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Sample records for stable chemical form

  1. Chemical forms of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Enzo

    1979-01-01

    Release of radioiodine built-up during reactor operations presents a potential problem from the standpoint of environmental safety. Among the chemical forms of radioiodine, depending upon the circumstances, organic iodides cast a most serious problem because of its difficulties in the trapping and because of its stability compared to other chemical forms. Furthermore, pellet-cladding interaction (PCl) fuel failures in LWR fuel rods are believed to be stress corrosion cracks caused by embrittling fission product species, radioiodine. To deal with these problems, knowledge is required on the chemical behaviors of radioiodine in and out of fuels, as well as the release behaviors from fuels. Here a brief review is given of these respects, in aiming at clearing-up the questions still remaining unknown. The data seem to indicate that radioiodine exists as a combined form in fuels. upon heating slightly irradiated fuels, the iodine atoms are released in a chemical form associated with uranium atoms. Experiments, however, as needed with specimen of higher burnup, where the interactions of radioiodine with metallic fission products could be favored. The dominant release mechanism of radioiodine under normal operating temperatures will be diffusion to grain boundaries leading to open surfaces. Radiation-induced internal traps, however, after the rate of diffusion significantly. The carbon sources of organic iodides formed under various conditions and its formation mechanisms have also been considered. (author)

  2. Palmitic acid/polypyrrole composites as form-stable phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silakhori, Mahyar; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mahlia, Teuku Meurah Indra; Fauzi, Hadi; Baradaran, Saeid; Naghavi, Mohammad Sajad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel phase change composite of palmitic acid–polypyrrole(PA–PPy) was fabricated. • Thermal properties of PA–PPy are characterized in different mass ratios of PA–PPy. • Thermal cycling test showed that form stable PCM had a favorable thermal reliability. - Abstract: In this study a novel palmitic acid (PA)/polypyrrole (PPy) form-stable PCMs were readily prepared by in situ polymerization method. PA was used as thermal energy storage material and PPy was operated as supporting material. Form-stable PCMs were investigated by SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrometer) analysis that illustrated PA Particles were wrapped by PPy particles. XRD (X-ray diffractometer) was used for crystalline phase of PA/PPy composites. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used for investigating Thermal stability and thermal energy storage properties of prepared form-stable PCMs. According to the obtained results the form stable PCMs exhibited favorable thermal stability in terms of their phase change temperature. The form-stable PCMs (79.9 wt% loading of PA) were considered as the highest loading PCM with desirable latent heat storage of 166.3 J/g and good thermal stability. Accelerated thermal cycling tests also showed that form stable PCM had an acceptable thermal reliability. As a consequence of acceptable thermal properties, thermal stability and chemical stability, we can consider the new kind of form stable PCMs for low temperature solar thermal energy storage applications

  3. Thermal performance study of form-stable composite phase change material with polyacrylic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Shin Yiing; Munusamy, Yamuna; Ong, Kok Seng; Chee, Swee Yong; Sanmuggam, Shimalaa

    2017-04-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is one of the most popular and widely used as thermal energy storage material because it is able to absorb and release a large amount of latent heat during a phase change process over a narrow temperature range. In this work, the form-stable composite PCM was prepared by blending of PMMA and myristic acid in different weight percentage. PMMA was used as a supporting material while myristic acid was used as PCM. Theoretically, PCM can be encapsulated in the support material after blending. However, a small amount of liquid PCMs can leak out from supporting material due to the volume change in phase change process. Therefore, a form-stable composite PCM with polyacrylic coating was studied. Leakage test was carried out to determine the leakage percentage of the form-stable composite PCM. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the chemical compatibility of the form-stable PCM composite while differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the melting, freezing point and the latent heat of melting and freezing for the form-stable composite PCM.

  4. Using stable isotopes to monitor forms of sulfur during desulfurization processes: A quick screening method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao-Li; Hackley, Keith C.; Coleman, D.D.; Kruse, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A method using stable isotope ratio analysis to monitor the reactivity of sulfur forms in coal during thermal and chemical desulfurization processes has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. The method is based upon the fact that a significant difference exists in some coals between the 34S/32S ratios of the pyritic and organic sulfur. A screening method for determining the suitability of coal samples for use in isotope ratio analysis is described. Making these special coals available from coal sample programs would assist research groups in sorting out the complex sulfur chemistry which accompanies thermal and chemical processing of high sulfur coals. ?? 1987.

  5. Behaviors and chemical forms of radionuclides in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yoshihide

    1981-01-01

    Although the radionuclides introduced into the marine environment from various sources and routes are finally distributed among the components of the marine ecosystem, the residence time is one of the most useful measures of the reactivity of an element in the oceanic chemical system. Heavy metals such as Mn, Fe, Co and Zn which have shorter residence times, reveal more complicated behaviours in relation to marine radioecological interest than alkaline earth element such as Sr which has a longer residence time. The possible physico-chemical forms of radionuclides in the oceans are usually classified into three categories, that is, species in true solution, colloidal species, and particulate forms. The modeling to study the dispersion of radionuclides introduced into the marine environment can be approached with the aid of the knowledge of behaviors of their stable counterparts in seawater. The different physico-chemical forms between stable and radioactive nuclides in seawater may cause different biological concentration of the element. To realize the chemical speciation of radionuclides in the marine environment, it is also important in thermodynamical calculation to consider heterogeneous interfaces where cause raising the concentration of reactants in seawater, especially in the coastal waters. In the discussion on the primary factors that can affect the elemental distribution in the marine environment, primary productivity and bacterial activity are emphasized for the transformation of physicochemical states of radionuclides in the marine environment. Finally, the radioecological differences between radiocobalt in organic complexed and ionic forms were demonstrated in the experiments on the uptake and elimination of radiocobalt by mussels. (J.P.N.)

  6. Chemical compatibility of DWPF canistered waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require that the contents of the canistered waste form are compatible with one another and the stainless steel canister. The canistered waste form is a closed system comprised of a stainless steel vessel containing waste glass, air, and condensate. This system will experience a radiation field and an elevated temperature due to radionuclide decay. This report discusses possible chemical reactions, radiation interactions, and corrosive reactions within this system both under normal storage conditions and after exposure to temperatures up to the normal glass transition temperature, which for DWPF waste glass will be between 440 and 460 degrees C. Specific conclusions regarding reactions and corrosion are provided. This document is based on the assumption that the period of interim storage prior to packaging at the federal repository may be as long as 50 years

  7. Broken Homes: Stable Risk, Changing Reasons, Changing Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Dorrian Apple

    1985-01-01

    Cohort membership and two measures of social disadvantage were used as explanatory variables in analysis of the risk of growing up in a broken home and of the living arrangements of children with broken homes. The risk of a broken home by age 16 proved to be stable across cohorts and greater for those from disadvantaged homes. (Author/BL)

  8. Method for forming thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2013-08-20

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  9. Earth's first stable continents did not form by subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tim E; Brown, Michael; Gardiner, Nicholas J; Kirkland, Christopher L; Smithies, R Hugh

    2017-03-09

    The geodynamic environment in which Earth's first continents formed and were stabilized remains controversial. Most exposed continental crust that can be dated back to the Archaean eon (4 billion to 2.5 billion years ago) comprises tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite rocks (TTGs) that were formed through partial melting of hydrated low-magnesium basaltic rocks; notably, these TTGs have 'arc-like' signatures of trace elements and thus resemble the continental crust produced in modern subduction settings. In the East Pilbara Terrane, Western Australia, low-magnesium basalts of the Coucal Formation at the base of the Pilbara Supergroup have trace-element compositions that are consistent with these being source rocks for TTGs. These basalts may be the remnants of a thick (more than 35 kilometres thick), ancient (more than 3.5 billion years old) basaltic crust that is predicted to have existed if Archaean mantle temperatures were much hotter than today's. Here, using phase equilibria modelling of the Coucal basalts, we confirm their suitability as TTG 'parents', and suggest that TTGs were produced by around 20 per cent to 30 per cent melting of the Coucal basalts along high geothermal gradients (of more than 700 degrees Celsius per gigapascal). We also analyse the trace-element composition of the Coucal basalts, and propose that these rocks were themselves derived from an earlier generation of high-magnesium basaltic rocks, suggesting that the arc-like signature in Archaean TTGs was inherited from an ancestral source lineage. This protracted, multistage process for the production and stabilization of the first continents-coupled with the high geothermal gradients-is incompatible with modern-style plate tectonics, and favours instead the formation of TTGs near the base of thick, plateau-like basaltic crust. Thus subduction was not required to produce TTGs in the early Archaean eon.

  10. Stable Chemical Dosimeters for Partial Reconstruction of Nuclear Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornik, I.; Zec, U.; Baric, M.; Razem, D. [Ruder Boskovic Nuclear Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1969-10-15

    The application of chemical dosimeters, tissue equivalent with respect to gamma rays and neutrons, is proposed for dosimetric topography of the space around nuclear devices in case of accidents. The dosimeters in the form of sealed glass ampoules have sufficient sensitivity and long-term stability and are evaluated or checked directly by conventional spectrophotometry. The sensitivity, expressed as yield per rad, is approximately equal for gamma rays and neutrons. The resolution in both cases is about one rad, and the range is up to several thousand rads. The precision of dosimetry is {+-} 1 rad or {+-} 2%, whichever is higher. In free space and unshielded the dosimeter measures the total rad-absorbed dose delivered by gamma rays and neutrons, i.e. the first collision gamma plus neutron dose. If used on- or in-phantom, especially if several dosimeters are disposed within and around the same phantom, it can give important data about the amount of the neutron component of the dose and about the effective mean energy of incident neutrons. The neutron component of the dose can be directly measured if the gamma dosimeter is used together with the chemical dosimeter. The experiments giving the change of optical density per rad and the radiation chemical yield with respect to the absorbed dose delivered by 14-MeV neutrons are described in detail. The possibility is also mentioned of applying the dosimeter as a very sensitive monitor for thermal neutrons, which is due to the chlorine content of 4.73% and activation to {sup 38}Cl. The opinion is expressed that this dosimeter deserves some attention as a part of future planning and development work on area and personnel accidental dosimetry systems. (author)

  11. Quantum-chemical consideration of extermal valent forms of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionova, G.V.; Pershina, V.G.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    Stability of valent forms of actinides that has not yet studied experimentally, is considered within the framework of quantum-chemical considerations. Oxidizing potentials E 0 for actinide elements are determined theoretically. A dependence of the definite valent state stability on relativistic effect is shown. A conclusion is made that oxidizing potential E 0 (4-5) for americium should be higher than E 0 (4-5) for plutonium. A relatively small oxidizing potential E 0 (4-5) for curium speaks about principle possibility of production of five-valent curium in solution, though it is less stable than the six-valent one. Oxidizing potential corresponding to transition of three-valent californium into the four-valent state should be less than the value adopted in literature. A relatively small oxidizing potential of californium E 0 (4-5) speaks about possible existence of five-valent californium in solution

