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Sample records for stable chromosomal integration

  1. Transposon-mediated chromosomal integration of transgenes in the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti and establishment of stable transgenic lines.

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    Hongguang Shao

    Full Text Available Genetic transformation is a potential tool for analyzing gene function and thereby identifying new drug and vaccine targets in parasitic nematodes, which adversely affect more than one billion people. We have previously developed a robust system for transgenesis in Strongyloides spp. using gonadal microinjection for gene transfer. In this system, transgenes are expressed in promoter-regulated fashion in the F1 but are silenced in subsequent generations, presumably because of their location in repetitive episomal arrays. To counteract this silencing, we explored transposon-mediated chromosomal integration of transgenes in S. ratti. To this end, we constructed a donor vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the Ss-act-2 promoter with flanking inverted tandem repeats specific for the piggyBac transposon. In three experiments, free-living Strongyloides ratti females were transformed with this donor vector and a helper plasmid encoding the piggyBac transposase. A mean of 7.9% of F1 larvae were GFP-positive. We inoculated rats with GFP-positive F1 infective larvae, and 0.5% of 6014 F2 individuals resulting from this host passage were GFP-positive. We cultured GFP-positive F2 individuals to produce GFP-positive F3 L3i for additional rounds of host and culture passage. Mean GFP expression frequencies in subsequent generations were 15.6% in the F3, 99.0% in the F4, 82.4% in the F5 and 98.7% in the F6. The resulting transgenic lines now have virtually uniform GFP expression among all progeny after at least 10 generations of passage. Chromosomal integration of the reporter transgenes was confirmed by Southern blotting and splinkerette PCR, which revealed the transgene flanked by S. ratti genomic sequences corresponding to five discrete integration sites. BLAST searches of flanking sequences against the S. ratti genome revealed integrations in five contigs. This result provides the basis for two powerful functional genomic tools

  2. Transposon-mediated chromosomal integration of transgenes in the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti and establishment of stable transgenic lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hongguang; Li, Xinshe; Nolan, Thomas J; Massey, Holman C; Pearce, Edward J; Lok, James B

    2012-01-01

    Genetic transformation is a potential tool for analyzing gene function and thereby identifying new drug and vaccine targets in parasitic nematodes, which adversely affect more than one billion people. We have previously developed a robust system for transgenesis in Strongyloides spp. using gonadal microinjection for gene transfer. In this system, transgenes are expressed in promoter-regulated fashion in the F1 but are silenced in subsequent generations, presumably because of their location in repetitive episomal arrays. To counteract this silencing, we explored transposon-mediated chromosomal integration of transgenes in S. ratti. To this end, we constructed a donor vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Ss-act-2 promoter with flanking inverted tandem repeats specific for the piggyBac transposon. In three experiments, free-living Strongyloides ratti females were transformed with this donor vector and a helper plasmid encoding the piggyBac transposase. A mean of 7.9% of F1 larvae were GFP-positive. We inoculated rats with GFP-positive F1 infective larvae, and 0.5% of 6014 F2 individuals resulting from this host passage were GFP-positive. We cultured GFP-positive F2 individuals to produce GFP-positive F3 L3i for additional rounds of host and culture passage. Mean GFP expression frequencies in subsequent generations were 15.6% in the F3, 99.0% in the F4, 82.4% in the F5 and 98.7% in the F6. The resulting transgenic lines now have virtually uniform GFP expression among all progeny after at least 10 generations of passage. Chromosomal integration of the reporter transgenes was confirmed by Southern blotting and splinkerette PCR, which revealed the transgene flanked by S. ratti genomic sequences corresponding to five discrete integration sites. BLAST searches of flanking sequences against the S. ratti genome revealed integrations in five contigs. This result provides the basis for two powerful functional genomic tools in S. ratti

  3. Chromosome painting in biological dosimetry: Semi-automatic system to score stable chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sagredo, J.M.; Vallcorba, I.; Sanchez-Hombre, M.C.; Ferro, M.T.; San Roman Cos-Gayon, C.; Santos, A.; Malpica, N.; Ortiz, C.

    1997-01-01

    From the beginning of the description of the procedure of chromosome painting by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), it was thought its possible application to score induced chromosomal aberrations in radiation exposition. With chromosome painting it is possible to detect changes between chromosomes that has been validated in radiation exposition. Translocation scoring by FISH, contrarily to the unstable dicentrics, mainly detect stable chromosome aberrations that do not disappear, it allows the capability of quantify delayed acute expositions or chronic cumulative expositions. The large number of cells that have to be analyzed for high accuracy, specially when dealing with low radiation doses, makes it almost imperative to use an automatic analysis system. After validate translocation scoring by FISH in our, we have evaluated the ability and sensitivity to detect chromosomal aberrations by chromosome using different paint probes used, showing that any combination of paint probes can be used to score induced chromosomal aberrations. Our group has developed a FISH analysis that is currently being adapted for translocation scoring analysis. It includes systematic error correction and internal control probes. The performance tests carried out show that 9,000 cells can be analyzed in 10 hr. using a Sparc 4/370. Although with a faster computer, a higher throughput is expected, for large population screening or very low radiation doses, this performance still has to be improved. (author)

  4. Evaluating changes in stable chromosomal translocation frequency in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Wang Jianyi; Liu An; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Shively, John E.; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Williams, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The lack of any consistent correlation between radioimmunotherapy (RIT) dose and observed hematologic toxicity has made it difficult to validate RIT radiation dose estimates to marrow. Stable chromosomal translocations (SCT) which result after radiation exposure may be a biologic parameter that more closely correlates with RIT radiation dose. Increases in the frequency of SCT are observed after radiation exposure and are highly correlated with absorbed radiation dose. SCT are cumulative after multiple radiation doses and conserved through an extended number of cell divisions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether increases in SCT frequency were detectable in peripheral lymphocytes after RIT and whether the magnitude of these increases correlated with estimated radiation dose to marrow and whole body. Methods and Materials: Patients entered in a Phase I dose escalation therapy trial each received 1-3 intravenous cycles of the radiolabeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody, 90 Y-chimeric T84.66. Five mCi of 111 In-chimeric T84.66 was co-administered for imaging and biodistribution purposes. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to the start of therapy and 5-6 weeks after each therapy cycle. Peripheral lymphocytes were harvested after 72 hours of phytohemagglutinin stimulation and metaphase spreads prepared. Spreads were then stained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using commercially available chromosome paint probes to chromosomes 3 and 4. Approximately 1000 spreads were evaluated for each chromosome sample. Red marrow radiation doses were estimated using the AAPM algorithm and blood clearance curves. Results: Eighteen patients were studied, each receiving at least one cycle of therapy ranging from 5-22 mCi/m 2 . Three patients received 2 cycles and two patients received 3 cycles of therapy. Cumulative estimated marrow doses ranged from 9.2 to 310 cGy. Increases in SCT frequencies were observed after

  5. Early embryonic chromosome instability results in stable mosaic pattern in human tissues.

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    Hasmik Mkrtchyan

    Full Text Available The discovery of copy number variations (CNV in the human genome opened new perspectives on the study of the genetic causes of inherited disorders and the aetiology of common diseases. Here, a single-cell-level investigation of CNV in different human tissues led us to uncover the phenomenon of mitotically derived genomic mosaicism, which is stable in different cell types of one individual. The CNV mosaic ratios were different between the 10 individuals studied. However, they were stable in the T lymphocytes, immortalized B lymphoblastoid cells, and skin fibroblasts analyzed in each individual. Because these cell types have a common origin in the connective tissues, we suggest that mitotic changes in CNV regions may happen early during embryonic development and occur only once, after which the stable mosaic ratio is maintained throughout the differentiated tissues. This concept is further supported by a unique study of immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines obtained with 20 year difference from two subjects. We provide the first evidence of somatic mosaicism for CNV, with stable variation ratios in different cell types of one individual leading to the hypothesis of early embryonic chromosome instability resulting in stable mosaic pattern in human tissues. This concept has the potential to open new perspectives in personalized genetic diagnostics and can explain genetic phenomena like diminished penetrance in autosomal dominant diseases. We propose that further genomic studies should focus on the single-cell level, to better understand the aetiology of aging and diseases mediated by somatic mutations.

  6. Transposable prophage Mu is organized as a stable chromosomal domain of E. coli.

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    Rudra P Saha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The E. coli chromosome is compacted by segregation into 400-500 supercoiled domains by both active and passive mechanisms, for example, transcription and DNA-protein association. We find that prophage Mu is organized as a stable domain bounded by the proximal location of Mu termini L and R, which are 37 kbp apart on the Mu genome. Formation/maintenance of the Mu 'domain' configuration, reported by Cre-loxP recombination and 3C (chromosome conformation capture, is dependent on a strong gyrase site (SGS at the center of Mu, the Mu L end and MuB protein, and the E. coli nucleoid proteins IHF, Fis and HU. The Mu domain was observed at two different chromosomal locations tested. By contrast, prophage λ does not form an independent domain. The establishment/maintenance of the Mu domain was promoted by low-level transcription from two phage promoters, one of which was domain dependent. We propose that the domain confers transposition readiness to Mu by fostering topological requirements of the reaction and the proximity of Mu ends. The potential benefits to the host cell from a subset of proteins expressed by the prophage may in turn help its long-term stability.

  7. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Chromosomally Stable and Unstable Progeny of Irradiated Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet E.; Aypar, Umut; Waters, Katrina M.; Yang, Austin; Morgan, William F.

    2014-09-24

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon, the underlying mechanisms of which are poorly understood. Persistent oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cytokine levels and epigenetic changes are among the mechanisms invoked in the perpetuation of the phenotype. To determine whether epigenetic aberrations affect genomic instability we measured DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA (miR) levels in well characterized chromosomally stable and unstable clonally expanded single cell survivors of irradiation. While no changes in DNA methylation were observed for the gene promoters evaluated, increased LINE-1 methylation was observed for two unstable clones (LS12, CS9) and decreased Alu element methylation was observed for the other two unstable clones (115, Fe5.0-8). These relationships also manifested for mRNA and miR expression. mRNA identified for the LS12 and CS9 clones were most similar to each other (261 mRNA), while the 115 and Fe5.0-8 clones were more similar to each other, and surprisingly also similar to the two stable clones, 114 and 118 (286 mRNA among these four clones). Pathway analysis showed enrichment for pathways involved in mitochondrial function and cellular redox, themes routinely invoked in genomic instability. The commonalities between the two subgroups of clones were also observed for miR. The number of miR for which anti-correlated mRNA were identified suggests that these miR exert functional effects in each clone. The results of this study demonstrate significant genetic and epigenetic changes in unstable cells, but similar changes almost equally common in chromosomally stable cells. Possible conclusions might be that the chromosomally stable clones have some other form of instability, or that some of the observed changes represent a sort of radiation signature for and that other changes are related to genomic instability. Irrespective, these findings again suggest that a spectrum of changes both drive genomic

  8. An integrated genetic, physical, and transcriptional map of chromosome 13

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    Scheffer, H.; Kooy, R.F.; Wijngaard, A. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study a genetic map containing 20 markers and typed in 40 CEPH families is presented. It includes 7 thusfar untyped microsatellite markers, 7 that have previously been mapped on a subset of 8 CEPH families, one reference marker, D13S71, and three telomeric VNTR markers. Also, 4 intragenic RB1 markers were typed. The markers have an average heterozygosity of 73% (80%, excluding the three RFLPs). The total sex average length of the map is 140 cM. The mean female to male ratio is 1.54. For the non-telomeric part of the chromosome between the markers D13S221 in 13q12 and D13S173 in 13q33-q34, this ratio is 1.99. This ratio is reversed in the telomeric part of the chromosome between D13S173 and D13S234 in distal 13q34, where it is 0.47. A high new mutation frequency of 1% was detected in the (CTTT(T)){sub n} repeat in intron 20 of the RB1 gene. The map has been integrated with 7 microsatellite markers and 2 RFLP markers from CEPH database version 7.0, resulting in a map with 32 markers (28 loci) of chromosome 13q. In addition, a deletion hybrid breakpoint map ordering 50 markers in 18 intervals is constructed. It includes 32 microsatellite markers, 4 genes, 5 STSs, and 9 ESTs. Each of 18 intervals contains at least one microsatellite marker included in the extended genetic map. These data allow a correlation between the genetic and physical map of chromosome 13. New ESTs are currently being identified and localized at this integrated map.

  9. Integrating Multi-omic features exploiting Chromosome Conformation Capture data

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    Ivan eMerelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The representation, integration and interpretation of omic data is a complex task, in particular considering the huge amount of information that is daily produced in molecular biology laboratories all around the world. The reason is that sequencing data regarding expression profiles, methylation patterns, and chromatin domains is difficult to harmonize in a systems biology view, since genome browsers only allow coordinate-based representations, discarding functional clusters created by the spatial conformation of the DNA in the nucleus. In this context, recent progresses in high throughput molecular biology techniques and bioinformatics have provided insights into chromatin interactions on a larger scale and offer a formidable support for the interpretation of multi-omic data. In particular, a novel sequencing technique called Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C allows the analysis of the chromosome organization in the cell’s natural state. While performed genome wide, this technique is usually called Hi-C. Inspired by service applications such as Google Maps, we developed NuChart, an R package that integrates Hi-C data to describe the chromosomal neighbourhood starting from the information about gene positions, with the possibility of mapping on the achieved graphs genomic features such as methylation patterns and histone modifications, along with expression profiles. In this paper we show the importance of the NuChart application for the integration of multi-omic data in a systems biology fashion, with particular interest in cytogenetic applications of these techniques. Moreover, we demonstrate how the integration of multi-omic data can provide useful information in understanding why genes are in certain specific positions inside the nucleus and how epigenetic patterns correlate with their expression.

  10. Efficient site-specific integration in Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase.

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    Nkrumah, Louis J; Muhle, Rebecca A; Moura, Pedro A; Ghosh, Pallavi; Hatfull, Graham F; Jacobs, William R; Fidock, David A

    2006-08-01

    Here we report an efficient, site-specific system of genetic integration into Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite chromosomes. This is mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase, which catalyzes recombination between an incoming attP and a chromosomal attB site. We developed P. falciparum lines with the attB site integrated into the glutaredoxin-like cg6 gene. Transfection of these attB(+) lines with a dual-plasmid system, expressing a transgene on an attP-containing plasmid together with a drug resistance gene and the integrase on a separate plasmid, produced recombinant parasites within 2 to 4 weeks that were genetically uniform for single-copy plasmid integration. Integrase-mediated recombination resulted in proper targeting of parasite proteins to intra-erythrocytic compartments, including the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle. Recombinant attB x attP parasites were genetically stable in the absence of drug and were phenotypically homogeneous. This system can be exploited for rapid genetic integration and complementation analyses at any stage of the P. falciparum life cycle, and it illustrates the utility of Bxb1-based integrative recombination for genetic studies of intracellular eukaryotic organisms.

  11. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Bryan Utter

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01 from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC. Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT.

  12. Stable chromosomal inversion polymorphisms and insecticide resistance in the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae).

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    Brooke, B D; Hunt, R H; Chandre, F; Carnevale, P; Coetzee, M

    2002-07-01

    Anopheles gambiae Giles has been implicated as a major vector of malaria in Africa. A number of paracentric chromosomal inversions have been observed as polymorphisms in wild and laboratory populations of this species. These polymorphisms have been used to demonstrate the existence of five reproductive units in West African populations that are currently described as incipient species. They have also been correlated with various behavioral characteristics such as adaptation to aridity and feeding preference and have been associated with insecticide resistance. Two paracentric inversions namely 2La and 2Rb are highly ubiquitous in the wild and laboratory populations sampled. Both inversions are easily conserved during laboratory colonization of wild material and one shows significant positive heterosis with respect to Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Inversion 2La has previously been associated with dieldrin resistance and inversion 2Rb shows an association with DDT resistance based on this study. The stability and maintenance of these inversions as polymorphisms provides an explanation for the transmission and continued presence of DDT and dieldrin resistance in a laboratory strain of An. gambiae in the absence of insecticide selection pressure. This effect may also be operational in wild populations. Stable inversion polymorphism also provides a possible mechanism for the continual inheritance of suitable genetic factors that otherwise compromise the fitness of genetically modified malaria vector mosquitoes.

  13. Correlation of chromosomal instability, telomere length and telomere maintenance in microsatellite stable rectal cancer: a molecular subclass of rectal cancer.

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    Lisa A Boardman

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC tumor DNA is characterized by chromosomal damage termed chromosomal instability (CIN and excessively shortened telomeres. Up to 80% of CRC is microsatellite stable (MSS and is historically considered to be chromosomally unstable (CIN+. However, tumor phenotyping depicts some MSS CRC with little or no genetic changes, thus being chromosomally stable (CIN-. MSS CIN- tumors have not been assessed for telomere attrition.MSS rectal cancers from patients ≤50 years old with Stage II (B2 or higher or Stage III disease were assessed for CIN, telomere length and telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase activation [TA]; alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]. Relative telomere length was measured by qPCR in somatic epithelial and cancer DNA. TA was measured with the TRAPeze assay, and tumors were evaluated for the presence of C-circles indicative of ALT. p53 mutation status was assessed in all available samples. DNA copy number changes were evaluated with Spectral Genomics aCGH.Tumors were classified as chromosomally stable (CIN- and chromosomally instable (CIN+ by degree of DNA copy number changes. CIN- tumors (35%; n=6 had fewer copy number changes (<17% of their clones with DNA copy number changes than CIN+ tumors (65%; n=13 which had high levels of copy number changes in 20% to 49% of clones. Telomere lengths were longer in CIN- compared to CIN+ tumors (p=0.0066 and in those in which telomerase was not activated (p=0.004. Tumors exhibiting activation of telomerase had shorter tumor telomeres (p=0.0040; and tended to be CIN+ (p=0.0949.MSS rectal cancer appears to represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that may be categorized both on the basis of CIN status and telomere maintenance mechanism. MSS CIN- rectal cancers appear to have longer telomeres than those of MSS CIN+ rectal cancers and to utilize ALT rather than activation of telomerase.

  14. On the solution of high order stable time integration methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe; Blaheta, Radim; Sysala, Stanislav; Ahmad, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-22 ISSN 1687-2770 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : evolution equations * preconditioners for quadratic matrix polynomials * a stiffly stable time integration method Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.836, year: 2013 http://www.boundaryvalueproblems.com/content/2013/1/108

  15. A standard vector for the chromosomal integration and characterization of BioBrick™ parts in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Susanna; Pasotti, Lorenzo; Politi, Nicolò; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2013-05-10

    The chromosomal integration of biological parts in the host genome enables the engineering of plasmid-free stable strains with single-copy insertions of the desired gene networks. Although different integrative vectors were proposed, no standard pre-assembled genetic tool is available to carry out this task. Synthetic biology concepts can contribute to the development of standardized and user friendly solutions to easily produce engineered strains and to rapidly characterize the desired genetic parts in single-copy context. In this work we report the design of a novel integrative vector that allows the genomic integration of biological parts compatible with the RFC10, RFC23 and RFC12 BioBrick™ standards in Escherichia coli. It can also be specialized by using BioBrick™ parts to target the desired integration site in the host genome. The usefulness of this vector has been demonstrated by integrating a set of BioBrick™ devices in two different loci of the E. coli chromosome and by characterizing their activity in single-copy. Construct stability has also been evaluated and compared with plasmid-borne solutions. Physical modularity of biological parts has been successfully applied to construct a ready-to-engineer BioBrick™ vector, suitable for a stable chromosomal insertion of standard parts via the desired recombination method, i.e. the bacteriophage integration mechanism or homologous recombination. In contrast with previously proposed solutions, it is a pre-assembled vector containing properly-placed restriction sites for the direct transfer of various formats of BioBrick™ parts. This vector can facilitate the characterization of parts avoiding copy number artefacts and the construction of antibiotic resistance-free engineered microbes, suitable for industrial use.

  16. The Human Proteome Organization Chromosome 6 Consortium: integrating chromosome-centric and biology/disease driven strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C H; Kast, J; Foster, L J; Siu, K W M; Overall, C M; Binkowski, T A; Hildebrand, W H; Scherer, A; Mansoor, M; Keown, P A

    2014-04-04

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) is designed to generate a comprehensive map of the protein-based molecular architecture of the human body, to provide a resource to help elucidate biological and molecular function, and to advance diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Within this framework, the chromosome-based HPP (C-HPP) has allocated responsibility for mapping individual chromosomes by country or region, while the biology/disease HPP (B/D-HPP) coordinates these teams in cross-functional disease-based groups. Chromosome 6 (Ch6) provides an excellent model for integration of these two tasks. This metacentric chromosome has a complement of 1002-1034 genes that code for known, novel or putative proteins. Ch6 is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, many with high population prevalence, devastating clinical impact and profound societal consequences. The unique combination of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, phenomic and health services data being drawn together within the Ch6 program has enormous potential to advance personalized medicine by promoting robust biomarkers, subunit vaccines and new drug targets. The strong liaison between the clinical and laboratory teams, and the structured framework for technology transfer and health policy decisions within Canada will increase the speed and efficacy of this transition, and the value of this translational research. Canada has been selected to play a leading role in the international Human Proteome Project, the global counterpart of the Human Genome Project designed to understand the structure and function of the human proteome in health and disease. Canada will lead an international team focusing on chromosome 6, which is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, including immune and inflammatory disorders affecting the brain, skeletal system, heart and blood vessels, lungs, kidney, liver, gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system. Many of these chronic and persistent

  17. Development of stable reporter system cloning luxCDABE genes into chromosome of Salmonella enterica serotypes using Tn7 transposon

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    Lawrence Mark L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis may be a food safety problem when raw food products are mishandled and not fully cooked. In previous work, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella enterica serotypes using a plasmid-based reporting system that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products in short term studies. In this study, we report the use of a Tn7-based transposon system for subcloning of luxCDABE genes into the chromosome of eleven Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from the broiler production continuum. Results We found that the lux operon is constitutively expressed from the chromosome post-transposition and the lux cassette is stable without external pressure, i.e. antibiotic selection, for all Salmonella enterica serotypes used. Bioluminescence expression is based on an active electron transport chain and is directly related with metabolic activity. This relationship was quantified by measuring bioluminescence against a temperature gradient in aqueous solution using a luminometer. In addition, bioluminescent monitoring of two serotypes confirmed that our chicken skin model has the potential to be used to evaluate pathogen mitigation strategies. Conclusions This study demonstrated that our new stable reporting system eliminates bioluminescence variation due to plasmid instability and provides a reliable real-time experimental system to study application of preventive measures for Salmonella on food products in real-time for both short and long term studies.

  18. Novel Integrated Lab-on-Chip System for Chromosome Translocations Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar

    2009-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the development of a chromosome total analysis system (C-TAS) starting from the design strategy and simulations to the integration into a final monolithic plug and play device. Individual modules which perform the sample preprocessing and analysis tasks like - cell...... isolation, cell culture, cell lysing, chromosome extraction and Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization will be presented. How we solved connecting the individual chips and adjusting the microfluidic flows, by using simulations will be discussed....

  19. Exploitation of a chromosomally integrated lactose operon for controlled gene expression in Lactococcus lactis.

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    Payne, J; MacCormick, C A; Griffin, H G; Gasson, M J

    1996-02-01

    Lactococcus lactis MG5267 is a plasmid-free strain in which the lactose operon is integrated in the bacterial chromosome. The chromosomal lacG gene which encodes phospho-beta-galactosidase was inactivated by a double cross-over integration event. Unexpectedly, the resultant mutant was shown to retain a Lac-positive phenotype. The lysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophage LM-4 was subsequently integrated into the chromosome of this strain such that expression of the heterologous gene was mediated by the lactose operon promoter. Expression of the lysin gene was shown to be regulated by growth on lactose. This represents an important strategy for the controlled and stabilised expression of biotechnologically useful genes in L. lactis.

  20. Integration of hepatitis B virus DNA in chromosome-specific satellite sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaul, Y.; Garcia, P.D.; Schonberg, S.; Rutter, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors previously reported the cloning and detailed analysis of the integrated hepatitis B virus sequences in a human hepatoma cell line. They report here the integration of at least one of hepatitis B virus at human satellite DNA sequences. The majority of the cellular sequences identified by this satellite were organized as a multimeric composition of a 0.6-kilobase EcoRI fragment. This clone hybridized in situ almost exclusively to the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1 and 16 and to a lower extent to chromosome 2 and to the heterochromatic region of the Y chromosome. The immediate flanking host sequence appeared as a hierarchy of repeating units which were almost identical to a previously reported human satellite III DNA sequence

  1. Integration of 28 STSs into the physical map of human chromosome 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerken, S.; White, R.; Bradley, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Genes on human chromosome 18 are associated with familial glucocorticoid deficiency (MC2R), pemphigus vulgaris (DSG3) and foliaceus (DSG1), familial amyloidosis (TTR), colorectal carcinoma (DCC), erythropoietic protoporphyria (FECH), follicular lymphoma (BCL2, FVT1), and congenital methemoglobinemia (CYB5). As the resolution of human genetic maps improves, linkage between other diseases and specific regions of chromosome 18 will occur. A physical map of human chromosome 18 will prove useful in identifying candidate genes that are associated with these disorders. Using various physical and genetic mapping techniques, over 35 genes and 19 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are assigned to human chromosome 18. Most of these genes and several of the ESTs were sublocalized using a well-defined panel of somatic cell hybrids that contain different segments of human chromosome 18. Despite recent efforts, progress in mapping human chromosome 18 has lagged behind that achieved for other chromosomes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to integrate 9 new transcriptional tags [8 brain ESTs (8) and the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) (3)] and 19 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) into the physical map of human chromosome 18. The SSRs were isolated by screening genomic DNA libraries constructed in M13mp18 vectors with oligonucleotide probes that detected dinucleotide d(CA)- and tetranucleotide-repeat motifs. DNA sequences of clones that contained microsatellite repeats were obtained by thermal-cycle sequencing, and STSs were developed from clones that contained numerous repeats. STSs that identified highly polymorphic loci in eight unrelated CEPH parents were used for genotyping. Results of linkage analyses and estimates of heterozygosity for these markers will be reported. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Random chromosome elimination in synthetic Triticum-Aegilops amphiploids leads to development of a stable partial amphiploid with high grain micro- and macronutrient content and powdery mildew resistance.

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    Tiwari, Vijay K; Rawat, Nidhi; Neelam, Kumari; Kumar, Sundip; Randhawa, Gursharn S; Dhaliwal, Harcharan S

    2010-12-01

    Synthetic amphiploids are the immortal sources for studies on crop evolution, genome dissection, and introgression of useful variability from related species. Cytological analysis of synthetic decaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) - Aegilops kotschyi Boiss. amphiploids (AABBDDUkUkSkSk) showed some univalents from the C1 generation onward followed by chromosome elimination. Most of the univalents came to metaphase I plate after the reductional division of paired chromosomes and underwent equational division leading to their elimination through laggards and micronuclei. Substantial variation in the chromosome number of pollen mother cells from different tillers, spikelets, and anthers of some plants also indicated somatic chromosome elimination. Genomic in situ hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and simple sequence repeat markers analysis of two amphiploids with reduced chromosomes indicated random chromosome elimination of various genomes with higher sensitivity of D followed by the Sk and Uk genomes to elimination, whereas 1D chromosome was preferentially eliminated in both the amphiploids investigated. One of the partial amphiploids, C4 T. aestivum 'Chinese Spring' - Ae. kotschyi 396 (2n = 58), with 34 T. aestivum, 14 Uk, and 10 Sk had stable meiosis and high fertility. The partial amphiploids with white glumes, bold seeds, and tough rachis with high grain macro- and micronutrients and resistance to powdery mildew could be used for T. aestivum biofortification and transfer of powdery mildew resistance.

  3. Chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa after 137Cs γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Hirokazu; Kamiguchi, Yujiroh

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrated that freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa possess strong resistance to 137 Cs γ-ray irradiation at doses of up to 8 Gy. Freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa were rehydrated and injected into mouse oocytes with an intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technique. Most oocytes can be activated after ICSI by using spermatozoa irradiated with γ-rays before and after freeze-drying. Sperm chromosome complements were analyzed at the first cleavage metaphase. Chromosome aberrations increased in a dose-dependent manner in the spermatozoa irradiated before freeze-drying. However, no increase in oocytes with chromosome aberrations was observed when fertilized by spermatozoa that had been irradiated after freeze-drying, as compared with freeze-dried spermatozoa that had not been irradiated. These results suggest that both the chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried spermatozoa, as well as their ability to activate oocytes, were protected from γ-ray irradiation at doses at which chromosomal damage is found to be strongly induced in spermatozoa suspended in solution

  4. 3Disease Browser: A Web server for integrating 3D genome and disease-associated chromosome rearrangement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruifeng; Liu, Yifang; Li, Tingting; Li, Cheng

    2016-10-13

    Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure. Interestingly, we find that intellectual disability may be a candidate disease caused by 3D chromosome structure alteration. We also develop a Web server (3Disease Browser, http://3dgb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/disease/) for integrating and visualizing disease-associated CR events and chromosomal 3D structure.

  5. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh K Prusty

    Full Text Available More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR. Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  6. Stabilization of Telomere G-Quadruplexes Interferes with Human Herpesvirus 6A Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Gravel, Annie; Artusi, Sara; Richter, Sara N; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes using a mechanism that remains poorly understood. To achieve a better understanding of the HHV-6A/B integration mechanism, we made use of BRACO-19, a compound that stabilizes G-quadruplex secondary structures and prevents telomere elongation by the telomerase complex. First, we analyzed the folding of telomeric sequences into G-quadruplex structures and their binding to BRACO-19 using G-quadruplex-specific antibodies and surface plasmon resonance. Circular dichroism studies indicate that BRACO-19 modifies the conformation and greatly stabilizes the G-quadruplexes formed in G-rich telomeric DNA. Subsequently we assessed the effects of BRACO-19 on the HHV-6A initial phase of infection. Our results indicate that BRACO-19 does not affect entry of HHV-6A DNA into cells. We next investigated if stabilization of G-quadruplexes by BRACO-19 affected HHV-6A's ability to integrate its genome into host chromosomes. Incubation of telomerase-expressing cells with BRACO-19, such as HeLa and MCF-7, caused a significant reduction in the HHV-6A integration frequency ( P integration frequency in U2OS cells that lack telomerase activity and elongate their telomeres through alternative lengthening mechanisms. Our data suggest that the fluidity of telomeres is important for efficient chromosomal integration of HHV-6A and that interference with telomerase activity negatively affects the generation of cellular clones containing integrated HHV-6A. IMPORTANCE HHV-6A/B can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of infected cells. Telomeres consist of repeated hexanucleotides (TTAGGG) of various lengths (up to several kilobases) and end with a single-stranded 3' extension. To avoid recognition and induce a DNA damage response, the single-stranded overhang folds back on itself and forms a telomeric loop (T-loop) or adopts a tertiary structure, referred to as a G-quadruplex. In the

  7. HHV-6A/B Integration and the Pathogenesis Associated with the Reactivation of Chromosomally Integrated HHV-6A/B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Vanessa; Flamand, Louis

    2017-06-26

    Unlike other human herpesviruses, human herpesvirus 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/B) infection can lead to integration of the viral genome in human chromosomes. When integration occurs in germinal cells, the integrated HHV-6A/B genome can be transmitted to 50% of descendants. Such individuals, carrying one copy of the HHV-6A/B genome in every cell, are referred to as having inherited chromosomally-integrated HHV-6A/B (iciHHV-6) and represent approximately 1% of the world's population. Interestingly, HHV-6A/B integrate their genomes in a specific region of the chromosomes known as telomeres. Telomeres are located at chromosomes' ends and play essential roles in chromosomal stability and the long-term proliferative potential of cells. Considering that the integrated HHV-6A/B genome is mostly intact without any gross rearrangements or deletions, integration is likely used for viral maintenance into host cells. Knowing the roles played by telomeres in cellular homeostasis, viral integration in such structure is not likely to be without consequences. At present, the mechanisms and factors involved in HHV-6A/B integration remain poorly defined. In this review, we detail the potential biological and medical impacts of HHV-6A/B integration as well as the possible chromosomal integration and viral excision processes.

  8. Chromosomal Integration of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase Gene,blaKPC, in Klebsiella Species Is Elusive but Not Rare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Amy J; Stoesser, Nicole; Chai, Weidong; Carroll, Joanne; Barry, Katie; Cherunvanky, Anita; Sebra, Robert; Kasarskis, Andrew; Peto, Tim E; Walker, A Sarah; Sifri, Costi D; Crook, Derrick W; Sheppard, Anna E

    2017-03-01

    Carbapenemase genes in Enterobacteriaceae are mostly described as being plasmid associated. However, the genetic context of carbapenemase genes is not always confirmed in epidemiological surveys, and the frequency of their chromosomal integration therefore is unknown. A previously sequenced collection of bla KPC -positive Enterobacteriaceae from a single U.S. institution (2007 to 2012; n = 281 isolates from 182 patients) was analyzed to identify chromosomal insertions of Tn 4401 , the transposon most frequently harboring bla KPC Using a combination of short- and long-read sequencing, we confirmed five independent chromosomal integration events from 6/182 (3%) patients, corresponding to 15/281 (5%) isolates. Three patients had isolates identified by perirectal screening, and three had infections which were all successfully treated. When a single copy of bla KPC was in the chromosome, one or both of the phenotypic carbapenemase tests were negative. All chromosomally integrated bla KPC genes were from Klebsiella spp., predominantly K. pneumoniae clonal group 258 (CG258), even though these represented only a small proportion of the isolates. Integration occurred via IS 15 -ΔI-mediated transposition of a larger, composite region encompassing Tn 4401 at one locus of chromosomal integration, seen in the same strain ( K. pneumoniae ST340) in two patients. In summary, we identified five independent chromosomal integrations of bla KPC in a large outbreak, demonstrating that this is not a rare event. bla KPC was more frequently integrated into the chromosome of epidemic CG258 K. pneumoniae lineages (ST11, ST258, and ST340) and was more difficult to detect by routine phenotypic methods in this context. The presence of chromosomally integrated bla KPC within successful, globally disseminated K. pneumoniae strains therefore is likely underestimated. Copyright © 2017 Mathers et al.

  9. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobayashi, F.; Wu, J.Z.; Kanamori, H.; Tanaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Karasawa, W.; Kaneko, S.; Watanabe, S.; Sakaguchi, T.; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Mukai, Y.; Hamada, M.; Saito, M.; Hayakawa, K.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Nasuda, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Handa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, AUG 12 (2015), s. 595 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Centromere * Chromosomal rearrangement * Chromosome 6B Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.867, year: 2015

  10. Effect of LexA on Chromosomal Integration of CTXϕ in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Archana; Anbumani, D; Bag, Satyabrata; Mehta, Ojasvi; Kumar, Pawan; Saxena, Shruti; Nair, G Balakrish; Das, Bhabatosh

    2016-01-15

    The genesis of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae involves acquisition of CTXϕ, a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) filamentous phage that encodes cholera toxin (CT). The phage exploits host-encoded tyrosine recombinases (XerC and XerD) for chromosomal integration and lysogenic conversion. The replicative genome of CTXϕ produces ssDNA by rolling-circle replication, which may be used either for virion production or for integration into host chromosome. Fine-tuning of different ssDNA binding protein (Ssb) levels in the host cell is crucial for cellular functioning and important for CTXϕ integration. In this study, we mutated the master regulator gene of SOS induction, lexA, of V. cholerae because of its known role in controlling levels of Ssb proteins in other bacteria. CTXϕ integration decreased in cells with a ΔlexA mutation and increased in cells with an SOS-noninducing mutation, lexA (Ind(-)). We also observed that overexpression of host-encoded Ssb (VC0397) decreased integration of CTXϕ. We propose that LexA helps CTXϕ integration, possibly by fine-tuning levels of host- and phage-encoded Ssbs. Cholera toxin is the principal virulence factor responsible for the acute diarrheal disease cholera. CT is encoded in the genome of a lysogenic filamentous phage, CTXϕ. Vibrio cholerae has a bipartite genome and harbors single or multiple copies of CTXϕ prophage in one or both chromosomes. Two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases (XerC and XerD) recognize the folded ssDNA genome of CTXϕ and catalyze its integration at the dimer resolution site of either one or both chromosomes. Fine-tuning of ssDNA binding proteins in host cells is crucial for CTXϕ integration. We engineered the V. cholerae genome and created several reporter strains carrying ΔlexA or lexA (Ind(-)) alleles. Using the reporter strains, the importance of LexA control of Ssb expression in the integration efficiency of CTXϕ was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

  11. Sex determination in Madagascar geckos of the genus Paroedura (Squamata: Gekkonidae): are differentiated sex chromosomes indeed so evolutionary stable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubová, Martina; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Rovatsos, Michail; Farkačová, Klára; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-12-01

    Among amniote vertebrates, geckos represent a clade with exceptional variability in sex determination; however, only a minority of species of this highly diverse group has been studied in this respect. Here, we describe for the first time a female heterogamety in the genus Paroedura, the group radiated in Madagascar and adjacent islands. We identified homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome in Paroedura masobe, Paroedura oviceps, Paroedura karstophila, Paroedura stumpffi, and Paroedura lohatsara. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed that female-specific sequences are greatly amplified in the W chromosome of P. lohatsara and that P. gracilis seems to possess a derived system of multiple sex chromosomes. Contrastingly, neither CGH nor heterochromatin visualization revealed differentiated sex chromosomes in the members of the Paroedura picta-Paroedura bastardi-Paroedura ibityensis clade, which is phylogenetically nested within lineages with a heterochromatic W chromosome. As a sex ratio consistent with genotypic sex determination has been reported in P. picta, it appears that the members of the P. picta-P. bastardi-P. ibityensis clade possess homomorphic, poorly differentiated sex chromosomes and may represent a rare example of evolutionary loss of highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a telomeric probe revealed a telomere-typical pattern in all species and an accumulation of telomeric sequences in the centromeric region of autosomes in P. stumpffi and P. bastardi. Our study adds important information for the greater understanding of the variability and evolution of sex determination in geckos and demonstrates how the geckos of the genus Paroedura provide an interesting model for studying the evolution of the sex chromosomes.

  12. Cell Culture Systems To Study Human Herpesvirus 6A/B Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Collin, Vanessa; Hall-Sedlak, Ruth; Jerome, Keith R; Mori, Yasuko; Carbonneau, Julie; Boivin, Guy; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A/B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their viral genomes in the telomeres of human chromosomes. The viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration remain largely unknown, mostly due to the lack of efficient and reproducible cell culture models to study HHV-6A/B integration. In this study, we characterized the HHV-6A/B integration efficiencies in several human cell lines using two different approaches. First, after a short-term infection (5 h), cells were processed for single-cell cloning and analyzed for chromosomally integrated HHV-6A/B (ciHHV-6A/B). Second, cells were infected with HHV-6A/B and allowed to grow in bulk for 4 weeks or longer and then analyzed for the presence of ciHHV-6. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), droplet digital PCR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization, we could demonstrate that HHV-6A/B integrated in most human cell lines tested, including telomerase-positive (HeLa, MCF-7, HCT-116, and HEK293T) and telomerase-negative cell lines (U2OS and GM847). Our results also indicate that inhibition of DNA replication, using phosphonoacetic acid, did not affect HHV-6A/B integration. Certain clones harboring ciHHV-6A/B spontaneously express viral genes and proteins. Treatment of cells with phorbol ester or histone deacetylase inhibitors triggered the expression of many viral genes, including U39 , U90 , and U100 , without the production of infectious virus, suggesting that the tested stimuli were not sufficient to trigger full reactivation. In summary, both integration models yielded comparable results and should enable the identification of viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration and the screening of drugs influencing viral gene expression, as well as the release of infectious HHV-6A/B from the integrated state. IMPORTANCE The analysis and understanding of HHV-6A/B genome integration into host DNA is currently limited due to the lack of reproducible and efficient viral integration systems. In the

  13. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 in heart failure: prevalence and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Wallaschek, Nina; Gross, Ulrich M; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Seeberg, Bettina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Escher, Felicitas; Poller, Wolfgang; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) A and B are two betaherpesviruses that are associated with many conditions including roseola, drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, limbic encephalitis, and myocarditis. HHV-6 is integrated in the germline [chromosomically integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6)] in ∼0.8% of the human population. To date, the prevalence, species distribution, and treatment responses of ciHHV-6 are unknown for cardiac patients. We determined the prevalence of HHV-6 and ciHHV-6 genotypes in 1656 endomyocardial biopsies of patients with persisting unexplained symptoms of heart failure. Infection of cardiac tissue was identified by nested PCR, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Virus load and mRNA levels were followed in ciHHV-6 patients treated with ganciclovir. HHV-6 was detected in 273 of 1656 cardiac tissues (16.5%; HHV-6B, 98.2%, HHV-6A, 1.8%) by PCR. Nineteen of the 1656 patients (1.1%) presented with persistently high HHV-6 copy numbers indicative of ciHHV-6. Sequencing confirmed ciHHV-6A in seven patients (36.8%) which was considerably higher than detected in non-ciHHV-6 patients. Inheritance was demonstrated in three selected families, confirming ciHHV-6 chromosomal integration by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization. HHV-6 reactivation and chromosomal integration were confirmed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and heart tissue. Virus particles were identified in degenerating myocytes and interstitial cells. Antiviral treatment abolished viral mRNA and ameliorated cardiac symptoms. Virus replication in cardiac tissue of ciHHV-6 heart failure patients suggests that ciHHV-6 reactivation causes persistence of unexplained heart failure symptoms. We demonstrated that antiviral treatment, effective in decreasing viral transcripts and clinical complaints of cardiomyopathies, is a new therapeutic option for ciHHV-6-associated diseases. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  14. Enhanced integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Mu-En; Yeh, I-Hsin; Sung, Li-Yu; Wu, Meng-Ying; Chao, Yun-Peng; Ng, I-Son; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic engineering often necessitates chromosomal integration of multiple genes but integration of large genes into Escherichia coli remains difficult. CRISPR/Cas9 is an RNA-guided system which enables site-specific induction of double strand break (DSB) and programmable genome editing. Here, we hypothesized that CRISPR/Cas9-triggered DSB could enhance homologous recombination and augment integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome. We demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 system was able to trigger DSB in >98% of cells, leading to subsequent cell death, and identified that mutagenic SOS response played roles in the cell survival. By optimizing experimental conditions and combining the λ-Red proteins and linear dsDNA, CRISPR/Cas9-induced DSB enabled homologous recombination of the donor DNA and replacement of lacZ gene in the MG1655 strain at efficiencies up to 99%, and allowed high fidelity, scarless integration of 2.4, 3.9, 5.4, and 7.0 kb DNA at efficiencies approaching 91%, 92%, 71%, and 61%, respectively. The CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene integration also functioned in different E. coli strains including BL21 (DE3) and W albeit at different efficiencies. Taken together, our methodology facilitated precise integration of dsDNA as large as 7 kb into E. coli with efficiencies exceeding 60%, thus significantly ameliorating the editing efficiency and overcoming the size limit of integration using the commonly adopted recombineering approach. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 172-183. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  16. Analysis gives alterations stable chromosomic induced by the radiation in vitro the sanguine samples to well-known dose. Preliminary results obtained by means of chromosomic painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, M.J.; Moreno, M.; Gomez-Espi, M.; Olivares, P.; Herranz, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the University General Hospital Gregorio Marannon, once standardized the technique in situ hybridization with fluorescence by means of painting chromosomic the couples 1 and 2 you this carrying out the irradiation gives sanguine samples to well-known dose The objective these irradiations it is the elaboration in vitro a calibration chart dose effect for gamma ray. This new curve will allow to estimate dose in individuals with suspicion overexposure to ionizing radiations, solving some gives the limitations that it presents the technique classic cytogenetics

  17. Comparison of four stable numerical methods for Abel's integral equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murio, Diego A.; Mejia, Carlos E.

    1991-01-01

    The 3-D image reconstruction from cone-beam projections in computerized tomography leads naturally, in the case of radial symmetry, to the study of Abel-type integral equations. If the experimental information is obtained from measured data, on a discrete set of points, special methods are needed in order to restore continuity with respect to the data. A new combined Regularized-Adjoint-Conjugate Gradient algorithm, together with two different implementations of the Mollification Method (one based on a data filtering technique and the other on the mollification of the kernal function) and a regularization by truncation method (initially proposed for 2-D ray sample schemes and more recently extended to 3-D cone-beam image reconstruction) are extensively tested and compared for accuracy and numerical stability as functions of the level of noise in the data.

  18. Chromosomal integration of sfp gene in Bacillus subtilis to enhance bioavailability of hydrophobic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Ki; Kim, Seong-Bin; Park, Chan-Sun; Kim, Jong-Guk; Oh, Hee-Mock; Yoon, Byung-Dae; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2005-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis C9 effectively degrades aliphatic hydrocarbons up to a chain length of C19 and produces a lipopeptide-type biosurfactant, surfactin, yet it has no genetic competency. Therefore, to obtain a transformable surfactin producer, the sfp gene cloned from B. subtilis C9 was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis 168, a non-surfactin producer, by homologous recombination. The transformants reduced the surface tension of the culture broth from 70.0 mN/m to 28.0 mN/m, plus the surface-active compound produced by the transformants exhibited the same Rf value as that from B. subtilis C9 and authentic surfactin in a thin-layer chromatographic analysis. The integration of the sfp gene into the chromosome of B. subtilis 168 was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Like B. subtilis C9, the transformants readily degraded n-hexadecane, although the original strain did not. It was also statistically confirmed that the hydrocarbon degradation of the transformants was highly correlated to their surfactin production by the determination of the correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.997, P < 0.01). Therefore, these results indicate that the surfactin produced from B. subtilis enhances the bioavailability of hydrophobic liquids.

