while other samples lack primary terrestrial plant biomarker signatures. The biomarker signal in many samples contains significant additional material from unidentified sources. For example, the n-alkane distributions contain an unresolved complex mixture underlying the short and mid-chain n-alkanes. Samples from lacustrine intervals include long-chain diacids, hydroxy acids and (ω-1) ketoacids that suggest degradation of the original acids. Degradation of poorly preserved samples and the addition of non-terrestrial plant biomarkers may originate from a number of processes including forest fire or microbial alteration. Isotopic analysis of well-preserved terrestrial plant biomarkers will be presented along with examples where the original biomarker distribution has been altered.

  4. Quasi-stable injection channels in a wakefield accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltshire-Turkay, Mara; Farmer, John P.; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The influence of initial position on the acceleration of externally-injected electrons in a plasma wakefield is investigated. Test-particle simulations show previously unobserved complex structure in the parameter space, with quasi-stable injection channels forming for particles injected in narrow regions away from the wake centre. Particles injected into these channels remain in the wake for a considerable time after dephasing, and as a result achieve significantly higher energy than their n...

  5. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  6. Hermitian-Einstein metrics on parabolic stable bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiayu; Narasimhan, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    Let M-bar be a compact complex manifold of complex dimension two with a smooth Kaehler metric and D a smooth divisor on M-bar. If E is a rank 2 holomorphic vector bundle on M-bar with a stable parabolic structure along D, we prove the existence of a metric on E' = E module MbarD (compatible with the parabolic structure) which is Hermitian-Einstein with respect to the restriction of Kaehler metric of M-barD. A converse is also proved. (author). 24 refs

  7. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Introducing Stable Radicals into Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2017-09-27

    Ever since their discovery, stable organic radicals have received considerable attention from chemists because of their unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. Currently, one of the most appealing challenges for the chemical community is to develop sophisticated artificial molecular machines that can do work by consuming external energy, after the manner of motor proteins. In this context, radical-pairing interactions are important in addressing the challenge: they not only provide supramolecular assistance in the synthesis of molecular machines but also open the door to developing multifunctional systems relying on the various properties of the radical species. In this Outlook, by taking the radical cationic state of 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY •+ ) as an example, we highlight our research on the art and science of introducing radical-pairing interactions into functional systems, from prototypical molecular switches to complex molecular machines, followed by a discussion of the (i) limitations of the current systems and (ii) future research directions for designing BIPY •+ -based molecular machines with useful functions.

  9. Zirconium (IV) complexes with some polymethylenediimines | Na ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The syntheses of zirconium (IV) complexes have been carried out by the reaction of oxozirconium (IV) chloride with the appropriate diimines (Schiff bases). The complexes were isolated as yellow solids which are stable to heat. The complexes were found to be insoluble in most solvents. The infrared spectra, elemental ...

  10. Discrimination of ginseng cultivation regions using light stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwook; Song, Joo-Hyun; Heo, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Jin-Hee; Jung, In-Woo; Min, Ji-Sook

    2015-10-01

    Korean ginseng is considered to be a precious health food in Asia. Today, thieves frequently compromise ginseng farms by pervasive theft. Thus, studies regarding the characteristics of ginseng according to growth region are required in order to deter ginseng thieves and prevent theft. In this study, 6 regions were selected on the basis of Korea regional criteria (si, gun, gu), and two ginseng-farms were randomly selected from each of the 6 regions. Then 4-6 samples of ginseng were acquired from each ginseng farm. The stable isotopic compositions of H, O, C, and N of the collected ginseng samples were analyzed. As a result, differences in the hydrogen isotope ratios could be used to distinguish regional differences, and differences in the nitrogen isotope ratios yielded characteristic information regarding the farms from which the samples were obtained. Thus, stable isotope values could be used to differentiate samples according to regional differences. Therefore, stable isotope analysis serves as a powerful tool to discriminate the regional origin of Korean ginseng samples from across Korea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamics and control of twisting bi-stable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Andres F.; van Gemmeren, Valentin; Anderson, Aaron J.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2018-02-01