  12. Conversion of zircaloy to a massive chemically inert form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Kearsey, H.A.; Knibbs, R.H.; Mercer, A.C.; Nickerson, A.K.; Pearson, D.; Sambell, R.A.J.; Taylor, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    The report covers work carried out in the period July 1980 - December 1982 on the development and assessment of an aqueous route for the conversion of Zircaloy fuel element cladding to a stable oxide form and on alternative methods for incorporating the oxide into monolithic waste forms suitable for long-term storage and disposal. The work included two aspects, preliminary process development studies aimed at demonstrating the key steps in the process, and studies on the alternative immobilization techniques and the properties of the resulting waste forms. Experimental studies have shown that the ''hydrous zirconium oxide'' (with a residual fluoride content), following calcination at about 500 0 C, can be hot-pressed at 800-1000 0 C and 22.5 MPa to a high density ceramic waste form with good capacity for the incorporation of active species, such as U 4+ and Sr 2+ , and high leach resistance. Parallel studies have been carried out on the incorporation of the washed ''hydrous zirconium oxide'' in a range of cement matrices. A preliminary chemical engineering assessment of the overall process has been made and flowsheets for a plant to convert 250 kg Zircaloy/day have been prepared

  13. The retro-GCN4 leucine zipper sequence forms a stable three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittl, Peer R. E.; Deillon, Christine; Sargent, David; Liu, Niankun; Klauser, Stephan; Thomas, Richard M.; Gutte, Bernd; Grütter, Markus G.

    2000-01-01

    The question of whether a protein whose natural sequence is inverted adopts a stable fold is still under debate. We have determined the 2.1-Å crystal structure of the retro-GCN4 leucine zipper. In contrast to the two-stranded helical coiled-coil GCN4 leucine zipper, the retro-leucine zipper formed a very stable, parallel four-helix bundle, which now lends itself to further structural and functional studies. PMID:10716989

  14. Influence of physio-chemical forms on transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.; Salbu, B.

    1994-01-01

    The transfer and mobility of radionuclides within an ecosystem will be dependant on the physico-chemical forms of the deposited radionuclides. After a short summary of the influence of speciation and source term on the behaviour of anthropogenic radionuclides in aquatic and terrestrial systems, this paper focuses on appropriate sampling and analytical techniques that are applicable for speciation purposes. Particular emphasis is given to the significance of fuel particles in the releases from the Chernobyl reactor and, as an example of the application of the discussed techniques, results are presented from studies on 137 Cs and 90 Sr in soils collected from Nordic countries, and compared with results from soils collected in the SUS. The topics addressed include inhomogeneous deposition, the vertical distribution of radionuclides in soils, the use of sequential extraction to study the association of radionuclides with soil components, the use of NH 4 Ac extraction to distinguish between the mobile or labile fraction and the inert fraction of radionuclides in soils, aggregated transfer factors, and comparison of the distribution of radionuclides with naturally occurring stable isotopes. (orig.)

  15. Synthesis and investigation of novel shelf-stable, brain-specific chemical delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Obaid, Abdulrahman M.; Farag, Hassan A.; Khalil, Ashraf A.; Hamide, Sami G. Abdel; Ahmed, Hassan S.; Al-Affifi, Ahmed M.; Gadkariem Elrasheed, A.; El-Subbagh, Hussein I.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.; El-Kashef, Hassan A.

    2006-01-01

    A 1, 4-dihydropyridine pyridinium salt type redox system is described as a general and flexible method for site-specific and sustained delivery of drugs into the brain. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) were used as a model example to be delivered into the brain. Chemical and biological oxidations of these compounds were investigated. The prepared 1, 4-dihydropyridines were subjected to various chemical and biological oxidations to evaluate their ability to cross blood brain barrier (BBB), and to be oxidized biologically into their corresponding quaternary compounds. 1-(Ethioxy-carbonylmethyl)-3, 5-bis[N-(2-fluoro-benzylideneamino)carbamoyl]-1, 4-dyhydropyridine (31) proved to cross BBB in adequate rate and converted by the oxidizing enzymes into the corresponding quaternary salt N-(ethoxycarbolynmethyl)-3, 5-bis[N-(2-fluorobenylideneamino)carbamoyl]pyridimium bromide(20). Stability studies of the synthesized chemical delivery systems (CDSs) at various pH values and temperatures showed the shelf life time of a solution containing compound 31 is 20.53 days at 5C, which recommended a lower storage temperature for such solutions. The prepared CDSs proved to be fairly stable for powder form storage. The stability of the prepared compounds is attributed to the conjugation of the two carboxylic functions at C3 and C5 of the pyridine ring with their adjacent double bonds. These results are in consistency with the original rationale design. (author)

  16. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkeldei, Sarah Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste is generated by many different technical and scientific applications. For the past decades, different waste disposal strategies have been considered. Several questions on the waste disposal strategy remain unanswered, particularly regarding the long-term radiotoxicity of minor actinides (Am, Cm, Np), plutonium and uranium. These radionuclides mainly arise from high level nuclear waste (HLW), specific waste streams or dismantled nuclear weapons. Although many countries have opted for the direct disposal of spent fuel, from a scientific and technical point of view it is imperative to pursue alternative waste management strategies. Apart from the vitrification, especially for trivalent actinides and Pu, crystalline ceramic waste forms are considered. In contrast to glasses, crystalline waste forms, which are chemically and physically highly stable, allow the retention of radionuclides on well-defined lattice positions within the crystal structure. Besides polyphase ceramics such as SYNROC, single phase ceramics are considered as tailor made host phases to embed a specific radionuclide or a specific group. Among oxidic single phase ceramics pyrochlores are known to have a high potential for this application. This work examines ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlores as potential nuclear waste forms, which are known to show a high aqueous stability and a high tolerance towards radiation damage. This work contributes to (1) understand the phase stability field of pyrochlore and consequences of non-stoichiometry which leads to pyrochlores with mixed cationic sites. Mixed cationic occupancies are likely to occur in actinide-bearing pyrochlores. (2) The structural uptake of radionuclides themselves was studied. (3) The chemical stability and the effect of phase transition from pyrochlore to defect fluorite were probed. This phase transition is important, as it is the result of radiation damage in ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlores. ZrO{sub 2} - Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} pellets

  17. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkeldei, Sarah Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated by many different technical and scientific applications. For the past decades, different waste disposal strategies have been considered. Several questions on the waste disposal strategy remain unanswered, particularly regarding the long-term radiotoxicity of minor actinides (Am, Cm, Np), plutonium and uranium. These radionuclides mainly arise from high level nuclear waste (HLW), specific waste streams or dismantled nuclear weapons. Although many countries have opted for the direct disposal of spent fuel, from a scientific and technical point of view it is imperative to pursue alternative waste management strategies. Apart from the vitrification, especially for trivalent actinides and Pu, crystalline ceramic waste forms are considered. In contrast to glasses, crystalline waste forms, which are chemically and physically highly stable, allow the retention of radionuclides on well-defined lattice positions within the crystal structure. Besides polyphase ceramics such as SYNROC, single phase ceramics are considered as tailor made host phases to embed a specific radionuclide or a specific group. Among oxidic single phase ceramics pyrochlores are known to have a high potential for this application. This work examines ZrO 2 based pyrochlores as potential nuclear waste forms, which are known to show a high aqueous stability and a high tolerance towards radiation damage. This work contributes to (1) understand the phase stability field of pyrochlore and consequences of non-stoichiometry which leads to pyrochlores with mixed cationic sites. Mixed cationic occupancies are likely to occur in actinide-bearing pyrochlores. (2) The structural uptake of radionuclides themselves was studied. (3) The chemical stability and the effect of phase transition from pyrochlore to defect fluorite were probed. This phase transition is important, as it is the result of radiation damage in ZrO 2 based pyrochlores. ZrO 2 - Nd 2 O 3 pellets with pyrochlore and defect

  18. Looking for chemical reaction networks exhibiting a drift along a manifold of marginally stable states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogioli, Doriano

    2013-02-07

    I recently reported some examples of mass-action equations that have a continuous manifold of marginally stable stationary states [Brogioli, D., 2010. Marginally stable chemical systems as precursors of life. Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 058102; Brogioli, D., 2011. Marginal stability in chemical systems and its relevance in the origin of life. Phys. Rev. E 84, 031931]. The corresponding chemical reaction networks show nonclassical effects, i.e. a violation of the mass-action equations, under the effect of the concentration fluctuations: the chemical system drifts along the marginally stable states. I proposed that this effect is potentially involved in abiogenesis. In the present paper, I analyze the mathematical properties of mass-action equations of marginally stable chemical reaction networks. The marginal stability implies that the mass-action equations obey some conservation law; I show that the mathematical properties of the conserved quantity characterize the motion along the marginally stable stationary state manifold, i.e. they allow to predict if the fluctuations give rise to a random walk or a drift under the effect of concentration fluctuations. Moreover, I show that the presence of the drift along the manifold of marginally stable stationary-states is a critical property, i.e. at least one of the reaction constants must be fine tuned in order to obtain the drift. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A chemically stable PVD multilayer encapsulation for lithium microbatteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, J F; Sousa, R; Cunha, D J; Vieira, E M F; Goncalves, L M; Silva, M M; Dupont, L

    2015-01-01

    A multilayer physical vapour deposition (PVD) thin-film encapsulation method for lithium microbatteries is presented. Lithium microbatteries with a lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO 2 ) cathode, a lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON) electrolyte and a metallic lithium anode are under development, using PVD deposition techniques. Metallic lithium film is still the most common anode on this battery technology; however, it presents a huge challenge in terms of material encapsulation (lithium reacts with almost any materials deposited on top and almost instantly begins oxidizing in contact with atmosphere). To prove the encapsulation concept and perform all the experiments, lithium films were deposited by thermal evaporation technique on top of a glass substrate, with previously patterned Al/Ti contacts. Three distinct materials, in a multilayer combination, were tested to prevent lithium from reacting with protection materials and atmosphere. These multilayer films were deposited by RF sputtering and were composed of lithium phosphorous oxide (LiPO), LiPON and silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ). To complete the long-term encapsulation after breaking the vacuum, an epoxy was applied on top of the PVD multilayer. In order to evaluate oxidation state of lithium films, the lithium resistance was measured in a four probe setup (cancelling wires/contact resistances) and resistivity calculated, considering physical dimensions. A lithium resistivity of 0.16 Ω μm was maintained for more than a week. This PVD multilayer exonerates the use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD), glove-box chambers and sample manipulation between them, significantly reducing the fabrication cost, since battery and its encapsulation are fabricated in the same PVD chamber. (paper)

