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Sample records for stable colloidal solutions

  1. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes1, 2, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other2. Electrostatic stabilization3, 4 of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains2, 5. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  2. One-pot synthesis of stable colloidal solutions of MFe2O4 nanoparticles using oleylamine as solvent and stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Mirabet, Leonardo; Solano, Eduardo; Martínez-Julián, Fernando; Guzmán, Roger; Arbiol, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier; Pomar, Alberto; Yáñez, Ramón; Ros, Josep; Ricart, Susagna

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► One-pot synthesis of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles ( 3 and M(acac) 2 (M = Co, Mn, Cu and Zn) in oleylamine, which also acts as a capping ligand, by producing stable colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in non-polar solvents. The properties of the nanoparticles have been studied via different techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, which shows that nanoparticles are monocrystallines and a narrow dispersion in size; magnetic analyses have demonstrated that the resulting ferrite nanoparticles show high saturation values and superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature; X-ray diffraction has also been performed, and it confirms that the synthesized nanoparticles have a spinel structure. Complementarily, ligand exchange has been also carried out in order to produce dispersions of the synthesized nanoparticles in polar media

  3. Facile and efficient one-pot solvothermal and microwave-assisted synthesis of stable colloidal solutions of MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano, Eduardo; Perez-Mirabet, Leonardo [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Quimica (Spain); Martinez-Julian, Fernando; Guzman, Roger; Arbiol, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC (Spain); Yanez, Ramon [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Quimica (Spain); Pomar, Alberto; Ricart, Susagna, E-mail: ricart@icmab.es [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC (Spain); Ros, Josep [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Quimica (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Well-defined synthesis conditions of high quality MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, and Cu) spinel ferrite magnetic nanoparticles, with diameters below 10 nm, have been described based on facile and efficient one-pot solvothermal or microwave-assisted heating procedures. Both methods are reproducible and scalable and allow forming concentrated stable colloidal solutions in polar solvents, but microwave-assisted heating allows reducing 15 times the required annealing time and leads to an enhanced monodispersity of the nanoparticles. Non-agglomerated nanoparticles dispersions have been achieved using a simple one-pot approach where a single compound, triethyleneglycol, behaves at the same time as solvent and capping ligand. A narrow nanoparticle size distribution and high quality crystallinity have been achieved through selected nucleation and growth conditions. High resolution transmission electron microscopy images and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis confirm the expected structure and composition and show that similar crystal faceting has been formed in both synthetic approaches. The spinel nanoparticles behave as ferrimagnets with a high saturation magnetization and are superparamagnetic at room temperature. The influence of synthesis route on phase purity and unconventional magnetic properties is discussed in some particular cases such as CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  4. Facile and efficient one-pot solvothermal and microwave-assisted synthesis of stable colloidal solutions of MFe2O4 spinel magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, Eduardo; Perez-Mirabet, Leonardo; Martinez-Julian, Fernando; Guzmán, Roger; Arbiol, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier; Yañez, Ramón; Pomar, Alberto; Ricart, Susagna; Ros, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Well-defined synthesis conditions of high quality MFe 2 O 4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, and Cu) spinel ferrite magnetic nanoparticles, with diameters below 10 nm, have been described based on facile and efficient one-pot solvothermal or microwave-assisted heating procedures. Both methods are reproducible and scalable and allow forming concentrated stable colloidal solutions in polar solvents, but microwave-assisted heating allows reducing 15 times the required annealing time and leads to an enhanced monodispersity of the nanoparticles. Non-agglomerated nanoparticles dispersions have been achieved using a simple one-pot approach where a single compound, triethyleneglycol, behaves at the same time as solvent and capping ligand. A narrow nanoparticle size distribution and high quality crystallinity have been achieved through selected nucleation and growth conditions. High resolution transmission electron microscopy images and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis confirm the expected structure and composition and show that similar crystal faceting has been formed in both synthetic approaches. The spinel nanoparticles behave as ferrimagnets with a high saturation magnetization and are superparamagnetic at room temperature. The influence of synthesis route on phase purity and unconventional magnetic properties is discussed in some particular cases such as CuFe 2 O 4 , CoFe 2 O 4 , and ZnFe 2 O 4 .

  5. One-pot synthesis of stable colloidal solutions of MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles using oleylamine as solvent and stabilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Mirabet, Leonardo [Departament de Química, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Solano, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.solano@uab.cat [Departament de Química, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Martínez-Julián, Fernando; Guzmán, Roger [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Arbiol, Jordi [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier; Pomar, Alberto [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Yáñez, Ramón; Ros, Josep [Departament de Química, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ricart, Susagna [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► One-pot synthesis of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (<10 nm) in non-polar media. ► Nanoparticles present high monocrystal quality and monodispersion. ► Superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. ► Nanoparticles transfer to polar media via ligand exchange. - Abstract: An easy, efficient, reproducible and scalable one-pot synthetic methodology to obtain magnetic spinel ferrite nanoparticles has been developed. This approach is based on one-pot thermal decomposition of Fe(acac){sub 3} and M(acac){sub 2} (M = Co, Mn, Cu and Zn) in oleylamine, which also acts as a capping ligand, by producing stable colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in non-polar solvents. The properties of the nanoparticles have been studied via different techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, which shows that nanoparticles are monocrystallines and a narrow dispersion in size; magnetic analyses have demonstrated that the resulting ferrite nanoparticles show high saturation values and superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature; X-ray diffraction has also been performed, and it confirms that the synthesized nanoparticles have a spinel structure. Complementarily, ligand exchange has been also carried out in order to produce dispersions of the synthesized nanoparticles in polar media.

  6. Colloids dragged through a polymer solution: experiment, theory and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gutsche, Christof; Kremer, Friedrich; Krüger, Matthias; Rauscher, Markus; Weeber, Rudolf; Harting, Jens

    2007-01-01

    We present micro-rheological measurments of the drag force on colloids pulled through a solution of lambda-DNA (used here as a monodisperse model polymer) with an optical tweezer. The experiments show a violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation based on the independently measured viscosity of the DNA solution: the drag force is larger than expected. We attribute this to the accumulation of DNA infront of the colloid and the reduced DNA density behind the colloid. This hypothesis is corroborat...

  7. Enrichment of colloidal solutions by nanoparticles in underwater spark discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopat'ko, K.; Aftandiliants, Y.; Veklich, A.; Boretskij, V.; Taran, N.; Batsmanova, L.; Trach, V.; Tugai, T.

    2015-01-01

    The underwater spark discharge between manganese granules was studied. Optical emission spectroscopy methods were used for diagnostics of such discharge plasma. The colloidal solution with manganese nanoparticles was produced by this discharge. The biological applications of this colloid were analyzed. The mechanism of metallic nanoparticle action and their transformation at interacting with biological objects were studied in Alternaria alternata culture

  8. Colloids dragged through a polymer solution: Experiment, theory, and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Christof; Kremer, Friedrich; Krüger, Matthias; Rauscher, Markus; Weeber, Rudolf; Harting, Jens

    2008-08-28

    We present microrheological measurements of the drag force on colloids pulled through a solution of lambda-DNA (used here as a monodisperse model polymer) with an optical tweezer. The experiments show a drag force that is larger than expected from the Stokes formula and the independently measured viscosity of the DNA solution. We attribute this to the accumulation of DNA in front of the colloid and the reduced DNA density behind the colloid. This hypothesis is corroborated by a simple drift-diffusion model for the DNA molecules, which reproduces the experimental data surprisingly well, as well as by corresponding Brownian dynamics simulations.

  9. Air-stable n-type colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2014-06-08

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer promise in flexible electronics, light sensing and energy conversion. These applications rely on rectifying junctions that require the creation of high-quality CQD solids that are controllably n-type (electron-rich) or p-type (hole-rich). Unfortunately, n-type semiconductors made using soft matter are notoriously prone to oxidation within minutes of air exposure. Here we report high-performance, air-stable n-type CQD solids. Using density functional theory we identify inorganic passivants that bind strongly to the CQD surface and repel oxidative attack. A materials processing strategy that wards off strong protic attack by polar solvents enabled the synthesis of an air-stable n-type PbS CQD solid. This material was used to build an air-processed inverted quantum junction device, which shows the highest current density from any CQD solar cell and a solar power conversion efficiency as high as 8%. We also feature the n-type CQD solid in the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of atmospheric NO2. This work paves the way for new families of electronic devices that leverage air-stable quantum-tuned materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermodynamically stable emulsions using Janus dumbbells as colloid surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Fuquan; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Daeyeon

    2013-10-15

    One of the most important properties of emulsions is their stability. Most emulsions stabilized with molecular surfactants tend to lose their stability over time via different mechanisms. Although the stability of emulsions stabilized with homogeneous particles have been shown to be superior to that of surfactant-stabilized emulsions, these Pickering emulsions nevertheless are only kinetically stable and thus can undergo destabilization. Janus particles that have two opposite wetting surfaces have shown promise in imparting emulsions with long-term stability because of their strong attachment to the oil-water interface. In this theoretical study, we consider thermodynamics of emulsion stabilization using amphiphilic Janus dumbbells, which are nonspherical particles made of two partially fused spherical particles of opposite wettability. These amphiphilic dumbbells are attractive candidates as colloid surfactants for emulsion stabilization because highly uniform Janus dumbbells can be synthesized in large quantities; thus, their application in emulsion stabilization can become practical. Our theoretical calculation demonstrates that Janus dumbbells can indeed generate thermodynamically stable Pickering emulsions. In addition, we also find that there exists a total oil-water interfacial area that results in the lowest energy state in the system, which occurs when Janus dumbbells available in the system are completely consumed to fully cover the droplet interfaces. We show that the geometry of dumbbells as well as the composition of the emulsion mixtures has significant influences on the average size of dumbbell-stabilized emulsions. We also investigate the effect of asymmetry of Janus dumbbells on the average droplet radius. Our results clearly show that amphiphilic Janus dumbbells provide unique opportunities in stabilizing emulsions for various applications.

  11. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Mingjian

    2016-02-29

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  12. COLLOID RELEASE AND TRANSPORT IN AGRICULTURAL SOIL AS IMPACTED BY SOLUTION CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sandip Patil; Kamal Tawfiq; Gang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Colloid release from the agricultural soil under unsaturated conditions was controlled by the hydrodynamic force, capillary force and electrostatic force that were determined by the solution chemistry in terms of solution ionic strength and pH. In this research, colloid release from the agricultural soil was investigated using an intact soil column collected from an agricultural site in Gadsden County of Florida. Colloid release was monitored and the colloid release curve was simulated using ...

  13. Surface treatment of silica nanoparticles for stable and charge-controlled colloidal silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Tae-il; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Paek, Seung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to control the surface charge of colloidal silica nanoparticles with 20 nm and 100 nm diameters. Untreated silica nanoparticles were determined to be highly negatively charged and have stable hydrodynamic sizes in a wide pH range. To change the surface to a positively charged form, various coating agents, such as amine containing molecules, multivalent metal cation, or amino acids, were used to treat the colloidal silica nanoparticles. Molecules with chelating amine sites were determined to have high affinity with the silica surface to make agglomerations or gel-like networks. Amino acid coatings resulted in relatively stable silica colloids with a modified surface charge. Three amino acid moiety coatings (L-serine, L-histidine, and L-arginine) exhibited surface charge modifying efficacy of L-histidine > L-arginine > L-serine and hydrodynamic size preservation efficacy of L-serine > L-arginine > L-histidine. The time dependent change in L-arginine coated colloidal silica was investigated by measuring the pattern of the backscattered light in a Turbiscan™. The results indicated that both the 20 nm and 100 nm L-arginine coated silica samples were fairly stable in terms of colloidal homogeneity, showing only slight coalescence and sedimentation. PMID:25565824

  14. COLLOID RELEASE AND TRANSPORT IN AGRICULTURAL SOIL AS IMPACTED BY SOLUTION CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Patil

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloid release from the agricultural soil under unsaturated conditions was controlled by the hydrodynamic force, capillary force and electrostatic force that were determined by the solution chemistry in terms of solution ionic strength and pH. In this research, colloid release from the agricultural soil was investigated using an intact soil column collected from an agricultural site in Gadsden County of Florida. Colloid release was monitored and the colloid release curve was simulated using an implicit, finite-difference scheme to obtain the colloid release coefficient. It was found that the hydrodynamic force and electrostatic force overcame the capillary force under the experimental conditions of this research and consequently, colloids were released. For the colloid release, solution chemistry played a key role by controlling the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system. Colloid release exponentially decreased with the increase of solution ionic strength and increased with the increase of solution pH. Colloid release was finally found to be correlated to the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system, i.e., the greater the repulsive electrostatic force, the more colloids released.

  15. COLLOID RELEASE AND TRANSPORT IN AGRICULTURAL SOIL AS IMPACTED BY SOLUTION CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloid release from the agricultural soil under unsaturated conditions was controlled by the hydrodynamic force, capillary force and electrostatic force that were determined by the solution chemistry in terms of solution ionic strength and pH. In this research, colloid release from the agricultural soil was investigated using an intact soil column collected from an agricultural site in Gadsden County of Florida. Colloid release was monitored and the colloid release curve was simulated using an implicit, finite-difference scheme to obtain the colloid release coefficient. It was found that the hydrodynamic force and electrostatic force overcame the capillary force under the experimental conditions of this research and consequently, colloids were released. For the colloid release, solution chemistry played a key role by controlling the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system. Colloid release exponentially decreased with the increase of solution ionic strength and increased with the increase of solution pH. Colloid release was finally found to be correlated to the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system, i.e., the greater the repulsive electrostatic force, the more colloids released.

  16. A novel wound rinsing solution based on nano colloidal silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Kordestani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The present study aimed to investigate the antiseptic properties of a colloidal nano silver wound rinsing solution to inhibit a wide range of pathogens including bacteria, viruses and fungus present in chronic and acute wounds. Materials and Methods:The wound rinsing solution named SilvoSept® was prepared using colloidal nano silver suspension. Physicochemical properties, effectiveness against microorganism including  Staphylocoocous aureus ATCC 6538P, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 ,Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, MRSA , Mycobacterium spp. , HSV-1 and H1N1, and biocompatibility tests were carried out according to relevant standards . Results: X-ray diffraction (XRD scan was performed on the sample and verify single phase of silver particles in the compound. The size of the silver particles in the solution, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS techniqu, ranged 80-90 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed spherical shape with smooth surface of the silver nanoparticles. SilvoSept® reduced 5 log from the initial count of 107 CFU/mL of Staphylocoocous aureus ATCC 6538P, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, MRSA, Mycobacterium spp. Further assessments of SilvoSept solution exhibited a significant inhibition on the replication of HSV-1 and H1N1. The biocompatibility studies showed that the solution was non-allergic, non-irritant and noncytotoxic. Conclusion: Findings of the present study showed that SilvoSept® wound rinsing solution containing nano silver particles is an effective antiseptic solution against a wide spectrum of microorganism. This compound can be a suitable candidate for wound irrigation.   

  17. Removal of Metal Nanoparticles Colloidal Solutions by Water Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhovych, Olga; Svietlova, Nataliia; Konotop, Yevheniia; Karaushu, Olena; Hrechishkina, Svitlana

    2016-11-01

    The ability of seven species of aquatic plants ( Elodea canadensis, Najas guadelupensis, Vallisneria spiralis L., Riccia fluitans L., Limnobium laevigatum, Pistia stratiotes L., and Salvinia natans L.) to absorb metal nanoparticles from colloidal solutions was studied. It was established that investigated aquatic plants have a high capacity for removal of metal nanoparticles from aqueous solution (30-100%) which indicates their high phytoremediation potential. Analysis of the water samples content for elements including the mixture of colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ag + Ag2O) before and after exposure to plants showed no significant differences when using submerged or free-floating hydrophytes so-called pleuston. However, it was found that the presence of submerged hydrophytes in aqueous medium ( E. canadensis, N. guadelupensis, V. spiralis L., and R. fluitans L.) and significant changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments, unlike free-floating hydrophytes ( L. laevigatum, P. stratiotes L., S. natans L.), had occur. Pleuston possesses higher potential for phytoremediation of contaminated water basins polluted by metal nanoparticles. In terms of removal of nanoparticles among studied free-floating hydrophytes, P. stratiotes L. and S. natans L. deserve on special attention.

  18. Colloidal-Bound Polyphosphates and Organic Phosphates Are Bioavailable: A Nutrient Solution Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyn, Jessica; Faes, Joran; Fritzsche, Andreas; Smolders, Erik

    2017-08-16

    Colloidal forms of Fe(III) minerals can be stabilized in solution by coatings of organic or poly-phosphate (P), which reduce the zeta-potential. This opens up a route toward the development of nanoforms of P fertilizers. However, it is unclear if such P forms are bioavailable. To address this question, spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was grown in nutrient solutions, at equal total P, using three different forms of P (orthophosphate = P i ; hexametaphosphate = HMP; myo-inositol hexaphosphate = IHP), free or bound to goethite/ferrihydrite colloids. After 10 days, P uptake was determined with a dose-response curve using colloid-free P i as a reference treatment. The P i concentration generating equal P uptake as in colloidal P treatments was used to calculate the relative bioavailability of colloidal P (RBA colloid ). The RBA colloid was about 60% for P i -loaded goethite, stabilized with natural organic matter. For HMP/IHP-P i -loaded colloids, RBA colloid ranged between 10 and 50%, in line with their higher sorption strength. In conclusion, colloidal organic P or poly-P can stabilize Fe(III) colloids in solution and can contribute to plant-available P. Soil experiments are required to assess their potential as nanofertilizers.

  19. Highly stable colloidal TiO2 nanocrystals with strong violet-blue emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghamsari, Morteza Sasani; Gaeeni, Mohammad Reza; Han, Wooje; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Improved sol–gel method has been applied to prepare highly stable colloidal TiO 2 nanocrystals. The synthesized titania nanocrystals exhibit strong emission in the violet-blue wavelength region. Very long evolution time was obtained by preventing the sol to gel conversion with reflux process. FTIR, XRD, UV–vis absorption, photoluminescence and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) were used to study the optical properties, crystalline phase, morphology, shape and size of prepared TiO 2 colloidal nanocrystals. HRTEM showed that the diameter of TiO 2 colloidal nanocrystals is about 5 nm. Although the PL spectra show similar spectral features upon excitation wavelengths at 280, 300 and 350 nm, but their emission intensities are significantly different from each other. Photoluminescence quantum yield for TiO 2 colloidal nanocrystals is estimated to be 49% with 280 nm excitation wavelength which is in agreement and better than reported before. Obtained results confirm that the prepared colloidal TiO 2 sample has enough potential for optoelectronics applications.

  20. Colloid transport with wetting fronts: interactive effects of solution surface tension and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jie; Goeppert, Nadine; Tu, Ching; McCarthy, John; Perfect, Edmund; McKay, Larry

    2010-02-01

    Transport of colloids with transient wetting fronts represents an important mechanism of contaminant migration in the vadose zone. The work presented here used steady-state saturated and transient unsaturated flow columns to evaluate the transport of a fluorescent latex microsphere (980 nm in diameter) with capillary wetting fronts of different solution surface tensions and ionic strengths. The saturated transport experiments demonstrated that decreasing solution surface tension and ionic strength decreased colloid deposition at the solid-liquid interface and increased colloid recovery in the column effluent. The effect of solution surface tension on colloid transport and deposition was greater at lower ionic strength, suggesting an interaction between these two factors. Under transient unsaturated flow conditions, the number of colloids retained in sand decreased exponentially with travel distance through the porous media. However, lowering the solution surface tension and ionic strength resulted in a more even distribution of colloids along the column. The measured zeta potentials of colloids in different solutions suggest that both lowering surface tension and ionic strength would enhance the electrostatic repulsion between colloid and sand. The experimental results revealed that the effects are nonlinear, implying the possible existence of critical threshold values, beyond which the effects were not significant. In addition, colloid migration slowed down as solution surface tension decreased due to reduction of capillary forces that drove liquid movement. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  2. Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-x nanocomposite thin films from colloidal solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayado, P.; De Keukeleere, K.; Garzón, A.; Perez-Mirabet, L.; Meledin, A.; De Roo, J.; Vallés, F.; Mundet, B.; Rijckaert, H.; Pollefeyt, G.; Coll, M.; Ricart, S.; Palau, A.; Gázquez, J.; Ros, J.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Van Driessche, I.; Puig, T.; Obradors, X.

    2015-12-01

    A methodology of general validity to prepare epitaxial nanocomposite films based on the use of colloidal solutions containing different crystalline preformed oxide nanoparticles (ex situ nanocomposites) is reported. The trifluoroacetate (TFA) metal-organic chemical solution deposition route is used with alcoholic solvents to grow epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) films. For this reason stabilizing oxide nanoparticles in polar solvents is a challenging goal. We have used scalable nanoparticle synthetic methodologies such as thermal and microwave-assisted solvothermal techniques to prepare CeO2 and ZrO2 nanoparticles. We show that stable and homogeneous colloidal solutions with these nanoparticles can be reached using benzyl alcohol, triethyleneglycol, nonanoic acid, trifluoroacetic acid or decanoic acid as protecting ligands, thereby allowing subsequent mixing with alcoholic TFA solutions. An elaborate YBCO film growth analysis of these nanocomposites allows the identification of the different relevant growth phenomena, e.g. nanoparticles pushing towards the film surface, nanoparticle reactivity, coarsening and nanoparticle accumulation at the substrate interface. Upon mitigation of these effects, YBCO nanocomposite films with high self-field critical currents (J c ˜ 3-4 MA cm-2 at 77 K) were reached, indicating no current limitation effects associated with epitaxy perturbation, while smoothed magnetic field dependences of the critical currents at high magnetic fields and decreased effective anisotropic pinning behavior confirm the effectiveness of the novel developed approach to enhance vortex pinning. In conclusion, a novel low cost solution-derived route to high current nanocomposite superconducting films and coated conductors has been developed with very promising features.

  3. Interaction of Myoglobin colloids with BSA in solution: Insights into complex formation and elastic compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhumitha, D; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2017-12-01

    This work focusses on the supramolecular complex formed between Myoglobin (Mb) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) at colloids/solution interface at pH 4.0 and pH 7.5. Electrostatic interactions between Mb as colloids and BSA solution (pH=7.5 and 4.0) have been confirmed by Zeta potential that suggest that while Mb has a narrow interaction range, BSA has a wider interaction space. The organization of Mb colloids in BSA characterized using dilational rheological parameters show that the Mb colloids are elastic and the strong adsorbed water layers on the surface restrict the deformation, regulated by the viscoelastic surface layer. Stability of the complexes analyzed using UV-vis, Fluorescence and Circular dichroic spectroscopy indicate that there is a 1:1 interaction between Mb and BSA with a binding constant of about 10 5 M -1 . Quartz Crystal microbalance with dissipation has been used to evaluate the elastic compliance of the complexes of Mb colloids dispersed in very dilute BSA solution. The higher elastic compliance at pH=4.0 (than at pH=7.5) and the complex sizes correlate with changes in zeta potential suggesting that the mechanical properties of the protein in colloids are dependent on both the electrostatic interaction as well as the degree of hydration of the colloids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. THE LIME PURIFICATION OF SUGAR –CONTAINING SOLUTION USING HIGH VISCOSITY COLLOIDAL SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work was to determine the efficiency of combined application of lime and high-viscous suspensions, containing the aluminium nanoparticles as a precursor in treatment of sugar-containing solutions. At the first stage the aluminium nanopowder, encapsulated into a salt matrix, was produced by the combined precipitation from a gas phase of metal and halogenide of alkali metal (NaCl. For the long-term stabilization of aluminum nanoparticles the method, developed by the authors, for dispersing these powders in the composition of polyethylene glycols was used, providing the colloidal solution of high viscosity (gel. At the second stage, as an object of investigation a juice of sugar beet, produced in the laboratory conditions by water extracting from the beet chips, was applied. In the produced juice the main characteristics of its quality were determined: the content of solids, sucrose, its purity was calculated (ratio of sucrose to solids content, in%. The content of protein and pectin components was also determined (as the main components of the colloidal fraction of the diffusion juice. Conventionally, as a basic reagent for the process of a lime pretreatment a lime milk of 1.18 g/cm3 density, prepared by liming the burned lime using hot water, was used. During the experiments the effectiveness of reagents, containing aluminum in nanoform, on the degree of removal of the colloidal dispersion substances in the process of juice purification in sugar beet production and improvement of its quality, is shown. However, the obtained results show that, depending on the method of producing, the additional reagents with aluminium nanoparticles have different effect on change of diffusion juice purity in the process of its treatment by the lime milk.

  5. Directly deposited quantum dot solids using a colloidally stable nanoparticle ink

    KAUST Repository

    Fischer, Armin H.

    2013-08-12

    We develop a photovoltaic colloidal quantum dot ink that allows for lossless, single-step coating of large areas in a manufacturing-compatible process. Our materials strategy involves a solution-phase ligand exchange to transport compatible linkers that yield 1-thioglycerol-capped PbS quantum dots in dimethyl sulfoxide with a photoluminescence quantum yield of 24%. A proof-of-principle solar cell made from the ink exhibits 2.1% power conversion efficiency. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Sodium deoxycholate-decorated zein nanoparticles for a stable colloidal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Agnese; Paolino, Donatella; Iannone, Michelangelo; Palma, Ernesto; Fresta, Massimo; Cosco, Donato

    2018-01-01

    The use of biopolymers is increasing in drug delivery, thanks to the peculiar properties of these compounds such as their biodegradability, availability, and the possibility of modulating their physico-chemical characteristics. In particular, protein-based systems such as albumin are able to interact with many active compounds, modulating their biopharmaceutical properties. Zein is a protein of 20-40 kDa made up of many hydrophobic amino acids, generally regarded as safe (GRAS) and used as a coating material. In this investigation, zein was combined with various surfactants in order to obtain stable nanosystems by means of the nanoprecipitation technique. Specific parameters, eg, temperature, pH value, Turbiscan Stability Index, serum stability, in vitro cytotoxicity and entrapment efficiency of various model compounds were investigated, in order to identify the nanoformulation most useful for a systemic drug delivery application. The use of non-ionic and ionic surfactants such as Tween 80, poloxamer 188, and sodium deoxycholate allowed us to obtain nanoparticles characterized by a mean diameter of 100-200 nm when a protein concentration of 2 mg/mL was used. The surface charge was modulated by means of the protein concentration and the nature of the stabilizer. The most suitable nanoparticle formulation to be proposed as a colloidal drug delivery system was obtained using sodium deoxycholate (1.25% w/v) because it was characterized by a narrow size distribution, a good storage stability after freeze-drying and significant feature of retaining lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds. The sodium deoxycholate-coated zein nanoparticles are stable biocompatible colloidal carriers to be used as useful drug delivery systems.

  7. Agglomeration of luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles in colloidal solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, Aug (2016), s. 1-5, č. článku 367. ISSN 1556-276X Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline silicon * porous silicon * nanoparticles * colloids * agglomeration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2016

  8. Colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in the sampling of soil solution from Duckum soil in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seyong; Ko, Il-Won; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2018-03-24

    Colloid mobilization is a significant process governing colloid-associated transport of heavy metals in subsurface environments. It has been studied for the last three decades to understand this process. However, colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in soil solutions have rarely been studied using soils in South Korea. We investigated the colloid mobilization in a variety of flow rates during sampling soil solutions in sand columns. The colloid concentrations were increased at low flow rates and in saturated regimes. Colloid concentrations increased 1000-fold higher at pH 9.2 than at pH 7.3 in the absence of 10 mM NaCl solution. In addition, those were fourfold higher in the absence than in the presence of the NaCl solution at pH 9.2. It was suggested that the mobility of colloids should be enhanced in porous media under the basic conditions and the low ionic strength. In real field soils, the concentrations of As, Cr, and Pb in soil solutions increased with the increase in colloid concentrations at initial momentarily changed soil water pressure, whereas the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Al, and Co lagged behind the colloid release. Therefore, physicochemical changes and heavy metal characteristics have important implications for colloid-facilitated transport during sampling soil solutions.

  9. Stilbazolium Merocyanine Dye Determination in Different Solutions, Concentrations and Colloids Using SERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajchrowski, Grzegorz; Abdali, Salim; Nørbygaard, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements were carried out on stilbazolium merocyanine dye in methanol and pyridine solvents. Both solutions were measured in series of concentrations, covering a range of 5·10-5 M to 5·10-8 M. In these measurements Ag and Au colloids were used and the ......Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements were carried out on stilbazolium merocyanine dye in methanol and pyridine solvents. Both solutions were measured in series of concentrations, covering a range of 5·10-5 M to 5·10-8 M. In these measurements Ag and Au colloids were used...... report here on the success of using SERS to obtain Raman spectra of merocyanine dye at very low concentration in an attempt of new approach, which can be used for further investigations of the dye. The SERS spectra will here be reported and the results from different solutions, colloids, concentrations...

  10. Colloidal organization

    CERN Document Server

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  11. Stable, Fluorescent Polymethylmethacrylate Particles for the Long-Term Observation of Slow Colloidal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodger, Thomas E; Lu, Peter J; Wiseman, G Reid; Weitz, David A

    2017-06-27

    Suspensions of solid micron-scale colloidal particles in liquid solvents are a foundational model system used to explore a wide range of phase transitions, including crystallization, gelation, spinodal decomposition, and the glass transition. One of the most commonly used systems for these investigations is the fluorescent spherical particles of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) suspended in a mixture of nonpolar solvents that match the density and the refractive index of the particles to minimize sedimentation and scattering. However, the particles can swell in these solvents, changing their size and density, and may leak the fluorescent dye over days to weeks; this constrains the exploration of slow and kinetically limited processes, such as near-boundary phase separation or the glass transition. In this paper, we produce PMMA colloidal particles that employ polymerizable and photostable cyanine-based fluorescent monomers spanning the range of visible wavelengths and a polymeric stabilizer prepared from polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS-graft-PMMA. Using microcalorimetry, we characterize the thermodynamics of an accelerated equilibration process for these dispersions in the buoyancy- and refractive-index-matching solvents. We use confocal differential dynamic microscopy to demonstrate that they behave as hard spheres. The suspended particles are stable for months to years, maintaining fixed particle size and density, and do not leak dye. Thus, these particles enable longer term experiments than may have been possible earlier; we demonstrate this by observing spinodal decomposition in a mixture of these particles with a depletant polymer in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observe coarsening over several months and measure the growth of the characteristic length scale to be a fraction of a picometer per second; this rate is among the slowest observed in a phase-separating system. Our protocols should

  12. Initiating fibro-proliferation through interfacial interactions of myoglobin colloids with collagen in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, Madhumitha; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2017-08-01

    This work examines fibro-proliferation through interaction of myoglobin (Mb), a globular protein with collagen, an extracellular matrix fibrous protein. Designed colloids of Mb at pH 4.5 and 7.5 have been mixed with collagen solution at pH 7.5 and 4.5 in different concentrations altering their surface charges. For the Mb colloids, 100-200nm sizes have been measured from Transmission electron micrographs and zeta sizer. CD spectra shows a shift to beta sheet like structure for the protein in the colloids. Interaction at Mb/Collagen interface studied using Dilational rheology, Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and Differential Scanning calorimetry show that the perturbation is not only by the charge compensation arising from the difference in pH of the colloids and collagen, but also by the organized assembly of collagen at that particular pH. Results demonstrate that positive Mb colloids at pH 4.5, having more% of entrained water stabilize the collagen fibrils (pH 7.5) around them. Ensuing dehydration leads to effective cross-linking and inherently anisotropic growth of fibrils/fibres of collagen. In the case of Mb colloids at pH 7.5, the fibril formation seems to supersede the clustering of Mb suggesting that the fibro-proliferation is both pH and hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance dependent at the interface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous transport of synthetic colloids and a nonsorbing solute through single saturated natural fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Nuttall, H.E.; Kale, R.

    1994-01-01

    Tracer transport experiments involving colloids that showed little tendency to attach to rock surfaces and a nonsorbing solute (iodide) -were conducted in three different well-characterized natural fractures in tuff. The colloids always arrived earlier in the effluent than the iodide, which we believe is evidence of (1) hydrodynamic chromatography and/or (2) the fact that the colloids experience a smaller effective volume in the fracture because they diffuse too slowly to enter low-velocity regions (dead zones) along the rough fracture walls. The iodide also approached the inlet concentration in the effluent more slowly than the colloids, with the concentration at a given elution volume being greater at higher flow rates. By contrast, the rate of approach of the colloid concentration to the inlet concentration did not vary with flow rate. We attribute this behavior to matrix diffusion of the iodide, with the colloids being too large/nondiffusive to experience this phenomenon. Dispersion of all tracers was greatest in the fracture of widest average aperture and least in the fracture of narrowest aperture, which is consistent with Taylor dispersion theory. The tracer experiments were modeled/interpreted using a three-step approach that involved (1) estimating the aperture distribution in each fracture using surface profiling techniques, (2) predicting the flow field in the fractures using a localized parallel-plate approximation, and (3) predicting tracer transport in the fractures using particle-tracking techniques. Although considered preliminary at this time, the model results were in qualitative agreement with the experiments

  14. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model: analytical solution, moments, and application to colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A

    2009-11-20

    The transport of solutes and colloids in porous media is influenced by a variety of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. A combined physical-chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was therefore used to describe general mass transport. The model partitions the pore space into "mobile" and "immobile" flow regions with first-order mass transfer between these two regions (i.e, "physical" nonequilibrium or PNE). Partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases can either proceed as an equilibrium or a first-order process (i.e, "chemical" nonequilibrium or CNE) for both the mobile and immobile regions. An analytical solution for the PCNE model is obtained using iterated Laplace transforms. This solution complements earlier semi-analytical and numerical approaches to model solute transport with the PCNE model. The impact of selected model parameters on solute breakthrough curves is illustrated. As is well known, nonequilibrium results in earlier solute breakthrough with increased tailing. The PCNE model allows greater flexibility to describe this trend; for example, a closer resemblance between solute input and effluent pulse. Expressions for moments and transfer functions are presented to facilitate the analytical use of the PCNE model. Contours of mean breakthrough time, variance, and spread of the colloid breakthrough curves as a function of PNE and CNE parameters demonstrate the utility of a model that accounts for both physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. The model is applied to describe representative colloid breakthrough curves in Ottawa sands reported by Bradford et al. (2002). An equilibrium model provided a good description of breakthrough curves for the bromide tracer but could not adequately describe the colloid data. A considerably better description was provide by the simple CNE model but the best description, especially for the larger 3.2-microm colloids, was provided by the PCNE model.

  15. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  18. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- or depth-dependent retention in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for...

  19. Hydrophilic luminescent silicon nanoparticles in steric colloidal solutions: their size, agglomeration and toxicity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šimáková, Petra; Cibulka, Ondřej; Fučíková, Anna; Kalbáčová, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 12 (2017), s. 1-4, č. článku 1700195. ISSN 1862-6351 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * colloidal solutions * steric stabilization * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics

  20. Solution-Processable Ultrathin Size- and Shape-Controlled Colloidal Cu2-xS Nanosheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, Ward; Akkerman, Quinten A.; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Huis, Marijn A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304097586; Bals, Sara; Donega, Celso de Mello|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125593899

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets (NSs) possess extraordinary properties that are attractive for both fundamental studies and technological devices. Solution-based bottom-up methods are emerging as promising routes to produce free-standing NSs, but the synthesis of colloidal NSs with

  1. Study of the solution thermal conductivity effect on nonlinear refraction of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhosh, L.; Mansour, N.

    2015-06-01

    In nanoparticle colloidal systems, the thermal nonlinearity is affected by the thermal parameters of the surrounding solution. Having a low temperature gradient rate solution may be a key factor in producing high thermal nonlinear properties in colloids. In this manuscript, the effect of the thermal conductivity of the surrounding liquid environment on the thermal nonlinear refraction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) synthesized by laser ablation of a gold target in different solutions is investigated. Gold nanoparticles colloids have been fabricated by the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a pure gold plate in different liquid environments with a thermal conductivity range of 0.14-0.60 W mK-1 including cyclohexanone, castor oil, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, glycerin and water. The AuNPs colloids exhibit a UV-Vis absorption spectrum with a surface plasmon absorption peak at about 540  ±  20 nm. The thermal nonlinear optical responses of the gold colloids are measured using the Z-scan technique under low power CW laser irradiation at 532 nm near the surface plasmon peak of the nanoparticles. Our results show that the nonlinear refractive index of the nanoparticle colloids is considerably affected by the thermal conductivity of liquid medium. The largest nonlinear refractive index of -3.1  ×  10-7 cm2 W-1 is obtained for AuNP in cyclohexanone with the lowest thermal conductivity of 0.14 W mK-1 whereas the lowest one of -0.1  ×  10-7 cm2 W-1 is obtained for AuNP in water with the highest thermal conductivity of 0.60 W mK-1. This study shows that the nonlinear refractive index value of colloids can be controlled by the thermal conductivity of the used liquid’s environment. This allows us to design low threshold optical limiters by choosing a solution with low thermal conductivity for colloidal nanoparticles.

  2. All-Inorganic Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics Employing Solution-Phase Halide Passivation

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2012-09-12

    A new solution-phase halide passivation strategy to improve the electronic properties of colloidal quantum dot films is reported. We prove experimentally that the approach leads to an order-of-magnitude increase in mobility and a notable reduction in trap state density. We build solar cells having the highest efficiency (6.6%) reported using all-inorganic colloidal quantum dots. The improved photocurrent results from increased efficiency of collection of infrared-generated photocarriers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. All-inorganic colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics employing solution-phase halide passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Zhijun; Ren, Yuan; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Levina, Larissa; Stadler, Philipp; Lan, Xinzheng; Zhitomirsky, David; Sargent, Edward H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2012-12-11

    A new solution-phase halide passivation strategy to improve the electronic properties of colloidal quantum dot films is reported. We prove experimentally that the approach leads to an order-of-magnitude increase in mobility and a notable reduction in trap state density. We build solar cells having the highest efficiency (6.6%) reported using all-inorganic colloidal quantum dots. The improved photocurrent results from increased efficiency of collection of infrared-generated photocarriers. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Exact solutions, energy, and charge of stable Q-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Marques, M.A. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    In this work we deal with nontopological solutions of the Q-ball type in two spacetime dimensions. We study models of current interest, described by a Higgs-like and other, similar potentials which unveil the presence of exact solutions. We use the analytic results to investigate how to control the energy and charge to make the Q-balls stable. (orig.)

  5. Arsenic in solution, colloidal and particulate phases of East-Hainan estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Wolfgang; Boehler, Esther; Tang, Xiaoliang; Ren, Jingling; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daoru

    2013-04-01

    During two nominal dry seasons (December 2006, March 2009) and two wet seasons (July 2007, July/August 2008) the estuarine distribution and size speciation of arsenic was studied in the Wanquan river and the Wenchang/Wenjiao river estuaries, located in tropical East-Hainan (China). Arsenic in solution and in colloidal fractions was analyzed by anodic stripping voltammetry after oxidative UV digestion thereby including inorganic As(III) and As(V) as well as organic As forms. Particulate As was determined by high-resolution ICP-MS after a microwave assisted total decomposition protocol. Taking the two relatively similar estuaries and the two expeditions for each season together, the average concentrations of total dissolved As (aquaculture ponds and piles of excavated soil. The separation of colloidal fractions revealed that on average 82% of td-As remains in solution (aquaculture ponds, the two estuaries might be considered uncontaminated with respect to As.

  6. The Limitations of an Exclusively Colloidal View of Protein Solution Hydrodynamics and Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangapani, Prasad S.; Hudson, Steven D.; Migler, Kalman B.; Pathak, Jai A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are complex macromolecules with dynamic conformations. They are charged like colloids, but unlike colloids, charge is heterogeneously distributed on their surfaces. Here we overturn entrenched doctrine that uncritically treats bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a colloidal hard sphere by elucidating the complex pH and surface hydration-dependence of solution viscosity. We measure the infinite shear viscosity of buffered BSA solutions in a parameter space chosen to tune competing long-range repulsions and short-range attractions (2 mg/mL ≤ [BSA] ≤ 500 mg/mL and 3.0 ≤ pH ≤ 7.4). We account for surface hydration through partial specific volume to define volume fraction and determine that the pH-dependent BSA intrinsic viscosity never equals the classical hard sphere result (2.5). We attempt to fit our data to the colloidal rheology models of Russel, Saville, and Schowalter (RSS) and Krieger-Dougherty (KD), which are each routinely and successfully applied to uniformly charged suspensions and to hard-sphere suspensions, respectively. We discover that the RSS model accurately describes our data at pH 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0, but fails at pH 6.0 and 7.4, due to steeply rising solution viscosity at high concentration. When we implement the KD model with the maximum packing volume fraction as the sole floating parameter while holding the intrinsic viscosity constant, we conclude that the model only succeeds at pH 6.0 and 7.4. These findings lead us to define a minimal framework for models of crowded protein solution viscosity wherein critical protein-specific attributes (namely, conformation, surface hydration, and surface charge distribution) are addressed. PMID:24268154

  7. Modelling The Transport Of Solutes And Colloids In The Grimsel Migration Shear Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosakowski, G.; Smith, P

    2005-02-01

    This report describes modelling of the transport of solutes and colloids in an experimental system comprising an artificial dipole flow field in a water-conducting shear zone at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in the central Swiss Alps. The modelling work forms part of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation Project (CRR), which includes a series of field transport experiments and a supporting laboratory programme, as well as modelling studies. Four independent groups representing different organisations or research institutes have conducted the modelling, with each group employing its own modelling approach or approaches. Only the work conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is described in the present report. The modelling approaches used in the present study may not be directly applicable to safety assessment problems and the direct implications of the results of this study for safety assessment are limited. It can, however, be said that the study has demonstrated the high degree of mobility of bentonite and other colloids in a system that is at least in some ways comparable to those of interest in safety assessment, and has shown that bentonite colloids can at least potentially affect the transport of some safety relevant radionuclides over longer temporal and spatial scales than those addressed here. (author)

  8. Solute and colloid transport in karst conduits under low- and high-flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göppert, Nadine; Goldscheider, Nico

    2008-01-01

    Solute and colloid transport in karst aquifers under low and high flows was investigated by tracer tests using fluorescent dyes (uranine) and microspheres of the size of pathogenic bacteria (1 microm) and Cryptosporidium cysts (5 microm), which were injected into a cave stream and sampled at a spring 2.5 km away. The two types of microspheres were analyzed using an epifluorescence microscope or a novel fluorescence particle counter, respectively. Uranine breakthrough curves (BTCs) were regular shaped and recovery approached 100%. Microsphere recoveries ranged between 27% and 75%. During low flow, the 1-microm spheres displayed an irregular BTC preceding the uranine peak. Only a very few 5-microm spheres were recovered. During high flow, the 1-microm-sphere BTC was regular and more similar to the uranine curve. BTCs were modeled analytically with CXTFIT using a conventional advection dispersion model (ADM) and a two-region nonequilibrium model (2RNE). The results show that (1) colloids travel at higher velocities than solutes during low flow; (2) colloids and solutes travel at similar velocities during high flow; (3) higher maximum concentrations occur during high flow; and (4) the 2RNE achieves a better fit, while the ADM is more robust, as it requires less parameters.

  9. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alexander H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  10. Adhesion of bacterial pathogens to soil colloidal particles: influences of cell type, natural organic matter, and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Walker, Sharon L; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2014-04-15

    Bacterial adhesion to granular soil particles is well studied; however, pathogen interactions with naturally occurring colloidal particles (colloids as a function of cell type, natural organic matter (NOM), and solution chemistry. Specifically, batch adhesion experiments were conducted using NOM-present, NOM-stripped soil colloids, Streptococcus suis SC05 and Escherichia coli WH09 over a wide range of solution pH (4.0-9.0) and ionic strength (IS, 1-100 mM KCl). Cell characterization techniques, Freundlich isotherm, and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (sphere-sphere model) were utilized to quantitatively determine the interactions between cells and colloids. The adhesion coefficients (Kf) of S. suis SC05 to NOM-present and NOM-stripped soil colloids were significantly higher than E. coli WH09, respectively. Similarly, Kf values of S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 adhesion to NOM-stripped soil colloids were greater than those colloids with NOM-present, respectively, suggesting NOM inhibits bacterial adhesion. Cell adhesion to soil colloids declined with increasing pH and enhanced with rising IS (1-50 mM). Interaction energy calculations indicate these adhesion trends can be explained by DLVO-type forces, with S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 being weakly adhered in shallow secondary energy minima via polymer bridging and charge heterogeneity. S. suis SC05 adhesion decreased at higher IS 100 mM, which is attributed to the change of hydrophobic effect and steric repulsion resulted from the greater presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on S. suis SC05 surface as compared to E. coli WH09. Hence, pathogen adhesion to the colloidal material is determined by a combination of DLVO, charge heterogeneity, hydrophobic and polymer interactions as a function of solution chemistry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Formation of silver nanoparticles in an acid-catalyzed silica colloidal solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Yun

    2004-06-01

    In a weak basic, weak acidic or neutral water-alcohol solution, silver nanoparticles were generated by the reduction of Ag + ions in the present of colloidal silica. Silica as a substrate played an important role in the formation of Silver particles. The plasmon band of silver particles supported on the surface of silica was considerably shifted to longer wavelength compared with the pure silver sol. The shift in absorption spectra was explained in terms of surface effects induced by the interaction of silver and silica, as well as size effects and irregular shape.

  12. Structural and luminescence properties of silicon nanocrystals in colloidal solutions for bio applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Vorkotter, C.; Šimáková, Petra; Benedikt, J.; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 213, č. 11 (2016), s. 2873-2878 ISSN 1862-6300. [Spring Conference of the European-Materials-Research-Society (E-MRS). Lille, 02.05.2016-06.05.2016] Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanoparticles * porous silicon * colloidal solutions * surface modification * low-pressure microwave plasma synthesis Subject RIV: BO - Bio physics Impact factor: 1.775, year: 2016

  13. Radiation stability of colloidal metals in aqueous solutions: silver and other metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of accelerated electrons and γ-rays of 60N i on the stability of aqueous solutions of colloidal silver was studied. The threshold of absorbed dose, at which the stability dramatically decreases and coagulation of the metal occurs, was found. This critical dose corresponds to the reduction of silver ions determining the electrical potential of the sols. Radiation neutralization was also found for cadmium was not observed in the case of thallium, copper and platinum. A mechanism of the effect of radiation, taking into account the electrostatic factor in the stability of metal sols, was considered. (author)

  14. Cohesion and adhesion properties of modified water glass with colloidal solutions of ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Smyksy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the issue of the influence of colloidal solutions of nanoparticles of ZnO obtained using original method on physical and chemical properties (cohesions, adhesion, wettability of water glass. Adhesion and cohesion strength has been determined on the basis of own methodology of measurement using a special apparatus. The results of the above measurements have been supplemented with selected measurements of quartz wettability by the modified binder. Also, exemplary results have been presented of tests involving basic properties of moulding sans containing an addition of the aforementioned binder. In conclusions, the influence of binder modification on the properties of moulding sands have been presented.

  15. Feasibility Study on the Use of the Seeding Growth Technique in Producing a Highly Stable Gold Nanoparticle Colloidal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Han Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable colloidal gold nanoparticles (Au NPs are synthesized successfully using a seeding growth technique. The size of the nanoparticles is determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and it is observed that the size of the nanoparticles ranges from 7 to 30 nm. The TEM images and optical absorption spectra of the Au NPs reveal that the suspension is well dispersed and consistent with the particle size. The feasibility of the seeding growth technique is investigated using Turbiscan Classic MA 2000 screening stability tester. Based on the peak thickness kinetics and mean value kinetics, the backscattered light profiles indicate that the suspension is highly stable without particle sedimentation as well as negligible agglomeration. In addition, the Au NPs are proven to remain stable over a period of 2 months. Particle sedimentation eventually occurs due to the weight of nanoparticles. It is concluded that the seeding growth technique is feasible in synthesizing stable Au NPs. Controlling the stability, size and shape of Au NPs are technologically important because of the strong correlation between these parameters and the optical, electrical, and catalytic properties of the nanoparticles.

  16. Characterization of microstructure and catalytic of cerium oxide obtained by colloidal solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senisse, C.A.L.; Bergmann, C.P.; Alves, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated to obtain particles of cerium oxide, for use as catalysts for the combustion of methane using the technique of through polymeric colloidal solution. Obtaining the colloidal system is based on hydrolysis of salts such as cerium acetylacetonate, cerium nitrate in the presence of additives such as polyvinylbutyral (PVB), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA), at concentrations of 5, 10 and 15% in aqueous or alcoholic medium. These solutions containing ions of interest were subjected to a heat treatment at 650° C for 30 minutes, with heating rate of 2 ° C/ min. After heat treatment, the fibers were characterized according to their morphology, surface area, crystallinity, weight loss and catalytic activity. Samples obtained from cerium acetylacetonate were more reactive than the cerium nitrate to the combustion of methane, as showed greater conversions and higher temperatures reached during the process, which is of utmost importance since the combustion catalytic methane is used for generating thermal energy. After the reaction with methane, the samples underwent significant change in surface area, probably due to the intensity of combustion reactions of the nitrate and the generation of heat involved in this reaction, which gave rise to coarse particles. During the combustion process using the obtained from particles of cerium acetylacetonate, there was the release of large quantities of nitrogen compared to the results of assays with the particles obtained with cerium nitrate. (author)

  17. Impact of Metal Nanoform Colloidal Solution on the Adaptive Potential of Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Nataliya; Batsmanova, Ludmila; Kovalenko, Mariia; Okanenko, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are a known cause of oxidative stress and so induce antistress action. The latter property was the purpose of our study. The effect of two concentrations (120 and 240 mg/l) of nanoform biogenic metal (Ag, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn) colloidal solution on antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase; the level of the factor of the antioxidant state; and the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) of soybean plant in terms of field experience were studied. It was found that the oxidative processes developed a metal nanoparticle pre-sowing seed treatment variant at a concentration of 120 mg/l, as evidenced by the increase in the content of TBARS in photosynthetic tissues by 12 %. Pre-sowing treatment in a double concentration (240 mg/l) resulted in a decrease in oxidative processes (19 %), and pre-sowing treatment combined with vegetative treatment also contributed to the reduction of TBARS (10 %). Increased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was observed in a variant by increasing the content of TBARS; SOD activity was at the control level in two other variants. Catalase activity decreased in all variants. The factor of antioxidant activity was highest (0.3) in a variant with nanoparticle double treatment (pre-sowing and vegetative) at a concentration of 120 mg/l. Thus, the studied nanometal colloidal solution when used in small doses, in a certain time interval, can be considered as a low-level stress factor which according to hormesis principle promoted adaptive response reaction.

  18. The Colloidal Stabilization of Quantum Dots: Towards Manufacturable, Efficient Solution-Processed Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollny, Lisa

    Understanding colloidal stabilization can influence the design of optoelectronic devices and enable improvements to their performance and stability. For photovoltaics, important characteristics of the active layer material are high conductivity along with a minimum of recombination centers. In order to capitalize on the benefits of solution-processed materials, it is important to minimize the number of processing steps: ideally, to achieve a low-cost solution, materials would be deposited using a single process step compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. Prior to this work, the highest-performing colloidal quantum dots (CQD) solar cells have relied on several deposition steps that are repeated in a layer-by-layer (LBL) fashion. The purpose of these process steps has been to remove the long insulating ligands used in synthesis and replace them with short ligands that allow electrical conduction. The large number of steps combined, typically implemented via spin coating, leads to inefficient materials utilization and fails to show a path to a manufacturable solution. In this work, the first CQD solar cells were designed, built, and characterized combining state-of-art performance with scalable manufacture. Firstly, I report the first automated CQD synthesis to result in CQDs that form high-performance CQD solar cells. I analyze the CQD synthesis and by separating it into two phases---nucleation and growth phase---my insights are used to create higher-quality CQDs exhibiting enhanced monodispersity. I then proceed to develop a CQD ink: a CQD solution ready for direct deposition to form a semiconducting film exhibiting low trap state density. In early trials the CQD ink showed only limited power conversion efficiencies of 2%. I designed a new ink strategy, which I term cleavable hemiketal ligands. This novel two-component ligand strategy enables the combination of colloidal stabilization (via this longer two-component ligand) and cleavability (enabling excellent

  19. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals as charge transporting layers for solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyong; Bai, Sai; Wang, Xin; Dai, Xingliang; Gao, Feng; Sun, Baoquan; Ning, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2017-03-21

    Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals offer a unique combination of excellent low-temperature solution processability, rich and tuneable optoelectronic properties and intrinsic stability, which makes them an ideal class of materials as charge transporting layers in solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Developing new material chemistry and custom-tailoring processing and properties of charge transporting layers based on oxide nanocrystals hold the key to boosting the efficiency and lifetime of all-solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells, and thereby realizing an unprecedented generation of high-performance, low-cost, large-area and flexible optoelectronic devices. This review aims to bridge two research fields, chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals and interfacial engineering of optoelectronic devices, focusing on the relationship between chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, processing and properties of charge transporting layers and device performance. Synthetic chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, ligand chemistry that may be applied to colloidal oxide nanocrystals and chemistry associated with post-deposition treatments are discussed to highlight the ability of optimizing processing and optoelectronic properties of charge transporting layers. Selected examples of solution-processed solar cells and light-emitting diodes with oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers are examined. The emphasis is placed on the correlation between the properties of oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers and device performance. Finally, three major challenges that need to be addressed in the future are outlined. We anticipate that this review will spur new material design and simulate new chemistry for colloidal oxide nanocrystals, leading to charge transporting layers and solution-processed optoelectronic devices beyond the state-of-the-art.