    Compliance-based morphing structures have the potential to offer large shape adaptation, high stiffness and low weight, while reducing complexity, friction, and scalability problems of mechanism based systems. A promising class of structure that enables these characteristics are multi-stable structures given their ability to exhibit large deflections and rotations without the expensive need for continuous actuation, with the latter only required intermittently. Furthermore, multi-stable structures exhibit inherently fast response due to the snap-through instability governing changes between stable states, enabling rapid configuration switching between the discrete number of programmed shapes of the structure. In this paper, the design and utilisation of the inherent nonlinear dynamics of bi-stable twisting I-beam structures for actuation with low strain piezoelectric materials is presented. The I-beam structure consists of three compliant components assembled into a monolithic single element, free of moving parts, and showing large deflections between two stable states. Finite element analysis is utilised to uncover the distribution of strain across the width of the flange, guiding the choice of positioning for piezoelectric actuators. In addition, the actuation authority is maximised by calculating the generalised coupling coefficient for different positions of the piezoelectric actuators. The results obtained are employed to tailor and test I-beam designs exhibiting desired large deflection between stable states, while still enabling the activation of snap-through with the low strain piezoelectric actuators. To this end, the dynamic response of the I-beams to piezoelectric excitation is investigated, revealing that resonant excitations are insufficient to dynamically trigger snap-through. A novel bang-bang control strategy, which exploits the nonlinear dynamics of the structure successfully triggers both single and constant snap-through between the stable states

  12. Synthesis, Spectral and Antimicrobial Studies of Some Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II Complexes Containing 2-Thiophenecarboxaldehyde Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some new Schiff base metal complexes of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II derived from 3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline (HL1 and 4-fluoroaniline (HL2 with 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, FAB-mass, molar conductance, electronic spectra, ESR and magnetic susceptibility. The complexes exhibit coordination number 4 or 6. The complexes are colored and stable in air. Analytical data revealed that all the complexes exhibited 1:2 (metal: ligand ratio. FAB-mass data show degradation pattern of the complexes. The Schiff base and metal complexes show a good activity against the bacteria; B. subtilis, E. coli and S. aureus and fungi A. niger, A. flavus and C. albicans. The antimicrobial results also indicate that the metal complexes are better antimicrobial agents as compared to the Schiff bases.

  13. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  14. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beg Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective : The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Design : Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods : Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naοve asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. Results : All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54±28.01 vs 22.00±6.69; P =0.0001 but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54±28.01 vs 84.78±39.32 P = 0.0285.The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. Conclusion : There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects.

  15. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Mohammed F. S.; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A.; Abba, Abdullah A.; Habib, Syed S.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naïve asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. RESULTS: All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54±28.01 vs 22.00±6.69; P=0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54±28.01 vs 84.78±39.32 P=0.0285).The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV1/FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. CONCLUSION: There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. PMID:19561927

  16. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beg Mohammed F S; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A; Habib, Syed S; Abba, Abdullah A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naive asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 22.00 + -6.69; P =0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 84.78+ - 39.32 P 0.0285). The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. (author)

  17. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  18. Preparation and characterizations of new U(IV) and U(VI) complexes with carboxylate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbrignadello, G.; Tomat, G.; Battiston, G.; Vigato, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of some uranyl(VI) complexes containing glycolate (gly = CH 2 OHCOO - ) and methoxyacetate (MeOAc = CH 3 OCH 2 COO - ) ligands with metal:ligand ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 are reported. In addition, new stable uranium(IV) complexes containing the same ligands, or the oxydiacetate (oda = - OOCCH 2 OCH 2 COO - ) anion, have been prepared by photolysing aqueous solutions of uranyl(VI) nitrate in the presence of an excess of ligand. The possible structures of these complexes are discussed on the basis of IR results. The photoproduction mechanism of U(IV) complexes is proposed from electronic and spectrofluorimetric spectra and quantum yield data. (author)

  19. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  20. Population Games, Stable Games, and Passivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Fox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The class of “stable games”, introduced by Hofbauer and Sandholm in 2009, has the attractive property of admitting global convergence to equilibria under many evolutionary dynamics. We show that stable games can be identified as a special case of the feedback-system-theoretic notion of a “passive” dynamical system. Motivated by this observation, we develop a notion of passivity for evolutionary dynamics that complements the definition of the class of stable games. Since interconnections of passive dynamical systems exhibit stable behavior, we can make conclusions about passive evolutionary dynamics coupled with stable games. We show how established evolutionary dynamics qualify as passive dynamical systems. Moreover, we exploit the flexibility of the definition of passive dynamical systems to analyze generalizations of stable games and evolutionary dynamics that include forecasting heuristics as well as certain games with memory.