  19. HIV Provirus Stably Reproduces Parental Latent and Induced Transcription Phenotypes Regardless of the Chromosomal Integration Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Farhad B; Barreto, Kris; Bernhard, Wendy; Hashemi, Pargol; Lomness, Adam; Sadowski, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of HIV proviral latency is essential for development of a means to eradicate infection and achieve a cure. We have previously described an in vitro latency model that reliably identifies HIV expression phenotypes of infected cells using a dual-fluorescence reporter virus. Our results have demonstrated that ∼50% of infected cells establish latency immediately upon integration of provirus, a phenomenon termed early latency, which appears to occur by mechanisms that are distinct from epigenetic silencing observed with HIV provirus that establishes productive infections. In this study, we have used a mini-dual HIV reporter virus (mdHIV) to compare the long-term stability of provirus produced as early latent or productive infections using Jurkat-Tat T cell clones. Cloned lines bearing mdHIV provirus integrated at different chromosomal locations display unique differences in responsiveness to signaling agonists and chromatin-modifying compounds, and they also produce characteristic expression patterns from the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) dsRed and internal EIF1α-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EIF1α-eGFP) reporters. Furthermore, reporter expression profiles of single cell sorted subcultures faithfully reproduce expression profiles identical to that of their original parental population, following prolonged growth in culture, without shifting toward expression patterns resembling that of cell subclones at the time of sorting. Comparison of population dispersion coefficient (CV) and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the subcloned lines showed that both untreated and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-ionomycin-stimulated cultures produce expression patterns identical to those of their parental lines. These results indicate that HIV provirus expression characteristics are strongly influenced by the epigenetic landscape at the site of chromosomal integration. There is currently considerable interest in development of therapies to

  20. Sex determination in Madagascar geckos of the genus Paroedura (Squamata: Gekkonidae): are differentiated sex chromosomes indeed so evolutionary stable?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koubová, M.; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Rovatsos, M.; Farkačová, K.; Altmanová, M.; Kratochvíl, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2014), s. 441-452 ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/0718 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : sex chromosomes * heterochromatin * reptiles * sex determination * FISH * ITSs Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.478, year: 2014

  1. Development of a chromosomally integrated metabolite-inducible Leu3p-alpha-IPM "off-on" gene switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Poulou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Present technology uses mostly chimeric proteins as regulators and hormones or antibiotics as signals to induce spatial and temporal gene expression.Here, we show that a chromosomally integrated yeast 'Leu3p-alpha-IotaRhoMu' system constitutes a ligand-inducible regulatory "off-on" genetic switch with an extensively dynamic action area. We find that Leu3p acts as an active transcriptional repressor in the absence and as an activator in the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate (alpha-IotaRhoMu in primary fibroblasts isolated from double transgenic mouse embryos bearing ubiquitously expressing Leu3p and a Leu3p regulated GFP reporter. In the absence of the branched amino acid biosynthetic pathway in animals, metabolically stable alpha-IPM presents an EC(50 equal to 0.8837 mM and fast "OFF-ON" kinetics (t(50ON = 43 min, t(50OFF = 2.18 h, it enters the cells via passive diffusion, while it is non-toxic to mammalian cells and to fertilized mouse eggs cultured ex vivo.Our results demonstrate that the 'Leu3p-alpha-IotaRhoMu' constitutes a simpler and safer system for inducible gene expression in biomedical applications.

  2. Cascade of chromosomal rearrangements caused by a heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the double-stranded break repair model for T-DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufei; Chen, Zhiyu; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Huang, Jilei

    2017-06-01

    Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be integrated into the plant genome. The double-stranded break repair (DSBR) pathway is a major model for T-DNA integration. From this model, we expect that two ends of a T-DNA molecule would invade into a single DNA double-stranded break (DSB) or independent DSBs in the plant genome. We call the later phenomenon a heterogeneous T-DNA integration, which has never been observed. In this work, we demonstrated it in an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant seb19. To resolve the chromosomal structural changes caused by T-DNA integration at both the nucleotide and chromosome levels, we performed inverse PCR, genome resequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage analysis. We found, in seb19, a single T-DNA connected two different chromosomal loci and caused complex chromosomal rearrangements. The specific break-junction pattern in seb19 is consistent with the result of heterogeneous T-DNA integration but not of recombination between two T-DNA insertions. We demonstrated that, in seb19, heterogeneous T-DNA integration evoked a cascade of incorrect repair of seven DSBs on chromosomes 4 and 5, and then produced translocation, inversion, duplication and deletion. Heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the DSBR model and suggests that two ends of a T-DNA molecule could be integrated into the plant genome independently. Our results also show a new origin of chromosomal abnormalities. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Integrating linkage and radiation hybrid mapping data for bovine chromosome 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasuga Akiko

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine chromosome (BTA 15 contains a quantitative trait loci (QTL for meat tenderness, as well as several breaks in synteny with human chromosome (HSA 11. Both linkage and radiation hybrid (RH maps of BTA 15 are available, but the linkage map lacks gene-specific markers needed to identify genes underlying the QTL, and the gene-rich RH map lacks associations with marker genotypes needed to define the QTL. Integrating the maps will provide information to further explore the QTL as well as refine the comparative map between BTA 15 and HSA 11. A recently developed approach to integrating linkage and RH maps uses both linkage and RH data to resolve a consensus marker order, rather than aligning independently constructed maps. Automated map construction procedures employing this maximum-likelihood approach were developed to integrate BTA RH and linkage data, and establish comparative positions of BTA 15 markers with HSA 11 homologs. Results The integrated BTA 15 map represents 145 markers; 42 shared by both data sets, 36 unique to the linkage data and 67 unique to RH data. Sequence alignment yielded comparative positions for 77 bovine markers with homologs on HSA 11. The map covers approximately 32% of HSA 11 sequence in five segments of conserved synteny, another 15% of HSA 11 is shared with BTA 29. Bovine and human order are consistent in portions of the syntenic segments, but some rearrangement is apparent. Comparative positions of gene markers near the meat tenderness QTL indicate the region includes separate segments of HSA 11. The two microsatellite markers flanking the QTL peak are between defined syntenic segments. Conclusions Combining data to construct an integrated map not only consolidates information from different sources onto a single map, but information contributed from each data set increases the accuracy of the map. Comparison of bovine maps with well annotated human sequence can provide useful information about

  4. Suspected chromosomally integrated human herpes virus 6 in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Todisco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: We report a case of a 27-year-old male affected by acute myeloid leukaemia MLL-PTD positive. After autologous stem cell transplantation, he was monitored based on cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6 DNA quantification in blood. Relapse occurred one year after transplantation; then the patient underwent to allogenic bone marrow transplantation using genotypically HLA-identical donor (sister. HHV-6 DNAemia was positive and persistently elevated, either after autologous either after allogenic transplant suggesting the occurrence of HHV-6 chromosomally integration. The work aim is to prove the occurrence of chromosomally integrated-HHV-6 (ci-HHV-6. Materials and Methods: HHV-6 DNA extraction was performed by automated extractor and DNA was amplified-quantified by Real Time polymerase chain reaction. Species identification was performed by sequencing HHV6-U100 glycoprotein using automated sequencer and sequencing products were analysed using the Blast program. Results: After autologous transplantation HHV6-DNAemia was 5.4 log copies/mL setting to 3.9 log copies/mL for a long period post allogenic transplantation. The patient’s hair follicles were tested for HHV- 6 DNA having positive results. Sequences of both strains of HHV6 extracts from blood and hair follicles resulted species B. HHV6 viral load decreased significantly after Lymphocyte Infusion by ci-HHV6 negative donor (sister, having steady viral load during the following six months of monitoring. One year later, patient is in complete haematological remission. Conclusions: Detection of HHV-6 in hair follicles and HHV-6 DNAemia persistently elevated before allogenic transplant, confirm the occurrence of ci-HHV-6. The observed important decreasing viral load is potentially due to the successful engraftment of ci-HHV-6-negative donor marrow after allogeneic transplant.

  5. A database system for constructing, integrating, and displaying physical maps of chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slezak, T.; Wagner, M.; Yeh, Mimi; Ashworth, L.; Nelson, D.; Ow, D.; Branscomb, E.; Carrano, A.

    1994-06-01

    Efforts are underway at numerous sites around the world to construct physical maps of all human chromosomes. These maps will enable researchers to locate, characterize, and eventually understand the genes that control human structure and function. Accomplishing this goal will require a staggering amount of innovation and advancement of biological technology. The volume and complexity of the data already generated requires a sophisticated array of computational support to collect, store, analyze, integrate, and display it in biologically meaningful ways. The Human Genome Center at Livermore has spent the last 6 years constructing a database system to support its physical mapping efforts on human chromosome 19. Our computational support team is composed of experienced computer professionals who share a common pragmatic primary goal of rapidly supplying tools that meet the ever-changing needs of the biologists. Most papers describing computational support of genome research concentrate on mathematical details of key algorithms. However, in this paper we would like to concentrate on the design issues, tradeoffs, and consequences from the point of view of building a complex database system to support leading-edge genomic research. We introduce the topic of physical mapping, discuss the key design issues involved in our databases, and discuss the use of this data by our major tools (DNA fingerprint analysis and overlap computation, contig assembly, map integration, and database browsing.) Given the advantage of hindsight, we discuss what worked, what didn`t, and how we will evolve from here. As early pioneers in this field we hope that our experience may prove useful to others who are now beginning to design and construct similar systems.

  6. An accurate European option pricing model under Fractional Stable Process based on Feynman Path Integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Ma, Qinghua; Yao, Haixiang; Hou, Tiancheng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the Fractional Stable Process (FSP) for option pricing. The FSP is one of the few candidates to directly model a number of desired empirical properties of asset price risk neutral dynamics. However, pricing the vanilla European option under FSP is difficult and problematic. In the paper, built upon the developed Feynman Path Integral inspired techniques, we present a novel computational model for option pricing, i.e. the Fractional Stable Process Path Integral (FSPPI) model under a general fractional stable distribution that tackles this problem. Numerical and empirical experiments show that the proposed pricing model provides a correction of the Black-Scholes pricing error - overpricing long term options, underpricing short term options; overpricing out-of-the-money options, underpricing in-the-money options without any additional structures such as stochastic volatility and a jump process.

  7. Chromosomes A07 and A05 associated with stable and major QTLs for pod weight and size in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaiyong; Guo, Jianbin; Ren, Xiaoping; Chen, Weigang; Huang, Li; Zhou, Xiaojing; Chen, Yuning; Liu, Nian; Xiong, Fei; Lei, Yong; Liao, Boshou; Jiang, Huifang

    2018-02-01

    Co-localized intervals and candidate genes were identified for major and stable QTLs controlling pod weight and size on chromosomes A07 and A05 in an RIL population across four environments. Cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important legume crops grown in > 100 countries. Hundred-pod weight (HPW) is an important yield trait in peanut, but its underlying genetic mechanism was not well studied. In this study, a mapping population (Xuhua 13 × Zhonghua 6) with 187 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for HPW together with pod length (PL) and pod width (PW) by both unconditional and conditional QTL analyses. A genetic map covering 1756.48 cM was constructed with 817 markers. Additive effects, epistatic interactions, and genotype-by-environment interactions were analyzed using the phenotyping data generated across four environments. Twelve additive QTLs were identified on chromosomes A05, A07, and A08 by unconditional analysis, and five of them (qPLA07, qPLA05.1, qPWA07, qHPWA07.1, and qHPWA05.2) showed major and stable expressions in all environments. Conditional QTL mapping found that PL had stronger influences on HPW than PW. Notably, qHPWA07.1, qPLA07, and qPWA07 that explained 17.93-43.63% of the phenotypic variations of the three traits were co-localized in a 5 cM interval (1.48 Mb in physical map) on chromosome A07 with 147 candidate genes related to catalytic activity and metabolic process. In addition, qHPWA05.2 and qPLA05.1 were co-localized with minor QTL qPWA05.2 to a 1.3 cM genetic interval (280 kb in physical map) on chromosome A05 with 12 candidate genes. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the genetic components controlling pod weight and size as well as candidate QTLs and genes for improving pod yield in future peanut breeding.

  8. RELATIVE EXPRESSION AND STABILITY OF A CHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED AND PLASMID-BORNE MARKER GENE FUSION IN ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPETENT BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A xyIE-iceC transcriptional fusion was created by ligating a DNA fragment harboring the cloned xyIE structural gene from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 into the cloned iceC gene of Pseudomonas syringae Cit7. This fusion construct was integrated into chromosome of Pseu...

  9. Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6: Models of Viral Genome Release from the Telomere and Impacts on Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael L; Royle, Nicola J

    2017-07-12

    Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B, alongside some other herpesviruses, have the striking capacity to integrate into telomeres, the terminal repeated regions of chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated forms, ciHHV-6A and ciHHV-6B, are proposed to be a state of latency and it has been shown that they can both be inherited if integration occurs in the germ line. The first step in full viral reactivation must be the release of the integrated viral genome from the telomere and here we propose various models of this release involving transcription of the viral genome, replication fork collapse, and t-circle mediated release. In this review, we also discuss the relationship between ciHHV-6 and the telomere carrying the insertion, particularly how the presence and subsequent partial or complete release of the ciHHV-6 genome may affect telomere dynamics and the risk of disease.

  10. Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6: Models of Viral Genome Release from the Telomere and Impacts on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Wood

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B, alongside some other herpesviruses, have the striking capacity to integrate into telomeres, the terminal repeated regions of chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated forms, ciHHV-6A and ciHHV-6B, are proposed to be a state of latency and it has been shown that they can both be inherited if integration occurs in the germ line. The first step in full viral reactivation must be the release of the integrated viral genome from the telomere and here we propose various models of this release involving transcription of the viral genome, replication fork collapse, and t-circle mediated release. In this review, we also discuss the relationship between ciHHV-6 and the telomere carrying the insertion, particularly how the presence and subsequent partial or complete release of the ciHHV-6 genome may affect telomere dynamics and the risk of disease.

  11. Construction and characterization of stable, constitutively expressed, chromosomal green and red fluorescent transcriptional fusions in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Bangar, Hansraj; Saldanha, Roland; Pemberton, Adin; Aronow, Bruce; Dean, Gary E; Lamkin, Thomas J; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed stable, chromosomal, constitutively expressed, green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP) as reporters in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Using bioinformatic approaches and other experimental analyses, we identified P0253 and P1 as potent promoters that drive the optimal expression of fluorescent reporters in single copy in B. anthracis and Burkholderia spp. as well as their surrogate strains, respectively. In comparison, Y. pestis and its surrogate strain need two chromosomal copies of cysZK promoter (P2cysZK) for optimal fluorescence. The P0253-, P2cysZK-, and P1-driven GFP and RFP fusions were first cloned into the vectors pRP1028, pUC18R6KT-mini-Tn7T-Km, pmini-Tn7-gat, or their derivatives. The resultant constructs were delivered into the respective surrogates and subsequently into the select agent strains. The chromosomal GFP- and RFP-tagged strains exhibited bright fluorescence at an exposure time of less than 200 msec and displayed the same virulence traits as their wild-type parental strains. The utility of the tagged strains was proven by the macrophage infection assays and lactate dehydrogenase release analysis. Such strains will be extremely useful in high-throughput screens for novel compounds that could either kill these organisms, or interfere with critical virulence processes in these important bioweapon agents and during infection of alveolar macrophages. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A stable numerical inversion of Abel's integral equation using almost Bernstein operational matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Om P.; Singh, Vineet K.; Pandey, Rajesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Many problems in physics like reconstruction of the radially distributed emissivity from the line-of-sight projected intensity, the 3-D image reconstruction from cone-beam projections in computerized tomography, etc. lead naturally, in the case of radial symmetry, to the study of Abel's type integral equation. The aim of this communication is to modify the stable algorithm proposed in [Singh VK, Pandey RK, Singh OP. New stable numerical solution of singular integral equations of Abel type by using normalized Bernstein polynomials. Applied Mathematical Sciences 2009;3(5):241-255] which is based on normalized Bernstein polynomial approximation of the projected intensity profile. So, first we construct an orthonormal family {b i5 } i=0 5 of polynomials of degree 5 from the 5th degree Bernstein polynomials B i5 and use them as a basis to approximate the projected intensity profile. Then, a 6x6 matrix P, named as almost Bernstein operational matrix of integration is constructed and used to reduce the integral equation to a system of algebraic equation which can be solved easily. The method is quite accurate and stable even though the approximations are performed by polynomials of degree 5, as illustrated by applying the method to intensity data with and without random noise to invert and compare it with those obtained by the other methods or with the known analytical inverse. Thus it is good method for applying to experimental intensities distorted by noise.

  13. A Bayesian analysis of the chromosome architecture of human disorders by integrating reductionist data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Tripathi, Shailesh; Glazko, Galina V; Dehmer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach to estimate a chromosome and a disorder network from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. In contrast to other approaches, we obtain statistic rather than deterministic networks enabling a parametric control in the uncertainty of the underlying disorder-disease gene associations contained in the OMIM, on which the networks are based. From a structural investigation of the chromosome network, we identify three chromosome subgroups that reflect architectural differences in chromosome-disorder associations that are predictively exploitable for a functional analysis of diseases.

  14. Toward industrial production of isoprenoids in Escherichia coli: Lessons learned from CRISPR-Cas9 based optimization of a chromosomally integrated mevalonate pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Koma, Daisuke; Hu, Qijun

    2017-01-01

    AKB operon into the chromosome and by expressing a heterologous MVA pathway under stress-responsive control. Production levels dropped dramatically relative to plasmid-mediated expression when the entire pathway was integrated into the chromosome. In order to optimize the chromosomally integrated MVA pathway......, we established a CRISPR-Cas9 system to rapidly and systematically replace promoter sequences. This strategy led to higher pathway expression and a fivefold improvement in bisabolene production. More interestingly, we analyzed proteomics data sets to understand and address some of the challenges...... associated with metabolic engineering of the chromosomally integrated pathway. This report shows that integrating plasmid-optimized operons into the genome and making them work optimally is not a straightforward task and any poor engineering choices on the chromosome may lead to cell death rather than just...

  15. AN INTEGRATED MAP OF HUMAN-CHROMOSOME-13 ALLOWING REGIONAL LOCALIZATION OF GENETIC-MARKERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOY, RF; WIJNGAARD, A; VERLIND, E; SCHEFFER, H; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    37 CA repeats, 5 STSs, 9 ESTs, and 4 genes were mapped to 19 different intervals of chromosome 13 determined by the cytogenetic breakpoints of 19 different cell lines with interstitial deletions or translocations involving various parts of chromosome 13. A framework genetic linkage map was

  16. Imperceptible effect of radiation based on stable type chromosome aberrations accumulated in the lymphocytes of residents in the high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Wang Chunyan; Chen Deqing; Wei Luxin; Morishima, Hiroshige; Yuan Yongling; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic investigation of stable type aberrations (translocations) was performed with our improved methods in 6 children and 15 elderly persons in a high background radiation area (HBRA) in China, and in 8 children and 11 elderly persons in a control area. The total numbers of cells analyzed in elderly persons were 68,297 in HBRA and 35,378 in controls and in children were 45,535 in HBRA and 56,198 in controls. On average 5138 cells per subject were analyzed. The variation in the frequencies of translocations per 1000 cells was small in children while it was large in elderly persons. No significant difference was found in the frequencies between HBRA and control (P>0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). On the other hand, correlation between age and translocation frequencies was significant at the 1% level (r s =0.658 with 37DF, Spearman rank correlation test). The contribution of an elevated level of natural radiation in HBRA in China to the induction of stable type chromosome aberrations does not have a significant effect compared with the contribution of chemical mutagens and/or metabolic factors. The present study suggests that the probability of the risk of causing malignant and/or congenital diseases by the increased amount of radiation is imperceptible in HBRA where the level of natural radiation is 3 to 5 times higher than that in the control area. (author)

  17. Physical Mapping of Bread Wheat Chromosome 5A: An Integrated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfina Barabaschi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The huge size, redundancy, and highly repetitive nature of the bread wheat [ (L.] genome, makes it among the most difficult species to be sequenced. To overcome these limitations, a strategy based on the separation of individual chromosomes or chromosome arms and the subsequent production of physical maps was established within the frame of the International Wheat Genome Sequence Consortium (IWGSC. A total of 95,812 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones of short-arm chromosome 5A (5AS and long-arm chromosome 5A (5AL arm-specific BAC libraries were fingerprinted and assembled into contigs by complementary analytical approaches based on the FingerPrinted Contig (FPC and Linear Topological Contig (LTC tools. Combined anchoring approaches based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR marker screening, microarray, and sequence homology searches applied to several genomic tools (i.e., genetic maps, deletion bin map, neighbor maps, BAC end sequences (BESs, genome zipper, and chromosome survey sequences allowed the development of a high-quality physical map with an anchored physical coverage of 75% for 5AS and 53% for 5AL with high portions (64 and 48%, respectively of contigs ordered along the chromosome. In the genome of grasses, [ (L. Beauv.], rice ( L., and sorghum [ (L. Moench] homologs of genes on wheat chromosome 5A were separated into syntenic blocks on different chromosomes as a result of translocations and inversions during evolution. The physical map presented represents an essential resource for fine genetic mapping and map-based cloning of agronomically relevant traits and a reference for the 5A sequencing projects.

  18. The non-motor adaptor HMMR dampens Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Mei, Lin; Reid, Gregor S D; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2018-01-31

    Mitotic spindle assembly and organization require forces generated by motor proteins. The activity of these motors is regulated by non-motor adaptor proteins. However, there are limited studies reporting the functional importance of adaptors on the balance of motor forces and the promotion of faithful and timely cell division. Here, we show that genomic deletion or siRNA silencing of the non-motor adaptor Hmmr/ HMMR disturbs spindle microtubule organization and bipolar chromosome-kinetochore attachments with a consequent elevated occurrence of aneuploidy. Rescue experiments show a conserved motif in HMMR is required to generate inter-kinetochore tension and promote anaphase entry. This motif bears high homology with the kinesin Kif15 and is known to interact with TPX2, a spindle assembly factor. We find that HMMR is required to dampen kinesin Eg5-mediated forces through localizing TPX2 and promoting the formation of inhibitory TPX2-Eg5 complexes. In HMMR-silenced cells, K-fiber stability is reduced while the frequency of unattached chromosomes and the time needed for chromosome segregation are both increased. These defects can be alleviated in HMMR-silenced cells with chemical inhibition of Eg5, but not through the silencing of Kif15. Together, our findings indicate that HMMR balances Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation. © 2018 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  19. A recurrent human papillomavirus integration site at chromosome region 12q14-q15 in SW756 and SK-v cell lines derived from genital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre-Garau, X.; Couturier, J.; Favre, M.; Orth, G.

    1995-01-01

    The SW756 cell line, derived from an invasive cancer of the uterine cervix, harbours integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) 18 DNA sequences which have been located in chromosome band 12q13. By in situ hybridization experiments with tritiated and digoxigenin-labelled HPV18 probes on R-banded chromosomes, we now localize the integrated viral sequences in 12q14-q15. Interestingly, we have previously localized integrated HPV16 sequences in the same chromosomal region in SK-v cells, derived from a pre-invasive vulvar neoplasia. The chromosomal region 12q14-q15 could thus correspond to a preferential site for the integration of HPV DNA in genital tumors. (authors). 29 refs., 2 figs

  20. Russian ElectroKhimPribor integrated plant - producer and supplier of enriched stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarinov, A.N.; Polyakov, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Russian ElectroKhimPribor Integrated Plant, as well as ORNL, is a leading production which manufactures and supplied to the world market such specific products as stable isotopes. More than 200 isotopes of 44 elements can be obtained at its electromagnetic separator. Changes being underway for a few last years in Russia affected production and distribution of stable isotopes. There arose a necessity in a new approach to handling work in this field so as to create favourable conditions for both producers and customers. As a result, positive changes in calutron operation at ElectroKhimPribor has been reached; quality management system covering all stages of production has been set up; large and attractive stock of isotopes has been created; prospective scientific isotope-based developments are taken into account when planning separation F campaigns; executing the contracts is guaranteed; business philosophy has been changed to meet maximum of customer needs. For more than forty years ElectroKhimPribor have had no claim from customers as to quality of products or implementing contracts. Supplying enriched stable isotopes virtually to all the world's leading customers, ElectroKhimPribor cooperates successfully with Canadian company Trace Science since 1996

  1. Aquatic Habits of Cetacean Ancestors: Integrating Bone Microanatomy and Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Clementz, Mark T; Usip, Sharon; Bajpai, Sunil; Hussain, S Taseer; Hieronymus, Tobin L

    2016-12-01

    The earliest cetaceans were interpreted as semi-aquatic based on the presence of thickened bones and stable oxygen isotopes in tooth enamel. However, the origin of aquatic behaviors in cetacean relatives (e.g., raoellids, anthracotheres) remains unclear. This study reconstructs the origins of aquatic behaviors based on long bone microanatomy and stable oxygen isotopes of tooth enamel in modern and extinct cetartiodactylans. Our findings are congruent with published accounts that microanatomy can be a reliable indicator of aquatic behaviors in taxa that are obligatorily aquatic, and also highlight that some "semi-aquatic" behaviors (fleeing into the water to escape predation) may have a stronger relationship to bone microanatomy than others (herbivory in near-shore aquatic settings). Bone microanatomy is best considered with other lines of information in the land-to-sea transition of cetaceans, such as stable isotopes. This study extends our understanding of the progression of skeletal phenotypes associated with habitat shifts in the relatives of cetaceans. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Asymptotically Stable Solutions of a Generalized Fractional Quadratic Functional-Integral Equation of Erdélyi-Kober Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdalla Darwish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a generalized fractional quadratic functional-integral equation of Erdélyi-Kober type in the Banach space BC(ℝ+. We show that this equation has at least one asymptotically stable solution.

  3. Asymptotically Stable Solutions of a Generalized Fractional Quadratic Functional-Integral Equation of Erdélyi-Kober Type

    OpenAIRE

    Darwish, Mohamed Abdalla; Rzepka, Beata

    2014-01-01

    We study a generalized fractional quadratic functional-integral equation of Erdélyi-Kober type in the Banach space BC(ℝ+). We show that this equation has at least one asymptotically stable solution.

  4. PTEN in the maintenance of genome integrity: From DNA replication to chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sheng-Qi; Ouyang, Meng; Brandmaier, Andrew; Hao, Hongbo; Shen, Wen H

    2017-10-01

    Faithful DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation are the key machineries of genetic transmission. Disruption of these processes represents a hallmark of cancer and often results from loss of tumor suppressors. PTEN is an important tumor suppressor that is frequently mutated or deleted in human cancer. Loss of PTEN has been associated with aneuploidy and poor prognosis in cancer patients. In mice, Pten deletion or mutation drives genomic instability and tumor development. PTEN deficiency induces DNA replication stress, confers stress tolerance, and disrupts mitotic spindle architecture, leading to accumulation of structural and numerical chromosome instability. Therefore, PTEN guards the genome by controlling multiple processes of chromosome inheritance. Here, we summarize current understanding of the PTEN function in promoting high-fidelity transmission of genetic information. We also discuss the PTEN pathways of genome maintenance and highlight potential targets for cancer treatment. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. An integrated YAC-overlap and 'cosmid-pocket' map of the human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizetić, D; Gellen, L; Hamvas, R M; Mott, R; Grigoriev, A; Vatcheva, R; Zehetner, G; Yaspo, M L; Dutriaux, A; Lopes, C

    1994-05-01

    We describe here the construction of an ordered clone map of human chromosome 21, based on the identification of ordered sets of YAC clones covering > 90% of the chromosome, and their use to identify groups of cosmid clones (cosmid pockets) localised to subregions defined by the YAC clone map. This is to our knowledge the highest resolution map of one human chromosome to date, localising 530 YAC clones covering both arms of the chromosome, spanning > 36 Mbp, and localising more than 6300 cosmids to 145 intervals on both arms of the chromosome. The YAC contigs have been formed by hybridising a 6.1 equivalents chromosome 21 enriched YAC collection displayed on arrayed nylon membranes to a series of 115 DNA markers and Alu-PCR products from YACs. Forty eight mega-YACs from the previously published CEPH-Genethon map of sequence tagged sites (STS) have also been included in the contig building experiments. A YAC tiling path was then size-measured and confirmed by gel-fingerprinting. A minimal tiling path of 70 YACs were then used as probes against the 7.5 genome equivalents flow sorted chromosome 21 cosmid library in order to identify the lists of cosmids mapping to alternating shared--non-shared intervals between overlapping YACs ('cosmid pockets'). For approximately 1/5 of the minimal tiling path of YACs, locations and non-chimaerism have been confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and approximately 1/5 of all cosmid pocket assignments have independent, confirmatory marker hybridizations in the ICRF cosmid reference library system. We also demonstrate that 'pockets' contain overlapping sets of cosmids (cosmid contigs). In addition to being an important logical intermediate step between the YAC maps published so far and a future map of completely ordered cosmids, this map provides immediately available low-complexity cosmid material for high resolution FISH mapping of chromosomal aberrations on interphase nuclei, and for rapid positional isolation of

  6. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Integrating stomach content and stable isotope analyses to quantify the diets of pygoscelid penguins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Polito

    Full Text Available Stomach content analysis (SCA and more recently stable isotope analysis (SIA integrated with isotopic mixing models have become common methods for dietary studies and provide insight into the foraging ecology of seabirds. However, both methods have drawbacks and biases that may result in difficulties in quantifying inter-annual and species-specific differences in diets. We used these two methods to simultaneously quantify the chick-rearing diet of Chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarctica and Gentoo (P. papua penguins and highlight methods of integrating SCA data to increase accuracy of diet composition estimates using SIA. SCA biomass estimates were highly variable and underestimated the importance of soft-bodied prey such as fish. Two-source, isotopic mixing model predictions were less variable and identified inter-annual and species-specific differences in the relative amounts of fish and krill in penguin diets not readily apparent using SCA. In contrast, multi-source isotopic mixing models had difficulty estimating the dietary contribution of fish species occupying similar trophic levels without refinement using SCA-derived otolith data. Overall, our ability to track inter-annual and species-specific differences in penguin diets using SIA was enhanced by integrating SCA data to isotopic mixing modes in three ways: 1 selecting appropriate prey sources, 2 weighting combinations of isotopically similar prey in two-source mixing models and 3 refining predicted contributions of isotopically similar prey in multi-source models.

  8. Non integrative strategy decreases chromosome instability and improves endogenous pluripotency genes reactivation in porcine induced pluripotent-like stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congras, Annabelle; Barasc, Harmonie; Canale-Tabet, Kamila; Plisson-Petit, Florence; Delcros, Chantal; Feraud, Olivier; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Hadadi, Eva; Griscelli, Franck; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Turhan, Ali; Afanassieff, Marielle; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Pinton, Alain; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine; Acloque, Hervé

    2016-06-01

    The pig is an emerging animal model, complementary to rodents for basic research and for biomedical and agronomical purposes. However despite the progress made on mouse and rat models to produce genuine pluripotent cells, it remains impossible to produce porcine pluripotent cell lines with germline transmission. Reprogramming of pig somatic cells using conventional integrative strategies remains also unsatisfactory. In the present study, we compared the outcome of both integrative and non-integrative reprogramming strategies on pluripotency and chromosome stability during pig somatic cell reprogramming. The porcine cell lines produced with integrative strategies express several pluripotency genes but they do not silence the integrated exogenes and present a high genomic instability upon passaging. In contrast, pig induced pluripotent-like stem cells produced with non-integrative reprogramming system (NI-iPSLCs) exhibit a normal karyotype after more than 12 months in culture and reactivate endogenous pluripotency markers. Despite the persistent expression of exogenous OCT4 and MYC, these cells can differentiate into derivatives expressing markers of the three embryonic germ layers and we propose that these NI-iPSLCs can be used as a model to bring new insights into the molecular factors controlling and maintaining pluripotency in the pig and other non-rodent mammalians.

  9. Molecular analysis of an integrative conjugative element, ICEH, present in the chromosome of different strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcos Pinto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversification of bacterial species and pathotypes is largely caused by lateral gene transfer (LGT of diverse mobile DNA elements such as plasmids, phages, transposons and genomic islands. Thus, acquisition of new phenotypes by LGT is very important for bacterial evolution and relationship with hosts. This paper reports a 23 kb region containing fourteen CDSs with similarity to the previous described Integrative Conjugal Element of Mycoplasma fermentans (ICEF. This element, named ICEH, is present as one copy at distinct integration sites in the chromosome of 7448 and 232 pathogenic strains and is absent in the type strain J (non-pathogenic. Notable differences in the nucleotide composition of the insertion sites were detected, and could be correlated to a lack of specificity of the ICEH integrase. Although present in strains of the same organism, the ICEH elements are more divergent than the typical similarity between other chromosomal locus of Mycoplasma hyopneunomiae, suggesting an accelerated evolution of these constins or an ongoing process of degeneration, while maintaining conservation of the tra genes. An extrachromosomal form of this element had been detected in the 7448 strain, suggesting a possible involvement in its mobilization and transference of CDSs to new hosts.

  10. Numerically stable approach for high-precision orbit integration using Encke's method and equinoctial elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmer, Matthias; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Future gravity missions like GRACE-FO and beyond will deliver low-low satellite-to-satellite (ll-sst) ranging measurements of much increased precision. This necessitates a re-evaluation of the processes used in gravity field determination with an eye to numerical stability. When computing gravity fields from ll-sst data, precise positions of both satellites are needed in the setup of the observation equations. These positions thus have an immediate effect on the sought-after gravity field parameters. We use reduced-dynamic orbits which are computed through integration of all accelerations experienced by the satellite, as determined through a priori models and observed through the accelerometer. Our simulations showed that computing the orbit of the satellite through complete integration of all acting forces leads to numeric instabilities magnitudes larger than the expected ranging accuracy. We introduce a numerically stable approach employing a best-fit keplerian reference orbit based on Encke's method. Our investigations revealed that using canonical formulations for the evaluation of the reference keplerian orbit and accelerations lead to insufficient precision, necessitating an alternative formulation like the equinoctial elements.

  11. An energy-stable time-integrator for phase-field models

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe

    2016-12-27

    We introduce a provably energy-stable time-integration method for general classes of phase-field models with polynomial potentials. We demonstrate how Taylor series expansions of the nonlinear terms present in the partial differential equations of these models can lead to expressions that guarantee energy-stability implicitly, which are second-order accurate in time. The spatial discretization relies on a mixed finite element formulation and isogeometric analysis. We also propose an adaptive time-stepping discretization that relies on a first-order backward approximation to give an error-estimator. This error estimator is accurate, robust, and does not require the computation of extra solutions to estimate the error. This methodology can be applied to any second-order accurate time-integration scheme. We present numerical examples in two and three spatial dimensions, which confirm the stability and robustness of the method. The implementation of the numerical schemes is done in PetIGA, a high-performance isogeometric analysis framework.

  12. Integration of molecular cytogenetics, dated molecular phylogeny, and model-based predictions to understand the extreme chromosome reorganization in the Neotropical genus Tonatia (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Volleth, Marianne; Hoffmann, Federico G; Scott, LuAnn; Wichman, Holly A; Yang, Fengtang; Baker, Robert J

    2015-10-06

    Defining factors that contributed to the fixation of a high number of underdominant chromosomal rearrangements is a complex task because not only molecular mechanisms must be considered, but also the uniqueness of natural history attributes of each taxon. Ideally, detailed investigation of the chromosome architecture of an organism and related groups, placed within a phylogenetic context, is required. We used multiple approaches to investigate the dynamics of chromosomal evolution in lineages of bats with considerable karyotypic variation, focusing on the different facets contributing to fixation of the exceptional chromosomal changes in Tonatia saurophila. Integration of empirical data with proposed models of chromosome evolution was performed to understand the probable conditions for Tonatia's karyotypic evolution. The trajectory of reorganization of chromosome blocks since the common ancestor of Glossophaginae and Phyllostominae subfamilies suggests that multiple tandem fusions, as well as disruption and fusions of conserved phyllostomid chromosomes were major drivers of karyotypic reshuffling in Tonatia. Considerable variation in the rates of chromosomal evolution between phyllostomid lineages was observed. Thirty-nine unique fusions and fission events reached fixation in Tonatia over a short period of time, followed by ~12 million years of chromosomal stasis. Physical mapping of repetitive DNA revealed an unusual accumulation of LINE-1 sequences on centromeric regions, probably associated with the chromosomal dynamics of this genus. Multiple rearrangements have reached fixation in a wave-like fashion in phyllostomid bats. Different biological features of Tonatia support distinct models of rearrangement fixation, and it is unlikely that the fixations were a result of solely stochastic processes in small ancient populations. Increased recombination rates were probably facilitated by expansion of repetitive DNA, reinforced by aspects of taxon reproduction and

  13. Improvement of Fibrinolytic Activity of Bacillus subtilis 168 by Integration of a Fibrinolytic Gene into the Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seon-Ju; Park, Ji Yeong; Lee, Jae Yong; Lee, Kang Wook; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Gyoung Min; Shin, Jung-Hye; Kim, Jong-Sang; Kim, Jeong Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Fibrinolytic enzyme genes (aprE2, aprE176, and aprE179) were introduced into the Bacillus subtilis 168 chromosome without any antibiotic resistance gene. An integration vector, pDG1662, was used to deliver the genes into the amyE site of B. subtilis 168. Integrants, SJ3-5nc, SJ176nc, and SJ179nc, were obtained after two successive homologous recombinations. The integration of each fibrinolytic gene into the middle of the amyE site was confirmed by phenotypes (Amy(-), Spec(S)) and colony PCR results for these strains. The fibrinolytic activities of the integrants were higher than that of B. subtilis 168 by at least 3.2-fold when grown in LB broth. Cheonggukjang was prepared by inoculating each of B. subtilis 168, SJ3-5nc, SJ176nc, and SJ179nc, and the fibrinolytic activity of cheonggukjang was 4.6 ± 0.7, 10.8 ± 0.9, 7.0 ± 0.6, and 8.0 ± 0.2 (U/g of cheonggukjang), respectively at 72 h. These results showed that construction of B. subtilis strains with enhanced fibrinolytic activities is possible by integration of a strong fibrinolytic gene via a marker-free manner.

  14. Versatile nourseothricin and streptomycin/spectinomycin resistance gene cassettes and their use in chromosome integration vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Stephanie S; Mladinich, Katherine M; Boonyakanog, Angkana; Mima, Takehiko; Karkhoff-Schweizer, RoxAnn R; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-10-01

    An obstacle for the development of genetic systems for many bacteria is the limited number of antibiotic selection markers, especially for bacteria that are intrinsically antibiotic resistant or where utilization of such markers is strictly regulated. Here we describe the development of versatile cassettes containing nourseothricin, streptomycin/spectinomycin, and spectinomycin selection markers. The antibiotic resistance genes contained on these cassettes are flanked by loxP sites with allow their in vivo excision from the chromosome of target bacteria using Cre recombinase. The respective selection marker cassettes were used to derive mini-Tn7 elements that can be used for single-copy insertion of genes into bacterial chromosomes. The utility of the selection markers was tested by insertion of the resulting mini-Tn7 elements into the genomes of Burkholderia thailandensis and B. pseudomallei efflux pump mutants susceptible to aminoglycosides, aminocyclitols, and streptothricins, followed by Cre-mediated antibiotic resistance marker excision. The versatile nourseothricin, streptomycin/spectinomycin and spectinomycin resistance loxP cassette vectors described here extend the repertoire of antibiotic selection markers for genetic manipulation of diverse bacteria that are susceptible to aminoglycosides and aminocyclitols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An integrative approach to assess X-chromosome inactivation using allele-specific expression with applications to epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nicholas B; Fogarty, Zachary C; Larson, Melissa C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Lawrenson, Kate; Gayther, Simon; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J

    2017-12-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) epigenetically silences transcription of an X chromosome in females; patterns of XCI are thought to be aberrant in women's cancers, but are understudied due to statistical challenges. We develop a two-stage statistical framework to assess skewed XCI and evaluate gene-level patterns of XCI for an individual sample by integration of RNA sequence, copy number alteration, and genotype data. Our method relies on allele-specific expression (ASE) to directly measure XCI and does not rely on male samples or paired normal tissue for comparison. We model ASE using a two-component mixture of beta distributions, allowing estimation for a given sample of the degree of skewness (based on a composite likelihood ratio test) and the posterior probability that a given gene escapes XCI (using a Bayesian beta-binomial mixture model). To illustrate the utility of our approach, we applied these methods to data from tumors of ovarian cancer patients. Among 99 patients, 45 tumors were informative for analysis and showed evidence of XCI skewed toward a particular parental chromosome. For 397 X-linked genes, we observed tumor XCI patterns largely consistent with previously identified consensus states based on multiple normal tissue types. However, 37 genes differed in XCI state between ovarian tumors and the consensus state; 17 genes aberrantly escaped XCI in ovarian tumors (including many oncogenes), whereas 20 genes were unexpectedly inactivated in ovarian tumors (including many tumor suppressor genes). These results provide evidence of the importance of XCI in ovarian cancer and demonstrate the utility of our two-stage analysis. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Development of a modularized two-step (M2S) chromosome integration technique for integration of multiple transcription units inSaccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwei; Ding, Wentao; Zhang, Xueli; Jiang, Huifeng; Bi, Changhao

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has already been used for heterologous production of fuel chemicals and valuable natural products. The establishment of complicated heterologous biosynthetic pathways in S. cerevisiae became the research focus of Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering. Thus, simple and efficient genomic integration techniques of large number of transcription units are demanded urgently. An efficient DNA assembly and chromosomal integration method was created by combining homologous recombination (HR) in S. cerevisiae and Golden Gate DNA assembly method, designated as modularized two-step (M2S) technique. Two major assembly steps are performed consecutively to integrate multiple transcription units simultaneously. In Step 1, Modularized scaffold containing a head-to-head promoter module and a pair of terminators was assembled with two genes. Thus, two transcription units were assembled with Golden Gate method into one scaffold in one reaction. In Step 2, the two transcription units were mixed with modules of selective markers and integration sites and transformed into S. cerevisiae for assembly and integration. In both steps, universal primers were designed for identification of correct clones. Establishment of a functional β-carotene biosynthetic pathway in S. cerevisiae within 5 days demonstrated high efficiency of this method, and a 10-transcriptional-unit pathway integration illustrated the capacity of this method. Modular design of transcription units and integration elements simplified assembly and integration procedure, and eliminated frequent designing and synthesis of DNA fragments in previous methods. Also, by assembling most parts in Step 1 in vitro, the number of DNA cassettes for homologous integration in Step 2 was significantly reduced. Thus, high assembly efficiency, high integration capacity, and low error rate were achieved.

  17. Construction of reference chromosome-scale pseudomolecules for potato: integrating the potato genome with genetic and physical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D'Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A; Hamilton, John P; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J

    2013-11-06

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker-based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal "pseudomolecules".

  18. Roles of CcrA and CcrB in Excision and Integration of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec, a Staphylococcus aureus Genomic Island▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Archer, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    The gene encoding resistance to methicillin and other β-lactam antibiotics in staphylococci, mecA, is carried on a genomic island, SCCmec (for staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec). The chromosomal excision and integration of types I to IV SCCmec are catalyzed by the site-specific recombinases CcrA and CcrB, the genes for which are encoded on each element. We sought to identify the relative contributions of CcrA and CcrB in the excision and integration of SCCmec. Purified CcrB but not CcrA ...

  19. Influence of chromosomal integration on glucocorticoid-regulated transcription of growth-stimulating papillomavirus genes E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Knebel Doeberitz, M.; Bauknecht, T.; Bartsch, D.; Zur Hausen, H. (Inst. fur Virusforshung/ATV, Heidelberg (West Germany))

    1991-02-15

    In most cervical carcinoma cells the E6 and E7 genes of specific human papillomaviruses are transcribed from viral sequences integrated into host cell chromosomes. Glucocorticoids activate the promoter elements of various human papillomaviruses in transient-expression assays. The authors have analyzed the effect of dexamethasone on the transcription rate of human papillomaviruses 18 E6 and E7 genes integrated at different chromosomal sites in four cervical cancer cell lines. Dexamethasone led to an increase in the transcription rate of the integrated E6-E7 sequences in C4-1 and C4-2 cells but led to a decrease in SW 756 cells and did not affect the transcription rate in HeLa cells. It thus appears that dominant regulatory mechanisms presumably depending on the chromosomal integration site are able to override the response of the viral promoter to steroid hormones. The growth rate of all dexamethasone-treated cell lines correlated consistently with the expression of the papillomavirus E6 and E7 genes, supporting their role in the maintenance of the proliferative phenotype of cervical carcinoma cells. Since human papillomaviruses are integrated into the host cell genome at variable, presumably randomly selected chromosomal loci, regulatory mechanisms that influence viral gene expression, and hence cell growth, may differ among cancers of independent clonal origin.

  20. Characterization of X chromosome inactivation using integrated analysis of whole-exome and mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Szelinger

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI is an epigenetic, gene dosage compensatory mechanism by inactivation of one copy of X in cells. Random XCI of one of the parental chromosomes results in an approximately equal proportion of cells expressing alleles from either the maternally or paternally inherited active X, and is defined by the XCI ratio. Skewed XCI ratio is suggestive of non-random inactivation, which can play an important role in X-linked genetic conditions. Current methods rely on indirect, semi-quantitative DNA methylation-based assay to estimate XCI ratio. Here we report a direct approach to estimate XCI ratio by integrated, family-trio based whole-exome and mRNA sequencing using phase-by-transmission of alleles coupled with allele-specific expression analysis. We applied this method to in silico data and to a clinical patient with mild cognitive impairment but no clear diagnosis or understanding molecular mechanism underlying the phenotype. Simulation showed that phased and unphased heterozygous allele expression can be used to estimate XCI ratio. Segregation analysis of the patient's exome uncovered a de novo, interstitial, 1.7 Mb deletion on Xp22.31 that originated on the paternally inherited X and previously been associated with heterogeneous, neurological phenotype. Phased, allelic expression data suggested an 83∶20 moderately skewed XCI that favored the expression of the maternally inherited, cytogenetically normal X and suggested that the deleterious affect of the de novo event on the paternal copy may be offset by skewed XCI that favors expression of the wild-type X. This study shows the utility of integrated sequencing approach in XCI ratio estimation.

  1. Stable X chromosome inactivation involves the PRC1 Polycomb complex and requires histone MACROH2A1 and the CULLIN3/SPOP ubiquitin E3 ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Lund, Anders H; van der Stoop, Petra

    2005-01-01

    protein BMI1 and the variant histone MACROH2A. We find that in addition to MACROH2A, PRC1 is recruited to the inactivated X chromosome in somatic cells in a highly dynamic, cell cycle-regulated manner. Importantly, RNAi-mediated knock-down of CULLIN3 or SPOP results in loss of MACROH2A1 from...... the inactivated X chromosome (Xi), leading to reactivation of the Xi in the presence of inhibitors of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. Likewise, Xi reactivation is also seen on MacroH2A1 RNAi under these conditions. Hence, we propose that the PRC1 complex is involved in the maintenance of X chromosome...