  20. Influence of macroporosity on preferential solute and colloid transport in unsaturated field soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cey, Edwin E; Rudolph, David L; Passmore, Joanna

    2009-06-26

    Transport of solutes and colloids in soils, particularly those subject to preferential flow along macropores, is important for assessing the vulnerability of shallow groundwater to contamination. The objective of this study was to investigate flow and transport phenomena for dissolved and colloid tracers during large infiltration events in partially saturated, macroporous soils. Controlled tracer infiltration tests were completed at two field sites in southern Ontario. A tension infiltrometer (TI) was used to infiltrate water with dissolved Brilliant Blue FCF dye simultaneously with 3.7 microm and 0.53 microm diameter fluorescent microspheres. Infiltration was conducted under maximum infiltration pressure heads ranging from -5.2 to -0.4 cm. All infiltration test sites were excavated to examine and photograph dye-stained flow patterns, map soil features, and collect samples for microsphere enumeration. Results indicated that preferential transport of dye and microspheres via macropores occurred when maximum pressure heads were greater than -3.0 cm, and the corresponding infiltration rates exceeded 2.0 cm h(-1). Dye and microspheres were detected at depths greater than 70 cm under the highest infiltration rates from both sites. Microsphere concentrations in the top 5-10 cm of soil decreased by more than two orders of magnitude relative to input concentrations, yet remained relatively constant with depth thereafter. There was some evidence for increased retention of the 3.7 microm microspheres relative to the 0.53 microm microspheres, particularly at lower infiltration pressures where straining and attachment mechanisms are most prevalent. Microspheres were observed within dye stained soil matrix surrounding individual macropores, illustrating the significance of capillary pressures in controlling the vertical migration of both tracers in the vicinity of the macropores. Overall, microsphere distributions closely followed the dye patterns, with microsphere

  1. Nonlinear oscillatory rheology and structure of wormlike micellar solutions and colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnon, Amanda Kate

    The complex, nonlinear flow behavior of soft materials transcends industrial applications, smart material design and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A long-standing, fundamental challenge in soft-matter science is establishing a quantitative connection between the deformation field, local microstructure and macroscopic dynamic flow properties i.e., the rheology. Soft materials are widely used in consumer products and industrial processes including energy recovery, surfactants for personal healthcare (e.g. soap and shampoo), coatings, plastics, drug delivery, medical devices and therapeutics. Oftentimes, these materials are processed by, used during, or exposed to non-equilibrium conditions for which the transient response of the complex fluid is critical. As such, designing new dynamic experiments is imperative to testing these materials and further developing micromechanical models to predict their transient response. Two of the most common classes of these soft materials stand as the focus of the present research; they are: solutions of polymer-like micelles (PLM or also known as wormlike micelles, WLM) and concentrated colloidal suspensions. In addition to their varied applications these two different classes of soft materials are also governed by different physics. In contrast, to the shear thinning behavior of the WLMs at high shear rates, the near hard-sphere colloidal suspensions are known to display increases, sometimes quite substantial, in viscosity (known as shear thickening). The stress response of these complex fluids derive from the shear-induced microstructure, thus measurements of the microstructure under flow are critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying the complex, nonlinear rheology of these complex fluids. A popular micromechanical model is reframed from its original derivation for predicting steady shear rheology of polymers and WLMs to be applicable to weakly nonlinear oscillatory shear flow. The validity, utility and limits of

  2. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of Fe colloid catalysts in inverse micelle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, A.; Stoker, M.; Hicks, M. [Sandia National Lab., Alburquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Surfactant molecules, possessing a hydrophilic head group and a hydrophobic tail group, aggregate in various solvents to form structured solutions. In two component mixtures of surfactant and organic solvents (e.g., toluene and alkanes), surfactants aggregate to form inverse micelles. Here, the hydrophilic head groups shield themselves by forming a polar core, and the hydrophobic tails groups are free to move about in the surrounding oleic phase. The formation of Fe clusters in inverse miscelles was studied.Iron salts are solubilized within the polar interior of inverse micelles, and the addition of the reducing agent LiBH{sub 4} initiates a chemical reduction to produce monodisperse, nanometer sized Fe based particles. The reaction sequence is sustained by material exchange between inverse micelles. The surfactant interface provides a spatial constraint on the reaction volume, and reactions carried out in these micro-heterogeneous solutions produce colloidal sized particles (10-100{Angstrom}) stabilized in solution against flocculation of surfactant. The clusters were stabilized with respect to size with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and with respect to chemical composition with Mossbauer spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, these iron based clusters were tested for catalytic activity in a model hydrogenolysis reaction. The hydrogenolysis of naphthyl bibenzyl methane was used as a model for coal pyrolysis.

  4. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham THN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available TH Nguyen Pham,1 Nigel A Lengkeek,2 Ivan Greguric,2 Byung J Kim,1 Paul A Pellegrini,2 Stephanie A Bickley,3 Marcel R Tanudji,3 Stephen K Jones,3 Brian S Hawkett,1 Binh TT Pham1 1Key Centre for Polymers and Colloids, School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, 2Radioisotopes and Radiotracers, NSTLI, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, 3Sirtex Medical Limited, North Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (SPIONs. The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography

  5. Colloid release and clogging in porous media: Effects of solution ionic strength and flow velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Vanderzalm, Joanne L; Patterson, Bradley M; Harris, Brett; Prommer, Henning

    2015-10-01

    The release and retention of in-situ colloids in aquifers play an important role in the sustainable operation of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) schemes. The processes of colloid release, retention, and associated permeability changes in consolidated aquifer sediments were studied by displacing native groundwater with reverse osmosis-treated (RO) water at various flow velocities. Significant amounts of colloid release occurred when: (i) the native groundwater was displaced by RO-water with a low ionic strength (IS), and (ii) the flow velocity was increased in a stepwise manner. The amount of colloid release and associated permeability reduction upon RO-water injection depended on the initial clay content of the core. The concentration of released colloids was relatively low and the permeability reduction was negligible for the core sample with a low clay content of about 1.3%. In contrast, core samples with about 6 and 7.5% clay content exhibited: (i) close to two orders of magnitude increase in effluent colloid concentration and (ii) more than 65% permeability reduction. Incremental improvement in the core permeability was achieved when the flow velocity increased, whereas a short flow interruption provided a considerable increase in the core permeability. This dependence of colloid release and permeability changes on flow velocity and colloid concentration was consistent with colloid retention and release at pore constrictions due to the mechanism of hydrodynamic bridging. A mathematical model was formulated to describe the processes of colloid release, transport, retention at pore constrictions, and subsequent permeability changes. Our experimental and modeling results indicated that only a small fraction of the in-situ colloids was released for any given change in the IS or flow velocity. Comparison of the fitted and experimentally measured effluent colloid concentrations and associated changes in the core permeability showed good agreement, indicating that the

  6. Fermi level equilibration between colloidal lead and silver particles in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henglein, A.; Holzwarth, A.; Mulvaney, P.

    1992-01-01

    Colloidal solutions of lead and silver were mixed under the exclusion of air. The equilibration of the Fermi levels in the two different types of metal particles took place over a few days at room temperature. The equilibration took place by the transfer of lead atoms from lead to silver particles until the latter carried a lead mantle of one to two monolayers. This could be concluded from the observed changes in the optical spectrum of the silver particles. The results are discussed in terms of two mechanisms: (1) Pb atom transfer following heterocoagulation of the lead and silver particles and (2) electron transfer during Brownian encounters, followed by Pb 2+ desorption from the lead particles and subsequent Pb 2+ reductor on the silver particles carrying the transferred electrons. Traces of methylviologen, MV 2+ , in the solution drastically increase the rate of equilibration; this is explained by a relay mechanism in which electrons in the lead particles are first picked up by MV 2+ and are then transferred from MV + to the silver particles. 2 refs., 4 figs

  7. Bio-inspired intelligent evaporation modulation in a thermo-sensitive nanogel colloid solution for self-thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi; Liu, Kang; Feng, Yanhui; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-06-28

    Intelligent evaporation and temperature modulation plays an important role in self-regulation of living organisms and many industrial applications. Here we demonstrate that a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) nanogel colloid solution can spontaneously and intelligently modulate its evaporation rate with temperature variation, which has a larger evaporation rate than distilled water at a temperature higher than its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and a smaller evaporation rate at a temperature lower than its LCST. It performs just like human skin. Theoretical analysis based on the thermodynamic derivation reveals that the evaporation rate transition around the LCST may originate from the saturated vapor pressure transition caused by the status transformation of the PNIPAM additives. An intelligent thermoregulation system based on the PNIPAM colloid solution is also demonstrated, illustrating its potential for intelligent temperature control and acting as an artificial skin.

  8. Charge inversion and colloidal stability of carbon black in battery electrolyte solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yan; Narayanan, Aditya; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects is an international journal devoted to the science of the fundamentals, engineering fundamentals, and applications of colloidal and interfacial phenomena and processes. The journal aims at publishing research papers of high quality and

  9. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  10. Tuning colloidal quantum dot band edge positions through solution-phase surface chemistry modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Daniel M.; Vörös, Márton; Brawand, Nicholas P.; McNichols, Brett W.; Miller, Elisa M.; Gu, Jing; Nozik, Arthur J.; Sellinger, Alan; Galli, Giulia; Beard, Matthew C.

    2017-05-01

    Band edge positions of semiconductors determine their functionality in many optoelectronic applications such as photovoltaics, photoelectrochemical cells and light emitting diodes. Here we show that band edge positions of lead sulfide (PbS) colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots (QDs), can be tuned over 2.0 eV through surface chemistry modification. We achieved this remarkable control through the development of simple, robust and scalable solution-phase ligand exchange methods, which completely replace native ligands with functionalized cinnamate ligands, allowing for well-defined, highly tunable chemical systems. By combining experiments and ab initio simulations, we establish clear relationships between QD surface chemistry and the band edge positions of ligand/QD hybrid systems. We find that in addition to ligand dipole, inter-QD ligand shell inter-digitization contributes to the band edge shifts. We expect that our established relationships and principles can help guide future optimization of functional organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures for diverse optoelectronic applications.

  11. Continuous agglomerate model for identifying the solute- indifferent part of colloid nanoparticle's surface charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfimov, A V; Aryslanova, E M; Chivilikhin, S A

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes an explicit analytical model for the surface potential of a colloidal nano-agglomerate. The model predicts that when an agglomerate reaches a certain critical size, its surface potential becomes independent of the agglomerate radius. The model also provides a method for identifying and quantifying the solute-indifferent charge in nanocolloids, that allows to assess the stability of toxicologically significant parameters of the system. (paper)

  12. Coordination chemistry and antisolvent strategy to rare-earth solid solution colloidal spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng Chao; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2012-11-21

    We have devised in this work a general synthetic strategy for preparation of single- and multicomponent rare-earth coordination polymer colloidal spheres (RE-CPCSs). This strategy is based on an integration of coordination chemistry and antisolvent effect for synchronized precipitation. Highly monodisperse RE-CPCSs with homogeneous mixing of RE elements, which are not readily attainable by any existing methods, have been successfully prepared for the first time. In addition, the type and molar ratio of these colloidal spheres can be adjusted easily in accordance to the variety and dosage of precursor salts. The molar ratio of RE elements in as-prepared colloidal spheres shows a linear relationship to that of starting reactants. Furthermore, the RE-based core/shell colloidal spheres can be facilely prepared by introducing other metal salts (beyond lanthanide elements) owing to their different coordination chemistry and precipitation behavior. By adjusting concentrations of the ionic activators, luminescent properties can be tuned accordingly. Moreover, the RE-CPCSs can be transformed to monodisperse lanthanide oxide spheres via simple heat treatment. We believe that the present synthetic strategy provides a viable route to prepare other lanthanide-containing colloidal spheres that have enormous potential for future applications as optoelectronic devices, catalysts, gas sensors, and solar cells.

  13. On the solution of high order stable time integration methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe; Blaheta, Radim; Sysala, Stanislav; Ahmad, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-22 ISSN 1687-2770 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : evolution equations * preconditioners for quadratic matrix polynomials * a stiffly stable time integration method Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.836, year: 2013 http://www.boundaryvalueproblems.com/content/2013/1/108

  14. Unloading and Reloading Colloidal Microcapsules with Apolar Solutions by Controlled and Reversible Buckling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Kamp, M.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new experimental method to encapsulate and release oils and fluorescent molecules into preformed elastic colloidal microcapsules of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-filled siloxane shells, which are cross-linked with tetraethoxysilane. The method uses controlled buckling, where the volume

  15. Nanoscale colloids in a freely adsorbing polymer solution: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marla, Krishna Tej; Meredith, J Carson

    2004-02-17

    A key issue in nanoscale materials and chemical processing is the need for thermodynamic and kinetic models covering colloid-polymer systems over the mesoscopic length scale (approximately 1-100 nm). We have applied Monte Carlo simulations to attractive nanoscale colloid-polymer mixtures toward developing a molecular basis for models of these complex systems. The expanded ensemble Monte Carlo simulation method is applied to calculate colloid chemical potentials (micro(c)) and polymer adsorption (gamma) in the presence of freely adsorbing Lennard-Jones (LJ) homopolymers (surface modifiers). gamma and micro(c) are studied as a function of nanoparticle diameter (sigma(c)), modifier chain length (n) and concentration, and colloid-polymer attractive strength over 0.3 attractive regime, nanocolloid chemical potential decreases and adsorbed amount increases as sigma(c), or n is increased. The scaling of gamma with n from the simulations agrees with the theory of Aubouy and Raphael (Macromolecules 1998, 31, 4357) in the extreme limits of Rg/sigma(c). When Rg/sigma(c) is large, the "colloid" approaches a molecular size and interacts only locally with a few polymer segments and gamma approximately n. When Rg/sigma(c) is small, the system approaches the conventional colloid-polymer size regime where multiple chains interact with a single particle, and gamma approximately sigma(c)2, independent of n. In contrast, adsorption in the mesoscopic range of Rg/sigma(c) investigated here is represented well by a power law gamma approximately n(p), with 0 attractive strength. Likewise, the chemical potential from our results is fitted well with micro(c) approximately n(q)sigma(c)3, where the cubic term results from the sigma(c) dependence of particle surface area (approximately sigma(c)2) and LJ attractive magnitude (approximately sigma(c)). The q-exponent for micro(c) (micro(c) approximately n(q)) varies with composition and LJ attractive strength but is always very close to the power

  16. EOS9nT: A TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and solute/colloid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.S.; Pruess, K.

    1998-04-01

    EOS9nT is a new TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and transport of an arbitrary number n of tracers (solutes and/or colloids) in the subsurface. The module first solves the flow-related equations, which are comprised of (a) the Richards equation and, depending on conditions, may also include (b) the flow equation of a dense brine or aqueous suspension and/or (c) the heat equation. A second set of transport equations, corresponding to the n tracers, are then solved sequentially. The low concentrations of the n tracers are considered to have no effect on the liquid phase, thus making possible the decoupling of their equations. The first set of equations in EOS9nT provides the flow regime and account for fluid density variations due to thermal and/or solute concentration effects. The n tracer transport equations account for sorption, radioactive decay, advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, molecular diffusion, as well as filtration (for colloids only). EOS9nT can handle gridblocks or irregular geometry in three-dimensional domains. Preliminary results from four 1-D verification problems show an excellent agreement between the numerical predictions and the known analytical solutions

  17. Colloidal stability of gold nanorod solution upon exposure to excised human skin: Effect of surface chemistry and protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Nouf N; Al-Qaoud, Khaled M; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Khalil, Enam A

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the colloidal stability of gold nanorods (with positive, negative and neutral surface charge) in solution upon contact with excised human skin. UV-vis absorption, plasmon peak broadening index (PPBI%) and transmission electron microscope analysis were used to follow nanoparticles aggregation in solution. Our results show that positively charged gold nanorods aggregate extensively upon exposure to excised human skin compared to negatively and neutrally charged gold nanorods. Skin-induced aggregation of cationic gold nanorods was linked to the adsorption of proteins released from the dermis layer to the surface of gold nanorods. Protein adsorption significantly screen nanorod's effective surface charge and induce their aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the presence of polyethylene glycol polymer on the surface of cationic gold nanorods minimize this aggregation significantly by providing steric repulsion (non-electrostatic stabilization mechanism). This work highlights the importance of evaluating the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution upon contact with skin, which is a "usually overlooked" parameter when studying the nanoparticle-skin interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. About Global Stable of Solutions of Logistic Equation with Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschenko, S. A.; Loginov, D. O.

    2017-12-01

    The article is devoted to the definition of all the arguments for which all positive solutions of logistic equation with delay tend to zero for t → ∞. The authors have proved the acquainted Wright’s conjecture on evaluation of a multitude of such arguments. An approach that enables subsequent refinement of this evaluation has been developed.

  19. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a

  20. Colloidal nematostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  1. Solution Synthesis Approach to Colloidal Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanoplatelets with Monolayer-Level Thickness Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We report a colloidal synthesis approach to CsPbBr3 nanoplatelets (NPLs). The nucleation and growth of the platelets, which takes place at room temperature, is triggered by the injection of acetone in a mixture of precursors that would remain unreactive otherwise. The low growth temperature enables the control of the plate thickness, which can be precisely tuned from 3 to 5 monolayers. The strong two-dimensional confinement of the carriers at such small vertical sizes is responsible for a narrow PL, strong excitonic absorption, and a blue shift of the optical band gap by more than 0.47 eV compared to that of bulk CsPbBr3. We also show that the composition of the NPLs can be varied all the way to CsPbBr3 or CsPbI3 by anion exchange, with preservation of the size and shape of the starting particles. The blue fluorescent CsPbCl3 NPLs represent a new member of the scarcely populated group of blue-emitting colloidal nanocrystals. The exciton dynamics were found to be independent of the extent of 2D confinement in these platelets, and this was supported by band structure calculations. PMID:26726764

  2. systematic investigations of foam separation of Nickel (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions; separation by adsorbing colloid flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beheir, Sh.G.; Shakir, K.; Aziz, M.

    2004-01-01

    in the preceding parts we dealt with the application of the foam separation processes: ion and precipitate flotations for the separation of Ni (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions. Adsorbing colloid flotation (ACF), another type that has proved very useful, is the subject of this paper. ACF of Ni(l l) was investigated using Al (OH) 3 as a colloidal carrier, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) or sodium lauryl sulphate (NaLs) either singly or in combination with gelatin as collectors. the precipitate flotation curve obtained for the carrier Al(OH) 3 , was compared with the corresponding theoretical one calculated from the data published for Al(I I I) hydrolysis. the effects of the different parameters that can influence the flotation process were determined . removals approaching 100% could be achieved under the optimum conditions. the results obtained were discussed with respect to the chemical state of Ni (l l), the ionization behaviour of the collectors, and properties of the carrier precipitate , and are compared with those results obtained by the ion and precipitate flotation techniques. the developed ACF process was successfully applied to the removal of Ni (l l) from radioactive wastewater

  3. Asymptotically flat, stable black hole solutions in Einstein-Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brihaye, Yves; Radu, Eugen; Tchrakian, D H

    2011-02-18

    We construct finite mass, asymptotically flat black hole solutions in d=5 Einstein-Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory. Our results indicate the existence of a second order phase transition between Reissner-Nordström solutions and the non-Abelian black holes which generically are thermodynamically preferred. Some of the non-Abelian configurations are also stable under linear, spherically symmetric perturbations.

  4. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage in Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics via Reactivity-Controlled Solution-Phase Ligand Exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Jo, Jea Woong

    2017-10-09

    The energy disorder that arises from colloidal quantum dot (CQD) polydispersity limits the open-circuit voltage (VOC) and efficiency of CQD photovoltaics. This energy broadening is significantly deteriorated today during CQD ligand exchange and film assembly. Here, a new solution-phase ligand exchange that, via judicious incorporation of reactivity-engineered additives, provides improved monodispersity in final CQD films is reported. It has been found that increasing the concentration of the less reactive species prevents CQD fusion and etching. As a result, CQD solar cells with a VOC of 0.7 V (vs 0.61 V for the control) for CQD films with exciton peak at 1.28 eV and a power conversion efficiency of 10.9% (vs 10.1% for the control) is achieved.

  5. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage in Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics via Reactivity-Controlled Solution-Phase Ligand Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jea Woong; Kim, Younghoon; Choi, Jongmin; de Arquer, F Pelayo García; Walters, Grant; Sun, Bin; Ouellette, Olivier; Kim, Junghwan; Proppe, Andrew H; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Fan, James; Xu, Jixian; Tan, Chih Shan; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H

    2017-11-01

    The energy disorder that arises from colloidal quantum dot (CQD) polydispersity limits the open-circuit voltage (V OC ) and efficiency of CQD photovoltaics. This energy broadening is significantly deteriorated today during CQD ligand exchange and film assembly. Here, a new solution-phase ligand exchange that, via judicious incorporation of reactivity-engineered additives, provides improved monodispersity in final CQD films is reported. It has been found that increasing the concentration of the less reactive species prevents CQD fusion and etching. As a result, CQD solar cells with a V OC of 0.7 V (vs 0.61 V for the control) for CQD films with exciton peak at 1.28 eV and a power conversion efficiency of 10.9% (vs 10.1% for the control) is achieved. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Efficient solution route to transparent ZnO semiconductor films using colloidal nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suehiro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanocrystals (NCs were synthesized by heating Zn (II acetylacetonate in oleic acid/oleylamine in the presence of 1,2-hexadecanediol at 220 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurements revealed the formation of monodispersed ZnO NCs of ca. 7 nm. ZnO NC assembled films were fabricated on a glass substrate by deposition with the colloidal ZnO NCs dispersed in toluene. The film composed of the NCs showed good optical transparency in the visible to near-infrared region. A device coupling the ZnO NC film with a p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS NC film exhibited an obvious diode-like current–voltage behavior. The results suggest that the transparent ZnO film has a potentiality to be used for an n-type window layer in some optoelectronic applications.

  7. Factors controlling the chemical composition of colloidal and dissolved fractions in soil solutions and the mobility of trace elements in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Sophie; Stille, Peter; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Chabaux, François

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the processes and physico-chemical conditions that affect the composition of the soil solutions of a forest soil and to elucidate their impact on the transport of major and trace elements through the colloidal (0.2 μm to 5 kDa) and dissolved (soil. All experiments were performed with soil solutions obtained using lysimeter plates situated on an experimental spruce parcel of the Strengbach catchment (Northeastern France). The surface samples filtered at 0.2 μm facilitated the examination of the influence of litter decomposition on the chemical composition of the upper soil solutions. The impact of the soils biogeochemical conditions (pH, moisture, temperature, oxic or anoxic conditions) on litter decomposition was also examined. More particularly, the increase in NH4+ and NO2- compounds in some of the soil solutions points to denitrification processes in an anoxic environment. Thus, under anoxic conditions, the soil solution is enriched in Ca, P, Mn and Zn, whereas under oxic conditions it is enriched in Al and Fe. The physico-chemical conditions are more seasonally dependent in the upper soil horizons than in the deeper ones and have an impact on the variability of the chemical composition of the soil solutions. The colloidal and dissolved fractions of the soil solutions were obtained by tangential flow ultra-filtration. The experimental results reveal that nutrients, such as NO3- and P, are primarily in the dissolved fraction and consequently bioavailable; secondary minerals may be dissolved and/or precipitate in the colloidal fraction, such as pyromorphite (Pb5(PO4)3(OH, Cl, F)). The results further indicate that microbial activity influences the composition of the colloidal and dissolved fractions, and possibly enriches the colloidal fraction in Ca, Mn and P, diminishes the concentrations of Pb, V, Cr and Fe in the dissolved fraction, and changes the structure of organic carbon (OC). These results are important

  8. Strontium migration in a crystalline medium: effects of the presence of bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula; Mingarro, Manuel

    2011-03-25

    The effects of bentonite colloids on strontium migration in fractured crystalline medium were investigated. We analyzed first the transport behaviour of bentonite colloids alone at different flow rates; then we compared the transport behaviour of strontium as solute and of strontium previously adsorbed onto stable bentonite colloids at a water velocity of approximately 7.1·10(-6)m/s-224m/yr. Experiments with bentonite colloids alone showed that - at the lowest water flow rate used in our experiments (7.1·10(-6)m/s) - approximately 70% of the initially injected colloids were retained in the fracture. Nevertheless, the mobile colloidal fraction, moved through the fracture without retardation, at any flow rate. Bentonite colloids deposited over the fracture surface were identified during post-mortem analyses. The breakthrough curve of strontium as a solute, presented a retardation factor, R(f)~6, in agreement with its sorption onto the granite fracture surface. The breakthrough curve of strontium in the presence of bentonite colloids was much more complex, suggesting additional contributions of colloids to strontium transport. A very small fraction of strontium adsorbed on mobile colloids moved un-retarded (R(f)=1) and this fraction was much lower than the expected, considering the quantity of strontium initially adsorbed onto colloids (90%). This behaviour suggests the hypothesis of strontium sorption reversibility from colloids. On the other hand, bentonite colloids retained within the granite fracture played a major role, contributing to a slower strontium transport in comparison with strontium as a solute. This was shown by a clear peak in the breakthrough curve corresponding to a retardation factor of approximately 20. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Crystalloid vs. hypertonic crystalloid-colloid solutions for induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia after experimental cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclescu, Adriana; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Wiklund, Lars

    2013-02-01

    To compare cerebral and hemodynamic consequences of different volumes of cold acetated Ringer's solution or cold hypertonic saline dextran administered in order to achieve mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest (CA) in a pig model of experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Using an experimental pig model of 12 min CA (followed by 8 min CPR or no resuscitation) we compared four groups of piglets: a control group, a normothermic group and two groups with different solutions administered for induction of hypothermia. The control group of 5 piglets underwent 12 min CA without subsequent CPR, after which the brain of the animals was removed immediately. After restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) the resuscitated piglets were randomized into a normothermic group (NT group=10), and two hypothermic groups that received cold infusions of either 30 mL/kg acetated Ringer's solution (Much fluid group, M, n=10) or 3mL/kg hypertonic saline dextran solution (Less fluid group, L, n=10), respectively, administered during 30 min. Additional external cooling with ice packs was used in hypothermic groups. Sixty or 180min after ROSC the experiment was terminated. Immediately after arrest the brain was removed for histological analyses. The median time to reach the target core temperature of 34 °C after ROSC was 51.5±7.8 min in L group and 48.8±8.6 min in M group. Less cerebral tissue content of water (psmall volumes of cold hypertonic crystalloid-colloids is less as effective as crystalloid's induced hypothermia in mitigating brain injury after cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Solutions of the Strominger System via Stable Bundles on Calabi-Yau Threefolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas, Björn; Garcia Fernandez, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We prove that a given Calabi-Yau threefold with a stable holomorphic vector bundle can be perturbed to a solution of the Strominger system provided that the second Chern class of the vector bundle is equal to the second Chern class of the tangent bundle. If the Calabi-Yau threefold has strict SU(...

  11. Poly(acrylic acid)-directed synthesis of colloidally stable single domain magnetite nanoparticles via partial oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altan, Cem L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul 34755 (Turkey); Laboratory of Materials and Interface Chemistry & Soft Matter cryoTEM Research Unit, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5600 MB (Netherlands); Gurten, Berna [Department of Chemical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul 34755 (Turkey); Sadza, Roel [Laboratory of Materials and Interface Chemistry & Soft Matter cryoTEM Research Unit, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5600 MB (Netherlands); Yenigul, Elcin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul 34755 (Turkey); Sommerdijk, Nico A.J.M., E-mail: n.sommerdijk@tue.nl [Laboratory of Materials and Interface Chemistry & Soft Matter cryoTEM Research Unit, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5600 MB (Netherlands); Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5600 MB (Netherlands); Bucak, Seyda, E-mail: seyda@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul 34755 (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Octahedral, single domain magnetite nanoparticles with average size of ~55 nm were synthesized through oxidative aging of a ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH){sub 2}) precursor at high pH in water. The synthesis was also carried out in the presence of the hydrophilic polymer poly(acrylic acid). Presence of the polymer changed the particle morphology from octahedral to spherical while average size decreased to 40–50 nm. Although these particles have a tendency to precipitate due to their high magnetic moment, dispersions of these particles were obtained in the presence of this particular polymer which made the particles stable in water for several days making them suitable for various biotechnological applications such as cell separation owing to their low toxicity. - Highlights: • Stable, single domain magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized via partial oxidation. • Particles are readily stabilized in water by a biocompatible polymer. • Steric barrier is essential for the stabilization of large magnetite nanoparticles.

  12. Nonlinear optical properties of colloidal silver nanoparticles produced by laser ablation in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavanskii, V A; Krasovskii, V I; Ivanchenko, P V; Simakin, Aleksandr V

    2004-01-01

    The optical and nonlinear optical properties of colloidal solutions of silver obtained by laser ablation in water and ethanol are studied. It is shown that freshly prepared colloids experience a full or partial sedimentation by changing their nonlinear optical properties. Aqueous colloids undergo a partial sedimentation and their nonlinear optical absorption changes to nonlinear optical transmission. The obtained results are interpreted using the Drude model for metal particles taking the particle size into account and can be explained by the sedimentation of larger silver particles accompanied by the formation of a stable colloid containing silver nanoparticles with a tentatively silver oxide shell. The characteristic size of particles forming such a stable colloid is determined and its optical nonlinearity is estimated. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  13. Polarons as stable solitary wave solutions to the Dirac-Coulomb system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comech, Andrew; Zubkov, Mikhail

    2013-11-01

    We consider solitary wave solutions to the Dirac-Coulomb system both from physical and mathematical points of view. Fermions interacting with gravity in the Newtonian limit are described by the model of Dirac fermions with the Coulomb attraction. This model also appears in certain condensed matter systems with emergent Dirac fermions interacting via optical phonons. In this model, the classical soliton solutions of equations of motion describe the physical objects that may be called polarons, in analogy to the solutions of the Choquard equation. We develop analytical methods for the Dirac-Coulomb system, showing that the no-node gap solitons for sufficiently small values of charge are linearly (spectrally) stable.

  14. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, TH Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh TT

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. PMID:28184160

  15. Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-x nanocomposite films and coated conductors from BaMO3 (M = Zr, Hf) colloidal solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradors, X.; Puig, T.; Li, Z.; Pop, C.; Mundet, B.; Chamorro, N.; Vallés, F.; Coll, M.; Ricart, S.; Vallejo, B.; Pino, F.; Palau, A.; Gázquez, J.; Ros, J.; Usoskin, A.

    2018-04-01

    Superconducting nanocomposites are the best material choice to address the performance required in power applications and magnets working under high magnetic fields. However, it is still challenging to sort out how to achieve the highest superconducting performance using attractive and competitive manufacturing processes. Colloidal solutions have been recently developed as a novel and very promising low cost route to manufacture nanocomposite coated conductors. Well dispersed and stabilized preformance nanoparticle solutions are first prepared with high concentrations and then mixed with the YBa2Cu3O7 metalorganic precursor solutions to generate colloidal solutions to grow the nanocomposite films. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that non-reactive BaZrO3 and BaHfO3 perovskite preformed nanoparticles are suitable for growing high quality thin and thick films, and coated conductors with a homogeneous distribution and controlled particle size using this fabrication method. Additionally, we extend the nanoparticle content of the nanocomposites up to 20%-25% mol without any degradation of the superconducting properties. Thick nanocomposite films, up to 0.8 μm, have been prepared with a single deposition of low-fluorine solutions using an ink jet printing dispenser and we demonstrate that the preformed nanoparticles display only a very limited coarsening during the growth process and so high critical current densities J c (B) under high magnetic fields. These films show the highest critical currents achieved so far based on the colloidal solution approach, I c = 220 A/cm-w at 77 K and self-field, and they still have a high potential for further increase in the film thickness. Finally, we also show that nanocomposite YBa2Cu3O7-BaZrO3 coated conductors based on an alternating beam assisted deposited YSZ buffer layer on stainless steel metallic substrates can be developed based on these novel colloidal solutions. Non-reactive preformed oxide perovskite

  16. Solution-Processed Environmentally Friendly Ag2S Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Broad Spectral Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor A. Öberg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A facile heat-up synthesis route is used to synthesize environmentally friendly Ag2S colloidal quantum dots (CQDs that are applied as light absorbing material in solid state p-i-n junction solar cell devices. The as-synthesized Ag2S CQDs have an average size of around 3.5 nm and exhibit broad light absorption covering ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared wavelength regions. The solar cell devices are constructed with a device architecture of FTO/TiO2/Ag2S CQDs/hole transport material (HTM /Au using a solution-processed approach. Different HTMs, N2,N2,N2′,N2′,N7,N7,N7′,N7′-octakis(4-methoxyphenyl-9,9′-spirobi(9H-fluorene-2,2′,7,7′ tetramine (spiro-OMeTAD, poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT, and poly((2,3-bis(3-octyloxyphenyl-5,8-quinoxalinediyl-2,5-thiophenediyl TQ1 are studied for maximizing the device photovoltaic performance. The solar cell device with P3HT as a hole transport material gives the highest performance and the solar cell exhibit broad spectral absorption. These results indicate that Ag2S CQD have high potential for utilization as environmentally friendly light absorbing materials for solar cell application and that the hole transport material is critical to maximize the solar cell photovoltaic performance.

  17. Evaluation of bacteria-facilitated cadmium transport in gravel columns using the HYDRUS colloid-facilitated solute transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liping; Å Imå¯Nek, Jirka

    2006-12-01

    The colloid-facilitated solute transport model, based on HYDRUS-1D, was evaluated using the column experimental data of Pang et al. (2005) for cadmium (Cd) transport facilitated by B. subtilis spores or E. coli in saturated coarse alluvial gravels. We simulated Cd transport involving convection, dispersion, kinetic adsorption/desorption to/from the aquifer media and to/from mobile/immobile bacteria, and kinetic attachment/detachment of the bacteria to/from the aquifer media. To reduce the number of parameters to be optimized, we independently estimated Cd sorption/desorption rates to mobile bacteria from a batch study. The model described the collected experimental data reasonably well. Extensive sensitivity analysis to various reaction parameters was carried out to obtain an understanding of the relative importance of individual model parameters on model predictions. Our modeling results suggest that the rates of Cd sorption or desorption differ not only between different bacterial species but also between unattached and deposited bacteria. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicated that the Cd sorption rate to unattached bacteria had a significantly greater impact on the model results than its sorption rate to deposited bacteria. For the experimental system investigated here, model results were most sensitive to parameters describing interactions between Cd-aquifer media, bacteria-aquifer media, and Cd-mobile bacteria, and they were less sensitive to interactions between Cd-immobile bacteria and desorption rate from mobile bacteria.

  18. Efficient and stable solution-processed planar perovskite solar cells via contact passivation

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Hairen

    2017-02-03

    Planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) made entirely via solution processing at low temperatures (<150°C) offer promise for simple manufacturing, compatibility with flexible substrates, and perovskite-based tandem devices. However, these PSCs require an electron-selective layer that performs well with similar processing. We report a contact-passivation strategy using chlorine-capped TiO2 colloidal nanocrystal film that mitigates interfacial recombination and improves interface binding in low-temperature planar solar cells. We fabricated solar cells with certified efficiencies of 20.1 and 19.5% for active areas of 0.049 and 1.1 square centimeters, respectively, achieved via low-temperature solution processing. Solar cells with efficiency greater than 20% retained 90% (97% after dark recovery) of their initial performance after 500 hours of continuous room-temperature operation at their maximum power point under 1-sun illumination (where 1 sun is defined as the standard illumination at AM1.5, or 1 kilowatt/square meter).

  19. Nanostructures of colloidal complexes formed in oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant dilute aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, S; Guillot, S; Ritacco, H; Boué, F; Langevin, D

    2007-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering measurements were performed on dilute solutions of carboxymethylcellulose/DTAB complexes in water in order to determine their size, shape and internal structures. At low polymer content, the complexes are spherical, rather monodisperse and probably made of polymer chains intercalated between surfactant micelles. Moreover, we show that these micelles have a similar cubic arrangement than found in polymer/surfactant precipitates formed at higher surfactant concentrations. At larger polymer content, in the semi-dilute polyelectrolyte regime, the complexes are larger, softer and polydisperse. However, they possess a similar internal structure in both regimes. Carboxymethylcellulose/CTAB complexes are also large, soft and polydisperse but do not seem to exhibit well-defined internal structures.

  20. Nanostructures of colloidal complexes formed in oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant dilute aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, S.; Guillot, S.; Ritacco, H.; Boué, F.; Langevin, D.

    2007-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering measurements were performed on dilute solutions of carboxymethylcellulose/DTAB complexes in water in order to determine their size, shape and internal structures. At low polymer content, the complexes are spherical, rather monodisperse and probably made of polymer chains intercalated between surfactant micelles. Moreover, we show that these micelles have a similar cubic arrangement than found in polymer/surfactant precipitates formed at higher surfactant concentrations. At larger polymer content, in the semi-dilute polyelectrolyte regime, the complexes are larger, softer and polydisperse. However, they possess a similar internal structure in both regimes. Carboxymethylcellulose/CTAB complexes are also large, soft and polydisperse but do not seem to exhibit well-defined internal structures.

  1. Lysine-functionalized nanodiamonds as gene carriers: development of stable colloidal dispersion for in vitro cellular uptake studies and siRNA delivery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwani, Saniya; Kaur, Randeep; Michel, Deborah; Chitanda, Jackson M; Verrall, Ronald E; Karunakaran, Chithra; Badea, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are emerging as an attractive tool for gene therapeutics. To reach their full potential for biological application, NDs should maintain their colloidal stability in biological milieu. This study describes the behavior of lysine-functionalized ND (lys-ND) in various dispersion media, with an aim to limit aggregation and improve the colloidal stability of ND-gene complexes called diamoplexes. Furthermore, cellular and macromolecular interactions of lys-NDs are also analyzed in vitro to establish the understanding of ND-mediated gene transfer in cells. lys-NDs were synthesized earlier through covalent conjugation of lysine amino acid to carboxylated NDs surface generated through re-oxidation in strong oxidizing acids. In this study, dispersions of lys-NDs were prepared in various media, and the degree of sedimentation was monitored for 72 hours. Particle size distributions and zeta potential measurements were performed for a period of 25 days to characterize the physicochemical stability of lys-NDs in the medium. The interaction profile of lys-NDs with fetal bovine serum showed formation of a protein corona, which was evaluated by size and charge distribution measurements. Uptake of lys-NDs in cervical cancer cells was analyzed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Cellular uptake of diamoplexes (complex of lys-NDs with small interfering RNA) was also analyzed using flow cytometry. Aqueous dispersion of lys-NDs showed minimum sedimentation and remained stable over a period of 25 days. Size distributions showed good stability, remaining under 100 nm throughout the testing period. A positive zeta potential of >+20 mV indicated a preservation of surface charges. Size distribution and zeta potential changed for lys-NDs after incubation with blood serum, suggesting an interaction with biomolecules, mainly proteins, and a possible formation of a protein corona. Cellular internalization of lys-NDs was confirmed

  2. Lysine-functionalized nanodiamonds as gene carriers: development of stable colloidal dispersion for in vitro cellular uptake studies and siRNA delivery application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alwani S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Saniya Alwani,1 Randeep Kaur,1 Deborah Michel,1 Jackson M Chitanda,2 Ronald E Verrall,3 Chithra Karunakaran,4 Ildiko Badea1 1Drug Design and Discovery Research Group, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, 2Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, 3Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, 4Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK, Canada Purpose: Nanodiamonds (NDs are emerging as an attractive tool for gene therapeutics. To reach their full potential for biological application, NDs should maintain their colloidal stability in biological milieu. This study describes the behavior of lysine-functionalized ND (lys-ND in various dispersion media, with an aim to limit aggregation and improve the colloidal stability of ND-gene complexes called diamoplexes. Furthermore, cellular and macromolecular interactions of lys-NDs are also analyzed in vitro to establish the understanding of ND-mediated gene transfer in cells. Methods: lys-NDs were synthesized earlier through covalent conjugation of lysine amino acid to carboxylated NDs surface generated through re-oxidation in strong oxidizing acids. In this study, dispersions of lys-NDs were prepared in various media, and the degree of sedimentation was monitored for 72 hours. Particle size distributions and zeta potential measurements were performed for a period of 25 days to characterize the physicochemical stability of lys-NDs in the medium. The interaction profile of lys-NDs with fetal bovine serum showed formation of a protein corona, which was evaluated by size and charge distribution measurements. Uptake of lys-NDs in cervical cancer cells was analyzed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Cellular uptake of diamoplexes (complex of lys-NDs with small interfering RNA was also analyzed using flow cytometry. Results: Aqueous dispersion of lys-NDs showed minimum sedimentation and remained stable over a period of 25 days. Size distributions showed

  3. Classification of stable solutions for non-homogeneous higher-order elliptic PDEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellaziz Harrabi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Under some assumptions on the nonlinearity f, we will study the nonexistence of nontrivial stable solutions or solutions which are stable outside a compact set of R n $\\mathbb {R}^{n}$ for the following semilinear higher-order problem: ( − Δ k u = f ( u in  R n , $$\\begin{aligned} (-\\Delta^{k} u= f(u \\quad \\mbox{in }\\mathbb {R}^{n}, \\end{aligned}$$ with k = 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 $k=1,2,3,4$ . The main methods used are the integral estimates and the Pohozaev identity. Many classes of nonlinearity will be considered; even the sign-changing nonlinearity, which has an adequate subcritical growth at zero as for example f ( u = − m u + λ | u | θ − 1 u − μ | u | p − 1 u $f(u= -m u +\\lambda|u|^{\\theta-1}u-\\mu |u|^{p-1}u$ , where m ≥ 0 $m\\geq0$ , λ > 0 $\\lambda>0$ , μ > 0 $\\mu>0$ , p , θ > 1 $p, \\theta>1$ . More precisely, we shall revise the nonexistence theorem of Berestycki and Lions (Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 82:313-345, 1983 in the class of smooth finite Morse index solutions as the well known work of Bahri and Lions (Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 45:1205-1215, 1992. Also, the case when f ( u u $f(uu$ is a nonnegative function will be studied under a large subcritical growth assumption at zero, for example f ( u = | u | θ − 1 u ( 1 + | u | q $f(u=|u|^{\\theta-1}u(1 + |u|^{q}$ or f ( u = | u | θ − 1 u e | u | q $f(u= |u|^{\\theta-1}u e^{|u|^{q}}$ , θ > 1 $\\theta>1$ and q > 0 $q>0$ . Extensions to solutions which are merely stable are discussed in the case of supercritical growth with k = 1 $k=1$ .

  4. Colloids in Biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  5. The effect of crystalloid versus Low molecular weight colloid solution on post-operative nausea and vomiting after ambulatory gynecological surgery - a prospective randomized trial

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Ivan

    2012-07-31

    AbstractBackgroundIntravenous fluid is recommended in international guidelines to improve patient post-operative symptoms, particularly nausea and vomiting. The optimum fluid regimen has not been established. This prospective, randomized, blinded study was designed to determine if administration of equivolumes of a colloid (hydroxyethyl starch 130\\/0.4) reduced post operative nausea and vomiting in healthy volunteers undergoing ambulatory gynecologic laparoscopy surgery compared to a crystalloid solution (Hartmann’s Solution).Methods120 patients were randomized to receive intravenous colloid (N = 60) or crystalloid (N = 60) intra-operatively. The volume of fluid administered was calculated at 1.5 ml.kg-1 per hour of fasting. Patients were interviewed to assess nausea, vomiting, anti-emetic use, dizziness, sore throat, headache and subjective general well being at 30 minutes and 2, 24 and 48 hours post operatively. Pulmonary function testing was performed on a subgroup.ResultsAt 2 hours the proportion of patients experiencing nausea (38.2 % vs 17.9%, P = 0.03) and the mean nausea score were increased in the colloid compared to crystalloid group respectively (1.49 ± 0.3 vs 0.68 ± 0.2, P = 0.028). The incidence of vomiting and anti-emetic usage was low and did not differ between the groups. Sore throat, dizziness, headache and general well being were not different between the groups. A comparable reduction on post-operative FVC and FEV-1 and PEFR was observed in both groups.ConclusionsIntra-operative administration of colloid increased the incidence of early postoperative nausea and has no advantage over crystalloid for symptom control after gynaecological laparoscopic surgery.

  6. Theoretical study of the morphology of self-assembled amphoteric oxide colloid nanocrystals in weak electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfimov, A. V.; Aryslanova, E. M.; Chivilikhin, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the theoretical study of the morphology of nanocrystals formed through self-assembly of amphoteric oxide colloidal nanoparticles in weak electrolytes. A mathematical model of multi-particle colloidal interaction was developed within the framework of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeak (DLVO) theory. This model accounts for the surface charge regulation during the multi-particle interaction and reveals the presence of orientation effects during nanoparticle aggregation. These effects are presumed to affect the morphology of the self-assembled nanocrystals and may present the means of controlling the structure of synthesised nanomaterials.

  7. Stable branches of a solution for a fermion on domain wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gani, V. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Department of Mathematics (Russian Federation); Ksenzov, V. G.; Kudryavtsev, A. E. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    The case when a fermion occupies an excited nonzero frequency level in the field of domain wall is discussed. It is demonstrated that a solution exists for the coupling constant in the limited interval 1 < g < g{sub max} Almost-Equal-To 1.65. It is shown that indeed there are different branches of stable solution for g in this interval. The first one corresponds to a fermion located on the domain wall (1 < g < 4{radical}2{pi}). The second branch, which belongs to the interval 4{radical}2{pi} {<=} g {<=} g{sub max}, describes a polarized fermion off the domain wall. The third branch with 1 < g < g{sub max} describes an excited antifermion in the field of the domain wall.

  8. Solute dispersion for stable density-driven flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Oca, Aronne; Riva, Monica; Carrera, Jesus; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the processes underpinning the reduced longitudinal spreading documented in stable variable density flows, as opposed to constant density settings, within heterogeneous porous media. We do so by decomposing velocity and pressure in terms of stationary and dynamic components. The former corresponds to the solution of the constant density flow problem, while the latter accounts for the effects induced by density variability. We focus on a stable flow configuration and analyze the longitudinal spread of saltwater injected from the bottom of a column formed by a heterogeneous porous medium initially fully saturated by freshwater. We adopt a perturbation expansion approach and derive the equations satisfied by section-averaged concentrations and their ensemble mean values. These formulations are respectively characterized by a single realization and an ensemble dispersive flux, which we determine through appropriate closure equations. The latter are solved via semi-analytical and numerical approaches. Our formulations and associated results enable us to discriminate the relative impact on the density-driven solute displacement of (a) covariance of the permeability of the porous medium, (b) cross-covariance between permeability and concentration, which is in turn linked to the coupling of flow and transport problems, and (c) cross-covariance between the dynamic and stationary velocities.

  9. Asymptotically Stable Solutions of a Generalized Fractional Quadratic Functional-Integral Equation of Erdélyi-Kober Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdalla Darwish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a generalized fractional quadratic functional-integral equation of Erdélyi-Kober type in the Banach space BC(ℝ+. We show that this equation has at least one asymptotically stable solution.

  10. Asymptotically Stable Solutions of a Generalized Fractional Quadratic Functional-Integral Equation of Erdélyi-Kober Type

    OpenAIRE

    Darwish, Mohamed Abdalla; Rzepka, Beata

    2014-01-01

    We study a generalized fractional quadratic functional-integral equation of Erdélyi-Kober type in the Banach space BC(ℝ+). We show that this equation has at least one asymptotically stable solution.

  11. Fabrication of anisotropic multifunctional colloidal carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerri, Huda A.

    The field of colloidal assembly has grown tremendously in recent years, although the direct or template-assisted methods used to fabricate complex colloidal constructions from monodisperse micro- and nanoparticles have been generally demonstrated on model materials. In this work, novel core particle syntheses, particle functionalizations and bottom-up assembly techniques are presented to create functional colloidal devices. Using particle lithography, high-information colloidal vectors have been developed and modified with imaging and targeting agents. Localized nanoscale patches have been reliably positioned on microparticles to serve as foundations for further chemical or physical modifications. Site-specific placement of RGD targeting ligands has been achieved in these lithographed patches. Preferential uptake of these targeted vectors by RGD-specific 3T3 fibroblasts was verified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. A transition was made from the functionalization of model imaging core particles to the lithography of colloidal cartridges, in an effort to construct colloidal syringes with specialized, programmable release profiles. A variety of functional, pH-sensitive fluorescent cores were engineered to respond to solution conditions. When triggered, the diverse composite core microparticles and reservoir microcapsules released embedded fluorescent moieties such as dye molecules, and fluorophore-conjugated nanoparticles. The microcapsules, created using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition on sacrificial templates, were selectively modified with a robust coating. The pH-responsive anisotropic reservoir microcapsules were extremely stable in solution, and exhibited a "Lazarus" functionality of rehydrating to their original state following desiccation. A snapshot of focused-release of core constituents through the lone opening in colloidal monotremes has been obtained by anisotropically-functionalizing degradable cores with barrier shells. Additionally

  12. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  13. A potential new, stable state of the E-cadherin strand-swapped dimer in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann-Gillett, Alexandra; Mark, Alan E; Deplazes, Evelyne; O'Mara, Megan L

    2018-01-01

    E-cadherin is a transmembrane glycoprotein that facilitates inter-cellular adhesion in the epithelium. The ectodomain of the native structure is comprised of five repeated immunoglobulin-like domains. All E-cadherin crystal structures show the protein in one of three alternative conformations: a monomer, a strand-swapped trans homodimer and the so-called X-dimer, which is proposed to be a kinetic intermediate to forming the strand-swapped trans homodimer. However, previous studies have indicated that even once the trans strand-swapped dimer is formed, the complex is highly dynamic and the E-cadherin monomers may reorient relative to each other. Here, molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the stability and conformational flexibility of the human E-cadherin trans strand-swapped dimer. In four independent, 100 ns simulations, the dimer moved away from the starting structure and converged to a previously unreported structure, which we call the Y-dimer. The Y-dimer was present for over 90% of the combined simulation time, suggesting that it represents a stable conformation of the E-cadherin dimer in solution. The Y-dimer conformation is stabilised by interactions present in both the trans strand-swapped dimer and X-dimer crystal structures, as well as additional interactions not found in any E-cadherin dimer crystal structures. The Y-dimer represents a previously unreported, stable conformation of the human E-cadherin trans strand-swapped dimer and suggests that the available crystal structures do not fully capture the conformations that the human E-cadherin trans homodimer adopts in solution.

  14. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  15. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  16. Stable, metastable and unstable solutions of a spin-1 Ising system based on the free energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskİin, Mustafa; Özgan, Şükrü

    1990-04-01

    Stable, metastable and unstable solutions of a spin-1 Ising model with bilinear and biquadratic interactions are found by using the free energy surfaces. The free energy expression is obtained in the lowest approximation of the cluster variation method. All these solutions are shown in the two-dimensional phase space, especially the unstable solutions which in some cases are difficult to illustrate in the two-dimensional phase space, found by Keskin et al. recently.

  17. Application of stable, nitroxide free radicals in solution to low magnetic fields measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, Rene

    1973-01-01

    The first attempts to use the Overhauser-Abragam effect for measuring low magnetic fields date back to 1956. However, the instability of the free radical used, PREMY'S Salt, as well as its virtual insolubility in solvents other than water, hampered the development of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized in accordance to this principle: dynamic polarization of protons. New free radicals stable and soluble in many solvents, will enhanced the interest in the device. In particular, the use of 2,2,6,6, tetramethyl- piperidine-4-one-1-oxide (TANO or TANONE) leads to a high sensitivity, low field magnetometer. The methods of measurements, the required apparatus and sample preparation are first described. Next the results of measurements made both in high and low magnetic fields with various free radicals in different solvents are presented in tabular and graphical form. These measurements have determined which radical-solvent couple will yield a high dynamic polarization coefficient. In addition, the improvement obtained by complete deuteration of the free radical has been demonstrated. Problems connected with the application of such radicals in solution to the 'double effect probe' of the magnetometer built by LETI at CEN Grenoble and the solutions reached are discussed. (author) [fr

  18. Dense ionization and subsequent non-homogeneous radical-mediated chemistry of femtosecond laser-induced low density plasma in aqueous solutions: synthesis of colloidal gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmouaddine, Hakim; Shi, Minghan; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Meesat, Ridthee; Sanche, Léon; Houde, Daniel

    2017-03-15

    The "cold" low density plasma channels generated by the filamentation of powerful femtosecond laser pulses in aqueous solutions constitute a source of dense ionization. Here, we probed the radiation-assisted chemistry of water triggered by laser ionization via the radical-mediated synthesis of nanoparticles in gold chloride aqueous solutions. We showed that the formation of colloidal gold originates from the reduction of trivalent ionic gold initially present in solution by the reactive radicals (e.g. hydrated electrons) produced upon the photolysis of water. We analyzed both the reaction kinetics of the laser-induced hydrated electrons and the growth kinetics of the gold nanoparticles. Introduction of radical scavengers into the solutions and different initial concentrations of gold chloride provided information about the radical-mediated chemistry. The dense ionization results in the second order cross-recombination of the photolysis primary byproducts. Competition with recombination imposes the non-homogeneous interaction of reactive radicals with solute present in irradiated aqueous solutions. Such a laser-induced non-homogeneous chemistry suggests similarities with the radiation chemistry of water exposed to conventional densely ionizing radiation (high dose rate, high linear energy transfer).

  19. Assembly of open clusters of colloidal dumbbells via droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Van, Hai; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of a mixture of asymmetric colloidal dumbbells and emulsion droplets by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The evaporation of the droplets and the competition between droplet-colloid attraction and colloid-colloid interactions lead to the formation of clusters built up of colloid aggregates with both closed and open structures. We find that stable packings and hence complex colloidal structures can be obtained by changing the relative size of the colloidal spheres and/or their interfacial tension with the droplets.