  20. A chemically stable PVD multilayer encapsulation for lithium microbatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J. F.; Sousa, R.; Cunha, D. J.; Vieira, E. M. F.; Silva, M. M.; Dupont, L.; Goncalves, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    A multilayer physical vapour deposition (PVD) thin-film encapsulation method for lithium microbatteries is presented. Lithium microbatteries with a lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) cathode, a lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON) electrolyte and a metallic lithium anode are under development, using PVD deposition techniques. Metallic lithium film is still the most common anode on this battery technology; however, it presents a huge challenge in terms of material encapsulation (lithium reacts with almost any materials deposited on top and almost instantly begins oxidizing in contact with atmosphere). To prove the encapsulation concept and perform all the experiments, lithium films were deposited by thermal evaporation technique on top of a glass substrate, with previously patterned Al/Ti contacts. Three distinct materials, in a multilayer combination, were tested to prevent lithium from reacting with protection materials and atmosphere. These multilayer films were deposited by RF sputtering and were composed of lithium phosphorous oxide (LiPO), LiPON and silicon nitride (Si3N4). To complete the long-term encapsulation after breaking the vacuum, an epoxy was applied on top of the PVD multilayer. In order to evaluate oxidation state of lithium films, the lithium resistance was measured in a four probe setup (cancelling wires/contact resistances) and resistivity calculated, considering physical dimensions. A lithium resistivity of 0.16 Ω μm was maintained for more than a week. This PVD multilayer exonerates the use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD), glove-box chambers and sample manipulation between them, significantly reducing the fabrication cost, since battery and its encapsulation are fabricated in the same PVD chamber.

  1. Preparation and thermal properties of form stable paraffin phase change material encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xing; Liu Hongyan; Wang Shujun; Zhang Lu; Cheng Hua

    2006-01-01

    Paraffin waxes are cheap and have moderate thermal energy storage density but low thermal conductivity and, hence, require large surface area to be used in energy storage. Form stable paraffin phase change materials (PCM) in which paraffin serves as a latent heat storage material and polyolefins act as a supporting material, because of paraffin leakage, are required to be improved. The form stable paraffin PCM in the present paper was encapsulated in an inorganic silica gel polymer successfully by in situ polymerization. The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to measure its thermal properties. At the same time, the Washburn equation, which measures the wetting properties of powder materials, was used to test the hydrophilic-lipophilic properties of the PCMs. The result indicated that the enthalpy of the microencapsulated PCMs was reduced little, while their hydrophilic properties were enhanced largely

  2. Polymorphic drugs examined with neutron spectroscopy: Is making more stable forms really that simple?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Landsgesell, Sven; Koza, Michael M.; Frick, Bernhard; Boldyreva, Elena V.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Pressure induced transition in the denser polymorphic form. • Weak strength of hydrogen bonds driving new stable packing. • Lattice anisotropy versus charge transfer. - Abstract: Understanding polymorphism in pharmaceutical ingredients is a long-standing challenge in formulation science. A well-known example is paracetamol, C 8 H 9 NO 2 . The marketed stable form I crystallizes with corrugated molecular layers. In contrast, form II, which is thermodynamically favorable at high pressures, has relatively planar layers that can slip over each other without difficulty, but is metastable at ambient conditions. By means of inelastic neutron scattering we demonstrated that the lattice modes of form II exhibit a sudden 1 meV energy shift at 300 K under a pressure of ca 0.4 GPa. Moreover, evidence of an increase of the vibrational energy in both polymorphs was found, which was accompanied, in form I, by an unexpectedly weak increase of the tunnel splitting. These results indicate an anisotropy of the potential surface probed by the methyl rotor, and are discussed in relation to the differences of the strength of the hydrogen bond environment for each polymorph

  3. Polymorphic drugs examined with neutron spectroscopy: Is making more stable forms really that simple?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Landsgesell, Sven [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner Platz, 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Koza, Michael M.; Frick, Bernhard [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156 38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Boldyreva, Elena V. [Novosibirsk State University, ul. Pirogova 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry, ul. Kutateladze 18, Novosibirsk 630128 (Russian Federation); Bordallo, Heloisa N., E-mail: bordallo@nbi.ku.dk [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Pressure induced transition in the denser polymorphic form. • Weak strength of hydrogen bonds driving new stable packing. • Lattice anisotropy versus charge transfer. - Abstract: Understanding polymorphism in pharmaceutical ingredients is a long-standing challenge in formulation science. A well-known example is paracetamol, C{sub 8}H{sub 9}NO{sub 2}. The marketed stable form I crystallizes with corrugated molecular layers. In contrast, form II, which is thermodynamically favorable at high pressures, has relatively planar layers that can slip over each other without difficulty, but is metastable at ambient conditions. By means of inelastic neutron scattering we demonstrated that the lattice modes of form II exhibit a sudden 1 meV energy shift at 300 K under a pressure of ca 0.4 GPa. Moreover, evidence of an increase of the vibrational energy in both polymorphs was found, which was accompanied, in form I, by an unexpectedly weak increase of the tunnel splitting. These results indicate an anisotropy of the potential surface probed by the methyl rotor, and are discussed in relation to the differences of the strength of the hydrogen bond environment for each polymorph.

  4. Preparation, Characterization and Thermal Properties of Paraffin Wax – Expanded Perlite Form-Stable Composites for Latent Heat Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba GURMEN OZCELIK

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, form-stable composite phase change materials (PCM for latent heat storage were prepared by impregnating paraffin wax into the pores of the expanded perlite (EP. The characterization of the composite PCMs was performed by FTIR, TGA, SEM and DSC analysis. The melting point and heat of fusion were determined for 25 % paraffin included composite, as 54.3 °C and 94.71 J/g and for 45 % paraffin included composite as 53.6 °C and 106.69 J/g, respectively. The FTIR results showed that there were no chemical reaction between the perlite and paraffin. TGA analysis indicated that both composite PCMs had good thermal stability. SEM images showed that the paraffin was dispersed uniformly into the pores and on the EP surface. There was no leakage and degradation at the composite PCMs after heating and cooling cycles. According to the results, both prepared composites showed good thermal energy storage properties, reliability and stability. All results suggested that the presented form- stable composite PCMs has great potential for thermal energy storage applications.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.13661

  5. Cluster analysis to evaluate stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters behavior on uranium mining waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de Souza; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo; Goncalves, Simone, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Morais, Gustavo Ferrari de; Campelo, Emanuele Lazzaretti Cordova [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Desenvolvimento de Processos; Dores, Luis Augusto de Carvalho Bresser [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Gerencia de Descomissionamento

    2011-07-01

    The Ore Treating Unit (UTM, in portuguese) is a deactivated uranium mine. A cluster analysis was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in their effluents. The utilization of the cluster analysis proved itself effective in the assessment, allowing the identification of groups of chemical elements, physical-chemical parameters and their joint analysis (elements and parameters). As a result we may assert, based on data analysis, that there is a strong link between calcium and magnesium and between aluminum and rare-earth oxides on UTM's effluents. Sulphate was also identified as strongly linked to total and dissolved solids, and those to electrical conductivity. There were other associations, but not so strongly linked. Further gathering, to seasonal evaluation, are required in order to confirm those analysis. Additional statistical analysis (factor analysis) must be used to try to identify the origin of the identified groups on this analysis. (author)

  6. Cluster analysis to evaluate stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters behavior on uranium mining waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de Souza; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo; Goncalves, Simone; Kelecom, Alphonse; Morais, Gustavo Ferrari de; Campelo, Emanuele Lazzaretti Cordova; Dores, Luis Augusto de Carvalho Bresser

    2011-01-01

    The Ore Treating Unit (UTM, in portuguese) is a deactivated uranium mine. A cluster analysis was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in their effluents. The utilization of the cluster analysis proved itself effective in the assessment, allowing the identification of groups of chemical elements, physical-chemical parameters and their joint analysis (elements and parameters). As a result we may assert, based on data analysis, that there is a strong link between calcium and magnesium and between aluminum and rare-earth oxides on UTM's effluents. Sulphate was also identified as strongly linked to total and dissolved solids, and those to electrical conductivity. There were other associations, but not so strongly linked. Further gathering, to seasonal evaluation, are required in order to confirm those analysis. Additional statistical analysis (factor analysis) must be used to try to identify the origin of the identified groups on this analysis. (author)

  7. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites as form stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet; Alkan, Cemil; Karaipekli, Ali; Onal, Adem

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA), palmitic acid (PA), myristic acid (MA) and lauric acid (LA) are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications, but high cost is the major drawback of them, limiting their utility area in thermal energy storage. The use of fatty acids as form stable PCMs will increase their feasibilities in practical applications due to the reduced cost of the LHTES system. In this regard, a series of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites, SMA/SA, SMA/PA, SMA/MA, and SMA/LA, were prepared as form stable PCMs by encapsulation of fatty acids into the SMA, which acts as a supporting material. The encapsulation ratio of fatty acids was as much as 85 wt.% and no leakage of fatty acid was observed even when the temperature of the form stable PCM was over the melting point of the fatty acid in the composite. The prepared form stable composite PCMs were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), viscosimetry and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy methods, and the results showed that the SMA was physically and chemically compatible with the fatty acids. In addition, the thermal characteristics such as melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of the form stable composite PCMs were measured by using the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique, which indicated they had good thermal properties. On the basis of all the results, it was concluded that form stable SMA/fatty acid composite PCMs had important potential for practical LHTES applications such as under floor space heating of buildings and passive solar space heating of buildings by using wallboard, plasterboard or floors impregnated with a form stable PCM due to their satisfying thermal properties, easy preparation in desired dimensions, direct usability without needing additional encapsulation thereby eliminating the thermal resistance caused by the shell and, thus, reducing the cost of