  2. Integration of Stable Droplet Formation on a CD Microfluidic Device for Extreme Point of Care Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Shruthi Vatsyayani

    With the advent of microfluidic technologies for molecular diagnostics, a lot of emphasis has been placed on developing diagnostic tools for resource poor regions in the form of Extreme Point of Care devices. To ensure commercial viability of such a device there is a need to develop an accurate sample to answer system, which is robust, portable, isolated yet highly sensitive and cost effective. This need has been a driving force for research involving integration of different microsystems like droplet microfluidics, Compact-disc (CD)microfluidics along with sample preparation and detection modules on a single platform. This work attempts to develop a proof of concept prototype of one such device using existing CD microfluidics tools to generate stable droplets used in point of care diagnostics (POC diagnostics). Apart from using a fairly newer technique for droplet generation and stabilization, the work aims to develop this method focused towards diagnostics for rural healthcare. The motivation for this work is first described with an emphasis on the current need for diagnostic testing in rural health-care and the general guidelines prescribed by WHO for such a sample to answer system. Furthermore, a background on CD and droplet microfluidics is presented to understand the merits and de-merits of each system and the need for integrating the two. This phase of the thesis also includes different methods employed/demonstrated to generate droplets on a spinning platform. An overview on the detection platforms is also presented to understand the challenges involved in building an extreme point of care device. In the third phase of the thesis, general manufacturing techniques and materials used to accomplish this work is presented. Lastly, design trials for droplet generation is presented. The shortcomings of these trials are solved by investigating mechanisms pertaining to design modification and use of agarose based droplet generation to ensure a more robust sample

  3. New vectors for chromosomal integration enable high-level constitutive or inducible magnetosome expression of fusion proteins in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Sarah; Hofmann, Julia; Pollithy, Anna; Lang, Claus; Schüler, Dirk

    2014-04-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense biomineralizes magnetosomes, which consist of monocrystalline magnetite cores enveloped by a phospholipid bilayer containing specific proteins. Magnetosomes represent magnetic nanoparticles with unprecedented magnetic and physicochemical characteristics. These make them potentially useful in a number of biotechnological and biomedical applications. Further functionalization can be achieved by expression of foreign proteins via genetic fusion to magnetosome anchor peptides. However, the available genetic tool set for strong and controlled protein expression in magnetotactic bacteria is very limited. Here, we describe versatile vectors for either inducible or high-level constitutive expression of proteins in M. gryphiswaldense. The combination of an engineered native PmamDC promoter with a codon-optimized egfp gene (Mag-egfp) resulted in an 8-fold increase in constitutive expression and in brighter fluorescence. We further demonstrate that the widely used Ptet promoter is functional and tunable in M. gryphiswaldense. Stable and uniform expression of the EGFP and β-glucuronidase (GusA) reporters was achieved by single-copy chromosomal insertion via Tn5-mediated transposition. In addition, gene duplication by Mag-EGFP-EGFP fusions to MamC resulted in further increased magnetosome expression and fluorescence. Between 80 and 210 (for single MamC-Mag-EGFP) and 200 and 520 (for MamC-Mag-EGFP-EGFP) GFP copies were estimated to be expressed per individual magnetosome particle.

  4. Repetitive, Marker-Free, Site-Specific Integration as a Novel Tool for Multiple Chromosomal Integration of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kia Vest; Martinussen, Jan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    of a minimal bacterial attachment site (attBmin), two mutated loxP sequences (lox66 and lox71) allowing for removal of undesirable vector elements (antibiotic resistance marker), and a counterselection marker (oroP) for selection of loxP recombination on the pKV6 vector. When transformed into L. lactis......We present a tool for repetitive, marker-free, site-specific integration in Lactococcus lactis, in which a nonreplicating plasmid vector (pKV6) carrying a phage attachment site (attP) can be integrated into a bacterial attachment site (attB). The novelty of the tool described here is the inclusion...

  5. Next-generation sequencing and syntenic integration of flow-sorted arms of wheat chromosome 4A exposes the chromosome structure and gene content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernandez, P.; Martis, M.; Dorado, G.; Pfeifer, M.; Galvez, S.; Schaaf, S.; Jouve, N.; Šimková, Hana; Valárik, Miroslav; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, K. F. X.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 3 (2012), s. 377-386 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/08/1629; GA ČR GAP501/10/1740 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : wheat genome * chromosome sorting * genome zipper Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.582, year: 2012

  6. Effects of a Balanced Translocation between Chromosomes 1 and 11 Disrupting the DISC1 Locus on White Matter Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Whalley

    Full Text Available Individuals carrying rare, but biologically informative genetic variants provide a unique opportunity to model major mental illness and inform understanding of disease mechanisms. The rarity of such variations means that their study involves small group numbers, however they are amongst the strongest known genetic risk factors for major mental illness and are likely to have large neural effects. DISC1 (Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 is a gene containing one such risk variant, identified in a single Scottish family through its disruption by a balanced translocation of chromosomes 1 and 11; t(1;11 (q42.1;q14.3.Within the original pedigree, we examined the effects of the t(1;11 translocation on white matter integrity, measured by fractional anisotropy (FA. This included family members with (n = 7 and without (n = 13 the translocation, along with a clinical control sample of patients with psychosis (n = 34, and a group of healthy controls (n = 33.We report decreased white matter integrity in five clusters in the genu of the corpus callosum, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, acoustic radiation and fornix. Analysis of the mixed psychosis group also demonstrated decreased white matter integrity in the above regions. FA values within the corpus callosum correlated significantly with positive psychotic symptom severity.We demonstrate that the t(1;11 translocation is associated with reduced white matter integrity in frontal commissural and association fibre tracts. These findings overlap with those shown in affected patients with psychosis and in DISC1 animal models and highlight the value of rare but biologically informative mutations in modeling psychosis.

  7. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  8. Establishment and characterization of a novel Hodgkin lymphoma cell line, AM-HLH, carrying the Epstein-Barr virus genome integrated into the host chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Masahiko; Daibata, Masanori; Tagami, Erika; Taguchi, Takahiro; Maekawa, Fumiyo; Takeoka, Kayo; Fukutsuka, Katsuhiro; Shimomura, Daiki; Hayashi, Takamasa; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    We describe the establishment and characterization of a cell line, AM-HLH, obtained from a patient with Epstein-Barr virus-positive (EBV + ) nodular sclerosis-type Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The cells were positive for CD2 and CD30 and negative for CD15. The immunoglobulin heavy- and κ light-chain genes were rearranged. The karyotype was of the triploid range. Southern blotting using the EBV terminal repeat probe detected 3 hybridizing bands that were identical to those of the parental HL material. The cells expressed EBV-encoded RNAs as well as latent genes (EBNA1, EBNA2, LMP1, and LMP2A) and lytic genes (BZLF1 and BALF2). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the cosmid pJB8 clone containing a fragment of EBV DNA as a probe revealed multiple hybridization signals at a marker chromosome. Additional FISH using whole chromosome painting and centromere probes in combination with multicolor FISH determined that multiple EBV copies were clustered within the chromosome 20 materials of the marker chromosome. Culture supernatants of AM-HLH contained IL-10 as measured by the bead-based immunoassay. It is possible that an integrated EBV genome and cellular genes on chromosome 20 were coamplified, leading to the enhanced expression of genes involved in cell growth control. The AM-HLH cell line will be useful to clarify the role of cytokines in the development of EBV + HL. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Vaginal Neoplasia Induced by an Unusual Papillomavirus Subtype in a Woman with Inherited Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus Type 6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Maxime; Gaymard, Alexandre; Lebail-Carval, Karine; Frobert, Emilie; Beaufils, Etienne; Chene, Gautier; Tommasino, Massimo; Lina, Bruno; Gaucherand, Pascal; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Bonnafous, Pascale; Gheit, Tarik; Buenerd, Annie; Lamblin, Gery; Mekki, Yahia

    2017-01-01

    We describe here a case of high-grade vaginal squamous lesion in a 54-year-old woman with a papillomaviruses (HPV) genital infection that developed from a cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) to a high-grade SIL (H-SIL) on cytological examination. A colposcopy exam led to the detection of suspect vaginal lesions with granulomatous infiltrations, which were classified as a Vaginal Intra-Epithelial Neoplasia grade 2 after pathologists' analyses. After a laser vaginal surgery and a loop excision of the transformation zone, the analyses of the anatomical pieces using a near-complete HPV screening panel revealed an HPV-4 infection that was not detected before in cervical smears. This HPV-infection is associated with a high human herpesvirus type 6A (HHV-6A) viral load in the same anatomical piece. The presence of an inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6A (iciHHV-6A) was proved in this patient by real-time polymerase chain reaction on hair follicles and nail. This case suggests reconsidering both the benign nature of low-grade lesions in the female genital tract and the well-known "good" prognosis of low-risk HPV infection, especially when iciHHV-6A is diagnosed. This clinical course insists on the benefits of the multiplex panel use or global sequencing in order to optimize biological testing sensitivity, and so enhance clinical management of infection-induced neoplasia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Integration of human adipocyte chromosomal interactions with adipose gene expression prioritizes obesity-related genes from GWAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, David Z; Garske, Kristina M; Alvarez, Marcus; Bhagat, Yash V; Boocock, James; Nikkola, Elina; Miao, Zong; Raulerson, Chelsea K; Cantor, Rita M; Civelek, Mete; Glastonbury, Craig A; Small, Kerrin S; Boehnke, Michael; Lusis, Aldons J; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Mohlke, Karen L; Laakso, Markku; Pajukanta, Päivi; Ko, Arthur

    2018-04-17

    Increased adiposity is a hallmark of obesity and overweight, which affect 2.2 billion people world-wide. Understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie obesity-related phenotypes can help to improve treatment options and drug development. Here we perform promoter Capture Hi-C in human adipocytes to investigate interactions between gene promoters and distal elements as a transcription-regulating mechanism contributing to these phenotypes. We find that promoter-interacting elements in human adipocytes are enriched for adipose-related transcription factor motifs, such as PPARG and CEBPB, and contribute to heritability of cis-regulated gene expression. We further intersect these data with published genome-wide association studies for BMI and BMI-related metabolic traits to identify the genes that are under genetic cis regulation in human adipocytes via chromosomal interactions. This integrative genomics approach identifies four cis-eQTL-eGene relationships associated with BMI or obesity-related traits, including rs4776984 and MAP2K5, which we further confirm by EMSA, and highlights 38 additional candidate genes.

  11. Multiple opposing constraints govern chromosome interactions during meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Y Lui

    Full Text Available Homolog pairing and crossing over during meiosis I prophase is required for accurate chromosome segregation to form euploid gametes. The repair of Spo11-induced double-strand breaks (DSB using a homologous chromosome template is a major driver of pairing in many species, including fungi, plants, and mammals. Inappropriate pairing and crossing over at ectopic loci can lead to chromosome rearrangements and aneuploidy. How (or if inappropriate ectopic interactions are disrupted in favor of allelic interactions is not clear. Here we used an in vivo "collision" assay in budding yeast to test the contributions of cohesion and the organization and motion of chromosomes in the nucleus on promoting or antagonizing interactions between allelic and ectopic loci at interstitial chromosome sites. We found that deletion of the cohesin subunit Rec8, but not other chromosome axis proteins (e.g. Red1, Hop1, or Mek1, caused an increase in homolog-nonspecific chromosome interaction, even in the absence of Spo11. This effect was partially suppressed by expression of the mitotic cohesin paralog Scc1/Mdc1, implicating Rec8's role in cohesion rather than axis integrity in preventing nonspecific chromosome interactions. Disruption of telomere-led motion by treating cells with the actin polymerization inhibitor Latrunculin B (Lat B elevated nonspecific collisions in rec8Δ spo11Δ. Next, using a visual homolog-pairing assay, we found that the delay in homolog pairing in mutants defective for telomere-led chromosome motion (ndj1Δ or csm4Δ is enhanced in Lat B-treated cells, implicating actin in more than one process promoting homolog juxtaposition. We suggest that multiple, independent contributions of actin, cohesin, and telomere function are integrated to promote stable homolog-specific interactions and to destabilize weak nonspecific interactions by modulating the elastic spring-like properties of chromosomes.

  12. Multiple chromosomal gene integration for production of pharmaceutical proteins in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Malene; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Gunnarsson, Nina

    2014-01-01

    When studying protein folding and secretion the general conception is that all cells in a population express an equal amount of protein. Recent work has shown that expression levels vary greatly in cell populations which express proteins on plasmids. Hence a yeast expression platform has been dev....... An amplification method has been developed for the platform which enables fast integration of genes. Future perspectives involve exploring the capabilities of the platform for recombinant protein production including performance and stability studies.......When studying protein folding and secretion the general conception is that all cells in a population express an equal amount of protein. Recent work has shown that expression levels vary greatly in cell populations which express proteins on plasmids. Hence a yeast expression platform has been......, expressing CFP and RFP on the separate plasmids or expressing CFP and RFP using the yeast expression platform shows expression varies greatly in a cell population based on plasmid expression compared to the yeast expression platform. When expressed on plasmids a few cells are high performers on both proteins...

  13. Disrupted fornix integrity in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Cabaral, Margarita; Amaral, David G; Buonocore, Michael H; Harvey, Danielle; Kalish, Kristopher; Carmichael, Owen T; Schumann, Cynthia M; Lee, Aaron; Dougherty, Robert F; Perry, Lee M; Wandell, Brian A; Simon, Tony J

    2015-04-30

    The fornix is the primary subcortical output fiber system of the hippocampal formation. In children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), hippocampal volume reduction has been commonly reported, but few studies as yet have evaluated the integrity of the fornix. Therefore, we investigated the fornix of 45 school-aged children with 22q11.2DS and 38 matched typically developing (TD) children. Probabilistic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography was used to reconstruct the body of the fornix in each child׳s brain native space. Compared with children, significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher radial diffusivity (RD) was observed bilaterally in the body of the fornix in children with 22q11.2DS. Irregularities were especially prominent in the posterior aspect of the fornix where it emerges from the hippocampus. Smaller volumes of the hippocampal formations were also found in the 22q11.2DS group. The reduced hippocampal volumes were correlated with lower fornix FA and higher fornix RD in the right hemisphere. Our findings provide neuroanatomical evidence of disrupted hippocampal connectivity in children with 22q11.2DS, which may help to further understand the biological basis of spatial impairments, affective regulation, and other factors related to the ultra-high risk for schizophrenia in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transmission of chromosomal and instability via a chromosome irradiated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji; Tanabe, Masateru; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    We examined the stability of the transferred chromosome in 5 and 12 microcell hybrids including unirradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively, and 6 and 19 microcell hybrids including 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively. The transferred chromosome was structurally stable in most microcell hybrids transferred with the unirradiated chromosomes 6 and 8. In contrast, the 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes were unstable in 3 out of 6 hybrids (50%) with chromosome 6 and 3 out of 19 hybrids (16%) with chromosome 8, showing multiple aberrations in high frequencies (35∼98%). To know the cause of delayed chromosomal instability, intrachromosomal rearrangements of the human chromosome is investigated by subtelomere FISH in 17 microcell hybrids transferred with chromosomes 6 and 8. We found frequent intrachromosomal in 7 microcell hybrids (41%). However, no clear correlation was observed between the intrachromosomal rearrangements and the induction of delayed chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

  15. Integration of metal-resistant determinants from the plasmid of an Acidocella strain into the chromosome of Escherichia coli DH5alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sajalendu; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Nandi, Suvobroto; Banerjee, Pataki C

    2005-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of mine origin are ideal systems for studying microbial metal resistance because of their ability to grow in the presence of high concentrations of metal salts. We have previously shown that the metal-resistant transformants obtained after transformation of Escherichia coli DH5alpha with plasmid DNA preparation from Acidocella sp. strain GS19h did not contain any plasmid suggesting chromosomal integration of the plasmid(s) (Appl Environ Microbiol 1997; 63: 4523-4527). The present study provides evidence in support of this suggestion. The pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern of genomic DNA of the plasmidless metal-resistant transformants differed markedly from that of the untransformed DH5alpha strain. Moreover, when the recombinant plasmids constructed by cloning plasmid DNA fragments of the Acidocella strain GS19h in the vector pBluescript II KS+ were used to transform E. coli DH5alpha strain, no plasmid DNA was detected in some of the zinc- and ampicillin-resistant (ZnrAmpr) clones. The PFGE pattern of genomic DNA of such a transformed clone also differed markedly from that of the parent strain, suggesting chromosomal integration of the recombinant plasmid(s) containing both ampicillin- and zinc-resistance determinants. This observation was further supported by hybridization of chromosomal DNA of the plasmidless ZnrAmpr E. coli DH5alpha clone with the probes made from the plasmid DNA of strain GS19h and the vector DNA. Thus, this study corroborates our previous finding and documents the phenomenon of integration of metal-resistant determinants from the Acidocella GS19h plasmid(s) into the chromosome of E. coli DH5alpha.

  16. Unconditionally Energy Stable Implicit Time Integration: Application to Multibody System Analysis and Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshin; Tortorelli, Daniel A.; Hansen, John Michael

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computer hardware and improved algorithms for multibody dynamics over the past decade have generated widespread interest in real-time simulations of multibody mechanics systems. At the heart of the widely used algorithms for multibody dynamics are a choice of coordinates which define...... the kinmatics of the system, and a choice of time integrations algorithms. The current approach uses a non-dissipative implict Newmark method to integrate the equations of motion defined in terms of the independent joint coordinates of the system. The reduction of the equations of motion to a minimal set...... of ordinary diffferential equations is employed to avoid the instabilities associated with the direct integrations of differential-algebraic equations. To extend the unconditional stability of the implicit Newmark method to nonlinear dynamic systems, a discrete energy balance is enforced. This constraint...

  17. Study of a Microfluidic Chip Integrating Single Cell Trap and 3D Stable Rotation Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single cell manipulation technology has been widely applied in biological fields, such as cell injection/enucleation, cell physiological measurement, and cell imaging. Recently, a biochip platform with a novel configuration of electrodes for cell 3D rotation has been successfully developed by generating rotating electric fields. However, the rotation platform still has two major shortcomings that need to be improved. The primary problem is that there is no on-chip module to facilitate the placement of a single cell into the rotation chamber, which causes very low efficiency in experiment to manually pipette single 10-micron-scale cells into rotation position. Secondly, the cell in the chamber may suffer from unstable rotation, which includes gravity-induced sinking down to the chamber bottom or electric-force-induced on-plane movement. To solve the two problems, in this paper we propose a new microfluidic chip with manipulation capabilities of single cell trap and single cell 3D stable rotation, both on one chip. The new microfluidic chip consists of two parts. The top capture part is based on the least flow resistance principle and is used to capture a single cell and to transport it to the rotation chamber. The bottom rotation part is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP and is used to 3D rotate the single cell in the rotation chamber with enhanced stability. The two parts are aligned and bonded together to form closed channels for microfluidic handling. Using COMSOL simulation and preliminary experiments, we have verified, in principle, the concept of on-chip single cell traps and 3D stable rotation, and identified key parameters for chip structures, microfluidic handling, and electrode configurations. The work has laid a solid foundation for on-going chip fabrication and experiment validation.

  18. Determining origin in a migratory marine vertebrate: a novel method to integrate stable isotopes and satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Zanden, Hannah B.; Tucker, Anton D.; Hart, Kristen M.; Lamont, Margaret M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Addison, David S.; Mansfield, Katherine L.; Phillips, Katrina F.; Wunder, Michael B.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Pajuelo, Mariela; Bolten, Alan B.; Bjorndal, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool to track animal movements in both terrestrial and marine environments. These intrinsic markers are assimilated through the diet and may exhibit spatial gradients as a result of biogeochemical processes at the base of the food web. In the marine environment, maps to predict the spatial distribution of stable isotopes are limited, and thus determining geographic origin has been reliant upon integrating satellite telemetry and stable isotope data. Migratory sea turtles regularly move between foraging and reproductive areas. Whereas most nesting populations can be easily accessed and regularly monitored, little is known about the demographic trends in foraging populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine migration patterns of loggerhead nesting aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), where sea turtles have been historically understudied. Two methods of geographic assignment using stable isotope values in known-origin samples from satellite telemetry were compared: 1) a nominal approach through discriminant analysis and 2) a novel continuous-surface approach using bivariate carbon and nitrogen isoscapes (isotopic landscapes) developed for this study. Tissue samples for stable isotope analysis were obtained from 60 satellite-tracked individuals at five nesting beaches within the GoM. Both methodological approaches for assignment resulted in high accuracy of foraging area determination, though each has advantages and disadvantages. The nominal approach is more appropriate when defined boundaries are necessary, but up to 42% of the individuals could not be considered in this approach. All individuals can be included in the continuous-surface approach, and individual results can be aggregated to identify geographic hotspots of foraging area use, though the accuracy rate was lower than nominal assignment. The methodological validation provides a foundation for future sea turtle studies in the region to inexpensively

  19. Determining origin in a migratory marine vertebrate: a novel method to integrate stable isotopes and satellite tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanden, Hannah B Vander; Tucker, Anton D; Hart, Kristen M; Lamont, Margaret M; Fuisaki, Ikuko; Addison, David; Mansfield, Katherine L; Phillips, Katrina F; Wunder, Michael B; Bowen, Gabriel J; Pajuelo, Mariela; Bolten, Alan B; Bjorndal, Karen A

    2015-03-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool to track animal movements in both terrestrial and marine environments. These intrinsic markers are assimilated through the diet and may exhibit spatial gradients as a result of biogeochemical processes at the base of the food web. In the marine environment, maps to predict the spatial distribution of stable isotopes are limited, and thus determining geographic origin has been reliant upon integrating satellite telemetry and stable isotope data. Migratory sea turtles regularly move between foraging and reproductive areas. Whereas most nesting populations can be easily accessed and regularly monitored, little is known about the demographic trends in foraging populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine migration patterns of loggerhead nesting aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), where sea turtles have been historically understudied. Two methods of geographic assignment using stable isotope values in known-origin samples from satellite telemetry were compared: (1) a nominal approach through discriminant analysis and (2) a novel continuous-surface approach using bivariate carbon and nitrogen isoscapes (isotopic landscapes) developed for this study. Tissue samples for stable isotope analysis were obtained from 60 satellite-tracked individuals at five nesting beaches within the GoM. Both methodological approaches for assignment resulted in high accuracy of foraging area determination, though each has advantages and disadvantages. The nominal approach is more appropriate when defined boundaries are necessary, but up to 42% of the individuals could not be considered in this approach. All individuals can be included in the continuous-surface approach, and individual results can be aggregated to identify geographic hotspots of foraging area use, though the accuracy rate was lower than nominal assignment. The methodological validation provides a foundation for future sea turtle studies in the region to

  20. Psychosocial correlates of safe sex communication between Latina women and their stable male partners: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Heidi; Larson, Elaine

    2017-05-01

    Latina women in stable relationships have risks for human immunodeficiency virus and other sexually transmitted infections. Improving safe sexual communication (SSC) could enable women to accurately assess and mitigate their risk of infection within their relationship. Literature to identify psychosocial correlates that facilitate or inhibit SSC between Latina women and their partners has not yet been synthesized. The purpose of this study was to conduct an integrative review and synthesis of empirical and theoretical research that examines psychosocial correlates of SSC among adult Latina women from the United States, Latina America, and the Caribbean with stable male partners. A systematic search of LILACS, EBSCO, and PsychInfo databases was conducted to identify qualitative and quantitative studies that investigated psychosocial correlates of SSC among adult Latina women with a stable male partner. Pertinent data were abstracted and quality of individual studies was appraised. A qualitative synthesis was conducted following Miles and Huberman's method. Five qualitative and three quantitative studies meet eligibility criteria. Factors related to SSC related to three main themes: (1) relationship factors such as length, quality, and power/control, (2) individual factors including attitudes, beliefs, background, behaviors, and intrapersonal characteristics, and (3) partner factors related to partner beliefs and behaviors. The interplay of relationship, individual, and partner factors should be considered in the assessment of SSC for Latina women with their stable partners. To inform future interventions and clinical guidelines, additional research is needed to identify which factors are most related to SSC for this population, and how comparable experiences are for Latina women of different subcultures and living in different countries.

  1. Stable unitary integrators for the numerical implementation of continuous unitary transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Samuel; Refael, Gil

    2017-09-01

    The technique of continuous unitary transformations has recently been used to provide physical insight into a diverse array of quantum mechanical systems. However, the question of how to best numerically implement the flow equations has received little attention. The most immediately apparent approach, using standard Runge-Kutta numerical integration algorithms, suffers from both severe inefficiency due to stiffness and the loss of unitarity. After reviewing the formalism of continuous unitary transformations and Wegner's original choice for the infinitesimal generator of the flow, we present a number of approaches to resolving these issues including a choice of generator which induces what we call the "uniform tangent decay flow" and three numerical integrators specifically designed to perform continuous unitary transformations efficiently while preserving the unitarity of flow. We conclude by applying one of the flow algorithms to a simple calculation that visually demonstrates the many-body localization transition.

  2. Structural changes, market concentration and vertical integration: would they lead to more stable markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmassebi, H.

    1991-01-01

    This communication is concerned with three major developments that are likely to have significant impact on the future structure of world oil markets: oil company mergers and acquisitions, shift of exploration and production activity from the United States to overseas, and joint venture agreements between producing countries and oil companies aimed at further downstream integration by OPEC. The last two developments are likely to contribute substantially to price and market stability in the future

  3. Integration as the basis of stable and dynamic development of enterprises in agroindustrial complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ivanovich Ogorodnikov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of market relations in Russian economy generates an objective need to address a number of problems in the relationship between agroundustrial complex organizations in connection with privatization, liberalization of prices and imbalances in the existing inter-industry production and economic relations that negatively affect the results of their economic activities. Because of the flagrant violations of the replenishment process, a diverse range of connections and relationships between producers and processors was broken. The major direction of lifting agricultural economy in this situation is the development of cooperatives and agroindustrial integration. In addition, the formation of large integrated complexes demonstrates high efficiency and rapid development, which is the basis of agroindustrial sector in many developed countries. The increase of competition forces business entities to combine capabilities and mutually beneficial cooperation in the struggle for the strengthening of market positions. Thus, increasing the degree of integration in the agricultural sector helps to get out of the protracted crisis and move more quickly to the innovations.

  4. Ipl1/Aurora kinase suppresses S-CDK-driven spindle formation during prophase I to ensure chromosome integrity during meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Newnham

    Full Text Available Cells coordinate spindle formation with DNA repair and morphological modifications to chromosomes prior to their segregation to prevent cell division with damaged chromosomes. Here we uncover a novel and unexpected role for Aurora kinase in preventing the formation of spindles by Clb5-CDK (S-CDK during meiotic prophase I and when the DDR is active in budding yeast. This is critical since S-CDK is essential for replication during premeiotic S-phase as well as double-strand break induction that facilitates meiotic recombination and, ultimately, chromosome segregation. Furthermore, we find that depletion of Cdc5 polo kinase activity delays spindle formation in DDR-arrested cells and that ectopic expression of Cdc5 in prophase I enhances spindle formation, when Ipl1 is depleted. Our findings establish a new paradigm for Aurora kinase function in both negative and positive regulation of spindle dynamics.

  5. Stella preserves maternal chromosome integrity by inhibiting 5hmC-induced γH2AX accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Tsunetoshi; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kimura, Tohru; Oda, Masaaki; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Hori, Mayuko; Sekita, Yoichi; Arakawa, Tatsuhiko; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru

    2015-05-01

    In the mouse zygote, Stella/PGC7 protects 5-methylcytosine (5mC) of the maternal genome from Tet3-mediated oxidation to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Although ablation of Stella causes early embryonic lethality, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we report impaired DNA replication and abnormal chromosome segregation (ACS) of maternal chromosomes in Stella-null embryos. In addition, phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX), which has been reported to inhibit DNA replication, accumulates in the maternal chromatin of Stella-null zygotes in a Tet3-dependent manner. Cell culture assays verified that ectopic appearance of 5hmC induces abnormal accumulation of γH2AX and subsequent growth retardation. Thus, Stella protects maternal chromosomes from aberrant epigenetic modifications to ensure early embryogenesis. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Ipl1/Aurora Kinase Suppresses S-CDK-Driven Spindle Formation during Prophase I to Ensure Chromosome Integrity during Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Newnham, Louise; Jordan, Philip W.; Carballo, Jesus A.; Newcombe, Sonya; Hoffmann, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Cells coordinate spindle formation with DNA repair and morphological modifications to chromosomes prior to their segregation to prevent cell division with damaged chromosomes. Here we uncover a novel and unexpected role for Aurora kinase in preventing the formation of spindles by Clb5-CDK (S-CDK) during meiotic prophase I and when the DDR is active in budding yeast. This is critical since S-CDK is essential for replication during premeiotic S-phase as well as double-strand break induction tha...

  7. Explicit solution of the time domain volume integral equation using a stable predictor-corrector scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Al Jarro, Ahmed

    2012-11-01

    An explicit marching-on-in-time (MOT) scheme for solving the time domain volume integral equation is presented. The proposed method achieves its stability by employing, at each time step, a corrector scheme, which updates/corrects fields computed by the explicit predictor scheme. The proposedmethod is computationally more efficient when compared to the existing filtering techniques used for the stabilization of explicit MOT schemes. Numerical results presented in this paper demonstrate that the proposed method maintains its stability even when applied to the analysis of electromagnetic wave interactions with electrically large structures meshed using approximately half a million discretization elements.

  8. Generation of a Stable Transgenic Swine Model Expressing a Porcine Histone 2B-eGFP Fusion Protein for Cell Tracking and Chromosome Dynamics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sper, Renan B; Koh, Sehwon; Zhang, Xia; Simpson, Sean; Collins, Bruce; Sommer, Jeff; Petters, Robert M; Caballero, Ignacio; Platt, Jeff L; Piedrahita, Jorge A

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic pigs have become an attractive research model in the field of translational research, regenerative medicine, and stem cell therapy due to their anatomic, genetic and physiological similarities with humans. The development of fluorescent proteins as molecular tags has allowed investigators to track cell migration and engraftment levels after transplantation. Here we describe the development of two transgenic pig models via SCNT expressing a fusion protein composed of eGFP and porcine Histone 2B (pH2B). This fusion protein is targeted to the nucleosomes resulting a nuclear/chromatin eGFP signal. The first model (I) was generated via random insertion of pH2B-eGFP driven by the CAG promoter (chicken beta actin promoter and rabbit Globin poly A; pCAG-pH2B-eGFP) and protected by human interferon-β matrix attachment regions (MARs). Despite the consistent, high, and ubiquitous expression of the fusion protein pH2B-eGFP in all tissues analyzed, two independently generated Model I transgenic lines developed neurodegenerative symptoms including Wallerian degeneration between 3-5 months of age, requiring euthanasia. A second transgenic model (II) was developed via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated homology-directed repair (HDR) of IRES-pH2B-eGFP into the endogenous β-actin (ACTB) locus. Model II transgenic animals showed ubiquitous expression of pH2B-eGFP on all tissues analyzed. Unlike the pCAG-pH2B-eGFP/MAR line, all Model II animals were healthy and multiple pregnancies have been established with progeny showing the expected Mendelian ratio for the transmission of the pH2B-eGFP. Expression of pH2B-eGFP was used to examine the timing of the maternal to zygotic transition after IVF, and to examine chromosome segregation of SCNT embryos. To our knowledge this is the first viable transgenic pig model with chromatin-associated eGFP allowing both cell tracking and the study of chromatin dynamics in a large animal model.

  9. Highly Stable Liquid Metal-Based Pressure Sensor Integrated with a Microfluidic Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekeon Jung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pressure measurement is considered one of the key parameters in microfluidic systems. It has been widely used in various fields, such as in biology and biomedical fields. The electrical measurement method is the most widely investigated; however, it is unsuitable for microfluidic systems because of a complicated fabrication process and difficult integration. Moreover, it is generally damaged by large deflection. This paper proposes a thin-film-based pressure sensor that is free from these limitations, using a liquid metal called galinstan. The proposed pressure sensor is easily integrated into a microfluidic system using soft lithography because galinstan exists in a liquid phase at room temperature. We investigated the characteristics of the proposed pressure sensor by calibrating for a pressure range from 0 to 230 kPa (R2 > 0.98 using deionized water. Furthermore, the viscosity of various fluid samples was measured for a shear-rate range of 30–1000 s−1. The results of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were evaluated using a commercial viscometer and normalized difference was found to be less than 5.1% and 7.0%, respectively. The galinstan-based pressure sensor can be used in various microfluidic systems for long-term monitoring with high linearity, repeatability, and long-term stability.

  10. Integration of genetic and physical maps of the chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genome using flow-sorted chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zatloukalová, Pavlína; Hřibová, Eva; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Šimková, Hana; Adoración, C.; Kahl, G.; Millán, T.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2011), s. 729-739 ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC-FISH * Chromosome isolation * Flow cytometric sorting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.087, year: 2011

  11. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenzes Maria

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II. Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II. The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M; 16 h nicotine (16N; 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N. Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M, or for 16 h (16N, resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%. Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%. A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%. Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  12. Telomerase expression is sufficient for chromosomal integrity in cells lacking p53 dependent G1 checkpoint function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson Dennis A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary cultures of human fibroblasts display a finite lifespan ending at senescence. Loss of p53 function by mutation or viral oncogene expression bypasses senescence, allowing cell division to continue for an additional 10 – 20 doublings. During this time chromosomal aberrations seen in mitotic cells increase while DNA damage and decatenation checkpoint functions in G2 cells decrease. Methods To explore this complex interplay between chromosomal instability and checkpoint dysfunction, human fibroblast lines were derived that expressed HPV16E6 oncoprotein or dominant-negative alleles of p53 (A143V and H179Q with or without the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Results Cells with normal p53 function displayed 86 – 93% G1 arrest after exposure to 1.5 Gy ionizing radiation (IR. Expression of HPV16E6 or p53-H179Q severely attenuated G1 checkpoint function (3 – 20% arrest while p53-A143V expression induced intermediate attenuation (55 – 57% arrest irrespective of telomerase expression. All cell lines, regardless of telomerase expression or p53 status, exhibited a normal DNA damage G2 checkpoint response following exposure to 1.5 Gy IR prior to the senescence checkpoint. As telomerase-negative cells bypassed senescence, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations increased generally congruent with attenuation of G2 checkpoint function. Telomerase expression allowed cells with defective p53 function to grow >175 doublings without chromosomal aberrations or attenuation of G2 checkpoint function. Conclusion Thus, chromosomal instability in cells with defective p53 function appears to depend upon telomere erosion not loss of the DNA damage induced G1 checkpoint.

  13. The Global Network of Isotopes in Rivers (GNIR): Integration of Stable Water Isotopes in Riverine Research and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halder, J.; Terzer, S.; Wassenaar, L.; Araguas, L.; Aggarwal, P.

    2015-01-01

    Rivers play a crucial role in the global water cycle as watershed-integrating hydrological conduits for returning terrestrial precipitation, runoff, surface and groundwater, as well as melting snow and ice back to the world’s oceans. The IAEA Global Network of Isotopes in Rivers (GNIR) is the coherent extension of the IAEA Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) and aims to fill the informational data gaps between rainfall and river discharge. Whereas the GNIP has been surveying the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, and tritium composition in precipitation, the objective of GNIR is to accumulate and disseminate riverine isotope data. We introduce the new global database of riverine water isotopes and evaluate its current long-term data holdings with the objective to improve the application of water isotopes and to inform water managers and researchers. An evaluation of current GNIR database holdings confirmed that seasonal variations of the stable water isotope composition in rivers are closely coupled to precipitation and snow-melt water run-off on a global scale. Rivers could be clustered on the basis of seasonal variations in their isotope composition and latitude. Results showed furthermore, that there were periodic phases within each of these groupings and additional modelling exercises allowed a priori prediction of the seasonal variability as well as the isotopic composition of stable water isotopes in rivers. This predictive capacity will help to improve existing and new sampling strategies, help to validate and interpret riverine isotope data, and identify important catchment processes. Hence, the IAEA promulgates and supports longterm hydrological isotope observation networks and the application of isotope studies complementary with conventional hydrological, water quality, and ecological studies. (author)

  14. Molecular and virological evidence of viral activation from chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6A in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akifumi; Watanabe, Ken; Ohye, Tamae; Suzuki, Kyoko; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Shimizu, Norio; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Katano, Harutaka; Inoue, Naoki; Imai, Kohsuke; Takagi, Masatoshi; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2014-08-15

    It has been unclear whether chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) can be activated with pathogenic effects on the human body. We present molecular and virological evidence of ciHHV-6A activation in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. These findings have significant implications for the management of patients with ciHHV-6. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Winter diets of immature green turtles (Chelonia mydas) on a northern feeding ground: integrating stomach contents and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Natalie C.; Bjorndal, Karen A.; Lamont, Margaret M.; Carthy, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    The foraging ecology and diet of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, remain understudied, particularly in peripheral areas of its distribution. We assessed the diet of an aggregation of juvenile green turtles at the northern edge of its range during winter months using two approaches. Stomach content analyses provide a single time sample, and stable isotope analyses integrate diet over a several-month period. We evaluated diet consistency in prey choice over time by comparing the results of these two approaches. We examined stomach contents from 43 juvenile green turtles that died during cold stunning events in St. Joseph Bay, Florida, in 2008 and 2011. Stomach contents were evaluated for volume, dry mass, percent frequency of occurrence, and index of relative importance of individual diet items. Juvenile green turtles were omnivorous, feeding primarily on seagrasses and tunicates. Diet characterizations from stomach contents differed from those based on stable isotope analyses, indicating the turtles are not feeding consistently during winter months. Evaluation of diets during warm months is needed.

  16. Construction of the landscape for multi-stable systems: Potential landscape, quasi-potential, A-type integral and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Peijie, E-mail: cliffzhou@pku.edu.cn; Li, Tiejun, E-mail: tieli@pku.edu.cn [LMAM and School of Mathematical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-03-07

    Motivated by the famous Waddington’s epigenetic landscape metaphor in developmental biology, biophysicists and applied mathematicians made different proposals to construct the landscape for multi-stable complex systems. We aim to summarize and elucidate the relationships among these theories from a mathematical point of view. We systematically investigate and compare three different but closely related realizations in the recent literature: the Wang’s potential landscape theory from steady state distribution of stochastic differential equations (SDEs), the Freidlin-Wentzell quasi-potential from the large deviation theory, and the construction through SDE decomposition and A-type integral. We revisit that the quasi-potential is the zero noise limit of the potential landscape, and the potential function in the third proposal coincides with the quasi-potential. We compare the difference between local and global quasi-potential through the viewpoint of exchange of limit order for time and noise amplitude. We argue that local quasi-potentials are responsible for getting transition rates between neighboring stable states, while the global quasi-potential mainly characterizes the residence time of the states as the system reaches stationarity. The difference between these two is prominent when the transitivity property is broken. The most probable transition path by minimizing the Onsager-Machlup or Freidlin-Wentzell action functional is also discussed. As a consequence of the established connections among different proposals, we arrive at the novel result which guarantees the existence of SDE decomposition while denies its uniqueness in general cases. It is, therefore, clarified that the A-type integral is more appropriate to be applied to the decomposed SDEs rather than its primitive form as believed by previous researchers. Our results contribute to a deeper understanding of landscape theories for biological systems.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Tweedy, J; Spyrou, MA; Pearson, M; Lassner, D; Kuhl, U; Gompels, UA

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, imp...

  18. Enterobacter cloacae Complex Isolates Harboring blaNMC-A or blaIMI-Type Class A Carbapenemase Genes on Novel Chromosomal Integrative Elements and Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David A; Mataseje, Laura F; Davidson, Ross; Delport, Johannes A; Fuller, Jeff; Hoang, Linda; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Levett, Paul N; Roscoe, Diane L; Willey, Barbara M; Mulvey, Michael R

    2017-05-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates submitted to a reference laboratory from 2010 to 2015 were screened by PCR for seven common carbapenemase gene groups, namely, KPC, NDM, OXA-48, VIM, IMP, GES, and NMC-A/IMI. Nineteen of the submitted isolates (1.7%) were found to harbor Ambler class A bla NMC-A or bla IMI -type carbapenemases. All 19 isolates were resistant to at least one carbapenem but susceptible to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tigecycline, and ciprofloxacin. Most isolates (17/19) gave positive results with the Carba-NP test for phenotypic carbapenemase detection. Isolates were genetically diverse by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis macrorestriction analysis, multilocus sequence typing, and hsp60 gene analysis. The genes were found in various Enterobacter cloacae complex species; however, bla NMC-A was highly associated with Enterobacter ludwigii Whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis revealed that all NMC-A ( n = 10), IMI-1 ( n = 5), and IMI-9 ( n = 2) producers harbored the carbapenemase gene on EludIMEX-1-like integrative mobile elements (EcloIMEXs) located in the identical chromosomal locus. Two novel genes, bla IMI-5 and bla IMI-6 , were harbored on different IncFII-type plasmids. Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates harboring bla NMC-A/IMI -type carbapenemases are relatively rare in Canada. Though mostly found integrated into the chromosome, some variants are located on plasmids that may enhance their mobility potential. © Crown copyright 2017.

  19. Integrated genomic analysis implicates haploinsufficiency of multiple chromosome 5q31.2 genes in de novo myelodysplastic syndromes pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A Graubert

    Full Text Available Deletions spanning chromosome 5q31.2 are among the most common recurring cytogenetic abnormalities detectable in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. Prior genomic studies have suggested that haploinsufficiency of multiple 5q31.2 genes may contribute to MDS pathogenesis. However, this hypothesis has never been formally tested. Therefore, we designed this study to systematically and comprehensively evaluate all 28 chromosome 5q31.2 genes and directly test whether haploinsufficiency of a single 5q31.2 gene may result from a heterozygous nucleotide mutation or microdeletion. We selected paired tumor (bone marrow and germline (skin DNA samples from 46 de novo MDS patients (37 without a cytogenetic 5q31.2 deletion and performed total exonic gene resequencing (479 amplicons and array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. We found no somatic nucleotide changes in the 46 MDS samples, and no cytogenetically silent 5q31.2 deletions in 20/20 samples analyzed by array CGH. Twelve novel single nucleotide polymorphisms were discovered. The mRNA levels of 7 genes in the commonly deleted interval were reduced by 50% in CD34+ cells from del(5q MDS samples, and no gene showed complete loss of expression. Taken together, these data show that small deletions and/or point mutations in individual 5q31.2 genes are not common events in MDS, and implicate haploinsufficiency of multiple genes as the relevant genetic consequence of this common deletion.

  20. Filtering of high modal frequencies for stable real-time explicit integration of deformable objects using the Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinaga, Iker; Fierz, Basil; Spillmann, Jonas; Harders, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    The behavior, performance, and run-time of mechanical simulations in interactive virtual surgery depend heavily on the type of numerical differential equation solver used to integrate in time the dynamic equations obtained from simulation methods, such as the Finite Element Method. Explicit solvers are fast but only conditionally stable. The condition number of the stiffness matrix limits the highest possible time step. This limit is related to the geometrical properties of the underlying mesh, such as element shape and size. In fact, it can be governed by a small set of ill-shaped elements. For many applications this issue can be solved a priori by a careful meshing. However, when meshes are cut during interactive surgery simulation, it is difficult and computationally expensive to control the quality of the resulting elements. As an alternative, we propose to modify the elemental stiffness matrices directly in order to ensure stability. In this context, we first investigate the behavior of the eigenmodes of the elemental stiffness matrix in a Finite Element Method. We then propose a simple filter to reduce high model frequencies and thus allow larger time steps, while maintaining the general mechanical behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  2. Integrating small molecule signalling and H-NS antagonism in Vibrio cholerae, a bacterium with two chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Charles J

    2015-08-01

    H-NS is a well-established silencer of virulence gene transcription in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Biofilm formation aids V. cholerae in colonizing both its host and its external environments, and H-NS silences biofilm gene expression. Cyclic-di-guanosine monophosphate acts through the DNA binding proteins VpsR and VpsT to overcome H-NS-mediated repression of biofilm genes, driving a transition between a planktonic and a colonial/biofilm lifestyle. The H-NS binding pattern has now been charted on both chromosomes in V. cholerae, but whether or not this abundant DNA-binding-and-bridging protein plays any roles in nucleoid organization in this bacterium remains an open question. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-01-01

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-α resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  4. Human Herpesvirus 6B Induces Hypomethylation on Chromosome 17p13.3, Correlating with Increased Gene Expression and Virus Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Elin; Dunn, Nicky; Niehusmann, Pitt; Wideman, Sarah; Wipfler, Peter; Becker, Albert J; Ekström, Tomas J; Almgren, Malin; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) is a neurotropic betaherpesvirus that achieves latency by integrating its genome into host cell chromosomes. Several viruses can induce epigenetic modifications in their host cells, but no study has investigated the epigenetic modifications induced by HHV-6B. This study analyzed methylation with an Illumina 450K array, comparing HHV-6B-infected and uninfected Molt-3 T cells 3 days postinfection. Bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to validate the Illumina results and to investigate methylation over time in vitro Expression of genes was investigated using quantitative PCR (qPCR), and virus integration was investigated with PCR. A total of 406 CpG sites showed a significant HHV-6B-induced change in methylation in vitro Remarkably, 86% (351/406) of these CpGs were located integration in Molt-3 cell DNA 3 days after infection. The telomere at 17p has repeatedly been described as an integration site for HHV-6B, and we show for the first time that HHV-6B induces hypomethylation in this region during acute infection, which may play a role in the integration process, possibly by making the DNA more accessible. IMPORTANCE The ability to establish latency in the host is a hallmark of herpesviruses, but the mechanisms differ. Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) is known to establish latency through integration of its genome into the telomeric regions of host cells, with the ability to reactivate. Our study is the first to show that HHV-6B specifically induces hypomethylated regions close to the telomeres and that integrating viruses may use the host methylation machinery to facilitate their integration process. The results from this study contribute to knowledge of HHV-6B biology and virus-host interaction. This in turn will lead to further progress in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which HHV-6B contributes to pathological processes and may have important implications in both disease prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2017 American

  5. Integrated Assessment Of Groundwater Recharge In The North Kelantan River Basin Using Environmental Water Stable Isotopes, Tritium And Chloride Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Zakaria Wan Muhamad Tahir; Nur Hayati Hussin; Ismail Yusof; Kamaruzaman Mamat; Johari Abdul Latif; Rohaimah Demanah

    2014-01-01

    Estimation and understanding of groundwater recharge mechanism and capacity of aquifer are essential issues in water resources investigation. An integrated study of environmental chloride content in the unsaturated zone using chloride mass balance method (CMB) and isotopic analyses of deuterium, oxygen-18, and tritium values range in the alluvial channel aquifer profiles (quaternary sediments) of the North Kelantan River basin has been carried out in order to estimate and understand groundwater recharge processes. However, the rate of aquifer recharge is one of the most difficult factors to measure in the evaluation of ground water resources. Estimation of recharge, by whatever method, is normally subject to large uncertainties and errors. In this paper, changes in stable isotopic signatures in different seasons and tritium analysis of the sampled groundwater observed at different depth in the aquifer system were evaluated. Stable isotope data are slightly below the local meteoric water line (LMWL) indicating that there is some isotopic enrichment due to direct evaporation through the soil surface which is exposed prior or during the recharging process. The overall data on water isotopic signatures from boreholes and production wells (shallow and relatively deep aquifer system) are spread over a fairly small range but somewhat distinct compared to river water isotopic compositions. Such a narrow variation in isotopic signatures of the sampled groundwaters may suggest that all groundwater samples originated from the same area of direct recharge predominantly from rainfall and nearby rivers. Environmental tritium data measured in groundwater at different depths and locations together with a medium-term of limited monthly rainfall collections were used to investigate the groundwater age distributions (residence times). The existence of groundwater in the aquifer system (sampled wells) is predominantly designated as modern (young) water that has undergone recharged

  6. Effect of Built-Up Edge Formation during Stable State of Wear in AISI 304 Stainless Steel on Machining Performance and Surface Integrity of the Machined Part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Yassmin Seid; Fox-Rabinovich, German; Paiva, Jose Mario; Wagg, Terry; Veldhuis, Stephen Clarence

    2017-10-25

    During machining of stainless steels at low cutting -speeds, workpiece material tends to adhere to the cutting tool at the tool-chip interface, forming built-up edge (BUE). BUE has a great importance in machining processes; it can significantly modify the phenomenon in the cutting zone, directly affecting the workpiece surface integrity, cutting tool forces, and chip formation. The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 304 stainless steel has a high tendency to form an unstable BUE, leading to deterioration of the surface quality. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the nature of the surface integrity induced during machining operations. Although many reports have been published on the effect of tool wear during machining of AISI 304 stainless steel on surface integrity, studies on the influence of the BUE phenomenon in the stable state of wear have not been investigated so far. The main goal of the present work is to investigate the close link between the BUE formation, surface integrity and cutting forces in the stable sate of wear for uncoated cutting tool during the cutting tests of AISI 304 stainless steel. The cutting parameters were chosen to induce BUE formation during machining. X-ray diffraction (XRD) method was used for measuring superficial residual stresses of the machined surface through the stable state of wear in the cutting and feed directions. In addition, surface roughness of the machined surface was investigated using the Alicona microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to reveal the surface distortions created during the cutting process, combined with chip undersurface analyses. The investigated BUE formation during the stable state of wear showed that the BUE can cause a significant improvement in the surface integrity and cutting forces. Moreover, it can be used to compensate for tool wear through changing the tool geometry, leading to the protection of the cutting tool from wear.