  20. On stable exponential cosmological solutions with non-static volume factor in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchuk, V D; Ernazarov, K K

    2017-01-01

    A ( n + 1)-dimensional gravitational model with cosmological constant and Gauss-Bonnet term is studied. The ansatz with diagonal cosmological metrics is adopted and solutions with exponential dependence of scale factors: a i ∼ exp ( v i t ), i = 1, …, n , are considered. The stability analysis of the solutions with non-static volume factor is presented. We show that the solutions with v 1 = v 2 = v 3 = H > 0 and small enough variation of the effective gravitational constant G are stable if certain restriction on ( v i ) is obeyed. New examples of stable exponential solutions with zero variation of G in dimensions D = 1 + m + 2 with m > 2 are presented. (paper)

  1. Sampling and physical and actinide characterization of colloids from the Grimsel test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of groundwater from a granite fracture at the Grimsel test site in Switzerland have been collected as part of a second intercomparison of groundwater colloid sampling and characterization techniques carried out by members of the Coco Club (colloids and complexes) sponsored by the CEC. This report describes the Harwell contribution to this exercise. The bulk of naturally occurring actinides were found to reside in solution with 10 particles/I (detection limit ∼50 nm) for samples determined by three laboratories. The colloids were shown to be negatively charged using microelectrophoresis and to be relatively stable. There was evidence of a reduction in the pH of the water after storage due to air contamination. This work has served to identify the problems associated with colloid sampling and characterization techniques

  2. Formation of plutonium(IV) colloid by the alpha-reduction of aqueous solutions of Pu(V) and Pu(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    We describe concentration changes caused by chemical and alpha-induced radiolytic reactions in various oxidation state pure solutions of Pu(VI), Pu(V), or Pu(IV) colloid or mixtures of these oxidation states at pH values > 1 for a period of nearly two years. The rates of approach to steady-states and the resulting experimental concentration quotient values were determined in order to find the conditions under which equilibrium in 2PuO 2 + + PuO 2 2+ + PuO/sub 2(coll)/ reaction might be attained and to learn about the underlying reactions. Computer calculations were used to compare the data with the results required from proposed reaction schemes

  3. Carbon nanotubes decorated with gold, platinum and rhodium clusters by injection of colloidal solutions into the post-discharge of an RF atmospheric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claessens, N; Demoisson, F; Dufour, T; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Mansour, Ali; Guillot, J [Department ' Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR), 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2010-09-24

    In this paper, we present a new, simple, robust and efficient technique to decorate multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with metal nanoparticles. As case studies, Au, Pt and Rh nanoparticles are grafted onto MWCNTs by spraying a colloidal solution into the post-discharge of an atmospheric argon or argon/oxygen RF plasma. The method that we introduce here is different from those usually described in the literature, since the treatment is operated at atmospheric pressure, allowing the realization in only one step of the surface activation and the deposition processes. We demonstrate experimentally that the addition of oxygen gas in the plasma increases significantly the amount of grafted metal nanoparticles. Moreover, TEM pictures clearly show that the grafted nanoparticles are well controlled in size.

  4. Effective improvement in optical properties of colloidal CdTe@ZnS quantum dots synthesized from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongbo; Si, Boni; Lu, Siwu; Ma, Xuan; Liu, Enzhou; Fan, Jun; Li, Xinghua; Hu, Xiaoyun

    2016-09-09

    Efficient synthesis of high-quality quantum dots (QDs) with excellent optical properties by aqueous synthesis is still of great significance for extended optical applications. Herein we highlight the advantages in optical properties of colloidal CdTe@ZnS QDs prepared by a facile and highly effective aqueous synthesis method. These achievements were realized by delicate manipulation of the conditions involved in nucleation and the growth process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated the QDs were uniform size and well dispersible. The emission peaks of the as-prepared QDs could shift from 496 to 698 nm with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM), and the corresponding fluorescent color changed from green to red. Moreover, the emission could even reach to the near-infrared (NIR) region (706-796 nm) by extending the reaction time. The highest photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of the QDs could reach to 60%, and the average of FWHM was about 55 nm. To address the problem of wide size-distribution in PL QY decrease and FWHM broadening, the colloids of QDs prepared at long reaction time (above 3 h) were centrifuged (12 000 r min(-1)). In addition, the assessment of QD cytotoxicity indicated the CdTe@ZnS QDs were much less cytotoxic and showed good biocompatibility. Compared with organic synthesis, our aqueous synthesis of QDs could be carried out efficiently on a large scale and showed good batch-to-batch reproducibility. The as-prepared CdTe@ZnS QDs exhibited excellent optical properties and hold a good potential to be applied in optoelectronic and biological applications.

  5. Effective improvement in optical properties of colloidal CdTe@ZnS quantum dots synthesized from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongbo; Si, Boni; Lu, Siwu; Ma, Xuan; Liu, Enzhou; Fan, Jun; Li, Xinghua; Hu, Xiaoyun

    2016-09-01

    Efficient synthesis of high-quality quantum dots (QDs) with excellent optical properties by aqueous synthesis is still of great significance for extended optical applications. Herein we highlight the advantages in optical properties of colloidal CdTe@ZnS QDs prepared by a facile and highly effective aqueous synthesis method. These achievements were realized by delicate manipulation of the conditions involved in nucleation and the growth process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated the QDs were uniform size and well dispersible. The emission peaks of the as-prepared QDs could shift from 496 to 698 nm with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM), and the corresponding fluorescent color changed from green to red. Moreover, the emission could even reach to the near-infrared (NIR) region (706-796 nm) by extending the reaction time. The highest photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of the QDs could reach to 60%, and the average of FWHM was about 55 nm. To address the problem of wide size-distribution in PL QY decrease and FWHM broadening, the colloids of QDs prepared at long reaction time (above 3 h) were centrifuged (12 000 r min-1). In addition, the assessment of QD cytotoxicity indicated the CdTe@ZnS QDs were much less cytotoxic and showed good biocompatibility. Compared with organic synthesis, our aqueous synthesis of QDs could be carried out efficiently on a large scale and showed good batch-to-batch reproducibility. The as-prepared CdTe@ZnS QDs exhibited excellent optical properties and hold a good potential to be applied in optoelectronic and biological applications.

  6. Stable monopole and dyon solutions in the einstein-yang-mills theory in asymptotically anti-de sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjoraker; Hosotani

    2000-02-28

    A continuum of new monopole and dyon solutions in the Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space are found. They are regular everywhere and specified by their mass and their non-Abelian electric and magnetic charges. A class of monopole solutions which have no node in non-Abelian magnetic fields is shown to be stable against spherically symmetric linear perturbations.

  7. Preparation of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-stabilized ZnO colloid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Gutul

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for the synthesis of a colloidal ZnO solution with poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP as stabilizer. Stable colloidal solutions with good luminescence properties are obtained by using PVP as stabilizer in the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles by a sol–gel method assisted by ultrasound. Nanoparticles with sizes of 30–40 nm in a PVP matrix are produced as a solid product. The colloidal ZnO/PVP/methanol solution, apart from the most intense PL band at 356 nm coming from the PVP, exhibits a strong PL band at 376 nm (3.30 eV which corresponds to the emission of the free exciton recombination in ZnO nanoparticles.

  8. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  9. Numerical Analysis of Colloid Transport in Volcanic Ash Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, H.; Kawamoto, K.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.; Simunek, J.

    2006-12-01

    Many studies have been conducted to investigate colloid-facilitated transport of organic or inorganic contaminants in soils. Because many contaminants, even non-soluble contaminants, can sorb onto colloids, failure to account for colloid-facilitated transport may lead to significant errors in predicting movement of contaminants in soils. Volcanic ash soils usually contain a considerable amount of soil particles smaller than 1 micrometer that are considered to have colloidal properties. This study investigated experimentally and numerically the transport of such colloidal particles in a volcanic ash soil called Tachikawa loam under simulated rainfall conditions. Disturbed soil columns were irrigated by controlled rainfall events using artificial rain water (ARW) and colloid solution extracted from Tachikawa loam soil (soil particles smaller than 1 micrometer). There was a continuous leaching of natural colloids with an initial increase in concentrations followed by a long tailing even when irrigated only by ARW. When colloid solution was applied, the breakthrough curve of the applied colloid showed no tailing and least time lag. HYDRUS-1D was used to obtain transport parameters of natural and applied colloids from breakthrough curves using a standard colloid transport model with the first-order deposition and entrainment coefficients (i.e., attachment and detachment terms) to account for kinetic sorption. The estimated distribution coefficient of natural colloids was an order of magnitude larger than that of applied colloids. While the estimated attachment coefficient of natural colloids was negligible, that of applied colloids led to a high retention of applied colloids in soils. The estimated detachment coefficient of natural colloids was three to four orders of magnitude greater than that of applied colloids. One possible explanation is that the estimated attachment coefficient for applied colloids may account for so-called straining that is a physical filtration

  10. [The study of antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles in the form of a colloidal solution in the matrix of finely dispersed silica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchak, G I; Surmasheva, E V; Mikhienkova, A I; Nikonova, N A; Romanenko, L I; Oliĭnyk, Z A; Gorval', A K; Rosada, M A

    2012-01-01

    In the experimental study obtained with chemical method colloid solution of nanoparticles (NPs) of silver (Ag) and a composite on his base in the matrix of finely dispersed silica with particle size of 8-12 nm and NPs concentration in basic solution of 0,0016% (0,016 mg/cm3) were established to exhibit high antimicrobial activity against the test organisms: E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. Aureus and C. Albicans, which depended on a set of factors. Antibacterial properties of tissue impregnated with Ag-NPs were studied. As stabilizing substances a mixture of surface-active substance sodium dodecyl sulfate and polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone was used Before the beginning of the study effective neutralizer was tailored. Times of preservation of antimicrobial activity of test samples have been established, and also their stability throughout long term of supervision (24 months) has been shown. Effect of organic pollution on antimicrobal activity of the samples has been studied. Based on obtained results the algorithm of the study of antimicrobial properties of nanopreparations has been elaborated.

  11. Liquid crystal boojum-colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasinkevych, M; Silvestre, N M; Telo da Gama, M M

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a liquid crystal (LC) lead to distortions of the director field. The distortions are responsible for long-range effective colloidal interactions whose asymptotic behaviour is well understood. The short-distance behaviour depends on the structure and dynamics of the topological defects nucleated near the colloidal particles and a full nonlinear theory is required to describe it. Spherical colloidal particles with strong planar degenerate anchoring nucleate a pair of antipodal surface topological defects, known as boojums. We use the Landau-de Gennes theory to resolve the mesoscopic structure of the boojum cores and to determine the pairwise colloidal interactions. We compare the results in three (3D) and two (2D) spatial dimensions for spherical and disc-like colloidal particles, respectively. The corresponding free energy functionals are minimized numerically using finite elements with adaptive meshes. Boojums are always point-like in 2D, but acquire a rather complex structure in 3D, which depends on the combination of the anchoring potential, the radius of the colloid, the temperature and the LC elastic anisotropy. We identify three types of defect cores in 3D that we call single, double and split-core boojums, and investigate the associated structural transitions. The split-core structure is favoured by low temperatures, strong anchoring and small twist to splay or bend ratios. For sufficiently strong anchoring potentials characterized by a well-defined uniaxial minimum, the split-core boojums are the only stable configuration. In the presence of two colloidal particles, we observe substantial re-arrangements of the inner defects in both 3D and 2D. These re-arrangements lead to qualitative changes in the force-distance profile when compared to the asymptotic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. In line with the experimental results, the presence of the defects prevents coalescence of the colloidal particles in 2D, but not in 3D

  12. Colloidal superballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and

  13. Colloidal polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  14. Colloid properties in groundwaters from crystalline formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Colloids are present in all groundwaters. The role they may play in the migration of safety-relevant radionuclides in the geosphere therefore must be studied. Colloid sampling and characterisation campaigns have been carried out in Switzerland. On the bases of the results from studies in the Grimsel area, Northern Switzerland and the Black Forest, as well as those obtained by other groups concerned with crystalline waters, a consistent picture is emerging. The groundwater colloids in crystalline formations are predominantly comprised of phyllosilicates and silica originating from the aquifer rock. Under constant hydrogeochemical conditions, the colloid concentration is not expected to exceed 100 ng.ml -1 when the calcium concentration is greater than 10 -4 . However, under transient chemical or physical conditions, such as geothermal or tectonic activity, colloid generation may be enhanced and the colloid concentration may reach 10 μg.ml -1 or more, if both the calcium and sodium concentrations are low. In the Nagra Crystalline Reference Water the expected colloid concentration is -1 . This can be compared, for example, to a colloid concentration of about 10 ng.ml -1 found in Zurzach water. The small colloid concentration in the reference water is a consequence of an attachment factor for clay colloids (monmorillonite) close to 1. A model indicates that at pH 8, the nuclide partition coefficients between water and colloid (K p ) must be smaller than 10 7 ml.g -1 if sorption takes place by surface complexation on colloids, = AIOH active groups forming the dominant sorption sites. This pragmatic model is based on the competition between the formation of nuclide hydroxo complexes in solution and their sorption on colloids. Experimental nuclide sorption data on colloids are compared with those obtained by applying this model. For a low colloid concentration, a sorption capacity of the order of 10 -9 M and reversible surface complexation, their presence in the

  15. New Insights into Stability of Plutonium Intrinsic Colloids in the Presence of Clay at Elevated Temperatures: Experimental and Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P.; Sun, Y.; Zavarin, M.; Dai, Z.; Carroll, S.; Kersting, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    Colloid-facilitated plutonium transport is often found to be the dominant mechanism controlling its migration in the environment. However, the form of Pu (intrinsic versus pseudo-colloid) and its stability is not well understood. Accurate prediction of colloid-facilitated transport requires a deep understanding of the underlying mechanisms and rates that control the stability of colloidal plutonium. In the present study, we examine the stability of Pu intrinsic colloids relative to Pu-montmorillonite pseudo colloids using a novel experimental design and modeling approaches. We gain new insights into mechanisms of interactions between Pu intrinsic colloids and montmorrilonite clay colloids. The results of these efforts provide a clearer understanding of how Pu can migrate over significant temporal and spatial scales. We employ dialysis membranes in an effort to completely segregate Pu intrinsic colloids (2-5 nm) from montmorillonite clay colloids (>100 nm) and allow aqueous Pu to establish equilibrium between both colloidal phases. Using the dialysis membrane approach, we are able to isolate multiple processes, including hydrolysis/precipitation of Pu(IV, aq), dissolution of PuO2 intrinsic colloids in the absence and presence of the clay, and formation of Pu/clay pseudo-colloids. Therefore, the kinetics of these multiple processes that take place either sequentially or simultaneously in our systems can be examined individually. Experiments are conducted in pH 8 solution of 5 mM NaCl/0.7 mM NaHCO3 at both 25 and 80 °C. Pu intrinsic colloids dissolve at a moderate rate in the absence of the clay, and the dissolution is enhanced in the presence of clay. Furthermore, an elevated temperature will increase the solubility of Pu intrinsic colloids. The formation of Pu intrinsic colloid is reversible, though dissolution is kinetically limited. In contrast, Pu pseudo colloids (sorbed Pu on clay) are more stable than Pu intrinsic colloids at both temperatures, and the

  16. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples

  17. Organic solution-processible electroluminescent molecular glasses for non-doped standard red OLEDs with electrically stable chromaticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xiaoman; Zuo, Weiwei; Liu, Yingliang, E-mail: liuylxn@sohu.com; Zhang, Zhenru; Zeng, Cen; Xu, Shengang; Cao, Shaokui, E-mail: caoshaokui@zzu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The D–A–D electroluminescent molecular glasses are synthesized. • Non-doped red electroluminescent film is fabricated by spin-coating. • Red OLED shows stable wavelength, luminous efficiency and chromaticity. • CIE1931 coordinate is in accord with standard red light in PAL system. - Abstract: Organic light-emitting molecular glasses (OEMGs) are synthesized through the introduction of nonplanar donor and branched aliphatic chain into electroluminescent emitters. The target OEMGs are characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, IR, UV–vis and fluorescent spectra as well as elemental analysis, TG and DSC. The results indicated that the optical, electrochemical and electroluminescent properties of OEMGs are adjusted successfully by the replacement of electron-donating group. The non-doped OLED device with a standard red electroluminescent emission is achieved by spin-coating the THF solution of OEMG with a triphenylamine moiety. This non-doped red OLED device takes on an electrically stable electroluminescent performance, including the stable maximum electroluminescent wavelength of 640 nm, the stable luminous efficiency of 2.4 cd/A and the stable CIE1931 coordinate of (x, y) = (0.64, 0.35), which is basically in accord with the CIE1931 coordinate (x, y) = (0.64, 0.33) of standard red light in PAL system.

  18. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  19. Stable preparations of tyrosine hydroxylase provide the solution structure of the full-length enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezem, Maria T.; Baumann, Anne; Skjærven, Lars; Meyer, Romain; Kursula, Petri; Martinez, Aurora; Flydal, Marte I.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. TH is a highly complex enzyme at mechanistic, structural, and regulatory levels, and the preparation of kinetically and conformationally stable enzyme for structural characterization has been challenging. Here, we report on improved protocols for purification of recombinant human TH isoform 1 (TH1), which provide large amounts of pure, stable, active TH1 with an intact N-terminus. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged maltose-binding protein on amylose resin was representative of the iron-bound functional enzyme, showing high activity and stabilization by the natural feedback inhibitor dopamine. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged ZZ domain on TALON is remarkably stable, as it was partially inhibited by resin-derived cobalt. This more stable enzyme preparation provided high-quality small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and reliable structural models of full-length tetrameric TH1. The SAXS-derived model reveals an elongated conformation (Dmax = 20 nm) for TH1, different arrangement of the catalytic domains compared with the crystal structure of truncated forms, and an N-terminal region with an unstructured tail that hosts the phosphorylation sites and a separated Ala-rich helical motif that may have a role in regulation of TH by interacting with binding partners. PMID:27462005

  20. Enabling Flexible Heterostructures for Li-Ion Battery Anodes Based on Nanotube and Liquid-Phase Exfoliated 2D Gallium Chalcogenide Nanosheet Colloidal Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanfang John; Park, Sang-Hoon; Ronan, Oskar; Harvey, Andrew; Seral-Ascaso, Andrés; Lin, Zifeng; McEvoy, Niall; Boland, Conor S; Berner, Nina C; Duesberg, Georg S; Rozier, Patrick; Coleman, Jonathan N; Nicolosi, Valeria

    2017-09-01

    2D metal chalcogenide (MC) nanosheets (NS) have displayed high capacities as lithium-ion battery (LiB) anodes. Nevertheless, their complicated synthesis routes coupled with low electronic conductivity greatly limit them as promising LiB electrode material. Here, this work reports a facile single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) percolating strategy for efficiently maximizing the electrochemical performances of gallium chalcogenide (GaX, X = S or Se). Multiscaled flexible GaX NS/SWCNT heterostructures with abundant voids for Li + diffusion are fabricated by embedding the liquid-exfoliated GaX NS matrix within a SWCNT-percolated network; the latter improves the electron transport and ion diffusion kinetics as well as maintains the mechanical flexibility. Consequently, high capacities (i.e., 838 mAh g -1 per gallium (II) sulfide (GaS) NS/SWCNT mass and 1107 mAh g -1 per GaS mass; the latter is close to the theoretical value) and good rate capabilities are achieved, which can be majorly attributed to the alloying processes of disordered Ga formed after the first irreversible GaX conversion reaction, as monitored by in situ X-ray diffraction. The presented approach, colloidal solution processing of SWCNT and liquid-exfoliated MC NS to produce flexible paper-based electrode, could be generalized for wearable energy storage devices with promising performances. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Polymers and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurtenberger, P. [ETH Zurich, Inst. fuer Polymere, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  2. Stable Covalent Organic Frameworks for Exceptional Mercury Removal from Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Zhai, Lipeng; Xu, Hong; Jiang, Donglin

    2017-02-15

    The pre-designable porous structures found in covalent organic frameworks (COFs) render them attractive as a molecular platform for addressing environmental issues such as removal of toxic heavy metal ions from water. However, a rational structural design of COFs in this aspect has not been explored. Here we report the rational design of stable COFs for Hg(II) removal through elaborate structural design and control over skeleton, pore size, and pore walls. The resulting framework is stable under strong acid and base conditions, possesses high surface area, has large mesopores, and contains dense sulfide functional termini on the pore walls. These structural features work together in removing Hg(II) from water and achieve a benchmark system that combines capacity, efficiency, effectivity, applicability, selectivity, and reusability. These results suggest that COFs offer a powerful platform for tailor-made structural design to cope with various types of pollution.

  3. Formation of aquatic actinide(IV) colloid and stabilization via interaction with An(III)/Ln(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J.I.; Panak, P.J.; Kim, J.I.; Kim, M.A.; Fanghaenel, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Aquatic actinide colloids are attracting increasingly attention in the long-term safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal, since the colloid-facilitated migration of actinides in groundwater systems has been widely recognized. However, their provenance is rarely understood in detail. Aquatic actinide colloids are present either as real colloids (actinide oxides/hydroxides) or as pseudocolloids (actinides imbedded in natural aquatic colloids). Of particular interest is whether or not the actinide(IV) ion forms its stable 'real colloids' as assumed generally in the literature. Answering this question is the main objective of the present work. As a representative tetravalent actinide ion, Th(IV) is chosen for investigation. A dilute Th(IV) solution (10 -4 or 10 -6 M) in 0.5 M HCl/NaCl is examined by coulometric pH change from 3 to 7 at 0.1 pH unit to ascertain the colloid formation at the pH edge of its solubility and beyond by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). Conversion of Th(IV) colloids to precipitation upon its over-saturation at given pH is followed by aging. Similar experiments are carried out in parallel with a pure dilute Eu(III) solution and a mixture of Th and Eu, both in dilute concentrations. All solutions are submitted to ultracentrifugation prior to each experiment to remove latent colloidal impurities. Replacing Eu by Cm, a mixture solution of Th and Cm is pH titrated from 2 to 9 while analyzing the resulting species by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Th(IV) colloids formed initially at its solubility pH edge or beyond undergo precipitation by aging, whereas the Eu(III) ion does not form colloids under the given conditions. Stable colloids are observed only in mixture solution of Th and Eu, suggesting that the mutual oxo-bridging of tetravalent and trivalent metal ions results in colloids with a well-polarized surface for hydration, thus stabilized in water. The spectroscopic

  4. Unencapsulated Air-stable Organic Field Effect Transistor by All Solution Processes for Low Power Vapor Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Linrun; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Jiaqing; Yang, Ruozhang; Hu, Wei; Li, Qiaofeng; Wang, Ruolin; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    With its excellent mechanical flexibility, low-cost and low-temperature processing, the solution processed organic field-effect transistor (OFET) is a promising platform technology for developing ubiquitous sensor applications in digital health, environment monitoring and Internet of Things. However, a contradiction between achieving low voltage operation and having stable performance severely hinder the technology to become commercially viable. This work shows that, by reducing the sub-gap density of states (DOS) at the channel for low operation voltage and using a proper low-k non-polar polymer dielectric layer, such an issue can be addressed. Stable electrical properties after either being placed for weeks or continuously prolonged bias stressing for hours in ambient air are achieved for all solution processed unencapsulated OFETs with the channel being exposed to the ambient air for analyte detection. The fabricated device presents a steep subthreshold swing less than 100 mV/decade, and an ON/OFF ratio of 106 at a voltage swing of 3 V. The low voltage and stable operation allows the sensor made of the OFET to be incorporated into a battery-powered electronic system for continuously reliable sensing of ammonia vapor in ambient air with very small power consumption of about 50 nW.

  5. A combined crystalloid and colloid pd solution as a glucose-sparing strategy for volume control in high-transport apd patients: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freida, Philippe; Issad, Belkacem; Dratwa, Max; Lobbedez, Thierry; Wu, Lieling; Leypoldt, John K; Divino-Filho, Jose Carolino

    2009-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the continuous exposure to high glucose concentrations during peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an important cause of ultrafiltration (UF) failure. The cornerstone of prevention and treatment of UF failure is reduction of glucose exposure, which will also alleviate the systemic impact of significant free glucose absorption. The challenge for the future is to discover new therapeutic strategies to enhance fluid and sodium removal while diminishing glucose load and exposure using combinations of available osmotic agents. To investigate in patients on automated PD (APD) with a fast transport pattern whether there is a glucose-sparing advantage to replacing 7.5% icodextrin (ICO) during the long dwell with a mixed crystalloid and colloid PD fluid (bimodal UF) in an attempt to promote daytime UF and sodium removal while diminishing the glucose strength of the dialysate at night. A 2 parallel arm, 4 month, prospective nonrandomized study. PD units or university hospitals in 4 French and Belgian districts. During the 4-month intervention period, net UF and peritoneal sodium removal during the long dwell when treated by bimodal UF was about 2-fold higher than baseline (with ICO). The estimated percent change (95% confidence interval) from baseline in net daytime UF for the bimodal solution was 150% (106% - 193%), versus 18% (-7% - 43%) for ICO (p < 0.001). The estimated percent change from baseline in peritoneal sodium removal for the bimodal solution was 147% (112% - 183%), versus 23% (-2% - 48%) for ICO (p < 0.001). The estimated percent change from baseline in UF efficiency (24-hour net UF divided by the amount of glucose absorbed) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) when using the bimodal solution was 71%, versus -5% for ICO. Prescription of bimodal UF during the day in APD patients offers the opportunity to optimize the long dwell exchange in a complete 24-hour APD cycle. The current study demonstrated that a bimodal solution based on the

  6. Osmotic virial coefficients for model protein and colloidal solutions: Importance of ensemble constraints in the analysis of light scattering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderius, Daniel W.; Krekelberg, William P.; Roberts, Christopher J.; Shen, Vincent K.

    2012-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions in solution may be quantified by the osmotic second virial coefficient (OSVC), which can be measured by various experimental techniques including light scattering. Analysis of Rayleigh light scattering measurements from such experiments requires identification of a scattering volume and the thermodynamic constraints imposed on that volume, i.e., the statistical mechanical ensemble in which light scattering occurs. Depending on the set of constraints imposed on the scattering volume, one can obtain either an apparent OSVC, A2,app, or the true thermodynamic OSVC, {B_{22}^{osm}}, that is rigorously defined in solution theory [M. A. Blanco, E. Sahin, Y. Li, and C. J. Roberts, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 225103 (2011), 10.1063/1.3596726]. However, it is unclear to what extent A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}} differ, which may have implications on the physical interpretation of OSVC measurements from light scattering experiments. In this paper, we use the multicomponent hard-sphere model and a well-known equation of state to directly compare A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}}. Our results from the hard-sphere equation of state indicate that A2,app underestimates {B_{22}^{osm}}, but in a systematic manner that may be explained using fundamental thermodynamic expressions for the two OSVCs. The difference between A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}} may be quantitatively significant, but may also be obscured in experimental application by statistical uncertainty or non-steric interactions. Consequently, the two OSVCs that arise in the analysis of light scattering measurements do formally differ, but in a manner that may not be detectable in actual application.

  7. Colloidal Electrolytes and the Critical Micelle Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, L. G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods for determining the Critical Micelle Concentration of Colloidal Electrolytes; methods described are: (1) methods based on Colligative Properties, (2) methods based on the Electrical Conductivity of Colloidal Electrolytic Solutions, (3) Dye Method, (4) Dye Solubilization Method, and (5) Surface Tension Method. (BR)

  8. Modeling of the geochemical behaviour and of the radionuclide transport in the presence of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Lee, Jan

    1997-01-01

    CHESS, a complete geochemical model, especially developed for coupling purposes in a transparent manner with transport codes. The second topic concerns the development of a probabilistic theory for colloid retention, as well as for the kinetics involved in the reaction. The proposed theory seem to be robust, predicts correctly the impact of System parameters such as pH, ionic strength and colloid size, and is applicable to real Systems, at least at the scale of laboratory experiments. The thesis also presents the theory of adsorption kinetics. This theory is more rigorous than the theories available in the literature, and applies for porous as well as fractured media. A comparison with models provided by the literature and with experimental data seems to confirm the correctness of the theory. The third topic involves reactive transport modelling of chemical species and colloids and has lead to the development of a new transport model, HYTEC. This tool includes convective-diffusive-dispersive transport of colloids, aqueous species and gases, calculates the thermodynamic equilibrium state of the solution and incorporates the newly developed theory of colloid retention. As far as we know, this is the first model which integrates colloids as well as the complete geochemistry in a transport model. Resuming, this work shows the importance of the adsorption capacity of most of the natural colloids with respect to actinides, such as uranium, americium and europium. The complexation capacity of organic colloids is even greater than that of inorganic colloids, such as silica, clays and hydrous ferric oxide. This study also indicates that colloids are capable of keeping the radioactive load during their journey through the geological medium, even if the complexing affinity of the medium is much stronger than of the colloids. Accordingly, colloids may act as a very rapid transport vehicle for radionuclides, provided they are chemically and electrostatically stable in suspension

  9. Preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A.; Aneman, A.; Guttormsen, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    trials of ICU patients showing changes in mortality or renal function, respectively. CONCLUSION: Most Scandinavian ICUs use both synthetic and natural colloids, but HES 130/0.4 is by far the preferred colloid. Few units have protocols for colloid use, but most use them for hypovolaemia, and the majority......BACKGROUND: Fluid resuscitation is a frequent intervention in intensive care. Colloids are widely used, but recent data suggest harm by some of these solutions. This calls for more clinical studies on this matter, but the current preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units...... the questionnaire. Most ICUs used both synthetic and natural colloids, and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 was the preferred colloid in 59 units. Eleven ICUs had protocols for colloid use. The most frequent indication was second-line fluid for hypovolaemia, but one in three ICUs used colloids as first-line fluid...

  10. Gemini surfactant for fluorescent and stable quantum dots in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haibing; Wang Xiaoqiong; Gao Zhinong; He Zhike

    2007-01-01

    Highly fluorescent and stable CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) coated with gemini surfactant are successfully synthesized in aqueous media. Analyses of luminescence spectrometry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, and transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) indicate that the water-soluble QDs are monodisperse and have a luminescence enhancement compared with the original hydrophobic QDs. The water-soluble QDs coated with gemini surfactant are shown to be biocompatible, photostable, and have been proven to be suitable for live cell imaging

  11. Preparation of radioactive colloidal gold 198Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cammarosano, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation with simple equipment of radioactive colloidal gold of particle size about approximately 300 A from seed colloid stabilized by gelatine is described. Some physico-chemical parameters which can affect the process of formation of these colloidal particles are analysed; particle size has been meassured with an electron microscope. The colloid stability has been studied as a function of dilution, age and pH. Nucleation and growth of radioactive colloidal gold have been studied using spectrophotometry. Absorption spectra of the two ones are presented and compared. Quality control of the production process is verified through measurement of parameters, such as radioactive and radiochemical purity and biological distribution in laboratorial animals. This distribution was evalusted for rats injected endovenously with the gold colloidal solution.(Author) [pt

  12. All-solution processed polymer light-emitting diodes with air stable metal-oxide electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, P. de; Moet, D.J.D.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present an all-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) using spincoated zinc oxide (ZnO) and vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as electron and hole injecting contact, respectively. We compare the performance of these devices to the standard PLED design using PEDOT:PSS as anode and Ba/Al as

  13. All-solution processed polymer light-emitting diodes with air stable metal-oxide electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, P.; Moet, D. J. D.; Blom, P. W. M.

    We present an all-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) using spincoated zinc oxide (ZnO) and vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as electron and hole injecting contact, respectively. We compare the performance of these devices to the standard PLED design using PEDOT:PSS as anode and Ba/Al as

  14. Stable Isotope Analyses of water and Aqueous Solutions by Conventional Dual-inlet Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Juske [ORNL; Kendall, C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

    2004-01-01

    The foundation of various analytical methods for the stable isotope composition of water and other aqueous samples (natural abundance, {sup 1}H : {sup 2}H (D) = 99.985 : 0.015 atom%, and {sup 16}O : {sup 17}O : {sup 18}O = 99.762 : 0.038 : 0.200 atom%) was established during the Manhatten Project in the U.S.A., when large amounts of heavy water were produced for nuclear reactors (see Kirshenbaum, 1951, for a detailed account). From early on, there was great interest in the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water, because they are the ideal tracers of water sources and reactions. The increased analytical precisions made possible by the subsequent development of modern gas-source isotope-ratio mass spectrometers with dual-inlets and multi-collectors, have caused the proliferation of new analytical methods and applications for the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water. These stable isotopes have found wide applications in basic as well as applied sciences (chemistry, geology, hydrology, biology, medical sciences, and food sciences). This is because water is ubiquitous, is an essential and predominant ingredient of living organisms, and is perhaps the most reactive compound in the Earth.

  15. Developing a Stable Aqueous Enteric Coating Formulation with Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-MF) and Colloidal Silicon Dioxide as Anti-tacking Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Tanvi M; Quadir, Anisul; Obara, Sakae; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Hoag, Stephen W

    2018-02-16

    The purpose of this study was to use statistical design of experiments to develop a stable aqueous enteric coating formulation containing stabilizing excipients, such as polyethylene glycol that can minimize hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate aggregation and minimize spray-nozzle clogging at elevated processing temperatures. The mechanisms of stabilization (i.e. charge stabilization and molecular interactions) were studied by performing zeta potential and FTIR studies. Electrostatic stabilization by sodium lauryl sulfate and hydrogen bonding by polyethylene glycol provided dispersion stability and yielded a stable aqueous coating formulation that prevented spray-nozzle clogging. An enteric coated tablet with better gastric resistance was obtained by incorporating fumed silica (Aerosil ® R972) as the anti-tacking agent instead of talc. Dissolution testing on the riboflavin enteric coated tablets showed a good enteric release profile without releasing riboflavin in 0.1 N HCl, and completely disintegrating within 10 min in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Characterization of colloids in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.; Klenze, R.

    1987-07-01

    Natural colloids in the Gorleben aquifer systems have been investigated as for their chemical composition, quantification and size distribution. Humic substances appear to be the major organic materials in these groundwaters, generating humic colloids which are analysed to be humic acid (and fulvic acid) loaded with a large number of trace heavy metal ions. These metal ions include natural homologues of actinides and some fission products in trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent state. Concentrations of trivalent and tetravalent heavy metal ions are linearly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DDC) concentration in different groundwaters. The DOC is found to be present as humic colloids. The Am 3+ ions introduced in such a groundwater readily undergo the generation of its pseudocolloids through sorption or ion exchange reactions with humic colloids. The chemical behaviour of Am(III), being similar to the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe 3+ , REE etc. found in natural colloids, has been investigated by laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). Groundwaters from Ispra, Markham Clinton and Felslabor Grimsel. Bidistilled water and one of Gorleben groundwaters, Gohy 1011, are taken for the purpose of comparison. This groundwater contains the least amount of natural colloids of all Gorleben groundwaters hitherto investigated. An indirect quantification is made by comparison of the LPAS results with experiment from Latex solution. (orig./IRB)

  17. Fully stable cosmological solutions with a non-singular classical bounce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    We recently showed how it is possible to use a cubic Galileon action to construct classical cosmological solutions that enter a contracting null energy condition (NEC) violating phase, bounce at finite values of the scale factor and exit into an expanding NEC-satisfying phase without encountering any singularities or pathologies. A drawback of these examples is that singular behavior is encountered at some time either just before or just after the NEC-violating phase. In this Letter, we show that it is possible to circumvent this problem by extending our method to actions that include the next order L4 Galileon interaction. Using this approach, we construct non-singular classical bouncing cosmological solutions that are non-pathological for all times.

  18. A stable numerical solution method in-plane loading of nonlinear viscoelastic laminated orthotropic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1989-01-01

    In response to the tremendous growth in the development of advanced materials, such as fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) composite materials, a new numerical method is developed to analyze and predict the time-dependent properties of these materials. Basic concepts in viscoelasticity, laminated composites, and previous viscoelastic numerical methods are presented. A stable numerical method, called the nonlinear differential equation method (NDEM), is developed to calculate the in-plane stresses and strains over any time period for a general laminate constructed from nonlinear viscoelastic orthotropic plies. The method is implemented in an in-plane stress analysis computer program, called VCAP, to demonstrate its usefulness and to verify its accuracy. A number of actual experimental test results performed on Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates are compared to predictions calculated from the numerical method.

  19. Formation of Polyelectrolyte Complex Colloid Particles between Chitosan and Pectin with Different Degree of Esterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Sun, Hongyuan; He, Jieyu

    2017-12-01

    The effects of degree of esterification, pectin/chitosan ratio and pH on the formation of polyelectrolyte complex colloid particles between chitosan (CS) and pectin (PE) were investigated. Low methoxyl pectin (LPE) was achieved by de-esterifying high methoxyl pectin (HPE) with pectin methyl esterase. Turbidity titration and colorimetric method was used to determine the stability of complex colloid particles. The structure and morphology of complex particles were characterized by FTIR and TEM. When pectin solution was dropped into chitosan solution, complex colloidal dispersion was stable as PE/CS mass ratio was no more than 3:2. Colloidal particles of HPE-CS complex coagulated at larger ratio of PE/CS than LPE-CS. The maximum complex occurred at pH 6.1 for HPE-CS and pH 5.7 for LPE-CS, and decreasing pH leaded to the dissociation of complex particles. Electrostatic interactions between carboxyl groups on pectin and amino groups on chitosan were confirmed by FTIR. Colloidal particle sizes ranged from about 100 nm to 400 nm with spherical shape.

  20. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stable-isotope and solute-chemistry approaches to flow characterization in a forested tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Martha A.; Shanley, James B.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Willenbring, Jane K; Occhi, Marcie; González, Grizelle

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of changing climate has led to uncertainty about the resilience of forested mountain watersheds in the tropics. In watersheds where frequent, high rainfall provides ample runoff, we often lack understanding of how the system will respond under conditions of decreased rainfall or drought. Factors that govern water supply, such as recharge rates and groundwater storage capacity, may be poorly quantified. This paper describes 8-year data sets of water stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) of precipitation (4 sites) and a stream (1 site), and four contemporaneous stream sample sets of solute chemistry and isotopes, used to investigate watershed response to precipitation inputs in the 1780-ha Río Mameyes basin in the Luquillo Mountains of northeastern Puerto Rico. Extreme δ2H and δ18O values from low-pressure storm systems and the deuterium excess (d-excess) were useful tracers of watershed response in this tropical system. A hydrograph separation experiment performed in June 2011 yielded different but complementary information from stable isotope and solute chemistry data. The hydrograph separation results indicated that 36% of the storm rain that reached the soil surface left the watershed in a very short time as runoff. Weathering-derived solutes indicated near-stream groundwater was displaced into the stream at the beginning of the event, followed by significant dilution. The more biologically active solutes exhibited a net flushing behavior. The d-excess analysis suggested that streamflow typically has a recent rainfall component (∼25%) with transit time less than the sampling resolution of 7 days, and a more well-mixed groundwater component (∼75%). The contemporaneous stream sample sets showed an overall increase in dissolved solute concentrations with decreasing elevation that may be related to groundwater inputs, different geology, and slope position. A considerable amount of water from rain events runs off as quickflow and bypasses

  2. Pyridine and phosphonate containing ligands for stable lanthanide complexation. An experimental and theoretical study to assess the solution structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato-Iglesias, Marta; Balogh, Edina; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tóth, Eva; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez Blas, Teresa

    2006-12-07

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the stability and solution structure of lanthanide complexes with two novel ligands containing pyridine units and phosphonate pendant arms on either ethane-1,2-diamine (L2) or cyclohexane-1,2-diamine (L3) backbones. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the protonation constants of the ligands and the stability constants of the complexes with Gd(III) and the endogenous metal ions Zn(II) and Cu(II). While the stability constant of the GdL2 complex is too high to be determined by direct pH-potentiometric titrations, the cyclohexyl derivative GdL3 has a lower and assessable stability (log K(GdL3)=17.62). Due to the presence of the phosphonate groups, various protonated species can be detected up to pH approximately 8 for both ligands and all metal ions studied. The molecular clusters [Ln(L)(H2O)](3-).19H2O (Ln=La, Nd, Ho or Lu; L=L2 or L3) were characterized by theoretical calculations at the HF level. Our calculations provide two minimum energy geometries where the ligand adopts different conformations: twist-wrap (tw), in which the ligand wraps around the metal ion by twisting the pyridyl units relative to each other, and twist-fold (tf), where the slight twisting of the pyridyl units is accompanied by an overall folding of the two pyridine units towards one of the phosphonate groups. The relative free energies of the tw and tf conformations of [Ln(L)(H2O)]3- (L=L2, L3) complexes calculated in aqueous solution (C-PCM) by using the B3LYP model indicate that the tw form is the most stable one along the whole lanthanide series for the complexes of L3, while for those of L2 only the Gd(III) complex is more stable in the tf conformation by ca. 0.5 kcal mol-1. 1H NMR studies of the Eu(III) complex of L3 show the initial formation of the tf complex in aqueous solution, which slowly converts to the thermodynamically stable tw form. The structures calculated for the Nd(III) complexes are in reasonably

  3. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kats, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are

  4. Using colloidal silica as isolator, diverter and blocking agent for subsurface geological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, William L.; Roberts, Sarah K.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Ezzedine, Souheil M.; Hunt, Jonathan D.

    2018-03-06

    A system for blocking fast flow paths in geological formations includes preparing a solution of colloidal silica having a nonviscous phase and a solid gel phase. The solution of colloidal silica is injected into the geological formations while the solution of colloidal silica is in the nonviscous phase. The solution of colloidal silica is directed into the fast flow paths and reaches the solid gel phase in the fast flow paths thereby blocking flow of fluid in the fast paths.

  5. Thermally Stable Solution Processed Vanadium Oxide as a Hole Extraction Layer in Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulami, Abdullah; Griffin, Jonathan; Alqurashi, Rania; Yi, Hunan; Iraqi, Ahmed; Lidzey, David; Buckley, Alastair

    2016-03-25

    Low-temperature solution-processable vanadium oxide (V₂O x ) thin films have been employed as hole extraction layers (HELs) in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells. V₂O x films were fabricated in air by spin-coating vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide (s-V₂O x ) at room temperature without the need for further thermal annealing. The deposited vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide film undergoes hydrolysis in air, converting to V₂O x with optical and electronic properties comparable to vacuum-deposited V₂O₅. When s-V₂O x thin films were annealed in air at temperatures of 100 °C and 200 °C, OPV devices showed similar results with good thermal stability and better light transparency. Annealing at 300 °C and 400 °C resulted in a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5% with a decrement approximately 15% lower than that of unannealed films; this is due to the relative decrease in the shunt resistance (R sh ) and an increase in the series resistance (R s ) related to changes in the oxidation state of vanadium.

  6. Cu-Containing Fe-Ni Corrosion-Resistant Alloys Designed by a Cluster-Based Stable Solid Solution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baozeng; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yingmin; Li, Chunyan; Qiang, Jianbing; Ji, Chunjun; Dong, Chuang

    2012-02-01

    Copper is a good corrosion resisting element, but due to its immiscibility with Fe, it is only used as a minor-alloying element in stainless steels. In this work, we introduced a double-cluster structure model [CuNi12][NiFe12] m for stable solid solutions in Cu-containing Fe-Ni corrosion-resistant invar alloys. Our model takes into account all of the enthalpies between the element pairs by assuming Fe-Ni and Ni-Cu nearest neighbors and by avoiding Fe-Cu ones, so that the ideally stabilized structures are described by mixing two cuboctahedral clusters in the fcc lattice, NiFe12 and CuNi12. Two alloy series were designed by varying the relative proportions of the two clusters and the Cu contents. It was proved that the alloys with Cu contents below those prescribed by this model could easily be solutionized and water-quenched to a monolithic fcc solid solution, and resultant alloys possessed good corrosion-resisting properties in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution.

  7. Measurement of the Four-Point Susceptibility of an Out-of-Equilibrium Colloidal Solution of Nanoparticles Using Time-Resolved Light Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Ricardo; ruocco, giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    The spatial fluctuations of the dynamics of a colloidal system composed of nanoparticles are probed by a novel experimental setup, which combines homodyne and heterodyne dynamic light scattering focused onto a micron-sized volume via a microscope objective. The technique is used to measure the four-point...

  8. The radiation chemistry of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, R.M.

    1976-08-01

    One of the most important problems associated with water cooled reactors is the accumulation on the pipework of radio-active deposits. These are formed from corrosion products which become activated during their passage through the reactor core. The first step of the activation process involves the deposition of the corrosion products, which are present as either colloidal or particulate matter, onto surfaces in the reactor core, i.e. within the radiation zone. A review of the literature on the effect of radiation on colloids is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the dependence of colloidal parameters such as particle size, turbidity and electrophoretic mobility on radiation dose. Most of the data available is of a qualitative nature only. Evidence is presented that colloids of iron are affected (in some cases precipitated) by radiation, and it is suggested that this process plays a part in the deposition of corrosion products in nuclear reactor cores. The bulk of the information available can be rationalized in terms of the radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions, and the interaction of the radicals produced with the atoms or molecules at the surface of the colloidal particles. This approach is very successful in explaining the variation of the mean particle size of monodisperse sulphur hydrosols with dose, for which quantitative experimental data are available. (author)

  9. Influence of heteroaggregation processes between intrinsic colloids and carrier colloids on cerium(III) mobility through fractured carbonate rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2016-09-01

    Colloid facilitated transport of radionuclides has been implicated as a major transport vector for leaked nuclear waste in the subsurface. Sorption of radionuclides onto mobile carrier colloids such as bentonite and humic acid often accelerates their transport through saturated rock fractures. Here, we employ column studies to investigate the impact of intrinsic, bentonite and humic acid colloids on the transport and recovery of Ce(III) through a fractured chalk core. Ce(III) recovery where either bentonite or humic colloids were added was 7.7-26.9% Ce for all experiments. Greater Ce(III) recovery was observed when both types of carrier colloids were present (25.4-37.4%). When only bentonite colloids were present, Ce(III) appeared to be fractionated between chemical sorption to the bentonite colloid surfaces and heteroaggregation of bentonite colloids with intrinsic carbonate colloids, precipitated naturally in solution. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and colloid stability experiments reveal that in suspensions of humic acid colloids, colloid-facilitated Ce(III) migration results only from the latter attachment mechanism rather than from chemical sorption. This observed heteroaggregation of different colloid types may be an important factor to consider when predicting potential mobility of leaked radionuclides from geological repositories for spent fuel located in carbonate rocks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Caution on the storage of waters and aqueous solutions in plastic containers for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E

    2012-11-30

    The choice of containers for storage of aqueous samples between their collection, transport and water hydrogen ((2)H) and oxygen ((18)O) stable isotope analysis is a topic of concern for a wide range of fields in environmental, geological, biomedical, food, and forensic sciences. The transport and separation of water molecules during water vapor or liquid uptake by sorption or solution and the diffusive transport of water molecules through organic polymer material by permeation or pervaporation may entail an isotopic fractionation. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the extent of such fractionation. Sixteen bottle-like containers of eleven different organic polymers, including low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE), polypropylene (PP), polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and perfluoroalkoxy-Teflon (PFA), of different wall thickness and size were completely filled with the same mineral water and stored for 659 days under the same conditions of temperature and humidity. Particular care was exercised to keep the bottles tightly closed and prevent loss of water vapor through the seals. Changes of up to +5‰ for δ(2)H values and +2.0‰ for δ(18)O values were measured for water after more than 1 year of storage within a plastic container, with the magnitude of change depending mainly on the type of organic polymer, wall thickness, and container size. The most important variations were measured for the PET and PC bottles. Waters stored in glass bottles with Polyseal™ cone-lined PP screw caps and thick-walled HDPE or PFA containers with linerless screw caps having an integrally molded inner sealing ring preserved their original δ(2)H and δ(18)O values. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen stable isotope compositions of the organic polymeric materials were also determined. The results of this study clearly show that for precise and accurate measurements of the water stable isotope composition in aqueous solutions, rigorous sampling and

  11. Shape Separation of Colloidal Metal Nanoparticles via Size Exclusion Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Marvi, Sarrah

    2016-01-01

    The inherent polydispersity of solution-based, colloidal nanoparticle syntheses has necessitated the development of facile post-processing methods for the purification of anisotropic nanoparticles. Here, the use of size exclusion chromatography is explored for the shape separation of colloidal silver nanocube and colloidal gold bipyramid solutions. Multiple column packing materials, pore sizes, and mobile phases were tested to address the prevalent issues of metal adsorption to the high surfa...

  12. Stability and minimum size of colloidal clusters on a liquid-air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergamenshchik, V M

    2012-02-01

    A vertical force applied to each of two colloids, trapped at a liquid-air interface, induces their logarithmic pairwise attraction. I recently showed [Phys. Rev. E 79, 011407 (2009)] that in clusters of size R much larger than the capillary length λ, the attraction changes to that of a power law and is much stronger due to a many-body effect, and I derived two equations that describe the equilibrium coarse-grained meniscus profile and colloid density in such clusters. In this paper, this theory is shown also to describe small clusters with R≪ λ provided the number N of colloids therein is sufficiently large. An analytical solution for a small circular cluster with an arbitrary short-range power-law pairwise repulsion is found. The energy of a cluster is obtained as a function of its radius R and colloid number N. As in large clusters, the attraction force and energy universally scale with the distance L between colloids as L(-3) and L(-2), respectively, for any repulsion forces. The states of an equilibrium cluster, predicted by the theory, are shown to be stable with respect to small perturbations of the meniscus profile and colloid density. The minimum number of colloids in a circular cluster, which sustains the thermal motion, is estimated. For standard parameters, it can be very modest, e.g., in the range 20-200, which is in line with experimental findings on reversible clusterization on a liquid-air interface. © 2012 American Physical Society

  13. Fate of process solution cyanide and nitrate at three nevada gold mines inferred from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.A.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    Stable isotope methods have been used to identify the mechanisms responsible for cyanide consumption at three heap-leach operations that process Carlin-type gold ores in Nevada, U.S.A. The reagent cyanide had ??15N values ranging from -5 to -2??? and ??13C values from -60 to -35???. The wide ??13C range reflects the use by different suppliers of isotopically distinct natural-gas feedstocks and indicates that isotopes may be useful in environmental studies where there is a need to trace cyanide sources. In heap-leach circuits displaying from 5 to 98% consumption of cyanide, barren-solution and pregnant-solution cyanide were isotopically indistinguishable. The similarity is inconsistent with cyanide loss predominantly by HCN offgassing (a process that in laboratory experiments caused substantial isotopic changes), but it is consistent with cyanide retention within the heaps as solids, a process that caused minimal isotopic changes in laboratory simulations, or with cyanide oxidation, which also appears to cause minimal changes. In many pregnant solutions cyanide was carried entirely as metal complexes, which is consistent with ferrocyanides having precipitated or cyanocomplexes having been adsorbed within the heaps. It is inferred that gaseous cyanide emissions from operations of this type are less important than has generally been thought and that the dissolution or desorption kinetics of solid species is an important control on cyanide elution when the spent heaps undergo rinsing. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium had ??15N values of 1-16???. The data reflect isotopic fractionation during ammonia offgassing or denitrification of nitrate - particularly in reclaim ponds - but do not indicate the extent to which nitrate is derived from cyanide or from explosive residues. ?? The Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 2000.

  14. THE COLLOIDAL BEHAVIOR OF EDESTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, David I.

    1922-01-01

    1. It has been shown by titration experiments that the globulin edestin behaves like an amphoteric electrolyte, reacting stoichiometrically with acids and bases. 2. The potential difference developed between a solution of edestin chloride or acetate separated by a collodion membrane from an acid solution free from protein was found to be influenced by salt concentration and hydrogen ion concentration in the way predicted by Donnan's theory of membrane equilibrium. 3. The osmotic pressure of such edestin-acid salt solutions was found to be influenced by salt concentration and by hydrogen ion concentration in the same way as is the potential difference. 4. The colloidal behavior of edestin is thus completely analogous to that observed by Loeb with gelatin, casein, and egg albumin, and may be explained by Loeb's theory of colloidal behavior, which is based on the idea that proteins react stoichiometrically as amphoteric electrolytes and on Donnan's theory of membrane equilibrium. PMID:19871959

  15. Electronically Active Impurities in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Carey, Graham H.

    2014-11-25

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Colloidal quantum dot films have seen rapid progress as active materials in photodetection, light emission, and photovoltaics. Their processing from the solution phase makes them an attractive option for these applications due to the expected cost reductions associated with liquid-phase material deposition. Colloidally stable nanoparticles capped using long, insulating aliphatic ligands are used to form semiconducting, insoluble films via a solid-state ligand exchange in which the original ligands are replaced with short bifunctional ligands. Here we show that this ligand exchange can have unintended and undesired side effects: a high molecular weight complex can form, containing both lead oleate and the shorter conductive ligand, and this poorly soluble complex can end up embedded within the colloidal quantum dot (CQD) active layer. We further show that, by adding an acidic treatment during film processing, we can break up and wash away these complexes, producing a higher quality CQD solid. The improved material leads to photovoltaic devices with reduced series resistance and enhanced fill factor relative to controls employing previously reported CQD solids. (Figure Presented).

  16. Sampling and analysis of groundwater colloids. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takala, M.; Manninen, P.

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this literature study was to give basic information of colloids: their formation, colloid material, sampling and characterisation of groundwater colloids. Colloids are commonly refereed to as particles in the size range of 1 nm to 1000 nm. They are defined as a suspension of solid material in a liquid that does not appear to separate even after a long period of time. Colloids can be formed from a variety of inorganic or organic material. Inorganic colloids in natural groundwaters are formed by physical fragmentation of the host rock or by precipitation. The water chemistry strongly controls the stability of colloids. The amount of colloid particles in a solution tends to decrease with the increasing ionic strength of the solution. Increases in pH and organic material tend to increase the stability of colloids. The mobility of colloids in a porous medium is controlled mainly by groundwater movement, sedimentation, diffusion and interception. Factors controlling sampling artefacts are oxygen diffusion: leads to e.g. calcite precipitation, pumping rates and filtering techniques. Efforts to minimise artefact formation should be taken if the scope of the sampling programme is to study the colloid particles. The colloid phase size distribution can be determined by light scattering systems, laser induced break down or by single particle analysis using SEM micrographs. Elemental compositions can be analysed with EDS spectrometry from single colloid particles. Bulk compositions of the colloid phase can be analysed with e.g. ICP-MS analyser. The results of this study can be used as guidelines for groundwater colloid samplings. Recommendations for future work are listed in the conclusions of this report. (orig.)