  8. INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ON THE FORMING OF WELDING ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. О. Vakulenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is a comparative analysis of chemical compounds influence on the process of forming arc welding and condition of its burning. Methodology. A wire with diameter 3 mm of low carbon steel with contain of carbon 0.15% was material for electrode. As chemical compounds, which determine the terms of arc welding forming the following compounds were used: kaolin; CaCO3 with admixtures of gypsum up to 60%; SiO2 and Fe − Si with the iron concentration up to 50%. Researches were conducted using the direct electric current and arc of reverse polarity. As a source of electric current a welding transformer of type PSO-500n was used. On the special stand initial gap between the electrode and metal plate was 1-1.5 mm. The inter electrode space was filled with the probed chemical compound and the electric arc was formed. At the moment of arc forming the values of electric current and arc voltage were determined. After the natural break of electric arc, the final gap value between electrodes was accepted as a maximal value of arc length. Findings. Experimentally the transfer of metal in interelectrode space corresponded to the tiny drop mechanism. According to external signs the relation between maximal arc length and the power of electric current has the form of exponential dependence. Specific power of electric arc at the moment of arc forming per unit of its length characterizes the environment in the interelectrode space. Originality. 1 Based on the analysis of influence of the studied chemical compounds on the formation processes of electric arc the inversely proportional relationship between the power of the electric current and the maximum arc length until the moment of its natural break is defined. 2 Ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric current, with the sufficiently high coefficient of correlation is submitted to the exponential dependence. Influence of the compounds under study on the process of

  9. INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ON THE FORMING OF ELECTRIC ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Vakulenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is a comparative analysis of chemical compounds influence on the process of electric arc forming and condition of its burning. Methodology. Material for an electrode was a wire 3 mm in diameter of low carbon steel with contain of carbon 0.15%. As chemical compounds, which determine the terms of forming of arc welding were used kaolin; CaCO3 with the admixtures of gypsum to 60%; SiO2 and Fe – Si with the iron concentration to 50%. Researches were conducted at the use of direct electric current and the arc of reverse polarity. As a source of electric current the welding transformer of type PSO-500 was used. On the special stand an initial gap between the electrode and metal-plate was equal to 1–1.5 mm. The interelectrode interval was filled with the probed chemical compounds and it was formed an electric arc. In the moment of electric arc arise the values of electric current and the arc voltage were determined. After the natural break of electric arc, the final size of the gap between electrodes was accepted as the maximal value of the arc lengths. Findings. In the conditions of experiment the metal transfer in interelectrode interval corresponded to the drop mechanism. According to external characteristics the ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric discharge has the appearance of exponential dependence. Specific power of electric arc characterizes environment of interelectrode interval in the moment of arc forming per unit of its length. Originality. 1. On the basis of influence analysis of the studied chemical compounds on the formation processes of electric arc inversely proportional relationship between the power of the electric current and the maximum arc length to the moment of its natural break is defined. 2. The ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric current with sufficiently high correlation coefficient is subjected to the exponential dependence. Influence of

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF MODEL FOR QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF DYNAMICALLY STABLE FORMS OF RIVER CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Zenkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the method of calculating the optimum curvature of the river channels using the kinematic model of the flow structure based on the concept of discrete nature of the channel process. It offers the analytic form of the equation of motion of river flow, which can be used simulation modeling for searching dynamically stable form of the river channel, and which can control water level in rivers. The source data for the illustrations of given in the article modeling methods have been served the images received from MODIS on the Terra satellite, for the lower reaches of the river Kur, which merges with the river Urmi, forming the Tunguska river – the left tributary of the Amur.The modified geometric method can be used to calculate obliquity of tangent to the curve and normal in those situations when observed on satellite imagery points are located on the coordinate of the network irregularly and when three points lying on the curve of the riverbed do not form isosceles triangle.The model assembles tangential and radial components of the forces acting on the water flow (centrifugal, friction and gravity. Curvature radius is explicitly expressed in the model through the parameter  – gradient angle relative to the axis X. As solution for the value of the angle  is searched, when the correlation function reaches its maximum. It is assumed that the riverbed shape “wrong” and could be modified so that the resulting curve better correlated with calculated curve. Morphometric dependences for macroforms allow creating series of morphological methods for the calculation of deformations and displacement of the shore in any section of meander scroll.The proposed technique has been tested also on satellite imagery of high resolution. The presented methods of calculation are used as the basis for hydrological projects of geoinformation systems oriented at prediction of morphodynamic processes and morphological evolution of river

  11. Polymorphic drugs examined with neutron spectroscopy: Is making more stable forms really that simple?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Landsgesell, Sven; Koza, Michael M.; Frick, Bernhard; Boldyreva, Elena V.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding polymorphism in pharmaceutical ingredients is a long-standing challenge in formulation science. A well-known example is paracetamol, C8H9NO2. The marketed stable form I crystallizes with corrugated molecular layers. In contrast, form II, which is thermodynamically favorable at high pressures, has relatively planar layers that can slip over each other without difficulty, but is metastable at ambient conditions. By means of inelastic neutron scattering we demonstrated that the lattice modes of form II exhibit a sudden 1 meV energy shift at 300 K under a pressure of ca 0.4 GPa. Moreover, evidence of an increase of the vibrational energy in both polymorphs was found, which was accompanied, in form I, by an unexpectedly weak increase of the tunnel splitting. These results indicate an anisotropy of the potential surface probed by the methyl rotor, and are discussed in relation to the differences of the strength of the hydrogen bond environment for each polymorph.

  12. Investigation of Chemical and Physical Changes to Bioapatite During Fossilization Using Trace Element Geochemistry, Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, C. A.; Kohn, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Bioapatite in the form of vertebrate bone can be used for a wide variety of paleo-proxies, from determination of ancient diet to the isotopic composition of meteoric water. Bioapatite alteration during diagenesis is a constant barrier to the use of fossil bone as a paleo-proxy. To elucidate the physical and chemical alteration of bone apatite during fossilization, we analyzed an assortment of fossil bones of different ages for trace elements, using LA-ICP-MS, stable isotopes, and reflected IR spectroscopy. One set of fossil bones from the Pleistocene of Idaho show a diffusion recrystallization profile, however, rare earth element (REE) profiles indicate diffusion adsorption. This suggests that REE diffusion is controlled by changing (namely decreasing) boundary conditions (i.e. decreasing concentration of REE in surrounding pore fluids). Reflected IR analysis along this concentration profile reveal that areas high in U have lost type A carbonate from the crystal structure in addition to water and organics. Stable isotopic analysis of carbon and oxygen will determine what, if any, change in the isotopic composition of the carbonate component of apatite has occurred do to the diffusion and recrystallization process. Analysis of much older bone from the Cretaceous of China reveal shallow REE and U concentration profiles and very uniform reflected IR spectra with a significant loss of type A carbonate throughout the entire bone cortex. Analysis of stable isotopes through the bone cortex will be compared to the stable isotopes collected from the Pleistocene of Idaho.

  13. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/calcined diatomite composites as form-stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhiming; Zhang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Shuilin; Park, Yuri; Frost, Ray L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite. ► The optimum mixed proportion was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry. ► Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC. ► Thermal cycling test showed that the prepared PCMs are thermally reliable and chemically stable. - Abstract: A composite paraffin-based phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite through the fusion adsorption method. In this study, raw diatomite was purified by thermal treatment in order to improve the adsorption capacity of diatomite, which acted as a carrier material to prepare shape-stabilized PCMs. Two forms of paraffin (paraffin waxes and liquid paraffin) with different melting points were blended together by the fusion method, and the optimum mixed proportion with a suitable phase-transition temperature was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Then the prepared composite paraffin was adsorbed in calcined diatomite. The prepared paraffin/calcined diatomite composites were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) analysis techniques. Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC method. DSC results showed that there was an optimum adsorption ratio between composite paraffin and calcined diatomite and the phase-transition temperature and the latent heat of the composite PCMs were 33.04 °C and 89.54 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test of composite PCMs showed that the prepared material is thermally reliable and chemically stable. The obtained paraffin/calcined diatomite composites have proper latent heat and melting temperatures, and show practical significance and good potential application value

  14. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/calcined diatomite composites as form-stable phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhiming [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Zhang, Yuzhong [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilinzh@yahoo.com.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Park, Yuri [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Frost, Ray L., E-mail: r.frost@qut.edu.au [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2013-04-20

    Highlights: ► Composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite. ► The optimum mixed proportion was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry. ► Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC. ► Thermal cycling test showed that the prepared PCMs are thermally reliable and chemically stable. - Abstract: A composite paraffin-based phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite through the fusion adsorption method. In this study, raw diatomite was purified by thermal treatment in order to improve the adsorption capacity of diatomite, which acted as a carrier material to prepare shape-stabilized PCMs. Two forms of paraffin (paraffin waxes and liquid paraffin) with different melting points were blended together by the fusion method, and the optimum mixed proportion with a suitable phase-transition temperature was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Then the prepared composite paraffin was adsorbed in calcined diatomite. The prepared paraffin/calcined diatomite composites were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) analysis techniques. Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC method. DSC results showed that there was an optimum adsorption ratio between composite paraffin and calcined diatomite and the phase-transition temperature and the latent heat of the composite PCMs were 33.04 °C and 89.54 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test of composite PCMs showed that the prepared material is thermally reliable and chemically stable. The obtained paraffin/calcined diatomite composites have proper latent heat and melting temperatures, and show practical significance and good potential application value.

  15. Study on polyethylene glycol/epoxy resin composite as a form-stable phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yutang; Kang Huiying; Wang Weilong; Liu Hong; Gao Xuenong

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable polyethylene glycol (PEG)/epoxy resin (EP) composite as a novel phase change material (PCM) was prepared using casting molding method. In this new material, PEG acts as the latent heat storage material and EP polymer serves as the supporting material, which provides structural strength and prevents the leakage of the melted PEG. The structure and morphology of the novel composite were observed using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermo-mechanical property and transition behavior were characterized by polarizing optical microscope (POM), static thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The experimental results show that, as a result of the physical tangled function of the epoxy resin carrier to the PEG segment, the composite macroscopically presents the solid-solid phase change characteristic.

  16. Correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, C.B.

    1982-03-01

    The influence of martensite in mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite was studied by varying the amount of martensite in the mixtures. Microstructural parameters were determined by Optical Quantitative Metallography and used to establish the correlation between the mechanical response of the mixtures in tension and their microstructures. The 'in situ' deformation of each phase in mixtures was determined experimentally in terms of the rule of mixtures. It is shown that the partitioning of the deformation depends on the amount of martensite in the mixture and that it tends to a condition of isostrain at higher martensite volume fractions. Optical observation of fractured specimens showed that the beginning of the fracture process may related to regions of the austenite grain boundaries where they meet martensite plates. (Author) [pt

  17. Migration modelling of different plutonium chemical forms through porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltelli, A.