  7. Effect of Built-Up Edge Formation during Stable State of Wear in AISI 304 Stainless Steel on Machining Performance and Surface Integrity of the Machined Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovich, German; Wagg, Terry

    2017-01-01

    During machining of stainless steels at low cutting -speeds, workpiece material tends to adhere to the cutting tool at the tool–chip interface, forming built-up edge (BUE). BUE has a great importance in machining processes; it can significantly modify the phenomenon in the cutting zone, directly affecting the workpiece surface integrity, cutting tool forces, and chip formation. The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 304 stainless steel has a high tendency to form an unstable BUE, leading to deterioration of the surface quality. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the nature of the surface integrity induced during machining operations. Although many reports have been published on the effect of tool wear during machining of AISI 304 stainless steel on surface integrity, studies on the influence of the BUE phenomenon in the stable state of wear have not been investigated so far. The main goal of the present work is to investigate the close link between the BUE formation, surface integrity and cutting forces in the stable sate of wear for uncoated cutting tool during the cutting tests of AISI 304 stainless steel. The cutting parameters were chosen to induce BUE formation during machining. X-ray diffraction (XRD) method was used for measuring superficial residual stresses of the machined surface through the stable state of wear in the cutting and feed directions. In addition, surface roughness of the machined surface was investigated using the Alicona microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to reveal the surface distortions created during the cutting process, combined with chip undersurface analyses. The investigated BUE formation during the stable state of wear showed that the BUE can cause a significant improvement in the surface integrity and cutting forces. Moreover, it can be used to compensate for tool wear through changing the tool geometry, leading to the protection of the cutting tool from wear. PMID:29068405

  8. Effect of Built-Up Edge Formation during Stable State of Wear in AISI 304 Stainless Steel on Machining Performance and Surface Integrity of the Machined Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassmin Seid Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During machining of stainless steels at low cutting -speeds, workpiece material tends to adhere to the cutting tool at the tool–chip interface, forming built-up edge (BUE. BUE has a great importance in machining processes; it can significantly modify the phenomenon in the cutting zone, directly affecting the workpiece surface integrity, cutting tool forces, and chip formation. The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI 304 stainless steel has a high tendency to form an unstable BUE, leading to deterioration of the surface quality. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the nature of the surface integrity induced during machining operations. Although many reports have been published on the effect of tool wear during machining of AISI 304 stainless steel on surface integrity, studies on the influence of the BUE phenomenon in the stable state of wear have not been investigated so far. The main goal of the present work is to investigate the close link between the BUE formation, surface integrity and cutting forces in the stable sate of wear for uncoated cutting tool during the cutting tests of AISI 304 stainless steel. The cutting parameters were chosen to induce BUE formation during machining. X-ray diffraction (XRD method was used for measuring superficial residual stresses of the machined surface through the stable state of wear in the cutting and feed directions. In addition, surface roughness of the machined surface was investigated using the Alicona microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was used to reveal the surface distortions created during the cutting process, combined with chip undersurface analyses. The investigated BUE formation during the stable state of wear showed that the BUE can cause a significant improvement in the surface integrity and cutting forces. Moreover, it can be used to compensate for tool wear through changing the tool geometry, leading to the protection of the cutting tool from wear.

  9. EasyClone: method for iterative chromosomal integration of multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Strucko, Tomas; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin

    2014-01-01

    of multiple genes with an option of recycling selection markers. The vectors combine the advantage of efficient uracil excision reaction-based cloning and Cre-LoxP-mediated marker recycling system. The episomal and integrative vector sets were tested by inserting genes encoding cyan, yellow, and red...... on episomal plasmids, where correspondingly 95% and 6% of the cells were within a fluorescence interval of Log10 mean ± 15% for all three colors. We demonstrate that selective markers can be simultaneously removed using Cre-mediated recombination and all the integrated heterologous genes remain...

  10. Novel system for efficient isolation of Clostridium double-crossover allelic exchange mutants enabling markerless chromosomal gene deletions and DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Fast, Alan G; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2012-11-01

    Isolation of Clostridium mutants based on gene replacement via allelic exchange remains a major limitation for this important genus. Use of a heterologous counterselection marker can facilitate the identification of the generally rare allelic exchange events. We report on the development of an inducible counterselection marker and describe its utility and broad potential in quickly and efficiently generating markerless DNA deletions and integrations at any genomic locus without the need for auxotrophic mutants or the use of the mobile group II introns. This system is based on a codon-optimized mazF toxin gene from Escherichia coli under the control of a lactose-inducible promoter from Clostridium perfringens. This system is potentially applicable to almost all members of the genus Clostridium due to their similarly low genomic GC content and comparable codon usage. We isolated all allelic-exchange-based gene deletions (ca_p0167, sigF, and sigK) or disruptions (ca_p0157 and sigF) we attempted and integrated a 3.6-kb heterologous DNA sequence (made up of a Clostridium ljungdahlii 2.1-kb formate dehydrogenase [fdh] gene plus a FLP recombination target [FRT]-flanked thiamphenicol resistance marker) into the Clostridium acetobutylicum chromosome. Furthermore, we report on the development of a plasmid system with inducible segregational instability, thus enabling efficient deployment of the FLP-FRT system to generate markerless deletion or integration mutants. This enabled expeditious deletion of the thiamphenicol resistance marker from the fdh integrant strain as well as the sigK deletion strain. More generally, our system can potentially be applied to other organisms with underdeveloped genetic tools.

  11. Harnessing novel chromosomal integration loci to utilize an organosolv-derived hemicellulose fraction for isobutanol production with engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Julian; Müller, Felix; Takors, Ralf; Blombach, Bastian

    2018-01-01

    A successful bioeconomy depends on the manifestation of biorefineries that entirely convert renewable resources to valuable products and energies. Here, the poorly exploited hemicellulose fraction (HF) from beech wood organosolv processing was applied for isobutanol production with Corynebacterium glutamicum. To enable growth of C. glutamicum on HF, we integrated genes required for D-xylose and l-arabinose metabolization into two of 16 systematically identified and novel chromosomal integration loci. Under aerobic conditions, this engineered strain CArXy reached growth rates up to 0.34 ± 0.02 h -1 on HF. Based on CArXy, we developed the isobutanol producer strain CIsArXy, which additionally (over)expresses genes of the native l-valine biosynthetic and the heterologous Ehrlich pathway. CIsArXy produced 7.2 ± 0.2 mM (0.53 ± 0.02 g L -1 ) isobutanol on HF at a carbon molar yield of 0.31 ± 0.02 C-mol isobutanol per C-mol substrate (d-xylose + l-arabinose) in an anaerobic zero-growth production process. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua; Spyrou, Maria Alexandra; Pearson, Max; Lassner, Dirk; Kuhl, Uwe; Gompels, Ursula A

    2016-01-15

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, implying functional non-defective genomes. To further define the relationship between HHV-6A and CiHHV-6A we used next-generation sequencing to characterize genomes from three CiHHV-6A cardiac patients. Comparisons to known exogenous HHV-6A showed CiHHV-6A genomes formed a separate clade; including all 85 non-interrupted genes and necessary cis-acting signals for reactivation as infectious virus. Greater single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density was defined in 16 genes and the direct repeats (DR) terminal regions. Using these SNPs, deep sequencing analyses demonstrated superinfection with exogenous HHV-6A in two of the CiHHV-6A patients with recurrent cardiac disease. Characterisation of the integration sites in twelve patients identified the human chromosome 17p subtelomere as a prevalent site, which had specific repeat structures and phylogenetically related CiHHV-6A coding sequences indicating common ancestral origins. Overall CiHHV-6A genomes were similar, but distinct from known exogenous HHV-6A virus, and have the capacity to reactivate as emerging virus infections.

  13. [Efficacy of integrative respiratory rehabilitation training in exercise ability and quality of life of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in stable phase: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan-hong; Wang, Jun-hua; Li, Hai-feng; Zhu, Xiao-hu; Wang, Gang

    2010-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important clinical disease, and its global prevalence and mortality rates are high. It is meaningful to investigate the efficacy of integrative respiratory rehabilitation training in quality of life and respiratory physiology of COPD patients in stable phase. To observe the efficacy of integrative respiratory rehabilitation training in exercise ability and quality of life of COPD patients in stable phase. Eighty outpatients and inpatients with COPD from Department of Respiratory Medicine, Taihe Hospital, Yunyang Medical College were randomly divided into 4 groups, with 20 patients in each group. The patients in group A only received drug therapy, the patients in group B received traditional qigong training, the patients in group C received modern rehabilitation training, and the patients in group D received integrative respiratory rehabilitation training. Chronic respiratory questionnaire (CRQ), 6-minute walking distance and Borg score in each group were examined before and after one-, three-, and six-month and one-year treatment. The 6-minute walking distance, Borg score and CRQ score in group A had no significant changes after treatment (P>0.05). After one-month treatment, there were no significant differences in 6-minute walking distance and Borg score in groups B, C and D as compared with those before treatment (Pexercise ability of COPD patients, and integrative respiratory rehabilitation training program is better than modern rehabilitation training and traditional qigong training programs. The efficacy of respiratory rehabilitation training is time-dependent, and need long-time adherence to the therapy.

  14. Identification and Mapping of Simple Sequence Repeat Markers from Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome End Sequences for Genome Characterization and Genetic–Physical Map Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M. Córdoba

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers or simple sequence repeat (SSR loci are useful for diversity characterization and genetic–physical mapping. Different in silico microsatellite search methods have been developed for mining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences for SSRs. The overall goal of this study was genome characterization based on SSRs in 89,017 BAC end sequences (BESs from the G19833 common bean ( L. library. Another objective was to identify new SSR taking into account three tandem motif identification programs (Automated Microsatellite Marker Development [AMMD], Tandem Repeats Finder [TRF], and SSRLocator [SSRL]. Among the microsatellite search engines, SSRL identified the highest number of SSRs; however, when primer design was attempted, the number dropped due to poor primer design regions. Automated Microsatellite Marker Development software identified many SSRs with valuable AT/TA or AG/TC motifs, while TRF found fewer SSRs and produced no primers. A subgroup of 323 AT-rich, di-, and trinucleotide SSRs were selected from the AMMD results and used in a parental survey with DOR364 and G19833, of which 75 could be mapped in the corresponding population; these represented 4052 BAC clones. Together with 92 previously mapped BES- and 114 non-BES-derived markers, a total of 280 SSRs were included in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based map, integrating a total of 8232 BAC clones in 162 contigs from the physical map.

  15. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  16. Electron Lenses for Experiments on Nonlinear Dynamics with Wide Stable Tune Spreads in the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Carlson, K. [Fermilab; McGee, M. W. [Fermilab; Nobrega, L. E. [Fermilab; Romanov, A. L. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Noll, D. [Frankfurt U.

    2015-06-01

    Recent developments in the study of integrable Hamiltonian systems have led to nonlinear accelerator lattice designs with two transverse invariants. These lattices may drastically improve the performance of high-power machines, providing wide tune spreads and Landau damping to protect the beam from instabilities, while preserving dynamic aperture. To test the feasibility of these concepts, the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is being designed and built at Fermilab. One way to obtain a nonlinear integrable lattice is by using the fields generated by a magnetically confined electron beam (electron lens) overlapping with the circulating beam. The parameters of the required device are similar to the ones of existing electron lenses. We present theory, numerical simulations, and first design studies of electron lenses for nonlinear integrable optics.

  17. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  18. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  19. Stable expression and replication of hepatitis B virus genome in an integrated state in a human hepatoma cell line transfected with the cloned viral DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Fujiyama, A.; Matsubara, K.

    1987-01-01

    A human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Huh6-c15) was transfected with a recombinant DNA molecule that consists of tandemly arranged hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome and a neomycin-resistant gene. One clone resistant to G-418 produces and releases surface antigen and e antigen into medium at a high level and accumulates core particles intracellularly. This clone has a chromosomally integrated set of the original recombinant DNA and produces a 3.5-kilobase transcript corresponding to the pregenome RNA as well as HBV DNAs in an extrachromosomal form. Most of these DNAs were in single-stranded or partially double-stranded form and were packaged in the intracellular core particles. In the medium, particles were detected that contained HBV DNA and were morphologically indistinguishable from Dane particles. These results demonstrate that the HBV genome in an integrated state acted as a template for viral gene expression and replication. The cells were maintained for more than 6 months without losing the ability to produce the extrachromosomal HBV DNA and Dane-like particles. Thus, the cells can be used as a model system for analyses of gene expression and DNA replication of HBV in human hepatocytes

  20. Stable expression and replication of hepatitis B virus genome in an integrated state in a human hepatoma cell line transfected with the cloned viral DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurimoto, T; Fujiyama, A; Matsubara, K

    1987-01-01

    A human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Huh6-c15) was transfected with a recombinant DNA molecule that consists of tandemly arranged hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome and a neomycin-resistant gene. One clone resistant to G-418 produces and releases surface antigen and e antigen into medium at a high level and accumulates core particles intracellularly. This clone has a chromosomally integrated set of the original recombinant DNA and produces a 3.5-kilobase transcript corresponding to the pregenome RNA as well as HBV DNAs in an extrachromosomal form. Most of these DNAs were in single-stranded or partially double-stranded form and were packaged in the intracellular core particles. In the medium, particles were detected that contained HBV DNA and were morphologically indistinguishable from Dane particles. These results demonstrate that the HBV genome in an integrated state acted as a template for viral gene expression and replication. The cells were maintained for more than 6 months without losing the ability to produce the extrachromosomal HBV DNA and Dane-like particles. Thus, the cells can be used as a model system for analyses of gene expression and DNA replication of HBV in human hepatocytes.

  1. Ten alien chromosome additions of Gossypium hirsutum-Gossypium bickii developed by integrative uses of GISH and species-specific SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dong; Feng, Shouli; Li, Sai; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Baoliang

    2018-03-27

    Gossypium bickii: (2n = 26, G 1 G 1 ), a wild diploid cotton, carries many favourable traits. However, these favourable traits cannot be directly transferred into G. hirsutum (2n = 52, AADD) cultivars due to the differences in genomes. Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are considered an invaluable tool for the introgression of genes of interest from wild relatives into cultivated crops. In this study, the G. hirsutum-G. bickii amphidiploid (2n = 78, AADDG 1 G 1 ) was backcrossed with G. hirsutum to develop alien additions containing individual G. bickii chromosomes in a G. hirsutum background. Genomic in situ hybridization was employed to detect the number of alien chromosomes added to the backcross progenies. A total of 183 G. bickii-specific DNA markers were developed to discriminate the identities of the G. bickii chromosomes added to G. hirsutum and assess the alien chromosome transmissibility. Chromosomes 4G b and 13G b showed the highest transmissibility, while chromosomes 1G b , 7G b and 11G b showed the lowest. Ten of the 13 possible G. hirsutum-G. bickii MAALs were isolated and characterized, which will lay the foundation for transferring resistance genes of G. bickii into G. hirsutum, as well as for gene assignment, physical mapping, and selective isolation and mapping of cDNAs for particular G. bickii chromosomes. The strategies of how to use MAALs to develop varieties with the trait of interest from wild species (such as glanded plant-glandless seed) were proposed and discussed.

  2. Modulators of Enterococcus faecalis Cell Envelope Integrity and Antimicrobial Resistance Influence Stable Colonization of the Mammalian Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banla, Ismael L; Kommineni, Sushma; Hayward, Michael; Rodrigues, Marinelle; Palmer, Kelli L; Salzman, Nita H; Kristich, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis is both a colonizer of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and an agent of serious nosocomial infections. Although it is typically required for pathogenesis, GIT colonization by E. faecalis is poorly understood. E. faecalis tolerates high concentrations of GIT antimicrobials, like cholate and lysozyme, leading us to hypothesize that resistance to intestinal antimicrobials is essential for long-term GIT colonization. Analyses of E. faecalis mutants exhibiting defects in antimicrobial resistance revealed that IreK, a determinant of envelope integrity and antimicrobial resistance, is required for long-term GIT colonization. IreK is a member of the PASTA kinase protein family, bacterial transmembrane signaling proteins implicated in the regulation of cell wall homeostasis. Among several determinants of cholate and lysozyme resistance in E. faecalis , IreK was the only one found to be required for intestinal colonization, emphasizing the importance of this protein to enterococcal adaptation to the GIT. By studying Δ ireK suppressor mutants that recovered the ability to colonize the GIT, we identified two conserved enterococcal proteins (OG1RF_11271 and OG1RF_11272) that function antagonistically to IreK and interfere with cell envelope integrity, antimicrobial resistance, and GIT colonization. Our data suggest that IreK, through its kinase activity, inhibits the actions of these proteins. IreK, OG1RF_11271, and OG1RF_11272 are found in all enterococci, suggesting that their effect on GIT colonization is universal across enterococci. Thus, we have defined conserved genes in the enterococcal core genome that influence GIT colonization through their effect on enterococcal envelope integrity and antimicrobial resistance. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  4. A Jacobi–Legendre polynomial-based method for the stable solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammari, Amara; Karoui, Abderrazek

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we build a stable scheme for the solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type. This scheme is obtained by further developing the orthogonal polynomial-based techniques for solving the Abel integral equation of Ammari and Karoui (2010 Inverse Problems 26 105005). More precisely, this method is based on the simultaneous use of the two families of orthogonal polynomials of the Legendre and Jacobi types. In particular, we provide an explicit formula for the computation of the Legendre expansion coefficients of the solution. This explicit formula is based on some known formulae for the exact computation of the integrals of the product of some Jacobi polynomials with the derivatives of the Legendre polynomials. Besides the explicit and the exact computation of the expansion coefficients of the solution, our proposed method has the advantage of ensuring the stability of the solution under a fairly weak condition on the functional space to which the data function belongs. Finally, we provide the reader with some numerical examples that illustrate the results of this work. (paper)

  5. High-Performance Integrated Self-Package Flexible Li-O2Battery Based on Stable Composite Anode and Flexible Gas Diffusion Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Yang; Xu, Ji-Jing; Bao, Di; Chang, Zhi-Wen; Liu, Da-Peng; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xin-Bo

    2017-07-01

    With the rising development of flexible and wearable electronics, corresponding flexible energy storage devices with high energy density are required to provide a sustainable energy supply. Theoretically, rechargeable flexible Li-O 2 batteries can provide high specific energy density; however, there are only a few reports on the construction of flexible Li-O 2 batteries. Conventional flexible Li-O 2 batteries possess a loose battery structure, which prevents flexibility and stability. The low mechanical strength of the gas diffusion layer and anode also lead to a flexible Li-O 2 battery with poor mechanical properties. All these attributes limit their practical applications. Herein, the authors develop an integrated flexible Li-O 2 battery based on a high-fatigue-resistance anode and a novel flexible stretchable gas diffusion layer. Owing to the synergistic effect of the stable electrocatalytic activity and hierarchical 3D interconnected network structure of the free-standing cathode, the obtained flexible Li-O 2 batteries exhibit superior electrochemical performance, including a high specific capacity, an excellent rate capability, and exceptional cycle stability. Furthermore, benefitting from the above advantages, the as-fabricated flexible batteries can realize excellent mechanical and electrochemical stability. Even after a thousand cycles of the bending process, the flexible Li-O 2 battery can still possess a stable open-circuit voltage, a high specific capacity, and a durable cycle performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Integrated high resolution stratigraphy of the Gurpi Formation (Late Cretaceous) in the Zagros Basin (Iran): Calcareous nannofossils, planktonic foraminifers, carbon and oxygen stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javad Razmjooei, Mohammad; Thibault, Nicolas; Kani, Anoshiravan; Dinarès-Turell, Jaume; Pucéat, Emmanuelle; Shahriari, Samira; Jamali, Amir Mohammad; Cocquerez, Théophile

    2017-04-01

    The Gurpi Formation (Fm.) consists of fossiliferous, alternating marls and marly limestones, spanning the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene in the NW to central part of the Zagros Basin. This formation was deposited in deep shelf to basin margin settings. A preliminary study of the calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy and carbon and oxygen stable isotopes was already presented by Razmjooei et al. (2014) on the Shahneshin section (Shahneshin anticline) which corresponds to open marine, upper bathyal depositional environments. However this study was at a relatively low resolution and the section was not presented with a detailed sedimentology. The ca. 350 m long Gurpi Fm. of the Shahneshin section has been re-logged in detail in 2016 and a new high resolution study has been carried out, spanning the middle Coniacian to early Danian. Here, we present the result of this new investigation that integrates the biostratigraphy of calcareous nannofossils (based on 165 samples), that of planktonic foraminifers (62 samples) and carbon and oxygen stable isotopes (353 samples) along with a comprehensive panorama and detailed log of the section. A large number of carbon isotope excursions previously defined by Jarvis et al. (2006) and Thibault et al. (2016) have been identified in the section and can be correlated to the Gubbio record, which is the standard reference for the southwestern Tethys. Our new high resolution study constitutes a new reference for Late Cretaceous sediments of the eastern Tethys.

  7. In-situ unsaturated zone stable water isotope (2H and 18O) measurements in semi-arid environments using tunable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaj, M.; Beyer, M.; Koeniger, P.; Wanke, H.; Hamutoko, J.; Himmelsbach, T.

    2015-06-01

    Stable isotopes (deuterium, 2H, and oxygen-18, 18O) of soil pore water were measured directly in the field using tunable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and commercially available soil gas probes in a semi-arid region of the Cuvelai-Etosha-Basin, Namibia. High spatial and temporal resolution was achieved in the study area with reasonable accuracy and measurements were in agreement with laboratory-based cryogenic vacuum extraction and subsequent cavity ring down laser spectroscopic isotope analysis (CRDS). After drift correction of the isotope data, mean precision for over 140 measurements of two consecutive field campaigns in June and November 2014 were 1.8 and 0.46 ‰ for δ2H and 18O, respectively. Mean Accuracy using quality check standards was 5 and 0.3 ‰ for δ2H and δ18O, respectively. Results support the applicability of an in-situ measurement system for the determination of stable isotopes in soil pore water. Spatio-temporal variability could be deduced with the observed data in an extremely dry evaporation dominated environment which was sporadically affected by intermittent rainfall.

  8. Tyramide-FISH mapping of single genes for development of an integrated recombination and cytogenetic map of chromosome 5 of Allium cepa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosome 5 of onion carries major quantitative trait loci (QTL) of interest to breeders that control dry-matter content, pungency and storability of bulbs, amounts and types of epicuticular waxes, and resistances to abiotic factors. SNPs, SSRs and RFLPs in expressed regions of the onion genome hav...

  9. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  10. Recombinant protein expression by targeting pre-selected chromosomal loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krömer Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells is mostly achieved by stable integration of transgenes into the chromosomal DNA of established cell lines. The chromosomal surroundings have strong influences on the expression of transgenes. The exploitation of defined loci by targeting expression constructs with different regulatory elements is an approach to design high level expression systems. Further, this allows to evaluate the impact of chromosomal surroundings on distinct vector constructs. Results We explored antibody expression upon targeting diverse expression constructs into previously tagged loci in CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells that exhibit high reporter gene expression. These loci were selected by random transfer of reporter cassettes and subsequent screening. Both, retroviral infection and plasmid transfection with eGFP or antibody expression cassettes were employed for tagging. The tagged cell clones were screened for expression and single copy integration. Cell clones producing > 20 pg/cell in 24 hours could be identified. Selected integration sites that had been flanked with heterologous recombinase target sites (FRTs were targeted by Flp recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE. The results give proof of principle for consistent protein expression upon RMCE. Upon targeting antibody expression cassettes 90-100% of all resulting cell clones showed correct integration. Antibody production was found to be highly consistent within the individual cell clones as expected from their isogenic nature. However, the nature and orientation of expression control elements revealed to be critical. The impact of different promoters was examined with the tag-and-targeting approach. For each of the chosen promoters high expression sites were identified. However, each site supported the chosen promoters to a different extent, indicating that the strength of a particular promoter is dominantly defined by its chromosomal context

  11. Delineation and analysis of chromosomal regions specifying Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Huon, Christèle; Fayolle, Corinne; Demeure, Christian E; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Médigue, Claudine; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has recently diverged from the less virulent enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Its emergence has been characterized by massive genetic loss and inactivation and limited gene acquisition. The acquired genes include two plasmids, a filamentous phage, and a few chromosomal loci. The aim of this study was to characterize the chromosomal regions acquired by Y. pestis. Following in silico comparative analysis and PCR screening of 98 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis, we found that eight chromosomal loci (six regions [R1pe to R6pe] and two coding sequences [CDS1pe and CDS2pe]) specified Y. pestis. Signatures of integration by site specific or homologous recombination were identified for most of them. These acquisitions and the loss of ancestral DNA sequences were concentrated in a chromosomal region opposite to the origin of replication. The specific regions were acquired very early during Y. pestis evolution and were retained during its microevolution, suggesting that they might bring some selective advantages. Only one region (R3pe), predicted to carry a lambdoid prophage, is most likely no longer functional because of mutations. With the exception of R1pe and R2pe, which have the potential to encode a restriction/modification and a sugar transport system, respectively, no functions could be predicted for the other Y. pestis-specific loci. To determine the role of the eight chromosomal loci in the physiology and pathogenicity of the plague bacillus, each of them was individually deleted from the bacterial chromosome. None of the deletants exhibited defects during growth in vitro. Using the Xenopsylla cheopis flea model, all deletants retained the capacity to produce a stable and persistent infection and to block fleas. Similarly, none of the deletants caused any acute flea toxicity. In the mouse model of infection, all deletants were fully virulent upon subcutaneous or aerosol infections. Therefore

  12. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. D. Hendriks

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up in a peat meadow. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2–20×103 m. Statistical testing and a calibration experiment showed high precision (7.8×10−3 ppb and accuracy (<0.30% of the instrument, while no drift was observed. The instrument response time was determined to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a 3-axis ultrasonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer for measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instruments were satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates.

    Due to erroneous measurements, spikes and periods of low turbulence the data series consisted for 26% of gaps. Observed CH4 fluxes consisted mainly of emission, showed a diurnal cycle, but were rather variable over. The average CH4 emission was 29.7 nmol m−2 s−1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission was approximately 80.0 nmol m−2 s−1 and the typical minimum flux was approximately 0.0 nmol m−2 s−1. The correspondence of the measurements with flux chamber measurements in the footprint was good and the observed CH4 emission rates were comparable with eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas.

    Additionally, three measurement techniques with lower sampling frequencies were simulated, which might give the possibility to measure CH4 fluxes without an external pump and save energy. Disjunct eddy covariance appeared to be the most reliable substitute for 10 Hz eddy covariance, while relaxed eddy accumulation gave

  13. Modeling, simulation, and fabrication of a fully integrated, acid-stable, scalable solar-driven water-splitting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Karl; Chen, Yikai; Karp, Christoph; Beeman, Jeffrey W; Shaner, Matthew; Spurgeon, Joshua; Sharp, Ian D; Amashukeli, Xenia; West, William; Jin, Jian; Lewis, Nathan S; Xiang, Chengxiang

    2015-02-01

    A fully integrated solar-driven water-splitting system comprised of WO3 /FTO/p(+) n Si as the photoanode, Pt/TiO2 /Ti/n(+) p Si as the photocathode, and Nafion as the membrane separator, was simulated, assembled, operated in 1.0 M HClO4 , and evaluated for performance and safety characteristics under dual side illumination. A multi-physics model that accounted for the performance of the photoabsorbers and electrocatalysts, ion transport in the solution electrolyte, and gaseous product crossover was first used to define the optimal geometric design space for the system. The photoelectrodes and the membrane separators were then interconnected in a louvered design system configuration, for which the light-absorbing area and the solution-transport pathways were simultaneously optimized. The performance of the photocathode and the photoanode were separately evaluated in a traditional three-electrode photoelectrochemical cell configuration. The photocathode and photoanode were then assembled back-to-back in a tandem configuration to provide sufficient photovoltage to sustain solar-driven unassisted water-splitting. The current-voltage characteristics of the photoelectrodes showed that the low photocurrent density of the photoanode limited the overall solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency due to the large band gap of WO3 . A hydrogen-production rate of 0.17 mL hr(-1) and a STH conversion efficiency of 0.24 % was observed in a full cell configuration for >20 h with minimal product crossover in the fully operational, intrinsically safe, solar-driven water-splitting system. The solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, ηSTH , calculated using the multiphysics numerical simulation was in excellent agreement with the experimental behavior of the system. The value of ηSTH was entirely limited by the performance of the photoelectrochemical assemblies employed in this study. The louvered design provides a robust platform for implementation of various types of

  14. Whole chromosome gain does not in itself confer cancer-like chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Baldetorp, Bo; Gisselsson, David

    2013-12-24

    Constitutional aneuploidy is typically caused by a single-event meiotic or early mitotic error. In contrast, somatic aneuploidy, found mainly in neoplastic tissue, is attributed to continuous chromosomal instability. More debated as a cause of aneuploidy is aneuploidy itself; that is, whether aneuploidy per se causes chromosomal instability, for example, in patients with inborn aneuploidy. We have addressed this issue by quantifying the level of somatic mosaicism, a proxy marker of chromosomal instability, in patients with constitutional aneuploidy by precise background-filtered dual-color FISH. In contrast to previous studies that used less precise methods, we find that constitutional trisomy, even for large chromosomes that are often trisomic in cancer, does not confer a significantly elevated rate of somatic chromosomal mosaicism in individual cases. Constitutional triploidy was associated with an increased level of somatic mosaicism, but this consisted mostly of reversion from trisomy to disomy and did not correspond to a proportionally elevated level of chromosome mis-segregation in triploids, indicating that the observed mosaicism resulted from a specific accumulation of cells with a hypotriploid chromosome number. In no case did the rate of somatic mosaicism in constitutional aneuploidy exceed that of "chromosomally stable" cancer cells. Our findings show that even though constitutional aneuploidy was in some cases associated with low-level somatic mosaicism, it was insufficient to generate the cancer-like levels expected if aneuploidy single-handedly triggered cancer-like chromosomal instability.

  15. Trophic structure in a pilot system for the integrated multi-trophic aquaculture off the east coast of Korean peninsula as determined by stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Je; Han, Eunah; Lee, Won Chan; Kwak, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung Chul; Park, Mi Seon; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A pilot system for the integrated multi-trophic aquaculture was installed. • The black rockfish, sea cucumber, oyster, and macroalgae were co-cultured. • Co-cultured sea cucumber at the IMTA site assimilated aquaculture wastes. • Fish cage-waste contribution to food web in/around the IMTA system was minor. • The sea cucumber was identified as an extractive species of fish cage wastes. - Abstract: To assess the potential for nutritional exploitation of caged-fish-derived waste through the use of extractive co-cultured species in a pilot system for an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA), we compared their C and N stable isotope ratios with those of uncultured macroinvertebrates in and around the system. Black rockfish were co-cultured with sea cucumber, oyster, and two macroalgae as extractive species. Isotope signatures of the co-cultured sea cucumber at the IMTA site differed from those at the control site, indicating their assimilation of aquaculture wastes. In contrast, δ 13 C and δ 15 N of individual taxa of the cultured oyster and uncultured invertebrates were consistent between sites, suggesting a minor contribution of the aquaculture waste to benthic and pelagic food chains in and around the IMTA system. These results provide evidence of the suitability of using sea cucumber as an extractive species to reduce the impact of a monoculture system on the ambient environment

  16. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  17. Visual exploratory analysis of integrated chromosome 19 proteomic data derived from glioma cancer stem-cell lines based on novel nonlinear dimensional data reduction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespinats, Sylvain; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2015-05-01

    Chromosome 19 is known to be linked to neurodegeneration and many cancers. Glioma-derived cancer stem cells (GSCs) are tumor-initiating cells and may be refractory to radiation and chemotherapy and thus have important implications for tumor biology and therapeutics. The analysis and interpretation of large proteomic data sets requires the development of new data mining and visualization approaches. Traditional techniques are insufficient to interpret and visualize these resulting experimental data. The emphasis of this paper lies in the presentation of novel approaches for the visualization, clustering and projection representation to unveil hidden data structures relevant for the accurate interpretation of biological experiments. These qualitative and quantitative methods are applied to the proteomic analysis of data sets derived from the GSCs. The achieved clustering and visualization results provide a more detailed insight into the expression patterns for chromosome 19 proteins.

  18. Use of the integration elements encoded by the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Lone; Hammer, Karin

    1999-01-01

    Previously we showed that only one phage-expressed protein (Orf1), a 425-bp region upstream of the orf1 gene (presumably encoding a promoter), and the attP region are necessary and also sufficient for integration of the bacteriophage TP901-1 genome into the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis subsp......P region seem to be necessary for site-specific integration of the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1. By use of the integrative elements (attP and orf1) expressed by the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1, a system for obtaining stable chromosomal single-copy transcriptional fusions in L. lactis...

  19. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other human chromosomes. The presence of abnormal chromosomal number described in general as aneuploidy, here trisomy, is observed in certain other syndromes too. Trisomies of chromosome 18, 13,22,8,9 and X are known. Children with these 'numerical' anomalies have severe and complex malformations. Mental ...

  20. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  1. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  2. [Chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Santos-Munive, Victoria; Alonso-Avelino, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    In order to spot common chromosomal imbalances in early and late lesions of cervical cancer that might be used as progression biomarkers, we made a search of literature in PubMed from 1996 to 2011. The medical subject headings employed were chromosomal alterations, loss of heterozygosis, cervical cancer, cervical tumorigenesis, chromosomal aberrations, cervical intraepithelial neoplasm and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The common chromosomal imbalances were gains in 8q24 (77.7 %), 20q13 (66.9 %), 3q26 (47.1 %), Xp22 (43.8 %), and 5p15 (60 %), principally. On the other hand, integration of the high-risk human papillomavirus genome into the host chromosome has been associated with the development of neoplasia, but the chromosomal imbalances seem to precede and promote such integration. Chromosomal imbalances in 8q24, 20q13, 3q21-26 and 5p15-Xp22, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization assay or comparative genomic hybridization assay for early detection of the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus, are promising markers of cervical cancer progression.

  3. Chromosomal geometry in the interface from the frequency of the radiation induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.; Otero, D.; Di Giorgio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosomal aberrations. Stable chromosomal aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). When DSBs induction and interaction is done at random, and the proximity effects are neglected, the expected relation between translocations and inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm length. The number of translocations and inversions is analyzed by using G-banding in 16 lymphocytes cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0,5 Gy - 3 Gy). The result obtained was: F=13,5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values, but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have more interaction probability. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. A DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length= 1μ is assumed. According to our results, the confinement volume is ≅ 6.4% of the nuclear volume. Nevertheless, we presume that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosomal confinement. (authors). 14 refs

  4. Trophic structure in a pilot system for the integrated multi-trophic aquaculture off the east coast of Korean peninsula as determined by stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Je; Han, Eunah; Lee, Won Chan; Kwak, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung Chul; Park, Mi Seon; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2015-06-15

    To assess the potential for nutritional exploitation of caged-fish-derived waste through the use of extractive co-cultured species in a pilot system for an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA), we compared their C and N stable isotope ratios with those of uncultured macroinvertebrates in and around the system. Black rockfish were co-cultured with sea cucumber, oyster, and two macroalgae as extractive species. Isotope signatures of the co-cultured sea cucumber at the IMTA site differed from those at the control site, indicating their assimilation of aquaculture wastes. In contrast, δ(13)C and δ(15)N of individual taxa of the cultured oyster and uncultured invertebrates were consistent between sites, suggesting a minor contribution of the aquaculture waste to benthic and pelagic food chains in and around the IMTA system. These results provide evidence of the suitability of using sea cucumber as an extractive species to reduce the impact of a monoculture system on the ambient environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...

  6. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  7. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  8. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  9. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... [Traut W. 2010 New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia. J. Genet. 89,. 307–313]. Introduction. Sex-chromosome ..... age group III-Y chromosomes were successful while in well- aerated population cages, linkage group I-Y chromosomes.

  10. Sex Chromosome Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in t...

  11. A Highly Stable Marching-on-in-Time Volume Integral Equation Solver for Analyzing Transient Wave Interactions on High-Contrast Scatterers

    KAUST Repository

    Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-06

    Time domain integral equation (TDIE) solvers represent an attractive alternative to finite difference (FDTD) and finite element (FEM) schemes for analyzing transient electromagnetic interactions on composite scatterers. Current induced on a scatterer, in response to a transient incident field, generates a scattered field. First, the scattered field is expressed as a spatio-temporal convolution of the current and the Green function of the background medium. Then, a TDIE is obtained by enforcing boundary conditions and/or fundamental field relations. TDIEs are often solved for the unknown current using marching on-in-time (MOT) schemes. MOT-TDIE solvers expand the current using local spatio-temporal basis functions. Inserting this expansion into the TDIE and testing the resulting equation in space and time yields a lower triangular system of equations (termed MOT system), which can be solved by marching in time for the coefficients of the current expansion. Stability of the MOT scheme often depends on how accurately the spatio-temporal convolution of the current and the Green function is discretized. In this work, band-limited prolate-based interpolation functions are used as temporal bases in expanding the current and discretizing the spatio-temporal convolution. Unfortunately, these functions are two sided, i.e., they require ”future” current samples for interpolation, resulting in a non-causal MOT system. To alleviate the effect of non-causality and restore the ability to march in time, an extrapolation scheme can be used to estimate the future values of the currents from their past values. Here, an accurate, stable and band-limited extrapolation scheme is developed for this purpose. This extrapolation scheme uses complex exponents, rather than commonly used harmonics, so that propagating and decaying mode fields inside the dielectric scatterers are accurately modeled. The resulting MOT scheme is applied to solving the time domain volume integral equation (VIE

  12. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Progress report, September 1991--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  13. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  14. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  15. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  16. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  17. [Meiotic chromosomes of the tree frog Smilisca baudinii (Anura: Hylidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, Javier; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber

    2011-03-01

    The Mexican tree frog Smilisca baudinii, is a very common frog in Central America. In spite their importance to keep the ecological equilibrium of the rainforest, its biology and genetics are poorly known. In order to contribute with its biological knowledge, we described the typical meiotic karyotype based in standard cytogenetic protocols to specimens collected in Tabasco, Mexico. The study was centered in the analysis of 131 chromosome spreads at meiotic stage from two adults of the species (one female and one male). The metaphase analysis allowed the establishment of the modal haploid number of 1n = 12 bivalent chromosomes. The chromosomic formulae from the haploid bivalent karyotype was integrated by 12 biarmed chromosomes characterized by twelve pairs of metacentric-submetacentric (msm) chromosomes. The meiotic counting gives the idea that diploid chromosome number is integrated by a complement of 2n = 24 biarmed chromosomes. The presence of sex chromosomes from female and male meiotic spreads was not observed. Current results suggest that S. baudinii chromosome structure is well shared among Hylidae family and "B" chromosomes are particular structures that have very important evolutionary consequences in species diversification.

  18. Stable propagation of 'selfish'genetic elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    viruses such as the Epstein-Barr virus (Harris et al 1985;. Kanda et al 2001) and bovine papilloma virus (Lehman and Botchan 1998; Ilves et al 1999), which exist pre- dominantly as extrachromosomal episomes, have been shown to utilize chromosome tethering as a means for stable segregation. The tethering mechanism ...

  19. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In each of our cells there is about 6 feet long DNA packed. Into 46 units called chromosomes. Chromosome: is a long thread of DNA wrapped around proteins. ... application of. Mendel's 'gene' concept to a human trait was' by the physician A. Garrod. He described the genetic disease alkaptonuria as an alteration In specific.

  20. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 41-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These pieces of DNA which are clusters of several genes are called linkages groups or chromosomes. Therefore chromosomes are nothing but long. Cen. DNA. A,denin~ .... and as precursors for other biomolecules like hormones, purines and pyrimidines. ... in the history of science, Garrod's contributions to human genet-.

  2. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  3. The human Y chromosome: a masculine chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, Michiel J.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2006-01-01

    Once considered to be a genetic wasteland of no scientific interest beyond sex determination, the human Y chromosome has made a significant comeback in the past few decades and is currently implicated in multiple diseases, including spermatogenic failure - absent or very low levels of sperm

  4. Targets for, and consequences of, radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mark Isaac

    Chromosomal instability has been demonstrated in a human- hamster hybrid cell line, GM10115, after exposure to x- rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds. Labeling cells with 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which caused radiation damage to the DNA and associated nuclear structures, did induce chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein, 125I-succinyl- concanavalin A, into either the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm, failed to elicit chromosomal instability. These results show that radiation damage to the nucleus, and not to extranuclear regions, contributes to the induction of chromosomal instability. To determine the role of DNA strand breaks as a molecular lesion responsible for initiating chromosomal instability, cells were treated with a variety of DNA strand breaking agents. Agents capable of producing complex DNA double strand breaks, including X-rays, Neocarzinostatin and bleomycin, were able to induce chromosomal instability. In contrast, double strand breaks produced by restriction endonucleases as well as DNA strand breaks produced by hydrogen peroxide failed to induce chromosomal instability. This demonstrates that the type of DNA breakage is important in the eventual manifestation of chromosomal instability. In order to understand the relationship between chromosomal instability and other end points of genomic instability, chromosomally stable and unstable clones were analyzed for sister chromatid exchange, delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation, mismatch repair and delayed gene amplification

  5. Chromosome numbers in antlions (Myrmeleontidae) and owlflies (Ascalaphidae) (Insecta, Neuroptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Valentina G.; Khabiev, Gadzhimurad N.; Krivokhatsky, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A short review of main cytogenetic features of insects belonging to the sister neuropteran families Myrmeleontidae (antlions) and Ascalaphidae (owlflies) is presented, with a particular focus on their chromosome numbers and sex chromosome systems. Diploid male chromosome numbers are listed for 37 species, 21 genera from 9 subfamilies of the antlions as well as for seven species and five genera of the owlfly subfamily Ascalaphinae. The list includes data on five species whose karyotypes were studied in the present work. It is shown here that antlions and owlflies share a simple sex chromosome system XY/XX; a similar range of chromosome numbers, 2n = 14-26 and 2n = 18-22 respectively; and a peculiar distant pairing of sex chromosomes in male meiosis. Usually the karyotype is particularly stable within a genus but there are some exceptions in both families (in the genera Palpares and Libelloides respectively). The Myrmeleontidae and Ascalaphidae differ in their modal chromosome numbers. Most antlions exhibit 2n = 14 and 16, and Palparinae are the only subfamily characterized by higher numbers, 2n = 22, 24, and 26. The higher numbers, 2n = 20 and 22, are also found in owlflies. Since the Palparinae represent a basal phylogenetic lineage of the Myrmeleontidae, it is hypothesized that higher chromosome numbers are ancestral for antlions and were inherited from the common ancestor of Myrmeleontidae + Ascalaphidae. They were preserved in the Palparinae (Myrmeleontidae), but changed via chromosomal fusions toward lower numbers in other subfamilies. PMID:26807036

  6. Integrated automation for continuous high-throughput synthetic chromosome assembly and transformation to identify improved yeast strains for industrial production of peptide sweetener brazzein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production and recycling of recombinant sweetener peptides in industrial biorefineries involves the evaluation of large numbers of genes and proteins. High-throughput integrated robotic molecular biology platforms that have the capacity to rapidly synthesize, clone, and express heterologous gene ope...

  7. Transition of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia to micro-invasive carcinoma is characterized by integration of HPV 16/18 and numerical chromosome abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, AHN; Smedts, F; Dignef, W; Ummelen, M; Sonke, G; Mravunac, M; Vooijs, GP; Speel, EJM; Ramaekers, FCS

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN I, II, and III) and cases of CIN III associated with micro-invasive cervical carcinoma (CIN III & mCA) were analysed for evidence of episomal or integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In parallel,

  8. Transition of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia to micro-invasive carcinoma is characterized by integration of HPV 16/18 and numerical chromosome abnormalities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, A.H.N.; Smedts, F.; Dignef, W.; Ummelen, M.; Sonke, G.S.; Mravunac, M.; Vooijs, G.P.; Speel, E.J.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.

    2004-01-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN I, II, and III) and cases of CIN III associated with micro-invasive cervical carcinoma (CIN III & mCA) were analysed for evidence of episomal or integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In parallel,

  9. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shuohao [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kamihira, Masamichi, E-mail: kamihira@chem-eng.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  10. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  12. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  13. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...... who want it, is discussed. Screening for chromosome disease in all pregnancies is not without problems, but may be reasonable in some localities....

  14. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Cotias-de-Oliveira,Ana Lúcia Pires; Assis,José Geraldo Aquino de; Bellintani,Moema Cortizo; Andrade,Jorge Clarêncio Souza; Guedes,Maria Lenise Silva

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  15. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    OpenAIRE

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G.; Baker, Robert J.; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within d...

  16. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  17. A novel genetic tool for metabolic optimization of Corynebacterium glutamicum: efficient and repetitive chromosomal integration of synthetic promoter-driven expression libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Jing; Chen, Jun; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2017-01-01

    readily could integrate into the attB site in this strain providing expression of the corresponding integrase. Subsequent expression of the Cre recombinase promoted recombination between the modified loxP sites, resulting in a strain only retaining the target insertions and an attB site. To simplify...... the procedure, non-replicating circular expression units for the phage integrase and the Cre recombinase were used. As a showcase, we used the tool to construct a battery of strains simultaneously expressing the two reporter genes, lacZ (encoding β-galactosidase) and gusA (encoding β...