  17. Active and Stable Methane Oxidation Nano-Catalyst with Highly-Ionized Palladium Species Prepared by Solution Combustion Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Khader

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and testing of active and stable nano-catalysts for methane oxidation. The nano-catalyst was palladium/ceria supported on alumina prepared via a one-step solution-combustion synthesis (SCS method. As confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM, SCS preparative methodology resulted in segregating both Pd and Ce on the surface of the Al2O3 support. Furthermore, HTEM showed that bigger Pd particles (5 nm and more were surrounded by CeO2, resembling a core shell structure, while smaller Pd particles (1 nm and less were not associated with CeO2. The intimate Pd-CeO2 attachment resulted in insertion of Pd ions into the ceria lattice, and associated with the reduction of Ce4+ into Ce3+ ions; consequently, the formation of oxygen vacancies. XPS showed also that Pd had three oxidation states corresponding to Pd0, Pd2+ due to PdO, and highly ionized Pd ions (Pd(2+x+ which might originate from the insertion of Pd ions into the ceria lattice. The formation of intrinsic Ce3+ ions, highly ionized (Pd2+ species inserted into the lattice of CeO2 Pd ions (Pd(2+x+ and oxygen vacancies is suggested to play a major role in the unique catalytic activity. The results indicated that the Pd-SCS nano-catalysts were exceptionally more active and stable than conventional catalysts. Under similar reaction conditions, the methane combustion rate over the SCS catalyst was ~18 times greater than that of conventional catalysts. Full methane conversions over the SCS catalysts occurred at around 400 °C but were not shown at all with conventional catalysts. In addition, contrary to the conventional catalysts, the SCS catalysts exhibited superior activity with no sign of deactivation in the temperature range between ~400 and 800 °C.

  18. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  19. Colloid-Mediated Transport of PPCPs through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xijuan; Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter the soil through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land application. Colloids, such as clays that are present in soil, may interact with PPCPs to affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses how soil colloids mediate the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. The affinities of PPCPs for colloids as well as the influence factors were investigated. For PPCPs that have high sorption (e.g., ciprofloxacin with Kd ˜104-5 L/kg) on soil colloids, the transport is dominantly controlled by colloids, with a higher extent of colloid-facilitated effect at lower ionic strength. For PPCPs that have intermediate sorption (e.g., tetracycline with Kd ˜103-4 L/kg) on soil colloids, the mobility of dissolved and colloid-bound PPCPs respond oppositely to the effect of changes in solution ionic strength, making the net effect of soil colloids on PPCP transport variable with soil solution chemistry. For PPCPs with low sorption (e.g., ibuprofen with Kd ˜102-3 L/kg) on soil colloids, other measures (such as pre-filtration) must be taken. This study suggested that colloids are significant carriers of PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  20. Characterization of Metal Ion ­ Colloid Interaction: Impact On Colloid-facilitated Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, C. H.; Schmitt, D.; Kaulisch, E.-M.; Frimmel, F. H.

    It is generally accepted, that metal transport in natural aquatic systems strongly de- pends on the metal binding form. Besides complex formation with well defined inor- ganic and organic ligands, the interaction with colloidal particles and soil material is one of the most important reactions of metal ions in aquatic systems. Mobile colloids compete with the stationary soil matrix for binding of metal ions and might facili- tate their transport. Important representatives for mineral and organic colloids are clay minerals and natural organic matter (NOM), respectively. In this work, the interaction of metal ions with clay minerals and NOM is characterized by coupling of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation AF4 to inductively coupled plasma ­ mass spectrometry (ICPMS). A method for separating mineral from organic colloids is presented, which allows to quantify the amount of metals being bound to either colloid. For different metal ions (Cu, Zn, Pb, Pt) and a metalloid (As) a different extent of binding to either colloid was found.The information obtained from the AF4-ICPMS measurements was useful for the understanding of the observations from column experiments which were conducted to quantify the colloid-facilitated metal transport. In column experiments, the transport of the mineral colloids itself and the influence of NOM onto the colloid transport were investigated. Furthermore, the dependance of colloid transport from the ionic strength and the pH value was elucidated. In order to get information about the co-transport of metal ions by organic and mineral colloids, metal ions were adsorbed onto the colloidal material and a distribution coef- ficient of the metal ions between the colloidal phase and the solution was determined. The colloidal suspension containing both, "free" and adsorbed metal ions were then injected onto the column. The direct metal breakthrough caused by colloidal trans- port was detected at the column outlet. The results clearly

  1. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Book Description: Colloidal science and technology is one of the fastest growing research and technology areas. This book explores the cutting edge research in colloidal science and technology that will be usefull in almost every aspect of modern society. This book has a depth of information...... related to historical prospective, synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling and application of unique class of colloidal materials starting from colloidal gold to coated silica colloid and platinum, titania colloids. This book is unique in its design, content, providing depth of science about...... different colloidal materials and their applications in chemistry, physics, biological, medical sciences and environment. Graduate students, academic and industrial researchers and medical professionals will discover recently developed colloidal materials and their applications in many areas of human...

  2. Colloid and surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jeong Jung; Cho, Sun Chae; Ryeo, Su Dong

    1995-08-01

    This book consists of two parts about colloid and surfactant. The first parts has explanations colloid and surface science, which deal with creation and properties of colloidal particles, surfactant and micelle colloid, property of surfactant, membranes, absorption of surface science, electrokinetic phenomenon, emulsion, foam and rheology. The second part mentions surfactant on anionic surfactant with five types, amphoteric surface active agent, non-ionic surface active agent and use of surfactant.

  3. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on the formation of colloidal gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, R.; Grieser, F.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous solutions is known to produce hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals due to a process called acoustic cavitation. This phenomenon involves the formation, growth and collapse of microbubbles in solution. The cavitation threshold, the resonant size of the bubble, the ratio of stable to transient cavities produced and many other bubble properties depend on the frequency of the applied l sound field. A study of the reduction of Au III to colloidal gold in the presence of alcohol at a number of frequencies: 20, 358, 500 and 1062 kHz has been undertaken to observe any differences in the chemical effects of the ultrasonic frequency. Alcohols are surface active molecules, therefore on bubble collapse the alcohol is present to scavenge some of the primary radicals before they recombine. The secondary radicals produced are more stable and hence can disperse into the bulk solution, where reaction with solute can occur

  4. Purification technologies for colloidal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Gee, Megan Y; Greytak, A B

    2017-01-10

    Almost all applications of colloidal nanocrystals require some type of purification or surface modification process following nanocrystal growth. Nanocrystal purification - the separation of nanocrystals from undesired solution components - can perturb the surface chemistry and thereby the physical properties of colloidal nanocrystals due to changes in solvent, solute concentrations, and exposure of the nanocrystal surface to oxidation or hydrolysis. For example, nanocrystal quantum dots frequently exhibit decreased photoluminescence brightness after precipitation from the growth solvent and subsequent redissolution. Consequently, purification is an integral part of the synthetic chemistry of colloidal nanocrystals, and the effect of purification methods must be considered in order to accurately compare and predict the behavior of otherwise similar nanocrystal samples. In this Feature Article we examine established and emerging approaches to the purification of colloidal nanoparticles from a nanocrystal surface chemistry viewpoint. Purification is generally achieved by exploiting differences in properties between the impurities and the nanoparticles. Three distinct properties are typically manipulated: polarity (relative solubility), electrophoretic mobility, and size. We discuss precipitation, extraction, electrophoretic methods, and size-based methods including ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration, diafiltration, and size-exclusion chromatography. The susceptibility of quantum dots to changes in surface chemistry, with changes in photoluminescence decay associated with surface chemical changes, extends even into the case of core/shell structures. Accordingly, the goal of a more complete description of quantum dot surface chemistry has been a driver of innovation in colloidal nanocrystal purification methods. We specifically examine the effect of purification on surface chemistry and photoluminescence in quantum dots as an example of the challenges associated with

  5. Colloids from the aqueous corrosion of uranium nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Mertz, C. J.; Goldberg, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids may enhance the subsurface transport of radionuclides and potentially compromise the long-term safe operation of the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Little data is available on colloid formation for the many different waste forms expected to be buried in the repository. This work expands the sparse database on colloids formed during the corrosion of metallic uranium nuclear fuel. We characterized spherical UO 2 and nickel-rich montmorilonite smectite-clay colloids formed during the corrosion of uranium metal fuel under bathtub conditions at 90 °C. Iron and chromium oxides and calcium carbonate colloids were present but were a minor population. The estimated upper concentration of the UO 2 and clays was 4 × 10 11 and 7 × 10 11-3 × 10 12 particles/L, respectively. However, oxygen eventually oxidized the UO 2 colloids, forming long filaments of weeksite K 2(UO 2) 2Si 6O 15 · 4H 2O that settled from solution, reducing the UO 2 colloid population and leaving predominantly clay colloids. The smectite colloids were not affected by oxygen. Plutonium was not directly observed within the UO 2 colloids but partitioned completely to the colloid size fraction. The plutonium concentration in the colloidal fraction was slightly higher than the value used in the viability assessment model, and does not change in concentration with exposure to oxygen. This paper provides conclusive evidence for single-phase radioactive colloids composed of UO 2. However, its impact on repository safety is probably small since oxygen and silica availability will oxidize and effectively precipitate the UO 2 colloids from concentrated solutions.

  6. Observation of a microcrystalline gel in colloids with competing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian Hui; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-12-14

    A stable short-range crystalline structure is observed in colloidal systems with competing short-range attractions and long-range repulsions. We term these structures "microcrystalline gels" as the microcrystals are embedded in a dense disordered network.

  7. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  8. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30-40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  9. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-10-13

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30-40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  10. Biocompatible Amphiphilic Hydrogel-Solid Dimer Particles as Colloidal Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Amstad, Esther; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Cai, Liheng; Fan, Jing; Chen, Qiushui; Hai, Mingtan; Koehler, Stephan; Zhang, Huidan; Liang, Fuxin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Weitz, David A

    2017-12-26

    Emulsions of two immiscible liquids can slowly coalesce over time when stabilized by surfactant molecules. Pickering emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles can be much more stable. Here, we fabricate biocompatible amphiphilic dimer particles using a hydrogel, a strongly hydrophilic material, and achieve large contrast in the wetting properties of the two bulbs, resulting in enhanced stabilization of emulsions. We generate monodisperse single emulsions of alginate and shellac solution in oil using a flow-focusing microfluidics device. Shellac precipitates from water and forms a solid bulb at the periphery of the droplet when the emulsion is exposed to acid. Molecular interactions result in amphiphilic dimer particles that consist of two joined bulbs: one hydrogel bulb of alginate in water and the other hydrophobic bulb of shellac. Alginate in the hydrogel compartment can be cross-linked using calcium cations to obtain stable particles. Analogous to surfactant molecules at the interface, the resultant amphiphilic particles stand at the water/oil interface with the hydrogel bulb submerged in water and the hydrophobic bulb in oil and are thus able to stabilize both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions, making these amphiphilic hydrogel-solid particles ideal colloidal surfactants for various applications.

  11. Random packing of colloids and granular matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with the random packing of colloids and granular matter. A random packing is a stable disordered collection of touching particles, without long-range positional and orientational order. Experimental random packings of particles with the same shape but made of different materials

  12. Quantitative uptake of colloidal particles by cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Neus [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC),Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Hühn, Jonas; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Valdeperez, Daniel; Masood, Atif [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Said, Alaa Hassan [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University (Egypt); Escudero, Alberto [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC — Universidad de Sevilla, Seville (Spain); Pelaz, Beatriz [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Gonzalez, Elena [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); University of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Duarte, Miguel A. Correa [University of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Roy, Sathi [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Chakraborty, Indranath [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lim, Mei L.; Sjöqvist, Sebastian [Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC),Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Jungebluth, Philipp [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Parak, Wolfgang J., E-mail: wolfgang.parak@physik.uni-marburg.de [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); CIC biomaGUNE, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    The use of nanotechnologies involving nano- and microparticles has increased tremendously in the recent past. There are various beneficial characteristics that make particles attractive for a wide range of technologies. However, colloidal particles on the other hand can potentially be harmful for humans and environment. Today, complete understanding of the interaction of colloidal particles with biological systems still remains a challenge. Indeed, their uptake, effects, and final cell cycle including their life span fate and degradation in biological systems are not fully understood. This is mainly due to the complexity of multiple parameters which need to be taken in consideration to perform the nanosafety research. Therefore, we will provide an overview of the common denominators and ideas to achieve universal metrics to assess their safety. The review discusses aspects including how biological media could change the physicochemical properties of colloids, how colloids are endocytosed by cells, how to distinguish between internalized versus membrane-attached colloids, possible correlation of cellular uptake of colloids with their physicochemical properties, and how the colloidal stability of colloids may vary upon cell internalization. In conclusion three main statements are given. First, in typically exposure scenarios only part of the colloids associated with cells are internalized while a significant part remain outside cells attached to their membrane. For quantitative uptake studies false positive counts in the form of only adherent but not internalized colloids have to be avoided. pH sensitive fluorophores attached to the colloids, which can discriminate between acidic endosomal/lysosomal and neutral extracellular environment around colloids offer a possible solution. Second, the metrics selected for uptake studies is of utmost importance. Counting the internalized colloids by number or by volume may lead to significantly different results. Third, colloids

  13. Tunable Time-Dependent Colloidal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Andrew M.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles can be driven by changes in temperature, density, or the concentration of solutes, and it is even possible to program the thermal response and equilibrium phase transitions of such systems. It is still difficult, however, to tune how the self-assembly process varies in time. We demonstrate control over the time-dependence of colloidal interactions, using DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with binding energies that are set by the concentration of a free linker strand in solution. We control the rate at which this free strand is consumed using a catalytic DNA reaction, whose rate is governed by the concentration of a catalyst strand. Varying the concentration of the linker, its competitor, and the catalyst at a fixed temperature, we can tune the rate and degree of the formation of colloidal aggregates and their following disassembly. Close to the colloidal melting point, the timescales of these out-of-equilibrium assembly and disassembly processes are determined by the rate of the catalytic reaction. Far below the colloidal melting point, however, the effects from varying our linker and competitor concentrations dominate.

  14. Silica colloids and their effect on radionuclide sorption. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelttae, P.; Hakanen, M.

    2008-05-01

    Silica sol, commercial colloidal silica manufactured by Eka Chemicals in Bohus, Sweden is a promising inorganic grout material for sealing small fractures in low permeable rock. This literature review collects information about the use of silica sol as an injection grout material, the properties of inorganic, especially silica colloids, colloid contents in granitic groundwater conditions, essential characterization methods and colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides. Objective was to evaluate the release and mobility of silica sol colloids, the effect of the groundwater conditions, the amount of colloids compared with natural colloids in Olkiluoto conditions, radionuclide sorption on colloids and their contribution to radionuclide transport. Silica sol seems to be a feasible material to seal fractures with an aperture as small as 10 μm in low permeable rock. The silica sol gel is sufficiently stable to limit to water ingress during the operational phase, the requirement that the pH should be below 11 is fulfilled and the compatibility with Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials is expected to be good. No significant influence on the bentonite properties caused by the silica sol is expected when calcium chloride is used as an accelerator but the influence of sodium chloride has not been examined. No significant release of colloids is expected under prevailing groundwater conditions. The long-term (100 y) stability of silica sol gel has not yet been clearly demonstrated and a long-term release of silica colloids cannot be excluded. The question is the amount of colloids, how mobile they are and the influence of possible glacial melt waters. The bentonite buffer used in the EBS system is assumed to be a potential source of colloids. In a study in Olkiluoto, bentonite colloids were found only in low salinity groundwater. In general, low salinity water (total dissolved solids -1 ) favours colloid stability and bentonite colloids can remain stable over long

  15. Preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Fluid resuscitation is a frequent intervention in intensive care. Colloids are widely used, but recent data suggest harm by some of these solutions. This calls for more clinical studies on this matter, but the current preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units (ICUs) are unknown. In March-May 2007, 120 Scandinavian ICUs were invited to answer a web-based survey consisting of 18 questions on types of colloids, indications, contraindications and rationale of use. Seventy-three ICUs, of which 31 were university hospital units, answered the questionnaire. Most ICUs used both synthetic and natural colloids, and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 was the preferred colloid in 59 units. Eleven ICUs had protocols for colloid use. The most frequent indication was second-line fluid for hypovolaemia, but one in three ICUs used colloids as first-line fluid. Thirty-five ICUs had contraindications, which were mainly for the use of synthetic colloids (acute renal failure 25 units, bleeding 15 units). Most units based the use of colloids on theoretical knowledge and tradition. Sixty-five and 54 ICUs were ready to change colloid use based on data from randomised trials of ICU patients showing changes in mortality or renal function, respectively. Most Scandinavian ICUs use both synthetic and natural colloids, but HES 130/0.4 is by far the preferred colloid. Few units have protocols for colloid use, but most use them for hypovolaemia, and the majority have no contraindications. Most ICUs are ready to change colloid use if randomised trials in ICU patients show changes in mortality or renal function.

  16. Log-stable laws as asymptotic solutions to a fragmentation equation:Application to the distribution of droplets in a high Weber-number spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbert, Nicolas; Séro-Guillaume, Olivier

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, it will be shown that “totally skewed to the left” log-stable distributions are suitable asymptotic solutions to a fragmentation equation. This result generalizes Kolmogorov’s work on log-normal distribution for the drops’ size number distribution of particles under pulverization. Indeed, Kolmogorov’s discrete process is extended to a continuous time Markov process for the volume distribution instead of the number distribution. New hypotheses are then introduced which lead to log-stable distributions as asymptotic solutions of the fragmentation equation. Log-stable laws are then used to fit experimental probability distribution function (pdf) of Simmons and Hanratty measuring drop sizes in a horizontal annular gas-liquid flow at high Weber number [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 27, 861 (2001)]. Log-stable pdf better fits to the experimental pdf than usual empirical spray pdf and especially, because of the heavy tail of the associated stable distribution, in the small drops part of the distribution.

  17. Analytical phase diagrams for colloids and non-adsorbing polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Gerard J; Tuinier, Remco

    2008-11-04

    We review the free-volume theory (FVT) of Lekkerkerker et al. [Europhys. Lett. 20 (1992) 559] for the phase behavior of colloids in the presence of non-adsorbing polymer and we extend this theory in several aspects: (i) We take the solvent into account as a separate component and show that the natural thermodynamic parameter for the polymer properties is the insertion work Pi(v), where Pi is the osmotic pressure of the (external) polymer solution and v the volume of a colloid particle. (ii) Curvature effects are included along the lines of Aarts et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matt. 14 (2002) 7551] but we find accurate simple power laws which simplify the mathematical procedure considerably. (iii) We find analytical forms for the first, second, and third derivatives of the grand potential, needed for the calculation of the colloid chemical potential, the pressure, gas-liquid critical points and the critical endpoint (cep), where the (stable) critical line ends and then coincides with the triple point. This cep determines the boundary condition for a stable liquid. We first apply these modifications to the so-called colloid limit, where the size ratio q(R)=R/a between the radius of gyration R of the polymer and the particle radius a is small. In this limit the binodal polymer concentrations are below overlap: the depletion thickness delta is nearly equal to R, and Pi can be approximated by the ideal (van't Hoff) law Pi=Pi(0)=phi/N, where phi is the polymer volume fraction and N the number of segments per chain. The results are close to those of the original Lekkerkerker theory. However, our analysis enables very simple analytical expressions for the polymer and colloid concentrations in the critical and triple points and along the binodals as a function of q(R). Also the position of the cep is found analytically. In order to make the model applicable to higher size ratio's q(R) (including the so-called protein limit where q(R)>1) further extensions are needed. We

  18. Synthesis of colloidal silica dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patrick M; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2005-11-22

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of stable suspensions of monodisperse fluorescently labeled silica dumbbell particles. Pure dispersions of silica dumbbells with center-to-center lengths from 174 nm to 2.3 microm were produced with a variety of aspect ratios. Individual particles in concentrated dispersions of these particles could be imaged with confocal microscopy. These particles can be used as a colloidal model system for addressing fundamental questions about crystal and glass formation of low-aspect-ratio anisotropic particles. They also have potential in photonic applications and electro-optical devices.

  19. Solution to the colloidal silica problem in the San Luis Potosi power plant; Solucion del problema de silice coloidal en la central termoelectrica San Luis Potosi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Rubalcava, Humberto [Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Mercado, Sergio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Guerra, Protasio [Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1988-12-31

    In June 1986 the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) made tests to raise the load of the first normalized unit of 350 MW of the San Luis Potosi Power Plant; although the new system for colloidal silica removal had not yet been installed, consisting of a hollow fibers ultra-filtration system with a capacity of 110 m{sup 3}, that for the first time would be applied in a Mexican power plant. It was decided to install this system due to the fact that the well water supplying this power plant comes from a geothermal reservoir, with water at 38 degrees Celsius and a silica content of 15 to 250 parts per billion (ppb) of colloidal silica, which makes it necessary to eliminate it in order to enable the boiler operation at its design conditions (175 bars (2573 psig) and 540 degrees Celsius). Although a demineralizing plant existed for the boiler feed water make up, the ion exchange resins were not able to retain the colloidal silica. Also, the First Unit operation was held at 25% of its rated capacity; in trying to raise the output to 50%, the silica concentration in the boiler water went over the allowed limits, resulting in a concentration of 1,500 ppb in the boiler water and 28 ppb in the steam. One the ultra-filtration plant was installed, the power plant operated at full rated capacity with silica concentrations in the steam lower than the permitted concentration, i.e. 10 ppb . By the end of 1987 the Second Unit of 350 MW was put into operation with the ultra-filtration system in operation, reaching full load without any problem. Once confirmed the efficiency of the ultra-filtration for the colloidal silica removal, CFE will apply this system in other power plants of the country having the same problem. [Espanol] En junio de 1986, la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) efectuo pruebas de elevacion de carga en la primera unidad normalizada de 350 MW de la central termoelectrica San Luis Potosi; sin embargo, aun no se terminaba de instalar el nuevo sistema para la

  20. Shear Thickening Electrolyte Built from Sterically Stabilized Colloidal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Brian H; Armstrong, Beth L; Doucet, Mathieu; Heroux, Luke; Browning, James F; Agamalian, Michael; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Veith, Gabriel M

    2018-03-21

    We present a method to prepare shear thickening electrolytes consisting of silica nanoparticles in conventional liquid electrolytes with limited flocculation. These electrolytes rapidly and reversibly stiffen to solidlike behaviors in the presence of external shear or high impact, which is promising for improved lithium ion battery safety, especially in electric vehicles. However, in initial chemistries the silica nanoparticles aggregate and/or sediment in solution over time. Here, we demonstrate steric stabilization of silica colloids in conventional liquid electrolyte via surface-tethered PMMA brushes, synthesized via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The PMMA increases the magnitude of the shear thickening response, compared to the uncoated particles, from 0.311 to 2.25 Pa s. Ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering revealed a reduction in aggregation of PMMA-coated silica nanoparticles compared to bare silica nanoparticles in solution under shear and at rest, suggesting good stabilization. Conductivity tests of shear thickening electrolytes (30 wt % solids in electrolyte) at rest were performed with interdigitated electrodes positioned near the meniscus of electrolytes over the course of 24 h to track supernatant formation. Conductivity of electrolytes with bare silica increased from 10.1 to 11.6 mS cm -1 over 24 h due to flocculation. In contrast, conductivity of electrolytes with PMMA-coated silica remained stable at 6.1 mS cm -1 over the same time period, suggesting good colloid stability.

  1. Quantifying particulate and colloidal release of radionuclides in waste-weathered hanford sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrial, Nicolas; Thompson, Aaron; LaSharr, Kelsie; Amistadi, Mary Kay; Chorover, Jon

    2015-05-01

    At the Hanford Site in the state of Washington, leakage of hyperalkaline, high ionic strength wastewater from underground storage tanks into the vadose zone has induced mineral transformations and changes in radionuclide speciation. Remediation of this wastewater will decrease the ionic strength of water infiltrating to the vadose zone and could affect the fate of the radionuclides. Although it was shown that radionuclide host phases are thermodynamically stable in the presence of waste fluids, a decrease in solution ionic strength and pH could alter aggregate stability and remobilize radionuclide-bearing colloids and particulate matter. We quantified the release of particulate, colloidal, and truly dissolved Sr, Cs, and I from hyperalkaline-weathered Hanford sediments during a low ionic strength pore water leach and characterized the released particles and colloids using electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Although most of the Sr, Cs, and I was released in dissolved form, between 3 and 30% of the Sr and 4 to 18% of the Cs was associated with a dominantly zeolitic mobile particulate fraction. Thus, the removal of hyperalkaline wastewater will likely induce Sr and Cs mobilization that will be augmented by particulate- and colloid-facilitated transport. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Colloid-Facilitated Cesium Transport in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Flury, M.; Harsh, J. B.

    2002-12-01

    Transport of 137Cs and colloids through a Hanford sediment column under unsaturated conditions was investigated. The movement of cesium and colloids followed the convective-dispersive solute transport equation and the mass transfer processes governing colloid-facilitated cesium transport were colloidal deposition, cesium sorption to the medium, and cesium sorption to colloids. It was found that cesium was strongly adsorbed to Hanford sediments and only colloid-bound cesium could breakthrough. Cesium experienced a greater facilitated transport at higher saturation than at low saturation and the migration of cesium was more a function of the behavior of colloids than of dissolved cesium. A two-region model was used in describing colloid-facilitated cesium migration and the influence of the system saturation was examined by relating to the variation of simulated model parameters. Hanford native colloids, i.e., \\textit{in-situ} colloids from the Hanford site, and modified colloids, i.e., \\textit{in-situ} colloids subject to chemical treatment, were used as model colloids to study facilitated cesium transport in this research. The results of this study will be of help in understanding the response of colloid-facilitated cesium migration to variation of saturation at the Hanford site. Key words: cesium; colloid; facilitated transport; saturation; and Hanford sediment.

  3. Assessment of trace heavy metals dynamics during the interaction of aqueous solutions with the artificial OECD soil: Evaluation of the effect of soil organic matter content and colloidal mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontoni, Ludovico; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Esposito, Giovanni; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A micro-contamination phenomenon was reproduced and studied at lab-scale, mimicking the irrigation of a standard artificial soil with a water solution containing three Heavy Metals (HMs) at trace concentration level. To assess the dynamics of micro-pollutants accumulation and migration trough the soil, the organic matter in the soil was varied, together with sodicity of the irrigation water. Accumulation of the investigated contaminants was observed mainly in the top layer (≤1 cm) of the irrigated soil. This was attributed to the high interaction capacity of the soil compared to the low HM concentrations in the water phase. HMs transport pattern was described assuming a multi-component mechanism including: i) the interaction of HMs with the colloidal phase of the soil; ii) the slow and constant release of small molecular weight ligands detaching from the soil immobile matrix; iii) the transportation of HMs through the soil by these low molecular weight chaperon molecules. The mobility was directly related to the soil organic matter (SOM), since higher amount of SOM correspond to a higher number of chaperon molecules. In the first centimetre of the soil the metals were mostly bound to the acid labile fraction. Very low mobilization was observed with increasing sodicity in the leaching water, since such conditions were unfavourable to the colloidal mobilization of SOM. This indicated that water/soil transfer of pollutant is not only related to the contaminant concentration in the irrigation water but also to the characteristics of the aqueous solution and to the physical-chemical properties of the soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of colloid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  6. Colloid process engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  7. Characterization of Groundwater Colloids Sampled from KAERI Underground Research Tunnel (KURT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Lee, Tae Yeop

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that colloid formation of radionuclides by sorption of radionuclides on negatively charged naturally occurring colloidal matters can drastically increase the mobility of the radionuclides released from a radioactive waste repository. Therefore, the roles of colloids in the radionuclide migration could be very important in terms of safety assessment on a radioactive waste repository. To assess the effects of mobile natural colloids on the radionuclide migration in geological media, it is necessary to obtain information about colloid characteristics such as elemental composition, size distribution, and concentrations under relevant solution conditions. These properties determine the distribution of the radionuclide between the dissolved and the colloidal phases and the mobility of the radio-colloids in a considered migration medium. Therefore, in this study, physicochemical properties of natural groundwater colloids sampled from a deep granite groundwater in the KAERI Underground Research Tunnel (KURT) are investigated to characterize the behaviors of natural groundwater colloids in a deep granitic groundwater

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly water-dispersible anatase nanocrystals from transparent aqueous sols of titanate colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yusuke; Ohya, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Transparent colloidal aqueous solutions of anatase nanocrystals were hydrothermally synthesized from aqueous transparent sols with tetramethylammonium titanate colloids, the surfaces of which were modified with citric acid, by structural conversion of the titanate to anatase. This modification hindered coalescence of the titanate colloids during the hydrothermal synthesis. Although the amount of citric acid adsorbed on the colloids was reduced during hydrothermal treatment, a small amount of citric acid was adsorbed on the resulting anatase nanocrystals. Moreover, the use of the titanate colloids as a precursor was compared with the use of a citrato Ti complex, tetramethylammonium citratotitanate. The hydrothermal treatment of the transparent aqueous solutions of the Ti complex yielded opaque solutions with large anatase colloids, suggesting that the titanate colloids were useful for preparing transparent anatase colloidal solutions. Because the shape and size of resulting colloids may be dependent on the size and shape of starting colloids, the use of titanate colloids as a precursor may make it easy to control size and shape of anatase colloids.

  9. Biogeochemical Factors Influencing the Transport and Fate of Colloids and Colloid-Associated Contaminants in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The vadose zone exhibits large spatial and temporal variability in many physical, chemical, and biological factors that strongly influence the transport and fate of colloids (e.g., microbes, nanoparticles, clays, and dissolved organic matter) and colloid-associated contaminants (e.g., heavy metals, radionuclides, pesticides, and antibiotics). This presentation highlights our research activities to better understand and predict the influence of specific biogeochemical processes on colloid and colloid-facilitated transport. Results demonstrate the sensitivity of colloid transport, retention, release, and clogging to transients in solution chemistry (e.g., ionic strength, pH, cation and anion type, and surfactants), water velocity and saturation, and preferential flow. Mathematical modeling at interface-, pore-, and continuum-scales is shown to be a critical tool to quantify the relative importance and coupling of these biogeochemical factors on colloid and contaminant transport and fate, which otherwise might be experimentally intractable. Existing gaps in knowledge and model limitations are identified.

  10. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-06-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N‧-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH 7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  11. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Actinide contaminants were introduced to the subsurface environment as a result of nuclear weapons development and testing, as well as for nuclear power generation and related research activities for defense and civilian applications. Even though most actinide species were believed to be fairly immobile once in the subsurface, recent studies have shown the transport of actinides kilometers away from their disposal sites. For example, the treated liquid wastes released into Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory were predicted to travel less than a few meters; however, plutonium and americium have been detected 3.4 km away from the waste outfall. A colloid-facilitated mechanism has been suggested to account for this unexpected transport of these radioactive wastes. Clays, oxides, organic matters, and actinide hydroxides have all been proposed as the possible mobile phase. Pu ions associated with natural colloids are often referred to as pseudo-Pu colloids, in contrast with the intrinsic Pu colloids that consist of Pu oxides. Significant efforts have been made to investigate the role of pseudo-Pu colloids, while few studies have evaluated the environmental behavior of the intrinsic Pu colloids. Given the fact that Pu (IV) has extremely low solubility product constant, it can be inferred that the transport of Pu in the intrinsic form is highly likely at suitable environmental conditions. This study investigates the transport of intrinsic Pu colloids in a saturated alluvium material packed in a cylindrical column (2.5-cm Dia. x 30-cm high) and compares the results to previous data on the transport of pseudo Pu colloids in the same material. A procedure to prepare a stable intrinsic Pu colloid suspension that produced consistent and reproducible electrokinetic and stability data was developed. Electrokinetic properties and aggregation stability were characterized. The Pu colloids, together with trillium as a conservative tracer, were injected into the

  12. Preparation and characterization compatible pellets for immobilization of colloidal sulphur nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlim, M.; Zarlaida, F.; Khaldun, I.; Dewi, R.; Jamilah, M.

    2018-03-01

    Mercury pollution in atmosphere is dominated by mercury vapour release from coal burning and gold-amalgam separation in gold mining. The initial steps in formulating a compatible mercury absorbent for mercury stabilization was fabrication of pellet supported colloidal sulphur. Sulphur is used to stabilize mercury vapour by formation of metacinnabar that has much lower toxicity. The sulphur reactivity toward mercury vapour can be enhanced by using colloidal sulphur nanoparticles immobilized on compatible pellets. Clay pellets would have heat resistance but in fact, they were less stable in aqueous solution although their stability increased with inclusion of rice husk ash and sawdust or pineapple leaf fibre in the composite. Pellets made of rice husk ash and polyvinyl acetate were stable in water at least for 24 hours. Sulphur from thiosulfate precursor that immobilized onto surface of pellet using chitosan as the stabilizer and the binding agent gave lower sulphur content compared to sulphur from other precursors (sulphur powder and sulphur-CS2). Sulphur from thiosulfate precursor was in form of colloid, has nanosize, and disperse particles on the surface of rice husk ash pellets. Sulphur immobilization methods affect on sulphur particles exposure on the pellet surface.

  13. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  14. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  15. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF THE COLLODIAL SOLUTION BASED ON BIOGENIC METAL NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Liapina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was obtaining a stable suspension based on biocompatible substances with application of biogenic metal nanoparticles encapsulated into NaCl salt matrix, as a precursor. Water-soluble complex based on different amine derivatives with antiseptic properties was selected as a liquid for salt dissolution. The solution was subjected to dispersion using ultrasonication at elevated temperature. Dispersion is accompanied by salt shell removal with simultaneous formation of an organic shell on the surfaces of metal nanoparticles that ensure their stabilization. Study of the suspension after soaking at room temperature for 100 days showed that its characteristics remain stable. A method for producing a stable colloidal solution based on nanoparticles of biogenic metal (Cu, Co, fem etc. was developed. Metal nanopowder encapsulated into salt shell was used as a precursor. It is shown that such colloidal solutions are characterized by narrow size dispersion, as well as stability to temperature impact and time factor.

  16. Solution-Processed In2O3/ZnO Heterojunction Electron Transport Layers for Efficient Organic Bulk Heterojunction and Inorganic Colloidal Quantum-Dot Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eisner, Flurin

    2018-04-25

    We report the development of a solution‐processed In2O3/ZnO heterojunction electron transport layer (ETL) and its application in high efficiency organic bulk‐heterojunction (BHJ) and inorganic colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells. Study of the electrical properties of this low‐dimensional oxide heterostructure via field‐effect measurements reveals that electron transport along the heterointerface is enhanced by more than a tenfold when compared to the individual single‐layer oxides. Use of the heterojunction as the ETL in organic BHJ photovoltaics is found to consistently improve the cell\\'s performance due to the smoothening of the ZnO surface, increased electron mobility and a noticeable reduction in the cathode\\'s work function, leading to a decrease in the cells’ series resistance and a higher fill factor (FF). Specifically, non‐fullerene based organic BHJ solar cells based on In2O3/ZnO ETLs exhibit very high power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of up to 12.8%, and high FFs of over 70%. The bilayer ETL concept is further extended to inorganic lead‐sulphide CQD solar cells. Resulting devices exhibit excellent performance with a maximum PCE of 8.2% and a FF of 56.8%. The present results highlight the potential of multilayer oxides as novel ETL systems and lay the foundation for future developments.

  17. Colloidal Gold--Collagen Protein Core--Shell Nanoconjugate: One-Step Biomimetic Synthesis, Layer-by-Layer Assembled Film, and Controlled Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Yan, Linyin; Ma, Guanghui; Liu, Lei; Dai, Luru; Li, Junbai; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-11

    The biogenic synthesis of biomolecule-gold nanoconjugates is of key importance for a broad range of biomedical applications. In this work, a one-step, green, and condition-gentle strategy is presented to synthesize stable colloidal gold-collagen core-shell nanoconjugates in an aqueous solution at room temperature, without use of any reducing agents and stabilizing agents. It is discovered that electrostatic binding between gold ions and collagen proteins and concomitant in situ reduction by hydroxyproline residues are critically responsible for the formation of the core-shell nanoconjugates. The film formed by layer-by-layer assembly of such colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates can notably improve the mechanical properties and promote cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. Thus, the colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates synthesized by such a straightforward and clean manner, analogous to a biomineralization pathway, provide new alternatives for developing biologically based hybrid biomaterials toward a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  18. Parameter and model sensitivities for colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport on the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Painter, S.; Turner, D.; Pickett, D.; Bertetti, P.

    2004-06-01

    We investigate the potential effects of inorganic colloids on radionuclide transport in groundwater using generic sensitivity studies and an example based on the alluvial aquifer near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our emphasis is on kinetically controlled sorption of radionuclides on mobile and immobile colloids. Three kinetic sorption models are considered for the sensitivity analysis: bilinear, Langmuir, and linear. Plutonium is assumed to be injected into the Yucca Mountain alluvial aquifer at a constant rate and follows a random stream tube to a monitoring boundary. The linear sorption model provides a reasonable upper bound on colloid-facilitated plutonium transport for the site-specific conditions. In the absence of colloid filtration and retardation, colloids enhance the plutonium discharge by a large factor over the situation without colloids. Exchange of plutonium between solution and reversibly attached colloids makes colloid retardation relatively ineffective at reducing colloid-facilitated transport except when the retardation factor is large. Irreversible removal of colloids (filtration) is more effective than retardation at reducing colloid-facilitated transport. For fixed filtration rate the degree of attenuation depends sensitively and nonmonotonically on the rate of plutonium desorption from colloids. These results emphasize the need for accurate measurements of rates of desorption from colloids as well as in situ studies of filtration of naturally occurring colloids.

  19. Criterion for noise-induced synchronization: Application to colloidal alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jonah A.; Moths, Brian; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal bodies of irregular shape rotate as they descend under gravity in solution. This rotational response provides a means of bringing a dispersion of identical bodies into a synchronized rotation with the same orientation using programed forcing. We use the notion of statistical entropy to derive bounds on the rate of synchronization. These bounds apply generally to dynamical systems with stable periodic motion with a phase ϕ (t ) , when subjected to an impulsive perturbation. The impulse causes a change of phase expressible as a phase map ψ (ϕ ) . We derive an upper limit on the average change of entropy Δ H Δ H in terms of this phase map; when this limit is negative, alignment must occur. For systems that have achieved a low entropy, the approaches this upper limit.

  20. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  1. Sorption behavior of cesium onto bentonite colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Masuda, Tsuguya; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    It is considered that bentonite colloid might be generated from bentonite which will be used as buffer material in geological disposal system, and can facilitate the migration of radionuclides by means of sorption. In order to examine this characteristic, sorption and desorption experiments of Cs onto bentonite colloid were carried out to obtain its distribution coefficient (Kd) and information on the reversibility of its sorption. In addition, particle size distribution and shape of colloid were investigated and their effect on the sorption behavior was discussed. Kds for Cs were around 20 m 3 /kg for sorption and 30 m 3 /kg for desorption, in which sorbed Cs was desorbed by 8.4x10 -4 mol/l of NaCl solution. These values did not show any dependencies on Cs concentration and duration of sorption and desorption. The first 20% of sorbed Cs was desorbed reversibly at least. Most of colloidal particles were larger than 200 nm and TEM micrographs showed they had only several sheets of the clay crystal. Obtained Kds for colloidal bentonite were larger than those for powdered bentonite. This can be caused by difference of competing ions in the solution, characteristics of contained smectite, or sorption site density. (author)

  2. Technetium migration in Boom Clay - Assessing the role of colloid-facilitated transport in a deep clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, C.; Martens, E.; Maes, N.; Jacops, E.; Van Gompel, M.; Van Ravestyn, L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The role of colloids - mainly dissolved natural organic matter (NOM, 50-150 mg/l) - in the transport of radionuclides in the Boom Clay formation (Mol, Belgium), has long since been a matter of (heavy) debate. For more than 20 years, batch experiments with Boom Clay suspensions showed a pronounced influence of the dissolved organic carbon concentration on the aqueous concentrations of different radionuclides like Tc, Np, Am and U. Moreover, small fractions of these radionuclides were also observed to elute almost un-retarded out of confined clay cores in percolation experiments. In the past years, a new conceptual model for the speciation of the long-lived fission product Technetium- 99 ( 99 Tc) under Boom Clay conditions has been drafted. In brief, the stable oxidation state of 99 Tc in these conditions is +IV, and, therefore, Tc solution concentrations are limited by the solubility of TcO 2 .nH 2 O(s). However, during reduction of TcVII (in the TcO 4 - form) to TcIV, precursor TcO 2 .nH 2 O colloids are formed, which are stabilised by the dissolved organic matter present in Boom Clay interstitial pore water, and in supernatants of Boom Clay batch suspensions. Moreover, this stabilisation process occurs in such a systematic way, that (conditional) interaction constants could be established, and the behaviour was described as a 'hydrophobic sorption', or, more accurately, a 'colloid-colloid' interaction. This conceptual model was implemented into PHREEQC geochemical and Hydrus transport code to come to a reactive transport model that was used to simulate both the outflow and the tracer profile in several long-term running percolation experiments (both in lab and under in situ conditions). To account for slow dissociation kinetics of Tc from the NOM colloid, a first-order kinetic rate equation was also added to the model. In order to describe the migration of colloidal particles (NOM), an

  3. Gamma radiation synthesis of colloidal AgNPs for its potential application in antimicrobial fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Anuradha; Garai, Purabi; Singh, Rita; Prakash Gupta, P.; Malav, Shatrughan; Singh, Durgeshwer; Kumar, Devendra; Tiwari, B. L.; Vaijapurkar, S. G.

    2015-10-01

    Highly stable colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles in a water-isopropanol-polyvinyl alcohol system was prepared through 60Co-gamma radiation at total dose of 35 kGy at dose rate of 5.67 kGy/h under nitrogen atmosphere. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the obtained colloidal solution indicated the formation of spherical shaped well mono dispersed silver nanoparticles with average diameter about 30 nm having very narrow size distribution. The radiolytically obtained nanosilver colloid was coated onto cotton fabrics by a simple industrial screen printing method and its adhesion with the fabric was found out by leaching studies using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). Good adhesion was achieved by the adopted method wherein 89.5% of the coated nanosilver was retained in the fabric even after keeping the fabrics soaked in water for more than 60 h. Antimicrobial efficacy tests of the nanosilver coated cotton fabric showed that nanosilver coating is effective in killing both bacterial and fungal strains even at very low nanosilver loading (21.81 μgm/cm2). Nanosilver coating on the cotton fabric did not allow microbes (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans) to adhere and proliferate on fabric surface. Staphylococci (Staphylococcus aureus) and Yeast (Candida albicans) showed inhibition zones in presence of these nanosilver coated fabrics while no inhibition zone was observed with the uncoated control fabric.

  4. Synthesis and properties of colloidal heteronanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mello Donegá, C.

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal heteronanocrystals (HNCs) can be regarded as solution-grown inorganic–organic hybrid nanomaterials, since they consist of inorganic nanoparticles that are coated with a layer of organic ligand molecules. The hybrid nature of these nanostructures provides great flexibility in engineering

  5. Colloidal Plasmas: Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various ...

  6. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  7. Characterization of Nanoparticles and Colloids in Aquatic Systems 1. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Investigations of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Aggregates in Aqueous Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Glinka, Charles J.; Goddard, William A.; Johnson, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) constitute 30-50% of dissolved organic matter in natural aquatic systems. In aqueous solutions, a commonly accepted view is that FA and HA exist as soluble macroligands at low concentration and as supramolecular aggregates at higher concentration. The size, shape and structure of these aggregates are still the subject of ongoing debate in the environmental chemistry literature. In this article, we use small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to assess the effects of solute concentration, solution pH and background electrolyte (NaCl) concentration on the structures of Suwannee River FA (SRFA) aggregates in D 2 O. The qualitative features of the SANS curves and data analysis are not consistent with the view point that SRFA forms micelle-like aggregates as its concentration in aqueous solution increases. We find that SRFA forms fractal aggregates in D 2 0 with size greater than 242 nm. The SRFA aggregates undergo a significant degree of restructuring in compactness as solution pH, solute concentration and NaCl concentration increase

  8. Sodium meta-autunite colloids: Synthesis, characterization,stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    zzuoping@lbl.gov

    2004-04-10

    Waste forms of U such as those in the United States Department of Energy's Hanford Site often contain high concentrations of Na and P. Low solubility sodium uranyl phosphates such as sodium meta-autunite have the potential to form mobile colloids that can facilitate transport of this radionuclide. In order to understand the geochemical behavior of uranyl phosphate colloids, we synthesized sodiummeta-autunite colloids, and characterized their morphology, chemical composition, structure, dehydration, and surface charge. The stability of these synthetic plate-shaped colloids was tested with respect to time and pH. The highest aggregation rate was observed at pH 3, and the rate decreases as pH increases, indicating that higher stability of colloid dispersion under neutral and alkaline pH conditions. The synthetic colloids are all negatively charged and no isoelectric points were found over a pH range of 3 to 9. The zeta-potentials of the colloids in the phosphate solution show a strong pH-dependence in the more acidic range over time, but are relatively constant in the neutral and alkaline pH range. The geochemical behavior of the synthetic colloids can be interpreted using DLVO theory. The results suggest that formation of mobile sodium meta-autunite colloids can enhance the transport of U in some contaminated sediments.

  9. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-04-07

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  10. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: Synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-03-01

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals.

  11. Liquid phase deposition of silica: Thin films, colloids and fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsitt, Elizabeth A.

    Little research has been done to explore liquid phase deposition (LPD) of silica on non-planar substrates. This thesis proves that the seeded growth of silica colloids from fullerene and surfactant micelles is possible via LPD, as is the coating of individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and carbon fibers. Working on the premise that a molecular growth mechanism (versus colloidal/gel deposition) is valid for LPD, nanostructured substrates and specific chemical functional groups should act as "seeds," or templates, for silica growth. Seeded growth is confirmed by reactions of the growth solution with a range of surfactants and with materials with distinctive surface moieties. LPD promises lower production costs and environmental impact as compared to present methods of coating technology, because it is an inherently simple process, using low temperatures and inexpensive air-stable reactants. Silica is ubiquitous in materials science. Its applications range from thixotropic additives for paint to gate dielectrics in the semiconductor industry. Nano-structured coatings and thin films are integral in today's electronics industry and will become more vital as the size of electronics shrinks. With the incorporation of nanoparticles in future devices, the ability to deposit quality coatings with finely tuned properties becomes paramount. The methods developed herein have applications in fabricating insulators for use in the future molecular scale electronics industry. Additionally, these silica nanoparticles have applications as templates for use in photonics and fuel cell membrane production and lend strength and durability to composites.

  12. Kinetics of colloidal fractal aggregation by differential dynamic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Lee, M.; Lotti, A.; Pigazzini, M. C.; Singh, K.; Cerbino, R.

    2011-11-01

    We study the kinetics of an aggregation process induced by adding salt to a stable colloidal suspension of 73 nm (diameter) particles. Despite the subdiffraction size of the colloidal particles, the process is monitored via optical microscopy, which is used here to obtain time-resolved scattering information about the colloidal aggregates. The radius of the aggregates is determined as a function of time and their fractal dimension is extracted. Our results are compatible with a diffusion limited aggregation process, as independently confirmed by spectral turbidimetry measurements on the same sample.

  13. Fabrication of Phase-Change Polymer Colloidal Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preparation of phase-change polymer colloidal photonic crystals (PCs by assembling hollow latex spheres encapsulated with dodecanol for the first time. The monodispersed hollow latex spheres were obtained by phase reversion of monodispersed core-shell latex spheres in the n-hexane, which dissolves the PS core and retains the PMMA/PAA shell. The as-prepared phase-change colloidal PCs show stable phase-change behavior. This fabrication of phase-change colloidal PCs would be significant for PC’s applications in functional coatings and various optic devices.

  14. Suspended particles, colloids and radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.; McKinley, I.; Shea, M.; Smellie, J.

    1993-01-01

    Radionuclide can be transported either in true solution or associated with suspended particles and colloids. The definitions of colloids and suspended particles are introduced and the mechanisms by which they can influence radionuclide transport discussed. The aim of the Pocos de Caldas investigations was to characterise the natural particulate material in the groundwater, to investigate the association of trace elements with this material and to obtain information on the stability and mobility of the particles. The concentration of suspended particles measured in the groundwater samples were low; the particles also appear to be immobile. (author) 4 figs

  15. Study on the colloids generated from testing of high-level nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The generation of colloids in the interaction of high-level nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90 degrees C has been investigated. The stability of the colloidal suspensions has been characterized with respect to salt concentration, pH time, particle size, and zeta potential. The compositions and the morphology of the colloids have also been determined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From ourtest results combined with earlier ones, we conclude that the waste glass may contribute to the colloid formation by increasing ion concentration in groundwater, which causes nucleation of colloids; by releasing radionuclides that adsorb onto existing groundwater colloids; and by spalling colloidal-size fragments from the surface layer of the reacted glass. The colloids are silicon-rich particles, such as smectites and uranium silicates. When the salt concentration in the solution is high the colloidal suspensions agglomerate. However, the agglomerated particles can be resuspended if the salt concentration is lowered by dilution with groundwater. The colloids agglomerate quickly after the leachate is cooled to room temperature. Most of the colloids settle out of the solution within a few days at ambient temperature. The isoelectric point is at a pH of approximately 1.0. Between pH 1 and 10.5, the colloids are negatively charged, which suggests that they will deposit readily on, positively charged surfaces. The average particle size islargest at the isoelectric point and is smallest around pH 6

  16. Laboratory observations and mathematical modeling of colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in chemically heterogeneous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiers, James E.

    2002-04-01

    In the work reported here, I examine colloid-facilitated solute transport through a natural porous medium that exhibits grain-scale heterogeneity in chemical composition. I conducted six column experiments using the contaminant hydroxyatrazine (HA) and either homogeneous clay-colloid suspensions or mixtures of clay colloids and dissolved organic matter. The transport of colloids composed of illite and montmorillonite, although not conservative, is only slightly affected by rate-limited mass transfer reactions with the oxide-coated aquifer material. Coinjection of HA with monomineralogic suspensions of illite colloids produces modest increases in effluent concentrations of HA relative to experiments performed with colloid-free influent solutions. Montmorillonite colloids have a much higher capacity to bind HA than illite colloids and substantially increase the transport rate of HA in the column experiments. Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) does not strongly complex aqueous phase HA, but its addition to column influent mixtures that contain HA and montmorillonite suppresses HA adsorption to the clay colloids and promotes a decline in HA mobility. A model for colloid-facilitated transport, formulated to account for nonuniformity in the kinetics of colloid deposition and HA adsorption, closely describes HA transport in experiments performed with monomineralogic clay-colloid suspensions, heterogeneous suspensions made of both illite and montmorillonite, and mixtures of montmorillonite and SRHA.

  17. Colloids or artefacts?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, M.; Vuorinen, U.; Allard, B.; Pettersson, C.; Hinkkanen, H.

    1994-01-01

    TVO (Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Finland) initiated a co-operative task with SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) to critically evaluate colloid sampling methods at the test site in Olkiluoto, SW Finland. Three different colloid sampling methods were compared when sampling at 613-618 m depth. The colloid sampling consisted of ordinary filtering (cross-flow filtering, 20-450 nm) in open air, inert filtering (cross-flow filtering, prefilter=2500 nm, separate filtration to three fractions 50,200 and 400 nm) by using N 2 and ultrafiltration (tangential filtering, prefilter=1000 nm concentration to a single fraction 2-1000 nm) using N 2 . Two samples per method were taken with an interval of three weeks. For organic determination one sample was collected. Care was taken to avoid possible known artefacts in connection with the colloid sampling. (27 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.)

  18. Liquid crystal colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  19. Dispersion stability and electrokinetic properties of intrinsic plutonium colloids: implications for subsurface transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I; Zhou, Dongxu; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Tarimala, Sowmitri; Ware, S Doug; Keller, Arturo A

    2013-06-04

    Subsurface transport of plutonium (Pu) may be facilitated by the formation of intrinsic Pu colloids. While this colloid-facilitated transport is largely governed by the electrokinetic properties and dispersion stability (resistance to aggregation) of the colloids, reported experimental data is scarce. Here, we quantify the dependence of ζ-potential of intrinsic Pu(IV) colloids on pH and their aggregation rate on ionic strength. Results indicate an isoelectric point of pH 8.6 and a critical coagulation concentration of 0.1 M of 1:1 electrolyte at pH 11.4. The ζ-potential/pH dependence of the Pu(IV) colloids is similar to that of goethite and hematite colloids. Colloid interaction energy calculations using these values reveal an effective Hamaker constant of the intrinsic Pu(IV) colloids in water of 1.85 × 10(-19) J, corresponding to a relative permittivity of 6.21 and refractive index of 2.33, in agreement with first principles calculations. This relatively high Hamaker constant combined with the positive charge of Pu(IV) colloids under typical groundwater aquifer conditions led to two contradicting hypotheses: (a) the Pu(IV) colloids will exhibit significant aggregation and deposition, leading to a negligible subsurface transport or (b) the Pu(IV) colloids will associate with the relatively stable native groundwater colloids, leading to a considerable subsurface transport. Packed column transport experiments supported the second hypothesis.

  20. Colloid-templated multisectional porous polymeric fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jung Hun; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2008-10-07

    A fabrication method for porous polymeric fibers (PPFs) is reported. We show that a multisectional colloidal crystal can be assembled within a microcapillary by alternating dipping into colloidal solutions of varying size. Subsequent infiltration with curable polymer and washing with suitable solvents results in porous fibers with a cylindrical cross section. Along the length of the fiber, alternating sections of controlled length, pore size, and pore size distribution exist. These fibers present interesting materials for neural scaffolding, catalysis, and possibly photonics if produced with a high degree of crystallinity. The surface pores and bulk porosity of the fibers are characterized by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (vp-SEM). Careful analysis shows that the surface pores vary with the colloidal template diameter and polymer infiltration time.

  1. Waveguides in colloidal nanosuspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Peña, Luis A.; Salazar-Romero, Yadira; Terborg, Roland A.; Hernández-Cordero, Juan; Torres, Juan P.; Volke-Sepúlveda, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present and discuss a set of experiments based on the application of the nonlinear properties of colloidal nanosuspensions to induce waveguides with a high-power CW laser beam (wavelength 532nm) and its use for controlling an additional probe beam. The probe is a CW laser of a different wavelength (632nm), whose power is well below the critical value to induce nonlinear effects in the colloidal medium. We also discuss a technique for the characterization of the induced waveguides.