    1979-01-01

    Two solutions of the migration equations are described. The first relates to the transport equations for the decay chain Am 243→Pu 239→U 235. Numerical integration was performed in this case by a simulation code written in CSMP III language and plutonium is considered to be all in the same chemical form. The second case relates to the problem of Pu speciation and migration. The decay chain Pu 240→U 236 is considered and numerical integration is performed by a modified version of Bo code COLUMN. Pseudo first order reactions are supposed to act between Pu states to maintain equilibrium during the migration

  18. Preparation and characterization of form-stable paraffin/polyurethane composites as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Keping; Yu, Xuejiang; Tian, Chunrong; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paraffin/polyurethane composite as form-stable phase change material was prepared by bulk polymerization. • Paraffin/polyurethane composite possesses typical character of dual phase transition. • Total latent heat of n-eicosane/PUPCM is as high as 141.2 J/g. • Maximum encapsulation ratio for n-octadecane/PUPCM composites is 25% w/w. - Abstract: Polyurethane phase change material (PUPCM) has been demonstrated to be effective solid–solid phase change material for thermal energy storage. However, the high cost and complex process on preparation of PUPCMs with high enthalpy and broad phase transition temperature range can prohibit industrial-scale applications. In this work, a series of novel form-stable paraffin/PUPCMs composites (n-octadecane/PUPCM, n-eicosane/PUPCM and paraffin wax/PUPCM) with high enthalpy and broad phase transition temperature range (20–65 °C) were directly synthesized via bulk polymerization. The composites were prepared at different mass fractions of n-octadecane (10, 20, 25, 30% w/w). The results indicated that the maximum encapsulation ratio for n-octadecane/PUPCM10000 composites was around 25% w/w. The chemical structure and crystalline properties of these composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), polarizing optical microscopy (POM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Thermal properties and thermal reliability of the composites were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). From DSC analysis, the composites showed a typical dual phase change temperature. The enthalpy for the composite with 25% w/w n-eicosane was as high as 141.2 J/g. TGA analysis indicated that the composites degraded at considerably high temperatures. The process of preparation of PUPCMs and their composites was very simple, inexpensive, environmental friendly and easy to process into desired shapes, which could find the promising applications in solar

  19. Physico-chemical properties of different forms of bovine lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokkhim, Huma; Bansal, Nidhi; Grøndahl, Lisbeth; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2013-12-01

    Three forms of bovine lactoferrin (Lf), apo-, native- and holo- with 0.9%, 12.9% and 99.7% iron content, respectively, were characterised for their physico-chemical properties. Colour, surface tension, thermal properties, particle charge and rheological behaviour of Lf were found to be affected by the form of Lf. The surface tension of Lf tends to decrease with decrease in iron content. The Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that all forms of Lf had similar secondary structures while the tertiary structure was different for holo-Lf. The Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) analysis showed that the apo- and holo-Lf in aqueous solution displayed thermal denaturation temperatures of 71±0.2 and 91±0.5 °C, respectively, suggesting that the iron saturation of Lf tends to increase its thermal stability. The study of particle charge properties (ζ-potential) in 1 mM KCl salt solution showed that apo-Lf reached the net charge of zero in the pH range 5.5-6.5 whereas native and holo-Lf in the pH range 8.0-9.0. The apparent viscosity of 1% (wt/wt) solution of the different forms of Lf showed no difference between apo- and native-Lf (≈1.4 mPas) while the value was significantly higher (2.38 mPas) for holo-Lf. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Accumulation of Co by abalone, 1. Effect of chemical form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Nakahara, M. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Nakaminato, Ibaraki (Japan). Nakaminato Lab. Brance Office); Shimizu, C.

    1982-03-01

    The appearance of radioactive Co in the liver of abalone from sea water was examined to consider the effect of chemical forms of Co(CoCl/sub 2/ and cyanocobalamin; vitamin B/sub 12/) in sea water upon the metabolisms in marine organisms. Organic /sup 57/Co(cyanocobalamin) from sea water appeared in the liver of abalone combining with a constituent with a molecular weight of 4 x 10/sup 4/. The constituent had the activity of vitamin B/sub 12/, while inorganic /sup 60/Co(CoCl/sub 2/) appeared combining with three constituents with molecular weights more than or equal to 1.5 x 10/sup 6/, 7 x 10/sup 3/ and less than or equal to 1.5 x 10/sup 3/ which did not show the activities of vitamin B/sub 12/. The effect of chemical forms of Co in sea water is significant in its accumulation by some species of marine organisms.

  1. Form-Stable Phase Change Materials Based on Eutectic Mixture of Tetradecanol and Fatty Acids for Building Energy Storage: Preparation and Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on preparation and performance analysis of a series of form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs, based on eutectic mixtures as phase change materials (PCMs for thermal energy storage and high-density polyethylene (HDPE-ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA polymer as supporting materials. The PCMs were eutectic mixtures of tetradecanol (TD–capric acid (CA, TD–lauric acid (LA, and TD–myristic acid (MA, which were rarely explored before. Thermal properties of eutectic mixtures and FSPCMs were measured by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The onset melting/solidification temperatures of form-stable PCMs were 19.13 °C/13.32 °C (FS TD–CA PCM, 24.53 °C/24.92 °C (FS TD–LA PCM, and 33.15 °C/30.72 °C (FS TD–MA PCM, respectively, and latent heats were almost greater than 90 J/g. The surface morphologies and chemical stability of form-stable PCM were surveyed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, respectively. The thermal cycling test revealed that the thermal reliability of these three form-stable PCMs was good. Thermal storage/release experiment indicated melting/solidification time was shortened by introducing 10 wt % aluminum powder (AP. It is concluded that these FSPCMs can act as potential building thermal storage materials in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties.

  2. Form-Stable Phase Change Materials Based on Eutectic Mixture of Tetradecanol and Fatty Acids for Building Energy Storage: Preparation and Performance Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyu; Lu, Shilei; Kong, Xiangfei; Liu, Shangbao; Li, Yiran

    2013-10-22

    This paper is focused on preparation and performance analysis of a series of form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs), based on eutectic mixtures as phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage and high-density polyethylene (HDPE)-ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) polymer as supporting materials. The PCMs were eutectic mixtures of tetradecanol (TD)-capric acid (CA), TD-lauric acid (LA), and TD-myristic acid (MA), which were rarely explored before. Thermal properties of eutectic mixtures and FSPCMs were measured by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The onset melting/solidification temperatures of form-stable PCMs were 19.13 °C/13.32 °C (FS TD-CA PCM), 24.53 °C/24.92 °C (FS TD-LA PCM), and 33.15 °C/30.72 °C (FS TD-MA PCM), respectively, and latent heats were almost greater than 90 J/g. The surface morphologies and chemical stability of form-stable PCM were surveyed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, respectively. The thermal cycling test revealed that the thermal reliability of these three form-stable PCMs was good. Thermal storage/release experiment indicated melting/solidification time was shortened by introducing 10 wt % aluminum powder (AP). It is concluded that these FSPCMs can act as potential building thermal storage materials in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties.

  3. Chemical fractionation of radionuclides and stable elements in aquatic plants of the Yenisei River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    The Yenisei River is contaminated with artificial radionuclides released by one of the Russian nuclear plants. The aquatic plants growing in the radioactively contaminated parts of the river contain artificial radionuclides. The aim of the study was to investigate accumulation of artificial radionuclides and stable elements by submerged plants of the Yenisei River and estimate the strength of their binding to plant biomass by using a new sequential extraction scheme. The aquatic plants sampled were: Potamogeton lucens, Fontinalis antipyretica, and Batrachium kauffmanii. Gamma-spectrometric analysis of the samples of aquatic plants has revealed more than 20 radionuclides. We also investigated the chemical fractionation of radionuclides and stable elements in the biomass and rated radionuclides and stable elements based on their distribution in biomass. The greatest number of radionuclides strongly bound to biomass cell structures was found for Potamogeton lucens and the smallest for Batrachium kauffmanii. For Fontinalis antipyretica, the number of distribution patterns that were similar for both radioactive isotopes and their stable counterparts was greater than for the other studied species. The transuranic elements (239)Np and (241)Am were found in the intracellular fraction of the biomass, and this suggested their active accumulation by the plants.

  4. Selection of chemical forms of iodine for transmutation of 129I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirasu, Yoshiro; Minato, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    To select suitable chemical forms of iodine for the target for transmutation of 129 I, the properties of iodine compounds of NaI, MgI 2 , CaI 2 , CuI and Ca(IO 3 ) 2 were compared and the out-of-reactor heating experiments of the pellets of CuI and Ca(IO 3 ) 2 with the cladding materials were carried out. CuI and Ca(IO 3 ) 2 are not deliquescent but stable in the air, which is of great advantage to construction, operation and maintenance of the processing plants. The cladding with Cu metal liner could be compatible with CuI though the compatibility of the stainless steel with CuI is not good. Ca(IO 3 ) 2 should be deleted from the list of the candidate target materials for the transmutation of 129 I due to the severe chemical reaction with the cladding materials

  5. Soil adsorption of various chemical forms of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabova, T.; Palagyi, S.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption was studied of radioiodate and radioiodide by the soil in an experiment aimed at testing the behaviour of these two chemical forms of radioiodine. 131 IO 3 - was used in the experiment, prepared by the oxidation of carrier-free Na 131 I with NaClO in an acid medium. Thin-layer chromatography showed that the stability of radioiodate depended on the solution pH value. The highest stability was found at pH 7 to 11. When pH=7 was maintained, only a slow reduction was found of radioiodate to radioiodide. A significant difference was found in the adsorption of radioiodate and radioiodide. The iodide was sorbed faster and to a higher degree, especially by chernozem (due to the high content of organic mass in the soil) as against retzina. It is believed that soil contamination is primarily due to radioiodide. (L.O.)

  6. Chemically Stable Covalent Organic Framework (COF)-Polybenzimidazole Hybrid Membranes: Enhanced Gas Separation through Pore Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Bishnu P; Chaudhari, Harshal D; Banerjee, Rahul; Kharul, Ulhas K

    2016-03-24

    Highly flexible, TpPa-1@PBI-BuI and TpBD@PBI-BuI hybrid membranes based on chemically stable covalent organic frameworks (COFs) could be obtained with the polymer. The loading obtained was substantially higher (50 %) than generally observed with MOFs. These hybrid membranes show an exciting enhancement in permeability (about sevenfold) with appreciable separation factors for CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4. Further, we found that with COF pore modulation, the gas permeability can be systematically enhanced. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Delay chemical master equation: direct and closed-form solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leier, Andre; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T

    2015-07-08

    The stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) describes the time evolution of a discrete nonlinear Markov process. This stochastic process has a probability density function that is the solution of a differential equation, commonly known as the chemical master equation (CME) or forward-Kolmogorov equation. In the same way that the CME gives rise to the SSA, and trajectories of the latter are exact with respect to the former, trajectories obtained from a delay SSA are exact representations of the underlying delay CME (DCME). However, in contrast to the CME, no closed-form solutions have so far been derived for any kind of DCME. In this paper, we describe for the first time direct and closed solutions of the DCME for simple reaction schemes, such as a single-delayed unimolecular reaction as well as chemical reactions for transcription and translation with delayed mRNA maturation. We also discuss the conditions that have to be met such that such solutions can be derived.