  18. Radiation induced chromosome aberrations and interphase DNA geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.; Di Giorgio, M.; Otero, D.

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosome aberrations. Stable chromosome aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). Assuming DSBs induction and interaction is completely random and neglecting proximity effects, the expected ratio of translocations to inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm lengths. We analyzed the number of translocations and inversions using G-banding, in 16 lymphocyte cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0.5Gy-3Gy). Our results give F=13.5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have an extra probability of interaction. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. We assume a DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length = 1 μ. We propose that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosome confinement. (author). 14 refs

  19. Quantification of long-term wastewater fluxes at the surface water/groundwater-interface: an integrative model perspective using stable isotopes and acesulfame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, I; Barth, J A C; Bol, R; Schulz, M; Ternes, T A; Schüth, C; van Geldern, R

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of acesulfame to trace wastewater-related surface water fluxes from streams into the hyporheic and riparian zones over long-term periods was investigated. The transport behavior of acesulfame was compared with the transport of water stable isotopes (δ(18)O or δ(2)H). A calibrated model based on a joint inversion of temperature, acesulfame, and piezometric pressure heads was employed in a model validation using data sets of acesulfame and water stable isotopes collected over 5months in a stream and groundwater. The spatial distribution of fresh water within the groundwater resulting from surface water infiltration was estimated by computing groundwater ages and compared with the predicted acesulfame plume obtained after 153day simulation time. Both, surface water ratios calculated with a mixing equation from water stable isotopes and simulated acesulfame mass fluxes, were investigated for their ability to estimate the contribution of wastewater-related surface water inflow within groundwater. The results of this study point to limitations for the application of acesulfame to trace surface water-groundwater interactions properly. Acesulfame completely missed the wastewater-related surface water volumes that still remained in the hyporheic zone under stream-gaining conditions. In contrast, under stream-losing conditions, which developed after periods of stagnating hydraulic exchange, acesulfame based predictions lead to an overestimation of the surface water volume of up to 25% in the riparian zone. If slow seepage velocities prevail a proportion of acesulfame might be stored in smaller pores, while when released under fast flowing water conditions it will travel further downstream with the groundwater flow direction. Therefore, under such conditions acesulfame can be a less-ideal tracer in the hyporheic and riparian zones and additional monitoring with other environmental tracers such as water stable isotopes is highly recommended. © 2013 Elsevier

  20. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  1. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  2. Co-segregation of sex chromosomes in the male black widow spider Latrodectus mactans (Araneae, Theridiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Jeffrey G; Felt, Kristen D; Doan, Ryan N; Nedo, Alexander O; Ellison, Cassondra A; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2017-10-01

    During meiosis I, homologous chromosomes join together to form bivalents. Through trial and error, bivalents achieve stable bipolar orientations (attachments) on the spindle that eventually allow the segregation of homologous chromosomes to opposite poles. Bipolar orientations are stable through tension generated by poleward forces to opposite poles. Unipolar orientations lack tension and are stereotypically not stable. The behavior of sex chromosomes during meiosis I in the male black widow spider Latrodectus mactans (Araneae, Theridiidae) challenges the principles governing such a scenario. We found that male L. mactans has two distinct X chromosomes, X 1 and X 2 . The X chromosomes join together to form a connection that is present in prometaphase I but is lost during metaphase I, before the autosomes disjoin at anaphase I. We found that both X chromosomes form stable unipolar orientations to the same pole that assure their co-segregation at anaphase I. Using micromanipulation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy, we studied this unusual chromosome behavior to explain how it may fit the current dogma of chromosome distribution during cell division.

  3. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafik, H.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia

  4. Integrated Monitoring Study (IMS) 1995: Characterization of micrometeorological phenomena mixing and diffusion in low wind speed stable conditions: Study design and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, H.A.; Carr, E.L.; Guo, Z. [Systems Applications International, Inc., San Rafael, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the current research effort is to improve the characterization and understanding of mixing and dispersion during low wind speed periods. An outcome of the study will be the development of an enhanced modeling treatment of micrometeorological phenomena within the San Joaquin Valley of California, to be applied during stable atmospheric periods characterized by low wind speeds. The first phase of the study consisted of a literature review and assessment of the current understanding of dispersion under low wind speed conditions, including an evaluation of current modeling approaches. In the second phase of the study, recommendations were made for monitoring, data analysis, and modeling approaches that could be employed during stable low wind speed conditions to increase our understanding and fill critical data gaps. Finally, Phase III includes the execution of the measurement program and subsequent data and modeling analyses. This report presents results of Phase I and Phase II, and describes the measurement program that was conducted in Phase III. Data analysis and modeling will be presented in future reports. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  6. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38 ... Author Affiliations. Vani Brahmachari1. Developmental Biology and Genetics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  7. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-01-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism. Farida El-Baz a. , Mohamed Saad Zaghloul a. , Ezzat El Sobky a. ,. Reham M Elhossiny a,. *, Heba Salah a. , Neveen Ezy Abdelaziz b a Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt b Children with Special ...

  9. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. 14-1: Large-Area Processing of Solution Type Metal-Oxide in TFT Backplanes and Integration in Highly Stable OLED Displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Takata, R.; Neumann, A.; Pham, D.V.; Anselmann, R.; Maas, J.; Steen, J.L. van der; Gelinck, G.; Ilias Katsouras

    2017-01-01

    Solution type metal-oxide semiconductor was processed on mass-production ready equipment and integrated in a backplane with ESL architecture TFTs. Excellent thickness uniformity of the semiconductor layer was obtained over the complete Gen1 glass substrate (320 mm x 352 mm), resulting in homogeneous

  11. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  12. Assignment of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar linkage groups to specific chromosomes: Conservation of large syntenic blocks corresponding to whole chromosome arms in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koop Ben F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most teleost species, especially freshwater groups such as the Esocidae which are the closest relatives of salmonids, have a karyotype comprising 25 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes and 48–52 chromosome arms. After the common ancestor of salmonids underwent a whole genome duplication, its karyotype would have 100 chromosome arms, and this is reflected in the modal range of 96–104 seen in extant salmonids (e.g., rainbow trout. The Atlantic salmon is an exception among the salmonids as it has 72–74 chromosome arms and its karyotype includes 12 pairs of large acrocentric chromosomes, which appear to be the result of tandem fusions. The purpose of this study was to integrate the Atlantic salmon's linkage map and karyotype and to compare the chromosome map with that of rainbow trout. Results The Atlantic salmon genetic linkage groups were assigned to specific chromosomes in the European subspecies using fluorescence in situ hybridization with BAC probes containing genetic markers mapped to each linkage group. The genetic linkage groups were larger for metacentric chromosomes compared to acrocentric chromosomes of similar size. Comparison of the Atlantic salmon chromosome map with that of rainbow trout provides strong evidence for conservation of large syntenic blocks in these species, corresponding to entire chromosome arms in the rainbow trout. Conclusion It had been suggested that some of the large acrocentric chromosomes in Atlantic salmon are the result of tandem fusions, and that the small blocks of repetitive DNA in the middle of the arms represent the sites of chromosome fusions. The finding that the chromosomal regions on either side of the blocks of repetitive DNA within the larger acrocentric chromosomes correspond to different rainbow trout chromosome arms provides support for this hypothesis.

  13. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  14. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Blaudez, D [UMR, France

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  15. The Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework integrates plant litter decomposition with soil organic matter stabilization: do labile plant inputs form stable soil organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrufo, M Francesca; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Boot, Claudia M; Denef, Karolien; Paul, Eldor

    2013-04-01

    The decomposition and transformation of above- and below-ground plant detritus (litter) is the main process by which soil organic matter (SOM) is formed. Yet, research on litter decay and SOM formation has been largely uncoupled, failing to provide an effective nexus between these two fundamental processes for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling and storage. We present the current understanding of the importance of microbial substrate use efficiency and C and N allocation in controlling the proportion of plant-derived C and N that is incorporated into SOM, and of soil matrix interactions in controlling SOM stabilization. We synthesize this understanding into the Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework. This framework leads to the hypothesis that labile plant constituents are the dominant source of microbial products, relative to input rates, because they are utilized more efficiently by microbes. These microbial products of decomposition would thus become the main precursors of stable SOM by promoting aggregation and through strong chemical bonding to the mineral soil matrix. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Chromosomal instability in near-diploid colorectal cancer: a link between numbers and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Muleris

    Full Text Available Chromosomal instability (CIN plays a crucial role in tumor development and occurs mainly as the consequence of either missegregation of normal chromosomes (MSG or structural rearrangement (SR. However, little is known about the respective chromosomal targets of MSG and SR and the way these processes combined within tumors to generate CIN. To address these questions, we karyotyped a consecutive series of 96 near-diploid colorectal cancers (CRCs and distinguished chromosomal changes generated by either MSG or SR in tumor cells. Eighty-three tumors (86% presented with chromosomal abnormalities that contained both MSGs and SRs to varying degrees whereas all 13 others (14% showed normal karyotype. Using a maximum likelihood statistical method, chromosomes affected by MSG or SR and likely to represent changes that are selected for during tumor progression were found to be different and mostly mutually exclusive. MSGs and SRs were not randomly associated within tumors, delineating two major pathways of chromosome alterations that consisted of either chromosome gains by MSG or chromosomal losses by both MSG and SR. CRCs showing microsatellite instability (MSI presented with either normal karyotype or chromosome gains whereas MSS (microsatellite stable CRCs exhibited a combination of the two pathways. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the respective involvement of MSG and SR in near-diploid colorectal cancers, showing how these processes target distinct portions of the genome and result in specific patterns of chromosomal changes according to MSI status.

  17. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Summary In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the “chromosome cycle”. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice “progressive” chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are “segregation forks” in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the “nucleoid administration” system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle. PMID:23962352

  18. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching......Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...

  19. Self-consistent predictor/corrector algorithms for stable and efficient integration of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Herbert, John M.

    2018-01-01

    The "real time" formulation of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) involves integration of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham (TDKS) equation in order to describe the time evolution of the electron density following a perturbation. This approach, which is complementary to the more traditional linear-response formulation of TDDFT, is more efficient for computation of broad-band spectra (including core-excited states) and for systems where the density of states is large. Integration of the TDKS equation is complicated by the time-dependent nature of the effective Hamiltonian, and we introduce several predictor/corrector algorithms to propagate the density matrix, one of which can be viewed as a self-consistent extension of the widely used modified-midpoint algorithm. The predictor/corrector algorithms facilitate larger time steps and are shown to be more efficient despite requiring more than one Fock build per time step, and furthermore can be used to detect a divergent simulation on-the-fly, which can then be halted or else the time step modified.

  20. A Stable Marching on-in-time Scheme for Solving the Time Domain Electric Field Volume Integral Equation on High-contrast Scatterers

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Sadeed Bin

    2015-05-05

    A time domain electric field volume integral equation (TD-EFVIE) solver is proposed for characterizing transient electromagnetic wave interactions on high-contrast dielectric scatterers. The TD-EFVIE is discretized using the Schaubert- Wilton-Glisson (SWG) and approximate prolate spherical wave (APSW) functions in space and time, respectively. The resulting system of equations can not be solved by a straightforward application of the marching on-in-time (MOT) scheme since the two-sided APSW interpolation functions require the knowledge of unknown “future” field samples during time marching. Causality of the MOT scheme is restored using an extrapolation technique that predicts the future samples from known “past” ones. Unlike the extrapolation techniques developed for MOT schemes that are used in solving time domain surface integral equations, this scheme trains the extrapolation coefficients using samples of exponentials with exponents on the complex frequency plane. This increases the stability of the MOT-TD-EFVIE solver significantly, since the temporal behavior of decaying and oscillating electromagnetic modes induced inside the scatterers is very accurately taken into account by this new extrapolation scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed MOT solver maintains its stability even when applied to analyzing wave interactions on high-contrast scatterers.

  1. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  2. Chromosome-wide mechanisms to decouple gene expression from gene dose during sex-chromosome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Bayly S; Anderson, Erika; Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Bian, Qian; Jorgensen, Erik; Meyer, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Changes in chromosome number impair fitness by disrupting the balance of gene expression. Here we analyze mechanisms to compensate for changes in gene dose that accompanied the evolution of sex chromosomes from autosomes. Using single-copy transgenes integrated throughout the Caenorhabditis elegans genome, we show that expression of all X-linked transgenes is balanced between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. However, proximity of a dosage compensation complex (DCC) binding site (rex site) is neither necessary to repress X-linked transgenes nor sufficient to repress transgenes on autosomes. Thus, X is broadly permissive for dosage compensation, and the DCC acts via a chromosome-wide mechanism to balance transcription between sexes. In contrast, no analogous X-chromosome-wide mechanism balances transcription between X and autosomes: expression of compensated hermaphrodite X-linked transgenes is half that of autosomal transgenes. Furthermore, our results argue against an X-chromosome dosage compensation model contingent upon rex-directed positioning of X relative to the nuclear periphery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17365.001 PMID:27572259

  3. Integration of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system into an examination incubator to facilitate in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development in higher vertebrate embryos under stable physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happel, Christoph M.; Thrane, Lars; Thommes, Jan

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution in vivo imaging of higher vertebrate embryos over short or long time periods under constant physiological conditions is a technically challenging task for researchers working on cardiovascular development. In chick embryos, for example, various studies have shown that without...... significance, should be documented under physiological conditions. However, previous studies were mostly carried out outside of an incubator or under suboptimal environmental conditions. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first detailed description of an optical coherence tomography (OCT......) system integrated into an examination incubator to facilitate real-time in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development under physiological environmental conditions. We demonstrate the suitability of this OCT examination incubator unit for use in cardiovascular development studies by examples of proof...

  4. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  5. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions...

  6. Artificial chromosomes for antibiotic-producing actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosio, M; Giusino, F; Cappellano, C; Bossi, E; Puglia, A M; Donadio, S

    2000-03-01

    Bacteria belonging to the order Actinomycetales produce most microbial metabolites thus far described, several of which have found applications in medicine and agriculture. However, most strains were discovered by their ability to produce a given molecule and are, therefore, poorly characterized physiologically and genetically. Thus, methodologies for genetic manipulation of actinomycetes are not available and efficient tools have been developed for just a few strains. This constitutes a serious limitation to applying molecular genetics approaches to strain development and structural manipulation of microbial metabolites. To overcome this hurdle, we have developed bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) that can be shuttled among Escherichia coli, where they replicate autonomously, and a suitable Streptomyces host, where they integrate site-specifically into the chromosome. The existence of gene clusters and of genetically amenable host strains, such as Streptomyces coelicolor or Streptomyces lividans, makes this a sensible approach. We report here that 100 kb segments of actinomycete DNA can be cloned into these vectors and introduced into genetically accessible S. lividans, where they are stably maintained in integrated form in its chromosome.

  7. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  8. X Chromosome Evolution in Cetartiodactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Perelman, Polina L; Makunin, Alexey I; Larkin, Denis M; Farré, Marta; Kukekova, Anna V; Lynn Johnson, Jennifer; Lemskaya, Natalya A; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Roelke-Parker, Melody E; Bellizzi, June; Ryder, Oliver A; O'Brien, Stephen J; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2017-08-31

    The phenomenon of a remarkable conservation of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals has been first described by Susumu Ohno in 1964. A notable exception is the cetartiodactyl X chromosome, which varies widely in morphology and G-banding pattern between species. It is hypothesized that this sex chromosome has undergone multiple rearrangements that changed the centromere position and the order of syntenic segments over the last 80 million years of Cetartiodactyla speciation. To investigate its evolution we have selected 26 evolutionarily conserved bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the cattle CHORI-240 library evenly distributed along the cattle X chromosome. High-resolution BAC maps of the X chromosome on a representative range of cetartiodactyl species from different branches: pig (Suidae), alpaca (Camelidae), gray whale (Cetacea), hippopotamus (Hippopotamidae), Java mouse-deer (Tragulidae), pronghorn (Antilocapridae), Siberian musk deer (Moschidae), and giraffe (Giraffidae) were obtained by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To trace the X chromosome evolution during fast radiation in specious families, we performed mapping in several cervids (moose, Siberian roe deer, fallow deer, and Pere David's deer) and bovid (muskox, goat, sheep, sable antelope, and cattle) species. We have identified three major conserved synteny blocks and rearrangements in different cetartiodactyl lineages and found that the recently described phenomenon of the evolutionary new centromere emergence has taken place in the X chromosome evolution of Cetartiodactyla at least five times. We propose the structure of the putative ancestral cetartiodactyl X chromosome by reconstructing the order of syntenic segments and centromere position for key groups.

  9. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome....... The absence of the initiation cascade in Dam- cells is proposed to account for this observation of apparent incompatibility between plasmid and chromosomal copies of oriC. Studies using oriC-pBR322 chimeric plasmids and their deletion derivatives indicated that the incompatibility determinant is an intact...... in the oriC region of the chromosome, led to the conclusion that initiation of DNA replication commences at a fixed cell mass, irrespective of the number of origins contained on the chromosome....

  10. X chromosome and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, L M; Zouk, H; Himmelman, C; Turecki, G

    2011-02-01

    Suicide completion rates are significantly higher in males than females in most societies. Although gender differences in suicide rates have been partially explained by environmental and behavioral factors, it is possible that genetic factors, through differential expression between genders, may also help explain gender moderation of suicide risk. This study investigated X-linked genes in suicide completers using a two-step strategy. We first took advantage of the genetic structure of the French-Canadian population and genotyped 722 unrelated French-Canadian male subjects, of whom 333 were suicide completers and 389 were non-suicide controls, using a panel of 37 microsatellite markers spanning the entire X chromosome. Nine haplotype windows and several individual markers were associated with suicide. Significant results aggregated primarily in two regions, one in the long arm and another in the short arm of chromosome X, limited by markers DXS8051 and DXS8102, and DXS1001 and DXS8106, respectively. The second stage of the study investigated differential brain expression of genes mapping to associated regions in Brodmann areas 8/9, 11, 44 and 46, in an independent sample of suicide completers and controls. Six genes within these regions, Rho GTPase-activating protein 6, adaptor-related protein complex 1 sigma 2 subunit, glycoprotein M6B, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90  kDa polypeptide 3, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 and THO complex 2, were found to be differentially expressed in suicide completers.

  11. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  12. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  13. Matefin/SUN-1 phosphorylation is part of a surveillance mechanism to coordinate chromosome synapsis and recombination with meiotic progression and chromosome movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Woglar

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis I depends on the establishment of a crossover between homologous chromosomes. This requires induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, alignment of homologs, homolog association by synapsis, and repair of DSBs via homologous recombination. The success of these events requires coordination between chromosomal events and meiotic progression. The conserved SUN/KASH nuclear envelope bridge establishes transient linkages between chromosome ends and cytoskeletal forces during meiosis. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this bridge is essential for bringing homologs together and preventing nonhomologous synapsis. Chromosome movement takes place during synapsis and recombination. Concomitant with the onset of chromosome movement, SUN-1 clusters at chromosome ends associated with the nuclear envelope, and it is phosphorylated in a chk-2- and plk-2-dependent manner. Identification of all SUN-1 phosphomodifications at its nuclear N terminus allowed us to address their role in prophase I. Failures in recombination and synapsis led to persistent phosphorylations, which are required to elicit a delay in progression. Unfinished meiotic tasks elicited sustained recruitment of PLK-2 to chromosome ends in a SUN-1 phosphorylation-dependent manner that is required for continued chromosome movement and characteristic of a zygotene arrest. Furthermore, SUN-1 phosphorylation supported efficient synapsis. We propose that signals emanating from a failure to successfully finish meiotic tasks are integrated at the nuclear periphery to regulate chromosome end-led movement and meiotic progression. The single unsynapsed X chromosome in male meiosis is precluded from inducing a progression delay, and we found it was devoid of a population of phosphorylated SUN-1. This suggests that SUN-1 phosphorylation is critical to delaying meiosis in response to perturbed synapsis. SUN-1 may be an integral part of a checkpoint system to monitor

  14. Chromosomal rearrangements occurred repeatedly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, molecular and/or chromosomal data indicate that Paroedura is a monophyletic genus, in which chromosome rearrangements occurred repeatedly and independently during the specific diversification. Moreover both P. bastardi and P. gracilis in current definitions are paraphyletic assemblages of several ...

  15. Sex chromosomes in Ephestia kuehniella

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marec, František; Sahara, K.; Traut, W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2001), s. 131 ISSN 0003-3995. [European Cytogenetics Conference /3./. 07.07.2001-10.07.2001, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Telomere * sex chromosomes * chromosome fragments Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  16. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  17. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  18. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    Research continued on field flow fractionation of chromosomes. Progress in the past year can be organized into three main categories: (1) chromosome sample preparation; (2) preliminary chromosome fractionation; (3) fractionation of a polystyrene aggregate model which approximates the chromosome shape. We have been successful in isolating metaphase chromosomes from the Chinese hamster. We also received a human chromosome sample from Dr. Carolyn Bell-Prince of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results are discussed. 2 figs.

  19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is necessary to detect an association between chromosome aberrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in utero and reveals nonrandom chromosome involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocskay, Kirsti A; Orjuela, Manuela A; Tang, Deliang; Liu, Xinhua; Warburton, Dorothy; Perera, Frederica P

    2007-03-01

    Chromosome aberrations are associated with environmental exposures in infants and children. Recently we reported that prenatal exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was significantly (P al. [ 2005]: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:506-511). To determine whether the environmental exposures may be targeting specific chromosomes and to compare various methods for measuring chromosome aberrations, we further evaluated this same subset of subjects composed of African-American and Dominican nonsmoking mother-newborn pairs residing in low-income neighborhoods of New York City, and exposed to varying levels of airborne PAHs. Chromosome aberrations were measured in cord blood lymphocytes, both by whole chromosome probe (WCP) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and traditional Giemsa-staining. Prenatal exposures were assessed by personal air monitoring. Breaks in chromosomes 1-6, as detected by WCP FISH, were nonrandomly distributed, underscoring the importance of appropriate chromosome probe selection to capture cytogenetic damage in response to exposure. FISH for stable aberrations was found to be a more sensitive method for detecting aberration frequencies associated with environmental exposures, when compared with FISH for unstable aberrations or Giemsa-staining for aberrations. Together, these results suggest that PAHs may be targeting specific chromosomes and highlight the importance of using the more sensitive detection methods to assess risk in populations with low levels of exposure. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Image cytometry: nuclear and chromosomal DNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carlos Roberto; Clarindo, Wellington Ronildo; Abreu, Isabella Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Image cytometry (ICM) associates microscopy, digital image and software technologies, and has been particularly useful in spatial and densitometric cytological analyses, such as DNA ploidy and DNA content measurements. Basically, ICM integrates methodologies of optical microscopy calibration, standard density filters, digital CCD camera, and image analysis softwares for quantitative applications. Apart from all system calibration and setup, cytological protocols must provide good slide preparations for efficient and reliable ICM analysis. In this chapter, procedures for ICM applications employed in our laboratory are described. Protocols shown here for human DNA ploidy determination and quantification of nuclear and chromosomal DNA content in plants could be used as described, or adapted for other studies.

  1. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  2. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  3. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  4. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  5. Role of Chromosome Changes in Evolution and Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornsorn Srikulnath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of most species of crocodilians were studied using conventional and molecular cytogenetics. These provided an important contribution of chromosomal rearrangements for the evolutionary processes of Crocodylia and Sauropsida (birds and reptiles. The karyotypic features of crocodilians contain small diploid chromosome numbers (30~42, with little interspecific variation of the chromosome arm number (fundamental number among crocodiles (56~60. This suggested that centric fusion and/or fission events occurred in the lineage, leading to crocodilian evolution and diversity. The chromosome numbers of Alligator, Caiman, Melanosuchus, Paleosuchus, Gavialis, Tomistoma, Mecistops, and Osteolaemus were stable within each genus, whereas those of Crocodylus (crocodylians varied within the taxa. This agreed with molecular phylogeny that suggested a highly recent radiation of Crocodylus species. Karyotype analysis also suggests the direction of molecular phylogenetic placement among Crocodylus species and their migration from the Indo-Pacific to Africa and The New World. Crocodylus species originated from an ancestor in the Indo-Pacific around 9~16 million years ago (MYA in the mid-Miocene, with a rapid radiation and dispersion into Africa 8~12 MYA. This was followed by a trans-Atlantic dispersion to the New World between 4~8 MYA in the Pliocene. The chromosomes provided a better understanding of crocodilian evolution and diversity, which will be useful for further study of the genome evolution in Crocodylia.

  6. [Detecting human chromosome anomalies with primed in situ labeling (PRINS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-Jian; Liu, Di-Shi; Ding, Xian-Ping

    2008-08-01

    Numerical chromosome anomaly was one of the most important kinds of human chromosome diseases by inducing pregnancy loss, miscarriage, infant death, congenital malformations and nerve damage. The present study was to establish a rapid, reliable and reasonable multicolor primed in situ labeling (PRINS) protocol for diagnosing numerical anomaly in human chromosome. First, nuclei of cultured lymphocytes and sperms were labeled with the method of PRINS, and then nuclei of cultured lymphocytes, sperms and other specimen were labeled with the method of updated non-ddNTP-blocking multicolor PRINS technique. The labeling effect of different target sequences and the feature of different fluorochromes were evaluated by experiment. Meanwhile, several parameters of PRINS were optimized to obtain more homogeneous and stable labeling effect. At last, the applicative value of PRINS was evaluated by comparing the clinical effect and labeling characteristics between FISH probe and PRINS. In the present study, several chromosomes were simultaneously marked successfully in the same sperm nucleus within 2.5 hours. And the frequency of one-color-labeling reached 99%. The many advantages, compared with FISH, make PRINS become the first choice in diagnosing diseases related to numerical anomaly in human chromosome.

  7. Production of shikimic acid from Escherichia coli through chemically inducible chromosomal evolution and cofactor metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan-Yan; Ling, Chen; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Huang, Jian; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2014-02-10

    Shikimic acid (SA) produced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum) is a key intermediate for the synthesis of neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu®), an anti-influenza drug. However, plants cannot deliver a stable supply of SA. To avoid the resulting shortages and price fluctuations, a stable source of affordable SA is required. Although recent achievements in metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains have significantly increased SA productivity, commonly-used plasmid-based expression systems are prone to genetic instability and require constant selective pressure to ensure plasmid maintenance. Cofactors also play an important role in the biosynthesis of different fermentation products. In this study, we first constructed an E. coli SA production strain that carries no plasmid or antibiotic marker. We then investigated the effect of endogenous NADPH availability on SA production. The pps and csrB genes were first overexpressed by replacing their native promoter and integrating an additional copy of the genes in a double gene knockout (aroK and aroL) of E. coli. The aroG(fbr), aroB, aroE and tktA gene cluster was integrated into the above E. coli chromosome by direct transformation. The gene copy number was then evolved to the desired value by triclosan induction. The resulting strain, E. coli SA110, produced 8.9-fold more SA than did the parental strain E. coli (ΔaroKΔaroL). Following qRT-PCR analysis, another copy of the tktA gene under the control of the 5P(tac) promoter was inserted into the chromosome of E. coli SA110 to obtain the more productive strain E. coli SA110. Next, the NADPH availability was increased by overexpressing the pntAB or nadK genes, which further enhanced SA production. The final strain, E. coli SA116, produced 3.12 g/L of SA with a yield on glucose substrate of 0.33 mol/mol. An SA-producing E. coli strain that carries neither a plasmid nor an antibiotic marker was constructed by triclosan

  8. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  9. Chromosomal localization of microsatellite loci in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cavasini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata has been used as a model organism for genetics and evolutionary studies in the last three decades. A linkage map with 48 microsatellite loci recently published for this species showed five syntenic groups, which had their homology determined to Drosophila melanogaster chromosomes. Then, by inference, each of the groups was associated with one of the five major chromosomes of D. mediopunctata. Our objective was to carry out a genetic (chromosomal analysis to increase the number of available loci with known chromosomal location. We made a simultaneous analysis of visible mutant phenotypes and microsatellite genotypes in a backcross of a standard strain and a mutant strain, which had each major autosome marked. Hence, we could establish the chromosomal location of seventeen loci; including one from each of the five major linkage groups previously published, and twelve new loci. Our results were congruent with the previous location and they open new possibilities to future work integrating microsatellites, chromosomal inversions, and genetic determinants of physiological and morphological variation.

  10. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...

  11. X chromosome control of meiotic chromosome synapsis in mouse inter-subspecific hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Bhattacharyya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid sterility (HS belongs to reproductive isolation barriers that safeguard the integrity of species in statu nascendi. Although hybrid sterility occurs almost universally among animal and plant species, most of our current knowledge comes from the classical genetic studies on Drosophila interspecific crosses or introgressions. With the house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus and Mus m. domesticus as a model, new research tools have become available for studies of the molecular mechanisms and genetic networks underlying HS. Here we used QTL analysis and intersubspecific chromosome substitution strains to identify a 4.7 Mb critical region on Chromosome X (Chr X harboring the Hstx2 HS locus, which causes asymmetrical spermatogenic arrest in reciprocal intersubspecific F1 hybrids. Subsequently, we mapped autosomal loci on Chrs 3, 9 and 13 that can abolish this asymmetry. Combination of immunofluorescent visualization of the proteins of synaptonemal complexes with whole-chromosome DNA FISH on pachytene spreads revealed that heterosubspecific, unlike consubspecific, homologous chromosomes are predisposed to asynapsis in F1 hybrid male and female meiosis. The asynapsis is under the trans- control of Hstx2 and Hst1/Prdm9 hybrid sterility genes in pachynemas of male but not female hybrids. The finding concurred with the fertility of intersubpecific F1 hybrid females homozygous for the Hstx2(Mmm allele and resolved the apparent conflict with the dominance theory of Haldane's rule. We propose that meiotic asynapsis in intersubspecific hybrids is a consequence of cis-acting mismatch between homologous chromosomes modulated by the trans-acting Hstx2 and Prdm9 hybrid male sterility genes.

  12. FISH on chromosomes derived from the snail model organism Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoemelam, Edwin C; Raghavan, Nithya; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, Andre; Bridger, Joanna M; Knight, Matty

    2010-01-01

    The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the mapping of single copy genes onto homologous chromosome has been integral to vast number genome sequencing projects, such as that of mouse and human. The chromosomes of these organisms are well-studied and are the staple resource of most of the early studies conducted in cytogenetics. However, there are now protocols for analyzing FISH probes in a number of different organisms on both metaphase and interphase chromosomes.Here, we describe the methodologies for the chromosomal mapping of nonrepetitive (single-copy) genes of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata onto metaphase chromosomes derived from the only molluscan cell-line in existence. The technique described in this chapter was developed for the B. glabrata genome sequencing project through troubleshooting experimental procedures established for other organisms so that both the optimum resolution of metaphase chromosome and the effective hybridization of genes were achieved.

  13. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV. Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  14. The use of a mutationally unstable X-chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster for mutagenicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, B.; Svahlin, H.; Rasmuson, A.; Montell, I.; Olofsson, H.

    1978-01-01

    Somatic eye-colour mutations in an unstable genetic system, caused by a transposable element in the white locus of the X-chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster, is suggested as an assay system for mutagenicity testing. The system is evaluated by comparison with a corresponding system in a stable X-chromosome. Its sensitivity is confirmed with X-ray and EMS treatment, and it is found to be confined to the specific segment of the X-chromosome where the transposable element is localized. (Auth.)

  15. The fate of chromosomes and alleles in an allohexaploid Brassica population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Annaliese S; Nelson, Matthew N; Takahira, Junko; Cowling, Wallace A; Alves, Gustavo Moreira; Chaudhuri, Arkaprava; Chen, Ning; Ragu, Mohana E; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Coriton, Olivier; Huteau, Virginie; Eber, Frédérique; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Batley, Jacqueline

    2014-05-01

    Production of allohexaploid Brassica (2n = AABBCC) is a promising goal for plant breeders due to the potential for hybrid heterosis and useful allelic contributions from all three of the Brassica genomes present in the cultivated diploid (2n = AA, 2n = BB, 2n = CC) and allotetraploid (2n = AABB, 2n = AACC, and 2n = BBCC) crop species (canola, cabbages, mustards). We used high-throughput SNP molecular marker assays, flow cytometry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize a population of putative allohexaploids derived from self-pollination of a hybrid from the novel cross (B. napus × B. carinata) × B. juncea to investigate whether fertile, stable allohexaploid Brassica can be produced. Allelic segregation in the A and C genomes generally followed Mendelian expectations for an F2 population, with minimal nonhomologous chromosome pairing. However, we detected no strong selection for complete 2n = AABBCC chromosome complements, with weak correlations between DNA content and fertility (r(2) = 0.11) and no correlation between missing chromosomes or chromosome segments and fertility. Investigation of next-generation progeny resulting from one highly fertile F2 plant using FISH revealed general maintenance of high chromosome numbers but severe distortions in karyotype, as evidenced by recombinant chromosomes and putative loss/duplication of A- and C-genome chromosome pairs. Our results show promise for the development of meiotically stable allohexaploid lines, but highlight the necessity of selection for 2n = AABBCC karyotypes.

  16. Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Siebert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure.

  17. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  18. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  19. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  20. Chromosome painting for plant biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Lamb, Jonathan C; Albert, Patrice S; Danilova, Tatiana; Han, Fangpu; Gao, Zhi; Findley, Seth; Birchler, James A

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an invaluable tool for chromosome analysis and engineering. The ability to visually localize endogenous genes, transposable elements, transgenes, naturally occurring organellar DNA insertions - essentially any unique sequence larger than 2 kb - greatly facilitates progress. This chapter details the labeling procedures and chromosome preparation techniques used to produce high-quality FISH signals on somatic metaphase and meiotic pachytene spreads.

  1. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  2. Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in maize genome. MAHESH C. YADAV1,2∗, J. K. S. ... cated chromosomal segments in maize genome. Materials and methods. Development and .... each in chromosomes 2 and 7, while 10 other pairs of du- plicate loci had one copy in chromosome 3 and the ...

  3. Ring chromosome 13 and ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsu, Elif; Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; Ipekçi, Belkıs

    2014-01-01

    Ambiguous genitalia, known to be associated with sex chromosome disorders, may also be seen with autosomal chromosome anomalies. Herein, we report a case with ambiguous genitalia and ring chromosome 13. Ring chromosome 13 is a rare genetic anomaly in which the loss of genetic material determines the clinical spectrum.

  4. Ring Chromosome 13 and Ambiguous Genitalia

    OpenAIRE

    Özsu, Elif; Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; İpekçi, Belkıs

    2014-01-01

    Ambiguous genitalia, known to be associated with sex chromosome disorders, may also be seen with autosomal chromosome anomalies. Herein, we report a case with ambiguous genitalia and ring chromosome 13. Ring chromosome 13 is a rare genetic anomaly in which the loss of genetic material determines the clinical spectrum.

  5. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.R.; Hecht, F.; Lubs, H.A.; Kimberling, W.; Brown, J.; Gerald, P.S.; Summitt, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, s o radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant. (U.K.)

  6. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  8. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  9. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  10. A Resolvase-like Protein is required for the Site-Specific Integration of the Temperate Lactococcal Bacteriophage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bettina; Brøndsted, Lone; Vogensen, Finn K.

    1996-01-01

    showed 38-44 % similarity to the resolvase group of site-specific integrases, while no similarity to known proteins was found in the C-terminal end. Bacteriophage TP901-1 therefore contains a unique integration system, not resembling the Int-class of site-specific integrases usually found in temperate...... bacteriophages. The constructed integration vector pBC170, integrates into the chromosomal attachment site very efficiently and forms stable transformants with a frequency corresponding to 20 % of the transformation efficiency....

  11. A resolvase-like protein is requered for the site-specific integration of the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bettina; Brøndsted, Lone; Vogensen, Finn K.

    1996-01-01

    upstream of attP. The N-terminal 150 to 1180 amino acids of Orf1 showed 38 to 44% similarity to the resolvase group of site-specific integrases, while no similarity to know proteins was found in the C-terminal end. Bacteriophage 'TP901-1 therefore contains a unique integration system that does not resemble...... the Int class of site-specific integrases usually found in temperate bacteriophages. The constructed integration vector, pBC170, integrates into the chromosomal attachment site very efficiently and forms stable transformants with a frequency corresponding to 20% of the transformation efficiency....

  12. Transcription of a protein-coding gene on B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Vladimir A; Dementyeva, Polina V; Larkin, Denis M; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Perelman, Polina L; Yang, Fengtang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2013-08-06

    Most eukaryotic species represent stable karyotypes with a particular diploid number. B chromosomes are additional to standard karyotypes and may vary in size, number and morphology even between cells of the same individual. For many years it was generally believed that B chromosomes found in some plant, animal and fungi species lacked active genes. Recently, molecular cytogenetic studies showed the presence of additional copies of protein-coding genes on B chromosomes. However, the transcriptional activity of these genes remained elusive. We studied karyotypes of the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) that possess up to 14 B chromosomes to investigate the presence and expression of genes on supernumerary chromosomes. Here, we describe a 2 Mbp region homologous to cattle chromosome 3 and containing TNNI3K (partial), FPGT, LRRIQ3 and a large gene-sparse segment on B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer. The presence of the copy of the autosomal region was demonstrated by B-specific cDNA analysis, PCR assisted mapping, cattle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone localization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). By comparative analysis of B-specific and non-B chromosomal sequences we discovered some B chromosome-specific mutations in protein-coding genes, which further enabled the detection of a FPGT-TNNI3K transcript expressed from duplicated genes located on B chromosomes in roe deer fibroblasts. Discovery of a large autosomal segment in all B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer further corroborates the view of an autosomal origin for these elements. Detection of a B-derived transcript in fibroblasts implies that the protein coding sequences located on Bs are not fully inactivated. The origin, evolution and effect on host of B chromosomal genes seem to be similar to autosomal segmental duplications, which reinforces the view that supernumerary chromosomal elements might play an important role in genome evolution.

  13. An expert image analysis system for chromosome analysis application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.; Suetens, P.; Oosterlinck, A.; Van den Berghe, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports a recent study on applying a knowledge-based system approach as a new attempt to solve the problem of chromosome classification. A theoretical framework of an expert image analysis system is proposed, based on such a study. In this scheme, chromosome classification can be carried out under a hypothesize-and-verify paradigm, by integrating a rule-based component, in which the expertise of chromosome karyotyping is formulated with an existing image analysis system which uses conventional pattern recognition techniques. Results from the existing system can be used to bring in hypotheses, and with the rule-based verification and modification procedures, improvement of the classification performance can be excepted

  14. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  15. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. METHODS: From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  16. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    Objective To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. Methods From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  17. Stable transformation of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 induced by UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzelzkalns, V.A.; Bogorad, L.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation of the photoheterotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 with low levels of UV light allows for stable, integrative transformation of these cells by heterologous DNA. In this system, transformation does not rely on an autonomously replicating plasmid and is independent of homologous recombination. Cells treated with UV light in the absence of DNA and cells given DNA but not exposed to UV do not yield antibiotic-resistant colonies in platings of up to 2 x 10 8 cells. Optimal conditions for this UV-induced transformation are described. Analysis of the transformants indicates that (i) only a segment of the introduced plasmid is found in the DNA of the transformed cells; (ii) in independently isolated clones, DNA insertion apparently occurs at different sites in the chromosome; and (iii) hybridization data suggest that insertion in one of the transformants may have occurred into a region of the chromosome that is repeated or that integration of plasmid DNA may have been accompanied by a rearrangement or duplication of DNA sequences near the insertion site. DNA isolated from the primary transformants as well as a cloned fragment containing the UV- inserted plasmid sequence and flanking cyanobacterial DNA transform wild-type cells at a high frequency (5.0 x 10 -4 and 1.5 x 10 -5 , respectively). Possible mechanisms of this transformation system are discussed, as are the potential uses of this system as an integrative cloning-complementation vector and as a mutagenic agent in which the genetic lesion is already tagged with a selectable marker

  18. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  19. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  20. STN1 protects chromosome ends in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiangyu; Leehy, Katherine; Warrington, Ross T; Lamb, Jonathan C; Surovtseva, Yulia V; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2008-12-16

    Telomeres shield the natural ends of chromosomes from nucleolytic attack, recognition as double-strand breaks, and inappropriate processing by DNA repair machinery. The trimeric Stn1/Ten1/Cdc13 complex is critical for chromosome end protection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while vertebrate telomeres are protected by shelterin, a complex of six proteins that does not include STN1 or TEN1. Recent studies demonstrate that Stn1 and Ten1 orthologs in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contribute to telomere integrity in a complex that is distinct from the shelterin components, Pot1 and Tpp1. Thus, chromosome-end protection may be mediated by distinct subcomplexes of telomere proteins. Here we report the identification of a STN1 gene in Arabidopsis that is essential for chromosome-end protection. AtSTN1 encodes an 18-kDa protein bearing a single oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold with significant sequence similarity to the yeast Stn1 proteins. Plants null for AtSTN1 display an immediate onset of growth and developmental defects and reduced fertility. These outward phenotypes are accompanied by catastrophic loss of telomeric and subtelomeric DNA, high levels of end-to-end chromosome fusions, increased G-overhang signals, and elevated telomere recombination. Thus, AtSTN1 is a crucial component of the protective telomere cap in Arabidopsis, and likely in other multicellular eukaryotes.

  1. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437 ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  2. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  3. COMPARISON OF IMAGE ENHANCEMENT METHODS FOR CHROMOSOME KARYOTYPE IMAGE ENHANCEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa Made Sri Arsa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The chromosome is a set of DNA structure that carry information about our life. The information can be obtained through Karyotyping. The process requires a clear image so the chromosome can be evaluate well. Preprocessing have to be done on chromosome images that is image enhancement. The process starts with image background removing. The image will be cleaned background color. The next step is image enhancement. This paper compares several methods for image enhancement. We evaluate some method in image enhancement like Histogram Equalization (HE, Contrast-limiting Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE, Histogram Equalization with 3D Block Matching (HE+BM3D, and basic image enhancement, unsharp masking. We examine and discuss the best method for enhancing chromosome image. Therefore, to evaluate the methods, the original image was manipulated by the addition of some noise and blur. Peak Signal-to-noise Ratio (PSNR and Structural Similarity Index (SSIM are used to examine method performance. The output of enhancement method will be compared with result of Professional software for karyotyping analysis named Ikaros MetasystemT M . Based on experimental results, HE+BM3D method gets a stable result on both scenario noised and blur image.

  4. Stable co-existence of separate replicons in Escherichia coli is dependent on once-per-cell-cycle initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarstad, K.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2003-01-01

    DNA replication in most organisms is regulated such that all chromosomes are replicated once, and only once, per cell cycle. In rapidly growing Escherichia coli, replication of eight identical chromosomes is initiated essentially simultanously, each from the same origin, oriC. Plasmid-borne ori......C sequences (mini-chromosomes) are also initiated in synchrony with the eight chromosomal origins. We demonstrate that specific inactivation of newly formed, hemimethylated origins (sequestration) was required for the stable coexistence of oriC-dependent replicons. Cells in which initiations were not confined...

  5. Recurrent integration of human papillomaviruses 16, 45, and 67 near translocation breakpoints in new cervical cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, L. A.; Szuhai, K.; van Eendenburg, J. D.; Bezrookove, V.; Kenter, G. G.; Schuuring, E.; Tanke, H.; Fleuren, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive chromosomal changes and integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences mark the development of invasive cervical cancer. Chromosomal localization of HPV integration is essential to the study of genomic regions involved in HPV-induced pathogenesis. Yet, the available information

  6. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Institut für Biologie, Zentrum für medizinische Struktur- und Zellbiologie, Universität Lübeck,. Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Lübeck, Germany. Abstract. The phorid fly Megaselia scalaris is a laboratory model for the turnover and early differentiation of sex chromosomes. Isolates from the field have an XY ...

  7. Microsatellites mapping for non-model species with chromosomal rearrangement: a case study in the frog Quasipaa boulengeri (Anura: Dicroglossidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiuyun; Yuan, Siqi; Liu, Ya; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao

    2017-08-01

    Gene mapping is an important resource for understanding the evolution of genes and cytogenetics. Model species with a known genetic map or genome sequence allow for the selection of genetic markers on a desired chromosome, while it is hard to locate these markers on chromosomes of non-model species without such references. A frog species, Quasipaa boulengeri, shows chromosomal rearrangement polymorphisms, making itself a fascinating model for chromosomal speciation mediated by suppressed recombination. However, no markers have been located on its rearranged chromosomes. We present a complete protocol to map microsatellites based on mechanical microdissection and chromosome amplification techniques. Following this protocol, we mapped 71 microsatellites of Q. boulengeri at the chromosome level. In total, eight loci were assigned to rearranged chromosomes, and the other 63 loci might attach to other chromosomes. These microsatellites could be used to compare the gene flow and verify the chromosomal suppressed recombination hypothesis in Q. boulengeri. This integrated protocol could be effectively used to map genes to chromosomes for non-model species.

  8. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  9. [B chromosome polymorphism of blackflies (Diptera, Simuliidae) from the north-western region of Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubareva, L A; Petrova, N A

    2006-01-01

    We have studied karyofonds of natural populations and B-chromosome morphology of 8 species of blackflies from the North-Western region of Russia: Odagmia ornata Mg., Hellichiella crassa Rubz., Simulium morsitans Edw., Simulium argyreatum Mg., Shoenbaueria pusilla Fries., Cnetha fontinalis Radzv., Stegopterna duo-decimata Rubz., and Archesimulium tuberosum Lundstr. For this purpose we made slides of squashed blackflies larvae with salivary gland polytene chromosomes stained by aceto-orcein, in addition to similarly stained slides with mitotic chromosomes from gonads and ganglia. Morphology of polytene B-chromosomes of Shoenbaueria pusilla Fries., Cnetha fontinalis Radzv., Stegopterna duodecimata Rubz., and Archesimulium tuberosum Lundstr. has been first described. B-chromosome polymorphism was found in all species, but the number of B chromosomes was conserved within each differences in polytene individual. Stable and distinct interspecific differences in the morphology of polytene B-chromosomes were demonstrated, and these characters are advisable to use to distinguish the species. We have investigated for the first time karyofonds of Od. ornata populations from Arkhangelsk Region (Solovetskie Islands) and Leningrad Region (railway station Sablino), and those of S. argyreatum populations from Murmansk Region (Kandalaksha environs) and Karelia (railway station Chupa). A long term study of Od. ornata and S. argyrestum population from North-Western Russia revealed interspecific and interpopulation dynamics of the occurrence of specimens with B-chromosomes. Some populations showed an increased percentage of individuals with B-chromosomes. It is suggested that B-chromosomes may play a role in adaptation of polulations to severe environmental conditions.