  2. High Order A-stable Continuous General Linear Methods for Solution of Systems of Initial Value Problems in ODEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauda GuliburYAKUBU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate solutions to initial value systems of ordinary differential equations may be approximated efficiently by Runge-Kutta methods or linear multistep methods. Each of these has limitations of one sort or another. In this paper we consider, as a middle ground, the derivation of continuous general linear methods for solution of stiff systems of initial value problems in ordinary differential equations. These methods are designed to combine the advantages of both Runge-Kutta and linear multistep methods. Particularly, methods possessing the property of A-stability are identified as promising methods within this large class of general linear methods. We show that the continuous general linear methods are self-starting and have more ability to solve the stiff systems of ordinary differential equations, than the discrete ones. The initial value systems of ordinary differential equations are solved, for instance, without looking for any other method to start the integration process. This desirable feature of the proposed approach leads to obtaining very high accuracy of the solution of the given problem. Illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the novelty and reliability of the methods.

  3. Controls of evaporative irrigation return flows in comparison to seawater intrusion in coastal karstic aquifers in northern Sri Lanka: Evidence from solutes and stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrajith, Rohana, E-mail: rohanac@pdn.ac.lk [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Diyabalanage, Saranga [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Premathilake, K.M. [Water Supply and Drainage Board, Telewala Road, Ratmalana (Sri Lanka); Hanke, Christian; Geldern, Robert van; Barth, Johannes A.C. [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), Department of Geography and Geosciences, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater in Miocene karstic aquifers in the Jaffna Peninsula of Sri Lanka is an important resource since no other fresh water sources are available in the region. The subsurface is characterized by highly productive limestone aquifers that are used for drinking and agriculture purposes. A comprehensive hydrogeochemical study was carried out to reveal the processes affecting the groundwater quality in this region. Major and trace element composition and environmental isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen (δ{sup 18}O{sub H2O} and δ{sup 2}H{sub H2O}) were determined in 35 groundwater samples for this investigation. The ion abundance of groundwater in the region was characterized by an anion sequence order with HCO{sub 3}¯ > Cl¯ > SO{sub 4}¯ > NO{sub 3}¯. For cations, average Na{sup +}+K{sup +} contents in groundwater exceeded those of Ca{sup 2+} + Mg{sup 2+} in most cases. Ionic relationships of major solutes indicated open system calcite dissolution while seawater intrusions are also evident but only close to the coast. The solute contents are enriched by agricultural irrigation returns and associated evaporation. This was confirmed by the stable isotope composition of groundwater that deviated from the local meteoric water line (LMWL) and formed its own regression line denoted as the local evaporation line (LEL). The latter can be described by δ{sup 2}H{sub H2O} = 5.8 × δ{sup 18}O{sub H2O-–} 2.9. Increased contents of nitrate-N (up to 5 mg/L), sulfate (up to 430 mg/L) and fluoride (up to 1.5 mg/L) provided evidences for anthropogenic inputs of solutes, most likely from agriculture activities. Among trace elements Ba, Sr, As and Se levels in the Jaffna groundwater were higher compared to that of the dry zone metamorphic aquifers in Sri Lanka. Solute geochemistry and stable isotope evidences from the region indicates that groundwater in the area is mainly derived from local modern precipitation but modified heavily by progressive evaporative

  4. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  5. Concentration dependent transport of colloids in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Bettahar, Mehdi

    2006-01-05

    A series of column experiments was undertaken to explore the influence of colloid input concentration (2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 times a reference concentration), colloid size (negatively charged 3.2 and 1.0 microm carboxyl latex), and sand grain size (360, 240, and 150 microm quartz sands) on transport and deposition. A similar mass of stable mono-dispersed colloids was added to each column. For a given input concentration, decreasing the sand size and increasing the colloid size resulted in increased mass retention in the sand near the column inlet and lower relative concentrations in the effluent. For a given sand and colloid, increasing the input concentration produced less deposition and higher mass recovery in the effluent, especially for coarser sands and smaller colloids. Results of a time dependent attachment (blocking) and detachment model were not consistent with this behavior because the simulations predicted much less retention near the column inlet and a decreasing number of favorable attachment sites (mass of deposited colloids) with increasing input concentration in a given system (colloid and sand). A time dependent straining model (filling of straining sites) provided a better description of the effluent and deposition data, but still could not account for the observed concentration dependent mass recovery. Alternatively, the straining model was refined to include a liberation term that assumed that straining was hindered at higher concentrations (collision frequencies) due to repulsive colloid (aqueous phase)-colloid (strained) interactions. Simulations that included straining, liberation, attachment, and detachment significantly improved the description of the experimental data.

  6. A Jacobi–Legendre polynomial-based method for the stable solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammari, Amara; Karoui, Abderrazek

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we build a stable scheme for the solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type. This scheme is obtained by further developing the orthogonal polynomial-based techniques for solving the Abel integral equation of Ammari and Karoui (2010 Inverse Problems 26 105005). More precisely, this method is based on the simultaneous use of the two families of orthogonal polynomials of the Legendre and Jacobi types. In particular, we provide an explicit formula for the computation of the Legendre expansion coefficients of the solution. This explicit formula is based on some known formulae for the exact computation of the integrals of the product of some Jacobi polynomials with the derivatives of the Legendre polynomials. Besides the explicit and the exact computation of the expansion coefficients of the solution, our proposed method has the advantage of ensuring the stability of the solution under a fairly weak condition on the functional space to which the data function belongs. Finally, we provide the reader with some numerical examples that illustrate the results of this work. (paper)

  7. Stabilization through precipitation in a system of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Y Mikal; Velikov, Krassimir P; Kegel, Willem K

    2012-09-01

    The ionic strength of a solution decreases during the precipitation of an insoluble salt, which can cause an initially unstable colloidal system to stabilize during its formation. We show this effect in the precipitation and aging of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate, where we observe two distinct stages in the aggregation process. The first stage is the formation of nanoparticles that immediately aggregate into clusters with sizes on the order of 200 nm. In the second stage these clusters slowly grow in size but remain in dispersion for days, even months for dialyzed systems. Eventually these clusters become macroscopically large and sediment out of dispersion. Noting the clear instability of the nanoparticles, it is interesting to find two stages in their aggregation even without the use of additives such as surface active molecules. This is explained by accounting for the rapid decrease of ionic strength during precipitation, rendering the nanoparticles relatively stable when precipitation is complete. Calculating the interaction potentials for this scenario we find good agreement with the experimental observations. These results indicate that coupling of ionic strength to aggregation state can be significant and should be taken into account when considering colloidal stability of insoluble salts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Blocking effect of colloids on arsenate adsorption during co-transport through saturated sand columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Guo, Huaming; Lei, Mei; Wan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hanzhi; Feng, Xiaojuan; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun

    2016-06-01

    Transport of environmental pollutants through porous media is influenced by colloids. Co-transport of As(V) and soil colloids at different pH were systematically investigated by monitoring breakthrough curves (BTCs) in saturated sand columns. A solute transport model was applied to characterize transport and retention sites of As(V) in saturated sand in the presence of soil colloids. A colloid transport model and the DLVO theory were used to reveal the mechanism and hypothesis of soil colloid-promoted As(V) transport in the columns. Results showed that rapid transport of soil colloids, regulated by pH and ionic strength, promoted As(V) transport by blocking As(V) adsorption onto sand, although soil colloids had low adsorption for As(V). The promoted transport was more significant at higher concentrations of soil colloids (between 25 mg L(-1) and 150 mg L(-1)) due to greater blocking effect on As(V) adsorption onto the sand surfaces. The blocking effect of colloids was explained by the decreases in both instantaneous (equilibrium) As adsorption and first-order kinetic As adsorption on the sand surface sites. The discovery of this blocking effect improves our understanding of colloid-promoted As transport in saturated porous media, which provides new insights into role of colloids, especially colloids with low As adsorption capacity, in As transport and mobilization in soil-groundwater systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional Aspects of the Solution Structure and Dynamics of PAF, a Highly Stable Antifungal Protein from Penicillium chrysogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Gyula; Barna, Teréz; Gáspári, Zoltán; Sándor, Szabolcs; Kövér, Katalin E.; Binder, Ulrike; Sarg, Bettina; Kaiserer, Lydia; Chhillar, Anil Kumar; Eigentler, Andrea; Leiter, Éva; Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Pócsi, István; Lindner, Herbert; Marx, Florentine

    2015-01-01

    Summary PAF is a promising antimycotic without toxic effects on mammalian cells and therefore may be a drug candidate against the often lethal Aspergillus infections in human. The pathogenesis of PAF on sensitive fungi involves G-protein coupled signaling followed by apoptosis. Here, the solution structure of this small, cationic, antifungal protein from Penicillium chrysogenum is determined by solution NMR. We proved that PAF belongs to the SCOP fold class of its closest homologue AFP from Aspergillus giganteus. PAF comprises five β—strands forming two orthogonally packed β—sheets sharing a common interface. The ambiguity in the assignment of two disulfide bonds of three was investigated by NMR dynamics combined with restrained molecular dynamics calculations. The clue could not be resolved: two ensembles with different disulfide patterns and the one with no S-S bond exhibit essentially the same fold. 15N relaxation dispersion and interference experiments did not reveal disulfide bond rearrangements via slow exchange. The measured order parameters and the 3.0 ns correlation time is appropriate for a compact monomeric protein of this size. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that the highly conserved and positively charged lysine-rich domain region on the surface enhances the toxicity of PAF. However, the efficacy of the OB fold is reduced in PAF compared to AFP, due to less solvent exposed aromatic regions explaining the absence of chitobiose binding. The present work lends further support to the understanding of the documented substantial differences between the mode of action of two highly homologous antifungal proteins. PMID:19459942

  10. Impact of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun

    2016-10-18

    Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the impact of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated porous media.

  11. Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Role of Colloids on the Radionuclide Migration in a Crystalline Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; Alonso, Ursula; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel; Mingarro, Manuel; Lopez, Trinidad [CIEMAT, Departamento de Medioambiente, Avenida Complutense, 22 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    In a deep geological repository (DGR) of high level radioactive waste, all the possible phenomena affecting radionuclide migration have to be studied to assess its security over time. Colloids can play an important role for contaminant transport if the following conditions are fulfilled: colloids exist in a non negligible concentration, they are mobile and stable in the environment of interest, and they are able to adsorb radionuclides irreversibly. In this study, different transport experiments where performed to improve the knowledge on the main mechanisms affecting the radionuclide migration in the presence of colloids in a crystalline medium. Firstly, colloid stability was analysed and then transport experiments in an artificial granite longitudinal fracture were carried out. Synthetic colloids of different size and bentonite clay colloids were used to evaluate the effects of colloid size, charge, and water flow rate on their mobility. Results showed that both major importance of the water flow rate on the mobility of colloids and their recovery and a higher interaction of smaller particles with the surface. Finally, the migration behaviour of Sr, and Sr adsorbed onto bentonite colloids was compared. The elution curves of Sr adsorbed onto colloid were significantly different from the ones of Sr alone, pointing out that sorption/desorption mechanisms must be taken into account to understand the radionuclide migration in the fracture in the presence of colloids. (authors)

  12. Nematic Liquid-Crystal Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-12-25

    This article provides a concise review of a new state of colloidal matter called nematic liquid-crystal colloids. These colloids are obtained by dispersing microparticles of different shapes in a nematic liquid crystal that acts as a solvent for the dispersed particles. The microparticles induce a local deformation of the liquid crystal, which then generates topological defects and long-range forces between the neighboring particles. The colloidal forces in nematic colloids are much stronger than the forces in ordinary colloids in isotropic solvents, exceeding thousands of k B T per micrometer-sized particle. Of special interest are the topological defects in nematic colloids, which appear in many fascinating forms, such as singular points, closed loops, multitudes of interlinked and knotted loops or soliton-like structures. The richness of the topological phenomena and the possibility to design and control topological defects with laser tweezers make colloids in nematic liquid crystals an excellent playground for testing the basic theorems of topology.

  13. Application of L-Aspartic Acid-Capped ZnS:Mn Colloidal Nanocrystals as a Photosensor for the Detection of Copper (II) Ions in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jungho; Hwang, Cheong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Water-dispersible ZnS:Mn nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized by capping the surface with polar L-aspartic acid (Asp) molecules. The obtained ZnS:Mn-Asp NC product was optically and physically characterized using the corresponding spectroscopic methods. The ultra violet-visible (UV-VIS) absorption spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum of the NCs showed broad peaks at 320 and 590 nm, respectively. The average particle size measured from the obtained high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) image was 5.25 nm, which was also in accordance with the Debye-Scherrer calculations using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Moreover, the surface charge and degree of aggregation of the ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs were determined by electrophoretic and hydrodynamic light scattering methods, respectively. These results indicated the formation of agglomerates in water with an average size of 19.8 nm, and a negative surface charge (−4.58 mV) in water at ambient temperature. The negatively-charged NCs were applied as a photosensor for the detection of specific cations in aqueous solution. Accordingly, the ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs showed an exclusive luminescence quenching upon addition of copper (II) cations. The kinetic mechanism study on the luminescence quenching of the NCs by the addition of the Cu2+ ions proposed an energy transfer through the ionic binding between the two oppositely-charged ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs and Cu2+ ions. PMID:28335210

  14. Application of L-Aspartic Acid-Capped ZnS:Mn Colloidal Nanocrystals as a Photosensor for the Detection of Copper (II Ions in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Heo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-dispersible ZnS:Mn nanocrystals (NCs were synthesized by capping the surface with polar L-aspartic acid (Asp molecules. The obtained ZnS:Mn-Asp NC product was optically and physically characterized using the corresponding spectroscopic methods. The ultra violet-visible (UV-VIS absorption spectrum and photoluminescence (PL emission spectrum of the NCs showed broad peaks at 320 and 590 nm, respectively. The average particle size measured from the obtained high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM image was 5.25 nm, which was also in accordance with the Debye-Scherrer calculations using the X-ray diffraction (XRD data. Moreover, the surface charge and degree of aggregation of the ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs were determined by electrophoretic and hydrodynamic light scattering methods, respectively. These results indicated the formation of agglomerates in water with an average size of 19.8 nm, and a negative surface charge (−4.58 mV in water at ambient temperature. The negatively-charged NCs were applied as a photosensor for the detection of specific cations in aqueous solution. Accordingly, the ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs showed an exclusive luminescence quenching upon addition of copper (II cations. The kinetic mechanism study on the luminescence quenching of the NCs by the addition of the Cu2+ ions proposed an energy transfer through the ionic binding between the two oppositely-charged ZnS:Mn-Asp NCs and Cu2+ ions.

  15. Controlled assembly of jammed colloidal shells on fluid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Stone, Howard A.

    2005-07-01

    Assembly of colloidal particles on fluid interfaces is a promising technique for synthesizing two-dimensional microcrystalline materials useful in fields as diverse as biomedicine, materials science, mineral flotation and food processing. Current approaches rely on bulk emulsification methods, require further chemical and thermal treatments, and are restrictive with respect to the materials used. The development of methods that exploit the great potential of interfacial assembly for producing tailored materials have been hampered by the lack of understanding of the assembly process. Here we report a microfluidic method that allows direct visualization and understanding of the dynamics of colloidal crystal growth on curved interfaces. The crystals are periodically ejected to form stable jammed shells, which we refer to as colloidal armour. We propose that the energetic barriers to interfacial crystal growth and organization can be overcome by targeted delivery of colloidal particles through hydrodynamic flows. Our method allows an unprecedented degree of control over armour composition, size and stability.

  16. Validation of classical density-dependent solute transport theory for stable, high-concentration-gradient brine displacements in coarse and medium sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S. J.; Barry, D. A.; Schotting, R. J.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    A series of careful laboratory soil column experiments was carried out for the purpose of providing data for testing recently presented theories of miscible density-dependent flow and transport. In particular, modifications to the standard theory involve extensions to both Darcy's (for flow) and Fick's laws (for diffusive/dispersive solute flux). Both coarse- and medium-grained sands were used in the experiments. All experiments concerned upward (i.e., stable) displacement of fresh water within the soil by a brine solution, under either constant head or constant volume flux conditions. The experimental data were analysed using accurate numerical solutions of the standard governing flow and transport model, as well as models with modified Darcy's and Fick's laws. Model parameters were determined by a step-wise fitting procedure based on the least-squares criterion. The results show clearly that, for large density contrasts, an extended Darcy's law was not necessary. On the other hand, an extension to Fick's Law was needed to model the experimental data accurately.

  17. Effect of the Addition of a Labile Gelatin Component on the Degradation and Solute Release Kinetics of a Stable PEG Hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldeck, H.; Kao, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanisms and resulting products of biodegradable materials is critical in understanding the behavior of the material including solute transport and biological response. Previous mathematical analyses of a semi-interpenetrating network (sIPN) containing both labile gelatin and a stable cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) network found that diffusion-based models alone were unable to explain the release kinetics of solutes from the system. In this study, degradation of the sIPN and its effect on solute release and swelling kinetics were investigated. The kinetics of the primary mode of degradation, gelatin dissolution, was dependent on temperature, preparation methods, PEGdA and gelatin concentration, and the weight ratio between the gelatin and PEG. The gelatin dissolution rate positively correlated with both matrix swelling and the release kinetics of high-molecular-weight model compound, FITC-dextran. Coupled with previous in vitro studies, the kinetics of sIPN degradation provided insights into the time-dependent changes in cellular response including adhesion and protein expression. These results provide a facile guide in material formulation to control the delivery of high-molecular-weight compounds with concomitant modulation of cellular behavior. PMID:21801489

  18. Fourier-transform light scattering of individual colloidal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, HyeonSeung; Park, HyunJoo; Kim, Youngchan; Kim, Mahn Won; Park, YongKeun

    2012-07-01

    We present measurements of the scalar-field light scattering of individual dimer, trimer, and tetrahedron shapes among colloidal clusters. By measuring the electric field with quantitative phase imaging at the sample plane and then numerically propagating to the far-field scattering plane, the two-dimensional light-scattering patterns from individual colloidal clusters are effectively and precisely retrieved. The measured scattering patterns are consistent with simulated patterns calculated from the generalized multiparticle Mie solution.

  19. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Style, R. W.

    2010-06-30

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy\\'s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the concentration and stress profiles during drying. A solution is found for the steady-state growth of a nedimensional crust during constant evaporation rate from the surface. The solution is used to demonstrate the importance of the system boundary conditions on stress profiles and diffusivity in a drying crust. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  20. Closed-Form and Numerically-Stable Solutions to Problems Related to the Optimal Two-Impulse Transfer Between Specified Terminal States of Keplerian Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senent, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The first part of the paper presents some closed-form solutions to the optimal two-impulse transfer between fixed position and velocity vectors on Keplerian orbits when some constraints are imposed on the magnitude of the initial and final impulses. Additionally, a numerically-stable gradient-free algorithm with guaranteed convergence is presented for the minimum delta-v two-impulse transfer. In the second part of the paper, cooperative bargaining theory is used to solve some two-impulse transfer problems when the initial and final impulses are carried by different vehicles or when the goal is to minimize the delta-v and the time-of-flight at the same time.

  1. Calcium biogeochemical cycle at the beech tree-soil solution interface from the Strengbach CZO (NE France): insights from stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Gangloff, Sophie; Labolle, François; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the fourth most abundant element in mineral nutrition and plays key physiological and structural roles in plant metabolism. At the soil-water-plant scale, stable Ca isotopes are a powerful tool for the identification of plant-mineral interactions and recycling via vegetation. Radiogenic Sr isotopes are often used as tracers of Ca sources and mixtures of different reservoirs. In this study, stable Ca and radiogenic Sr are combined and analysed in several organs from two beech trees that were collected in June and September in the Strengbach critical zone observatory (CZO) (NE France) and in corresponding soil solutions. At the beech-tree scale, this study confirms the field Ca adsorption (i.e., physico-chemical mechanism and not vital effects) on carboxyl acid groups of pectin in the apoplasm of small roots. The analysis of the xylem sap and corresponding organs shows that although the Strengbach CZO is nutrient-poor, Ca seems to be non-limiting for tree-growth. Different viscosities of xylem sap between the stemwood and branches or leaves can explain δ44/40Ca values in different tree-organs. The bark and phloem 40Ca-enrichments could be due to Ca-oxalate precipitation in the bark tissues and in the phloem. The results from this study regarding the combination of these two isotopic systems show that the isotopic signatures of the roots are dominated by Ca fractionation mechanisms and Sr, and thus Ca, source variations. In contrast, translocation mechanisms are only governed by Ca fractionation processes. This study showed that at the root-soil solution interface, litter degradation was not the main source of Ca and Sr and that the soil solutions are not the complement of uptake by roots for samples from the 2011/2013 period. The opposite is observed for older samples. These observations indicate the decreasing contribution of low radiogenic Sr fluxes, such as recycling, alimenting the soil solutions. Such reduced importance of nutrient uptake and

  2. Colloidal attraction induced by a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R; Ianni, F; Ruocco, G

    2009-04-21

    Colloidal crystals are of extreme importance for applied research and for fundamental studies in statistical mechanics. Long-range attractive interactions, such as capillary forces, can drive the spontaneous assembly of such mesoscopic ordered structures. However, long-range attractive forces are very rare in the colloidal realm. Here we report a novel strong, long-ranged attraction induced by a thermal gradient in the presence of a wall. By switching the thermal gradient on and off, we can rapidly and reversibly form stable hexagonal 2D crystals. We show that the observed attraction is hydrodynamic in nature and arises from thermally induced slip flow on particle surfaces. We used optical tweezers to measure the force law directly and compare it to an analytical prediction based on Stokes flow driven by Marangoni-like forces.

  3. Colloid Release From Differently Managed Loess Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) in a soil can have a major impact on soil functions, such as permeability to water and air, and on soil strength, which can impair soil fertility and workability. In addition, the content of WDC in the soil may increase the risk of nutrient loss...... and of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. In the present study, soils from the Bad Lauchstadt long-term static fertilizer experiment with different management histories were investigated to relate basic soil properties to the content of WDC, the content of water-stable aggregates (WSA......), and aggregate tensile strength. Our studies were carried out on soils on identical parent material under controlled management conditions, enabling us to study the long-term effects on soil physical properties with few explanatory variables in play. The content of WDC and the amount of WSA were measured...

  4. Frequency-Stable Ionic-Type Hybrid Gate Dielectrics for High Mobility Solution-Processed Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sang Heo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate high mobility solution-processed metal-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs by using a high-frequency-stable ionic-type hybrid gate dielectric (HGD. The HGD gate dielectric, a blend of sol-gel aluminum oxide (AlOx and poly(4-vinylphenol (PVP, exhibited high dielectric constant (ε~8.15 and high-frequency-stable characteristics (1 MHz. Using the ionic-type HGD as a gate dielectric layer, an minimal electron-double-layer (EDL can be formed at the gate dielectric/InOx interface, enhancing the field-effect mobility of the TFTs. Particularly, using the ionic-type HGD gate dielectrics annealed at 350 °C, InOx TFTs having an average field-effect mobility of 16.1 cm2/Vs were achieved (maximum mobility of 24 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, the ionic-type HGD gate dielectrics can be processed at a low temperature of 150 °C, which may enable their applications in low-thermal-budget plastic and elastomeric substrates. In addition, we systematically studied the operational stability of the InOx TFTs using the HGD gate dielectric, and it was observed that the HGD gate dielectric effectively suppressed the negative threshold voltage shift during the negative-illumination-bias stress possibly owing to the recombination of hole carriers injected in the gate dielectric with the negatively charged ionic species in the HGD gate dielectric.

  5. Colloid-probe AFM studies of the interaction forces of proteins adsorbed on colloidal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Bremmell, Kristen E; Griesser, Hans J; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, colloid-probe AFM has been used to measure the direct interaction forces between colloidal particles of different size or surface functionality in aqueous media, as one can study different forces in symmerical systems (i.e., sphere-sphere geometry). The present study investigates the interaction between protein coatings on colloid probes and hydrophilic surfaces decorated with hexagonally close packed single particle layers that are either uncoated or coated with proteins. Controlled solvent evaporation from aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles (coated with or without lysozyme and albumin) produces single layers of close-packed colloidal crystals over large areas on a solid support. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different salt concentrations and pH values. The results show changes in the interaction forces as the surface charge of the unmodified or modified particles, and ionic strength or pH of the solution is altered. At high ionic strength or pH, electrostatic interactions are screened, and a strong repulsive force at short separation below 5 nm dominates, suggesting structural changes in the absorbed protein layer on the particles. We also study the force of adhesion, which decreases with an increment in the salt concentration, and the interaction between two different proteins indicating a repulsive interaction on approach and adhesion on retraction.

  6. Medical applications of colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  7. Binary colloidal crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christova-Zdravkova, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Binary crystals are crystals composed of two types of particles having different properties like size, mass density, charge etc. In this thesis several new approaches to make binary crystals of colloidal particles that differ in size, material and charge are reported We found a variety of crystal

  8. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Structure and thermodynamics of nonideal solutions of colloidal particles. Investigation of salt-free solutions of human serum albumin by using small-angle neutron scattering and Monte Carlo simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, B.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    The understanding of the structural and thermodynamic properties of moderately or highly concentrated solutions is fundamental, e.g., in medicine and biology and also in many technical processes, In this work, we have used the small-angle neutron scattering method (SANS), in combination with Monte...... Carlo simulation, to study salt-free solutions of human serum albumin (HSA) in the concentration range up to 0.26 g ml(-1). The model calculations of the theoretical SANS intensities are quite general, thus avoiding the approximation that the relative positions and orientations of the particles...

  10. Dynamic of Faceted Colloidal Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindoro, Melinda; Jee, Ah-Young; Yu, Changqian; Granick, Steve

    2014-03-01

    We study the emulsion induced clustering of faceted metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and their dynamics. Our approach to anisotropic building block is through the rational synthesis of water stable and highly uniform MOFs. This generates colloidal-sized MOFs of defined polyhedral shape with tunable size in micrometer range that are suitable for in situ imaging. The 3D clusters formations are promoted by hydrophilic MOFs particles confined in aqueous droplets of binary water-lutidine mixture at transition temperature. Below this temperature, the water droplet decreases in volume due to one phase mixing with lutidine which forces the N-mers of faceted particles to aggregate in close contact. We compare the faceted clusters formed to those made of spherical particles in term of the building block sphericity. Other focus of our study involves the dynamic of the clusters. We found that, unlike spherical clusters, these faceted N-mers are highly stable on large scale of temperature due to their dominant capillary force on their facet-to-facet contact.

  11. Rheology and dynamics of colloidal superballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, John R; Burton, George L; Blair, Daniel L; Hudson, Steven D

    2015-07-28

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis make it possible to generate a wide array of precisely controlled, non-spherical particles. This provides a unique opportunity to probe the role that particle shape plays in the dynamics of colloidal suspensions, particularly at higher volume fractions, where particle interactions are important. We examine the role of particle shape by characterizing both the bulk rheology and micro-scale diffusion in a suspension of pseudo-cubic silica superballs. Working with these well-characterized shaped colloids, we can disentangle shape effects in the hydrodynamics of isolated particles from shape-mediated particle interactions. We find that the hydrodynamic properties of isolated superballs are marginally different from comparably sized hard spheres. However, shape-mediated interactions modify the suspension microstructure, leading to significant differences in the self-diffusion of the superballs. While this excluded volume interaction can be captured with a rescaling of the superball volume fraction, we observe qualitative differences in the shear thickening behavior of moderately concentrated superball suspensions that defy simple rescaling onto hard sphere results. This study helps to define the unknowns associated with the effects of shape on the rheology and dynamics of colloidal solutions.

  12. Designing Zirconium Coated Polystyrene Colloids and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Chira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple technique has been developed to prepare core colloids that are modified using zirconium oxychloride, based on heating a solution of core colloid composites, consisting of poly (ethylenimine (PEI and zirconium oxychloride. The interaction of zirconium oxychloride with the polystyrene (PS core colloids has been investigated using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM data. FT-IR studies confirm the occurrence of amine groups present in PEI which are oxidized to carboxyl groups after the reaction. The EDX data and the SEM images confirm the presence of zirconium particles immobilized on the polystyrene surfaces. Demeton, a highly toxic nerve agent, was used due to its ability to easily bind through its organophosphate group illustrating a practical application of the PS-PEI-Zr particles. Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR Spectroscopy was used to assess the interactions between the toxic nerve agent demeton-S and the PS-PEI-Zr particles. The results show that the presented technique for coating polystyrene core colloids with zirconium was successfully accomplished, and the newly formed particles easily bond with demeton agents through the P=O functional group.

  13. Ubiquitous presence of Fe(II) in aquatic colloids and its association with organic carbon

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    von der Heyden, BP

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite being thermodynamically less stable, small ferrous colloids (60 nm to 3 µm in diameter) remain an important component of the biogeochemical cycle at the Earth’s surface, yet their composition and structure and the reasons...

  14. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Plutonium in Fractured Volcanic Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, A. B.; Zhao, P.; Walensky, J. R.; Roberts, S. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Zavarin, M.; Ramon, E. C.

    2004-12-01

    The transport of low-solubility radionuclides in a colloidal- or colloidal bound state is frequently suspected or observed. Groundwater contaminated with radionuclides associated with underground nuclear tests was collected from several different well locations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In each case, the low-levels of plutonium detected in the groundwater were overwhelmingly (>95percent) associated with the colloidal and not the dissolved fraction of the groundwater. The colloidal fractions consisted of secondary minerals such as clays and zeolites. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the potential colloidal transport of plutonium, colloid-facilitated fracture flow laboratory experiments are being conducted. Pseudocolloids consisting of Pu(IV) sorbed to clinoptilolite were combined with a radionuclide solution cocktail consisting of Np, U, Cs, Sr, Sm and 3H and Re (analog to Tc) tracers in NTS-type synthetic groundwater (4.5mM NaHCO3-). The cocktail was injected into a smooth fracture in a volcanic tuff rock core from the NTS and the effluent analyzed. Autoradiography and secondary ion mass spectrometry will be used to understand the mineral -colloid-radionuclide interactions in the fracture volcanic tuff.

  15. Reversibility of sorption of plutonium-239 onto hematite and goethite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, N.; Cotter, C.R.; Kitten, H.D.; Bentley, J.; Triay, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate: (1) sorption of plutonium-239 ( 239 Pu) on different iron oxide colloids (hematite and geothite), (2) sorption kinetics of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) onto these two colloids, and (3) desorption of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) from 239 Pu-loaded colloids as a function of time. Natural groundwater and carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater were used in this study. To examine the possible influence of bicarbonate on 239 Pu sorption, an additional set of experiments was conducted in sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) solutions under carbon dioxide free environments. Our results show that colloidal Pu(IV) as well as soluble Pu(V) was rapidly adsorbed by hematite and goethite colloids in both natural and synthetic groundwater. The amount of 239 Pu adsorbed by both iron oxide colloids in synthetic groundwater was higher than in natural groundwater. The presence of carbonate did not influence the sorption of 239 Pu. While sorption of soluble Pu(V) is a slow process, sorption of colloidal Pu(IV) occurs rapidly. Desorption of Pu from iron oxide colloids is much slower than the sorption processes. Our findings suggest that different sorption and desorption behaviors of 239 Pu by iron oxide colloids in groundwater may facilitate the transport of 239 Pu along potential flowpaths from the areas contaminated by radionuclide and release to the accessible environment. (orig.)

  16. Stochastic Simulations of Colloid-Facilitated Transport for Long Time and Space Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S.; Pickett, D.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2004-12-01

    Although it is widely recognized that naturally occurring inorganic colloids can potentially enhance the transport of radionuclides in the subsurface, comparatively few analyses have considered the long times and large travel distances associated with potential nuclear waste repositories. One-dimensional transient simulations in a stochastic Lagrangian framework are used to explore model and parameter sensitivities for colloid-facilitated transport at large scales. The model accounts for (i) advection and dispersion of radionuclides and colloids, (ii) radionuclide decay, (iii) exchange of radionuclides among colloid-bound, dissolved, and fixed substrate phases, and (iv) attachment and detachment of colloids to the fixed substrate. Kinetics of the exchanges between dissolved and colloid-bound states are addressed using linear and non-linear models. Generic sensitivity studies addressing both fractured and granular aquifers are considered, as is an example based on the groundwater transport pathway for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In the absence of mitigating factors such as permanent filtration of colloids, transport may be enhanced over the situation without colloids, but only for strongly sorbing radionuclides. Mass transfer between solution and immobilized colloids makes colloid retardation relatively ineffective at reducing facilitated transport except when the retardation factor is large. Results are particularly sensitive to the rate of desorption from colloids, a parameter that is difficult to measure with short-duration experiments. This paper is an independent product of the CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the view or regulatory position of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  17. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... followed by lower and stable colloid and phosphorus concentrations. The mass of particles leached at first flush was independent of clay content and was attributed to the instant release of particles associated with the macropore walls and released upon contact with flowing water. Below a clay content of È...

  18. Silica-coated titania and zirconia colloids for subsurface transport field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Elimelech, Menachem; Baeseman, Jenny L.; Magelky, Robin D.

    2000-01-01

    Silica-coated titania (TiO2) and zirconia (ZrO2) colloids were synthesized in two sizes to provide easily traced mineral colloids for subsurface transport experiments. Electrophoretic mobility measurements showed that coating with silica imparted surface properties similar to pure silica to the titania and zirconia colloids. Measurements of steady electrophoretic mobility and size (by dynamic light scattering) over a 90-day period showed that the silica-coated colloids were stable to aggregation and loss of coating. A natural gradient field experiment conducted in an iron oxide-coated sand and gravel aquifer also showed that the surface properties of the silica-coated colloids were similar. Colloid transport was traced at μg L-1 concentrations by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy measurement of Ti and Zr in acidified samples.

  19. Enhanced transport of ferrihydrite colloid by chain-shaped humic acid colloid in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Guo, Huaming; Lei, Mei; Li, Yongtao; Weng, Liping; Chen, Yali; Ma, Yuling; Deng, Yingxuan; Feng, Xiaojuan; Xiu, Wei

    2018-04-15

    Both humic acid and colloid particle size effectively regulate colloid transport. However, little is known about effect of particle size and configuration of humic acid colloid (HA colloid ) on enhanced-transport of ferrihydrite colloid (FH colloid ) in porous media. Co-transport of HA colloid and FH colloid at different pH was systematically investigated by monitoring breakthrough curves (BTCs) in saturated sand columns. The colloid transport model and the (X)DLVO theory were used to reveal the mechanism of HA colloid -enhanced FH colloid transport in the columns. Results showed that HA colloid enhanced FH colloid transport in neutral and alkaline conditions. In neutral conditions, small HA colloid (F-HA colloid ) with chain-shaped structure enhanced FH colloid transport more prominently than pristine granular HA colloid . The chain-shaped F-HA colloid caused osmotic repulsion and elastic-steric repulsion between colloids and sand, leading to enhanced transport. However, the granular HA colloid readily occurred as deposition due to attachment and straining, which decreased the enhanced transport of FH colloid . In alkaline conditions, both HA colloid and F-HA colloid were chain-shaped, with longer chains of HA colloid than F-HA colloid . Ferrihydrite colloid transport was enhanced by HA colloid more significantly than F-HA colloid due to stronger repulsion between mixed HA colloid -FH colloid and sand. It suggested that regulation of particle size and morphology of HA colloid would enhance FH colloid transport and further help in understanding FH colloid -facilitated contaminants transport in porous media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure and thermodynamics of nonideal solutions of colloidal particles. Investigation of salt-free solutions of human serum albumin by using small-angle neutron scattering and Monte Carlo simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, B.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    the Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the SANS data can be explained by a model where the HSA molecules behave as hard ellipsoids of revolution with semiaxes a = 6.8 nm, b = c = 1.9 nm. In addition to the hard core interaction, the particles are also surrounded by a soft, repulsive rectangular......The understanding of the structural and thermodynamic properties of moderately or highly concentrated solutions is fundamental, e.g., in medicine and biology and also in many technical processes, In this work, we have used the small-angle neutron scattering method (SANS), in combination with Monte...... Carlo simulation, to study salt-free solutions of human serum albumin (HSA) in the concentration range up to 0.26 g ml(-1). The model calculations of the theoretical SANS intensities are quite general, thus avoiding the approximation that the relative positions and orientations of the particles...

  1. Colloidal Behavior of Engineered NPs in Environmental Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    state of flux. 3 A common misconception • A common misconception in NP experiments is that the suspension remains stable. • This is rarely the...18 CNT with humics • 19 20 1 Ostega Lake humic More humics Summary & Conclusions • NP behavior generally follows colloidal chemistry , showing

  2. Phase diagrams of shape-anisotropic colloidal particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to predict the equilibrium phase behaviour of colloidal particles, one should first identify the “candidate” structures in which the particles may assemble. Subsequently, the free energy of the candidate structures should be determined to establish the thermodynamically stable phases and to

  3. Facile synthesis and catalytic properties of silver colloidal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. A facile method was explored to prepare stable silver colloidal nanoparticles (AgCNPs) in water. Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) was used as the stabilizing agent, without addition of any co-surfactant. The reaction was rapid and the product prepared at different conditions was measured by.

  4. Colloid mobilization and arsenite transport in soil columns: effect of ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Selim, H M

    2007-01-01

    Colloid generation and transport in soils is of significance because of suspected colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to the groundwater. In this study, colloid mobilization and its effect on the transport of arsenite [As(III)] were investigated in Olivier (fine-silty, mixed, active, thermic Aquic Fraglossudalfs) and Windsor (mixed, mesic typic Udipsamments) soil columns. Input solution of 10 mg L(-1) As(III) in 0.01 M NaCl was applied to water-saturated columns, and followed by leaching with deionized water (DIW). Flow interruptions were performed during the As(III) input and DIW leaching phases. Turbidity, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH of column effluents were monitored with time. Total and dissolved concentrations of As, Fe, and Al were analyzed. Effluent results demonstrated that colloid-facilitated transport contributed little to arsenic movement when the solution ionic strength was maintained constant. Mobilization of colloidal amorphous material and enhanced transport of As(III) were observed as a result of changes in ionic strength of the input solution. The peak of colloid generation coincided with peak concentrations of Fe, suggesting mobilization of Fe oxides and facilitated transport of As(III) adsorbed on oxide surfaces. Colloid mobilization was enhanced due to flow interruption in the Olivier column, which suggests slow dissociation of aggregated colloidal particles. Moreover, effluent results indicate significant effect of organic matter in stabilizing aggregates of colloidal particles.

  5. Producing colloids with microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannacci, Nicolas; Willaime, Herve; Tabeling, Patrick

    2008-11-01

    Submicronic emulsions are commonly used in pharmaceutical, food, cosmetic and material industries. Standard microfluidic tool is particularly convenient to produce in a very controlled way either droplets of typical diameter ranging from 10 to 300 microns with a perfect monodispersity (nanodrops in a way that is slightly dependent on the fluids used. The control on such a flow authorizes the adjustment of the diameter of the colloids formed. We will show brownian particles from 860 nm to 1.3 μm in diameter obtained in such way and their clustering into crystals thanks to their high monodispersity. These first experimental results are very promising and make evident the great potential of micro and nano-fluidics to produce nano-emulsions or colloids with very controlled size that metamaterials can require.

  6. Fractal nematic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter. PMID:28117325

  7. Direct visualization of colloidal liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Richard Vernon

    We have investigated various colloidal systems consisting of aqueous suspensions of micron sized polystyrene particles. These systems are appealing because they provide a fertile testing ground for theories of both the liquid and solid states, as well as for theories describing hydrodynamic interactions. Our first study of colloidal systems was motivated by some interesting observations we made while looking at a suspension under a light microscope. We, as well as other workers, noticed that particles undergoing Brownian motion can appear to linger around each other for long periods of time. The question arose as to whether this lingering was a product of interparticle interactions, or was an artifact due to random thermal motion and projection onto a two dimensional image plane. We found that the latter was true, which drove home the idea that we must be wary of our own biases when making scientific observations. During the course of the research on this lingering behavior, we developed a mathematical technique for generating successively more accurate approximate analytical solutions to initial value linear partial differential equations which are first order in time and have no mixing of spatial and time derivatives. This formalism is especially useful for diffusion problems, since the analytical approximation conserves probability at each order of approximation. Our next experimental effort involved colloidal systems in which the suspending medium was carefully prepared to promote long ranged electrostatic interactions between the particles. The interaction potential in such a suspension has been the topic of much research recently. Using digital video microscopy, as well as techniques we developed allowing the proper analysis of two dimensional data, we found that the interaction length in our samples was surprisingly short ranged compared to what we expected based on our water purification experiments. The problems with projection effects associated with two

  8. Colloidal capsules: nano- and microcapsules with colloidal particle shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollhorst, Tobias; Rezwan, Kurosch; Maas, Michael

    2017-04-18

    Utilizing colloidal particles for the assembly of the shell of nano- and microcapsules holds great promise for the tailor-made design of new functional materials. Increasing research efforts are devoted to the synthesis of such colloidal capsules, by which the integration of modular building blocks with distinct physical, chemical, or morphological characteristics in a capsule's shell can result in novel properties, not present in previous encapsulation structures. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the synthesis strategies and the progress made so far of bringing nano- and microcapsules with shells of densely packed colloidal particles closer to application in fields such as chemical engineering, materials science, or pharmaceutical and life science. The synthesis routes are categorized into the four major themes for colloidal capsule formation, i.e. the Pickering-emulsion based formation of colloidal capsules, the colloidal particle deposition on (sacrificial) templates, the amphiphilicity driven self-assembly of nanoparticle vesicles from polymer-grafted colloids, and the closely related field of nanoparticle membrane-loading of liposomes and polymersomes. The varying fields of colloidal capsule research are then further categorized and discussed for micro- and nano-scaled structures. Finally, a special section is dedicated to colloidal capsules for biological applications, as a diverse range of reports from this field aim at pharmaceutical agent encapsulation, targeted drug-delivery, and theranostics.

  9. Structure, stability, and formation pathways of colloidal gels in systems with short-range attraction and long-range repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schooneveld, Matti M; de Villeneuve, Volkert W A; Dullens, Roel P A; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Leunissen, Mirjam E; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-04-09

    We study colloidal gels formed upon centrifugation of dilute suspensions of spherical colloids (radius 446 nm) that interact through a long-range electrostatic repulsion (Debye length approximately 850 nm) and a short-range depletion attraction (approximately 12.5 nm), by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). In these systems, at low colloid densities, colloidal clusters are stable. Upon increasing the density by centrifugation, at different stages of cluster formation, we show that colloidal gels are formed that significantly differ in structure. While significant single-particle displacements do not occur on the hour time scale, the different gels slowly evolve within several weeks to a similar structure that is at least stable for over a year. Furthermore, while reference systems without long-range repulsion collapse into dense glassy states, the repulsive colloidal gels are able to support external stress in the form of a centrifugal field of at least 9g.

  10. Diffusion of organic colloids in compacted bentonite. The influence of ionic strength on molecular size and transport capacity of the colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, S.; Eriksen, Trygve E.

    2000-09-01

    Diffusion of radionuclides in compacted bentonite can be affected by inorganic and organic colloids if the radionuclides form complexes with the colloids. Formation and mobility of the colloid-radionuclide complexes will be governed by the properties of the colloids as well as the competition between complexation and sorption of the radionuclides on bentonite. This report presents the results of experiments with organic colloids humic acid (HA) and lignosulfonate (LS). The aim of the experiments has been to describe the HA and LS properties: size distribution, acidity, sorption on bentonite, diffusivity in compacted bentonite, complexation with strontium, and diffusion of strontium in bentonite in the presence of HA. This study indicates that the diffusion of cationic radionuclides like Sr 2+ is not affected by the presence of HA in high ionic strength solution. In 0.1 M NaClO 4 solution, HA is most probably not available for complexation due to coiling and shielding of the negative sites

  11. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy to prepare, cost-effective, and versatile with regards to modification and functionalization. Patterned colloidal PCs contribute a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate-induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification, is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, improved detection sensitivity and response speed of the sensors, control over the flow direction and wicking rate of microfluidic channels, recognition of cross-reactive molecules through an array-patterned microchip, fabrication of display devices with tunable patterns, well-arranged RGB units, and wide viewing-angles, and the ability to construct anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2017-02-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks).

  13. Colloid migration in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, J.R. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1989-09-15

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs.

  14. Influence of Natural Organic Matter on Aggregation, Deposition, and Transport of Fullerene Colloids in Aqueous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Rattanaudompol, U.; Powell, T.; Bouchard, D.

    2011-12-01

    Engineered fullerenes are increasingly being used in commercial products (e.g., skin and eye creams, tennis racquets, and lubricants) that may become a significant source for environmental release. A thorough understanding of fullerenes' aggregation in aqueous phase and deposition/transport in porous media is needed for evaluating the environmental persistence of fullerenes and subsequent human or ecological exposure. A number of recent studies have shown that fullerenes form stable colloidal aggregates in aqueous media and that their environmental behaviors largely depend on solution chemistry including ionic strength, solution pH, and the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). Nonetheless, the lack of systematic studies on NOM interaction with fullerene colloids and the coupling of this interaction with ionic strength and solution pH make predicting environmental behaviors of fullerenes a difficult task. In this study, electrophoretic mobility (EM), particle size, and aggregation kinetics of C60 colloidal suspensions were measured under a range of ionic strength (1.5-500.5 mM), solution pH (4, 7.8, and 10), and humic (0-9 mg C/L) or fulvic (0-11 mg C/L) acid concentrations. The EM data could be modeled with Ohshima's soft particle theory to probe thickness, softness, and charge density of adsorbed NOM layers on fullerene colloids. Under select conditions that represent low and high mobility, deposition studies using a quartz crystal microbalance and transport experiments in saturated and unsaturated sand columns will be conducted. It is anticipated that NOM may alter the transport of fullerene C60 differently in unsaturated media compared with saturated media. Our preliminary results showed that humic acid is more effective than fulvic acid in stabilizing fullerene suspensions and the extent of this stabilizing effect is a function of ionic strength when buffered at pH 7.8 with 0.5 mM NaHCO3. The findings of this study will help better assess the fate and

  15. Interaction between colloidal particles. Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longcheng Liu; Neretnieks, Ivars (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology)

    2010-02-15

    This report summarises the commonly accepted theoretical basis describing interaction between colloidal particles in an electrolyte solution. The two main forces involved are the van der Waals attractive force and the electrical repulsive force. The report describes in some depth the origin of these two forces, how they are formulated mathematically as well as how they interact to sometimes result in attraction and sometimes in repulsion between particles. The report also addresses how the mathematical models can be used to quantify the forces and under which conditions the models can be expected to give fair description of the colloidal system and when the models are not useful. This report does not address more recent theories that still are discussed as to their applicability, such as ion-ion correlation effects and the Coulombic attraction theory (CAT). These and other models will be discussed in future reports

  16. Synthesis of colloids based on gold nanoparticles dispersed in castor oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E. C. da; Silva, M. G. A. da; Meneghetti, S. M. P.; Machado, G.; Alencar, M. A. R. C.; Hickmann, J. M.; Meneghetti, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    New colloidal solutions of gold nanoparticles (AuNP), using castor oil as a nontoxic organic dispersant agent, were prepared via three different methods. In all three cases, tetrachloroauric(III) acid was employed as the gold source. The colloids were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuNP produced by the three methods were quasispherical in shape, however with different average sizes. The individual characteristics of the nanoparticles presented in each colloidal system were also confirmed by observation of absorption maxima at different wavelengths of visible light. Each method of synthesis leads to colloids with different grades of stability with respect to particle agglomeration.

  17. Stability of colloidal silver nanoparticles trapped in lipid bilayer: effect of lecithin concentration and applied temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barani, H.; Montazer, M.; Braun, H.G.; Dutschk, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The use of silver nanoparticle on various substrates has been widespread because of its good antibacterial properties that directly depend on the stability of the silver nanoparticles in a colloidal suspension. In this study, the colloidal solutions of the silver nanoparticles were synthesised by a

  18. Solution-Processed Cu(In, Ga)(S, Se)2Nanocrystal as Inorganic Hole-Transporting Material for Efficient and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Deng, Lin-Long; Cao, Jing; Wang, Xin; Chen, Wei-Yi; Jiang, Zhiyuan

    2017-12-01

    Perovskite solar cells are emerging as one of the most promising candidates for solar energy harvesting. To date, most of the high-performance perovskite solar cells have exclusively employed organic hole-transporting materials (HTMs) such as 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) or polytriarylamine (PTAA) which are often expensive and have low hole mobility. Almost all these HTMs reported needed lithium salt, e.g., lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Li-TFSI) doping, to improve hole mobility and performance. However, the use of Li-TFSI should be avoided because the hygroscopic nature of Li-TFSI could cause decomposition of perovskite and reduce device stability. Herein, we employed solution-processed CuIn 0.1 Ga 0.9 (S 0.9 Se 0.1 ) 2 (CIGSSe) nanocrystals as a novel inorganic HTM in perovskite solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 9.15% was obtained for CIGSSe-based devices with improved stability, compared to devices using spiro-OMeTAD as HTM. This work offers a promising candidate of Cu-based inorganic HTM for efficient and stable perovskite solar cells.

  19. Synergetic effects of solution-processable fluorinated graphene and PEDOT as a hole-transporting layer for highly efficient and stable normal-structure perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jae-Hun; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Joh, Han-Ik; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Na, Seok-In

    2017-11-16

    We demonstrate that a bi-interlayer consisting of water-free poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and fluorinated reduced graphene oxide (FrGO) noticeably enhances the efficiency and the stability of the normal-structure perovskite solar cells (PeSCs). With simple and low temperature solution-processing, the PeSC employing the PEDOT + FrGO interlayer exhibits a significantly improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.9%. Comprehensive investigations indicate that the enhanced PCE is mostly attributed to the retarded recombination in the devices. The minimized recombination phenomena are related to the interfacial dipoles at the PEDOT/FrGO interface, which facilitates the electron-blocking and the higher built-in potential in the devices. Furthermore, the PEDOT + FrGO device shows a better stability by maintaining 70% of the initial PCE over the 30 days exposure to ambient conditions. This is because the more hydrophobic graphitic sheets of the FrGO on the PEDOT further protect the perovskite films from oxygen/water penetration. Consequently, the introduction of composite interfacial layers including graphene derivatives can be an effective and versatile strategy for high-performing, stable, and cost-effective PeSCs.

  20. Average formation number n-barOH of colloid-type indium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanowicz, T.; Szent-Kirallyine Gajda, J.

    1983-01-01

    Indium perchlorate in perchloric acid solution was titrated with sodium hydroxide solution to various pH values. Indium hydroxide colloid was removed by ultracentrifugation and supernatant solution was titrated with base to neutral pH. The two-stage titration data were used to calculate the formation number of indium hydroxide colloid, which was found to equal n-bar OH = 2.8. (author)

  1. Effects of dissolved organic matter on the co-transport of mineral colloids and sorptive contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Saiers, James E.

    2015-06-01

    Colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone has important implications to groundwater quality, and has received considerable attention. Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in subsurface environments, and its influence on mineral colloids and solute transport has been well documented. However, research on the influence of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport is limited. The objective of this paper is to elucidate the effects of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport of a radioactive contaminant (Cs-137) within partially-saturated sediments. Measurements made with re-packed columns reveal that Cs-137 mobility was low when mineral colloids were absent and was unaffected by the presence of NOM. The addition of mineral colloids to influent increased Cs-137 mobility, and effluent Cs-137 was dominated by the colloid-associated form. When NOM was added to systems that contained mineral colloids and Cs-137, the mobility of Cs-137 further increased. A mathematical model simulating colloid-facilitated transport showed that NOM increases Cs-137 transport by increasing colloid mobility and reducing the rate of Cs-137 adsorption to the porous medium.

  2. Effects of dissolved organic matter on the co-transport of mineral colloids and sorptive contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Saiers, James E

    2015-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone has important implications to groundwater quality, and has received considerable attention. Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in subsurface environments, and its influence on mineral colloids and solute transport has been well documented. However, research on the influence of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport is limited. The objective of this paper is to elucidate the effects of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport of a radioactive contaminant (Cs-137) within partially-saturated sediments. Measurements made with re-packed columns reveal that Cs-137 mobility was low when mineral colloids were absent and was unaffected by the presence of NOM. The addition of mineral colloids to influent increased Cs-137 mobility, and effluent Cs-137 was dominated by the colloid-associated form. When NOM was added to systems that contained mineral colloids and Cs-137, the mobility of Cs-137 further increased. A mathematical model simulating colloid-facilitated transport showed that NOM increases Cs-137 transport by increasing colloid mobility and reducing the rate of Cs-137 adsorption to the porous medium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  4. The colloidal chemistry synthesis and electron microscopy characterization of shape-controlled metal and semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchi, Adam J.