  8. Polymorphic drugs examined with neutron spectroscopy: Is making more stable forms really that simple?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Landsgesell, Sven; Koza, Michael Marek

    2013-01-01

    Understanding  polymorphism  in  pharmaceutical  ingredients  is  a   long-­  standing  challenge.  A  well-­known  example  is  paracetamol,  C8H9NO2.   The  marketed  stable  form  I  crystallizes  with  corrugated  molecular  layers.   In  contrast,  form  II,  which  is  thermodynamically......  favorable  at  high   pressures,  has  relatively  planar  layers  that  can  slip  over  each  other   without  difficulty,    is  metastable  at  ambient  conditions.  By  means  of   inelastic  neutron  scattering  we  demonstrated  that  the  lattice  modes  of   form  II  exhibit  a  sudden  1  me......V  energy  shift  at  300  K  under  a  pressure  of   ca  0.4  GPa.  Moreover,  evidence  of  an  increase  of  the  vibrational  energy   in  both  polymorphs  was  found,  which  was  accompanied,  in  form  I,  by  an   unexpectedly  weak  increase  of  the  tunnel  splitting.  These  results   indicate...

  9. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Daniel F.; Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Dunderdale, Gary J.; Hozumi, Atsushi, E-mail: a.hozumi@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98, Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 463-8560 (Japan); Yagihashi, Makoto [Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute, Rokuban, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0058 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  10. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Miranda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  11. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Traversa, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte

  12. Chemical synthesis of highly stable PVA/PANI films for supercapacitor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, D.S.; Shaikh, J.S.; Dalavi, D.S.; Kalagi, S.S. [Thin Films Materials laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416004, M.S. (India); Patil, P.S., E-mail: psp_phy@unishivaji.ac.in [Thin Films Materials laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416004, M.S. (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of PVA/PANI films by spin and dip coating at room temperature. {yields} Thickness dependent supercapacitor behavior of PVA/PANI film. {yields} The synthesized film are highly stable up to 20,000 cycles. - Abstract: Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/polyaniline (PANI) thin films were chemically synthesized by adopting two step process: initially a thin layer (200 nm) of PVA was spin coated by using an aqueous PVA solution onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate, afterwards PANI was chemically polymerized from aniline monomer and dip coated onto the precoated substrate. The thickness of PANI layer was varied from 293 nm to 2367 nm by varying deposition cycles onto the precoated PVA thin film. The resultant PVA/PANI films were characterized for their optical, morphological and electrochemical properties. The FT-IR and Raman spectra revealed characteristic features of the PANI phase. The SEM study showed porous spongy structure. Electrochemical properties were studied by electrochemical impedance measurement and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical performance of PVA/PANI thin films was investigated in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte. The highest specific capacitance of 571 Fg{sup -1} was observed for the optimized thickness of 880 nm. The film was found to be stable for more than 20,000 cycles. The samples degraded slightly (25% decrement in specific capacitance) for the first 10,000 cycles. The degradation becomes much slower (10.8% decrement in specific capacitance) beyond 10,000 cycles. This dramatic improvement in the electrochemical stability of the PANI samples, without sacrificing specific capacitance was attributed to the optimized PVA layer.

  13. Atmospheric tritium concentration in the different chemical forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Shima, Nagayoshi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at obtaining background tritium concentrations in air at Rokkasho where the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been under construction. Atmospheric tritium was operationally separated into HTO, HT and hydrocarbon (CH 3 T) fractions, and analyzed for the samples collected every 3 d to 14 d during fiscal year 2005. The HT concentration was the highest among the chemical forms analyzed, followed by the HTO and CH 3 T concentrations. The HT and CH 3 T concentrations did not have clear seasonal variation patterns through the HTO concentrations in spring were higher than those in summer. The HT concentration followed the decline previously reported by Mason and Östlund with an apparent half-life of 4.8 y. The apparent and environmental half-lives of CH 3 T were estimated as 9.2 y and 36.5 y, respectively, by combining the present data with literature data. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the atmospheric lifetime of 12 y for CH 4 to estimate global warming in its 2007 report. The longer environmental half-life of CH 3 T suggested its supply from other sources than past nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere. (author)

  14. Physico-chemical properties of ready to eat, shelf-stable pasta during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, E; Curti, E; Cassotta, F; Najm, N E O; Vittadini, E

    2014-02-01

    The changes in physico-chemical properties of RTE shelf stable pasta were studied during storage with a multianalytical and multidimensional approach (with special focus on water status) to understand the ageing process in this product. Pasta hardness and amylopectin recrystallisation increased, macroscopic water status indicators and proton molecular translational mobility remained constant, and significant changes were measured in the proton rotational molecular mobility indicators ((1)H FID, (1)H T2) during storage. Since the main changes observed in RTE pasta during storage were similar to those observed in other cereal-based products, it would be interesting to verify the effect of the anti-staling methods commonly used in the cereal processing industry in improving RTE pasta shelf-stability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of grape contamination at the time of harvest using stable chemical substances analyzed by activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miribel, J.; Delmas, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the sixties the SERE, in conjunction with the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), conducted experiments on the contamination of wine produced from vines contaminated at the roots. The contamination must be carried out via the leaves and at different stages of growth so as to come as close as possible to the conditions of fall-out. An initial study of grape contamination at the time of the harvest was carried out using stable chemical substances which were analysed by activation. This technique makes it possible to use a large number of substances at the same time and is harmless for the environment. The results obtained appear to be satisfactory, and the method will be used next year for studies at other stages in the ripening of grapes [fr

  16. Preparation and flammability of high density polyethylene/paraffin/organophilic montmorillonite hybrids as a form stable phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yibing; Hu, Yuan; Song, Lei; Kong, Qinghong; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Yinping; Chen, Zuyao; Fan, Weicheng

    2007-01-01

    A kind of form stable phase change material (PCM) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE), paraffin, organophilic montmorillonite (OMT) and intumescent flame retardant (IFR) hybrids is prepared by using a twin screw extruder technique. This kind of form stable PCM is made of paraffin as a dispersed phase change material and HDPE as a supporting material. The structure of the montmorillonite (MMT) and OMT is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The analysis indicates that the MMT is a kind of lamellar structure, and the structure does not change after organic modification. However, the structure of the hybrid is evidenced by the XRD and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). Its thermal stability, latent heat and flame retardant properties are given by the Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method and cone calorimeter, respectively. Synergy is observed between the OMT and IFR. The XRD result indicates that the paraffin intercalates into the silicate layers of the OMT, thus forming a typically intercalated hybrid. The SEM investigation and DSC result show that the additives of OMT and IFR have hardly any effect on the HDPE/paraffin three dimensional netted structure and the latent heat. In TGA curves, although the onset of weight loss of flame-retardant form stable PCMs occur at a lower temperature than that of form stable PCM, flame-retardant form stable PCMs produce a large amount of char residue at 700 o C. The synergy between OMT and IFR leads to the decrease of the heat release rate (HRR), contributing to improvement of the flammability performance

  17. Stable tetrabenzo-Chichibabin's hydrocarbons: Tunable ground state and unusual transition between their closed-shell and open-shell resonance forms

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Zebing

    2012-09-05

    Stable open-shell polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of fundamental interest due to their unique electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and promising applications in materials sciences. Chichibabin\\'s hydrocarbon as a classical open-shell PAH has been investigated for a long time. However, most of the studies are complicated by their inherent high reactivity. In this work, two new stable benzannulated Chichibabin\\'s hydrocarbons 1-CS and 2-OS were prepared, and their electronic structure and geometry in the ground state were studied by various experiments (steady-state and transient absorption spectra, NMR, electron spin resonance (ESR), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), FT Raman, X-ray crystallographic etc.) and density function theory (DFT) calculations. 1-CS and 2-OS exhibited tunable ground states, with a closed-shell quinoidal structure for 1-CS and an open-shell biradical form for 2-OS. Their corresponding excited-state forms 1-OS and 2-CS were also chemically approached and showed different decay processes. The biradical 1-OS displayed an unusually slow decay to the ground state (1-CS) due to a large energy barrier (95 ± 2.5 kJ/mol) arising from severe steric hindrance during the transition from an orthogonal biradical form to a butterfly-like quinoidal form. The quick transition from the quinoidal 2-CS (excited state) to the orthogonal biradicaloid 2-OS (ground state) happened during the attempted synthesis of 2-CS. Compounds 1-CS and 2-OS can be oxidized into stable dications by FeCl 3 and/or concentrated H 2SO 4. The open-shell 2-OS also exhibited a large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section (760 GM at 1200 nm). © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Aerated Systems of the Type RH-RCl-Ethanol-Thymolsulphonphthalein Stable Low-Level Chemical Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornik, I.; Zec, U.; Anic, A.; Ranogajec, F. [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1967-03-15

    The characteristic of dosimeters described in this paper is concerned with the very sensitive colorimetric method of dose evaluation giving a fair sensitivity with low G(HC1). In addition, the systems are thermally stable and simple to manufacture. With photocolorimetric or spectrophotometric evaluation of about 100 rad the dosimetric: error can be as low as 1 rad, or lower. The examined technique of visual colorimetric evaluation at the same dose level gives the combined error of 10-20 rad, and up to {+-} 5 or 10% at 500 rad. Owing to the practically unlimited shelf life of dosimeters and visual colorimeters, and to the very low production costs of both devices, such chemical dosimeters could be of special interest for massive use as personal gamma dosimeters for wide populations, or as dosimeters for gamma and fast neutron dosimetric topography of nuclear accidents. With tetrachloroethylene and iso-octane G(HC1) has been found constant (8.4) for temperatures of between -10 and +35 Degree-Sign C and for dose-rates of between 80 and 80 000 rad/h. The upper dose limit of colorimetric evaluation is about 2000 rad. With other components G(HC1) can be lower and the range extends to higher doses. The colorimetric properties of the systems RH-ethanol-thymolsulphonphthalein, as well as some of the most interesting features of the production procedure, are described. The radiation chemical aspects are discussed briefly. (author)