  10. Use of a Human Artificial Chromosome for Delivering Trophic Factors in a Rodent Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A human artificial chromosome (HAC is maintained as an episome within a cell and avoids random integration into the host genome. It can transfer multiple and/or large transgenes along with their regulatory elements thereby resembling native chromosomes. Using this HAC system, we established mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that simultaneously expressed hepatocyte growth factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and insulin-like growth factor 1, termed HAC-MSCs. This cell line provides an opportunity for stable transplantation and thorough analyses. We then introduced the cells for the treatment of a neurodegenerative disorder, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The HAC-MSCs were transplanted via the fourth cerebral ventricle (CV or intravenous (i.v. infusion at various ages of recipient mice. Littermate- and sex-matched mice underwent a sham procedure. Compared to the controls, there was an encouraging trend of increased life span via CV transplantation and delayed onset in i.v. infusion 60 days after transplantation. Further, we confirmed a statistically significant increase in life span via CV transplantation at 100 days. This effect was not seen in mice transplanted with MSCs lacking the HAC. We successfully enhanced the trophic potential of the MSCs using the HAC. This strategy could be a promising direction for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Complete Measurement of Stable Isotopes in N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O) Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in water is a worldwide environmental problem and source apportionment is critical to managing nitrate pollution. Fractionation caused by physical, chemical and biological processes alters the isotope ratios of nitrates (15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O) and biochemical nitrification and denitrification impart different intramolecular site preference (15N14NO vs. 14N15NO). Additionally, atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O compared to other nitrate sources. The anomaly (Δ17O) is conserved during fractionation processes, providing a tracer of atmospheric nitrate. All of these effects can be used to apportion nitrate in soil. Current technology for measuring nitrate isotopes is complicated and costly - it involves conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide (N2O), purification, preconcentration and measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Site specific measurements require a custom IRMS. There is a pressing need to make this measurement simpler and more accessible. Los Gatos Research has developed a next generation mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to quantify all stable isotope ratios of N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O). We present the latest performance data demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the OA-ICOS based measurement. At an N2O concentration of 322 ppb, the analyzer quantifies [N2O], δ15N, δ15Na, δ15Nb, and δ18O with a precision of ±0.05 ppb, ±0.4 ‰, ±0.45 ‰, and ±0.6 ‰, and ±0.8 ‰ respectively (1σ, 100s; 1σ, 1000s for δ18O). Measurements of gas standards demonstrate accuracy better than ±1 ‰ for isotope ratios over a wide dynamic range (200 - 100,000 ppb). The measurement of δ17O requires a higher concentration (1 - 50 ppm), easily obtainable through conversion of nitrates in water. For 10 ppm of N2O, the instrument achieves a δ17O precision of ±0.05 ‰ (1σ, 1000s). This performance is sufficient to quantify atmospheric

  12. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  13. Clipboard Human Y-chromosome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Their findings, as described below, are revealing. They sequenced the euchromatic part of the Y-chromosome (23 Mb) (obtained from a single anony- mous human male), comprising 8 Mb of the short arm (Yp) and 14⋅5 Mb of the long arm (Yq), at an accuracy of 99⋅999% and classified these regions into three sequence ...

  14. Chromosomes go with the flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Carter, N.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2004), s. 1-4 ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GA521/03/0595 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : flow cytometry * chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.346, year: 2004

  15. Algorithm for sorting chromosomal aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Lund, Najaaraq; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray....

  16. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  17. Genomic disorders on chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shihui; Graf, William D; Shprintzen, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Chromosome 22, the first human chromosome to be completely sequenced, is prone to genomic alterations. Copy-number variants (CNVs) are common because of an enrichment of low-copy repeat sequences that precipitate a high frequency of nonallelic homologous misalignments and unequal recombination during meiosis. Among these is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans and the most common microdeletion syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and DiGeorge syndrome. This review will focus on the recent literature dealing with both the molecular and clinical aspects of chromosome 22 genomic variations. Although the literature covering this area is expansive, the majority is descriptive or analytical of the problems presented by these genomic disorders, and there is little evidence of translational research including treatment outcomes. With the increased use of microarray analysis in both research and clinical practice, variations in CNVs are becoming elucidated. Genomic analysis continues to characterize genes and gene effect. Research on the COMT gene continues to yield interesting findings, including a possible sex-mediated effect because of its regulatory role with estrogen. There is a small amount of treatment outcome data relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders in VCFS, but based on small samples and short-term follow-up. Although hundreds of studies in the past year have focused on genomic disorders of chromosome 22, little progress has been made in the implementation of translational research, even for more common disorders including VCFS.

  18. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2007-03-01

    Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup (3q), dup (11p), inv (11), dup (1q), del (1q), dup (4q), dup (5p), dup (6q), del (9p), dup (15q), dup(17q), Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD) such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  19. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  20. Comparative Chromosome Map and Heterochromatin Features of the Gray Whale Karyotype (Cetacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Lemskaya, Natalia A; Perelman, Polina L; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean karyotypes possess exceptionally stable diploid numbers and highly conserved chromosomes. To date, only toothed whales (Odontoceti) have been analyzed by comparative chromosome painting. Here, we studied the karyotype of a representative of baleen whales, the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus, Mysticeti), by Zoo-FISH with dromedary camel and human chromosome-specific probes. We confirmed a high degree of karyotype conservation and found an identical order of syntenic segments in both branches of cetaceans. Yet, whale chromosomes harbor variable heterochromatic regions constituting up to a third of the genome due to the presence of several types of repeats. To investigate the cause of this variability, several classes of repeated DNA sequences were mapped onto chromosomes of whale species from both Mysticeti and Odontoceti. We uncovered extensive intrapopulation variability in the size of heterochromatic blocks present in homologous chromosomes among 3 individuals of the gray whale by 2-step differential chromosome staining. We show that some of the heteromorphisms observed in the gray whale karyotype are due to distinct amplification of a complex of common cetacean repeat and heavy satellite repeat on homologous autosomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate localization of the telomeric repeat in the heterochromatin of both gray and pilot whale (Globicephala melas, Odontoceti). Heterochromatic blocks in the pilot whale represent a composite of telomeric and common repeats, while heavy satellite repeat is lacking in the toothed whale consistent with previous studies. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Tolerance of Whole-Genome Doubling Propagates Chromosomal Instability and Accelerates Cancer Genome Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dewhurst, Sally M.; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of whole-genome doubling to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumor evolution is unclear. We use long-term culture of isogenic tetraploid cells from a stable diploid colon cancer progenitor to investigate how a genome-doubling event affects genome stability over time. Rare cells ...

  2. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  3. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  4. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  5. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  6. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  7. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  8. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  9. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...... and discussed, and the previously reported cases of familially transmitted G-group ring chromosomes are reviewed....

  10. High resolution analysis of interphase chromosome domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A. E.; Jaunin, F.; Fakan, S.; Aten, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome territories need to be well defined at high resolution before functional aspects of chromosome organization in interphase can be explored. To visualize chromosomes by electron microscopy (EM), the DNA of Chinese hamster fibroblasts was labeled in vivo with thymidine analogue BrdU. Labeled

  11. Chromosome number and cytomorphological characterization of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosome counts from natural populations of Abrus pulchellus in Nigeria were carried out. Tetraploid (2n = 44) chromosome number was constant in all the samples investigated. The 44 chromosomes fall into three cytomorphological categories: eight metacentric and eight submetacentric pairs, and six acrocentric pairs.

  12. Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cioffi, M. de B.; Yano, C. F.; Sember, Alexandr; Bertollo, L.A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 258. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : alternative evolutionary models * simple and multiple sex chromosomes * independent and common origins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  13. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th . intermedium . Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th . intermedium , 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th . intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th . intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th . bessarabicum . Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th . intermedium . Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  14. Dynamic in situ chromosome immobilisation and DNA extraction using localized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Marie, Rodolphe

    2011-01-01

    A method of in situ chromosome immobilisation and DNA extraction in a microfluidic polymer chip was presented. Light-induced local heating was used to induce poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) phase transition in order to create a hydrogel and embed a single chromosome such that it was immobilised....... This was achieved with the use of a near-infrared laser focused on an absorption layer integrated in the polymer chip in close proximity to the microchannel. It was possible to proceed to DNA extraction while holding on the chromosome at an arbitrary location by introducing protease K into the microchannel. © 2011...

  15. ISCN rules for listing chromosomal rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    It contains the standard system for numbering human chromosomes and constitutional rearrangements and the banding pattern for normal chromosomes at 400-, 550-, and 850-band levels of resolution. ISCN 1995 also contains guidelines for cancer cytogenetics and for in situ hybridization. The complete ISCN 1995 also contains nomenclature for human meiotic chromosomes (not included here). The guidelines presented herein are recommended for use when reporting karyotypes, designating chromosome rearrangements and aberrations, and indicating regions of the genome where DNA sequences are located. It contains the standard system for numbering human chromosomes and constitutional rearrangements and the banding pattern for.

  16. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C.; Grzeschik, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration

  17. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  18. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  19. Spindle assembly checkpoint signalling is uncoupled from chromosomal position in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Liming; Homer, Hayden

    2012-06-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) averts aneuploidy by coordinating proper bipolar chromosomal attachment with anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-mediated securin and cyclin B1 destruction required for anaphase onset. The generation of a Mad2-based signal at kinetochores is central to current models of SAC-based APC/C inhibition. During mitosis, kinetochores of polar-displaced chromosomes, which are at greatest risk of mis-segregating, recruit the highest levels of Mad2, thereby ensuring that SAC activation is proportionate to aneuploidy risk. Paradoxically, although an SAC operates in mammalian oocytes, meiosis I (MI) is notoriously error prone and polar-displaced chromosomes do not prevent anaphase onset. Here we find that Mad2 is not preferentially recruited to the kinetochores of polar chromosomes of wild-type mouse oocytes, in which polar chromosomes are rare, or of oocytes depleted of the kinesin-7 motor CENP-E, in which polar chromosomes are more abundant. Furthermore, in CENP-E-depleted oocytes, although polar chromosomal displacement intensified during MI and the capacity to form stable end-on attachments was severely compromised, all kinetochores nevertheless became devoid of Mad2. Thus, it is possible that the ability of the SAC to robustly discriminate chromosomal position might be compromised by the propensity of oocyte kinetochores to become saturated with unproductive attachments, thereby predisposing to aneuploidy. Our data also reveal novel functions for CENP-E in oocytes: first, CENP-E stabilises BubR1, thereby impacting MI progression; and second, CENP-E mediates bi-orientation by promoting kinetochore reorientation and preventing chromosomal drift towards the poles.

  20. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate...... method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were analyzed in total...... the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding result is described in Paper III...

  1. Chromosome chains and platypus sex: kinky connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Terry

    2005-07-01

    Mammal sex determination depends on an XY chromosome system, a gene for testis development and a means of activating the X chromosome. The duckbill platypus challenges these dogmas.(1,2) Gutzner et al.(1) find no recognizable SRY sequence and question whether the mammalian X was even the original sex chromosome in the platypus. Instead they suggest that the original platypus sex chromosomes were derived from the ZW chromosome system of birds and reptiles. Unraveling the puzzles of sex determination and dosage compensation in the platypus has been complicated by the fact that it has a surplus of sex chromosomes. Rather than a single X and Y chromosome, the male platypus has five Xs and five Ys. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  3. Genome Organization Drives Chromosome Fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Andres; Maman, Yaakov; Jung, Seolkyoung; Wong, Nancy; Callen, Elsa; Day, Amanda; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Zhang, Hongliang; Rao, Suhas S P; Huang, Su-Chen; Mckinnon, Peter J; Aplan, Peter D; Pommier, Yves; Aiden, Erez Lieberman; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, André

    2017-07-27

    In this study, we show that evolutionarily conserved chromosome loop anchors bound by CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin are vulnerable to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) mediated by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B). Polymorphisms in the genome that redistribute CTCF/cohesin occupancy rewire DNA cleavage sites to novel loop anchors. While transcription- and replication-coupled genomic rearrangements have been well documented, we demonstrate that DSBs formed at loop anchors are largely transcription-, replication-, and cell-type-independent. DSBs are continuously formed throughout interphase, are enriched on both sides of strong topological domain borders, and frequently occur at breakpoint clusters commonly translocated in cancer. Thus, loop anchors serve as fragile sites that generate DSBs and chromosomal rearrangements. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting...... chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor......-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...

  5. Chromosomes aberations and enviromental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Srđan Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Changes in genetic material can lead to aberrant cell in the direction of disorders of cellular regulation, malignant transformation, cell death, or if the adjustment was made at the level of the reproductive cells, to genetic changes in some of the consequent off spring. The topic position in scientific/professional public: Breaking of chromosomes can occur spontaneously or can be induced. Chromatid/chromosome breakings can be induced by different environmental factors: chemicals, biological clastogenic agents, accidentally or intentionally. Conclusions: The authors suggest: - making conditions for strong respect of environmental regulations; - to use higher plants for the early detection of environmental mutagens; - create and orderly update National radionuclide database.

  6. Reconstructing spatial organizations of chromosomes through manifold learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangxiang; Deng, Wenxuan; Hu, Hailin; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Sai; Yang, Jinglin; Peng, Jian; Kaplan, Tommy; Zeng, Jianyang

    2018-02-02

    Decoding the spatial organizations of chromosomes has crucial implications for studying eukaryotic gene regulation. Recently, chromosomal conformation capture based technologies, such as Hi-C, have been widely used to uncover the interaction frequencies of genomic loci in a high-throughput and genome-wide manner and provide new insights into the folding of three-dimensional (3D) genome structure. In this paper, we develop a novel manifold learning based framework, called GEM (Genomic organization reconstructor based on conformational Energy and Manifold learning), to reconstruct the three-dimensional organizations of chromosomes by integrating Hi-C data with biophysical feasibility. Unlike previous methods, which explicitly assume specific relationships between Hi-C interaction frequencies and spatial distances, our model directly embeds the neighboring affinities from Hi-C space into 3D Euclidean space. Extensive validations demonstrated that GEM not only greatly outperformed other state-of-art modeling methods but also provided a physically and physiologically valid 3D representations of the organizations of chromosomes. Furthermore, we for the first time apply the modeled chromatin structures to recover long-range genomic interactions missing from original Hi-C data. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of bacterial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawer, Julia S P; Leach, David R F

    2013-01-01

    The separation of fragments of DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis is integral to laboratory life. Nevertheless, standard agarose gel electrophoresis cannot resolve fragments bigger than 50 kb. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a technique that has been developed to overcome the limitations of standard agarose gel electrophoresis. Entire linear eukaryotic chromosomes, or large fragments of a chromosome that have been generated by the action of rare-cutting restriction endonucleases, can be separated using this technique. As a result, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has many applications, from karyotype analysis of microbial genomes, to the analysis of chromosomal strand breaks and their repair intermediates, to the study of DNA replication and the identification of origins of replication. This chapter presents a detailed protocol for the preparation of Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA that has been embedded in agarose plugs, digested with the rare-cutting endonuclease NotI, and separated by contour-clamped homogeneous field electrophoresis. The principles in this protocol can be applied to the separation of all fragments of DNA whose size range is between 40 kb and 1 Mb.

  8. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  9. [Chromosome aberrations in malformed newborns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno Malfaz, F; Beltrán Pérez, A; Ruiz Labarga, C; Centeno Robles, T; Macías Pardal, J; Martín Bermejo, M

    2001-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of chromosome abnormalities in malformed newborn infants and to analyze the distribution of the types of anomalies, and the variation in their frequency with maternal age. We used the data collected according to the Spanish Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECEMC) methodology from March 1982 -September 1996. Of 33,562 newborns (live and stillborn), 1,409(4.1%) malformed infants were identified. A total of 332 karyotypes were performed in peripheral blood, representing 23.5% of the newborns with congenital defects. Results The frequency at birth of chromosome abnormalities was 5.4% of malformed newborns. There were 59 infants with Down's syndrome, 6 with trisomy 18, 3 with Turner's syndrome, 2 with trisomy 13, 2 with "Triple X", 1 tetraploidy, 1 triploidy, 1 trisomy 9 p, and 1 infant with a complex XXY mosaicism. The prevalence of Down's syndrome in the general population is 0.17%. The mean age of mothers with Down's syndrome infants was 34.2 years and paternal age was 36 years, and a non-statistically significant diminishing trend in mean maternal age was observed during the course of the study. The prevalence of Down's syndrome was higher in mothers aged more than 35 years. A non-statistically significant increase of the prevalence of Down's syndrome in newborns with mothers aged between 31 and 34 years was observed with time. The mean number of previous pregnancies was 2.81. Among a total of 49 mothers and fathers, two chromosome alterations were found. The prevalence of chromosome abnormalities in newborns with birth defects was 5.4%. The frequency of Down's syndrome was higher. Down's syndrome was more prevalent in mothers aged more than 35 years. The mean maternal age of Down's syndrome infants gradually diminished, and accumulated between the ages of 31 and 34 years.

  10. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  11. De Novo Chromosome Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman-Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, Jose'n.

    Chromatin consists of DNA and hundreds of proteins that interact with the genetic material. In vivo, chromatin folds into nonrandom structures. The physical mechanism leading to these characteristic conformations, however, remains poorly understood. We recently introduced MiChroM, a model that generates chromosome conformations by using the idea that chromatin can be subdivided into types based on its biochemical interactions. Here we extend and complete our previous finding by showing that structural chromatin types can be inferred from ChIP-Seq data. Chromatin types, which are distinct from DNA sequence, are partially epigenetically controlled and change during cell differentiation, thus constituting a link between epigenetics, chromosomal organization, and cell development. We show that, for GM12878 lymphoblastoid cells we are able to predict accurate chromosome structures with the only input of genomic data. The degree of accuracy achieved by our prediction supports the viability of the proposed physical mechanism of chromatin folding and makes the computational model a powerful tool for future investigations.

  12. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  13. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Sebastián; Panzera, Francisco; Ferrandis, Inés; Galvão, Cleber; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae). The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome) or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes). This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes) and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences. PMID:23778665

  14. Micromechanical study of mitotic chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    2011-03-01

    Our group has developed micromanipulation techniques for study of the highly compacted mitotic form of chromosome found in eukaryote cells during cell division. Each metaphase chromosome contains two duplicate centimeter-long DNA molecules, folded up by proteins into cylindrical structures several microns in length. Native chromosomes display linear and reversible stretching behavior over a wide range of extensions (up to 5x native length for amphibian chromosomes), described by a Young modulus of about 300 Pa. Studies using DNA-cutting and protein-cutting enzymes have revealed that metaphase chromosomes behave as a network of chromatin fibers held together by protein-based isolated crosslinks. Our results are not consistent with the more classical model of loops of chromatin attached to a protein-based structural organizer or ``scaffold". In short, our experiments indicate that metaphase chromosomes can be considered to be ``gels" of chromatin; the stretching modulus of a whole chromosome is consistent with stretching of the chromatin fibers contained within it. Experiments using topoisomerases suggest that topological constraints may play an appreciable role in confining chromatin in the metaphase chromosome. Finally, recent experiments on human chromosomes will be reviewed, including results of experiments where chromosome-folding proteins are specifically depleted using siRNA methods. Supported by NSF-MCB-1022117, DMR-0715099, PHY-0852130, DMR-0520513, NCI 1U54CA143869-01 (NU-PS-OC), and the American Heart Association.

  15. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  16. Utilization of deletion bins to anchor and order sequences along the wheat 7B chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, Tatiana; Grønvold, Lars; Kumar, Ajay; Kianian, Shahryar; He, Xinyao; Lillemo, Morten; Springer, Nathan M; Lien, Sigbjørn; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Sandve, Simen R

    2014-09-01

    A total of 3,671 sequence contigs and scaffolds were mapped to deletion bins on wheat chromosome 7B providing a foundation for developing high-resolution integrated physical map for this chromosome. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has a large, complex and highly repetitive genome which is challenging to assemble into high quality pseudo-chromosomes. As part of the international effort to sequence the hexaploid bread wheat genome by the international wheat genome sequencing consortium (IWGSC) we are focused on assembling a reference sequence for chromosome 7B. The successful completion of the reference chromosome sequence is highly dependent on the integration of genetic and physical maps. To aid the integration of these two types of maps, we have constructed a high-density deletion bin map of chromosome 7B. Using the 270 K Nimblegen comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array on a set of cv. Chinese spring deletion lines, a total of 3,671 sequence contigs and scaffolds (~7.8 % of chromosome 7B physical length) were mapped into nine deletion bins. Our method of genotyping deletions on chromosome 7B relied on a model-based clustering algorithm (Mclust) to accurately predict the presence or absence of a given genomic sequence in a deletion line. The bin mapping results were validated using three different approaches, viz. (a) PCR-based amplification of randomly selected bin mapped sequences (b) comparison with previously mapped ESTs and (c) comparison with a 7B genetic map developed in the present study. Validation of the bin mapping results suggested a high accuracy of the assignment of 7B sequence contigs and scaffolds to the 7B deletion bins.

  17. Refined human artificial chromosome vectors for gene therapy and animal transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuki, Y; Hoshiya, H; Takiguchi, M; Abe, S; Iida, Y; Osaki, M; Katoh, M; Hiratsuka, M; Shirayoshi, Y; Hiramatsu, K; Ueno, E; Kajitani, N; Yoshino, T; Kazuki, K; Ishihara, C; Takehara, S; Tsuji, S; Ejima, F; Toyoda, A; Sakaki, Y; Larionov, V; Kouprina, N; Oshimura, M

    2011-04-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have several advantages as gene therapy vectors, including stable episomal maintenance, and the ability to carry large gene inserts. We previously developed HAC vectors from the normal human chromosomes using a chromosome engineering technique. However, endogenous genes were remained in these HACs, limiting their therapeutic applications. In this study, we refined a HAC vector without endogenous genes from human chromosome 21 in homologous recombination-proficient chicken DT40 cells. The HAC was physically characterized using a transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning strategy followed by sequencing of TAR-bacterial artificial chromosome clones. No endogenous genes were remained in the HAC. We demonstrated that any desired gene can be cloned into the HAC using the Cre-loxP system in Chinese hamster ovary cells, or a homologous recombination system in DT40 cells. The HAC can be efficiently transferred to other type of cells including mouse ES cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. The transferred HAC was stably maintained in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, tumor cells containing a HAC carrying the suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), were selectively killed by ganciclovir in vitro and in vivo. Thus, this novel HAC vector may be useful not only for gene and cell therapy, but also for animal transgenesis.

  18. Chromosomal Replication Complexity: A Novel DNA Metrics and Genome Instability Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Kuzminov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As the ratio of the copy number of the most replicated to the unreplicated regions in the same chromosome, the definition of chromosomal replication complexity (CRC appears to leave little room for variation, being either two during S-phase or one otherwise. However, bacteria dividing faster than they replicate their chromosome spike CRC to four and even eight. A recent experimental inquiry about the limits of CRC in Escherichia coli revealed two major reasons to avoid elevating it further: (i increased chromosomal fragmentation and (ii complications with subsequent double-strand break repair. Remarkably, examples of stable elevated CRC in eukaryotic chromosomes are well known under various terms like "differential replication," "underreplication," "DNA puffs," "onion-skin replication," or "re-replication" and highlight the phenomenon of static replication fork (sRF. To accurately describe the resulting "amplification by overinitiation," I propose a new term: "replification" (subchromosomal overreplication. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, replification, via sRF processing, causes double-strand DNA breaks and, with their repair elevating chromosomal rearrangements, represents a novel genome instability factor. I suggest how static replication bubbles could be stabilized and speculate that some tandem duplications represent such persistent static bubbles. Moreover, I propose how static replication bubbles could be transformed into tandem duplications, double minutes, or inverted triplications. Possible experimental tests of these models are discussed.

  19. Efficient engineering of chromosomal ribosome binding site libraries in mismatch repair proficient Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, Sabine; Gerngross, Daniel; Schmitt, Steven; Roberts, Tania Michelle; Panke, Sven

    2017-09-26

    Multiplexed gene expression optimization via modulation of gene translation efficiency through ribosome binding site (RBS) engineering is a valuable approach for optimizing artificial properties in bacteria, ranging from genetic circuits to production pathways. Established algorithms design smart RBS-libraries based on a single partially-degenerate sequence that efficiently samples the entire space of translation initiation rates. However, the sequence space that is accessible when integrating the library by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing is severely restricted by DNA mismatch repair (MMR) systems. MMR efficiency depends on the type and length of the mismatch and thus effectively removes potential library members from the pool. Rather than working in MMR-deficient strains, which accumulate off-target mutations, or depending on temporary MMR inactivation, which requires additional steps, we eliminate this limitation by developing a pre-selection rule of genome-library-optimized-sequences (GLOS) that enables introducing large functional diversity into MMR-proficient strains with sequences that are no longer subject to MMR-processing. We implement several GLOS-libraries in Escherichia coli and show that GLOS-libraries indeed retain diversity during genome editing and that such libraries can be used in complex genome editing operations such as concomitant deletions. We argue that this approach allows for stable and efficient fine tuning of chromosomal functions with minimal effort.

  20. PREFERENTIAL SEGREGATION OF CHROMOSOMES FROM A TRIVALENT IN HAPLOPAPPUS GRACILIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JACKSON, R C

    1964-07-31

    Crosses between plants of Haplopappus gracilis (n = 2) and a race with three pairs of chromosomes (tribivalens) gave a highly fertile five-chromosome hybrid. In both races the chromosomes with the satellites appear homologous, but the other two tribivalens chromosomes pair with the A chromosome (without a satellite) of H. gracilis. Disjunction from the resulting trivalent is preferential: the A chromosome goes to one pole and the two tribivalens chromosomes to the other.

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in human glioblastomas: gain in chromosome 7p correlating with loss in chromosome 10q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María del Mar; Fan, Xing; Muñoz, Jorge; Perot, Christine; Fauvet, Didier; Danglot, Giselle; Palacio, Ana; Madero, Pilar; Zazpe, Idoya; Portillo, Eduardo; Tuñón, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Alfaro, Jorge; Eiras, José; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2003-01-01

    Various genomic alterations have been detected in glioblastoma. Chromosome 7p, with the epidermal growth factor receptor locus, together with chromosome 10q, with the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10 and deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 loci, and chromosome 9p, with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A locus, are among the most frequently damaged chromosomal regions in glioblastoma. In this study, we evaluated the genetic status of 32 glioblastomas by comparative genomic hybridization; the sensitivity of comparative genomic hybridization versus differential polymerase chain reaction to detect deletions at the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10, deleted in malignant brain tumors-1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A loci and amplifications at the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 locus; the frequency of genetic lesions (gain or loss) at 16 different selected loci (including oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and proliferation markers) mapping on 13 different chromosomes; and the possible existence of a statistical association between any pair of molecular markers studied, to subdivide the glioblastoma entity molecularly. Comparative genomic hybridization showed that the most frequent region of gain was chromosome 7p, whereas the most frequent losses occurred on chromosomes 10q and 13q. The only statistically significant association was found for 7p gain and 10q loss. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed.

  3. Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education ... Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research Intellectual ...

  4. Frequent induction of chromosomal aberrations in in vivo skin fibroblasts after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: hints to chromosomal instability after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massenkeil, G.; Zschieschang, P.; Thiel, G.; Hemmati, P. G.; Budach, V.; Dörken, B.; Pross, J.; Arnold, R.

    2015-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been part of standard conditioning regimens before allogeneic stem cell transplantation for many years. Its effect on normal tissue in these patients has not been studied extensively. We studied the in vivo cytogenetic effects of TBI and high-dose chemotherapy on skin fibroblasts from 35 allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) patients. Biopsies were obtained prospectively (n = 18 patients) before, 3 and 12 months after allogeneic SCT and retrospectively (n = 17 patients) 23–65 months after SCT for G-banded chromosome analysis. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 2/18 patients (11 %) before allogeneic SCT, in 12/13 patients (92 %) after 3 months, in all patients after 12 months and in all patients in the retrospective group after allogeneic SCT. The percentage of aberrant cells was significantly higher at all times after allogeneic SCT compared to baseline analysis. Reciprocal translocations were the most common aberrations, but all other types of stable, structural chromosomal aberrations were also observed. Clonal aberrations were observed, but only in three cases they were detected in independently cultured flasks. A tendency to non-random clustering throughout the genome was observed. The percentage of aberrant cells was not different between patients with and without secondary malignancies in this study group. High-dose chemotherapy and TBI leads to severe chromosomal damage in skin fibroblasts of patients after SCT. Our long-term data suggest that this damage increases with time, possibly due to in vivo radiation-induced chromosomal instability

  5. Stable chaos in fluctuation driven neural circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angulo-Garcia, David; Torcini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nonlinear instabilities in fluctuation driven (balanced) neural circuits are studied. • Balanced networks display chaos and stable phases at different post-synaptic widths. • Linear instabilities coexists with nonlinear ones in the chaotic regime. • Erratic motion appears also in linearly stable phase due to stable chaos. - Abstract: We study the dynamical stability of pulse coupled networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons against infinitesimal and finite perturbations. In particular, we compare mean versus fluctuations driven networks, the former (latter) is realized by considering purely excitatory (inhibitory) sparse neural circuits. In the excitatory case the instabilities of the system can be completely captured by an usual linear stability (Lyapunov) analysis, whereas the inhibitory networks can display the coexistence of linear and nonlinear instabilities. The nonlinear effects are associated to finite amplitude instabilities, which have been characterized in terms of suitable indicators. For inhibitory coupling one observes a transition from chaotic to non chaotic dynamics by decreasing the pulse-width. For sufficiently fast synapses the system, despite showing an erratic evolution, is linearly stable, thus representing a prototypical example of stable chaos

  6. Chromosome engineering: power tools for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Simon W L

    2010-12-01

    The term "chromosome engineering" describes technologies in which chromosomes are manipulated to change their mode of genetic inheritance. This review examines recent innovations in chromosome engineering that promise to greatly increase the efficiency of plant breeding. Haploid Arabidopsis thaliana have been produced by altering the kinetochore protein CENH3, yielding instant homozygous lines. Haploid production will facilitate reverse breeding, a method that downregulates recombination to ensure progeny contain intact parental chromosomes. Another chromosome engineering success is the conversion of meiosis into mitosis, which produces diploid gametes that are clones of the parent plant. This is a key step in apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) and could help to preserve hybrid vigor in the future. New homologous recombination methods in plants will potentiate many chromosome engineering applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Formation of radiation induced chromosome aberrations: involvement of telomeric sequences and telomerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirzio, L.

    2004-07-15

    As telomeres are crucial for chromosome integrity; we investigated the role played by telomeric sequences in the formation and in the transmission of radio-induced chromosome rearrangements in human cells. Starting from interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) as putative region of breakage, we showed that the radiation sensitivity is not equally distributed along chromosomes and. is not affected by ITS. On the contrary, plasmid integration sites are prone to radio-induced breaks, suggesting a possible integration at sites already characterized by fragility. However plasmids do not preferentially insert at radio-induced breaks in human cells immortalized by telomerase. These cells showed remarkable karyotype stability even after irradiation, suggesting a role of telomerase in the genome maintenance despite functional telomeres. Finally, we showed that the presence of more breaks in a cell favors the repair, leading to an increase of transmissible rearrangements. (author)

  8. Formation of radiation induced chromosome aberrations: involvement of telomeric sequences and telomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirzio, L.

    2004-07-01

    As telomeres are crucial for chromosome integrity; we investigated the role played by telomeric sequences in the formation and in the transmission of radio-induced chromosome rearrangements in human cells. Starting from interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) as putative region of breakage, we showed that the radiation sensitivity is not equally distributed along chromosomes and. is not affected by ITS. On the contrary, plasmid integration sites are prone to radio-induced breaks, suggesting a possible integration at sites already characterized by fragility. However plasmids do not preferentially insert at radio-induced breaks in human cells immortalized by telomerase. These cells showed remarkable karyotype stability even after irradiation, suggesting a role of telomerase in the genome maintenance despite functional telomeres. Finally, we showed that the presence of more breaks in a cell favors the repair, leading to an increase of transmissible rearrangements. (author)

  9. Coexistence of Y, W, and Z sex chromosomes in Xenopus tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roco, Álvaro S.; Olmstead, Allen W.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Amano, Tosikazu; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Bullejos, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Homomorphic sex chromosomes and rapid turnover of sex-determining genes can complicate establishing the sex chromosome system operating in a given species. This difficulty exists in Xenopus tropicalis, an anuran quickly becoming a relevant model for genetic, genomic, biochemical, and ecotoxicological research. Despite the recent interest attracted by this species, little is known about its sex chromosome system. Direct evidence that females are the heterogametic sex, as in the related species Xenopus laevis, has yet to be presented. Furthermore, X. laevis’ sex-determining gene, DM-W, does not exist in X. tropicalis, and the sex chromosomes in the two species are not homologous. Here we identify X. tropicalis’ sex chromosome system by integrating data from (i) breeding sex-reversed individuals, (ii) gynogenesis, (iii) triploids, and (iv) crosses among several strains. Our results indicate that at least three different types of sex chromosomes exist: Y, W, and Z, observed in YZ, YW, and ZZ males and in ZW and WW females. Because some combinations of parental sex chromosomes produce unisex offspring and other distorted sex ratios, understanding the sex-determination systems in X. tropicalis is critical for developing this flexible animal model for genetics and ecotoxicology. PMID:26216983

  10. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  11. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  12. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset complex neurobiological disorder characterized by a combination of persistent motor and vocal tics and frequent presence of other neuropsychiatric comorbidities. TS shares the fate of other complex disorders, where the genetic etiology is largely unknown...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  13. Advances in plant chromosome genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Šimková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2014), s. 122-136 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : BAC library * Chromosome sorting * Cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.015, year: 2014

  14. Stable Core, Shifting Periphery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravier, Magali

    The paper discusses the usefulness of the concept of empire in the study of the European Union, the integration process and the development EU’s external relations. In order to do so, it reflects critically on the use of this concept in the broader context of contemporary polities and selected...

  15. The U2 snDNA Is a Useful Marker for B Chromosome Detection and Frequency Estimation in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Diogo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio M; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we describe a strategy to determine the presence of B chromosomes in the living grasshopper Abracris flavolineata by FISH using U2 snDNA as a probe in interphase hemolymph nuclei. In individuals without B chromosomes, (0B) 2 dot signals were noticed, corresponding to A complement U2 snDNA clusters. In +1B and +2B individuals, 4 or 8 additional signals were noticed, respectively. In all cases, the absence or presence of 1 or 2 B chromosomes correlated in hemolymph and in somatic or germline tissues, validating the efficiency of the marker. Our data suggest that the B chromosome of A. flavolineata is present in all somatic tissues. B-carrying individuals showed the same number of B chromosomes in germ and somatic cells, suggesting that the B is mitotically stable. The marker was used to compare B chromosome frequency in the analyzed population with a sample collected previously, in order to test for B frequency changes and differences of B chromosome prevalence among sexes, but no statistically significant differences were noticed. The identification of living animals harboring B chromosomes will be very useful in future studies of B chromosome transmission, as well as in functional studies involving RNA analysis, thus contributing to the understanding of evolutionary history and the possible role of the B chromosome in A. flavolineata. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Introgression of Chromosome 3Ns from Psathyrostachys huashanica into Wheat Specifying Resistance to Stripe Rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Houyang; Wang, Yi; Fedak, George; Cao, Wenguang; Zhang, Haiqin; Fan, Xing; Sha, Lina; Xu, Lili; Zheng, Youliang; Zhou, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust is a destructive disease in the cool and humid wheat-growing areas of the world. Finding diverse sources of stripe rust resistance is critical for increasing genetic diversity of resistance for wheat breeding programs. Stripe rust resistance was identified in the alien species Psathyrostachys huashanica, and a wheat- P. huashanica amphiploid line (PHW-SA) with stripe rust resistance was reported previously. In this study, a P. huashanica 3Ns monosomic addition line (PW11) with superior resistance to stripe rust was developed, which was derived from the cross between PHW-SA and wheat J-11. We evaluated the alien introgressions PW11-2, PW11-5 and PW11-8 which were derived from line PW11 for reaction to new Pst race CYR32, and used molecular and cytogenetic tools to characterize these lines. The introgressions were remarkably resistant to CYR32, suggesting that the resistance to stripe rust of the introgressions thus was controlled by gene(s) located on P. huashanica chromosome 3Ns. All derived lines were cytologically stable in term of meiotic chromosome behavior. Two 3Ns chromosomes of P. huashanica were detected in the disomic addition line PW11-2. Chromosomes 1B of substitution line PW11-5 had been replaced by a pair of P. huashanica 3Ns chromosomes. In PW11-8, a small terminal segment from P. huashanica chromosome arm 3NsS was translocated to the terminal region of wheat chromosomes 3BL. Thus, this translocated chromosome is designated T3BL-3NsS. These conclusions were further confirmed by SSR analyses. Two 3Ns-specific markers Xgwm181 and Xgwm161 will be useful to rapidly identify and trace the translocated fragments. These introgressions, which had significant characteristics of resistance to stripe rust, could be utilized as novel germplasms for wheat breeding. PMID:21760909

  17. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit.

  18. Chromosome heteromorphisms in the Japanese, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofuni, Toshio; Awa, A.A.

    1982-12-01

    The type and frequency of chromosome variants detected by the C-staining method were ascertained in 1,857 individuals residing in Hiroshima. The most frequent heteromorphic variant was the total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 9 found in 27 individuals (1.45%). The total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was not seen in this sample, but the partial inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was found in 18 persons (0.97%). Partial inversion was also detected in the C-band in chromosome 9 in 22 individuals (1.18%). In chromosome 16, neither total nor partial inversion of the C-band was observed in the present study. The frequencies of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 with a very large C-band were 0.70%, 0.22%, and 0.54%, respectively. Aside from these (1, 9, and 16) a very large C-band was found occasionally in chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 15, and an unusual insertion of the Y chromosome was observed. A total of 128 C-band variants (6.89%) was found in the 1,857 Hiroshima residents. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common Trombophilic Mutations in Cases with Recurrent Miscarriage. Ahmet Karatas, Recep Eroz, Mustafa Albayrak, Tulay Ozlu, Bulent Cakmak, Fatih Keskin ...

  20. Chromosomal aberrations in ore miners of Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beno, M.; Vladar, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Vicanova, M.; Durcik, M.

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was performed in which the incidence of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners in ore mines located in Central Slovakia was monitored and related to lifetime underground radon exposure and to lifetime smoking. The conclusions drawn from the results of the study were as follows: the counts of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners were significantly higher than in an age matched control group of white-collar staff; the higher counts of chromosomal aberrations could be ascribed to underground exposure of miners and to smoking; a dependence of chromosomal aberration counts on the exposure to radon could not be assessed. (A.K.)

  1. Chromosome mapping by FISH to metaphase and interphase nuclei. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.

    1997-08-01

    The overall specific aims of this project were: (1) to determine the large-scale structure of interphase and metaphase chromosomes, in order to establish new capabilities for genome mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); (2) to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with genetic disease and map DNA sequences relative to them in order to facilitate the identification of new genes with disease-causing mutations; (3) to establish medium resolution physical maps of selected chromosomal regions using a combined metaphase and interphase mapping strategy and to corroborate physical and genetic maps and integrate these maps with the cytogenetic map; (4) to analyze the polymorphism and sequence evolution of subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes; (5) to establish a state-of-the-art FISH and image processing facility in the Department of Molecular Biotechnology, University of Washington, in order to map DNA sequences rapidly and accurately to benefit the Human Genome Project.

  2. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-01-01

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  3. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  4. Stabilization of chromosomes by DNA intercalators for flow karyotyping and identification by banding of isolated chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J. A.; Buys, C. H.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Mesa, J. R.; Yu, L. C.; Gray, J. W.; Osinga, J.; Stap, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of structurally unrelated DNA intercalators have been studied as stabilizers of mitotic chromosomes during isolation from rodent and human metaphase cells. Seven out of the nine intercalators tested were found to be useful as chromosome stabilizing agents. Chromosome suspensions prepared in

  5. Exchange of core chromosomes and horizontal transfer of lineage-specific chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, I.; Beerens, B.; Rose, L.; Fokkens, L.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of supernumerary or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes has been described in a number of plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. So far it was not known whether transfer is restricted to chromosomes of certain size or properties, or whether 'core' chromosomes can also undergo

  6. Numerical Contour Integration for Loop Integrals

    OpenAIRE

    Kurihara, Y.; Kaneko, T.

    2005-01-01

    A fully numerical method to calculate loop integrals, a numerical contour-integration method, is proposed. Loop integrals can be interpreted as a contour integral in a complex plane for an integrand with multi-poles in the plane. Stable and efficient numerical integrations an along appropriate contour can be performed for tensor integrals as well as for scalar ones appearing in loop calculations of the standard model. Examples of 3- and 4-point diagrams in 1-loop integrals and 2- and 3-point ...

  7. The X chromosome of monotremes shares a highly conserved region with the eutherian and marsupial X chromosomes despite the absence of X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.; Graves, J.A.M. (La Trobe Univ., Bundoora, Victoria (Australia)); Riggs, A.D. (Beckman Inst., Duarte, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Eight genes, located on the long arm of the human X chromosome and present on the marsupial X chromosome, were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomes of the platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus, one of the three species of monotreme mammals. All were located on the X chromosome. The authors conclude that the long arm of the human X chromosome represents a highly conserved region that formed part of the X chromosome in a mammalian ancestor at least 150 million years ago. Since three of these genes are located on the long arm of the platypus X chromosome, which is G-band homologous to the Y chromosome and apparently exempt from X chromosome inactivation, the conservation of this region has evidently not depended on isolation by X-Y chromosome differentiation and X chromosome inactivation.

  8. DNA amount of X and B chromosomes in the grasshoppers Eyprepocnemis plorans and Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Ruiz-Estévez, M; Rodríguez-Pérez, J; López-Pino, J L; Cabrero, J; Camacho, J P M

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the DNA amount in X and B chromosomes of 2 XX/X0 grasshopper species (Eyprepocnemis plorans and Locusta migratoria), by means of Feulgen image analysis densitometry (FIAD), using previous estimates in L. migratoria as standard (5.89 pg). We first analyzed spermatids of 0B males and found a bimodal distribution of integrated optical densities (IODs), suggesting that one peak corresponded to +X and the other to -X spermatids. The difference between the 2 peaks corresponded to the X chromosome DNA amount, which was 1.28 pg in E. plorans and 0.80 pg in L. migratoria. In addition, the +X peak in E. plorans gave an estimate of the C-value in this species (10.39 pg). We next analyzed diplotene cells from 1B males in E. plorans and +B males in L. migratoria (a species where Bs are mitotically unstable and no integer B number can be defined for an individual) and measured B chromosome IOD relative to X chromosome IOD, within the same cell, taking advantage of the similar degree of condensation for both positively heteropycnotic chromosomes at this meiotic stage. From this proportion, we estimated the DNA amount for 3 different B chromosome variants found in individuals from 3 E. plorans Spanish populations (0.54 pg for B1 from Saladares, 0.51 pg for B2 from Salobreña and 0.64 for B24 from Torrox). Likewise, we estimated the DNA amount of the B chromosome in L. migratoria to be 0.15 pg. To automate measurements, we wrote a GPL3 licensed Python program (pyFIA). We discuss the utility of the present approach for estimating X and B chromosome DNA amount in a variety of situations, and the meaning of the DNA amount estimates for X and B chromosomes in these 2 species. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. A neocentromere on human chromosome 3 without detectable alpha-satellite DNA forms morphologically normal kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, A; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A neocentromere at 3q26 was observed in a father and his daughter on a chromosome 3 with deleted centromeric region. No alpha-satellite DNA was detectable at the 3q26 neocentromere, but it was weakly positive with anticentromere (CREST) antibodies. Electron microscopy showed that the neocentromere...... formed microtubule-associated kinetochores with normal morphology and of the same size as the kinetochores of other large chromosomes. The deleted centromere formed a small linear marker chromosome that reacted strongly with anticentromere antibodies, but showed reduced kinetochore size. The 3q26...... neokinetochore was stable under adverse growth conditions, which often caused kinetochore loss in the original 3-centromere on the small marker....

  10. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  11. Process for assembly and transformation into Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a synthetic yeast artificial chromosome containing a multigene cassette to express enzymes that enhance xylose utilization designed for an automated pla

    Science.gov (United States)

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing a multigene cassette for expression of enzymes that enhance xylose utilization (xylose isomerase [XI] and xylulokinase [XKS]) was constructed and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate feasibility as a stable protein expression system ...

  12. Chromosome studies in Cashew ( Anacardium occidentale L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the increased cultivation of cashew as a commodity crop in sub-Sahara Africa, Asia and South America there are few chromosome studies on it. The present study investigates number, structure and behavior of chromosome in cashew populations growing in Nigeria. Cytological examination of these populations ...

  13. Flow Analysis and Sorting of Plant Chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Šimková, Hana; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Čížková, Jana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Oct 10 (2016), 5.3.1-5.3.43 ISSN 1934-9300 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : cell cycle synchronization * chromosome genomics * chromosome isolation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  14. How to Protect the Chromosomal Ends?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 6. How to Protect the Chromosomal Ends? - Telomerase, Chromosome Stability and Aging. Anurag N Paranjape Annapoorni Rangarajan. General Article Volume 15 Issue 6 June 2010 pp 538-547 ...

  15. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...

  16. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 1. (a–i) Putative novel genes created by the breakpoints. Translocation chromosomes are shown with the translocated segment indicated in red and the untranslocated segments in black or blue. Purple arrows indicate whether the chromosome is a donor (arrow pointing up) or a recipient (arrow ...

  17. Chromosomal evolution and phylogenetic analyses in Tayassu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The phylogenetic relationships among the tayassuids are unclear and have insti- gated debate over the ... [Adega F., Chaves R. and Guedes-Pinto H. 2007 Chromosomal evolution and phylogenetic analyses in Tayassu pecari and Pecari tajacu. (Tayassuidae): tales ..... Chromosome banding in Amphibia. XXV. Karyotype ...

  18. P chromosomes involved in intergenomic rearrangements of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-08

    Apr 8, 2014 ... Total genomic DNA were extracted from young leaves of. Pseudoroegneria spicata (2n = 2x ... ments of Y chromosomes for GISH (a); pAs1 repetitive DNA probe signal is green,. pHvG39 repetitive DNA probe ... 2010). Compared to the other P chromosomes, it is easier to exchange and rearrange for the.

  19. CHROMOSOME STUDY OF SOME GRASSHOPPER SPECIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, this research is aimed at studying the chromosomes of some Ethiopian grasshopper species. The grasshopper specimens used in this study were collected from eight localities in central Ethiopia. The specimens were identified as belonging to two families (Acrididae and Tetrigidae). Chromosome preparations were ...