    Solution methods of materials synthesis have found application in a variety of fields due to the diversity of products accessible, facility of process scalability, and the ease of tuning their properties through prudent selection of reaction conditions. Control of experimental variables during the formation of colloidally stable nanoscale solids within a liquid matrix allows for tailoring of the particles' characteristics, including shape, size, composition, and surface chemistry. In this dissertation, I will discuss how the manipulation of reaction chemistries can be used to synthesize shape-controlled metal and semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals. Further, I will elaborate on the mechanisms by which these particles form from molecular precursors and describe how their properties can differ from their bulk analogues through extensive characterization, especially using transmission electron microscopy. These studies contribute to the continued development of chemical routes to nanocrystals and their application as functional materials. First, I will review recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of shape-controlled nanocrystals, as well as highlight their promising applicability in a number of emerging technologies. These principles will then be leveraged to the specific case of catalytically-active rhodium nanocrystals, which can be synthesized with morphological and dimensional control using a polyol solution-mediated strategy. I describe an innovative shape-controlled synthesis to monodisperse colloidal rhodium icosahedra, cubes, triangular plates, and octahedra using this route. Additionally, new insights into the important role of the polyol reducing solvent on the synthesis of these nanocrystals are revealed, and how these might be exploited to engender superior reaction control and novel products. Next, I will describe how a crystallization mechanism was established for the synthesis of numerous morphologies of noble metal nanocrystals. I

  5. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  6. Sustainable steric stabilization of colloidal titania nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif

    2017-07-01

    A route to produce a stable colloidal suspension is essential if mono-dispersed particles are to be successfully synthesized, isolated, and used in subsequent nanocomposite manufacture. Dispersing nanoparticles in fluids was found to be an important approach for avoiding poor dispersion characteristics. However, there is still a great tendency for colloidal nanoparticles to flocculate over time. Steric stabilization can prevent coagulation by introducing a thick adsorbed organic layer which constitutes a significant steric barrier that can prevent the particle surfaces from coming into direct contact. One of the main features of hydrothermal synthesis technique is that it offers novel approaches for sustainable nanoparticle surface modification. This manuscript reports on the sustainable steric stabilization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle surface modification was performed via two main approaches including post-synthesis and in situ surface modification. The tuneable hydrothermal conditions (i.e. temperature, pressure, flow rates, and surfactant addition) were optimized to enable controlled steric stabilization in a continuous fashion. Effective post synthesis surface modification with organic ligand (dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA)) was achieved; the optimum surface coating temperature was reported to be 180-240 °C to ensure DDSA ring opening and binding to titania nanoparticles. Organic-modified titania demonstrated complete change in surface properties from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and exhibited phase transfer from the aqueous phase to the organic phase. Exclusive surface modification in the reactor was found to be an effective approach; it demonstrated surfactant loading level 2.2 times that of post synthesis surface modification. Titania was also stabilized in aqueous media using poly acrylic acid (PAA) as polar polymeric dispersant. PAA-titania nanoparticles demonstrated a durable amorphous polymeric layer of 2 nm thickness. This

  7. Neutron scattering from colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebula, D.J.; Thomas, R.K.; Harris, N.M.; Tabony, J.; White, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper appraises the usefulness of neutron diffraction and small angle scattering for determining the structure of dilute and concentrated sols. For monodisperse polystyrene latex, the particle size and density can be readily determined and an upper limit to density fluctuations within the colloid particle set. For the polystyrene latex peptized by the adsorption of laurate, the physical dimensions and packing density of the adsorbed phase can be determined. The effects of polydispersity for unpeptized and peptized graphite sols, and the effects of extreme particle anisotropy using sols of montmorillonite clay minerals have been studied. (author)

  8. Nematic Liquid-Crystal Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a concise review of a new state of colloidal matter called nematic liquid-crystal colloids. These colloids are obtained by dispersing microparticles of different shapes in a nematic liquid crystal that acts as a solvent for the dispersed particles. The microparticles induce a local deformation of the liquid crystal, which then generates topological defects and long-range forces between the neighboring particles. The colloidal forces in nematic colloids are much stronger than the forces in ordinary colloids in isotropic solvents, exceeding thousands of kBT per micrometer-sized particle. Of special interest are the topological defects in nematic colloids, which appear in many fascinating forms, such as singular points, closed loops, multitudes of interlinked and knotted loops or soliton-like structures. The richness of the topological phenomena and the possibility to design and control topological defects with laser tweezers make colloids in nematic liquid crystals an excellent playground for testing the basic theorems of topology. PMID:29295574

  9. Nematic Liquid-Crystal Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Muševič

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a concise review of a new state of colloidal matter called nematic liquid-crystal colloids. These colloids are obtained by dispersing microparticles of different shapes in a nematic liquid crystal that acts as a solvent for the dispersed particles. The microparticles induce a local deformation of the liquid crystal, which then generates topological defects and long-range forces between the neighboring particles. The colloidal forces in nematic colloids are much stronger than the forces in ordinary colloids in isotropic solvents, exceeding thousands of kBT per micrometer-sized particle. Of special interest are the topological defects in nematic colloids, which appear in many fascinating forms, such as singular points, closed loops, multitudes of interlinked and knotted loops or soliton-like structures. The richness of the topological phenomena and the possibility to design and control topological defects with laser tweezers make colloids in nematic liquid crystals an excellent playground for testing the basic theorems of topology.

  10. Photophysical effects between spirobenzopyran-methylmethacrylate functionalized colloidal particles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piech, Marcin; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2005-06-01

    Colloidal particles were derivatized with end-grafted polymethylmethacryate polymer brushes containing varying concentrations of spirobenzopyran photochromic molecules. The polymers were grown from initiator-functionalized silica partilces by an atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). These core-shell colloids formed stable suspensions in toluene with the spirobenzopyran in its closed, nonpolar form. However, UV-induced photoswitching of the photochrome to its open, polar merocyanine isomer caused rapid aggregation. The nature of this colloidal stability transition was examined with respect to the spirobenzopyran content in the polymeric brush and solvent polarity. Turbidimetry, wettability studies, UV-vis spectroscopy, suspension rheology, SEM, and visual inspection were utilized to characterize the system photoswitchability. It was found that the system exhibiting the greatest transition in toluene was the copolymer brush composed of 20% spirobenzopyran and 80% methyl methacrylate.

  11. Synthesis of Colloidal Ruthenium Nanocatalyst by Chemical Reduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Patharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of ruthenium trichloride (RuCl3 using sodium borohydrate (NaBH4 as reducing agent and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS as a stabilizer. Size and size distribution of synthesized colloidal Ru nanoparticles were studied by varying different parameters such as molar ratio (MR of SDS/RuCl3, NaBH4/RuCl3, effects of different stabilizers, and reducing agents. Prepared nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. Stability of colloidal nanoparticles was detected by Turbiscan. Stable Ru nanoparticles were dispersed on γ-Al2O3 to prepare Ru/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. This catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscope (TEM.

  12. Optimizing colloidal nanocrystals for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sytnyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    further details of these developments were worked out by another PhD student. Thus the full story of the Ag-chalcogenide nanocrystals is presented in Appendix A. Chapter 5 of the thesis introduces another possibility to obtain non-toxic nanocrystals. It describes a procedure to transform powders of archetypical organic pigments into colloidal solutions of semiconductor nanocrystals. These nanocrystals are synthesized with controlled sizes and shapes. They are eventually covered with smart ligands, providing rapid charge separation, and exhibit emission in the visible and near-infrared spectral region. Based on them, photodetectors with responsivities up to 0.9 A/W, humidity sensors with a dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude, and field effect transistors are demonstrated, fabricated by drop-casting or paint-brushing. These results show up an enormous potential of these colloidal pigment nanocrystals for the development of an environmentally-friendly, biocompatible, and low-cost electronics. (author)

  13. Colloid facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutsch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2015-04-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the internationally agreed-upon, long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. Eventually, corrosion of the waste canisters may lead to leakage of their hazardous contents, and the radionuclides can ultimately make their way into groundwater and pose a threat to the biosphere. Engineered bentonite barriers placed around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their storage location to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles eroding from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. In addition, the presence of organic matter in groundwater has been shown to additionally facilitate the uptake of radionuclides by the clay colloids. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of radionuclides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative of the Negev desert, Israel. Lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute to actinides for research on radionuclide transportation due to their similar chemical behavior. In this study, the migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide). Tracer solutions containing known concentrations of Ce, bentonite colloids, humic acid and bromide were prepared in a matrix solution containing salt concentrations representative of that of the average rain water found in the Negev. These solutions were then injected into a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Samples were analyzed for Ce and Br using ICP-MS, and colloid concentrations were determined using spectrophotographic analysis. Breakthrough curves comparing the rates of transportation of each tracer were obtained, allowing for comparison of

  14. Preparation, definition and stabilisation of an inorganic sol by an organic macromolecule: case of an aluminium hydroxide colloid; Preparation, definition et stabilisation par une macromolecule organique d'un sol mineral: cas d'un colloide d'hydroxyde d'aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurbin-Faucon, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    An attempt has been made in this work to define an aluminium colloid which is resistant as a high ionic force and to analyse, in the case of this system, the possibilities. and the limits of certain techniques used in the physical chemistry of colloids. The aluminium colloid is obtained by peptization of an aluminium hydroxide precipitate. The physical characterisation of the micelle is effected using the light scattering method which makes it possible to define the colloid from the point of view of size and shape. An interesting characteristic, arising from the low refractive index of the colloid studied, has led us to use not only the general MIE methods but also the methods normally used in macro-molecular chemistry; these latter involve fewer hypotheses and thus make it possible to carry out a more complete analysis of the sol. Since the aluminium hydroxide colloid is sensitive to a high ionic force, we have begun to study the possibility of making it more stable by means of a macromolecule: gelatin. After characterizing this macromolecule by means of potentiometric and light scattering measurements, we have shown the existence of a chemical interaction which occurs when aluminium hydroxide is brought into contact with gelatin; this interaction leads to the production of an inorganic-organic entity which is stable when the ionic force increases. We have established some of the characteristics of the complex thus formed, in particular the pH range of the solution necessary for its formation, its stability. in the presence of electrolytes and some hypotheses concerning its size and shape, Finally we have tried to define the influence of. the molecular weight and the respective dimensions of each constituent on the formation of the complex and thus on the stabilization. (author) [French] Dans cette etude nous avons essaye de definir un colloide d'aluminium resistant a une force ionique elevee et tente, a propos de ce systeme, d'analyser les possibilites

  15. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with improved aqueous colloidal stability and electrophoretic mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munjal, Sandeep; Khare, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized CoFe 2 O 4 (CFO) nanoparticles of size ∼ 12.2 nm by hydrothermal synthesis method. To control the size of these CFO nanoparticles, oleic acid was used as a surfactant. The inverse spinel phase of the synthesized nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction method. As synthesized oleic acid coated CFO (OA@CFO) nanoparticles has very less electrophoretic mobility in the water and are not water dispersible. These OA@CFO nanoparticles were successfully turned into water soluble phase with a better colloidal aqueous stability, through a chemical treatment using citric acid. The modified citric acid coated CFO (CA@CFO) nanoparticles were dispersible in water and form a stable aqueous solution with high electrophoretic mobility.

  16. Formation of colloids of the tetravalent uranium under influence of silicate in neutral and low alkaline aqueous systems; Bildung von Kolloiden des tetravalenten Urans unter Einfluss von Silikat in neutralen und schwachalkalischen waessrigen Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Isabell

    2016-03-30

    This work includes the preparation and characterization of new uranium(IV) colloids which are formed and stabilized in the near neutral pH range and under environmentally relevant conditions. Conclusions on stability behavior and particle size distributions were drawn based on results obtained by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements, as well as ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation in combination with element analyzes. Spectroscopic methodes confirmed the tetravalent state of uranium in the experiments. Unlike empirical data, it is possible to generate long-term stable uranium(IV) colloids at higher concentrations. By addition of geochemical components such as carbonate and silicate, they are stable and resistant in the near neutral pH range over a long period. It was found that dissolved silica plays an essential role in the preparation of colloids. Colloid-borne uranium(IV) up to a concentration of 10{sup -3} mol/L, corresponding to 0,238 g/L, is stabilized in solutions. This concentration is about three orders of magnitude higher than so far known silicate-free aqueous uranium(IV) colloids. Through the use of different analytical methods (invasive and non-invasive) it could be shown that the resulting uranium(IV) colloids are in the nanoscalar range. A high mobility can be assumed in aquatic systems. Evidence is provided by photon correlation spectroscopy, ultrafiltration, and ultracentrifugation that uranium(IV) can form silicate-containing colloids of a size lower than 20 nm. The particles are generated in near neutral to slightly alkaline solutions containing geochemical relevant components (carbonate, silicate, sodium ions). They remain stable in aqueous suspension over years. Electrostatic repulsion due to a negative zeta potential in the near-neutral to alkaline pH range caused by the silicate stabilizes the uranium(IV) colloids. The isoelectric point of the nanoparticles is shifted towards lower pH values by the silicate. The higher the

  17. Colloid-facilitated transport of lead in natural discrete fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang-Yu; Weisbrod, Noam

    2009-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated transport of lead (Pb) was explored in a natural chalk fracture with an average equivalent hydraulic aperture of 139 microm. Tracer solution was prepared by adding montmorillonite (100 mg L(-1)) and/or humic acid (HA) (10 mg L(-1)) to modified artificial rainwater containing dissolved Pb (21.4 mg Pb L(-1)), naturally precipitated PbCO(3) particles (16.4 mg Pb L(-1)) and LiBr (39.0 mg L(-1)). We found that Pb is only mobile when associated with colloids. PbCO(3) particles were not mobile in the fracture. The addition of HA to the montmorillonite suspension increased the suspension's mobility and therefore promoted the colloid-facilitated transport of Pb. The increases in pH and sodium absorption ratio induced by the chalk-tracer solution interactions appeared to increase the dispersion and mobilization of colloids entering the fracture. The dominant colloid-facilitated transport of Pb reported in this study has significant implications for risk assessment of Pb mobility in fractured rocks.

  18. Quantitative Assessment of the Potential Significance of Colloids to the KBS-3 Disposal Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, R.A.; White, M.J.; Wickham, S.M.; Bennett, D.G.; Hicks, T.W.

    2002-06-01

    was released in colloidal form and that the rate of plutonium desorption from colloids must have been slow. For the KBS-3 situation, the Aberg fracture from the SR97 performance assessment has been used to provide the basis for a COLLAGE II representation of colloid transport. Colloid concentrations of typical Swedish ground waters have been used, together with literature information on the strength of radionuclide-colloid sorption. Modelling results indicate that colloids may play a role in contaminant transport if radionuclides sorb strongly, and irreversibly or nearly irreversibly, to colloids. Furthermore, if the rates of radionuclide sorption and desorption to colloids lie in a certain range, then there exists the possibility that colloid-facilitated transport could lead to relatively rapid (<100 year) transport of radionuclides from the bentonite-host rock interface to the accessible environment. Early release will only occur over a relatively restricted range of low sorption/desorption rates. At these low rates, even if all plutonium is initially released to far-field groundwaters in solution, following diffusion through the bentonite buffer, a small amount is able to associate with groundwater colloids. Because of the slow rate of disassociation, this plutonium is then able to be carried significant distances on colloids before being released to solution where it is rapidly sorbed onto mineral surfaces. Were the strength of sorption of plutonium to colloids, or the concentration of colloids, to be greater than current best estimates, there could be a relatively greater early release.

  19. Size and Shape Dependence of the Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    20

    In general, energy is supplied in term of heat to the solution [8, 9, 10]. However, uses of other energy sources have also been reported in citrate reaction technique. Ultrasonic power, microwave dielectric heating, X-ray, γ-ray, UV and Laser radiation have also been used in citrate reduction technique to synthesize colloidal ...

  20. Observation of the Unusual Aggregation Kinetics of Colloidal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hofmeister (Specific ion) effects have been considered as important to chemical science as Mendel's work was to genetics. In this work, the aggregation kinetics of montmorillonite colloids in H+, Ag+, NH 4 + , K+ and Na+ solutions were measured in situ, detecting the unusual kinetics and ion specificity for H+. Activation ...

  1. Synthesis of nanosized silver colloids by microwave dielectric heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Very re- cently, an alcohol reduction method has been devel- oped to prepare metal nanoparticles. In this process, solution of the metal ions is refluxed at a particular ..... The most intriguing fact is the dependence of ab- sorption spectra on the nature of the solvent. In the case of silver colloids, prepared by photochemical.

  2. Magnetically actuated and controlled colloidal sphere-pair swimmer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran, Sijie; Guez, Allon; Friedman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically actuated swimming of microscopic objects has been attracting attention partly due to its promising applications in the bio-medical field and partly due to interesting physics of swimming in general. While colloidal particles that are free to move in fluid can be an attractive swimming system due it its simplicity and ability to assemble in situ , stability of their dynamics and the possibility of stable swimming behavior in periodically varying magnetic fields has not been considered. Dynamic behavior of two magnetically interacting colloidal particles subjected to rotating magnetic field of switching frequency is analyzed here and is shown to result in stable swimming without any stabilizing feedback. A new mechanism of swimming that relies only on rotations of the particles themselves and of the particle pair axis is found to dominate the swimming dynamics of the colloidal particle pair. Simulation results and analytical arguments demonstrate that this swimming strategy compares favorably to dragging the particles with an external magnetic force when colloidal particle sizes are reduced. (paper)

  3. Colloidal nanocrystals for quality lighting and displays: milestones and recent developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Talha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in colloidal synthesis of nanocrystals have enabled high-quality high-efficiency light-emitting diodes, displays with significantly broader color gamut, and optically-pumped lasers spanning the whole visible regime. Here we review these colloidal platforms covering the milestone studies together with recent developments. In the review, we focus on the devices made of colloidal quantum dots (nanocrystals, colloidal quantum rods (nanorods, and colloidal quantum wells (nanoplatelets as well as those of solution processed perovskites and phosphor nanocrystals. The review starts with an introduction to colloidal nanocrystal photonics emphasizing the importance of colloidal materials for light-emitting devices. Subsequently,we continue with the summary of important reports on light-emitting diodes, in which colloids are used as the color converters and then as the emissive layers in electroluminescent devices. Also,we review the developments in color enrichment and electroluminescent displays. Next, we present a summary of important reports on the lasing of colloidal semiconductors. Finally, we summarize and conclude the review presenting a future outlook.

  4. Model analysis of the colloid and radionuclide retardation experiment at the Grimsel Test Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Susumu; James, Scott C; Yui, Mikazu; Ibaraki, Motomu

    2006-06-01

    The colloid and radionuclide retardation experiments performed at NAGRA's Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland are part of an international collaboration program designed to collect in situ data on the impacts of colloids on radionuclide transport. In this work, breakthrough behaviors of trivalent americium (i.e., 241Am and 243Am) both in the absence and presence of bentonite colloids are analyzed with COLFRAC--a code that models colloid-facilitated solute transport in discretely-fractured, porous media. Model fits to the experimental results indicate that Am sorbed onto mobile colloids, which enhance Am transport relative to a non-sorbing tracer, 131I. Modelling results suggest that Am is kinetically sorbed onto both naturally occurring and exogenous bentonite colloids. Results also indicate that desorption of Am from colloids is slow with respect to the duration of the experiment. In addition, early colloid breakthrough compared to a conservative tracer suggests the effects of hydrodynamic chromatography. Overall, Am breakthrough curves suggest enhanced mobility due to co-transport with both naturally occurring and bentonite colloids.

  5. Migration of radionuclides in porous rock in the presence of colloids: effects of kinetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S H; Jen, C P

    2001-01-01

    This work investigates the colloid-facilitated migration of radionuclides with radioactive decay in porous media. The sorption processes for radionuclides with both the solid matrix and colloids are treated as equilibrium or nonequilibrium. An analytical solution is obtained from a simplified linear equilibrium interaction mechanism. In addition, the adsorption processes for radionuclides with colloids and porous rock can be assumed as nonequilibrium and modeled by the linear kinetic adsorption. The numerical method is employed to solve the coupled colloid and radionuclide transport equations under nonequilibrium sorption assumption. Moreover, the reaction rates of the adsorption processes for radionuclides with the solid matrix and colloids affect the transport characteristics of radionuclides. The fast reaction rate of radionuclides with colloids causes a higher concentration of radionuclides adsorbed on colloids in a dispersed phase and enlarges acceleration caused by colloids. However, the fast reaction rate for radionuclides with solid matrix increases the retardation effect caused by the solid matrix. This work developed a predictive model for the transport of colloid-facilitated radionuclides in porous medium and to assess the importance of various phenomenological coefficients, particularly parameters for the adsorption interactions.

  6. Microrheology of colloidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puertas, A M; Voigtmann, T

    2014-01-01

    Microrheology was proposed almost twenty years ago as a technique to obtain rheological properties in soft matter from the microscopic motion of colloidal tracers used as probes, either freely diffusing in the host medium, or subjected to external forces. The former case is known as passive microrheology, and is based on generalizations of the Stokes–Einstein relation between the friction experienced by the probe and the host-fluid viscosity. The latter is termed active microrheology, and extends the measurement of the friction coefficient to the nonlinear-response regime of strongly driven probes. In this review article, we discuss theoretical models available in the literature for both passive and active microrheology, focusing on the case of single-probe motion in model colloidal host media. A brief overview of the theory of passive microrheology is given, starting from the work of Mason and Weitz. Further developments include refined models of the host suspension beyond that of a Newtonian-fluid continuum, and the investigation of probe-size effects. Active microrheology is described starting from microscopic equations of motion for the whole system including both the host-fluid particles and the tracer; the many-body Smoluchowski equation for the case of colloidal suspensions. At low fluid densities, this can be simplified to a two-particle equation that allows the calculation of the friction coefficient with the input of the density distribution around the tracer, as shown by Brady and coworkers. The results need to be upscaled to agree with simulations at moderate density, in both the case of pulling the tracer with a constant force or dragging it at a constant velocity. The full many-particle equation has been tackled by Fuchs and coworkers, using a mode-coupling approximation and the scheme of integration through transients, valid at high densities. A localization transition is predicted for a probe embedded in a glass-forming host suspension. The

  7. Iron colloids reduce the bioavailability of phosphorus to the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baken, Stijn; Nawara, Sophie; Van Moorleghem, Christoff; Smolders, Erik

    2014-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a limiting nutrient in many aquatic systems. The bioavailability of P in natural waters strongly depends on its speciation. In this study, structural properties of iron colloids were determined and related to their effect on P sorption and P bioavailability. The freshwater green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata was exposed to media spiked with radiolabelled (33)PO4, and the uptake of (33)P was monitored for 1 h. The media contained various concentrations of synthetic iron colloids with a size between 10 kDa and 0.45 μm. The iron colloids were stabilised by natural organic matter. EXAFS spectroscopy showed that these colloids predominantly consisted of ferrihydrite with small amounts of organically complexed Fe. In colloid-free treatments, the P uptake flux by the algae obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the presence of iron colloids at 9 or 90 μM Fe, corresponding to molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 0.17, the truly dissolved P (<10 kDa) was between 4 and 60% of the total dissolved P (<0.45 μm). These colloids reduced the P uptake flux by R. subcapitata compared to colloid-free treatments at the same total dissolved P concentration. However, the P uptake flux from colloid containing solutions equalled that from colloid-free ones when expressed as truly dissolved P. This demonstrates that colloidal P did not contribute to the P uptake flux. It is concluded that, on the short term, phosphate adsorbed to ferrihydrite colloids is not available to the green alga R. subcapitata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pore-Scale Mechanisms of Colloid Interfacial Retention as Studied With Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazouskaya, V.; Jin, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Due to environmental concerns related to migration of colloids and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants, interfacial retention of colloids has drawn significant scientific attention in past years. Nevertheless, there are still questions that remain debatable or unanswered concerning the mechanisms of interfacial retention of colloids. The experimental tools traditionally include column experiments, which provide macroscopic experimental data, but not always ensure their non-ambiguous explanation. Pore-scale visualization techniques provide additional information on the occurring processes and serve the purpose of explaining the phenomena observed at larger scales. The progress in the field of microscopy provides state-of-the-art techniques for visualization experiments where behavior of single colloids can be observed and therefore analysis of the particular retention mechanism can be performed. We applied confocal microscopy to investigate the two most arguable sites of colloidal retention: AWI (air-water interface) and contact line, which proved itself as a promising technique. The benefits of confocal microscopy include visualization of single colloids, flexible positioning of the sample and therefore direct observation of the point of interest. In addition, fast image acquisition allows imaging experiments to be conducted under dynamic conditions. The combination of confocal imaging with the specialized imaging software provides the added advantage of quantitative evaluations of the acquired images. In our experiments, confocal microscopy was applied to investigate the retention of colloids on AWI and contact line as affected by colloid and solution properties (e.g., surface tension and ionic strength). Particular attention was given to the behavior of colloids on the contact line both in static and dynamic regimes including the investigation of moving evaporative fronts. Additionally, the importance of hydrodynamic effect on the colloidal retention at

  9. Stability and aggregation of nanoscale titanium dioxide particle (nTiO2): Effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhong; Cheng, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Fate and transport of engineered nanoscale titanium dioxide (nTiO 2 ) have received much attention during the past decade. The aggregation and stability of nTiO 2 in water with complicated components, however, have not been fully examined. The objective of this paper is to determine the individual and synergistic effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids on nTiO 2 stability and aggregation, and elucidate the related mechanisms. We conducted systematic laboratory experiments to determine nTiO 2 stability and aggregation in NaCl and MgCl 2 solutions, both in the absence and presence of humic acid and illite colloids. Results showed that Mg 2+ , in comparison to Na + , could make the zeta potential of nTiO 2 more positive, and shift the point of zero charge of nTiO 2 (pH pzc,TiO2 ) towards higher pH. We also found that nTiO 2 are destabilized by illite colloids at pH < pH pzc,TiO2 through formation of illite-nTiO 2 hetero-aggregates, but are not interfered by illite colloids at higher pH. HA was found to make nTiO 2 stable via electrostatic and steric effects, both in the absence and presence of illite colloids. Calculated interaction energy based on DLVO theory revealed that instability of the nTiO 2 suspensions is mainly caused by primary minima, and that secondary minima normally do not destabilize the suspension, even though they are found to promote aggregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Humic Acid on the Transport and Deposition of Colloidal Silica under Different Hydrogeochemical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport and deposition of colloids in aquifers plays an important role in managed aquifer recharge (MAR schemes. Here, the processes of colloidal silica transport and deposition were studied by displacing groundwater with recharge water. The results showed that significant amounts of colloidal silica transport occurred when native groundwater was displaced by HA solution. Solution contains varying conditions of ionic strength and ion valence. The presence of humic acid could affect the zeta potential and size of the colloidal silica, which led to obvious colloidal silica aggregation in the divalent ion solution. Humic acid increased colloidal silica transport by formation of non-adsorbing aqueous phase silica–HA complexes. The experimental and modeling results showed good agreement, indicating that the essential physics were accurately captured by the model. The deposition rates were less than 10−8 s−1 in deionized water and monovalent ion solution. Moreover, the addition of Ca2+ and increase of IS resulted in the deposition rates increasing by five orders of magnitude to 10−4 s−1. In all experiments, the deposition rates decreased in the presence of humic acid. Overall, the promotion of humic acid in colloidal silica was strongly associated with changes in water quality, indicating that they should receive greater attention during MAR.

  11. Noninvasive quantitative measurement of colloid transport in mesoscale porous media using time lapse fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Jonathan W; Banwart, Steven A; Heathwaite, A Louise

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate noninvasive quantitative imaging of colloid and solute transport at millimeter to decimeter (meso-) scale. Ultraviolet (UV) excited fluorescent solute and colloid tracers were independently measured simultaneously during co-advection through saturated quartz sand. Pulse-input experiments were conducted at constant flow rates and ionic strengths 10(-3), 10(-2) and 10(-1) M NaCl. Tracers were 1.9 microm carboxylate latex microspheres and disodium fluorescein. Spatial moments analysis was used to quantify relative changes in mass distribution of the colloid and solute tracers over time. The solute advected through the sand at a constant velocity proportional to flow rate and was described well by a conservative transport model (CXTFIT). In unfavorable deposition conditions increasing ionic strength produced significant reduction in colloid center of mass transport velocity over time. Velocity trends correlated with the increasing fraction of colloid mass retained along the flowpath. Attachment efficiencies (defined by colloid filtration theory) calculated from nondestructive retained mass data were 0.013 +/- 0.03, 0.09 +/- 0.02, and 0.22 +/- 0.05 at 10(-3), 10(-2), and 10(-1) M ionic strength, respectively, which compared well with previously published data from breakthrough curves and destructive sampling. Mesoscale imaging of colloid mass dynamics can quantify key deposition and transport parameters based on noninvasive, nondestructive, spatially high-resolution data.

  12. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS BY A COLLOID REMOVAL PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, J.

    1960-05-24

    A method is given for separating plutonium from uranium fission products. An acidic aqueous solution containing plutonium and uranium fission products is subjected to a process for separating ionic values from colloidal matter suspended therein while the pH of the solution is maintained between 0 and 4. Certain of the fission products, and in particular, zirconium, niobium, lanthanum, and barium are in a colloidal state within this pH range, while plutonium remains in an ionic form, Dialysis, ultracontrifugation, and ultrafiltration are suitable methods of separating plutonium ions from the colloids.

  13. [Antimicrobial activity of stable silver nanoparticles of a certain size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukha, Iu P; Eremenko, A M; Smirnova, N P; Mikhienkova, A I; Korchak, G I; Gorchev, V F; Chunikhin, A Iu

    2013-01-01

    Conditions for obtaining stable silver nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm were developed using a binary stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone/sodium dodecylsulphate in optimal ratio. Optical spectra, morphology and dependence of size of the nanoparticles on the amount of reducing agent were studied. Colloidal solutions of nanosilver showed a high bactericidal activity against strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and fungicidal activity against Candida albicans. The mechanism of action of nanosized silver on microbial cell was examined by laser scanning confocal microscope using fluorescent label. First step of antimicrobial effect on microorganisms was membrane damage and penetration of silver nanoparticles into the cell. Prolonged stability of nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activity over the past two years were showed.

  14. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  15. Effect of three-body forces on the phase behavior of charged colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J. Z.; Bratko, D.; Blanch, H. W.; Prausnitz, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Statistical-thermodynamic theory for predicting the phase behavior of a colloidal solution requires the pair interaction potential between colloidal particles in solution. In practice, it is necessary to assume pairwise additivity for the potential of mean force between colloidal particles, but little is known concerning the validity of this assumption. This paper concerns interaction between small charged colloids, such as surfactant micelles or globular proteins, in electrolyte solutions and the multibody effect on phase behavior. Monte Carlo simulations for isolated colloidal triplets in equilateral configurations show that, while the three-body force is repulsive when the three particles are near contact, it becomes short-ranged attractive at further separations, contrary to a previous study where the triplet force is attractive at all separations. The three-body force arises mainly from hard-sphere collisions between colloids and small ions; it is most significant in solutions of monovalent salt at low concentration where charged colloids experience strong electrostatic interactions. To illustrate the effect of three-body forces on the phase behavior of charged colloids, we calculated the densities of coexisting phases using van der Waals-type theories for colloidal solutions and for crystals. For the conditions investigated in this work, even though the magnitude of the three-body force may be as large as 10% of the total force at small separations, three-body forces do not have a major effect on the densities of binary coexisting phases. However, coexisting densities calculated using Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory are much different from those calculated using our simulated potential of mean force. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  16. On a second order of accuracy stable difference scheme for the solution of a source identification problem for hyperbolic-parabolic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashyralyyeva, Maral; Ashyraliyev, Maksat

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, a second order of accuracy difference scheme for the approximate solution of a source identification problem for hyperbolic-parabolic equations is constructed. Theorem on stability estimates for the solution of this difference scheme and their first and second order difference derivatives is presented. In applications, this abstract result permits us to obtain the stability estimates for the solutions of difference schemes for approximate solutions of two source identification problems for hyperbolic-parabolic equations.

  17. Synthesis of zirconia colloidal dispersions by forced hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA P. MARKOVIC

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Different zirconia colloidal dispersions (sols were prepared from zirconyl oxynitrate and zirconyl oxychloride solutions by forced hydrolysis. Vigorously stirred acidic solutions of these salts were refluxed at 102 oC for 24 h. Characterization of the obtained sols (pH, solid phase content, crystal structure was performed by potentiometric, XRD, TGA/DTA and SEM measurements. The prepared sols contained almost spherical monoclinic hydrated zirconia particles 7–10 nm in diameter.

  18. The sonochemical dissolution of colloidal CdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sostaric, J.; Mulvaney, P.; Grieser, F.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The passage of ultrasonic radiation through water leads to the formation and subsequent violent collapse of gas/vapour filled microbubbles in solution. The collapse of these microbubbles is extremely rapid, resulting in a virtually adiabatic process in which high temperatures and pressures are produced. In fact, the conditions are vigorous enough to lead to the thermal homolysis of water molecules within the microbubble, resulting in the formation of the highly reactive hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals. These radicals can recombine or, in the presence of air, react with oxygen to produce a number of chemically active species which can readily diffuse into the bulk solution. The dissolution of colloidal CdS at pH=10.5 appears to be due to the reaction of H 2 O 2 and O 2 - with the colloid. It was found that the reaction could be inhibited by the addition of Na 2 S to the colloidal solution. Results also show that the reactions involved in the presence of Na 2 S are complex and that sulfur oxyanions most likely partake in the overall scheme once they are formed. The Cd 2+ concentration was measured directly using an ion selective electrode and compared well with an indirect measurement of the concentration obtained from the absorbance of the colloid at 300 nm

  19. Colloid facilitated transport of strongly sorbing contaminants in natural porous media: mathematical modeling and laboratory column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolimund, Daniel; Borkovec, Michal

    2005-09-01

    Mobile colloidal particles may act as carriers of strongly sorbing contaminants in subsurface materials. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in salinity, similar to freshwater intrusion to a contaminated aquifer saturated with saltwater, or groundwater penetration into a contaminated site saturated with a dumpsite leachate. This process is studied for noncalcareous soil material with laboratory column experiments with sodium and calcium as major cations and with lead as a strongly sorbing model contaminant. The measured breakthrough curves of these elements were described with a mathematical transport model, which invokes release and deposition kinetics of the colloids, together with adsorption and desorption of the relevant ions to the solid matrix as well as to the suspended colloids. In particular, the specific coupling between colloid and solute transport is considered. The crux of a successful description of such colloidal transport processes is to capture the inhibition of the particle release by adsorbed divalent ions properly and explicitly to considerthe dependence of colloid release on the solution chemistry and the chemical conditions at the solid-liquid interface. Experiments and modeling address colloid-facilitated transport of lead out of a contaminated zone and through a noncontaminated zone, including effects of flow velocity and length of the noncontaminated zone. We finally show that colloid-facilitated transport can be suppressed by the injection of a suitably chosen solution of a calcium salt.

  20. Preparation of colloidal graphene in quantity by electrochemical exfoliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-12-15

    We reported the preparation of colloidal graphene in quantity via the anodic exfoliation of graphite in (NH4)2SO4 aqueous solution. In the currently designed electrochemical exfoliation route, mass high-quality graphene was produced within short reaction time, around 1h. The proposed electrochemical exfoliation mechanism showed that SO4(2-) and H2O can be intercalated into those graphite sheets, monolayer and few-layer graphene were obtained by the formation of gaseous SO2 and O2 within graphite sheets. Stability evaluation showed that our exfoliated colloidal graphene can be perfectly stabilized in DMF solvent more than 1 week. The colloidal graphene can be used to construct various simple and complex patterns by writing it on A4 paper, which can be applied to flexible printed electronic devices. Furthermore, colloidal graphene can show promising applications in the fabrication of binder- and additive-free electrodes for supercapacitors and lithium-ion batteries. Our present method shows huge potential for industrial-scale synthesis of high-quality graphene and further commercialization of graphene colloid for numerous advanced applications in flexible printed electronics and energy storage devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  2. STAR-POLYMER -- COLLOID MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Dzubiella

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results in theory and simulation of star-polymer--colloid mixtures are reviewed. We present the effective interaction between hard, colloidal particles and star polymers in a good solvent derived by monomer-resolved Molecular Dynamics simulations and theoretical arguments. The relevant parameters are the size ratio q between the stars and the colloids, as well as the number of polymeric arms f (functionality attached to the common center of the star. By covering a wide range of q's ranging from zero (star against a flat wall up to about 0.5, we establish analytical forms for the star-colloid interaction which are in excellent agreement with simulation results. By employing this cross interaction and the effective interactions between stars and colloids themselves, a demixing transition in the fluid phase is observed and systematically investigated for different arm numbers and size ratios. The demixing binodals are compared with experimental observations and found to be consistent. Furthermore, we map the full two-component system on an effective one-component description for the colloids, by inverting the two-component Ornstein-Zernike equations. Some recent results for the depletion interaction and freezing transitions are shown.

  3. Hybrid organic–inorganic inks flatten the energy landscape in colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Mengxia

    2016-11-14

    Bandtail states in disordered semiconductor materials result in losses in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and inhibit carrier transport in photovoltaics. For colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films that promise low-cost, large-area, air-stable photovoltaics, bandtails are determined by CQD synthetic polydispersity and inhomogeneous aggregation during the ligand-exchange process. Here we introduce a new method for the synthesis of solution-phase ligand-exchanged CQD inks that enable a flat energy landscape and an advantageously high packing density. In the solid state, these materials exhibit a sharper bandtail and reduced energy funnelling compared with the previous best CQD thin films for photovoltaics. Consequently, we demonstrate solar cells with higher Voc and more efficient charge injection into the electron acceptor, allowing the use of a closer-to-optimum bandgap to absorb more light. These enable the fabrication of CQD solar cells made via a solution-phase ligand exchange, with a certified power conversion efficiency of 11.28%. The devices are stable when stored in air, unencapsulated, for over 1,000 h.

  4. Hybrid organic-inorganic inks flatten the energy landscape in colloidal quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxia; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sabatini, Randy; García de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Munir, Rahim; Balawi, Ahmed Hesham; Lan, Xinzheng; Fan, Fengjia; Walters, Grant; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Laquai, Frédéric; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-02-01

    Bandtail states in disordered semiconductor materials result in losses in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and inhibit carrier transport in photovoltaics. For colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films that promise low-cost, large-area, air-stable photovoltaics, bandtails are determined by CQD synthetic polydispersity and inhomogeneous aggregation during the ligand-exchange process. Here we introduce a new method for the synthesis of solution-phase ligand-exchanged CQD inks that enable a flat energy landscape and an advantageously high packing density. In the solid state, these materials exhibit a sharper bandtail and reduced energy funnelling compared with the previous best CQD thin films for photovoltaics. Consequently, we demonstrate solar cells with higher Voc and more efficient charge injection into the electron acceptor, allowing the use of a closer-to-optimum bandgap to absorb more light. These enable the fabrication of CQD solar cells made via a solution-phase ligand exchange, with a certified power conversion efficiency of 11.28%. The devices are stable when stored in air, unencapsulated, for over 1,000 h.

  5. Colloid remediation in groundwater by polyelectrolyte capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.; Rao, S.; Jain, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing study to characterize groundwater colloids, to understand the geochemical factors affecting colloid transport in groundwater, and to develop an in-situ colloid remediation process. The colloids and suspended particulate matter used in this study were collected from a perched aquifer site that has radiation levels several hundred times the natural background and where previous researchers have measured and reported the presence of radiocolloids containing plutonium and americium. At this site, radionuclides have spread over several kilometers. Inorganic colloids collected from water samples are characterized with respect to concentration, mineralogy, size distribution, electrophoretic mobility (zeta potential), and radioactivity levels. Presented are the methods used to investigate the physiochemical factors affecting colloid transport and the preliminary analytical results. Included below are a description of a colloid transport model and the corresponding computational code, water analyses, characterization of the inorganic colloids, and a conceptual description of a process for in-situ colloid remediation using the phenomenon of polyelectrolyte capture

  6. Accelerated lattice Boltzmann model for colloidal suspensions rheology and interface morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Hassan; Kondaraju, Sasidhar

    2014-01-01

    Colloids are ubiquitous in the food, medical, cosmetics, polymers, water purification, and pharmaceutical industries. The thermal, mechanical, and storage properties of colloids are highly dependent on their interface morphology and their rheological behavior. Numerical methods provide a convenient and reliable tool for the study of colloids. Accelerated Lattice Boltzmann Model for Colloidal Suspensions introduce the main building-blocks for an improved lattice Boltzmann–based numerical tool designed for the study of colloidal rheology and interface morphology. This book also covers the migrating multi-block used to simulate single component, multi-component, multiphase, and single component multiphase flows and their validation by experimental, numerical, and analytical solutions.   Among other topics discussed are the hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for surfactant-covered droplets; biological suspensions such as blood; used in conjunction with the suppression of coalescence for investigating the...

  7. Phospholipid stabilized gold nanorods: towards improved colloidal stability and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Thomas, Neethu; Sudhakar, Swathi; Chadha, Anju; Mani, Ethayaraja

    2017-07-19

    Biocompatible and colloidally stable gold nanorods (GNRs) with well-defined plasmonic properties are essential for biomedical and theranostic applications. The as-synthesized GNRs using the seed-mediated method are stabilized by the surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which is known for its cytotoxicity in many cell lines. Biocompatible GNRs synthesized using known protocols exhibit some extent of cytotoxicity and colloidal instability because of the incomplete removal of CTAB. We report a facile method for the efficient removal of CTAB molecules with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid molecules, which are naturally present in cell membranes. The kinetics of the ligand exchange process is studied using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and corroborated with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. From colloidal stability studies using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy, the optimal lipid concentration and duration required for the successful ligand exchange of CTAB by DMPC are reported. Using thermogravimetric analysis, the surface concentration of DMPC on colloidally stable GNRs is found to be approximately 9 molecules per nm 2 . The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays show that the surface-modified DMPC-GNRs have significantly better biocompatibility than those of CTAB-GNRs. Studies on the ligand exchange, colloidal stability and biocompatibility of DMPC-GNRs with aspect ratios ranging from 2.2 to 4.2 demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method. The results provide insights into the important factors to be considered while designing biocompatible GNRs suitable for applications in nanomedicine.

  8. Colloids and composite materials Au/Pvp and Ag/Pvp generated by laser ablation in polymeric liquid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larez, J.; Rojas, C. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Faculty of Science, Center of Experimental Solid State Physics, Paseo Los Ilustres, Los Chaguaramos, Apdo. Postal 20513, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Castell, R., E-mail: jlarez@fisica.ciens.ucv.ve [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Department of Physics, Plasma and Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, Valle de Sartenejas, Baruta, Apdo. Postal 89000, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of silver and gold targets, immersed in a polymeric solution of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (Pvp), is used to generate colloids and composite metal-polymer. Solutions of Pvp in deionized water at different concentrations are employed. Two Pvp number average molecular weights were considered, 10000 g/mol and 55000 g/mol. The high purity targets are irradiated between 20 min and 40 min with the third harmonic (Thg) (λ = 335 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser operating at a rate of 10 Hz with pulses of 8 ns. Optical spectroscopy in UV and vis regions, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy and X-ray are used to identify and determine the shape and size of the produced particles. Very stable sub-micrometric spherical particles for Au/Pvp and Ag/Pvp samples are obtained with diameters of 0.72 μm and 0.40 μm, respectively. The preparation of colloids is performed in one step and no surfactant or dispersing agent is used in this process. (Author)

  9. A binomial modeling approach for upscaling colloid transport under unfavorable conditions: Emergent prediction of extended tailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus; Rasmuson, Anna; Johnson, William P.

    2017-07-01

    Colloid transport in saturated porous media is significantly influenced by colloidal interactions with grain surfaces. Near-surface fluid domain colloids experience relatively low fluid drag and relatively strong colloidal forces that slow their downgradient translation relative to colloids in bulk fluid. Near-surface fluid domain colloids may reenter into the bulk fluid via diffusion (nanoparticles) or expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones, they may immobilize (attach) via primary minimum interactions, or they may move along a grain-to-grain contact to the near-surface fluid domain of an adjacent grain. We introduce a simple model that accounts for all possible permutations of mass transfer within a dual pore and grain network. The primary phenomena thereby represented in the model are mass transfer of colloids between the bulk and near-surface fluid domains and immobilization. Colloid movement is described by a Markov chain, i.e., a sequence of trials in a 1-D network of unit cells, which contain a pore and a grain. Using combinatorial analysis, which utilizes the binomial coefficient, we derive the residence time distribution, i.e., an inventory of the discrete colloid travel times through the network and of their probabilities to occur. To parameterize the network model, we performed mechanistic pore-scale simulations in a single unit cell that determined the likelihoods and timescales associated with the above colloid mass transfer processes. We found that intergrain transport of colloids in the near-surface fluid domain can cause extended tailing, which has traditionally been attributed to hydrodynamic dispersion emanating from flow tortuosity of solute trajectories.

  10. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šimůnek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šimůnek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary

  11. Microgels: Novel Colloidal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Nieves, A.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Microgels are novel colloidal gels widely used because of the swelling or de-swelling exhibited under specific external conditions. In this work, the swelling and de-swelling of microgel particles is experimentally described. The medium pH, salt concentration and osmotic stress, are the three variables with which the change of phase has been realised. All transitions are found to occur well above the critical point of the system. Additionally, the basic applications in which the given transition is employed are described.

    Los microgeles son geles coloidales que se emplean por el inflado y/o desinflado que manifiestan ante ciertas condiciones externas. En este trabajo, se describe experimentalmente el inflado y el desinflado de partículas de gel. El pH del medio, su concentración iónica y el esfuerzo osmótico externo son las variables externas que se emplean para provocar el cambio de fase en las partículas. Todas las transiciones ocurren por encima del punto crítico del sistema. Adicionalmente, se presentan algunas de las aplicaciones en donde se emplea la transición provocada por la variable externa concreta.

  12. Interactions and Assemblies of Polymeric Materials and Colloidal Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Teresa Elaine

    Our need to reduce global energy use is well known and without question, not just from an economic standpoint but also to decrease human impact on climate change. Emerging advances in this area result from the ability to tailor-make materials and energy-saving devices using solution-phase chemistry and deposition techniques. Colloidally synthesized nanocrystals, with their tunable size, shape, and composition, and unusual optical and electronic properties, are leading candidates in these efforts. Because of recent advances in colloidal chemistries, the inventory of monodisperse nanocrystals has expanded to now include metals, semiconductors, magnetic materials, and dielectric materials. For a variety of applications, an active layer composed of a thin film of randomly close-packed nanocrystals is not ideal for optimized device performance; here, the ability to arrange these nano building units into mesoporous (2 nm design rules that govern the interactions between ligand-stripped nanocrystals and polymeric materials, leading to their hierarchical assembly into colloidal nanocrystal frameworks. I also include the development of quantitative, and novel, characterization techniques, and the application of such frameworks in energy efficiency devices such as electrochromic windows. Understanding the local environment of nanocrystal surfaces and their interaction with surrounding media is vital to their controlled assembly into higher-order structures. Though work has continued in this field for over a decade, researchers have yet to provide a simple and straightforward procedure to scale across nanoscale material systems and applications allowing for synthetic and structural tunability and quantitative characterization. In this dissertation, I have synthesized a new class of amphiphilic block copolymer architecture-directing agents based upon poly(dimethylacrylamide)-b-poly( styrene) (PDMA-b-PS), which are strategically designed to enhance the interaction between the

  13. Study on Colloidal Model of Petroleum Residues through the Attraction Potential between Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-li Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The samples of DaGang atmospheric residue (DG-AR, Middle East atmospheric residue (ME-AR, TaHe atmospheric residue (TH-AR, and their thermal reaction samples were chosen for study. All the samples were fractioned into six components separately, including saturates plus light aromatics, heavy aromatics, light resins, middle resins, heavy resins, and asphaltenes. The dielectric permittivity of the solutions of these components was measured, and the dielectric permittivity values of the components can be determined by extrapolation, which increased steadily from saturates plus light aromatics to asphaltenes. Moreover, the Hamaker constants of the components were calculated from their dielectric permittivity values. The Van der Waals attractive potential energy between colloids corresponding to various models could be calculated from the fractional composition and the Hamaker constants of every component. It was assumed that the cores of colloidal particles were formed by asphaltenes and heavy resins mainly; the other fractions acted as dispersion medium. For the three serials of thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy between colloids for this kind of model was calculated. For TH-AR thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy presented the maximum as thermal reaction is going on, which was near to the end of coke induction period.

  14. Application des techniques de diffusion de la lumière des rayons x et des neutrons à l'étude des systèmes colloïdaux. Deuxième partie : étude des différents systèmes : polymères en solution à l'état solide, solutions micellaires, systèmes fractals Application of Light, X-Ray and Neutron Diffusion Techniques to the Study of Colloidal Systems. Part Two: Research on Different Systems: Polymers in Solution in the Solid State, Micellar Solutions, Fractals Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinat D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article fait suite à la première partie (Revue Inst. Franç. du Pétrole, vol. 45, n°6, novembre-décembre 1990 concernant l'application des techniques de diffusion de la lumière, des rayons X et des neutrons à l'étude des systèmes colloïdaux et plus précisément à la présentation théorique des trois méthodes. L'objet de cette deuxième partie est la présentation non exhaustive de quelques domaines d'applications. Nous nous attacherons tout particulièrement à présenter les potentialités des méthodes pour la caractérisation de systèmes colloïdaux ou divisés rencontrés dans de nombreuses branches d'activité de l'industrie pétrolière. Nous aborderons dans une première partie les solutions polymériques et colloïdales. En particulier nous nous attarderons sur l'importance des techniques de diffusion pour la caractérisation des polymères en solution et des solutions micellaires. Nous verrons également quelles informations la diffusion centrale peut apporter sur la macrostructure des polymères cristallisés ou amorphes à l'état solide. De nombreux systèmes présentent une structure de type fractal ; après présentation de quelques exemples, nous montrerons que les méthodes de diffusion peuvent apporter certaines informations sur ces matériaux, notamment la dimension fractale. This article is the second one (the first one was published in Revue de l'Institut Français du Pétrole No. 6, NovemberDecember 1990 concerning the application of techniques of light scattering, X rays and neutrons to the analysis of colloidal systems and more specifically to the theoretical description of the three methods. The aim of this second part is to make a nonexhaustive description of several fields of applications. A special effort is made to describe the potential of these methods for characterizing colloidal or divided systems encountered in a great many activities involving the petroleum industry. The first part of this

  15. Colloid-electrospinning: fabrication of multicompartment nanofibers by the electrospinning of organic or/and inorganic dispersions and emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespy, Daniel; Friedemann, Kathrin; Popa, Ana-Maria

    2012-12-13

    Solution-, melt-, and co-axial electrospinning are well-known methods for producing nano- and microfibers. The electrospinning of colloids (or colloid-electrospinning) is a new field that offers the possibility to elaborate multicompartment nanomaterials. However, the presence of colloids in the electrospinning feed further complicates theoretical predictions in a system that is dependent on chemical, physical, and process parameters. Herein, we give a summary of recent important results and discuss the perspectives of electrospinning of colloids for the synthesis and characterization of multicompartment fibers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Quantum-Confined and Enhanced Optical Absorption of Colloidal PbS Quantum Dots at Wavelengths with Expected Bulk Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debellis, Doriana; Gigli, Giuseppe; Ten Brinck, Stephanie; Infante, Ivan; Giansante, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays it is well-accepted to attribute bulk-like optical absorption properties to colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) at wavelengths above 400 nm. This assumption permits to describe PbS QD light absorption by using bulk optical constants and to determine QD concentration in colloidal solutions from

  17. pH Reversible Encapsulation of Oppositely Charged Colloids Mediated by Polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Evers, Chris H J; Kegel, Willem K

    2017-05-09

    We report the first example of reversible encapsulation of micron-sized particles by oppositely charged submicron smaller colloids. The reversibility of this encapsulation process is regulated by pH-responsive poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) present in solution. The competitive adsorption between the small colloids and the poly(acrylic acid) on the surface of the large colloids plays a key role in the encapsulation behavior of the system. pH offers an experimental knob to tune the electrostatic interactions between the two oppositely charged particle species via regulation of the charge density of the poly(acrylic acid). This results in an increased surface coverage of the large colloids by the smaller colloids when decreasing pH. Furthermore, the poly(acrylic acid) also acts as a steric barrier limiting the strength of the attractive forces between the oppositely charged particle species, thereby enabling detachment of the smaller colloids. Finally, based on the pH tunability of the encapsulation behavior and the ability of the small colloids to detach, reversible encapsulation is achieved by cycling pH in the presence of the PAA polyelectrolytes. The role of polyelectrolytes revealed in this work provides a new and facile strategy to control heteroaggregation behavior between oppositely charged colloids, paving the way to prepare sophisticated hierarchical assemblies.

  18. The colloid hematite particle migration through the unsaturated porous bed at the presence of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowska, Agnieszka; Sznajder, Izabela; Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2017-07-01

    Colloidal particles have an ability to sorb heavy metals, metalloids, and organic compounds (e.g. biosurfactants) present in soil and groundwater. The pH and ionic strength changes may promote release of such particles causing potential contaminant transport. Therefore, it is very important to know how a colloid particle-mineral particle and colloid-mineral-biosurfactant system behaves in the natural environment. They can have negative impact on the environment and human health. This study highlighted the influence of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the transport of colloidal hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) through porous bed (materials collected from the Szklary and Zloty Stok solid waste heaps from Lower Silesia, Poland). Experiments were conducted using column set in two variants: colloid solution with porous bed and porous bed with adsorbed biosurfactants, in the ionic strengths of 5 × 10 -4 and 5 × 10 -3  M KCl. The zeta potential of mineral materials and colloidal hematite, before and after adsorption of biosurfactant, was determined. Obtained results showed that reduction in ionic strength facilitates colloidal hematite transport through the porous bed. The mobility of colloidal hematite was higher when the rhamnolipid adsorbed on the surface of mineral grain.

  19. Colloid filtration in surface dense vegetation: experimental results and theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Gao, Bin; Yang, Wen; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2014-04-01

    Understanding colloid and colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in overland flow through dense vegetation is important to protect water quality in the environment, especially for water bodies receiving agricultural and urban runoff. In previous studies, a single-stem efficiency theory for rigid and clean stem systems was developed to predict colloid filtration by plant stems of vegetation in laminar overland flow. Hence, in order to improve the accuracy of the single-stem efficiency theory to real dense vegetation system, we incorporated the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the filtration of colloids by stems. Laboratory dense vegetation flow chamber experiments and model simulations were used to determine the kinetic deposition (filtration) rate of colloids under various conditions. The results show that, in addition to flow hydrodynamics and solution chemistry, steric repulsion afforded by NOM layer on the plants stem surface also plays a significant role in controlling colloid deposition on vegetation in overland flow. For the first time, a refined single-stem efficiency theory with considerations of the NOM effect is developed that describes the experimental data with good accuracy. This theory can be used to not only help construct and refine mathematical models of colloid transport in real vegetation systems in overland flow, but also inform the development of theories of colloid deposition on NOM-coated surfaces in natural, engineered, and biomedical systems.

  20. Nanoscale size dependence in the conjugation of amyloid beta and ovalbumin proteins on the surface of gold colloidal particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K; Briglio, N M; Hartati, D Sri; Tsang, S M W; MacCormac, J E; Welchons, D R [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York College at Geneseo, One College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454 (United States)], E-mail: yokoyama@geneseo.edu

    2008-09-17

    Absorption spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the conjugation of amyloid {beta} protein solution (A{beta}{sub 1-40}) and chicken egg albumin (ovalbumin) with various sizes of gold colloidal nanoparticles for various pHs, ranging from pH 2 to pH 10. The pH value that indicates the colour change, pH{sub o}, exhibited colloidal size dependence for both A{beta}{sub 1-40} and ovalbumin coated particles. In particular, A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated gold colloidal particles exhibited non-continuous size dependence peaking at 40 and 80 nm, implying that their corresponding cage-like structures provide efficient net charge cancellation at these core sizes. Remarkably, only the pH{sub o} value for ovalbumin coated 80 nm gold colloid was pH>7, and a specific cage-like structure is speculated to have a positive net charge facing outward when ovalbumin self-assembles over this particular gold colloid. The previously reported reversible colour change between pH 4 and 10 took place only with A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated 20 nm gold colloids; this was also explored with ovalbumin coated gold colloids. Interestingly, gold colloidal nanoparticles showed a quasi-reversible colour change when they were coated with ovalbumin for all test sizes. The ovalbumin coated gold colloid was found to maintain reversible properties longer than A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated gold colloid.