  19. Analysis of iodine chemical form noted from severe fuel damage experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Osetek, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Data from the TMI-2 accident has shown that only small amounts of iodine (I) escaped the plant. The postulated reason for such limited release is the formation of CsI (a salt) within fuel, which remains stable in a reducing high-temperature steam-H 2 environment. Upon cooldown CsI would dissolve in water condensate to form an ionic solution. However, recent data from fuel destruction experiments indicate different iodine release behavior that is tied to fuel burnup and oxidation conditions, as well as fission product concentration levels in the steam/H 2 effluent. Analysis of the data indicate that at low-burnup conditions, atomic I release from fuel is favored. Likewise, at low fission product concentration conditions HI is the favored chemical form in the steam/H 2 environment, not CsI. Results of thermochemical equilibria and chemical kinetics analysis support the data trends noted from the PBF-SFD tests. An a priori assumption of CsI for risk analysis of all accident sequences may therefore be inappropriate

  20. Determination of chemical form of iodine with IC-ICP-MS system and its application to the environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Katou, S.; Sekimoto, H.; Muramatsu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Iodine-129 is one of the important radionuclides possibly released into the environment from nuclear weapons testing and from the nuclear facilities such as nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Because of its long half-life (1.57 x 10 7 y), knowing its long-term behavior in the environment is a major concern. As I-129 is expected to act together with stable iodine (I-127) in the environment after long time, the biogeochemical cycling of stable iodine in the environment can be used for the reliable safety assessment of I-129. Chemical form is the one of the important factors controlling the 'iodine behavior in the environment. Iodide (I - ) and iodate (IO 3 - ) are known to be the major chemical form in the aqueous solution. However, the information on the chemical form of iodine in the environmental sample is limited because of lack of reliable analytical technique for trace level of iodine in the environment. In this study, the analytical system by using ion chromatograph (IC) followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the separate determination of I - and IO 3 - in the aqueous solution. The IC with anion exchange column (EXCELPAK ICS-A23) was used for the separation of I - and IO 3 - with 30 mM (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 as eluent. Separated iodine was determined with ICP-MS on line. with the detection limit 0.1 - 1 μg/L. The total iodine concentration was also measured by the direct determination with ICP-MS. The iodine in the several environmental samples such as irrigation water in paddy field was successfully determined with information of chemical form. In incubation experiment with flooded soil, the change of the chemical form of iodine in the soil solution with change of Eh was observed. Detailed data will be discussed in the presentation.

  1. Inferences of paleoenvironment from petrographic, chemical and stable-isotope studies of calcretes and fracture calcites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.T.; Whelan, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Past research has indicated a genetic connection between calcite formed in calcretes at the surface of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and calcites deposited in underlying fractures of the unsaturated zone. This common genesis suggests that paleoenvironmental information, as well as the timing and pathways of past recharge episodes, might be obtained from studies of the deposits in both the calcretes and the unsaturated fractures. Chemical and isotopic modification of calcite-precipitating fluids appears to begin at the surface, largely under the influence of plant roots and their decay products. Chemical characteristics of the deeper calcites are either initiated or largely defined within the first few meters of fluid migration into the unsaturated tuffs beneath the calcretes. However, petrographic and isotopic data indicate a very unique low-δ 13 C microenvironment that is localized at the upper surfaces of the calcretes. These surfaces form an interface in the soil horizon where infiltration may pond above the underlying carbonate ''plug.'' In order to decipher the chemistry and petrology of past recharge events, it is important to first understand microenvironments such as this that contribute to mineral precipitation/dissolution events in the pedogenic environment

  2. Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (R-SOFCs) with chemically stable proton-conducting oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Proton-conducting oxides offer a promising way of lowering the working temperature of solid oxide cells to the intermediate temperate range (500 to 700. °C) due to their better ionic conductivity. In addition, the application of proton-conducting oxides in both solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and sold oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) provides unique advantages compared with the use of conventional oxygen-ion conducting conductors, including the formation of water at the air electrode site. Since the discovery of proton conduction in some oxides about 30. years ago, the development of proton-conducting oxides in SOFCs and SOECs (the reverse mode of SOFCs) has gained increased attention. This paper briefly summarizes the development in the recent years of R-SOFCs with proton-conducting electrolytes, focusing on discussing the importance of adopting chemically stable materials in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes. The development of electrode materials for proton-conducting R-SOFCs is also discussed. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  3. A highly stable and sensitive chemically modified screen-printed electrode for sulfide analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, D.-M. [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40217, Taiwan (China); Kumar, Annamalai Senthil [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40217, Taiwan (China); Zen, J.-M. [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40217, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jmzen@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-01-18

    We report here a highly stable and sensitive chemically modified screen-printed carbon electrode (CMSPE) for sulfide analysis. The CMSPE was prepared by first ion-exchanging ferricyanide into a Tosflex anion-exchange polymer and then sealing with a tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel layer. The sol-gel overlayer coating was crucial to stabilize the electron mediator (i.e., Fe(China){sub 6} {sup 3-}) from leaching. The strong interaction between the oxy-hydroxy functional group of sol-gel and the hydrophilic sites of Tosflex makes the composite highly rigid to trap the ferricyanide mediator. An obvious electrocatalytic sulfide oxidation current signal at {approx}0.20 V versus Ag/AgCl in pH 7 phosphate buffer solution was observed at the CMSPE. A linear calibration plot over a wide range of 0.1 {mu}M to 1 mM with a slope of 5.6 nA/{mu}M was obtained by flow injection analysis. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was 8.9 nM (i.e., 25.6 ppt). Practical utility of the system was applied to the determination of sulfide trapped from cigarette smoke and sulfide content in hot spring water.

  4. Measurement of the bio-availability in man of a pharmaceutic form of magnesium, by the means of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benech, H.; Pruvost, A.; Grognet, J.M.; Morge, X.

    1994-01-01

    A method for measuring the absolute bio-availability, in man, of an oral magnesium pharmaceutic form by the means of the simultaneous utilization of two stable magnesium isotopes, 25 Mg and 26 Mg, by oral or intra-venous administrations in order to study the metabolism of magnesium in the human body, is presented. Fecal elimination and urinary excretion of magnesium are recorded. 10 refs

  5. Preparation and thermal properties of form-stable palmitic acid/active aluminum oxide composites as phase change materials for latent heat storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guiyin; Li, Hui; Cao, Lei; Shan, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Form-stable palmitic acid (PA)/active aluminum oxide composites as phase change materials were prepared by adsorbing liquid palmitic acid into active aluminum oxide. In the composites, the palmitic acid was used as latent heat storage materials, and the active aluminum oxide was used as supporting material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) were used to determine the chemical structure, crystalloid phase and microstructure of the composites, respectively. The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetry analyzer (TGA). The FT-IR analyses results indicated that there is no chemical interaction between the palmitic acid and active aluminum oxide. The SEM results showed that the palmitic acid was well adsorbed into porous network of the active aluminum oxide. The DSC results indicated that the composites melt at 60.25 °C with a latent heat of 84.48 kJ kg −1 and solidify at 56.86 °C with a latent heat of 78.79 kJ kg −1 when the mass ratio of the PA to active aluminum oxide is 0.9:1. Compared with that of the PA, the melting and solidifying time of the composites CPCM5 was reduced by 20.6% and 21.4% because of the increased heat transfer rate through EG addition. The TGA results showed that the active aluminum oxide can improve the thermal stability of the composites. -- Highlights: ► Form-stable PA/active aluminum oxide composites as PCMs were prepared. ► Chemical structure, crystalloid phase and microstructure of composites were determined. ► Thermal properties and thermal stability of the composites were investigated. ► Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of the composites.

  6. Earth's oldest stable crust in the Pilbara Craton formed by cyclic gravitational overturns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemer, Daniel; Schrank, Christoph E.; Murphy, David T.; Wenham, Lana; Allen, Charlotte M.

    2018-05-01

    During the early Archaean, the Earth was too hot to sustain rigid lithospheric plates subject to Wilson Cycle-style plate tectonics. Yet by that time, up to 50% of the present-day continental crust was generated. Preserved continental fragments from the early Archaean have distinct granite-dome/greenstone-keel crust that is interpreted to be the result of a gravitationally unstable stratification of felsic proto-crust overlain by denser mafic volcanic rocks, subject to reorganization by Rayleigh-Taylor flow. Here we provide age constraints on the duration of gravitational overturn in the East Pilbara Terrane. Our U-Pb ages indicate the emplacement of 3,600-3,460-million-year-old granitoid rocks, and their uplift during an overturn event ceasing about 3,413 million years ago. Exhumation and erosion of this felsic proto-crust accompanied crustal reorganization. Petrology and thermodynamic modelling suggest that the early felsic magmas were derived from the base of thick ( 43 km) basaltic proto-crust. Combining our data with regional geochronological studies unveils characteristic growth cycles on the order of 100 million years. We propose that maturation of the early crust over three of these cycles was required before a stable, differentiated continent emerged with sufficient rigidity for plate-like behaviour.

  7. Investigation of chemical forms of elements in surface waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshal, G.M.; Velyukhanova, T.K.; Koshcheeva, I.Ya.; Dorofeeva, V.A.; Buachidze, N.S.; Kasimova, O.G.; Makharadze, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The main trends in the research of the state of elements in natural waters are examined. The hydrolysis of CU(2), Hg(2), Au(3), Sb(3), Ru(4) over a pH range, specific for natural waters, has been studied by solubility and paper electrophoresis technnques and by filtration through cellulose ionites. The regions of predominating different forms of hydroxo complexes have been found and the thermodynamic constants of hydrolysis equilibria have been calculated. Solubility, filtration through sephadexes and cellulose ionites, paper electrophoresis techniques were used to study the complexation of Cu(2), Hg(2), Au(3), Sb(3), Ru(4) with fulvic acids. Some data have been obtained on the composition, stability and molecular-mass distribution of fulvate complexes of ten elements in different oxidation states. High-molecular anionic fulvate complexes are among main forms of most easily hydrolysed elments in solution. The possibility has been shown of prediction of the ratio of coexisting forms of trace elements in solution by theoretical calculations and experimentally Using fractionation on cellulose ionites and sephadexes

  8. 75 FR 36306 - Chemical Mixtures Containing Listed Forms of Phosphorus and Change in Application Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... have large industrial uses. Regulated chemical mixtures are not items having common household uses... and others from exposure to the toxic chemicals left behind. Executive Order 12988 This regulation... 1117-AA66 Chemical Mixtures Containing Listed Forms of Phosphorus and Change in Application Process...

  9. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  10. Pu(V) as the stable form of oxidized plutonium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandini, K.A.; Penrose, W.R.; Nelson, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    This work presents analytical evidence supporting the proposition that Pu(V) is the sole or predominant form of oxidized plutonium in natural waters. Two independent methods, the selective adsorption of Pu(VI) by silica gel, and the somewhat less selective coprecipitation of Pu(V) with calcium carbonate, were developed to separate Pu(V) from Pu(VI). Measurements of ambient plutonium in several natural waters by these methods found only Pu(V). In laboratory tracer studies, Pu(VI) was shown to be highly unstable in dilute bicarbonate solution and in Lake Michigan water, reducing in first-order fashion to Pu(V). (orig.)