  20. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... Abstract. X-chromosome inactivation, which was discovered by Mary Lyon in 1961 results in random silencing of one X chromosome in female mammals. This review is dedicated to Mary Lyon, who passed away last year. She predicted many of the features of X inactivation, for e.g., the existence of an X ...

  1. AFM image of an entire polygene chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minqian; Takeuchi; Ikai, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author present AFM images of an entire polygene chromosome of Drosophila for the first time. Comparing with conventional optical microscope, the AFM image of the polygene chromosomes provides much higher resolution and 3-D measurement capability which will lead to finer scale gene mapping and identification

  2. Know Your Chromosomes -R-ES-ONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hybrid cells. Each clone of cellsl in the library, would contain only one or a pair of human chromosomes, plus a background of mouse chromosomes. Cell fusions have been carried out not only between human and mouse cells but also between human and. Vani Brahmachari is at the Developmental. Biology and Genetics.

  3. Cat-eye syndrome with unusual marker chromosome probably not chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, W; Verma, R S; Jhaveri, R C

    1984-05-01

    An unusual supernumerary chromosome with a single satellite on the long arm was found in a child with manifestations of the cat-eye syndrome including apparently low-set and malformed ears, preauricular tags, micrognathia, and imperforate anus. Although G-banding suggested that this extra material was chromosome 22, this was not confirmed by several other banding techniques. After examination of the parents' chromosomes, the nature and origin of this extra chromosome remains obscure. We conclude that patients previously diagnosed as having "partial trisomy 22" with incomplete cat-eye syndrome may have a different chromosome constitution when studied by various banding techniques.

  4. A chromosome-centric human proteome project (C-HPP) to characterize the sets of proteins encoded in chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suli; Im, Hogune; Bairoch, Amos; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Chen, Rui; Deutsch, Eric W; Dalton, Stephen; Fenyo, David; Fanayan, Susan; Gates, Chris; Gaudet, Pascale; Hincapie, Marina; Hanash, Samir; Kim, Hoguen; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lundberg, Emma; Mias, George; Menon, Rajasree; Mu, Zhaomei; Nice, Edouard; Paik, Young-Ki; Uhlen, Mathias; Wells, Lance; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Yan, Fangfei; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Snyder, Michael; Omenn, Gilbert S; Beavis, Ronald C; Hancock, William S

    2013-01-04

    We report progress assembling the parts list for chromosome 17 and illustrate the various processes that we have developed to integrate available data from diverse genomic and proteomic knowledge bases. As primary resources, we have used GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, Human Protein Atlas (HPA), and GeneCards. All sites share the common resource of Ensembl for the genome modeling information. We have defined the chromosome 17 parts list with the following information: 1169 protein-coding genes, the numbers of proteins confidently identified by various experimental approaches as documented in GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and HPA, examples of typical data sets obtained by RNASeq and proteomic studies of epithelial derived tumor cell lines (disease proteome) and a normal proteome (peripheral mononuclear cells), reported evidence of post-translational modifications, and examples of alternative splice variants (ASVs). We have constructed a list of the 59 "missing" proteins as well as 201 proteins that have inconclusive mass spectrometric (MS) identifications. In this report we have defined a process to establish a baseline for the incorporation of new evidence on protein identification and characterization as well as related information from transcriptome analyses. This initial list of "missing" proteins that will guide the selection of appropriate samples for discovery studies as well as antibody reagents. Also we have illustrated the significant diversity of protein variants (including post-translational modifications, PTMs) using regions on chromosome 17 that contain important oncogenes. We emphasize the need for mandated deposition of proteomics data in public databases, the further development of improved PTM, ASV, and single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases, and the construction of Web sites that can integrate and regularly update such information. In addition, we describe the distribution of both clustered and scattered sets of protein families on the

  5. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sex chromosomes exhibit many unusual patterns in sequence and gene expression relative to autosomes. Birds have evolved a female heterogametic sex system (male ZZ, female ZW), through stepwise suppression of recombination between chrZ and chrW. To address the broad patterns and complex...... driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... ('fast-Z' evolution). And species with a lower level of intronic heterozygosities tend to evolve even faster on the Z chromosome. Further analysis of fast-evolving genes' enriched functional categories and sex-biased expression patterns support that, fast-Z evolution in birds is mainly driven by genetic...

  6. Review of the Y chromosome and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ely

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The Y chromosome from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR has a locus that raises blood pressure 20-25 mmHg. Associated with the SHR Y chromosome effect is a 4-week earlier pubertal rise of testosterone and dependence upon the androgen receptor for the full blood pressure effect. Several indices of enhanced sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity are also associated with the SHR Y chromosome. Blockade of SNS outflow reduced the blood pressure effect. Salt sensitivity was increased by the Y chromosome as was salt appetite which was SNS dependent. A strong correlation (r = 0.57, P<0.001 was demonstrable between plasma testosterone and angiotensin II. Coronary collagen increased with blood pressure and the presence of the SHR Y chromosome. A promising candidate gene for the Y effect is the Sry locus (testis determining factor, a transcription factor which may also have other functions.

  7. Chromosomal damage at bone-marrow cells is induced by exposure of rats to waterpipe water filtrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Mohammad A; Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alzubi, Mohammad A; Masadeh, Majed M; Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K

    2018-04-03

    Waterpipe smoking is continuing to spread globally. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of waterpipe water filtrate on chromosomal integrity in the bone-marrow cells of rats. Chromosomal damage was examined using in vivo chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and SCEs assays. Young Wistar male rats were exposed to WWF via drinking water. Chromosomal damage was measured in bone marrow cells after 6 weeks of treatment using fluorescent-plus-Giemsa staining. Treatment of rats with waterpipe water filtrate for 6 weeks did not affect food/liquid consumption and gain in body weight. The results showed that waterpipe water filtrate increased the frequencies of chromosomal breaks and exchanges by more than 30% (p < 0.01). In addition, waterpipe water filtrate significantly increased SCEs in the bone-marrow cells of rats. In conclusion, waterpipe water filtrate contains genotoxic compounds providing additional evidence for genotoxicity of waterpipe smoke.

  8. Comparison of mitotic cell death by chromosome fragmentation to premature chromosome condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bremer Steven W

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitotic cell death is an important form of cell death, particularly in cancer. Chromosome fragmentation is a major form of mitotic cell death which is identifiable during common cytogenetic analysis by its unique phenotype of progressively degraded chromosomes. This morphology however, can appear similar to the morphology of premature chromosome condensation (PCC and thus, PCC has been at times confused with chromosome fragmentation. In this analysis the phenomena of chromosome fragmentation and PCC are reviewed and their similarities and differences are discussed in order to facilitate differentiation of the similar morphologies. Furthermore, chromosome pulverization, which has been used almost synonymously with PCC, is re-examined. Interestingly, many past reports of chromosome pulverization are identified here as chromosome fragmentation and not PCC. These reports describe broad ranging mechanisms of pulverization induction and agree with recent evidence showing chromosome fragmentation is a cellular response to stress. Finally, biological aspects of chromosome fragmentation are discussed, including its application as one form of non-clonal chromosome aberration (NCCA, the driving force of cancer evolution.

  9. The Y chromosome of the Atelidae family (Platyrrhini): study by chromosome microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifalli-Iughetti, C; Koiffmann, C P

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the intergeneric variability of the Y chromosome, we describe the hybridization of the Y chromosome of Brachytelesarachnoides, obtained by microdissection, to metaphases of Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus, Lagothrixlagothricha, and Alouatta male specimens. Brachytelesarachnoides (Atelinae) has 62 chromosomes and a very small Y chromosome. Our results showed that the Brachytelesarachnoides Y chromosome probe hybridized to Lagothrixlagothricha metaphases yielding one hybridization signal on only the tiny Y chromosome, and when hybridized with Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus metaphases it yielded one hybridization signal on two thirds of the small acrocentric Y chromosome. However, no hybridization signal was observed in Alouatta metaphases (subfamily Alouattinae), a closely related genus in the Atelidae family. Furthermore, our data support a close phylogenetic relationship among Brachyteles, Ateles, and Lagothrix and their placement in the Atelinae subfamily, but exclude Alouatta from this group indicating its placement as basal to this group. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis to AnalyzeSchizosaccharomyces pombeChromosomes and Chromosomal Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Walker, Carol; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2018-04-02

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) uses alternatively oriented pulsed electrical fields to separate large DNA molecules. Here, we describe PFGE protocols and conditions for separating and visualizing chromosomes between 0.5 and 6 Mb (optimal for analyzing the endogenous fission yeast chromosomes of 5.7, 4.6, and 3.5 Mb), and for shorter chromosomal elements of between 50 and 600 kb, such as the 530 kb Ch 16 minichromosome. In addition to determining chromosome size, this technique has a wide range of applications, including determining whether DNA replication or repair is complete, defining the molecular karyotype of cells, analyzing chromosomal rearrangements, assigning genes or constructs to particular chromosomes, and isolating DNA from specific chromosomes. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Chromosome differentiation patterns during cichlid fish evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirchio Mauro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation which has led to an extensive ecological diversity and their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To increase our understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, karyotypes of one Asian, 22 African, and 30 South American cichlid species were investigated, and chromosomal data of the family was reviewed. Results Although there is extensive variation in the karyotypes of cichlid fishes (from 2n = 32 to 2n = 60 chromosomes, the modal chromosome number for South American species was 2n = 48 and the modal number for the African ones was 2n = 44. The only Asian species analyzed, Etroplus maculatus, was observed to have 46 chromosomes. The presence of one or two macro B chromosomes was detected in two African species. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene revealed a variable number of clusters among species varying from two to six. Conclusions The karyotype diversification of cichlids seems to have occurred through several chromosomal rearrangements involving fissions, fusions and inversions. It was possible to identify karyotype markers for the subfamilies Pseudocrenilabrinae (African and Cichlinae (American. The karyotype analyses did not clarify the phylogenetic relationship among the Cichlinae tribes. On the other hand, the two major groups of Pseudocrenilabrinae (tilapiine and haplochromine were clearly discriminated based on the characteristics of their karyotypes. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene did not follow the chromosome diversification in the family. The dynamic evolution of the repeated units of rRNA genes generates patterns of chromosomal distribution that do not help follows the phylogenetic relationships among taxa. The presence of B chromosomes in cichlids is of particular interest because they may not be represented in

  12. Standard guidelines for the chromosome-centric human proteome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Young-Ki; Omenn, Gilbert S; Uhlen, Mathias; Hanash, Samir; Marko-Varga, György; Aebersold, Ruedi; Bairoch, Amos; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Legrain, Pierre; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Na, Keun; Jeong, Seul-Ki; He, Fuchu; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Nishimura, Toshihide; Keown, Paul; Baker, Mark S; Yoo, Jong Shin; Garin, Jerome; Archakov, Alexander; Bergeron, John; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Hancock, William S

    2012-04-06

    The objective of the international Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is to map and annotate all proteins encoded by the genes on each human chromosome. The C-HPP consortium was established to organize a collaborative network among the research teams responsible for protein mapping of individual chromosomes and to identify compelling biological and genetic mechanisms influencing colocated genes and their protein products. The C-HPP aims to foster the development of proteome analysis and integration of the findings from related molecular -omics technology platforms through collaborations among universities, industries, and private research groups. The C-HPP consortium leadership has elicited broad input for standard guidelines to manage these international efforts more efficiently by mobilizing existing resources and collaborative networks. The C-HPP guidelines set out the collaborative consensus of the C-HPP teams, introduce topics associated with experimental approaches, data production, quality control, treatment, and transparency of data, governance of the consortium, and collaborative benefits. A companion approach for the Biology and Disease-Driven HPP (B/D-HPP) component of the Human Proteome Project is currently being organized, building upon the Human Proteome Organization's organ-based and biofluid-based initiatives (www.hupo.org/research). The common application of these guidelines in the participating laboratories is expected to facilitate the goal of a comprehensive analysis of the human proteome.

  13. A Viral Immunity Chromosome in the Marine Picoeukaryote, Ostreococcus tauri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheree Yau

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-algae of the genus Ostreococcus and related species of the order Mamiellales are globally distributed in the photic zone of world's oceans where they contribute to fixation of atmospheric carbon and production of oxygen, besides providing a primary source of nutrition in the food web. Their tiny size, simple cells, ease of culture, compact genomes and susceptibility to the most abundant large DNA viruses in the sea render them attractive as models for integrative marine biology. In culture, spontaneous resistance to viruses occurs frequently. Here, we show that virus-producing resistant cell lines arise in many independent cell lines during lytic infections, but over two years, more and more of these lines stop producing viruses. We observed sweeping over-expression of all genes in more than half of chromosome 19 in resistant lines, and karyotypic analyses showed physical rearrangements of this chromosome. Chromosome 19 has an unusual genetic structure whose equivalent is found in all of the sequenced genomes in this ecologically important group of green algae.

  14. Transfer of stem cells carrying engineered chromosomes with XY clone laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, Ildiko; Katona, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Current transgenic technologies for gene transfer into the germline of mammals cause a random integration of exogenous naked DNA into the host genome that can generate undesirable position effects as well as insertional mutations. The vectors used to generate transgenic animals are limited by the amount of foreign DNA they can carry. Mammalian artificial chromosomes have large DNA-carrying capacity and ability to replicate in parallel with, but without integration into, the host genome. Hence they are attractive vectors for transgenesis, cellular protein production, and gene therapy applications as well. ES cells mediated chromosome transfer by conventional blastocyst injection has a limitation in unpredictable germline transmission. The demonstrated protocol of laser-assisted microinjection of artificial chromosome containing ES cells into eight-cell mouse embryos protocol described here can solve the problem for faster production of germline transchromosomic mice.

  15. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  16. Dynamical attraction to stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Albert M.; Talet, Marina

    2012-01-01

    We apply dynamical ideas within probability theory, proving an almost-sure invariance principle in log density for stable processes. The familiar scaling property (self-similarity) of the stable process has a stronger expression, that the scaling flow on Skorokhod path space is a Bernoulli flow. We prove that typical paths of a random walk with i.i.d. increments in the domain of attraction of a stable law can be paired with paths of a stable process so that, after applying a non-random regula...

  17. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  18. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  19. Label Free Chromosome Translocation Detection with Silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Frøhling, Kasper Bayer

    HROMOSOME translocation, which is a rearrangement of arms between two chromosomes, is a major group of chromosome abnormalities leading to cancer. As a result, two derivative chromosomes with sequences coming from both chromosomes are formed. The current translocation detection method is a Fluore......HROMOSOME translocation, which is a rearrangement of arms between two chromosomes, is a major group of chromosome abnormalities leading to cancer. As a result, two derivative chromosomes with sequences coming from both chromosomes are formed. The current translocation detection method...

  20. Chromosome damage evolution after low and high LET irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA and chromatin lesions which are converted to chromosome lesions detected in the first post-irradiation mitosis by classic cytogenetic techniques as chromosomal aberrations (CAs). These techniques allow to monitor also delayed aberrations observed after many cell generations post-irradiation - the manifestation of chromosomal instability phenotype (CIN). The problem discussed is how to predict time evolution from initial to delayed DNA/chromosome damage. To address this question, in the present work a mechanistic model of CIN is elaborated which integrates pathways of (*) DNA damage induction and its conversion to chromosome lesions (aberrations), (**) lesion transmission and generation through cell cycles. Delayed aberrations in subsequent cycles are formed in the model owing to two pathways, DNA damage generation de novo as well as CA transmission from previous cycles. DNA damage generation rate is assumed to consist of bystander and non-bystander components. Bystander signals impact all cells roughly equally, whereas non-bystander DSB generation rate differs for the descendants of unirradiated and irradiated cells. Monte Carlo simulation of processes underlying CIN allows to predict the time evolution of initial radiation-induced damage - kinetics curve for delayed unstable aberrations (dicentrics) together with dose response and RBE as a function of time after high vs low LET irradiation. The experimental data for radiation-induced CIN in TK6 lymphoblastoid cells and human lymphocytes irradiated with low (gamma) and high (Fe, C) LET radiation are analyzed on the basis of the proposed model. One of the conclusions is that without bystander signaling, just taking into account the initial DNA damage and non-bystander DSB generation, it is impossible to describe the available experimental data for high-LET-induced CIN. The exact contribution of bystander effects for high vs low LET remains unknown, but the relative contribution may be

  1. Inter-chromosomal Contact Properties in Live-Cell Imaging and in Hi-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Philipp G; Barutcu, A Rasim; Weiner, Catherine L; Rinn, John L

    2018-03-15

    Imaging (fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH]) and genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) are two major approaches to the study of higher-order genome organization in the nucleus. Intra-chromosomal and inter-chromosomal interactions (referred to as non-homologous chromosomal contacts [NHCCs]) have been observed by several FISH-based studies, but locus-specific NHCCs have not been detected by Hi-C. Due to crosslinking, neither of these approaches assesses spatiotemporal properties. Toward resolving the discrepancies between imaging and Hi-C, we sought to understand the spatiotemporal properties of NHCCs in living cells by CRISPR/Cas9 live-cell imaging (CLING). In mammalian cells, we find that NHCCs are stable and occur as frequently as intra-chromosomal interactions, but NHCCs occur at farther spatial distance that could explain their lack of detection in Hi-C. By revealing the spatiotemporal properties in living cells, our study provides fundamental insights into the biology of NHCCs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  3. Creation of stable Pseudomonas aeruginosa promoter-reporter fusion mutants using linear plasmid DNA transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Leung, Kai P

    2016-06-24

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that is commonly encountered clinically in different types of infections. Reporter-gene systems and construction of mutants defective in specific functions are useful tools for studying the cellular physiology and virulence of this organism. The common mutant construction process requires constructing target alleles into large size suicide vector(s) for transformations, and extra steps involved in resolving merodiploids. Here we describe a new approach using linearized plasmid transformation for creating a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene system to study promoter activities in P. aeruginosa. We successfully created promoter-reporter fusion plasmids for studying the promoter activity of virulence genes in P. aeruginosa. The promoter of exoenzyme S (a virulence factor) was used in preparation of these fusion plasmids. These fusion plasmids were linearized and used directly to transform P. aeruginosa. Stable P. aeruginosa chromosomally integrated promoter-reporter fusion mutants were obtained. We demonstrated that the promoter of Exoenzyme S gene was activated when P. aeruginosa was grown in a biofilm state, as evidenced by the expression of GFP in these biofilm cells. Direct transformation with linearized plasmid DNA provides another avenue to create P. aeruginosa mutants. This new approach eliminates the use of suicide vector(s) for creating P. aeruginosa mutants, and thus speeds up the process mutant construction.

  4. Complete Genomes of Classical Swine Fever Virus Cloned into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, I.; Uttenthal, Åse

    Complete genome amplification of viral RNA provides a new tool for the generation of modified pestiviruses. We have used our full-genome amplification strategy for generation of amplicons representing complete genomes of classical swine fever virus. The amplicons were cloned directly into a stable...... single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) generating full-length pestivirus DNAs from which infectious RNA transcripts could be also derived. Our strategy allows construction of stable infectious BAC DNAs from a single full-length PCR product....

  5. DNA Cross-Bridging Shapes a Single Nucleus from a Set of Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwer, Matthias; Schneider, Maximilian W G; Hoefler, Rudolf; Schmalhorst, Philipp S; Jude, Julian G; Zuber, Johannes; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2017-08-24

    Eukaryotic cells store their chromosomes in a single nucleus. This is important to maintain genomic integrity, as chromosomes packaged into separate nuclei (micronuclei) are prone to massive DNA damage. During mitosis, higher eukaryotes disassemble their nucleus and release individualized chromosomes for segregation. How numerous chromosomes subsequently reform a single nucleus has remained unclear. Using image-based screening of human cells, we identified barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) as a key factor guiding membranes to form a single nucleus. Unexpectedly, nuclear assembly does not require BAF's association with inner nuclear membrane proteins but instead relies on BAF's ability to bridge distant DNA sites. Live-cell imaging and in vitro reconstitution showed that BAF enriches around the mitotic chromosome ensemble to induce a densely cross-bridged chromatin layer that is mechanically stiff and limits membranes to the surface. Our study reveals that BAF-mediated changes in chromosome mechanics underlie nuclear assembly with broad implications for proper genome function. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Karyotype evolution in Rhinolophus bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera) illuminated by cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Ao, Lei; Feng, Qing; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae) is the second most speciose genus in Chiroptera and has extensively diversified diploid chromosome numbers (from 2n = 28 to 62). In spite of many attempts to explore the karyotypic evolution of this genus, most studies have been based on conventional Giemsa staining rather than G-banding. Here we have made a whole set of chromosome-specific painting probes from flow-sorted chromosomes of Aselliscus stoliczkanus (Hipposideridae). These probes have been utilized to establish the first genome-wide homology maps among six Rhinolophus species with four different diploid chromosome numbers (2n = 36, 44, 58, and 62) and three species from other families: Rousettus leschenaulti (2n = 36, Pteropodidae), Hipposideros larvatus (2n = 32, Hipposideridae), and Myotis altarium (2n = 44, Vespertilionidae) by fluorescence in situ hybridization. To facilitate integration with published maps, human paints were also hybridized to A. stoliczkanus chromosomes. Our painting results substantiate the wide occurrence of whole-chromosome arm conservation in Rhinolophus bats and suggest that Robertsonian translocations of different combinations account for their karyotype differences. Parsimony analysis using chromosomal characters has provided some new insights into the Rhinolophus ancestral karyotype and phylogenetic relationships among these Rhinolophus species so far studied. In addition to Robertsonian translocations, our results suggest that whole-arm (reciprocal) translocations involving multiple non-homologous chromosomes as well could have been involved in the karyotypic evolution within Rhinolophus, in particular those bats with low and medium diploid numbers.

  7. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  8. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  9. Insect sex chromosomes. VI. A presumptive hyperactivation of the male X chromosome in Acheta domesticus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S R; Ali, S

    1982-01-01

    The functional status of the X chromosome in Acheta domesticus has been analysed at the whole chromosome level on the basis of (1) 3H-thymidine autoradiography, (2) 5-BrdU/AO fluorescence microscopy (3) in vivo 5-BrdU incorporation and (4) 3H-UdR induced aberrations. The rationale of these techniques in relation to the functional aspect of the X chromosome is that the inactive X chromosome would (1) show asynchrony in DNA synthesis, (2) show differential fluorescence, (3) respond differentially to in vivo 5-BrdU treatment and (4) the active X chromosome would show aberrations when treated with 3H-Uridine. From the results, it appears that the X chromosomes in both male (XO) and female (XX) somatic cells of Acheta are euchromatic (active). Further, the single X in the male is transcriptionally as active as the two X chromosomes in the female. In other words, the single X in the male is hyperactive when compared with the single X in the female. From this it is inferred that the male X chromosome is differentially regulated in order to bring about an equalization of it's gene product(s) to that produced by both Xs in the female. Drosophila melanogaster has a comparable system of dosage compensation. Thus, Acheta is yet another insect showing evidence for an X chromosome regulatory mechanism of dosage compensation. Additionally, it is surmised that sex determination in Acheta is based on an autosomes/X chromosome balance mechanism.

  10. Large-scale reconstruction of 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomes are not positioned randomly within a nucleus, but instead, they adopt preferred spatial conformations to facilitate necessary long-range gene-gene interactions and regulations. Thus, obtaining the 3D shape of chromosomes of a genome is critical for understanding how the genome folds, functions and how its genes interact and are regulated. Here, we describe a method to reconstruct preferred 3D structures of individual chromosomes of the human genome from chromosomal contact data generated by the Hi-C chromosome conformation capturing technique. A novel parameterized objective function was designed for modeling chromosome structures, which was optimized by a gradient descent method to generate chromosomal structural models that could satisfy as many intra-chromosomal contacts as possible. We applied the objective function and the corresponding optimization method to two Hi-C chromosomal data sets of both a healthy and a cancerous human B-cell to construct 3D models of individual chromosomes at resolutions of 1 MB and 200 KB, respectively. The parameters used with the method were calibrated according to an independent fluorescence in situ hybridization experimental data. The structural models generated by our method could satisfy a high percentage of contacts (pairs of loci in interaction) and non-contacts (pairs of loci not in interaction) and were compatible with the known two-compartment organization of human chromatin structures. Furthermore, structural models generated at different resolutions and from randomly permuted data sets were consistent.

  11. Alteration of terminal heterochromatin and chromosome rearrangements in derivatives of wheat-rye hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shulan; Lv, Zhenling; Guo, Xiang; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu

    2013-08-20

    Wheat-rye addition and substitution lines and their self progenies revealed variations in telomeric heterochromatin and centromeres. Furthermore, a mitotically unstable dicentric chromosome and stable multicentric chromosomes were observed in the progeny of a Chinese Spring-Imperial rye 3R addition line. An unstable multicentric chromosome was found in the progeny of a 6R/6D substitution line. Drastic variation of terminal heterochromatin including movement and disappearance of terminal heterochromatin occurred in the progeny of wheat-rye addition line 3R, and the 5RS ditelosomic addition line. Highly stable minichromosomes were observed in the progeny of a monosomic 4R addition line, a ditelosomic 5RS addition line and a 6R/6D substitution line. Minichromosomes, with and without the FISH signals for telomeric DNA (TTTAGGG)n, derived from a monosomic 4R addition line are stable and transmissible to the next generation. The results indicated that centromeres and terminal heterochromatin can be profoundly altered in wheat-rye hybrid derivatives. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Bird-like sex chromosomes of platypus imply recent origin of mammal sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrunes, Frédéric; Waters, Paul D; Miethke, Pat; Rens, Willem; McMillan, Daniel; Alsop, Amber E; Grützner, Frank; Deakin, Janine E; Whittington, Camilla M; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Kremitzki, Colin L; Graves, Tina; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Warren, Wes; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2008-06-01

    In therian mammals (placentals and marsupials), sex is determined by an XX female: XY male system, in which a gene (SRY) on the Y affects male determination. There is no equivalent in other amniotes, although some taxa (notably birds and snakes) have differentiated sex chromosomes. Birds have a ZW female: ZZ male system with no homology with mammal sex chromosomes, in which dosage of a Z-borne gene (possibly DMRT1) affects male determination. As the most basal mammal group, the egg-laying monotremes are ideal for determining how the therian XY system evolved. The platypus has an extraordinary sex chromosome complex, in which five X and five Y chromosomes pair in a translocation chain of alternating X and Y chromosomes. We used physical mapping to identify genes on the pairing regions between adjacent X and Y chromosomes. Most significantly, comparative mapping shows that, contrary to earlier reports, there is no homology between the platypus and therian X chromosomes. Orthologs of genes in the conserved region of the human X (including SOX3, the gene from which SRY evolved) all map to platypus chromosome 6, which therefore represents the ancestral autosome from which the therian X and Y pair derived. Rather, the platypus X chromosomes have substantial homology with the bird Z chromosome (including DMRT1) and to segments syntenic with this region in the human genome. Thus, platypus sex chromosomes have strong homology with bird, but not to therian sex chromosomes, implying that the therian X and Y chromosomes (and the SRY gene) evolved from an autosomal pair after the divergence of monotremes only 166 million years ago. Therefore, the therian X and Y are more than 145 million years younger than previously thought.

  13. Chromosomal aberrations in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammer Altok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the chromosomal changes in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients diagnosed with clinical BPH underwent transurethral prostate resection to address their primary urological problem. All patients were evaluated by use of a comprehensive medical history and rectal digital examination. The preoperative evaluation also included serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA measurement and ultrasonographic measurement of prostate volume. Prostate cancer was detected in one patient, who was then excluded from the study. We performed conventional cytogenetic analyses of short-term cultures of 53 peripheral blood samples obtained from the BPH patients. Results: The mean (±standard deviation age of the 53 patients was 67.8±9.4 years. The mean PSA value of the patients was 5.8±7.0 ng/mL. The mean prostate volume was 53.6±22.9 mL. Chromosomal abnormalities were noted in 5 of the 53 cases (9.4%. Loss of the Y chromosome was the most frequent chromosomal abnormality and was observed in three patients (5.7%. There was no statistically significant relationship among age, PSA, prostate volume, and chromosomal changes. Conclusions: Loss of the Y chromosome was the main chromosomal abnormality found in our study. However, this coexistence did not reach a significant level. Our study concluded that loss of the Y chromosome cannot be considered relevant for the diagnosis of BPH as it is for prostate cancer. Because BPH usually occurs in aging men, loss of the Y chromosome in BPH patients may instead be related to the aging process.

  14. Sense of Humor, Stable Affect, and Psychological Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnie Cann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A good sense of humor has been implicated as a quality that could contribute to psychological well-being. The mechanisms through which sense of humor might operate include helping to reappraise threats, serving as a character strength, or facilitating happiness. The current research attempts to integrate these possibilities by examining whether a good sense of humor might operate globally by helping to maintain a more stable positive affect. Stable positive affect has been shown to facilitate more effective problem solving and to build resilience. However, not all humor is adaptive humor, so we also examine the roles that different styles of humor use might play. Individual differences in humor styles were used to predict stable levels of affect. Then, in a longitudinal design, humor styles and stable affect were used to predict subsequent resilience and psychological health. The results indicated that stable affect was related to resilience and psychological well-being, and that a sense of humor that involves self-enhancing humor, humor based on maintaining a humorous perspective about one’s experiences, was positively related to stable positive affect, negatively related to stable negative affect, and was mediated through stable affect in influencing resilience, well-being and distress. Thus, while a good sense of humor can lead to greater resilience and better psychological health, the current results, focusing on stable affect, find only self-enhancing humor provides reliable benefits.

  15. Stable transfection of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J; Henney, H R

    1997-03-01

    The promoter activity of an Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene was analyzed in its homologous system. A modified calcium phosphate transfection method using a neomycin marker vector was developed to achieve highly efficient transfection of the Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene into Acanthamoeba cells. In this transfection procedure, the calcium phosphate-DNA complex was formed gradually in the medium during incubation with cells and precipitated on the cells. The crucial factors for obtaining efficient transfection were the pH (6.95) of the transfection buffer used for the calcium phosphate precipitation and the amount (25 micrograms/96-well tissue culture plate) and form (circular) of transfecting DNA. Under these conditions, Acanthamoeba isolate 1B6 was transfected at an efficiency of about 40% with the constructed vector pOPSBU, a pOP13CAT-based polyubiquitin gene incorporated neomycin resistance vector. Acanthamoeba polyphaga was transfected at an efficiency of about 10% with this vector. Transfection of both Acanthamoeba strains appeared to result in low copy plasmid integration (about two copies per cell are suggested). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays showed that the promoter of the Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene in the constructed vector was especially strong in A. polyphaga, thus the pOPSBU-Acanthamoeba system may be useful for the construction of cDNA expression libraries, as well as for the expression of cloned genes.

  16. Genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiations deal with those effects in the descendants of the individuals irradiated. The information base concerning genetic and chromosomal injury to humans from radiation is less adequate than is the information base for cancer and leukemia. As a result, it is not possible to make the kinds of quantitative estimates that have been made for carcinogenesis in previous chapters of this book. The chapter includes a detailed explanation of various types of genetic injuries such as chromosomal diseases, x-linked diseases, autosomal dominant diseases, recessive diseases, and irregularly inherited diseases. Quantitative estimates of mutation rates and incidences are given based on atomic bomb survivors data

  17. Syntenic relationships between cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. and melon (C. melo L. chromosomes as revealed by comparative genetic mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staub Jack E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. (2n = 2 × = 14 and melon, C. melo L. (2n = 2 × = 24 are two important vegetable species in the genus Cucumis (family Cucurbitaceae. Both species have an Asian origin that diverged approximately nine million years ago. Cucumber is believed to have evolved from melon through chromosome fusion, but the details of this process are largely unknown. In this study, comparative genetic mapping between cucumber and melon was conducted to examine syntenic relationships of their chromosomes. Results Using two melon mapping populations, 154 and 127 cucumber SSR markers were added onto previously reported F2- and RIL-based genetic maps, respectively. A consensus melon linkage map was developed through map integration, which contained 401 co-dominant markers in 12 linkage groups including 199 markers derived from the cucumber genome. Syntenic relationships between melon and cucumber chromosomes were inferred based on associations between markers on the consensus melon map and cucumber draft genome scaffolds. It was determined that cucumber Chromosome 7 was syntenic to melon Chromosome I. Cucumber Chromosomes 2 and 6 each contained genomic regions that were syntenic with melon chromosomes III+V+XI and III+VIII+XI, respectively. Likewise, cucumber Chromosomes 1, 3, 4, and 5 each was syntenic with genomic regions of two melon chromosomes previously designated as II+XII, IV+VI, VII+VIII, and IX+X, respectively. However, the marker orders in several syntenic blocks on these consensus linkage maps were not co-linear suggesting that more complicated structural changes beyond simple chromosome fusion events have occurred during the evolution of cucumber. Conclusions Comparative mapping conducted herein supported the hypothesis that cucumber chromosomes may be the result of chromosome fusion from a 24-chromosome progenitor species. Except for a possible inversion, cucumber Chromosome 7 has largely remained intact in

  18. Chromosomal transformation in Bacillus subtilis is a non-polar recombination reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Carrasco (Begoña); E. Serrano (Ester); H. Sanchez (Humberto); C. Wyman (Claire); J.C. Alonso (Juan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNatural chromosomal transformation is one of the primary driving forces of bacterial evolution. This reaction involves the recombination of the internalized linear single-stranded (ss) DNA with the homologous resident duplex via RecA-mediated integration in concert with SsbA and DprA or

  19. Identification and molecular analysis of transgenic potato chromosomes transferred to tomato through microprotoplast fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, E.; Ramulu, K.S.; Dijkhuis, P.; Blaas, J.; Krens, F.A.; Verhoeven, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    Results are reported on the integration sites and copy number of alien marker genes neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) and β-glucuronidase (uidA), introduced into diploid potato Solanum tuberosum through transformation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Also, the transgenic potato chromosomes 3 and 5

  20. Genetic variation in the major mitotic checkpoint genes associated with chromosomal aberrations in healthy humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Försti, A.; Frank, Ch.; Smolková, B.; Kazimírová, A.; Barančoková, M.; Vymetálková, Veronika; Kroupa, M.; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Buchancová, J.; Dusinská, M.; Musak, L.; Vodička, Pavel; Hemminki, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 2 (2016), s. 442-446 ISSN 0304-3835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14789S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chromosomal integrity * cytogenetics * spindle checkpoint Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.375, year: 2016

  1. Conformation regulation of the X chromosome inactivation center: a model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scialdone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available X-Chromosome Inactivation (XCI is the process whereby one, randomly chosen X becomes transcriptionally silenced in female cells. XCI is governed by the Xic, a locus on the X encompassing an array of genes which interact with each other and with key molecular factors. The mechanism, though, establishing the fate of the X's, and the corresponding alternative modifications of the Xic architecture, is still mysterious. In this study, by use of computer simulations, we explore the scenario where chromatin conformations emerge from its interaction with diffusing molecular factors. Our aim is to understand the physical mechanisms whereby stable, non-random conformations are established on the Xic's, how complex architectural changes are reliably regulated, and how they lead to opposite structures on the two alleles. In particular, comparison against current experimental data indicates that a few key cis-regulatory regions orchestrate the organization of the Xic, and that two major molecular regulators are involved.

  2. New type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aseeva, E.A.; Domracheva, E.V.; Neverova, A.L; Bogomazova, A.N.; Snigiryova, G.P.; Novitskaya, N.N.; Khazins, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A comparative analysis of the distribution and the frequency of multiaberrant cells (MAC) among lymphocytes in different categories of low dose (up to 0.5 Gy) irradiated people was carried out. MAC were found in most of the examined groups and they were absent in the control population. A highest MAC frequency was observed in people exposed to alpha radiation (Pu, Ra). This fact allows MAC to be considered as an indicator of a high-energy local exposure. A new type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements was discovered in the course of analysis of stable aberrations by the FISH method. The biological consequences of MAC formation and possibility of revealing the whole diversity of cells with multiple aberrations by means of modern molecular-cytogenetic methods is discussed

  3. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  4. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepoint, Gilles [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)]. E-mail: g.lepoint@ulg.ac.be; Dauby, Patrick [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, rue Vautier, B1000 Brussels (Belgium); Gobert, Sylvie [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure of trophic webs in temperate, Mediterranean and tropical seagrass ecosystems. As environmental tracers, stable isotopes have proven their utility in sewage impact measuring and mapping. However, to make such environmental studies more comprehensible, future works on understanding of basic reasons for variations of N and C stable isotopes in seagrasses should be encouraged. At least, as experimental tracers, stable isotopes allow the study of many aspects of N and C cycles at the scale of a plant or at the scale of the seagrass ecosystem.

  5. The Impact of Reconstruction Methods, Phylogenetic Uncertainty and Branch Lengths on Inference of Chromosome Number Evolution in American Daisies (Melampodium, Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jamie; Schneeweiss, Gerald M; Stuessy, Tod F; Villaseñor, Jose L; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome number change (polyploidy and dysploidy) plays an important role in plant diversification and speciation. Investigating chromosome number evolution commonly entails ancestral state reconstruction performed within a phylogenetic framework, which is, however, prone to uncertainty, whose effects on evolutionary inferences are insufficiently understood. Using the chromosomally diverse plant genus Melampodium (Asteraceae) as model group, we assess the impact of reconstruction method (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, Bayesian methods), branch length model (phylograms versus chronograms) and phylogenetic uncertainty (topological and branch length uncertainty) on the inference of chromosome number evolution. We also address the suitability of the maximum clade credibility (MCC) tree as single representative topology for chromosome number reconstruction. Each of the listed factors causes considerable incongruence among chromosome number reconstructions. Discrepancies between inferences on the MCC tree from those made by integrating over a set of trees are moderate for ancestral chromosome numbers, but severe for the difference of chromosome gains and losses, a measure of the directionality of dysploidy. Therefore, reliance on single trees, such as the MCC tree, is strongly discouraged and model averaging, taking both phylogenetic and model uncertainty into account, is recommended. For studying chromosome number evolution, dedicated models implemented in the program ChromEvol and ordered maximum parsimony may be most appropriate. Chromosome number evolution in Melampodium follows a pattern of bidirectional dysploidy (starting from x = 11 to x = 9 and x = 14, respectively) with no prevailing direction.

  6. The Impact of Reconstruction Methods, Phylogenetic Uncertainty and Branch Lengths on Inference of Chromosome Number Evolution in American Daisies (Melampodium, Asteraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie McCann

    Full Text Available Chromosome number change (polyploidy and dysploidy plays an important role in plant diversification and speciation. Investigating chromosome number evolution commonly entails ancestral state reconstruction performed within a phylogenetic framework, which is, however, prone to uncertainty, whose effects on evolutionary inferences are insufficiently understood. Using the chromosomally diverse plant genus Melampodium (Asteraceae as model group, we assess the impact of reconstruction method (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, Bayesian methods, branch length model (phylograms versus chronograms and phylogenetic uncertainty (topological and branch length uncertainty on the inference of chromosome number evolution. We also address the suitability of the maximum clade credibility (MCC tree as single representative topology for chromosome number reconstruction. Each of the listed factors causes considerable incongruence among chromosome number reconstructions. Discrepancies between inferences on the MCC tree from those made by integrating over a set of trees are moderate for ancestral chromosome numbers, but severe for the difference of chromosome gains and losses, a measure of the directionality of dysploidy. Therefore, reliance on single trees, such as the MCC tree, is strongly discouraged and model averaging, taking both phylogenetic and model uncertainty into account, is recommended. For studying chromosome number evolution, dedicated models implemented in the program ChromEvol and ordered maximum parsimony may be most appropriate. Chromosome number evolution in Melampodium follows a pattern of bidirectional dysploidy (starting from x = 11 to x = 9 and x = 14, respectively with no prevailing direction.

  7. Chromosomal positioning of human T-lymphotropic type 1 proviruses by fluorescence in situ hybridisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J H; Rose, N J; Mann, S; Ferguson-Smith, M; Lever, A M

    2001-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) was employed to identify the chromosomal integration site of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) present in T-cell clones derived from HTLV-1-infected individuals and a virally transformed cell line, C8166-45. Proviral sequences were detected in C8166-45 but not uninfected Jurkat cells. Integration sites were reliably detected in T-cell clones determined previously to be infected with HTLV-1. The results indicated that the transformed cell line and some of the T-cell clones possessed more than one proviral integration site. This hybridisation system is useful for determining the number of integration events and for localising proviruses to specific chromosomal regions.

  8. What can Fe stable isotopes tell us about magmas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausberg, Niklas

    The majority of the Earth’s crust is formed by magmas, and understanding their production and differentiation is important to interpret the geologic rock record. A powerful tool to investigate magmatic processes is the distribution of the stable isotopes of the major redox-sensitive element...... the differentiation of magmas from the perspective of Fe stable isotopes, integrated with petrology, by studying igneous rocks and their constituent phases (minerals and glasses) from the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, Thingmuli, Iceland, Pantelleria, Italy, and the Bishop Tuff, USA. The findings are interpreted...... and for more quantitative model of the magmatic processes producing enigmatic stable isotope compositions of rhyolitic and granite magmas....

  9. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  10. Conservation of sex chromosomes in lacertid lizards

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rovatsos, M.; Vukič, J.; Altmanová, M.; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Moravec, J.; Kratochvíl, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 13 (2016), s. 3120-3126 ISSN 0962-1083 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : lizards * molecular sex ing * reptiles * sex chromosomes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 6.086, year: 2016

  11. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The literature is surveyed for data on recombination between loci on chromosome 5 of barley; 13 loci fall into the category “mapped” loci, more than 20 into the category “associated” loci and nine into the category “loci once suggested to be on chromosome 5”. A procedure was developed for estimat......The literature is surveyed for data on recombination between loci on chromosome 5 of barley; 13 loci fall into the category “mapped” loci, more than 20 into the category “associated” loci and nine into the category “loci once suggested to be on chromosome 5”. A procedure was developed...... data are utilized jointly, and (3) omission of inconsistent data and determination of the most likely order of the loci. This procedure was applied to the 42 recombination percentages available for the 13 “mapped” loci. Due to inconsistencies 14 of the recombination percentages and, therefore, two...

  12. Chromosomal contact permits transcription between coregulated genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanucchi, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription of coregulated genes occurs in the context of long-range chromosomal contacts that form multigene complexes. Such contacts and transcription are lost in knockout studies of transcription factors and structural chromatin proteins...

  13. Histone modifications: Cycling with chromosomal replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thon, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications tend to be lost during chromosome duplication. Several recent studies suggest that the RNA interference pathway becomes active during the weakened transcriptional repression occurring at centromeres in S phase, resulting in the re-establishment of histone modifications...

  14. System for the analysis of plant chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Martin, D.; Peraza Gonzalez, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes a computer system for the automation workers of recognition analysis and interpretation of plant chromosomes. This system permit to carry out the analysis in a more comfortable and faster way, using the image processing techniques

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosomal abnormalities in 2078 infertile couples referred for assisted reproductive techniques. Hum Reprod. 2005 Feb;20(2):437-42. ... Yq microdeletions in infertile italian couples referred for assisted reproductive technique. Sex Dev. 2007;1(6):347-52. doi: ...

  16. Cognitive and medical features of chromosomal aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutaff-Lee, Christa; Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the physical characteristics, medical complications, and cognitive and psychological profiles that are associated with chromosomal aneuploidy conditions, a group of conditions in which individuals are born with one or more additional chromosome. Overall, chromosomal aneuploidy conditions occur in approximately 1 in 250 children. Information regarding autosomal disorders including trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome) are presented. Sex chromosome aneuploidy conditions such as Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), XYY, trisomy X, and Turner syndrome (45,X), in addition to less frequently occurring tetrasomy and pentasomy conditions are also covered. Treatment recommendations and suggestions for future research directions are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Errata :Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent Abortions in Lagos, Nigeria. Akinde OR, Daramola A O, Taiwo I A, Afolayan M O and Akinsola Af. Sonographic Mammary Gland Density Pattern in Women in Selected ommunities of Southern Nigeria.

  18. Polytene chromosome analysis in relation to genetic sex separation in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerremans, P.; Busch-Petersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    The development of stable genetic sexing strains in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), is hampered by the presence of low levels of male recombination. Such recombination may be reduced by minimizing the distance between the translocation breakpoint and the translocated 'sexing' allele. Cytogenetic analysis of mitotic/meiotic and polytene chromosomes could provide information on the selection of such potentially stable genetic sexing strains. Translocation breakpoints in two genetic sexing strains in the medfly, based on a white female/brown male pupal colour dimorphism, have been determined. Preliminary results are described and the advantages and limitations of polytene chromosome analysis for the isolation of stable genetic sexing strains of the medfly are discussed. (author). 31 refs

  19. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  20. Y Chromosome Regulation of Autism Susceptibility Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    autistic children. Such distorted ratio could be as high as 8:1 in some populations [12, 13]. Sexual dimorphism in autism is a key and consistent... autism [18-24]. Recent studies in our laboratory suggest that genes on the Y chromosome could contribute to such sexual dimorphisms, thereby raising the...contribute to autism susceptibility, have provided a critical clue that the male-only chromosome is potentially a key player in the sexual dimorphism

  1. Chromosome evolution in Cophomantini (Amphibia, Anura, Hylinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Juan M; Cardozo, Dario E; Suárez, Pablo; Boeris, Juan M; Blasco-Zúñiga, Ailin; Barbero, Gastón; Gomes, Anderson; Gazoni, Thiago; Costa, William; Nagamachi, Cleusa Y; Rivera, Miryan; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P; Wiley, John E; Pieczarka, Julio C; Haddad, Celio F B; Faivovich, Julián; Baldo, Diego

    2018-01-01

    The hylid tribe Cophomantini is a diverse clade of Neotropical treefrogs composed of the genera Aplastodiscus, Boana, Bokermannohyla, Hyloscirtus, and Myersiohyla. The phylogenetic relationships of Cophomantini have been comprehensively reviewed in the literature, providing a suitable framework for the study of chromosome evolution. Employing different banding techniques, we studied the chromosomes of 25 species of Boana and 3 of Hyloscirtus; thus providing, for the first time, data for Hyloscirtus and for 15 species of Boana. Most species showed karyotypes with 2n = 2x = 24 chromosomes; some species of the B. albopunctata group have 2n = 2x = 22, and H. alytolylax has 2n = 2x = 20. Karyotypes are all bi-armed in most species presented, with the exception of H. larinopygion (FN = 46) and H. alytolylax (FN = 38), with karyotypes that have a single pair of small telocentric chromosomes. In most species of Boana, NORs are observed in a single pair of chromosomes, mostly in the small chromosomes, although in some species of the B. albopunctata, B. pulchella, and B. semilineata groups, this marker occurs on the larger pairs 8, 1, and 7, respectively. In Hyloscirtus, NOR position differs in the three studied species: H. alytolylax (4p), H. palmeri (4q), and H. larinopygion (1p). Heterochromatin is a variable marker that could provide valuable evidence, but it would be necesserary to understand the molecular composition of the C-bands that are observed in different species in order to test its putative homology. In H. alytolylax, a centromeric DAPI+ band was observed on one homologue of chromosome pair 2. The band was present in males but absent in females, providing evidence for an XX/XY sex determining system in this species. We review and discuss the importance of the different chromosome markers (NOR position, C-bands, and DAPI/CMA3 patterns) for their impact on the taxonomy and karyotype evolution in Cophomantini.