  1. Colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles in biologically relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCuspie, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the colloidal stability of nanoparticles (NPs) plays a key role in phenomenological interpretation of toxicological experiments, particularly if single NPs or their aggregates or agglomerates determine the dominant experimental result. This report examines a variety of instrumental techniques for surveying the colloidal stability of aqueous suspensions of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), including atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and colorimetry. It was found that colorimetry can adequately determine the concentration of single AgNPs that remained in solution if morphological information about agglomerates is not required. The colloidal stability of AgNPs with various surface capping agents and in various solvents ranging from cell culture media to different electrolytes of several concentrations, and in different pH conditions was determined. It was found that biocompatible bulky capping agents, such as bovine serum albumin or starch, that provided steric colloidal stabilization, as opposed to purely electrostatic stabilization such as with citrate AgNPs, provided better retention of single AgNPs in solution over a variety of conditions for up to 64 h of observation.

  2. Entropy Stabilizes Floppy Crystals of Mobile DNA-Coated Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Ruiz, Pablo Sampedro; Ni, Ran

    2018-01-01

    Grafting linkers with open ends of complementary single-stranded DNA makes a flexible tool to tune interactions between colloids, which facilitates the design of complex self-assembly structures. Recently, it has been proposed to coat colloids with mobile DNA linkers, which alleviates kinetic barriers without high-density grafting, and also allows the design of valency without patches. However, the self-assembly mechanism of this novel system is poorly understood. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we obtain phase diagrams for the system in both two and three dimensional spaces, and find stable floppy square and CsCl crystals when the binding strength is strong, even in the infinite binding strength limit. We demonstrate that these floppy phases are stabilized by vibrational entropy, and "floppy" modes play an important role in stabilizing the floppy phases for the infinite binding strength limit. This special entropic effect in the self-assembly of mobile DNA-coated colloids is very different from conventional molecular self-assembly, and it offers a new axis to help design novel functional materials using mobile DNA-coated colloids.

  3. Sustainable steric stabilization of colloidal titania nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbasuney, Sherif, E-mail: sherif_basuney2000@yahoo.com

    2017-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Controlled surface properties of titania nanoparticles via surface modification, flocculation from aqueous phase (a), stabilization in aqueous phase (b), extraction to organic phase (c). - Highlights: • Complete change in surface properties of titania nanoparticles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. • Harvesting the formulated nanoparticles from the aqueous phase to the organic phase. • Exclusive surface modification in the reactor during nanoparticle synthesis. • Sustainable stabilization of titania nanoparticles in aqueous media with polar polymeric dispersant. - Abstract: A route to produce a stable colloidal suspension is essential if mono-dispersed particles are to be successfully synthesized, isolated, and used in subsequent nanocomposite manufacture. Dispersing nanoparticles in fluids was found to be an important approach for avoiding poor dispersion characteristics. However, there is still a great tendency for colloidal nanoparticles to flocculate over time. Steric stabilization can prevent coagulation by introducing a thick adsorbed organic layer which constitutes a significant steric barrier that can prevent the particle surfaces from coming into direct contact. One of the main features of hydrothermal synthesis technique is that it offers novel approaches for sustainable nanoparticle surface modification. This manuscript reports on the sustainable steric stabilization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle surface modification was performed via two main approaches including post-synthesis and in situ surface modification. The tuneable hydrothermal conditions (i.e. temperature, pressure, flow rates, and surfactant addition) were optimized to enable controlled steric stabilization in a continuous fashion. Effective post synthesis surface modification with organic ligand (dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA)) was achieved; the optimum surface coating temperature was reported to be 180–240 °C to ensure DDSA ring opening

  4. Intrinsic and Carrier Colloid-facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, N.; Tran, E. L.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Teutsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. However, some radionuclides might be released from these repositories into the subsurface as a result of leakage, which ultimately make their way into groundwater. Engineered bentonite barriers around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their source to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles ("carrier" colloids) originating from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. As lanthanides are generally accepted to have the same chemical behaviors as their more toxic actinide counterparts, lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute for research on radionuclide transportation. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of lanthanides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative the Negev desert, Israel. The migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide) using a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Results suggest that mobility of Ce as a solute is negligible. In experiments conducted without bentonite colloids, the 1% of the Ce that was recovered migrated as "intrinsic" colloids in the form of carbonate precipitates. However, the total recovery of the Ce increased to 9% when it was injected into the core in the presence of bentonite colloids and 13% when both bentonite and precipitate colloids were injected. This indicates that lanthanides are essentially immobile in chalk as a solute but may be mobile as carbonate precipitates. Bentonite colloids, however, markedly increase the mobility of lanthanides through fractured chalk matrices.

  5. Nano-colloid electrophoretic transport: Fully explicit modelling via dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh Afrouzi, Hamid; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh; Moshfegh, Abouzar

    2018-02-01

    In present study, a novel fully explicit approach using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is introduced for modelling electrophoretic transport of nano-colloids in an electrolyte solution. Slater type charge smearing function included in 3D Ewald summation method is employed to treat electrostatic interaction. Moreover, capability of different thermostats are challenged to control the system temperature and study the dynamic response of colloidal electrophoretic mobility under practical ranges of external electric field in nano scale application (0.072 colloid. The effect of different colloidal repulsions are then studied on temperature, reduced mobility and zeta potential which is computed based on charge distribution within the spherical colloidal EDL. System temperature and electrophoretic mobility both show a direct and inverse relationship respectively with electric field and colloidal repulsion. Mobility declining with colloidal repulsion reaches a plateau which is a relatively constant value at each electrolyte salinity for Aii > 600 in DPD units regardless of electric field intensity. Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen and Lowe-Andersen thermostats are found to function more effectively under high electric fields (E > 0.145 [ v / nm ]) while thermal equilibrium is maintained. Reasonable agreements are achieved by benchmarking the radial distribution function with available electrolyte structure modellings, as well as comparing reduced mobility against conventional Smoluchowski and Hückel theories, and numerical solution of Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  6. Stable exponential cosmological solutions with zero variation of G and three different Hubble-like parameters in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet model with a Λ-term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernazarov, K.K. [RUDN University, Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ivashchuk, V.D. [RUDN University, Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Moscow (Russian Federation); VNIIMS, Center for Gravitation and Fundamental Metrology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    We consider a D-dimensional gravitational model with a Gauss-Bonnet term and the cosmological term Λ. We restrict the metrics to diagonal cosmological ones and find for certain Λ a class of solutions with exponential time dependence of three scale factors, governed by three non-coinciding Hubble-like parameters H > 0, h{sub 1} and h{sub 2}, corresponding to factor spaces of dimensions m > 2, k{sub 1} > 1 and k{sub 2} > 1, respectively, with k{sub 1} ≠ k{sub 2} and D = 1 + m + k{sub 1} + k{sub 2}. Any of these solutions describes an exponential expansion of 3d subspace with Hubble parameter H and zero variation of the effective gravitational constant G. We prove the stability of these solutions in a class of cosmological solutions with diagonal metrics. (orig.)

  7. Stable exponential cosmological solutions with zero variation of G in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet model with a Λ-term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernazarov, K.K. [RUDN University, Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ivashchuk, V.D. [RUDN University, Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for Gravitation and Fundamental Metrology, VNIIMS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    A D-dimensional gravitational model with a Gauss-Bonnet term and the cosmological term Λ is considered. By assuming diagonal cosmological metrics, we find, for a certain fine-tuned Λ, a class of solutions with exponential time dependence of two scale factors, governed by two Hubble-like parameters H > 0 and h < 0, corresponding to factor spaces of dimensions m > 3 and l > 1, respectively, with (m,l) ≠ (6,6), (7,4), (9,3) and D = 1+m+l. Any of these solutions describes an exponential expansion of three-dimensional subspace with Hubble parameter H and zero variation of the effective gravitational constant G. We prove the stability of these solutions in a class of cosmological solutions with diagonal metrics. (orig.)

  8. Injectable PLGA based Colloidal Gels for Zero-order Dexamethasone Release in Cranial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Wang, Jinxi; Lu, Qinghua; Detamore, Michael S.; Berkland, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Bone fillers have emerged as an alternative to the invasive surgery often required to repair skeletal defects. Achieving controlled release from these materials is desired for accelerating healing. Here, oppositely-charged Poly (d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were used to create a cohesive colloidal gel as an injectable drug-loaded filler to promote healing in bone defects. The colloid self-assembled through electrostatic forces resulting in a stable 3-D network that may be extruded or molded to the desired shape. The colloidal gel demonstrated shear-thinning behavior due to the disruption of interparticle interactions as the applied shear force was increased. Once the external force was removed, the cohesive property of the colloidal gel was recovered. Similar reversibility and shear-thinning behavior were also observed in colloidal gels loaded with dexamethasone. Near zero-order dexamethasone release was observed over two months when the drug was encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles and simply blending the drug with the colloidal gel showed similar kinetics for one month. Surgical placement was facilitated by the pseudoplastic material properties and in vivo observations demonstrated that the PLGA colloidal gels stimulated osteoconductive bone formation in rat cranial bone defects. PMID:20303585

  9. Agglomeration, colloidal stability, and magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticles: collective influences on environmental engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Swee Pin; Lim, JitKang; Ooi, Boon Seng; Ahmad, Abdul Latif

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) which exhibit magnetic and catalytic bifunctionalities have been widely accepted as one of the most promising nanoagents used in water purification processes. However, due to the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, MNPs can easily lose their colloidal stability and tend to agglomerate. Thus, it is necessary to enhance their colloidal stability in order to maintain the desired high specific surface area. Meanwhile, in order to successfully utilize MNPs for environmental engineering applications, an effective magnetic separation technology has to be developed. This step is to ensure the MNPs that have been used for pollutant removal can be fully reharvested back. Unfortunately, it was recently highlighted that there exists a conflicting role between colloidal stability and magnetic separability of the MNPs, whereby the more colloidally stable the particle is, the harder for it to be magnetically separated. In other words, attaining a win-win scenario in which the MNPs possess both good colloidal stability and fast magnetic separation rate becomes challenging. Such phenomenon has to be thoroughly understood as the colloidal stability and the magnetic separability of MNPs play a pivotal role on affecting their effective implementation in water purification processes. Accordingly, it is the aim of this paper to provide reviews on (i) the colloidal stability and (ii) the magnetic separation of MNPs, as well as to provide insights on (iii) their conflicting relationship based on recent research findings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Coupled effect of extended DLVO and capillary interactions on the retention and transport of colloids through unsaturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuang; Qi, Jun; Chen, Xijuan; Lazouskaya, Volha; Zhuang, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2016-12-15

    Colloids are potential vectors of contaminants in the subsurface environment. The knowledge of transport and retention behaviors of colloids is of primary importance for assessment and prediction of subsurface pollution risks. In this study, sand column experiments were conducted to investigate the coupled effects of various interfacial forces on the retention and transport of a hydrophilic silica colloid and a relatively hydrophobic latex colloid. Water column experiments were performed to observe the movement of colloids with air bubbles. Extended DLVO interaction energies and capillary potential energy were calculated to analyze colloid retention at air-water interface (AWI), solid-water interface (SWI), and air-water-solid interface (AWS). Results show that colloid retention decreases due to increase in electrostatic repulsion and Born repulsion as well as decrease in Lewis acid-base attraction and hydrophobic interactions. Water content effect and hydrophobic effect on colloid retention become more predominant in the solution of higher ionic strength. Colloid retention at AWI is minimal (i.e., due to nonexistence of primary and secondary minima) at the ionic strengths colloids is 4-5 orders of magnitude greater than the extended DLVO interaction energy (~10 3 K B T), suggesting that capillary retention at AWS is the primary mechanism controlling colloid retention in unsaturated porous media. Results from this study show that immobile solid phase (e.g., soil) could be much more important than air phase in determining colloid retention in unsaturated porous media under unfavorable conditions, especially in the solutions of high ionic strengths. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Colloid Thrusters, Physics, Fabrication and Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Akinwande, Akintunde I

    2005-01-01

    ... discovered pure ionic mode, the microfabrication in Silicon of two types of arrays of colloid or electrospray emitters, and the development of a quantitative theory for the colloidal regime (no ions...

  12. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  13. Colloid release from soil aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  14. Colloidal transport by active filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P B Sunil; Adhikari, R

    2017-01-14

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  15. Colloidal transport by active filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  16. Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics: A Path Forward

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-11-22

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer a path toward high-efficiency photovoltaics based on low-cost materials and processes. Spectral tunability via the quantum size effect facilitates absorption of specific wavelengths from across the sun\\'s broad spectrum. CQD materials\\' ease of processing derives from their synthesis, storage, and processing in solution. Rapid advances have brought colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic solar power conversion efficiencies of 6% in the latest reports. These achievements represent important first steps toward commercially compelling performance. Here we review advances in device architecture and materials science. We diagnose the principal phenomenon-electronic states within the CQD film band gap that limit both current and voltage in devices-that must be cured for CQD PV devices to fulfill their promise. We close with a prescription, expressed as bounds on the density and energy of electronic states within the CQD film band gap, that should allow device efficiencies to rise to those required for the future of the solar energy field. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alex

    2012-07-29

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  18. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental concerns such as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in groundwater and the subsurface soil. Clay colloid release is resulted from physical alteration of subsurface sediments. Despite the potential importance of clay colloid activiti es, the detailed mechanisms of release and transport of clay colloidal particles with in natural sediments are poorly understood. Pore medium structure, properties and flow dynamics, etc. are factors that affect clay colloid generation, mobilization, and subse quent transport. Possible mechanisms of clay colloid generation in the sediments in clude precipitation, erosion and mobilization by changes in pore water chemistry and clay colloid release depends on a balance of applied hydrodynamic and resisting adhesive torques and forces. The coupled role of pore water chemistry and fluid hydrodynamics thus play key roles in controlling clay colloid release and transport in the sediment s. This paper investigated clay colloidal particle release and transport, especially th e colloidal particle release mechanisms as well as the process modeling in the sediments. In this research, colloidal particle release from intact sediment columns with variable length was examined and colloidal particle release curves were simulated using an im plicit, finite-difference scheme. Colloidal particle release rate coefficient was found to be an exponential function of the sediment depth. The simulated results demonstrated that transport parameters were

  19. Colloidal phytosterols: synthesis, characterization and bioaccessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.; Seijen ten Hoorn, J.W.M.; Melnikov, S.M.; Velikov, K.P.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of phytosterol colloidal particles using a simple food grade method based on antisolvent precipitation in the presence of a non-ionic surfactant. The resulting colloidal particles have a rod-like shape with some degree of crystallinity. The colloidal dispersions display

  20. Self-Assembly of Faceted Colloidal Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gantapara, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion consists of insoluble microscopic particles that are suspended in a solvent. Typically, a colloid is a particle for which at least one of its dimension is within the size range of a nanometer to a micron. Due to collisions with much smaller solvent molecules, colloids perform

  1. Colloid formation during waste glass corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, C.J.; Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    The long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository may require a technical consideration of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides. The neglect of colloidal properties in assessing the near- and far-field migration behavior of actinides may lead to significant underestimates and poor predictions of biosphere exposure from high-level waste (HLW) disposal. Existing data on colloid-facilitated transport suggests that radionuclide migration may be enhanced, but the importance of colloids is not adequately assessed. Indeed, the occurrence of radionuclide transport, attributed to colloidal species, has been reported at Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos and at the Nevada Test Site; both unsaturated regions are similar to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain. Although some developments have been made on understanding the transport characteristics of colloids, the characterization of colloids generated from the corrosion of the waste form has been limited. Colloids are known to incorporate radionuclides either from hydrolysis of dissolved species (real colloids) or from adsorption of dissolved species onto existing groundwater colloids (pseudocolloids); however, these colloids may be considered secondary and solubility limited when compared to the colloids generated during glass alteration.

  2. Elaboration of hybrid materials by templating with mineral liquid crystals stabilization of a mixed sol of YSZ nanoparticles and V2O5 ribbon-like colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiot, C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this PhD was to investigate innovative soft chemistry ways to prepare hybrid materials with ordered nano-structures. Concretely, research were conducted on the development of a hybrid material made of an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix templated by a mineral liquid crystal, namely V 2 O 5 . In aqueous solutions, vanadium oxide exhibits ribbon-like colloids of typical dimensions 1 nm x 25 nm x 500 nm, stabilized by a strong negative surface charge. Above a critical concentration, the anisotropic colloids assemble into a nematic liquid crystal, whose domains can be oriented within the same direction over a macroscopic range under a weak magnetic field. The idea is to use V 2 O 5 anisotropic colloids as a template for a hybrid material, taking advantage of their ordering behavior. Preliminary experiments revealed a strong reactivity between molecular compounds of zirconium and vanadium oxide. Therefore, the studies were directed toward the preparation of a mixed colloidal sol containing YSZ nanoparticles and vanadium oxide ribbon-like colloids, as a precursor sol for the intended hybrid material. The YSZ nanoparticles are obtained through an outstanding hydrothermal synthesis leading to a stable suspension of nanocrystalline particles of ca. 5 nm, in pure water. Providing a mixed sol of YSZ and V 2 O 5 is a key challenge for it implies the co-stabilization of two types of colloids having different shape, size and surface properties. Besides, the existence of V 2 O 5 in its ribbon-like form requires acidic conditions and very low ionic strength. The first part of this work was then dedicated to the study of electro-steric stabilization of zirconia suspension by addition of acidic poly-electrolytes. Different polymers with carboxylic and/or sulfonic acidic functions were investigated. Based on zeta potential measurements and adsorption isotherms, the influence of molecular weight and polymer charge were discussed. Among the studied polymers, poly

  3. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Joseph [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  4. Colloid transport in a geochemically heterogeneous porous medium: aquifer tank experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Jonathan P; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Ryan, Joseph N; Elimelech, Menachem

    2003-09-01

    To examine colloid transport in geochemically heterogeneous porous media at a scale comparable to field experiments, we monitored the migration of silica-coated zirconia colloids in a two-dimensional layered porous media containing sand coated to three different extents by ferric oxyhydroxides. Transport of the colloids was measured over 1.65 m and 95 days. Colloid transport was modeled by an advection-dispersion-deposition equation incorporating geochemical heterogeneity and colloid deposition dynamics (blocking). Geochemical heterogeneity was represented as favorable (ferric oxyhydroxide-coated) and unfavorable (uncoated sand) deposition surface areas. Blocking was modeled as random sequential adsorption (RSA). Release of deposited colloids was negligible. The time to colloid breakthrough after the onset of blocking increased with increasing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated surface area. As the ferric oxyhydroxide surface area increased, the concentration of colloids in the breakthrough decreased. Model-fits to the experimental data were made by inverse solutions to determine the fraction of surface area favorable for deposition and the deposition rate coefficients for the favorable (ferric oxyhydroxide-coated) and unfavorable sites. The favorable deposition rate coefficient was also calculated by colloid filtration theory. The model described the time to colloid breakthrough and the blocking effect reasonably well and estimated the favorable surface area fraction very well for the two layers with more than 1% ferric oxyhydroxide coating. If mica edges in the uncoated sand were considered as favorable surface area in addition to the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings, the model predicted the favorable surface area fraction accurately for the layer with less than 1% ferric oxyhydroxide coating.

  5. Bonding assembled colloids without loss of colloidal stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vutukuri, H.R.; Stiefelhagen, J.C.P.; Vissers, T; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the diversity of self-assembled colloidal structures has strongly increased, as it is fueled by a wide range of applications in materials science and also in soft condensed-matter physics.[1–4] Some potential applications include photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, materials for

  6. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Biosolids Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod O. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive biosolids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of biosolids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without biosolids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in reclaimed and undisturbed forest soils, where the presence of unweathered spoil material and biosolids amendments contributed to higher metal release in solution fractions. Up to 81% of mobile Cu was associated with the colloid fraction, particularly when gibbsite was present, while only up to 18% of mobile Zn was associated with the colloid fraction. The colloid bound Cu was exchangeable by ammonium acetate, suggesting that it will release into groundwater resources.

  7. Axial dispersion via shear-enhanced diffusion in colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I. M.

    2012-03-01

    The familiar example of Taylor dispersion of molecular solutes is extended to describe colloidal suspensions, where the fluctuations that contribute to dispersion arise from hydrodynamic interactions. The generic scheme is illustrated for a suspension of particles in a pressure-driven pipe flow, with a concentration-dependent diffusivity that captures both the shear-induced and Brownian contributions. The effect of the cross-stream migration via shear-induced diffusion is shown to dramatically reduce the axial dispersion predicted by classical Taylor dispersion for a molecular solute. Analytic and numerical solutions are presented that illustrate the effect of the concentration dependence of this nonlinear hydrodynamic mechanism. Copyright © EPLA, 2012.

  8. Colloids and Radionuclide Transport: A Field, Experimental and Modeling Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P.; Zavarin, M.; Sylwester, E. E.; Allen, P. G.; Williams, R. W.; Kersting, A. B.

    2002-05-01

    Natural inorganic colloids (colloid-facilitated transport to the transport of low-solubility actinides, such as Pu, is still not well understood. In an effort to better understand the dominant geochemical mechanisms that control Pu transport, we have performed a series of sorption/desorption experiments using mineral colloids. We focused on natural colloidal minerals present in water samples collected from both saturated and vadose zone waters at the Nevada Test Site. These minerals include zeolites, clays, silica, Mn-oxides, Fe-oxides, and calcite. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy ( both XANES and EXAFS) was performed in order to characterize the speciation of sorbed plutonium. The XANES spectra show that only Pu(IV) was detected (within experimental error) on these mineral surfaces when the starting Pu oxidation state was +5, indicating that Pu(V) was reduced to Pu(IV) during sorption. The EXAFS detected Pu-M and Pu-C interactions (where M=Fe, Mn, or Si) indicating Pu(IV) surface complexation along with carbonate ternary complex formation on most of the minerals tested. Although the plutonium sorption as Pu(IV) species is mineral independent, the actual sorption paths are different for different minerals. The sorption rates were compared to the rates of plutonium disproportionation under similar conditions. The batch sorption/desorption experiments of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) onto colloidal zeolite (clinoptilolite, colloids particle size 171 ñ 25 nm) were conducted in synthetic groundwater (similar to J-13, Yucca Mountain standard) with a pH range from 4 to 10 and initial plutonium concentration of 10-9 M. The results show that Pu(IV) sorption takes place within an hour, while the rates of Pu(V) sorption onto the colloids is much slower and mineral dependent. The kinetic results from the batch sorption/desorption experiments, coupled with redox kinetics of plutonium in solution will be used in geochemical modeling of Pu surface complexation to colloids and

  9. Colloid and ionic tracer migration within SRS sediments: Final summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Seaman, J.C.; Bertsch, P.M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States). Div. of Biogeochemistry; Miller, W.P. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Soil Science

    1996-04-09

    The generation of a stable colloidal suspension in geologic materials has a number of environmental implications. Mobile colloids may act as vectors for the transport of adsorbed contaminants through soils and within aquifers and can cause serious problems related to well monitoring and formation permeability in an injections well system. Colloid-facilitated transport has been implicated in the migration of contaminants from seepage basins on the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) at a rate greater than was predicted in two- phase transport models. From 1955 to 1988, seepage basins overlying the water-table aquifer received acidic wastes containing high levels of Na+ and nitric acid, as well as trace radionuclides and metals from the nuclear materials processing facilities. Numerical simulations predicted that metal contaminants would not reach the water table, but measurable quantities of these contaminants have been detected in monitoring wells down gradient from the basins. Lack of agreement between predicted and observed contaminant migration in this and other studies has been attributed to both local non equilibrium situation, preferential flow paths within the geologic material, and to transport of the contaminant in association with a mobile solid phase, i.e. dispersed colloids. Additionally, the association of contaminants with a mobile colloidal phase has important ramifications for groundwater sampling on SRS intended to evaluate the potential environmental hazards of a given contaminant. As part of the F- and H-Area reclamation project, the Department of Energy has proposed the capture and treatment of the contaminant plume followed by reinjection of the treated water into the water table and upper confined aquifers. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. High-Performance Solution-Processable Poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s for Air-Stable Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, Albert J.J.M. van; Herwig, Peter T.; Chlon, Ceciel H.T.; Sweelssen, Jörgen; Schoo, Herman F.M.; Benito, Estrella Mena; Leeuw, Dago M. de; Tanase, Christina; Wildeman, Jurjen; Blom, Paul W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of the substitution pattern (unsymmetrical or symmetrical), the nature of the side chain (linear or branched), and the processing of several solution processable alkoxy-substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s (PPVs) on the charge-carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors

  11. 14-1: Large-Area Processing of Solution Type Metal-Oxide in TFT Backplanes and Integration in Highly Stable OLED Displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Takata, R.; Neumann, A.; Pham, D.V.; Anselmann, R.; Maas, J.; Steen, J.L. van der; Gelinck, G.; Ilias Katsouras

    2017-01-01

    Solution type metal-oxide semiconductor was processed on mass-production ready equipment and integrated in a backplane with ESL architecture TFTs. Excellent thickness uniformity of the semiconductor layer was obtained over the complete Gen1 glass substrate (320 mm x 352 mm), resulting in homogeneous

  12. Origins of Highly Stable Al-evaporated Solution-processed ZnO Thin Film Transistors: Insights from Low Frequency and Random Telegraph Signal Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Hyung; Kang, Tae Sung; Yang, Jung Yup; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-01-01

    One long-standing goal in the emerging field of flexible and transparent electronic devices is to meet the demand of key markets, such as enhanced output performance for metal oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFTs) prepared by a solution process. While solution-based fabrication techniques are cost-effective and ensure large-area coverage at low temperature, their utilization has the disadvantage of introducing large trap states into TFTs. Such states, the formation of which is induced by intrinsic defects initially produced during preparation, have a significant impact on electrical performance. Therefore, the ability to enhance the electrical characteristics of solution-processed TFTs, along with attaining a firm understanding of their physical nature, remains a key step towards extending their use. In this study, measurements of low-frequency noise and random telegraph signal noise are employed as generic alternative tools to examine the origins of enhanced output performance for solution-processed ZnO TFTs through the control of defect sites by Al evaporation. PMID:26525284

  13. Population and size distribution of solute-rich mesospecies within mesostructured aqueous amino acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawor-Baczynska, Anna; Moore, Barry D; Lee, Han Seung; McCormick, Alon V; Sefcik, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of highly soluble substances such as small amino acids are usually assumed to be essentially homogenous systems with some degree of short range local structuring due to specific interactions on the sub-nanometre scale (e.g. molecular clusters, hydration shells), usually not exceeding several solute molecules. However, recent theoretical and experimental studies have indicated the presence of much larger supramolecular assemblies or mesospecies in solutions of small organic and inorganic molecules as well as proteins. We investigated both supersaturated and undersaturated aqueous solutions of two simple amino acids (glycine and DL-alanine) using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Brownian Microscopy/Nanoparticles Tracking Analysis (NTA) and Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM). Colloidal scale mesospecies (nanodroplets) were previously reported in supersaturated solutions of these amino acids and were implicated as intermediate species on non-classical crystallization pathways. Surprisingly, we have found that the mesospecies are also present in significant numbers in undersaturated solutions even when the solute concentration is well below the solid-liquid equilibrium concentration (saturation limit). Thus, mesopecies can be observed with mean diameters ranging from 100 to 300 nm and a size distribution that broadens towards larger size with increasing solute concentration. We note that the mesospecies are not a separate phase and the system is better described as a thermodynamically stable mesostructured liquid containing solute-rich domains dispersed within bulk solute solution. At a given temperature, solute molecules in such a mesostructured liquid phase are subject to equilibrium distribution between solute-rich mesospecies and the surrounding bulk solution.

  14. Spontaneous nematic alignment of a lipid nanotube in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wuxiao; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Kameta, Naohiro; Wada, Momoyo; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2015-01-27

    The dispersibility and liquid crystal formation of a self-assembled lipid nanotube (LNT) was investigated in a variety of aqueous solutions. As the lipid component, we chose a bipolar lipid with glucose and tetraglycine headgroups, which self-assembled into an LNT with a small outer diameter of 16 to 17 nm and a high axial ratio of more than 310. The LNT gave a stable colloidal dispersion in its dilute solutions and showed spontaneous liquid crystal (LC) alignment at relatively low concentrations and in a pH region including neutral pH. The LNT samples with shorter length distributions were prepared by sonication, and the relationship between the LNT axial ratio and the minimum LC formation concentration was examined. The robustness of the LNT made the liquid crystal stable in mixed solvents of water/ethanol, water/acetone, and water/tetrahydrofuran (1:1 by volume) and at a temperature of up to 90 °C in water. The observed colloidal behavior of the LNT was compared to those of similar 1D nanostructures such as a phospholipid tubule.

  15. Thermo-solutal and kinetic modes of stable dendritic growth with different symmetries of crystalline anisotropy in the presence of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V.; Galenko, Peter K.; Toropova, Lyubov V.

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by important applications in materials science and geophysics, we consider the steady-state growth of anisotropic needle-like dendrites in undercooled binary mixtures with a forced convective flow. We analyse the stable mode of dendritic evolution in the case of small anisotropies of growth kinetics and surface energy for arbitrary Péclet numbers and n-fold symmetry of dendritic crystals. On the basis of solvability and stability theories, we formulate a selection criterion giving a stable combination between dendrite tip diameter and tip velocity. A set of nonlinear equations consisting of the solvability criterion and undercooling balance is solved analytically for the tip velocity V and tip diameter ρ of dendrites with n-fold symmetry in the absence of convective flow. The case of convective heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a binary mixture occurring as a result of intensive flows in the liquid phase is detailed. A selection criterion that describes such solidification conditions is derived. The theory under consideration comprises previously considered theoretical approaches and results as limiting cases. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  16. Direct formation of new, phase-stable, and photoactive anatase-type Ti1-2XNbXScXO2 solid solution nanoparticles by hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masanori; Ito, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    A new anatase phase of photoactive Ti 1-2X Nb X Sc X O 2 (X = 0-0.2) solid solutions was directly formed as nanoparticles from precursor solutions of TiOSO 4 , NbCl 5 , and Sc(NO 3 ) 3 under mild hydrothermal conditions at 180 deg. C for 5 h using the hydrolysis of urea. With the increase of the content of niobium and scandium from X = 0 to 0.2, the lattice parameters a 0 and c 0 , the crystallite size, and the optical band gap of anatase gradually increased. Their photocatalytic activity and adsorptivity were evaluated separately by the measurement of the concentration of methylene blue (MB) remained in the solution in the dark or under UV-light irradiation. The anatase-type Ti 1-2X Nb X Sc X O 2 (X = 0.05) showed approximately two times and three times as high photocatalytic activity as those of the hydrothermal anatase-type pure TiO 2 and commercially available reference pure TiO 2 (ST-01), respectively. The anatase phase of Ti 1-2X Nb X Sc X O 2 (X = 0-0.2) existed stably up to 900 deg. C during heat treatment in air. New rutile-type Ti 1-2X Nb X Sc X O 2 solid solutions are formed through the phase transformation. The starting temperature of anatase-to-rutile phase transformation for Ti 1-2X Nb X Sc X O 2 (X = 0-0.2) solid solutions was delayed but its completing temperature was accelerated

  17. Inner Phases of Colloidal Hexagonal Spin Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libál, A.; Nisoli, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. O.; Reichhardt, C.

    2018-01-01

    Using numerical simulations that mimic recent experiments on hexagonal colloidal ice, we show that colloidal hexagonal artificial spin ice exhibits an inner phase within its ice state that has not been observed previously. Under increasing colloid-colloid repulsion, the initially paramagnetic system crosses into a disordered ice regime, then forms a topologically charge ordered state with disordered colloids, and finally reaches a threefold degenerate, ordered ferromagnetic state. This is reminiscent of, yet distinct from, the inner phases of the magnetic kagome spin ice analog. The difference in the inner phases of the two systems is explained by their difference in energetics and frustration.

  18. A short textbook of colloid chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Jirgensons, B

    1962-01-01

    A Short Textbook of Colloid Chemistry, Second Revised Edition details the factual aspect of colloid chemistry that includes the basic facts, established empirical and mathematical relationships, and practical applications. The chapters of the title are organized into two parts. In the first part, the text discusses the general concepts of colloid chemistry, such as the history and scope, basic terms, and basic methods in experiment with colloids. Part Two covers the technical aspect of colloid chemistry, such as the optical properties, electrical properties, and viscosity. The book will be of

  19. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  20. Colloidal aspects of texture perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    The perception of complex textures in food is strongly related to the way food is processed during eating, and is modulated by other basic characteristics, such as taste and aroma. An understanding at the colloidal level of the basic processes in the mouth is essential in order to link the

  1. Characterization of Complex Colloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, J. C.; Guerin, M.; Jackson, B. P.; Ranville, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Surface chemical reactions play a major role in controlling contaminant fate and transport in the subsurface environment. Recent field and laboratory evidence suggests that mobile soil and groundwater colloids may facilitate the migration of sparingly soluble groundwater contaminants. Colloidal suspensions collected in the field or generated in laboratory column experiments tend to be fairly dilute in nature and comprised of relatively small particulates (reserved for studying ideal systems to the characterization of mobile colloids. However, many of these analytical techniques, including total/selective dissolution methods, dynamic light scattering, micro-electrophoresis, streaming potential, and even scanning electron microscopy (SEM), can be biased in of larger size fractions, and therefore, extremely sensitive to sampling, storage, and fractionation artifacts. In addition, surface modifiers such as sorbed oxides or organics can alter particulate appearance, composition, and behavior when compared to synthetic analogues or mineral standards. The current presentation will discuss the limitations and inherent biases associated with a number of analytical characterization techniques that are commonly applied to the study of mobile soil and groundwater colloids, including field flow fractionation (FFF) and acoustic based methods that have only recently become available.

  2. Influence of mineral colloids and humic substances on uranium(VI) transport in water-saturated geologic porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Cheng, Tao; Wu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Mineral colloids and humic substances often co-exist in subsurface environment and substantially influence uranium (U) transport. However, the combined effects of mineral colloids and humic substances on U transport are not clear. This study is aimed at quantifying U transport and elucidating geochemical processes that control U transport when both mineral colloids and humic acid (HA) are present. U-spiked solutions/suspensions were injected into water-saturated sand columns, and U and colloid concentrations in column effluent were monitored. We found that HA promoted U transport via (i) formation of aqueous U-HA complexes, and (ii) competition against aqueous U for surface sites on transport media. Illite colloids had no influence on U transport at pH5 in the absence of HA due to low mobility of the colloids. At pH9, U desorbed from mobile illite and the presence of illite decreased U transport. At pH5, high U transport occurred when both illite colloids and HA were present, which was attributed to enhanced U adsorption to illite colloids via formation of ternary illite-HA-U surface complexes, and enhanced illite transport due to HA attachment to illite and transport media. This study demonstrates that the combined effects of mineral colloids and HA on contaminant transport is different from simple addition of the individual effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Glass/Jamming Transition in Colloidal Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Philip N.; Prasad, Vikram; Weitz, David A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have studied colloidal aggregation in a model colloid plus polymer system with short-range attractive interactions. By varying the colloid concentration and the strength of the attraction, we explored regions where the equilibrium phase is expected to consist of colloidal crystallites in coexistance with colloidal gas (i.e. monomers). This occurs for moderate values of the potential depth, U approximately equal to 2-5 kT. Crystallization was not always observed. Rather, over an extended sub-region two new metastable phases appear, one fluid-like and one solid-like. These were examined in detail with light scattering and microscopy techniques. Both phases consist of a near uniform distribution of small irregular shaped clusters of colloidal particles. The dynamical and structural characteristics of the ergodic-nonergodic transition between the two phases share much in common with the colloidal hard sphere glass transition.

  4. The Influence of Radiation on Pit Solution Chemistry as it Pertains to the Transition from Metastable to Stable Pitting in Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galuszka-Muga, Barbara; Muga, Luis M.

    2006-01-01

    Previous work relevant to current efforts is summarized. A description of an improved version of a new electrochemical probe, the ArtPit, is given. The distinct feature of the probe for investigating metastable pitting of carbon steels is specified and compared to other approaches. The electrochemical response of the ArtPit under the gamma irradiation and elevated temperature conditions that occur at high level waste (HLW) storage tanks is presented. In particular, the Tafel slope determinations and chemical analyses of the ArtPit confined volume electrolyte are described. Based on results a possible approach for reducing the corrosion rate of HLW tank walls is suggested. Additional statistical analysis of the occurrence of short duration (passivated pits) and long term (stable pitting) electrochemical pulses (current surges) during exposure confirm that radiation enhances the occurrence of both more and smaller sized pits due to increased likelihood of repassivation

  5. 1D and 2D NMR Spectroscopy of Bonding Interactions within Stable and Phase-Separating Organic Electrolyte-Cellulose Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Matthew T; Farès, Christophe; Rinaldi, Roberto

    2017-09-11

    Organic electrolyte solutions (i.e. mixtures containing an ionic liquid and a polar, molecular co-solvent) are highly versatile solvents for cellulose. However, the underlying solvent-solvent and solvent-solute interactions are not yet fully understood. Herein, mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, the co-solvent 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone, and cellulose are investigated using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The use of a triply- 13 C-labelled ionic liquid enhances the signal-to-noise ratio for 13 C NMR spectroscopy, enabling changes in bonding interactions to be accurately pinpointed. Current observations reveal an additional degree of complexity regarding the distinct roles of cation, anion, and co-solvent toward maintaining cellulose solubility and phase stability. Unexpectedly, the interactions between the dialkylimidazolium ring C 2 -H substituent and cellulose become more pronounced at high temperatures, counteracted by a net weakening of acetate-cellulose interactions. Moreover, for mixtures that exhibit critical solution behavior, phase separation is accompanied by the apparent recombination of cation-anion pairs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Linking Catalyst-Coated Isotropic Colloids into "Active" Flexible Chains Enhances Their Diffusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bipul; Manna, Raj Kumar; Laskar, Abhrajit; Kumar, P B Sunil; Adhikari, Ronojoy; Kumaraswamy, Guruswamy

    2017-10-24

    Active colloids are not constrained by equilibrium: ballistic propulsion, superdiffusive behavior, or enhanced diffusivities have been reported for active Janus particles. At high concentrations, interactions between active colloids give rise to complex emergent behavior. Their collective dynamics result in the formation of several hundred particle-strong flocks or swarms. Here, we demonstrate significant diffusivity enhancement for colloidal objects that neither have a Janus architecture nor are at high concentrations. We employ uniformly catalyst-coated, viz. chemo-mechanically, isotropic colloids and link them into a chain to enforce proximity. Activity arises from hydrodynamic interactions between enchained colloidal beads due to reaction-induced phoretic flows catalyzed by platinum nanoparticles on the colloid surface. This results in diffusivity enhancements of up to 60% for individual chains in dilute solution. Chains with increasing flexibility exhibit higher diffusivities. Simulations accounting for hydrodynamic interactions between enchained colloids due to active phoretic flows accurately capture the experimental diffusivity. These simulations reveal that the enhancement in diffusivity can be attributed to the interplay between chain conformational fluctuations and activity. Our results show that activity can be used to systematically modulate the mobility of soft slender bodies.

  7. Effect of particle shape on colloid retention and release in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Lazouskaya, Volha; He, Qingxiang; Jin, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal particles of environmental concern often have nonspherical shapes. However, theories and models such as the classical filtration theory have been developed based on the behavior of spherical particles. This study examined the effect of particle shape on colloid retention (e.g., attachment and straining) and release in saturated porous media. Two- and three-step transport experiments were conducted in water-saturated glass bead columns using colloids dispersed in deionized water and an electrolyte solution. The particles used in the experiments were carboxylate-modified latex colloids of spherical (500 nm diam.) and rod (aspect ratio, 7.0) shapes. The rod-like particles were prepared by stretching the spherical particles. Analysis of the colloid breakthrough curves indicates that particle shape affected transport behavior, but retention did not increase with increasing aspect ratio. Retention of the spherical particles occurred mainly in the secondary energy minimum, whereas retention of rod-like particles occurred in primary and secondary energy minima. There was less straining of rod-like particles compared with spherical ones, indicating that the minor axis was the critical dimension controlling the process. Release of spherical particles on elution was instantaneous, whereas release of rod-like particles was rate limited, giving rise to long tails, implying an orientation effect for rod-like colloids. The results suggest that the differences in electrostatic properties and shape contributed to the observed different retention and release behaviors of the two colloids.

  8. Movie of phase separation during physics of colloids in space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area in the video is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  9. Phase separation during the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  10. COLLAGE 2: a numerical code for radionuclide migration through a fractured geosphere in aqueous and colloidal phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, P.; Cooper, N.

    1993-05-01

    In previous work, the COLLAGE code was developed to model the impacts of mobile and immobile colloidal material upon the dispersal and migration of a radionuclide species within a saturated planer fracture surrounded by porous media. The adsorption of radionuclides to colloid surfaces was treated as instantaneous and reversible. In this report we present a new version of the code, COLLAGE 2. Here the adsorption of radionuclides to the colloidal material is treated via first order kinetics. The flow and geometry of the fracture remain as in the previous model. The major effect of colloids upon the radionuclide species is to adsorb them within the fracture space and thus exclude them from the surrounding porous medium. Thus the matrix diffusion process, a strongly retarding effect, is exchanged for a colloid capture/release process by which adsorbed nuclides are also retarded. The effects of having a colloid-radionuclide kinetic interaction include the phenomena of double pulse breakthrough (the pseudo colloid population followed by the solute plume) in cases where the desorption process is slow and the pseudo colloids are highly mobile. Some example calculations are given and some verification examples are discussed. Finally a complete listing of the code is presented as an appendix, including the subroutines allowing for the numerical inversion of the Laplace transformed solution via Talbot's method. 6 figs

  11. COLLAGE 2: a numerical code for radionuclide migration through a fractured geosphere in aqueous and colloidal phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindrod, P.; Cooper, N. [Intera Information Technologies Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    1993-05-01

    In previous work, the COLLAGE code was developed to model the impacts of mobile and immobile colloidal material upon the dispersal and migration of a radionuclide species within a saturated planer fracture surrounded by porous media. The adsorption of radionuclides to colloid surfaces was treated as instantaneous and reversible. In this report we present a new version of the code, COLLAGE 2. Here the adsorption of radionuclides to the colloidal material is treated via first order kinetics. The flow and geometry of the fracture remain as in the previous model. The major effect of colloids upon the radionuclide species is to adsorb them within the fracture space and thus exclude them from the surrounding porous medium. Thus the matrix diffusion process, a strongly retarding effect, is exchanged for a colloid capture/release process by which adsorbed nuclides are also retarded. The effects of having a colloid-radionuclide kinetic interaction include the phenomena of double pulse breakthrough (the pseudo colloid population followed by the solute plume) in cases where the desorption process is slow and the pseudo colloids are highly mobile. Some example calculations are given and some verification examples are discussed. Finally a complete listing of the code is presented as an appendix, including the subroutines allowing for the numerical inversion of the Laplace transformed solution via Talbot`s method. 6 figs.

  12. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  13. A thermodynamic gauge for mobile counter-ions from colloids and nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philipse, Albert P.; Kuipers, Bonny W M; Vrij, Agienus

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic equilibrium sensor is proposed that measures the ratio of the number of elementary charges z to the mass m of charged solutes such as charged colloids and nanoparticles. The sensor comprises a small, membrane-encapsulated salt solution volume that absorbs neutral salt molecules in

  14. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongta

    increase of the effective refractive index of the diffractive medium, resulting in the red-shift of the optical stop bands. The wavelength shift is linearly proportional to the vapor partial pressure for a spectrum of vapors. Optical simulation and theoretical prediction based on Kelvin equation suggest that a liquid film is formed on the walls of the macropores during vapor condensation. The third topic describes introducing doctor blade coating fabricated large area and low cost macroporous films for thermochromic smart windows, which are useful for energy control in glazed buildings. The fabricated macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors and are capable of reflecting solar radiation when in-situ heated, and become transparent as cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer when cooled to building temperature. The fourth topic reports the roll-to roll fabricated excellent water-repelling and self-cleaning macroporous polymer films. The size of the voids can be easily controlled by tuning the duration of an oxygen reactive-ion etching process prior to the removal of the templating silica spheres from silica colloidal-polymer composites. After surface functionalization with fluorosilane, superhydrophobic surface with large apparent water contact angle and small sliding angle can be obtained. The self-cleaning functionality can be achieved on superhydrophobic macroporous coatings by preventing bacterial contamination is further demonstrated. The fifth topic presented is that the template macroporous polymer films with interconnected voids and uniform interconnecting nanopores can be directly used as filtration membranes to achieve size-exclusive separation of particles. The results also demonstrate that more than 85% of small sized particles are recovered after filtration. The results also demonstrate that Escherichia coli can be filtrated by the from macroporous polymer films aqueous solution.

  15. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  16. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  17. Colloidal stabilization of cerium-gadolinium oxide (CGO) suspensions via rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marani, Debora; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Bentzen, Janet Jonna

    2015-01-01

    colloidally stable state. The method was applied to explore the ability of four commercial dispersants (acidic affine, neutral, basic affine, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)) to disperse cerium-gadolinium oxide (CGO) in ethanol. Only the acidic affine and the PVP dispersants were found to efficiently disperse...

  18. Dynamical heterogeneities and defects in two-dimensional soft colloidal crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Van Der B.; Qi, W.; Sprakel, J.; Filion, L.; Dijkstra, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a two-dimensional system of charged colloidal particles using Brownian dynamics simulations. We determine the phase diagram and investigate the dynamics of this system in the density regime where hexatic and solid phases are stable. We find that the dynamics in these phases

  19. Strategy of Solution-Processed All-Inorganic Heterostructure for Humidity/Temperature-Stable Perovskite Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhifeng; Li, Sen; Li, Ying; Ji, Huifang; Li, Xinjian; Wu, Di; Xu, Tingting; Chen, Yongsheng; Tian, Yongtao; Zhang, Yuantao; Shan, Chongxin; Du, Guotong

    2018-02-27

    Recently, a pressing requirement of solid-state lighting sources with high performance and low cost has motivated increasing research in metal halide perovskites. However, the relatively low emission efficiency and poor operation stability of perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are still critical drawbacks. In this study, a strategy of solution-processed all-inorganic heterostructure was proposed to overcome the emission efficiency and operation stability issues facing the challenges of perovskite LEDs. Solution-processed n-ZnO nanoparticles and p-NiO are used as the carrier injectors to fabricate all-inorganic heterostructured CsPbBr 3 quantum dot LEDs, and a high-efficiency green emission is achieved with maximum luminance of 6093.2 cd/m 2 , external quantum efficiency of 3.79%, and current efficiency of 7.96 cd/A. More importantly, the studied perovskite LEDs possess a good operation stability after a long test time in air ambient. Typically, the devices can endure a high humidity (75%, 12 h) and a high working temperature (393 K, three heating/cooling cycles) even without encapsulation, and the operation stability is better than any previous reports. It is anticipated that this work will provide an effective strategy for the fabrication of high-performance perovskite LEDs with good stability under ambient and harsh conditions, making practical applications of such LEDs a real possibility.

  20. THE COLLOIDAL BEHAVIOR OF SERUM GLOBULIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, David I.

    1922-01-01

    1. The globulin prepared from ox serum by dilution and precipitation with carbon dioxide has been found, by electrometric titration experiments, to behave like an amphoteric electrolyte, reacting stoichiometrically with acids and bases. 2. The potential difference developed between a solution of globulin chloride, phosphate, or acetate and a solution of the corresponding acid, free from protein, separated from the globulin by a collodion membrane, was found to be influenced by hydrogen ion concentration and salt concentration in the way predicted by Donnan's theory of membrane equilibrium. In experiments with sodium globulinate and sodium hydroxide it was found that the potential difference could be similarly explained. 3. The osmotic pressure of such solutions could be qualitatively accounted for by the Donnan theory, but exhibited a discrepancy which is explicable by analogy with certain experiments of Loeb on gelatin. 4. The application of Loeb's theory of colloidal behavior, which had previously been found to hold in the case of gelatin, casein, egg albumin, and edestin, has thus been extended to another protein, serum globulin. PMID:19871977

  1. Probing deviations from traditional colloid filtration theory by atomic forces microscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno, Marissa Devan

    2005-12-01

    Colloid transport through saturated media is an integral component of predicting the fate and transport of groundwater contaminants. Developing sound predictive capabilities and establishing effective methodologies for remediation relies heavily on our ability to understand the pertinent physical and chemical mechanisms. Traditionally, colloid transport through saturated media has been described by classical colloid filtration theory (CFT), which predicts an exponential decrease in colloid concentration with travel distance. Furthermore, colloid stability as determined by Derjaguin-Landau-Veney-Overbeek (DLVO) theory predicts permanent attachment of unstable particles in a primary energy minimum. However, recent studies show significant deviations from these traditional theories. Deposition in the secondary energy minimum has been suggested as a mechanism by which observed deviations can occur. This work investigates the existence of the secondary energy minimum as predicted by DLVO theory using direct force measurements obtained by Atomic Forces Microscopy. Interaction energy as a function of separation distance between a colloid and a quartz surface in electrolyte solutions of varying ionic strength are obtained. Preliminary force measurements show promise and necessary modifications to the current experimental methodology have been identified. Stringent surface cleaning procedures and the use of high-purity water for all injectant solutions is necessary for the most accurate and precise measurements. Comparisons between direct physical measurements by Atomic Forces Microscopy with theoretical calculations and existing experimental findings will allow the evaluation of the existence or absence of a secondary energy minimum.

  2. Limitations and possibilities of green synthesis and long-term stability of colloidal Ag nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velgosová, Oksana; Mražíková, Anna

    2017-12-01

    In this paper the influence of algae life cycle and the solutions pH on the green synthesis of colloidal Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) as well as effect of different storage conditions on AgNPs long-term stability was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were biologically synthesized using extracts of Parachlorella kessleri algae cultivated 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. The formation of AgNPs was monitored using a UV-vis spectrophotometer and verified by TEM observation. The results confirmed formation of polyhedron and/or near polyhedron AgNPs, ranging between 5 and 60 nm in diameter. The age of algae influenced the synthesis rate and an amount of AgNPs in solution. The best results were obtained using tree weeks old algae. UV-vis analysis and TEM observation also revealed that the size and the stability of AgNPs depend on the pH of solution. AgNPs formed in solutions of higher pH (8 and 10) are polyhedron, fine, with narrow size interval and stabile. Nanoparticles formed in solutions of low pH (2, 4 and 6) started to lose their stability on 10th day of experiment, and the particle size interval was wide. The long-term stability of AgNPs can be influenced by light and temperature conditions. The most significant stability loss was observed at day light and room temperature (21°C). After 200-days significant amount of agglomerated particles settled on the bottom of the Erlenmeyer flask. AgNPs stored at dark and room temperature showed better long-term stability, weak particles agglomeration was observed. AgNPs stored at dark and at temperature 5°C showed the best long-term stability. Such AgNPs remained spherical, fine (5-20 nm), with narrow size interval and stable (no agglomeration) even after more than six months.

  3. Solar Cells Based on Inks of n-Type Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2014-10-28

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. New inorganic ligands including halide anions have significantly accelerated progress in colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaics in recent years. All such device reports to date have relied on halide treatment during solid-state ligand exchanges or on co-treatment of long-aliphatic-ligand-capped nanoparticles in the solution phase. Here we report solar cells based on a colloidal quantum dot ink that is capped using halide-based ligands alone. By judicious choice of solvents and ligands, we developed a CQD ink from which a homogeneous and thick colloidal quantum dot solid is applied in a single step. The resultant films display an n-type character, making it suitable as a key component in a solar-converting device. We demonstrate two types of quantum junction devices that exploit these iodide-ligand-based inks. We achieve solar power conversion efficiencies of 6% using this class of colloids.

  4. Release of colloids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a contaminated soil under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, S.; Totsche, K. U.; Kögel-Knabner, I.

    2003-04-01

    Mobile colloidal particles play an important role in the carrier-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing solutes. They act as a possible sorbent for contaminants and are possible pollutant carriers. Knowledge on the release and transport of soil-borne colloidal particles is mandatory for the understanding of the mobility of hydrophobic or surface-complexing contaminants. In soils, the major fraction of colloidal phase particles is of organic provenience. Their mobility in soils is controlled by the release from and the interactions with the immobile solid phase, by microbial formation processes as well as by the flow regime. Important factors of the release and transport are the site-specific meteorological conditions like groundwater recharge, temperature and moisture regime, and amount and distribution of precipitation. We studied the release of natural organic colloids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from a coarse textured, calcareous porous media under field conditions. Three natural gradient lysimeters and nine precipitation gauges were installed at a contaminated site. Sampling of the seepage water was triggered by rainfall events. Analysis of the samples comprised the determination of the 16 EPA-PAH in the liquid phase and in the colloidal and suspended particle fraction, dissolved and colloidal phase organic carbon (DCOC), pH, electrolytic conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results show a direct response of the release of colloids to strong rainfall events. The amount of seepage corresponds directly with the precipitation rate. Mean concentrations of DCOC in the seepage water range between 2 and 6 mg/l. PAH concentrations are very low in the liquid phase but reach up to 660 mg/kg in the colloidal and suspended particle fraction. This points to the importance of colloid-facilitated transport of the contaminant through the unsaturated soil zone.