  2. Chromosome evolution in Cophomantini (Amphibia, Anura, Hylinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Pablo; Boeris, Juan M.; Blasco-Zúñiga, Ailin; Barbero, Gastón; Gomes, Anderson; Gazoni, Thiago; Costa, William; Nagamachi, Cleusa Y.; Rivera, Miryan; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P.; Wiley, John E.; Pieczarka, Julio C.; Haddad, Celio F. B.; Faivovich, Julián; Baldo, Diego

    2018-01-01

    The hylid tribe Cophomantini is a diverse clade of Neotropical treefrogs composed of the genera Aplastodiscus, Boana, Bokermannohyla, Hyloscirtus, and Myersiohyla. The phylogenetic relationships of Cophomantini have been comprehensively reviewed in the literature, providing a suitable framework for the study of chromosome evolution. Employing different banding techniques, we studied the chromosomes of 25 species of Boana and 3 of Hyloscirtus; thus providing, for the first time, data for Hyloscirtus and for 15 species of Boana. Most species showed karyotypes with 2n = 2x = 24 chromosomes; some species of the B. albopunctata group have 2n = 2x = 22, and H. alytolylax has 2n = 2x = 20. Karyotypes are all bi-armed in most species presented, with the exception of H. larinopygion (FN = 46) and H. alytolylax (FN = 38), with karyotypes that have a single pair of small telocentric chromosomes. In most species of Boana, NORs are observed in a single pair of chromosomes, mostly in the small chromosomes, although in some species of the B. albopunctata, B. pulchella, and B. semilineata groups, this marker occurs on the larger pairs 8, 1, and 7, respectively. In Hyloscirtus, NOR position differs in the three studied species: H. alytolylax (4p), H. palmeri (4q), and H. larinopygion (1p). Heterochromatin is a variable marker that could provide valuable evidence, but it would be necesserary to understand the molecular composition of the C-bands that are observed in different species in order to test its putative homology. In H. alytolylax, a centromeric DAPI+ band was observed on one homologue of chromosome pair 2. The band was present in males but absent in females, providing evidence for an XX/XY sex determining system in this species. We review and discuss the importance of the different chromosome markers (NOR position, C-bands, and DAPI/CMA3 patterns) for their impact on the taxonomy and karyotype evolution in Cophomantini. PMID:29444174

  3. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody resp...... against the infection. On the other hand, immune complexes between the beta-lactamase and corresponding antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary injury in CF by mediating hyperimmune reactions....

  4. Demasculinization of the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Kalle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of organisms sex-biased genes are non-randomly distributed between autosomes and the shared sex chromosome X (or Z. Studies on Anopheles gambiae have produced conflicting results regarding the underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X chromosome and it is unclear to what extent sexual antagonism, dosage compensation or X-inactivation in the male germline, the evolutionary forces that have been suggested to affect the chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes, are operational in Anopheles. Results We performed a meta-analysis of sex-biased gene expression in Anopheles gambiae which provides evidence for a general underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X-chromosome that increased in significance with the observed degree of sex-bias. A phylogenomic comparison between Drosophila melanogaster, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus also indicates that the Anopheles X chromosome strongly disfavours the evolutionary conservation of male-biased expression and that novel male-biased genes are more likely to arise on autosomes. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that transgenes situated on the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome are transcriptionally silenced in the male germline. Conclusion The data presented here support the hypothesis that the observed demasculinization of the Anopheles X chromosome is driven by X-chromosome inactivation in the male germline and by sexual antagonism. The demasculinization appears to be the consequence of a loss of male-biased expression, rather than a failure in the establishment or the extinction of male-biased genes.

  5. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  6. Chromosomal profile of indigenous pig (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guru Vishnu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the chromosomal profile of indigenous pigs by computing morphometric measurements. Materials and Methods: A cytogenetic study was carried out in 60 indigenous pigs to analyze the chromosomal profile by employing the short term peripheral blood lymphocyte culture technique. Results: The modal chromosome number (2n in indigenous pigs was found to be 38 and a fundamental number of 64 as in the exotic. First chromosome was the longest pair, and thirteenth pair was the second largest while Y-chromosome was the smallest in the karyotype of the pig. The mean relative length, arm ratio, centromeric indices and morphological indices of chromosomes varied from 1.99±0.01 to 11.23±0.09, 1.04±0.05 to 2.95±0.02, 0.51±0.14 to 0.75±0.09 and 2.08±0.07 to 8.08±0.15%, respectively in indigenous pigs. Sex had no significant effect (p>0.05 on all the morphometric measurements studied. Conclusion: The present study revealed that among autosomes first five pairs were sub metacentric, next two pairs were sub telocentric (6-7, subsequent five pairs were metacentric (8-12 and remaining six pairs were telocentric (13-18, while both allosomes were metacentric. The chromosomal number, morphology and various morphometric measurements of the chromosomes of the indigenous pigs were almost similar to those established breeds reported in the literature.

  7. Chromosomal evolution in the plant family Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feinan; Tanksley, Steven D

    2010-03-17

    Over the past decades, extensive comparative mapping research has been performed in the plant family Solanaceae. The recent identification of a large set of single-copy conserved orthologous (COSII) markers has greatly accelerated comparative mapping studies among major solanaceous species including tomato, potato, eggplant, pepper and diploid Nicotiana species (as well as tetraploid tobacco). The large amount of comparative data now available for these species provides the opportunity to describe the overall patterns of chromosomal evolution in this important plant family. The results of this investigation are described herein. We combined data from multiple COSII studies, and other comparative mapping studies performed in tomato, potato, eggplant, pepper and diploid Nicotiana species, to deduce the features and outcomes of chromosomal evolution in the Solanaceae over the past 30 million years. This includes estimating the rates and timing of chromosomal changes (inversions and translocations) as well as deducing the age of ancestral progenitor species and predicting their genome configurations. The Solanaceae has experienced chromosomal changes at a modest rate compared with other families and the rates are likely conserved across different lineages of the family. Chromosomal inversions occur at a consistently higher rate than do translocations. Further, we find evidences for non-random positioning of the chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints. This finding is consistent with the similar finding in mammals, where hot spots for chromosomal breakages have apparently played a significant role in shaping genome evolution. Finally, by utilizing multiple genome comparisons we were able to reconstruct the most likely genome configuration for a number of now-extinct progenitor species that gave rise to the extant solanaceous species used in this research. The results from this study provide the first broad overview of chromosomal evolution in the family Solanaceae, and

  8. Abnormal sex chromosome constitution and longitudinal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Juul, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles.......Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles....

  9. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  10. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  11. Modelling chromosomal aberration induction by ionising radiation: The influence of interphase chromosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolenghi, A.; Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.

    Several advances have been achieved in the knowledge of nuclear architecture and functions during the last decade, thus allowing the identification of interphase chromosome territories and sub-chromosomal domains (e.g. arm and band domains). This is an important step in the study of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations; indeed, the coupling between track-structure simulations and reliable descriptions of the geometrical properties of the target is one of the main tasks in modelling aberration induction by radiation, since it allows one to clarify the role of the initial positioning of two DNA lesions in determining their interaction probability. In the present paper, the main recent findings on nuclear and chromosomal architecture are summarised. A few examples of models based on different descriptions of interphase chromosome organisation (random-walk models, domain models and static models) are presented, focussing on how the approach adopted in modelling the target nuclei and chromosomes can influence the simulation of chromosomal aberration yields. Each model is discussed by taking into account available experimental data on chromosome aberration induction and/or interphase chromatin organisation. Preliminary results from a mechanistic model based on a coupling between radiation track-structure features and explicitly-modelled, non-overlapping chromosome territories are presented.

  12. Paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in association with a maternal supernumerary marker chromosome (6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.S.; Crolla, J.A.; Sitch, F.L. [Salisbury District Hospital, Wiltshire (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy may arise by a number of different mechanisms of aneuploidy correction. A population that has been identified as being at increased risk of aneuploidy are those individuals bearing supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs). There have been a number of cases reported of trisomy 21 in association with bi-satellited marker chromosomes have described two individuals with small inv dup (15) markers. One had paternal isodisomy of chromosome 15 and Angelman syndrome. The other had maternal heterodisomy (15) and Prader-Willi syndrome. At the Wessex Regional Genetics Laboratory we have conducted a search for uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosomes from which SMCs originated. Our study population consists of 39 probands with SMCs originating from a number of different autosomes, including 17 with SMCs of chromosome 15 origin. Using PCR amplification of microsatellite repeat sequences located distal to the regions included in the SMCs we have determined the parental origin of the two normal homologues in each case. We have identified paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in a female child with a supernumerary marker ring chromosome 6 in approximately 70% of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The marker was found to be of maternal origin. This is the second case of paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 to be reported, and the first in association with a SMC resulting in a partial trisomy for a portion of the short arm of chromosome 6. In spite of this, the patient appears to be functioning appropriately for her age.

  13. Neo-sex chromosomes of Ronderosia bergi: insight into the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Gimenez, O M; Marti, D A; Cabral-de-Mello, D C

    2015-09-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved many times from morphologically identical autosome pairs, most often presenting several recombination suppression events, followed by accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences. In Orthoptera, most species have an X0♂ sex chromosome system. However, in the subfamily Melanoplinae, derived variants of neo-sex chromosomes (neo-XY♂ or neo-X1X2Y♂) emerged several times. Here, we examined the differentiation of neo-sex chromosomes in a Melanoplinae species with a neo-XY♂/XX♀ system, Ronderosia bergi, using several approaches: (i) classical cytogenetic analysis, (ii) mapping via fluorescent in situ hybridization of some selected repetitive DNA sequences and microdissected sex chromosomes, and (iii) immunolocalization of distinct histone modifications. The microdissected sex chromosomes were also used as sources for Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of RNA-coding multigene families, to study variants related to the sex chromosomes. Our data suggest that the R. bergi neo-Y has become differentiated after its formation by a Robertsonian translocation and inversions, and has accumulated repetitive DNA sequences. Interestingly, the ex autosomes incorporated into the neo-sex chromosomes retain some autosomal post-translational histone modifications, at least in metaphase I, suggesting that the establishment of functional modifications in neo-sex chromosomes is slower than their sequence differentiation.

  14. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genome of spinach single chromosome complement is about 1000 Mbp, which is the model material to study the molecular mechanisms of plant sex differentiation. The cytological study showed that the biggest spinach chromosome (chromosome 1) was taken as spinach sex chromosome. It had three alleles of ...

  15. Centromeric banding pattern of mitotic chromosomes in Vigna vexillata

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vigna vexillata chromosome characterization was carried out using the Leishman C- banding technique. The results showed that the chromosomes mostly exhibited bands at both the centromeric and telomeric regions. These bands will serve, as a valuable marker for the identification of the chromosomes. Chromosomes 2 ...

  16. Chromosomes in the genesis and progression of ependymomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogatto, S R; Casartelli, C; Rainho, C A

    1993-01-01

    chromosomes in three cases. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 2 were a finding for all cases and involved loss of material at 2q32-34. Other structural chromosome abnormalities detected involved chromosomes 4, 6, 10, 11, 12, and X. We also reviewed data on 22 cases previously reported....

  17. The tilapias' chromosomes influencing sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaani, A

    2013-01-01

    The sex chromosomes of tilapias (family Cichlidae; genera Oreochromis, Sarotherodon and Tilapia) have been studied for over 50 years, which has gained interest from both agricultural and basic scientific perspectives. Several closely related tilapia species which can interbreed have been studied, and it has been repeatedly demonstrated that there is variation within and between species in the chromosomal sex-determination mechanism. Both male and female heterogametic sex-determination systems have been characterized, as well as epistatic and environmental influences on sex determination. Three different linkage groups (LG1, LG3 and LG23) have been identified as sex-associated chromosomes and have been subjected to further cytogenetic research and analyses of the genes located around the sex-determining region. Variation in the genetic and physical characteristics of the sex chromosomes makes tilapias an excellent model system for studying the evolution of vertebrate sex chromosomes. This review summarizes the progress made along 5 decades of research and the current knowledge of the tilapias' sex chromosomes.

  18. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Chromosome Painting by GISH and Multicolor FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Steven S; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Qijun; Niu, Zhixia; Jan, Chao-Chien; Cai, Xiwen

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic technique for identifying chromosomes and mapping specific genes and DNA sequences on individual chromosomes. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and multicolor FISH (mc-FISH) represent two special types of FISH techniques. Both GISH and mc-FISH experiments have general steps and features of FISH, including chromosome preparation, probe labeling, blocking DNA preparation, target-probe DNA hybridization, post-hybridization washes, and hybridization signal detection. Specifically, GISH uses total genomic DNA from two species as probe and blocking DNA, respectively, and it can differentiate chromosomes from different genomes. The mc-FISH takes advantage of simultaneous hybridization of several DNA probes labeled by different fluorochromes to different targets on the same chromosome sample. Hybridization signals from different probes are detected using different fluorescence filter sets. Multicolor FISH can provide more structural details for target chromosomes than single-color FISH. In this chapter, we present the general experimental procedures for these two techniques with specific details in the critical steps we have modified in our laboratories.

  20. Flow cytogenetics: progress toward chromosomal aberration detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrano, A.V.; Gray, J.W.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Using clonal derivatives of the Chinese hamster M3-1 cell line, we demonstrate the potential of flow systems to karyotype homogeneous aberrations (aberrations which are identical and present in every cell) and to detect heterogeneous aberrations (aberrations which occur randomly in a population and are not identical in every cell). Flow cytometry (FCM) of ethidium bromide stained isolated chromosomes from clone 650A of the M3-1 cells distinguishes nine chromosome types from the fourteen present in the actual karyotype. X-irradiation of this parent 650A clone produced two sub-clones with an altered flow karyotype, that is, their FCM distributions were characterized by the addition of new peaks and alterations in area under existing peaks. From the relative DNA content and area for each peak, as determined by computer analysis, we predicted that each clone had undergone a reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes from two peaks. This prediction was confirmed by Giemsa-banding the metaphase cells. Heterogeneous aberrations are reflected in the flow karyotype as an increase in background, that is, an increase in area underlying the chromosome peaks. This increase is dose dependent but, as yet, the sample variability has been too large for quantitative analysis. Flow sorting of the valleys between chromosome peaks produces enriched fractions of aberrant chromosomes for visual analysis. These approaches are potentially applicable to the analysis of chromsomal aberrations induced by environmental contaminants

  1. Evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Lymberakis, Petros; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-12-22

    Amniote vertebrates possess various mechanisms of sex determination, but their variability is not equally distributed. The large evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and birds was believed to be connected with their endothermy. However, some ectotherm lineages seem to be comparably conserved in sex determination, but previously there was a lack of molecular evidence to confirm this. Here, we document a stability of sex chromosomes in advanced snakes based on the testing of Z-specificity of genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR) across 37 snake species (our qPCR technique is suitable for molecular sexing in potentially all advanced snakes). We discovered that at least part of sex chromosomes is homologous across all families of caenophidian snakes (Acrochordidae, Xenodermatidae, Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Lamprophiidae). The emergence of differentiated sex chromosomes can be dated back to about 60 Ma and preceded the extensive diversification of advanced snakes, the group with more than 3000 species. The Z-specific genes of caenophidian snakes are (pseudo)autosomal in the members of the snake families Pythonidae, Xenopeltidae, Boidae, Erycidae and Sanziniidae, as well as in outgroups with differentiated sex chromosomes such as monitor lizards, iguanas and chameleons. Along with iguanas, advanced snakes are therefore another example of ectothermic amniotes with a long-term stability of sex chromosomes comparable with endotherms. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Recurrent chromosome 6 abnormalities in malignant mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribotta, M; Roseo, F; Salvio, M; Castagneto, B; Carbone, M; Procopio, A; Giordano, A; Mutti, L

    1998-04-01

    The long latency period between asbestos exposure and the onset of malignant mesothelioma (MM) suggests that a multistep tumorigenesis process occurs whilst the capability of asbestos fibres to interfere directly with chromosomes focuses on the critical role of the chromosomal abnormalities in this neoplasm. The aim of our study was to identify any recurrent chromosomal changes in ten primary MM cell cultures derived from pleural effusions of patients with MM from the same geographic area and environmental and/or occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in accordance with International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature. Our results confirmed a great number of cytogenetic abnormalities in MM cells. Recurrent loss of the long arms of chromosome 6 (6q-) was the most frequent abnormality detected (four epithelial and two mixed subtypes) while, on the whole, abnormalities of chromosome 6 were found in nine out of ten cases whereas chromosome 6 was normal only in the case with fibromatous subtype. Monosomy 13 and 17 was found in five cases, monosomy 14 in four cases and 22 in three cases. Since deletion of 6q- was detected even in relatively undisturbed karyotype, we hypothesize a multistep carcinogenic process in which deletion of 6q- is an early event in the development and progression of malignant mesothelioma.

  3. Characterizing the chromosomes of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Daniel; Miethke, Pat; Alsop, Amber E; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia; Trifonov, Vladimir; Veyrunes, Frederic; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Kremitzki, Colin L; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley; Grützner, Frank; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Like the unique platypus itself, the platypus genome is extraordinary because of its complex sex chromosome system, and is controversial because of difficulties in identification of small autosomes and sex chromosomes. A 6-fold shotgun sequence of the platypus genome is now available and is being assembled with the help of physical mapping. It is therefore essential to characterize the chromosomes and resolve the ambiguities and inconsistencies in identifying autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have used chromosome paints and DAPI banding to identify and classify pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have established an agreed nomenclature and identified anchor BAC clones for each chromosome that will ensure unambiguous gene localizations.

  4. Polytene chromosome map and inversion polymorphism in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Ananina

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata belongs to the tripunctata group, and is one of the commonest Drosophila species collected in some places in Brazil, especially in the winter. A standard map of the polytene chromosomes is presented. The breakpoints of the naturally occurring chromosomal rearrangements are marked on the map. The distribution of breaking points through the chromosomes of D. mediopunctata is apparently non-random. Chromosomes X, II and IV show inversion polymorphisms. Chromosome II is the most polymorphic, with 17 inversions, 8 inversions in the distal region and 9 in the proximal region. Chromosome X has four different gene arrangements, while chromosome IV has only two.

  5. Stable expression of green fluorescent protein and targeted disruption of thioredoxin peroxidase-1 gene in Babesia bovis with the WR99210/dhfr selection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Masahito; Tanaka, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Inoue, Noboru; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro

    2012-02-01

    We have achieved stable expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Babesia bovis by using the WR99210/human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene selection system. A GFP-expression plasmid with a dhfr expression cassette (DHFR-gfp) was constructed and transfected into B. bovis by nucleofection. Following WR99210 selection, a GFP-fluorescent parasite population was obtained and the fluorescent parasite was maintained for more than 7 months under WR99210 drug pressure. The DHFR-gfp was used to construct a small circular chromosome and to target gene disruption in the parasite. For construction of the small circular chromosome (DHFR-gfp-Bbcent2), the putative centromere region of B. bovis chromosome 2 (Bbcent2) was cloned and inserted into the DHFR-gfp plasmid. Addition of Bbcent2 to the DHFR-gfp plasmid improved its segregation efficiency during parasite multiplication and GFP-expressing parasites were maintained for more than 2 months without drug pressure. For targeted disruption of a B. bovis gene we attempted to knockout the thioredoxin peroxidase-1 (TPx-1) gene (a single-copy 2-Cys peroxiredoxin gene, Tbtpx-1) by homologous recombination. To generate the targeting construct (DHFR-gfp-Bbtpx1KO), 5' and 3' portions of Bbtpx-1 were cloned into the DHFR-gfp plasmid. Following nucleofection, WR99210 selection and cloning, a GFP-fluorescent parasite population was obtained. Integration of the construct into the Bbtpx-1 locus was confirmed by PCR. The absence of Bbtpx-1 mRNA and protein were verified by reverse transcription PCR and western blot analysis/indirect immunofluorescence assay, respectively. This is the first report of targeted gene disruption of a Babesia gene. These advances in the methodology of genetic manipulation in B. bovis will facilitate functional analysis of Babesia genomes and will improve our understanding of the basic biology of apicomplexan parasites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The paternal sex ratio chromosome in the parasitic wasp Trichogramma kaykai condenses the paternal chromosomes into a dense chromatin mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van J.J.F.A.; Salverda, M.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Stouthamer, R.

    2003-01-01

    A recently discovered B chromosome in the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma kaykai was found to be transmitted through males only. Shortly after fertilization, this chromosome eliminates the paternal chromosome set leaving the maternal chromosomes and itself intact. Consequently, the sex ratio in these

  7. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an MRE? Is an MRE shelf stable? What foods are packaged in retort packages? What is aseptic ... type of package is used for aseptic processing? What foods are packaged in aseptic packages? Can I microwave ...

  8. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  9. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  10. Agrobacterium May Delay Plant Nonhomologous End-Joining DNA Repair via XRCC4 to Favor T-DNA Integration[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghchhipawala, Zarir E.; Vasudevan, Balaji; Lee, Seonghee; Morsy, Mustafa R.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a soilborne pathogen that causes crown gall disease in many dicotyledonous plants by transfer of a portion of its tumor-inducing plasmid (T-DNA) into the plant genome. Several plant factors that play a role in Agrobacterium attachment to plant cells and transport of T-DNA to the nucleus have been identified, but the T-DNA integration step during transformation is poorly understood and has been proposed to occur via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)–mediated double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair. Here, we report a negative role of X-RAY CROSS COMPLEMENTATION GROUP4 (XRCC4), one of the key proteins required for NHEJ, in Agrobacterium T-DNA integration. Downregulation of XRCC4 in Arabidopsis and Nicotiana benthamiana increased stable transformation due to increased T-DNA integration. Overexpression of XRCC4 in Arabidopsis decreased stable transformation due to decreased T-DNA integration. Interestingly, XRCC4 directly interacted with Agrobacterium protein VirE2 in a yeast two-hybrid system and in planta. VirE2-expressing Arabidopsis plants were more susceptible to the DNA damaging chemical bleomycin and showed increased stable transformation. We hypothesize that VirE2 titrates or excludes active XRCC4 protein available for DSB repair, thus delaying the closure of DSBs in the chromosome, providing greater opportunity for T-DNA to integrate. PMID:23064322

  11. Report of the fifth international workshop on human X chromosome mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, H.F.; Cremers, F.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Schlessinger, D.

    1994-12-31

    A high-quality integrated genetic and physical map of the X chromosome from telomere to telomere, based primarily on YACs formatted with probes and STSs, is increasingly close to reality. At the Fifth International X Chromosome Workshop, organized by A.M. Poustka and D. Schlessinger in Heidelberg, Germany, April 24--27, 1994, substantial progress was recorded on extension and refinement of the physical map, on the integration of genetic and cytogenetic data, on attempts to use the map to direct gene searches, and on nascent large-scale sequencing efforts. This report summarizes physical and genetic mapping information presented at the workshop and/or published since the reports of the fourth International X Chromosome Workshop. The principle aim of the workshop was to derive a consensus map of the chromosome, in terms of physical contigs emphasizing the location of genes and microsatellite markers. The resulting map is presented and updates previous versions. This report also updates the list of highly informative microsatellites. The text highlights the working state of the map, the genes known to reside on the X, and the progress toward integration of various types of data.

  12. BUBR1 recruits PP2A via the B56 family of targeting subunits to promote chromosome congression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    2013-03-01

    BUBR1 is a mitotic phosphoprotein essential for the maintenance of chromosome stability by promoting chromosome congression and proper kinetochore–microtubule (K-fiber attachment, but the underlying mechanism(s has remained elusive. Here we identify BUBR1 as a binding partner of the B56 family of Protein Phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits. The interaction between BUBR1 and the B56 family is required for chromosome congression, since point mutations in BUBR1 that block B56 binding abolish chromosome congression. The BUBR1:B56-PP2A complex opposes Aurora B kinase activity, since loss of the complex can be reverted by inhibiting Aurora B. Importantly, we show that the failure of BUBR1 to recruit B56-PP2A also contributes to the chromosome congression defects found in cells derived from patients with the Mosaic Variegated Aneuploidy (MVA syndrome. Together, we propose that B56-PP2A is a key mediator of BUBR1's role in chromosome congression and functions by antagonizing Aurora B activity at the kinetochore for establishing stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment at the metaphase plate.

  13. Live imaging of X chromosome reactivation dynamics in early mouse development can discriminate naïve from primed pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shin; Hosoi, Yusuke; Shiura, Hirosuke; Yamagata, Kazuo; Takahashi, Saori; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kohda, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-08-15

    Pluripotent stem cells can be classified into two distinct states, naïve and primed, which show different degrees of potency. One difficulty in stem cell research is the inability to distinguish these states in live cells. Studies on female mice have shown that reactivation of inactive X chromosomes occurs in the naïve state, while one of the X chromosomes is inactivated in the primed state. Therefore, we aimed to distinguish the two states by monitoring X chromosome reactivation. Thus far, X chromosome reactivation has been analysed using fixed cells; here, we inserted different fluorescent reporter gene cassettes (mCherry and eGFP) into each X chromosome. Using these knock-in 'Momiji' mice, we detected X chromosome reactivation accurately in live embryos, and confirmed that the pluripotent states of embryos were stable ex vivo, as represented by embryonic and epiblast stem cells in terms of X chromosome reactivation. Thus, Momiji mice provide a simple and accurate method for identifying stem cell status based on X chromosome reactivation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Safe genetic modification of cardiac stem cells using a site-specific integration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Feng; Liu, Junwei; Narsinh, Kazim H; Hu, Shijun; Han, Leng; Lee, Andrew S; Karow, Marisa; Nguyen, Patricia K; Nag, Divya; Calos, Michele P; Robbins, Robert C; Wu, Joseph C

    2012-09-11

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising cell source for regenerative repair after myocardial infarction. Exploitation of their full therapeutic potential may require stable genetic modification of the cells ex vivo. Safe genetic engineering of stem cells, using facile methods for site-specific integration of transgenes into known genomic contexts, would significantly enhance the overall safety and efficacy of cellular therapy in a variety of clinical contexts. We used the phiC31 site-specific recombinase to achieve targeted integration of a triple fusion reporter gene into a known chromosomal context in hCPCs and human endothelial cells. Stable expression of the reporter gene from its unique chromosomal integration site resulted in no discernible genomic instability or adverse changes in cell phenotype. Namely, phiC31-modified hCPCs were unchanged in their differentiation propensity, cellular proliferative rate, and global gene expression profile when compared with unaltered control hCPCs. Expression of the triple fusion reporter gene enabled multimodal assessment of cell fate in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence microscopy, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography. Intramyocardial transplantation of genetically modified hCPCs resulted in significant improvement in myocardial function 2 weeks after cell delivery, as assessed by echocardiography (P=0.002) and MRI (P=0.001). We also demonstrated the feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of genetically modifying differentiated human endothelial cells, which enhanced hind limb perfusion (P<0.05 at day 7 and 14 after transplantation) on laser Doppler imaging. The phiC31 integrase genomic modification system is a safe, efficient tool to enable site-specific integration of reporter transgenes in progenitor and differentiated cell types.

  15. Chromosome Doubling of Microspore-Derived Plants from Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) and Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Suxia; Su, Yanbin; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao; Sun, Peitian

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome doubling of microspore-derived plants is an important factor in the practical application of microspore culture technology because breeding programs require a large number of genetically stable, homozygous doubled haploid plants with a high level of fertility. In the present paper, 29 populations of microspore-derived plantlets from cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) and broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) were used to study the ploidy level and spontaneous chromosome doubling of these populations, the artificial chromosome doubling induced by colchicine, and the influence of tissue culture duration on the chromosomal ploidy of the microspore-derived regenerants. Spontaneous chromosome doubling occurred randomly and was genotype dependent. In the plant populations derived from microspores, there were haploids, diploids, and even a low frequency of polyploids and mixed-ploidy plantlets. The total spontaneous doubling in the 14 cabbage populations ranged from 0 to 76.9%, compared with 52.2 to 100% in the 15 broccoli populations. To improve the rate of chromosome doubling, an efficient and reliable artificial chromosome doubling protocol (i.e., the immersion of haploid plantlet roots in a colchicine solution) was developed for cabbage and broccoli microspore-derived haploids. The optimal chromosome doubling of the haploids was obtained with a solution of 0.2% colchicine for 9-12 h or 0.4% colchicine for 3-9 h for cabbage and 0.05% colchicine for 6-12 h for broccoli. This protocol produced chromosome doubling in over 50% of the haploid genotypes for most of the populations derived from cabbage and broccoli. Notably, after 1 or more years in tissue culture, the chromosomes of the haploids were doubled, and most of the haploids turned into doubled haploid or mixed-ploidy plants. This is the first report indicating that tissue culture duration can change the chromosomal ploidy of microspore-derived regenerants.

  16. Klinefelter syndrome and other sex chromosomal aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham John M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term Klinefelter syndrome (KS describes a group of chromosomal disorder in which there is at least one extra X chromosome to a normal male karyotype, 46,XY. XXY aneuploidy is the most common disorder of sex chromosomes in humans, with prevalence of one in 500 males. Other sex chromosomal aneuploidies have also been described, although they are much less frequent, with 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY being present in 1 per 17,000 to 1 per 50,000 male births. The incidence of 49,XXXXY is 1 per 85,000 to 100,000 male births. In addition, 46,XX males also exist and it is caused by translocation of Y material including sex determining region (SRY to the X chromosome during paternal meiosis. Formal cytogenetic analysis is necessary to make a definite diagnosis, and more obvious differences in physical features tend to be associated with increasing numbers of sex chromosomes. If the diagnosis is not made prenatally, 47,XXY males may present with a variety of subtle clinical signs that are age-related. In infancy, males with 47,XXY may have chromosomal evaluations done for hypospadias, small phallus or cryptorchidism, developmental delay. The school-aged child may present with language delay, learning disabilities, or behavioral problems. The older child or adolescent may be discovered during an endocrine evaluation for delayed or incomplete pubertal development with eunuchoid body habitus, gynecomastia, and small testes. Adults are often evaluated for infertility or breast malignancy. Androgen replacement therapy should begin at puberty, around age 12 years, in increasing dosage sufficient to maintain age appropriate serum concentrations of testosterone, estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, and luteinizing hormone (LH. The effects on physical and cognitive development increase with the number of extra Xs, and each extra X is associated with an intelligence quotient (IQ decrease of approximately 15–16 points, with language most affected

  17. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  18. Marked chromosomes associations in catarrhine monkeys, with a note on chromosome associations in other primate groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L.E.M. de

    In metaphase figures, obtained from cultures of whole blood, associations of the marked chromosomes were found in species of the following genera: Macaca, Cercocebus, Cercopithecus and Symphalangus. The different types of these associations are discussed. A note is given on chromosome associations

  19. Tracking of chromosome dynamics in live Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals that transcription promotes chromosome segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    Chromosome segregation is an essential part of the bacterial cell cycle but is poorly characterized in oval-shaped streptococci. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have tracked the dynamics of chromosome segregation in live cells of the

  20. Chromosome and genome size variation in Luzula (Juncaceae), a genus with holocentric chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bozek, M.; Leitch, A. R.; Leitch, I. J.; Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Kuta, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 4 (2012), s. 529-541 ISSN 0024-4074 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/07/P147 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosomal evolution * endopolyploidy * holokinetic chromosome * karyotype evolution * tetraploides * centromeres * TRNF intergenic spacer Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2012

  1. Painting of fourth and chromosome-wide regulation of the 4th chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Bernhardsson, Carolina; Larsson, Jan

    2007-05-02

    Drosophila melanogaster exhibits two expression-regulating systems that target whole, specific chromosomes: the dosage compensation system whereby the male-specific lethal complex doubles transcription of genes on the male X-chromosome and the chromosome 4-specific protein Painting of fourth, POF. POF is the first example of an autosome-specific protein and its presence raises the question of the universality of chromosome-specific regulation. Here we show that POF and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) are involved in the global regulation of the 4th chromosome. Contrary to previous conclusions, Pof is not essential for survival of diplo-4th karyotype flies. However, Pof is essential for survival of haplo-4th individuals and expression of chromosome 4 genes in diplo-4th individuals is decreased in the absence of Pof. Mapping of POF using chromatin immunoprecipitation suggested that it binds within genes. Furthermore, we show that POF binding is dependent on heterochromatin and that POF and HP1 bind interdependently to the 4th chromosome. We propose a balancing mechanism involving POF and HP1 that provides a feedback system for fine-tuning expression status of genes on the 4th chromosome.

  2. Unique mosaicism of structural chromosomal rearrangement: is chromosome 18 preferentially involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pater, J.M. de; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Scheres, J.M.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The mentally normal mother of a 4-year-old boy with del(18)(q21.3) syndrome was tested cytogenetically to study the possibility of an inherited structural rearrangement of chromosome 18. She was found to carry an unusual mosaicism involving chromosomes 18 and 21. Two unbalanced cell lines were seen

  3. MATERNAL SERUM CA 125 LEVELS IN PREGNANCIES WITH CHROMOSOMALLY-NORMAL AND CHROMOSOMALLY-ABNORMAL FETUSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLITH, JMM; MANTINGH, A; DEBRUIJN, HWA; KLOOSTERMAN, MD; KANHAI, HHH; WOLF, H; EVERHARDT, E; CHRISTIAENS, GCML

    1993-01-01

    We measured the maternal serum cancer antigen 125 (MS-CA 125) levels in 98 nonpregnant women, 765 first- and second-trimester pregnancies with chromosomally-normal fetuses, and 54 chromosomally-abnormal pregnancies. To determine the MS-CA 125 concentration, we used a new automated microparticle

  4. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuanliang; Bai, Lili; Fu, Shulan; Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R-C; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a J(s) genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s) , J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s) genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  5. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Deng

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome and pDbH12 (a J(s genome specific probe as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s , J and St in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of

  6. International workshop on chromosome 3. Final report, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmill, R.M.

    1992-07-01

    The Second Workshop on Human Chromosome 3 was held on April 4--5, 1991 at Denver, Colorado. There were 43 participants representing 8 nations. The workshop participants reviewed the current state of the chromosome 3 map, both physical and genetic, and prepared lists of markers and cell lines to be made commonly available. These markers and cell lines should be incorporated into the mapping efforts of diverse groups to permit the integration of data and development of consensus maps at future workshops. Region specific efforts were described for sections of the chromosome harboring genes thought to be involved in certain diseases including Von Hippel-Lindau disease, 3p-syndrome, lung cancer and renal cancer. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. PTEN regulates PLK1 and controls chromosomal stability during cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong; Hou, Sheng-Qi; He, Jinxue; Gu, Tingting; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PTEN functions as a guardian of the genome through multiple mechanisms. We have previously established that PTEN maintains the structural integrity of chromosomes. In this report, we demonstrate a fundamental role of PTEN in controlling chromosome inheritance to prevent gross genomic alterations. Disruption of PTEN or depletion of PTEN protein phosphatase activity causes abnormal chromosome content, manifested by enlarged or polyploid nuclei. We further identify polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as a substrate of PTEN phosphatase. PTEN can physically associate with PLK1 and reduce PLK1 phosphorylation in a phosphatase-dependent manner. We show that PTEN deficiency leads to PLK1 phosphorylation and that a phospho-mimicking PLK1 mutant causes polyploidy, imitating functional deficiency of PTEN phosphatase. Inhibition of PLK1 activity or overexpression of a non-phosphorylatable PLK1 mutant reduces the polyploid cell population. These data reveal a new mechanism by which PTEN controls genomic stability during cell division. PMID:27398835

  8. DNA methylation profiling of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Florian; Lewin, Joern; Cortese, Rene; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Attwood, John; Burger, Matthias; Burton, John; Cox, Tony V.; Davies, Rob; Down, Thomas A.; Haefliger, Carolina; Horton, Roger; Howe, Kevin; Jackson, David K.; Kunde, Jan; Koenig, Christoph; Liddle, Jennifer; Niblett, David; Otto, Thomas; Pettett, Roger; Seemann, Stefanie; Thompson, Christian; West, Tony; Rogers, Jane; Olek, Alex; Berlin, Kurt; Beck, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation constitutes the most stable type of epigenetic modifications modulating the transcriptional plasticity of mammalian genomes. Using bisulfite DNA sequencing, we report high-resolution methylation reference profiles of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22, providing a resource of about 1.9 million CpG methylation values derived from 12 different tissues. Analysis of 6 annotation categories, revealed evolutionary conserved regions to be the predominant sites for differential DNA methylation and a core region surrounding the transcriptional start site as informative surrogate for promoter methylation. We find 17% of the 873 analyzed genes differentially methylated in their 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTR) and about one third of the differentially methylated 5′-UTRs to be inversely correlated with transcription. While our study was controlled for factors reported to affect DNA methylation such as sex and age, we did not find any significant attributable effects. Our data suggest DNA methylation to be ontogenetically more stable than previously thought. PMID:17072317

  9. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  10. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E. Janes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of sequence from one individual of a target species that can be isolated by screening, mapped onto karyotypes, and sequenced. With these techniques, researchers have identified differences and similarities in sex chromosome content and organization across amniotes and have addressed hypotheses regarding the frequency and direction of past changes. Here, we review studies of sex chromosome evolution in amniotes and the ways in which the field of research has been affected by the advent of BAC libraries.

  11. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another......). The phenotype of patients correlated well with the extent of deletion or duplication of chromosome 21 sequences. These data demonstrate three mechanisms of r(21) formation and show that the phenotype of r(21) patients varies with the extent of chromosome 21 monosomy or trisomy....

  12. Analysis of the Ceratitis capitata y chromosome using in situ hybridization to mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhoeft, U.; Franz, G.

    1998-01-01

    In Ceratitis capitata the Y chromosome is responsible for sex-determination. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic analysis of mitotic chromosomes. FISH with the wild-type strain EgyptII and two repetitive DNA probes enabled us to differentiate between the short and the long arm of the Y chromosome and gives a much better resolution than C-banding of mitotic chromosomes. We identified the Y-chromosomal breakpoints in Y-autosome translocations using FISH. Even more complex rearrangements i.e. deletions and insertions in some translocation strains were detected by this method. A strategy for mapping the primary sex determination factor in Ceratitis capitata by FISH is presented. (author)

  13. Nonhomologous DNA end joining and chromosome aberrations in human embryonic lung fibroblasts treated with environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossner, Pavel; Rossnerova, Andrea; Beskid, Olena; Tabashidze, Nana; Libalova, Helena; Uhlirova, Katerina; Topinka, Jan; Sram, Radim J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyzed the effect of air pollutants on NHEJ and chromosome aberrations. • In HEL12469 cells B[a]P and extractable organic matter induced DSBs. • The compounds induced XRCC4 expression and a weak Ku70/80 response. • We found increased frequency of aberrations of chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 17. • The tested compounds preferentially affected chromosome 7. - Abstract: In order to evaluate the ability of a representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and PAH-containing complex mixtures to induce double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and repair of damaged DNA in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 cells), we investigated the effect of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles <2.5 μm (PM2.5) on nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) and induction of stable chromosome aberrations (CAs). PM2.5 was collected in winter and summer 2011 in two Czech cities differing in levels and sources of air pollutants. The cells were treated for 24 h with the following concentrations of tested chemicals: B[a]P: 1 μM, 10 μM, 25 μM; EOMs: 1 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml, 25 μg/ml. We tested several endpoints representing key steps leading from DSBs to the formation of CAs including histone H2AX phosphorylation, levels of proteins Ku70, Ku80 and XRCC4 participating in NHEJ, in vitro ligation activity of nuclear extracts of the HEL12469 cells and the frequency of stable CAs assessed by whole chromosome painting of chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 17 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results show that 25 μM of B[a]P and most of the tested doses of EOMs induced DSBs as indicated by H2AX phosphorylation. DNA damage was accompanied by induction of XRCC4 expression and an increased frequency of CAs. Translocations most frequently affected chromosome 7. We observed only a weak induction of Ku70/80 expression as well as ligation activity of nuclear extracts. In summary, our data suggest the induction of DSBs and

  14. Chromosome 10q tetrasomy: First reported case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackston, R.D.; May, K.M.; Jones, F.D. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While there are several reports of trisomy 10q (at least 35), we are not aware of previous cases of 10q tetrasomy. We present what we believe to be the initial report of such a case. R.J. is a 6 1/2 year old white male who presented with multiple dysmorphic features, marked articulation problems, hyperactivity, and developmental delays. He is the product of a term uncomplicated pregnancy. There was a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery with a birth weight of 6 lbs. 4oz. and length was 19 1/2 inch. Dysmorphic features include small size, an asymmetrically small head, low set ears with overfolded helixes, bilateral ptosis, downslanting eyes, right eye esotropia, prominent nose, asymmetric facies, high palate, mild pectus excavatum deformity of chest, and hyperextensible elbow joints. The patient is in special needs classes for mildly mentally handicapped students. Chromosome analysis at a resolution of 800 bands revealed a complex rearrangement of chromosomes 10 and 11. The segment 10q25.3 to q16.3 appears to be inverted and duplicated within the long arm of chromosome 10 at band q25.3 and the same segment of chromosome 10 is present on the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 11. There is no visible loss of material from chromosome 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed with a chromosome 10 specific {open_quotes}paint{close_quotes} to confirm that all of the material on the abnormal 10 and the material on the terminal short arm of 11 was from chromosome 10. Thus, it appears that the segment 10q25.3 to q26.3 is present in four copies. Parental chromosome studies are normal. We compared findings which differ in that the case of 10q tetrasomy did not have prenatal growth deficiency, microphthalmia, cleft palate, digital anomalies, heart, or renal defects. Whereas most cases of 10q trisomy are said to have severe mental deficiency, our case of 10q tetrasomy was only mildly delayed. We report this first apparent cited case of 10q tetrasomy.

  15. Cancer therapeutic target genes identified on chromosome 20q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated quantitative genome data analysis was recently able to pinpoint 18 genes on human chromosome 20q that could potentially serve as novel molecular targets for cancer therapy. Researchers Antoine M Snijders and Jian-Hua Mao from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Biological Systems and Engineering Division in Berkeley, California, United States, in their study published by the journal Advances in Modern Oncology Research (AMOR sought to compare the amounts of individual mRNAs – messenger RNAs that specify the amino acid sequence of the protein products of gene expression – in cancerous human tissues with corresponding normal tissues. The duo conducted a meta-analysis of genes on chromosome 20q that are found to be consistently upregulated across different human tumor types, while collecting gene transcript data of normal and tumor tissues across 11 different tumor types including brain, breast, colon, gastric, head and neck, liver, lung, ovarian, cervix, pancreas, and prostate cancers. “We calculated the differential expression of all 301 genes present on chromosome 20q for which gene transcript data was available. We then filtered for genes that were upregulated in tumors by at least 1.5 fold (p < 0.05 in seven or more tumor types,” they said. The resulting analysis identified 18 genes – some such as AURKA, UBE2C, TPX2, FAM83D, ZNF217, SALL4 and MMP9 have been previously known to potentially cause cancer. The 18-gene signature is revealed by the study to have robustly elevated levels across human cancers. “We observed significant association of our signature with disease-free survival in all 18 independent data… These data indicated that our signature is broadly predictive for disease-free survival, independent of tumor type,” the researchers said. In certain cases, Snijders and Mao found that increased gene expression was associated with better prognosis. “For example, the increased expressions of MMP9 and

  16. Chromosomal Islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: Molecular Switches for Survival and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Van Nguyen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI. S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5’ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13-20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI. Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  17. Using microsatellites to understand the physical distribution of recombination on soybean chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Ott

    Full Text Available Soybean is a major crop that is an important source of oil and proteins. A number of genetic linkage maps have been developed in soybean. Specifically, hundreds of simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have been developed and mapped. Recent sequencing of the soybean genome resulted in the generation of vast amounts of genetic information. The objectives of this investigation were to use SSR markers in developing a connection between genetic and physical maps and to determine the physical distribution of recombination on soybean chromosomes. A total of 2,188 SSRs were used for sequence-based physical localization on soybean chromosomes. Linkage information was used from different maps to create an integrated genetic map. Comparison of the integrated genetic linkage maps and sequence based physical maps revealed that the distal 25% of each chromosome was the most marker-dense, containing an average of 47.4% of the SSR markers and 50.2% of the genes. The proximal 25% of each chromosome contained only 7.4% of the markers and 6.7% of the genes. At the whole genome level, the marker density and gene density showed a high correlation (R(2 of 0.64 and 0.83, respectively with the physical distance from the centromere. Recombination followed a similar pattern with comparisons indicating that recombination is high in telomeric regions, though the correlation between crossover frequency and distance from the centromeres is low (R(2 = 0.21. Most of the centromeric regions were low in recombination. The crossover frequency for the entire soybean genome was 7.2%, with extremes much higher and lower than average. The number of recombination hotspots varied from 1 to 12 per chromosome. A high correlation of 0.83 between the distribution of SSR markers and genes suggested close association of SSRs with genes. The knowledge of distribution of recombination on chromosomes may be applied in characterizing and targeting genes.

  18. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott V; McShan, William M

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5' end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  19. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  20. Aberrations Involving Chromosome 1 as a Possible Predictor of Odds Ratio for Colon Cancer--Results from the Krakow Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Galas

    Full Text Available There is still an open question how to predict colorectal cancer risk before any morphological changes appear in the colon.The purpose was to investigate aberrations in chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 in peripheral blood lymphocytes analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique as a tool to assess the likelihood of colorectal cancer.A hospital-based case-control study included 20 colon cancer patients and 18 hospital-based controls. Information about potential covariates was collected by interview. The frequency of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations in chromosome 1, 2 and 4 was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique.Colorectal cancer patients, as compared to controls, had a relatively higher frequency of chromosome 1 translocations (median: 3.5 versus 1.0 /1000 cells, p = 0.006, stable aberrations (3.8 versus 1.0 /1000 cells, p = 0.007 and total aberrations (p = 0.009. There were no differences observed for chromosomes 2 and 4. Our results showed an increase in the odds of having colon cancer by about 50-80% associated with an increase by 1/1000 cells in the number of chromosome 1 aberrations.The results revealed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations, especially translocations in chromosome 1, seems to be a promising method to show a colon cancer risk. Additionally, our study suggests the reasonableness of use of biomarkers such as chromosome 1 aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in screening prevention programs for individuals at higher colon cancer risk to identify those who are at increased risk and require more frequent investigations, e.g. by sigmoidoscopy.