  5. Americium, Cesium, and Plutonium Colloid-Facilitated Transport in a Groundwater/Bentonite/Fracture Fill Material System: Column Experiments and Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Boukhalfa, H.; Reimus, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of desorption kinetics and colloid transport on radionuclides with different sorption affinities. We focused on quantifying transport mechanisms important for upscaling in time and distance. This will help determine the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides to aid in risk assessments. We selected a fractured/weathered granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model crystalline rock repository system because the system has been thoroughly studied and field experiments involving radionuclides have already been conducted. Working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiments with field-scale observations. Weathered fracture fill material (FFM) and bentonite used as backfill at the GTS were characterized (e.g., BET, SEM/EDS, QXRD), and batch and breakthrough column experiments were conducted. Solutions were prepared in synthetic groundwaters that matched the natural water chemistry. FFM samples were crushed, rinsed, sieved (150-355 μm), and equilibrated with synthetic groundwater. Bentonite was crushed, sodium-saturated, equilibrated with synthetic groundwater, and settled to yield a stable suspension. Suspensions were equilibrated with Am, Cs, or Pu. All experiments were conducted with Teflon®materials to limit sorption to system components. After radionuclide/colloid injections reached stability, radionuclide-free solutions were injected to observe the desorption and release behavior. Aliquots of effluent were measured for pH, colloid concentration, and total and dissolved radionuclides. Unanalyzed effluent from the first column was then injected through a second column of fresh material. The process was repeated for a third column and the results of all three breakthrough curves were modeled with a multi-site/multi-rate MATLAB code to elucidate the sorption rate coefficients and binding site densities of the bentonite colloids and

  6. The Influence of Radiation on Pit Solution Chemistry as it Pertains to the Transition from Metastable to Stable Pitting in Steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galuszka-Muga, Barbara

    2005-05-19

    An investigation was undertaken of the effect of gamma radiation on metastable pitting of mild carbon steels immersed in a solution similar to those existing at high level waste (HLW) deposits in the US. The object was to observe the extent to which a dosage rate of 1 Mrad/hour (10 Kgrey/hour) affected measurable electrochemical parameters such as pitting potential, open circuit potential, rate of metastable pitting and repassivation potential. Methods for reliably measuring electrochemical potentials in a high radiation field were developed. Exploratory analyses were made of the ion product release and electrolyte composition change in a confined volume simulating the conditions of a corrosion initiated pit during gamma irradiation. As expected the results indicated that the metastable pitting rate (as well as the general rate of corrosion) was significantly enhanced by a radiation field.

  7. Impact of dissolved organic matter on colloid transport in the vadose zone: deterministic approximation of transport deposition coefficients from polymeric coating characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Bin; Lion, Leonard W; Bisogni, James J; McDonough, Brendan A; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2011-02-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted to discern colloid transport and stability processes, the mechanistic understanding of how dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects colloid fate in unsaturated soils (i.e., the vadose zone) remains unclear. This study aims to bridge the gap between the physicochemical responses of colloid complexes and porous media interfaces to solution chemistry, and the effect these changes have on colloid transport and fate. Measurements of adsorbed layer thickness, density, and charge of DOM-colloid complexes and transport experiments with tandem internal process visualization were conducted for key constituents of DOM, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), at acidic, neutral and basic pH and two CaCl(2) concentrations. Polymeric characteristics reveal that, of the two tested DOM constituents, only HA electrosterically stabilizes colloids. This stabilization is highly dependent on solution pH which controls DOM polymer adsorption affinity, and on the presence of Ca(+2) which promotes charge neutralization and inter-particle bridging. Transport experiments indicate that HA improved colloid transport significantly, while FA only marginally affected transport despite having a large effect on particle charge. A transport model with deposition and pore-exclusion parameters fit experimental breakthrough curves well. Trends in deposition coefficients are correlated to the changes in colloid surface potential for bare colloids, but must include adsorbed layer thickness and density for sterically stabilized colloids. Additionally, internal process observations with bright field microscopy reveal that, under optimal conditions for retention, experiments with FA or no DOM promoted colloid retention at solid-water interfaces, while experiments with HA enhanced colloid retention at air-water interfaces, presumably due to partitioning of HA at the air-water interface and/or increased hydrophobic characteristics of HA-colloid complexes. © 2010

  8. Physico-chemical characterisation and biological evaluation of 188-Rhenium colloids for radiosynovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures, Ma Cristina; Savio, Eduardo; Malanga, Antonio; Fernández, Marcelo; Paolino, Andrea; Gaudiano, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a type of radiotherapy used to relieve pain and inflammation from rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, 188-Rhenium ( 188 Re) colloids were characterized by physical and biological methodologies. This was used to assess which parameters of the kit formulation would be the basis in the development of a more effective radiopharmaceutical for synovectomy. Intraarticular injection in knees of rabbits assessed cavity leakage of activity. The physical characteristics of tin (Sn) and sulphur (S) colloids were determined to assess the formulation with suitable properties. Particles were grouped in three ranges for analyzing their distribution according to their number, volume and surface. The ideal particle size range was considered to be from 2 to 10 microns. Membrane filtration and laser diffraction characterization methodologies were used. While membrane filtration could give misleading data, laser diffraction proportions more reliable results. The Sn colloid showed a better distribution of particle volume and surface than S colloid, in the 2 to 10 microns range. The 188 Re-Sn colloid was obtained with a radiochemical purity higher than 95% after 30 minutes of autoclaving. While Sn colloid kit stability was verified for 60 days, the 188 Re-Sn preparation was stable in the first 24 hrs. No significant intrabatch variability (n = 3) was detected. Biodistribution and scintigraphic studies in rabbits after intraarticular injection showed relevant activity only in knee, being 90% at 48 hours. The 188 Re-Sn colloid is easy to prepare, is stable for 24 hours and shows minimal cavity leakage after intraarticular injection into rabbit knees, suggesting this radiotherapeutical agent has suitable physical properties for evaluation for joint treatment in humans

  9. Colloidal quantum dot photodetectors

    KAUST Repository

    Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2011-05-01

    We review recent progress in light sensors based on solution-processed materials. Spin-coated semiconductors can readily be integrated with many substrates including as a post-process atop CMOS silicon and flexible electronics. We focus in particular on visible-, near-infrared, and short-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on size-effect-tuned semiconductor nanoparticles made using quantum-confined PbS, PbSe, Bi 2S3, and In2S3. These devices have in recent years achieved room-temperature D values above 1013 Jones, while fully-depleted photodiodes based on these same materials have achieved MHz response combined with 1012 Jones sensitivities. We discuss the nanoparticle synthesis, the materials processing, integrability, temperature stability, physical operation, and applied performance of this class of devices. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Colloid filtration theory and the Happel sphere-in-cell model revisited with direct numerical simulation of colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kirk E; Ginn, Timothy R

    2005-03-15

    The transport of colloids and bacterial cells through saturated porous media is a complex phenomenon involving many interrelated processes that are often treated via application of classical colloid filtration theory (CFT). This paper presents a numerical investigation of CFT from the Lagrangian perspective, to evaluate the role of some of the classical assumptions underlying the theory and to demonstrate a means to include processes relevant to bacterial transport that were inadequately characterized or neglected in the original formulation, including Brownian diffusion and potentially hysteretic potential functions. The methodology is based on conducting a Lagrangian trajectory analysis within Happel's sphere-in-cell porous media model to obtain the collection efficiency (eta), the frequency at which colloids or bacteria make contact with the solid phase of the porous medium. The Lagrangian framework of our model lends itself to mechanistic modeling of the biological processes that may be important in subsurface bacterial transport. The numerical study presented here focuses on the size range of bacterial colloids and smaller (down to 10 nm). Results of our model runs are in good agreement with the deterministic trajectory analysis of Rajagopalan and Tien (when diffusion is neglected) and in excellent agreement with the analytical solution to the Smoluchowski-Levich approximation of the convective-diffusion equation (when external forces and interception are neglected). Simple addition of our result for the deterministic eta to our result for the Smoluchowski-Levich eta matches the overall Rajagopalan and Tien eta to within 5% error or less for all cases studied. When we simulate diffusion and the deterministic forces together, our results diverge from the Rajagopalan and Tien eta as the particle size decreases, with discrepancies as large as 73%. These results suggest that accurate prediction of eta values for bacteria-sized (and all submicrometer) colloids

  11. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G; Dunstan, Dave E

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes.

  12. A study on particle deposition of an evaporating colloidal droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, Sang Kwon; Lee, Jung Yong [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The presented study aims to investigate the colloidal droplet deposition caused by evaporation of the liquid. In the numerical analysis, the evaporation is carried out by using different evaporation function intended to obtain different shape of solute deposition. In the experiment, the colloidal droplets of different solvents are placed on a glass plate and the surface profiles are measured after drying the solvents of the droplets to investigate the effect of the solvent evaporation on the final deposition profile. Comparing the surface profiles obtained under different conditions, the optimum drying conditions of colloidal droplets are determined to obtain uniform surface profiles. The numerical results showed that ring-shaped deposition of solute was formed at the edge of the droplet due to the coffee stain effect and the height of the ring was reduced at the lower evaporation rate. The experiments showed that the boiling point of a solvent was critical to the surface uniformity of the deposition profile and the mixture of solvents with different boiling points influenced the uniformity as well.

  13. Glass transition of soft colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Truzzolillo, Domenico; Galvan-Myoshi, Julian; Dieudonné-George, Philippe; Trappe, Véronique; Berthier, Ludovic; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-04-01

    We explore the glassy dynamics of soft colloids using microgels and charged particles interacting by steric and screened Coulomb interactions, respectively. In the supercooled regime, the structural relaxation time τα of both systems grows steeply with volume fraction, reminiscent of the behavior of colloidal hard spheres. Computer simulations confirm that the growth of τα on approaching the glass transition is independent of particle softness. By contrast, softness becomes relevant at very large packing fractions when the system falls out of equilibrium. In this nonequilibrium regime, τα depends surprisingly weakly on packing fraction, and time correlation functions exhibit a compressed exponential decay consistent with stress-driven relaxation. The transition to this novel regime coincides with the onset of an anomalous decrease in local order with increasing density typical of ultrasoft systems. We propose that these peculiar dynamics results from the combination of the nonequilibrium aging dynamics expected in the glassy state and the tendency of colloids interacting through soft potentials to refluidize at high packing fractions.

  14. Coagulation and rheological behaviors of soy milk colloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2017-04-01

    Coagulation and rheological behaviors of soy milk are reviewed from the viewpoint of colloidal dispersion system. From the results of relative viscosity in the range of small oil body volume fractions, oil bodies containing oleosin behave as rigid spheres. The Krieger-Dougherty equation was found to describe relative viscosities well under high oil body volume fraction. These results indicate that oil bodies in soy milk behave as though suspended matter. Cross-linking between colloid particles occurs when the coagulant is added, and bulky clusters are formed. The viscosity rises due to the hydrodynamic effects of these bulky clusters. A new viscosity equation that combines the Krieger-Dougherty equation and the effective volume fraction could describe the viscos behavior well for wide range of solid contents. Tofu is made by adding a coagulant to soy milk. For lipid concentrations of less than 2%, rupture stress increases depending on the lipid concentration, whereas at concentrations of more than 3%, rupture stress tends to decline. Kinugoshi tofu samples have a maximum value for rupture stress depending on lipid concentration. Digestion of oleosin in high-fat soy milk using papain treatment results in the centrifugal separation of soy milk cream easily. This result indicates that oleosin let oil bodies in soy milk stable. Therefore, it is important to control the state of soy milk colloidal dispersions.

  15. Fabrication of Stable and Regenerable Amine Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles as a Potential Material for Pt(IV) Recovery from Acidic Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D Harikishore Kumar; Wei, Wei; Shuo, Lin; Song, Myung-Hee; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2017-06-07

    MnFe 2 O 4 @SiO 2 -NH 2 magnetic nanocomposite (AFMNC) adsorbent with a particle size of ∼50 nm was successfully synthesized using a facile approach. The as-prepared composite particles showed a fast binding of Pt(IV) with easy magnetic solid-liquid separation. The kinetic data were fitted to both pseudo-first and second-order rate models, indicating that AFMNC exhibited a much higher rate of Pt(IV) binding (0.125 g mg -1 min -1 ) compared to that of commercial ion-exchange resin Amberjet 4200 (0.0002 g mg -1 min -1 ). The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model with a relatively high sorption capacity of 380 mg/g. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated the presence of platinum chloride after sorption on AFMNC, suggesting an adsorbate-adsorbent anion-exchange interaction. In addition, due to its magnetic characteristics, AFMNC can be easily separated from the aqueous medium after the sorption process. The novel nanocomposite may facilitate recovery of Pt(IV) from waste solutions.

  16. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  17. Spectroscopic properties of colloidal indium phosphide quantum wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Hang, Qingling; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Janes, David B.; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    Colloidal InP quantum wires are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, and passivated with the traditional quantum dots surfactants 1-hexadecylamine and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide. The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to other experimental results for InP quantum dots and wires, and to the predictions of theory. The photoluminescence behavior of the wires is also investigated. Efforts to enhance photoluminescence efficiencies through photochemical etching in the presence of HF result only in photochemical thinning or photo-oxidation, without a significant influence on quantum-wire photoluminescence. However, photo-oxidation produces residual dot and rod domains within the wires, which are luminescent. The results establish that the quantum-wire band gaps are weakly influenced by the nature of the surface passivation, and that colloidal quantum wires have intrinsically low photoluminescence efficiencies.

  18. Folded-light-path colloidal quantum dot solar cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Koleilat, Ghada I

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processing with quantum size-effect tuning to match absorption to the solar spectrum. Rapid advances have led to certified solar power conversion efficiencies of over 7%. Nevertheless, these devices remain held back by a compromise in the choice of quantum dot film thickness, balancing on the one hand the need to maximize photon absorption, mandating a thicker film, and, on the other, the need for efficient carrier extraction, a consideration that limits film thickness. Here we report an architecture that breaks this compromise by folding the path of light propagating in the colloidal quantum dot solid. Using this method, we achieve a substantial increase in short-circuit current, ultimately leading to improved power conversion efficiency.

  19. Quantification of Capillary Force Acting on Colloids in a Three-phase Model System of Partially Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Morales, V. L.; Gao, B.; Geohring, L. D.; Parlange, J.; Hay, A. G.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Colloid transport in the vadose zone has gained increasing importance due to groundwater contamination of colloidal-size pathogens and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants. Although colloid transport in saturated system is well understood, the presence of air phase in partially saturated zone poses an additional challenge for elucidating the mechanisms of the colloid transport. Capillary forces that occur when a colloid protrudes through water film around the grain or near air-water meniscus-solid interface has been identified as the major mechanism for colloid retention. Capillary force could be several orders of magnitude greater than the electrostatic DLVO force. Our current study investigates the effect of colloid surface properties, fluid chemistry, and film thickness on capillary force and associated meniscus configuration in a three-phase model system consisting of a particle protruding out of a spread film. Particles ranging from 100 to 600 micrometer are used as surrogates for colloids since the menisci of colloids cannot be visualized using currently available microscopic resolution. In our experimental setup, menisci configuration of soda-lime glass beads and polystyrene beads are visualized with high resolution Hirox digital bright field microscope in dionized water and solutions of 1:1 electrolyte (NaCl), 1:2 electrolyte (CaCl2), natural organic matters, and anionic, cationic or nonionic surfactants. The hydrophilic glass beads can be made hydrophobic by treating with octadecyltrichlorosilane, while the hydrophobic polystyrene can be made hydrophilic by carboxylation. The film thickness is also varied by allowing for evaporation. Contact angle, radius of three-phase contact line, and other relevant parameters for calculation of capillary force are measured. The changes of surface properties, fluid chemistry, and film thickness are expected to result in the observable changes of capillary force and associated meniscus configuration. This

  20. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  1. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: model development and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N; Mohan Kumar, M S; Majid Hassanizadeh, S; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe=0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high if

  2. Colloid molecular weight estimation by gel chromatography/acrylamide gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberatore, F.A.; Dearborn, C.; Nigam, S.; Poon, C.; Camin, L.; Liteplo, M.

    1984-01-01

    Size or molecular weight (MW) estimation of radiolabeled collides in aqueous solutions has long been a problem. The authors have prepared several minimicroaggregated albumin colloids (mμAA) by heat denaturation of stannous-containing HSA solutions at pH 7.0, 7.5, and 8.5). The resulting colloids were labeled with Tc-99m and compared with Au-198 colloid and Tc-99m-antimony sulfide colloid (Tc-99m-Sb/sub 2/S3) by gel chromatography and gel electrophoresis. Tc-99mm-mμAA aggregated at pH 7.0 and the Au-198 colloid appeared in the external void volume of a BioRad A5.0 agarose column indicating an apparent MW of > 5 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The pH7.5 Tc-99m-mμAA, migrated within the filtration range of the column as did a small fraction of Tc-99m-Sb/sub 2/S/sub 3/, suggesting that the MW is between 6 x 10/sup 4/ - 5 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The Tc-99m-mμAA, aggregated at pH 8.5, had an apparent MW on gel filtration similar to that of untreated albumin, MW 6.6 x 10-/sup 4/ daltons. The mobilities of the colloids, on acrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, were consistent with the results on gel chromatography. The largest colloids, Au-198 colloid and pH 7.0 Tc-99m-mμAA, barely entered the separating gel; intermediate sized colloids, a small fraction of Tc-99m-Sb/sub 2/S/sub 3/ and pH 7.5 Tc-99m-mμAA migrated farther into the separating gel; while pH 8.5 Tc-99m-mμAA had mobility approaching that of untreated albumin. Lymphoscintigraphy studies using these colloids in animals showed the predicted, particle size-related differences in migration and clearance. The authors conclude that gel chromatography and gel electrophoresis are useful methods for estimating the apparent size of the colloidal particles

  3. Colloidal paradigm in supercapattery electrode systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2018-01-01

    Among decades of development, electrochemical energy storage systems are now sorely in need of a new design paradigm at the nano size and ion level to satisfy the higher energy and power demands. In this review paper, we introduce a new colloidal electrode paradigm for supercapattery that integrates multiple-scale forms of matter, i.e. ion clusters, colloidal ions, and nanosized materials, into one colloid system, coupled with multiple interactions, i.e. electrostatic, van der Waals forces, and chemical bonding, thus leading to the formation of many redox reactive centers. This colloidal electrode not only keeps the original ionic nature in colloidal materials, but also creates a new attribute of high electroactivity. Colloidal supercapattery is a perfect application example of the novel colloidal electrode, leading to higher specific capacitance than traditional electrode materials. The high electroactivity of the colloidal electrode mainly comes from the contribution of exposed reactive centers, owing to the confinement effect of carbon and a binder matrix. Systematic and thorough research on the colloidal system will significantly promote the development of fundamental science and the progress of advanced energy storage technology.

  4. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  5. Nonequilibrium forces between dragged ultrasoft colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunil P; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-07

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The deformation, in the close encounter of colloids, and the energy dissipation are examined as a function of the drag velocity and their separation.

  6. Structural deformations in liquid crystals with dispersed magnetic nano-colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shoarinejad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  The stable colloidal dispersions of magnetic nano-particles in nematic liquid crystals are called ferronematics. Their behaviour in magnetic fields depends on various parameters such as anchoring energy, magnetic anisotropy, and shape and volume fraction of the particles. In the present paper, the threshold field is obtained for these colloidal nematics. Then, the influence of magnetic anisotropy, cell thickness, magnetic moment, and volume fraction of the particles are discussed . It is found that due to the influence of some effective parameters, the threshold field changes when compared to pure nematic liquid crystals. The obtained results are consistent with the reported experimental results.

  7. MEDICAL MANAGEMENT OF RENAL LITHIASIS—Increasing the Protective Urinary Colloids with Hyaluronidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Arthur J.; Hauser, Ernst A.; Seifter, Joseph

    1952-01-01

    Urine is a highly saturated solution due to the presence of certain colloids. The protective action of urinary colloids is of major importance in preventing precipitation, agglomeration and conglomeration of crystalloids from a super-saturated solution. If the concentration of such protective colloids is insufficient, stone formation begins or is accelerated. In 680 human subjects, the incidence of stone was found to be almost inversely proportional to the degree of protective urinary colloids present. Urine specimens were subjected to ultramicroscopic examination, determination of electric charge carried by the colloidal particles, determination of the surface tension, and photo-ultramicrographic studies. Subcutaneous injection of hyaluronidase mixed with physiologic saline solution greatly increases the content of protective colloids in the urine. The colloids are caused to set up to a gel, thereby preventing electrolytes present from crystallizing. They act as excellent dispersing agents and prevent the formation of stone. Hyaluronidase therapy, using 150 turbidity reducing units every 24 to 72 hours, was effective in preventing calculous formation or reformation during a period of 11 to 14 months in 18 of 20 patients in whom, previously, stones formed rapidly. In a second series of ten patients in whom stones formed rapidly, larger doses of hyaluronidase, averaging 300 turbidity reducing units every 24 to 48 hours, were given. The period of observation at the time of report was from six to ten months. In this group, there was no new stone formation or enlargement of existing stones as evidenced by x-ray studies at 30- to 60-day intervals. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:14905291

  8. Chemistry of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium. Hydrolysis, solubility, colloid formation and redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hye-Ryun

    2006-01-01

    The chemical properties of plutonium and zirconium are important in order to assess nuclear waste disposals with respect to isolation and immobilization of radionuclides. In this study, the hydrolysis, solubility and colloid formation of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium are investigated in 0.5 M HCl/NaCl solution using several complementary methods and the redox behavior of plutonium is investigated in acidic conditions as well. The solubilities of Pu(IV) and Zr(IV) are determined from the onset of colloid formation as a function of pH and metal concentration using LIBD (laser-induced breakdown detection). The investigation of the solubility of Zr(IV) is carried out at different concentrations (log [Zr] = -3 ∝ -7.6) and in a wide pH range (pH = 3 - 9) yielding log K sp (Zr(IV)) = -53.1 ± 0.5 based on the assumption that only mononuclear hydrolysis species exist in solution. Comparing the present results with literature data, the solubilities of Zr can be split in two groups, a crystalline phase with lower solubility and an amorphous phase (Zr(OH) 4 (am)) with higher solubility. The data obtained in the present work set an upper limit for the solubility of freshly formed Zr(OH) 4 (am). To understand this difference of solubilities, the geometrical structure of the dominant solution species is investigated as a function of pH using XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure). The samples at pH >2, still below the solubility limit determined by LIBD, contain the polynuclear Zr(IV) species probably due to the high concentration ([Zr] = 1 mM) and their structure do not resemble any reported simple ZrO 2 structure. The Zr(IV) colloid species in oversaturated solution under this experimental condition resembles amorphous Zr(IV) hydroxide rather than crystalline ZrO 2 . The solubility of Pu(IV) is investigated in acidic solution below pH 2. Considering only mononuclear hydrolysis species, log K sp (Pu(IV)) = -58.3 ± 0.4 is obtained. Since Pu(IV) is not redox stable even

  9. Improved electron injection and transport by use of baking soda as a low-cost, air-stable, n-dopant for solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earmme, Taeshik; Jenekhe, Samson A.

    2013-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, NaHCO3) is found to be an efficient low-cost, air-stable, and environmentally friendly n-dopant for electron-transport layer (ETL) in solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). A 2.0-fold enhancement in power efficiency of blue PhOLEDs is observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) ETL. The bulk conductivity of NaHCO3-doped BPhen film is increased by 5 orders of magnitude. Enhanced performance of PhOLEDs is similarly observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 1,3,5-tris(m-pyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene ETL. These results demonstrate that sodium bicarbonate is an effective n-dopant in organic electronics.

  10. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  11. Fabricating colloidal crystals and construction of ordered nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColloidal crystals of polymeric or inorganic microspheres are of extensive interest due to their potential applications in such as sensing, optics, photonic bandgap and surface patterning. The article highlights a set of approaches developed in our group, which are efficient to prepare colloidal crystals with ordered voids, patterned colloidal crystals on non-planar surfaces, heterogeneous colloidal crystals of different building blocks, colloidal crystals composed of non-spherical polyhedrons, and colloidal crystals of non-close-packed colloidal microspheres in particular. The use of these colloidal crystals as templates for different microstructures range from nanoscale to micron-scale is also summarized.

  12. Shape-Selection of Thermodynamically Stabilized Colloidal Pd and Pt Nanoparticles Controlled via Support Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, M.; Behafarid, F.; Holse, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal chemistry, in combination with nanoparticle (NP)/support epitaxial interactions is used here to synthesize shape-selected and thermodynamically stable metallic NPs over a broad range of NP sizes. The morphology of three-dimensional palladium and platinum NPs supported on TiO2(110) was i......Colloidal chemistry, in combination with nanoparticle (NP)/support epitaxial interactions is used here to synthesize shape-selected and thermodynamically stable metallic NPs over a broad range of NP sizes. The morphology of three-dimensional palladium and platinum NPs supported on TiO2...... rows and was found to be responsible for the shape control. The ability of synthesizing thermally stable shape-selected metal NPs demonstrated here is expected to be of relevance for applications in the field of catalysis, since the activity and selectivity of NP catalysts has been shown to strongly...

  13. Colloidal agglomerates in tank sludge: Impact on waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunker, B.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    'Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena. Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control

  14. Aggregation of amphiphilic polymers in the presence of adhesive small colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulin, Vladimir A; Johner, Albert; Avalos, Josep Bonet

    2010-11-07

    The interaction of amphiphilic polymers with small colloids, capable to reversibly stick onto the chains, is studied. Adhesive small colloids in solution are able to dynamically bind two polymer segments. This association leads to topological changes in the polymer network configurations, such as looping and cross-linking, although the reversible adhesion permits the colloid to slide along the chain backbone. Previous analyses only consider static topologies in the chain network. We show that the sliding degree of freedom ensures the dominance of small loops, over other structures, giving rise to a new perspective in the analysis of the problem. The results are applied to the analysis of the equilibrium between colloidal particles and star polymers, as well as to block copolymer micelles. The results are relevant for the reversible adsorption of silica particles onto hydrophilic polymers, used in the process of formation of mesoporous materials of the type SBA or MCM, cross-linked cyclodextrin molecules threading on the polymers and forming the structures known as polyrotaxanes. Adhesion of colloids on the corona of the latter induce micellization and growth of larger micelles as the number of colloids increase, in agreement with experimental data.

  15. Microhardness and Penetration of Artificial White Spot Lesions Treated with Resin or Colloidal Silica Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandava, Jyothi; Reddy, Y Shilpa; Kantheti, Sirisha; Chalasani, Uma; Ravi, Ravi Chandra; Borugadda, Roopesh; Konagala, Ravi Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Infiltration of early enamel lesions by materials having remineralizing capacity seems to improve aesthetics and arrests caries progression. To evaluate and compare the surface microhardness and penetration depth of a low viscosity resin and colloidal silica nanoparticle infiltrates into artificially created white spot lesions. Forty extracted human central incisors were embedded in acrylic resin blocks exposing the labial surfaces of the crowns. The specimens were immersed in demineralizing solution for 96 hours to create white spot lesions on labial surfaces. The samples were then divided into two groups (n=20 each), where in Group 1-resin infiltration (ICON DMG, Hamburg, Germany) and Group 2-colloidal silica infiltration (Arrow Fine chemicals, Rajkot, Gujarat, India) was done. Samples were subjected to vicker's microhardness testing at baseline, after demineralization and after treatment with resin or colloidal silica infiltrates. Then, the crowns were sectioned longitudinally and penetration depth of the infiltrants was measured using confocal laser scanning microscope and compared the readings to lesion depth. All the collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using t-test. Resin infiltration group showed significantly greater increase in microhardness compared to colloidal silica infiltration (p=0.001). The percentage of penetration of the resin group was 67.14% and that of colloidal silica group was 54.53% indicating significant difference between the two. Resin infiltrates performed better in regaining the baseline microhardness and penetrating deep into the porous white spot lesions, when compared to colloidal silica infiltrates.

  16. Solution-based colloidal synthesis of hybrid P3HT: Ternary CuInSe2 nanocomposites using a novel combination of capping agents for low-cost photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shailesh Narain; Chawla, Parul; Akanksha; Srivastava, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, ternary CuInSe2 (CISe) chalcopyrite nanocrystallites efficiently passivated by a novel combination of capping agents viz: aniline and 1-octadecene during chemical route synthesis were dispersed in conducting polymer matrix poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). By varying the composition and concentration of the ligands, the properties of the resulting CISe nanocrystallites and its corresponding polymer nanocomposites thus could be tailored. The structural, morphological and optical studies accomplished by various complimentary techniques viz. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Contact angle, Photoluminescence (PL) and Raman have enabled us to compare the different hybrid organic (polymer)-inorganic nanocomposites. On the basis of aniline-octadecene equilibrium phase diagram, the polydispersity of the CISe nanocrystals could be tuned by using controlled variations in the reaction conditions of nucleation and growth such as composition of the solvent and temperature. To the best of author's knowledge, the beneficial effects of both the capping agents; aniline and octadecene contributing well in tandem in the development of large-sized (100-125 nm) high quality, sterically- and photo-oxidative stable polycrystalline CISe and its corresponding polymer (P3HT):CISe composites with enhanced charge transfer efficiency has been reported for the first time. The low-cost synthesis and ease of preparation renders this method of great potential for its possible application in low-cost hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaics. The figure shows the Temperature vs Mole fraction graph of two different phases (aniline and 1-octadecene) in equilibrium.

  17. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  18. A colloid-facilitated transport model with variable colloid transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Wolfsberg, Andrew V.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Reimus, Paul W.

    2007-05-01

    Anomalous contaminant transport velocities in groundwater for species generally considered to be immobile are often attributed to the mechanism of colloid-facilitated transport. In some of the field observations attributed to colloid facilitation, an extremely small fraction of the total contaminant mass introduced to the groundwater is detected downstream. In this study, a new model of colloid-facilitated contaminant transport is proposed that explains this phenomenon as the variability of mobility of individual colloids in the population. The process of retardation via attachment and detachment of colloids on immobile surfaces is often modeled with time and space invariant parameters; here it is modeled assuming a diverse population of transport properties that account for the inherent variability of colloid size, surface charge and chemical properties, mineralogy, and the concomitant impact on colloid mobility. When the contaminant is assumed to irreversibly attach to or form colloids, the migration of the contaminant plume exhibits extremely non-Fickian behavior. The plume's center of mass travels with a velocity governed by the groundwater velocity divided by the mean colloid retardation factor. However, small quantities of contaminant attached to a few highly mobile colloids travel at velocities up to the groundwater velocity, far exceeding the velocity of the centroid of the plume. This paper introduces the colloid diversity model, presents some sensitivity calculations for an idealized case, and discusses the implications of such a model on data needs, simulation of field observations, and model scaling.

  19. Two-dimensional modeling of contaminant transport in porous media in the presence of colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhit, Hesham M.; Hassan, Ahmed E.

    2005-12-01

    It has long been known that colloids can facilitate the transport of contaminants in groundwater systems by reducing the effective retardation factor. A significant effort has been devoted to study colloid-facilitated contaminant transport during the past decade. Many of the previous studies were restricted to one-dimensional analyses and comparisons with finite-column experiments. In this work, a two-dimensional numerical model is developed and used to study the different interactions between colloids, contaminants, and porous media under homogeneous conditions. The numerical formulation of the model is based on discretizing mass balance equations and reaction equations using finite differences having a third-order, total variance-diminishing scheme for the advection terms. This scheme significantly reduces numerical dispersion and leads to greater accuracy compared to the standard central-differencing scheme. The model is tested against analytical solutions under simplified conditions as well as against experimental data, and the results are favorable. The model is used to investigate the impact of the various reaction rates and parameter values on the movement of contaminant plumes in two dimensions. The model is also used to investigate the hypothesis that colloids may increase the effective retardation factor of contaminant plumes. The analysis shows that assuming kinetic mass exchange between contaminant and colloids with constant reaction rate coefficients that are not related to the concentrations may lead to inaccurate results. These inaccurate results are exemplified in the finding that under the kinetic assumption the ratio of the initial concentration of colloids to the initial concentration of contaminant does not affect the amount of facilitation or retardation that occurs in the system. It is also found that colloids can increase the effective retardation factor for the contaminant under certain combinations of reaction rates and distribution

  20. Frost Heave in Colloidal Soils

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of frost heave in colloidal soils. The theory accountsfor heave and consolidation while not requiring a frozen fringe assumption. Two solidificationregimes occur: a compaction regime in which the soil consolidates to accommodate the ice lenses, and a heave regime during which liquid is sucked into the consolidated soil from an external reservoir, and the added volume causes the soil to heave. The ice fraction is found to vary inversely with thefreezing velocity V , while the rate of heave is independent of V , consistent with field and laboratoryobservations. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  1. Colloidal discs in nematic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre, N M; Patricio, P; Tasinkevych, M; Andrienko, D; Gama, M M Telo da

    2004-01-01

    We use adaptive finite elements methods to investigate a variety of structures in inverted nematic emulsions numerically. In particular, we study dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between colloidal discs in two-dimensional nematics. The behaviour of colloidal particles near a substrate and at a nematic-isotropic interface are also considered

  2. Manipulating colloids with charges and electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of experimental investigations on a variety of colloidal suspensions. Colloidal particles are at least a hundred times larger than atoms or molecules, but suspended in a liquid they display the same phase behavior, including fluid and crystalline phases. Due to their

  3. Repeptization by dissolution in a colloidal system of iron(III) pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Y Mikal; Velikov, Krassimir P; Kegel, Willem K

    2012-12-04

    Repeptization (redispersion) from an aggregated state is usually only possible in charge-stabilized colloidal systems if the system is either coagulated in the secondary minimum of the interaction potential or if the system cannot settle completely into the primary minimum. In this work, we analyze the zeta potential, conductivity, and long-term stability of colloidal systems of iron(III) pyrophosphate and surprisingly find that the system seems to defy conventional wisdom as it can be repeptized from its coagulated state regardless of aging time and background ions. Moreover, after having been stored for up to a month in 2 M NaCl, dialysis of iron pyrophosphate will yield a colloidal dispersion that is actually stable for a longer period of time than a fresh system with background electrolyte removed.

  4. Single-step fabrication of quantum funnels via centrifugal colloidal casting of nanoparticle films.

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Jin Young

    2015-07-13

    Centrifugal casting of composites and ceramics has been widely employed to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of functional materials. This powerful method has yet to be deployed in the context of nanoparticles--yet size-effect tuning of quantum dots is among their most distinctive and application-relevant features. Here we report the first gradient nanoparticle films to be constructed in a single step. By creating a stable colloid of nanoparticles that are capped with electronic-conduction-compatible ligands we were able to leverage centrifugal casting for thin-films devices. This new method, termed centrifugal colloidal casting, is demonstrated to form films in a bandgap-ordered manner with efficient carrier funnelling towards the lowest energy layer. We constructed the first quantum-gradient photodiode to be formed in a single deposition step and, as a result of the gradient-enhanced electric field, experimentally measured the highest normalized detectivity of any colloidal quantum dot photodetector.

  5. Study of colloids transport during two-phase flow using a novel polydimethylsiloxane micro-model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiulan; Karadimitriou, N K; Hassanizadeh, S M; Kleingeld, P J; Imhof, A

    2013-07-01

    As a representation of a porous medium, a closed micro-fluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with uniform wettability and stable hydrophobic properties, was designed and fabricated. A flow network, with a mean pore size of 30 μm, was formed in a PDMS slab, covering an area of 1 mm × 10 mm. The PDMS slab was covered and bonded with a 120-μm-thick glass plate to seal the model. The glass plate was first spin-coated with a thin layer, roughly 10 μm, of PDMS. The micro-model was treated with silane in order to make it uniformly and stably hydrophobic. Fluorescent particles of 300 μm in diameter were used as colloids. It is known that more removal of colloids occurs under unsaturated conditions, compared to saturated flow in soil. At the same time, the change of saturation has been observed to cause remobilization of attached colloids. The mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. This is the first time that a closed micro-model, made of PDMS with uniform and stable wettability, has been used in combination with confocal microscopy to study colloid transport under transient two-phase flow conditions. With confocal microscopy, the movement of fluorescent particles and flow of two liquids within the pores can be studied. One can focus at different depths within the pores and thus determine where the particles exactly are. Thus, remobilization of attached colloids by moving fluid-fluid interfaces was visualized. In order to allow for the deposition and subsequent remobilization of colloids during two-phase flow, three micro-channels for the injection of liquids with and without colloids were constructed. An outlet channel was designed where effluent concentration breakthrough curves can be quantified by measuring the fluorescence intensity. A peak concentration also indicated in the breakthrough curve with the drainage event. The acquired images and breakthrough curve successfully confirmed the utility of the combination of such a PDMS

  6. Colloid transport in saturated porous media: Elimination of attachment efficiency in a new colloid transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-01-01

    A colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple yet captures the essential features of colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media when colloid retention is dominated by the secondary minimum because an electrostatic barrier inhibits substantial deposition in the primary minimum. This model is based on conventional colloid filtration theory (CFT) but eliminates the empirical concept of attachment efficiency. The colloid deposition rate is computed directly from CFT by assuming all predicted interceptions of colloids by collectors result in at least temporary deposition in the secondary minimum. Also, a new paradigm for colloid re-entrainment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. To accomplish this, the initial colloid population is divided into two fractions. One fraction, by virtue of physiochemical characteristics (e.g., size and charge), will always be re-entrained after capture in a secondary minimum. The remaining fraction of colloids, again as a result of physiochemical characteristics, will be retained “irreversibly” when captured by a secondary minimum. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of the initial colloid population that will be retained “irreversibly” upon interception by a secondary minimum, and (2) the rate at which reversibly retained colloids leave the secondary minimum. These two parameters were correlated to the depth of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) secondary energy minimum and pore-water velocity, two physical forces that influence colloid transport. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport.

  7. Optical trapping of colloidal particles and measurement of the defect line tension and colloidal forces in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyukh, I.I.; Kuzmin, A.N.; Kachynski, A.V.; Prasad, P.N.; Lavrentovich, O.D.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of transparent microparticles suspended in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal with low birefringence. We employ the particle manipulation to measure line tension of a topologically stable disclination line and to determine colloidal interaction of particles with perpendicular surface anchoring of the director. The three-dimensional director fields and positions of the particles manipulated by laser tweezers are visualized by fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

  8. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Biosolids Application

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrod O. Miller; Anastasios D. Karathanasis; Christopher J. Matocha

    2011-01-01

    Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive biosolids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of biosolids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without biosolids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in...

  9. Semi-Analysis for the Pseudo-Colloid Migration of Multi-member Decay Chains in the Fractured Porous Medium with the Flux Boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Mi Seon; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Far-field modeling of radionuclide transport is an important component of general safety assessment studies carried out within the framework of storage of high-level radioactive waste in underground repositories. After a canister failure, radionuclides are leached from the backfilling and penetrate the surrounding bedrock, the final barrier between pollutant and Man's environment. Migration by pure diffusion through a hard tock or clay barrier is a rather slow process. In Fractured porous media, all of the groundwater flow occur within the fractures because fractures have permeabilities of several orders of magnitude larger than those of the rock matrix, if the geological layers are fully saturated with water. So radionuclides dissolved in groundwater will be transported along a fracture with molecular diffusion from the fracture to the rock matrix. Molecular diffusion from the fractures into the porous matrix constitutes an attenuation mechanism that can be highly order to prepare for extreme cases, it is assumed that the pollutants arrive rapidly in a fractured zone where transport takes place at much higher velocities. The specific problem of radionuclide transport through a fractured medium has been tackled by many scientists.According to the electromagnetic interaction between the solute and the colloid, solutes are absorbed by the colloid, and then we are called the pseudo-colloid. The natural colloid can exist inside a fracture with a density of 105 particles per one liter of a liquid. When the radionuclide migrates through a fractured rock, solutes sorb on natural colloids as well as the stationary fracture wall solid surface. Due to natural colloids, whose particle size is larger than that of solutes, colloids can migrate faster than solutes. Therefore, these pseudo-colloids, which are the sorbed solute molecules on the natural colloids, can also migrate faster than the solute. Both the solute and the pseudocolloid are sorbed onto and desorbed from

  10. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, Susanna

    2010-04-01

    Due to colloids potential to bind radionuclides (RN) and even mobilise sorbed RN, colloid transport of RN should be taken into account when modeling radionuclide transport in the scenario of a leaking canister in a deep bedrock repository of spent nuclear fuel. Colloids are always present in natural waters and the concentrations are controlled by the groundwater chemistry where specifically the ionic strength is of major importance. In many deep bedrock groundwaters, the ionic strength is fairly high (above the Critical Coagulation Concentration) and therefore colloids are not likely to be stable. In these types of groundwaters colloid concentrations up to 100 μg/l could be expected, and clay colloids organic degradation products and bacteria and viruses represent can be found. In a long time perspective cycles of glaciations can be expected in Sweden as in other Nordic countries. It can not be excluded that glacial melt water can intrude to repository depth with high flows. In this scenario the groundwater conditions may drastically change. In contact with dilute groundwater the bentonite barrier can start to propagate a bentonite gel and further release montmorillonite colloids into water bearing fractures. The concentration of colloids in vicinity of the bentonite barrier can then increase drastically. In contact with Grimsel groundwater types with [Na] and [Ca] of 0.001 and 0.0001 M respectively a montmorillonite concentration of a maximum of 20 mg/l is expected. Further, the groundwater chemistry of Grimsel seems to be representative for glacial meltwater when comparing with the water chemistry data on meltwaters from existing glaciers. A key to be able to model colloid transport of radionuclides is the sorption strength and the sorption reversibility. To facilitate this, a compilation of literature K d -values and an inventory of available sorption kinetic data has been composed for the prioritized elements Pu, Th, Am, Pb, Pa, Ra, Np, Cm, Ac, Tc, Cs, Nb, Ni

  11. Nonlinear rheology of colloidal dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brader, J M

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal dispersions are commonly encountered in everyday life and represent an important class of complex fluid. Of particular significance for many commercial products and industrial processes is the ability to control and manipulate the macroscopic flow response of a dispersion by tuning the microscopic interactions between the constituents. An important step towards attaining this goal is the development of robust theoretical methods for predicting from first-principles the rheology and nonequilibrium microstructure of well defined model systems subject to external flow. In this review we give an overview of some promising theoretical approaches and the phenomena they seek to describe, focusing, for simplicity, on systems for which the colloidal particles interact via strongly repulsive, spherically symmetric interactions. In presenting the various theories, we will consider first low volume fraction systems, for which a number of exact results may be derived, before moving on to consider the intermediate and high volume fraction states which present both the most interesting physics and the most demanding technical challenges. In the high volume fraction regime particular emphasis will be given to the rheology of dynamically arrested states. (topical review)

  12. Colloid centrifugation of boar semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, J M; Wallgren, M

    2011-09-01

    Colloid centrifugation of boar semen has been reported sporadically for at least the last two decades, beginning with density gradient centrifugation (DGC) and progressing more recently to single layer centrifugation (SLC). Single layer centrifugation through a species-specific colloid has been shown to be effective in selecting the best spermatozoa (spermatozoa with good motility and normal morphology) from boar sperm samples. The method is easier to use and less time-consuming than DGC and has been scaled-up to allow whole ejaculates from other species, e.g. stallions, to be processed in a practical manner. The SLC technique is described, and various scale-up versions are presented. The potential applications for SLC in boar semen preservation are as follows: to improve sperm quality in artificial insemination (AI) doses for 'problem' boars; to increase the shelf-life of normal stored sperm samples, either by processing the fresh semen before preparing AI doses or by processing the stored semen dose to extract the best spermatozoa; to remove pathogens (viruses, bacteria), thus improving biosecurity of semen doses and potentially reducing the use of antibiotics; to improve cryosurvival by removing dead and dying spermatozoa prior to cryopreservation; to select spermatozoa for in vitro fertilization. These applications are discussed and practical examples are provided. Finally, a few thoughts about the economic value of the technique to the boar semen industry are presented. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Single-step colloidal quantum dot films for infrared solar harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Kiani, Amirreza

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductors with bandgaps in the near- to mid-infrared can harvest solar light that is otherwise wasted by conventional single-junction solar cell architectures. In particular, colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials since they are cost-effective, processed from solution, and have a bandgap that can be tuned into the infrared (IR) via the quantum size effect. These characteristics enable them to harvest the infrared portion of the solar spectrum to which silicon is transparent. To date, IR CQD solar cells have been made using a wasteful and complex sequential layer-by-layer process. Here, we demonstrate ∼1 eV bandgap solar-harvesting CQD films deposited in a single step. By engineering a fast-drying solvent mixture for metal iodide-capped CQDs, we deposited active layers greater than 200 nm in thickness having a mean roughness less than 1 nm. We integrated these films into infrared solar cells that are stable in air and exhibit power conversion efficiencies of 3.5% under illumination by the full solar spectrum, and 0.4% through a simulated silicon solar cell filter.

  14. Colloidal dispersions of maghemite nanoparticles produced by laser pyrolysis with application as NMR contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Morales, Maria del Puerto [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bomati-Miguel, Oscar [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bautista, Carmen [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Zhao, Xinqing [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bonville, Pierre [CEA, CE Saclay, DSM/DRECAM/SPEC, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Alejo, Rigoberto Perez de [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Unidad de RMN, Paseo Juan XXIII, 1, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Unidad de RMN, Paseo Juan XXIII, 1, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, Martin [Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. C/San Martin de Porres 4, 28035 Madrid (Spain); Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco J [Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. C/San Martin de Porres 4, 28035 Madrid (Spain); Ferreiros, Joaquin [Hospital Clinico de Madrid ' San Carlos' , Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-08-07

    Biocompatible magnetic dispersions have been prepared from {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (5 nm) synthesized by continuous laser pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} vapours. The feasibility of using these dispersions as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents has been analysed in terms of chemical structure, magnetic properties, {sup 1}H NMR relaxation times and biokinetics. The magnetic nanoparticles were dispersed in a strong alkaline solution in the presence of dextran, yielding stable colloids in a single step. The dispersions consist of particle-aggregates 25 nm in diameter measured using transmission electron microscope and a hydrodynamic diameter of 42 nm measured using photon correlation spectroscopy. The magnetic and relaxometric properties of the dispersions were of the same order of magnitude as those of commercial contrast agents produced using coprecipitation. However, these dispersions, when injected intravenously in rats at standard doses showed a mono-exponential blood clearance instead of a biexponential one, with a blood half-life of 7 {+-} 1 min. Furthermore, an important enhancement of the image contrast was observed after the injection, mainly located at the liver and the spleen of the rat. In conclusion, the laser pyrolysis technique seems to be a good alternative to the coprecipitation method for producing MRI contrast agents, with the advantage of being a continuous synthesis method that leads to very uniform particles capable of being dispersed and therefore transformed in a biocompatible magnetic liquid.

  15. Change the Collective Behaviors of Colloidal Motors by Tuning Electrohydrodynamic Flow at the Subparticle Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingfu; Wu, Ning

    2018-01-23

    As demonstrated in biological systems, breaking the symmetry of surrounding hydrodynamic flow is the key to achieve autonomous locomotion of microscopic objects. In recent years, a variety of synthetic motors have been developed based on different propulsion mechanisms. Most work, however, focuses on the propulsion of individual motors. Here, we study the collective behaviors of colloidal dimers actuated by a perpendicularly applied AC electric field, which controls the electrohydrodynamic flow at subparticle levels. Although these motors experience strong dipolar repulsion from each other and are highly active, surprisingly, they assemble into a family of stable planar clusters with handedness. We show that this type of unusual structure arises from the contractile hydrodynamic flow around small lobes but extensile flow around the large lobes. We further reveal that the collective behavior, assembled structure, and assembly dynamics of these motors all depend on the specific directions of electrohydrodynamic flow surrounding each lobe of the dimers. By fine-tuning the surface charge asymmetry on particles and salt concentration in solution, we demonstrate the ability to control their collective behaviors on demand. This novel type of active assembly via hydrodynamic interactions has the potential to grow monodisperse clusters in a self-limiting fashion. The underlying concept revealed in this work should also apply to other types of active and asymmetric particles.

  16. Non-iridescent structural colors from uniform-sized SiO2 colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçu, Gökhan; Güner, Tuğrul; Demir, Mustafa M.

    2018-05-01

    Structural colors have recently attracted interest from diverse fields of research due to their ease of fabrication and eco-friendliness. These types of colors are, in principle, achieved by periodically arranged submicron-diameter colloidal particles. The interaction of light with a structure containing long-range ordered colloidal particles leads to coloration; this usually varies depending on the angle of observation (iridescence). However, the majority of the applications demand constant color that is independent of the viewing angle (non-iridescence). In this work, silica colloids were obtained using the Stöber method at different sizes from 150 to 300 nm in an alcoholic dispersion. The casting of the dispersion on a substrate leaves behind a photonic crystal showing a colorful iridescent film. However, centrifugation and redispersion of the SiO2 particles into fresh solvent may cause the formation of small, aggregated silica domains in the new dispersion. The casting of this dispersion allows for the development of photonic glass, presumably due to the accumulation of aggregates showing stable colloidal film independent of viewing angle. Moreover, depending on the size of the silica colloids, non-iridescent photonic glasses with various colors (violet, blue, green, and orange) are obtained.

  17. An alkali treating strategy for the colloidization of graphitic carbon nitride and its excellent photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fuxing; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Chenjuan; Chen, Binhe; Li, Peiran; Chen, Zhi; Dong, Xiaoping

    2016-04-15

    The colloid of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was of great importance for practical application. Herein we introduced an alkali treatment route to efficiently colloidize g-C3N4 under mild conditions by destroying the hydrogen bonds between linearly polymeric melon chains and hydrolyzing partial C−NH−C bonds linked two tri-s-triazine units. The obtained colloidal suspension was extremely stable due to its negative charges on surface, and the particle size of several hundred nanometers and the nanobelt-like morphology were revealed by electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering technologies. The structural, optical and functional group analysis demonstrated that the structure of CN heterocycles was preserved after the alkali treatment, and the produced colloidal g-C3N4 can be re-assembled by an electrostatic interaction. Moreover, contributing to the reduced electron-hole recombination, the photocatalytic performance of restacked carbon nitride colloids had more enhanced photocatalytic performance than bulk g-C3N4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monotonic Stable Solutions for Minimum Coloring Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, H.J.M.; Miquel, S.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    For the class of minimum coloring games (introduced by Deng et al. (1999)) we investigate the existence of population monotonic allocation schemes (introduced by Sprumont (1990)). We show that a minimum coloring game on a graph G has a population monotonic allocation scheme if and only if G is (P4,

  19. Monotonic stable solutions for minimum coloring games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, H.J.M.; Miquel, S.; Norde, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    For the class of minimum coloring games (introduced by Deng et al. Math Oper Res, 24:751–766, 1999) we investigate the existence of population monotonic allocation schemes (introduced by Sprumont Games Econ Behav 2:378–394, 1990). We show that a minimum coloring game on a graph G has a population

  20. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  1. Colloid transport and retention in unsaturated porous media: effect of colloid input concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Morales, Verónica L; Cakmak, M Ekrem; Salvucci, Anthony E; Geohring, Larry D; Hay, Anthony G; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2010-07-01

    Colloids play an important role in facilitating transport of adsorbed contaminants in soils. Recent studies showed that under saturated conditions colloid retention was a function of its concentration. It is unknown if this is the case under unsaturated conditions. In this study, the effect of colloid concentration on colloid retention was investigated in unsaturated columns by increasing concentrations of colloid influents with varying ionic strength. Colloid retention was observed in situ by bright field microscopy and quantified by measuring colloid breakthrough curves. In our unsaturated experiments, greater input concentrations resulted in increased colloid retention at ionic strength above 0.1 mM, but not in deionized water (i.e., 0 mM ionic strength). Bright field microscope images showed that colloid retention mainly occurred at the solid-water interface and wedge-shaped air-water-solid interfaces, whereas the retention at the grain-grain contacts was minor. Some colloids at the air-water-solid interfaces were rotating and oscillating and thus trapped. Computational hydrodynamic simulation confirmed that the wedge-shaped air-water-solid interface could form a "hydrodynamic trap" by retaining colloids in its low velocity vortices. Direct visualization also revealed that colloids once retained acted as new retention sites for other suspended colloids at ionic strength greater than 0.1 mM and thereby could explain the greater retention with increased input concentrations. Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) energy calculations support this concept. Finally, the results of unsaturated experiments were in agreement with limited saturated experiments under otherwise the same conditions.

  2. Accumulation of Colloidal Particles in Flow Junctions Induced by Fluid Flow and Diffusiophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sangwoo [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ault, Jesse T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Patrick B. [Unilever R& D Port Sunlight, Wirral (United Kingdom); Stone, Howard A. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-16

    The flow of solutions containing solutes and colloidal particles in porous media is widely found in systems including underground aquifers, hydraulic fractures, estuarine or coastal habitats, water filtration systems, etc. In such systems, solute gradients occur when there is a local change in the solute concentration. While the effects of solute gradients have been found to be important for many applications, we observe an unexpected colloidal behavior in porous media driven by the combination of solute gradients and the fluid flow. When two flows with different solute concentrations are in contact near a junction, a sharp solute gradient is formed at the interface, which may allow strong diffusiophoresis of the particles directed against the flow. Consequently, the particles accumulate near the pore entrance, rapidly approaching the packing limit. These colloidal dynamics have important implications for the clogging of a porous medium, where particles that are orders of magnitude smaller than the pore width can accumulate and block the pores within a short period of time. As a result, we also show that this effect can be exploited as a useful tool for preconcentrating biomolecules for rapid bioassays.

  3. Logarithmic relaxation in a colloidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperl, M

    2003-09-01

    The slow dynamics for a colloidal suspension of particles interacting with a hard-core repulsion complemented by a short-ranged attraction is discussed within the frame of mode-coupling theory for ideal glass transitions for parameter points near a higher-order glass-transition singularity. The solutions of the equations of motion for the density correlation functions are solved for the square-well system in quantitative detail by asymptotic expansion using the distance of the three control parameters-packing fraction, attraction strength and attraction range-from their critical values as small parameters. For given wave vectors, distinguished surfaces in parameter space are identified where the next-to-leading-order contributions for the expansion vanish so that the decay functions exhibit a logarithmic decay over large time intervals. For both coherent and tagged particle dynamics the leading-order logarithmic decay is accessible in the liquid regime for wave vectors of several times the principal peak in the structure factor. The logarithmic decay in the correlation function is manifested in the mean-squared displacement as a subdiffusive power law with an exponent varying sensitively with the control parameters. Shifting parameters through the distinguished surfaces, the correlation functions and the logarithm of the mean-squared displacement considered as functions of the logarithm of the time exhibit a crossover from concave to convex behavior, and a similar scenario is obtained when varying the wave vector.