  11. Morphology of silicon carbide formed by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pampuch, R.; Stobierski, L.

    1977-01-01

    Silicon carbide polycrystalline layers and particulate crystals were obtained in a modified van Arkel-de Boer apparatus on SiC-covered graphite and molybdenum susceptors. Gaseous SiCl 4 + CCl 4 + H 2 reactive mixtures with Si/C mole ratios varying between 0.9 and 1.4 and with Cl/Cl + H ratios varying between 2.10 -5 and 1.10 -3 were used. The morphology and structure of SiC products obtained at temperatures between 1400 and 1900 0 C and input gas flow rates between 5.10 -4 and 6.10 -2 moles per hour have been systematically investigated by scanning electronmicrographs, X-rays (using the Laue, Weissenberg, and rotation photographers), IR-spectra, and under the polarising microscope. The ranges of temperature and input gas flow rates in which the given habits and forms of the SiC products are formed have been assessed. The habits of the particulate crystals as function of temperature have been interpreted in terms of the existing theories of heterogeneous nucleation assuming layer growth of the crystals by two-dimensional nucleation. The influence of the composition of the gaseous mixtures upon the formation of the 2H polytype as well as the probable reasons for the common occurrence of stacking fault twins in the 3C polytype have been discussed. (author)

  12. Graphene/phase change material nanocomposites: light-driven, reversible electrical resistivity regulation via form-stable phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunming; Mi, Hongyi; Zheng, Qifeng; Ma, Zhenqiang; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-02-04

    Innovative photoresponsive materials are needed to address the complexity of optical control systems. Here, we report a new type of photoresponsive nanomaterial composed of graphene and a form-stable phase change material (PCM) that exhibited a 3 orders of magnitude change in electrical resistivity upon light illumination while retaining its overall original solid form at the macroscopic level. This dramatic change in electrical resistivity also occurred reversibly through the on/off control of light illumination. This was attributed to the reversible phase transition (i.e., melting/recrystallization) behavior of the microscopic crystalline domains present in the form-stable PCM. The reversible phase transition observed in the graphene/PCM nanocomposite was induced by a reversible temperature change through the on/off control of light illumination because graphene can effectively absorb light energy and convert it to thermal energy. In addition, this graphene/PCM nanocomposite also possessed excellent mechanical properties. Such photoresponsive materials have many potential applications, including flexible electronics.

  13. Porphyry-Copper Ore Shells Form at Stable Pressure-Temperature Fronts Within Dynamic Fluid Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, P.; Driesner, T.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production.

  14. Archaeal orthologs of Cdc45 and GINS form a stable complex that stimulates the helicase activity of MCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuli; Gristwood, Tamzin; Hodgson, Ben; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Bell, Stephen D

    2016-11-22

    The regulated recruitment of Cdc45 and GINS is key to activating the eukaryotic MCM(2-7) replicative helicase. We demonstrate that the homohexameric archaeal MCM helicase associates with orthologs of GINS and Cdc45 in vivo and in vitro. Association of these factors with MCM robustly stimulates the MCM helicase activity. In contrast to the situation in eukaryotes, archaeal Cdc45 and GINS form an extremely stable complex before binding MCM. Further, the archaeal GINS•Cdc45 complex contains two copies of Cdc45. Our analyses give insight into the function and evolution of the conserved core of the archaeal/eukaryotic replisome.

  15. Leach testing of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant final waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuman, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    A number of pellets and highly durable glasses prepared from nonradioactive-simulated high-level wasste calcines have been leach tested. The leach tests are patterned on the IAEA standard test and the proposed Materials Characterization Center tests. Most tests are made with static distilled water at 25, 70, 95, 250, and 350 0 C and in refluxing distilled water, Soxhlet, at 95 0 C. Leach rates are determined by analyzing the leachate by instrumental activation analysis or spectrochemical analysis and from weight loss. Leaches are run on glass using cast and core drilled cylinders, broken pieces and coarse ground material. Sample form has a considerable effect on leach rates; solid pieces gave higher leach rates than ground glass when expressed in g/cm 2 /day. Cesium, molybdenum and weight loss leach rates of cast glass cylinders in distilled water varied from -7 g/cm 7 /day at 25 0 C to approx. 10 -3 g/cm 2 /day at 250 0 C. The leach rates in static distilled water at 95 0 C were considerably lower than those in refluxing distilled water, Soxhlet, at the same temperature. Even at 25 0 C, sodium, cesium, and molybdenum readily leached from the porous pellets, but the pellets showed no visible attack, even at 250 0 C

  16. CAG Expansions Are Genetically Stable and Form Nontoxic Aggregates in Cells Lacking Endogenous Polyglutamine Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Zurawel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins containing polyglutamine (polyQ regions are found in almost all eukaryotes, albeit with various frequencies. In humans, proteins such as huntingtin (Htt with abnormally expanded polyQ regions cause neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD. To study how the presence of endogenous polyQ aggregation modulates polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we expressed polyQ expanded Htt fragments (polyQ Htt in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In stark contrast to other unicellular fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. pombe is uniquely devoid of proteins with more than 10 Q repeats. We found that polyQ Htt forms aggregates within S. pombe cells only with exceedingly long polyQ expansions. Surprisingly, despite the presence of polyQ Htt aggregates in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, no significant growth defect was observed in S. pombe cells. Further, PCR analysis showed that the repetitive polyQ-encoding DNA region remained constant following transformation and after multiple divisions in S. pombe, in contrast to the genetic instability of polyQ DNA sequences in other organisms. These results demonstrate that cells with a low content of polyQ or other aggregation-prone proteins can show a striking resilience with respect to polyQ toxicity and that genetic instability of repetitive DNA sequences may have played an important role in the evolutionary emergence and exclusion of polyQ expansion proteins in different organisms.

  17. Stable aerobic granules in continuous-flow bioreactor with self-forming dynamic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Li, Yajie; Yang, Changzhu; Pu, Wenhong; He, Liu; Bo, Fu

    2012-10-01

    A novel continuous-flow bioreactor with aerobic granular sludge and self-forming dynamic membrane (CGSFDMBR) was developed for efficient wastewater treatment. Under continuous-flow operation, aerobic granular sludge was successfully cultivated and characterized with small particle size of about 0.1-1.0mm, low settling velocity of about 15-25 m/h, loose structure and high water content of about 96-98%. To maintain the stability of aerobic granular sludge, strategies based on the differences of settling velocity and particle-size between granular and flocculent sludge were implemented. Moreover, in CGSFDMBR, membrane fouling was greatly relieved. Dynamic membrane was just cleaned once in more than 45 days' operation. CGSFDMBR presented good performance in treating septic tank wastewater, obtaining average COD, NH(4)(+)-N, TN and TP removal rates of 83.3%, 73.3%, 67.3% and 60%, respectively, which was more efficient than conventional bioreactors since that carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were simultaneously removed in a single aerobic reactor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unconventional, Chemically Stable, and Soluble Two-Dimensional Angular Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: From Molecular Design to Device Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lei

    2015-03-17

    , and correspondingly high carrier mobilities. In stark contrast to the 1-D acenes that form mono- and bis-adducts with fullerenes, 2-D PAHs show less reactivity with fullerenes. The geometry of 2-D PAHs plays a crucial role in determining both the barrier and the adduct stability. The reactivity and stability of the 2-D PAHs with regard to Diels-Alder reactions at different reactive sites were explained via DFT calculations of the reaction kinetics and of thermodynamics of reactions and simple Hückel molecular orbital considerations. Also, because of their increased stability in the presence of fullerenes, these compounds have been successfully used in OPVs. The small-molecule semiconductors highlighted in this Account exhibit good charge-transport properties, comparable to those of traditional linear acenes, while being much more environmentally stable. These features have made these 2-D PAHs excellent molecules for fundamental research and device applications. (Figure Presented). © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Preparation and isolation of dithiolene thiophosphoryl molecules as stable, protected forms of dithiolene ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Kuppuswamy; Bollinger, James E; Fink, Mark; Donahue, James P

    2007-04-16

    The reaction of P4S10 with acyloins, RC(O)CH(OH)R, in refluxing dioxane, followed by the addition of alkylating agents, forms dithiolene thiophosphoryl thiolate compounds, (R2C2S2)P(S)(SR'), which are readily isolated and purified. The compounds that have been prepared and identified spectroscopically are those with R = p-anisyl, R' = Me (1); R = p-anisyl, R' = Bz (2); R = Ph, R' = Me (4); R = Et, R' = Bz (5). Compounds 1, 2, and 4 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and found to possess a tetrahedral coordination geometry about the phosphorus atom, with overall Cs symmetry. In each case, the mirror plane bisects the dithiolene S-P-S chelate and contains the thiophosphoryl bond, which ranges in length from 1.9241(8) to 1.9361(7) A. The use of 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene as organic electrophile in the P4S10/acyloin reaction produced bis(2-methylnaphthalenyl) disulfide as the only identifiable product. The substitution of Lawesson's reagent for P4S10 in reactions with acyloins produced deoxy acyloin rather than products resulting from chalcogen exchange. Compounds 1-2 and 4-5 are Group 5 analogues of 1,3-dithiol-2-ones, (R2C2S2)C=O, and undergo a similar hydrolysis in aqueous base to liberate ene-1,2-dithiolate dianions from which corresponding metal dithiolene complexes may be prepared. Deprotection of 1 in MeO-/MeOH, followed by the addition of NiCl2.6H2O and then I2, produces square planar [Ni(S2C2(C6H4-p-OCH3)2)2] (8) in 93% yield. A high-resolution structure of 8 (P) reveals dithiolene C-C and C-S bond lengths that are clearly indicative of the thionyl radical monoanionic nature of the ligand. The use of isolated (R2C2S2)P(S)(SR') compounds as a dithiolene ligand source for the preparation of metal dithiolene complexes offers the advantages of clean reactivity and high yield.

  20. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte structure showed good chemical stability in both CO2 and H2O atmosphere, indicating that the BZPY layers effectively protect the inner BCY electrolyte, while the BCY electrolyte alone decomposed completely under the same conditions. Fuel cell prototypes fabricated with the sandwiched electrolyte achieved a relatively high performance of 185 mW cm- 2 at 700 C, with a high electrolyte film conductivity of 4 × 10- 3 S cm- 1 at 600 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Epoxy-Based Organogels for Thermally Reversible Light Scattering Films and Form-Stable Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Julieta; Dell' Erba, Ignacio E; Schroeder, Walter F; Hoppe, Cristina E; Williams, Roberto J J

    2017-03-29

    Alkyl chains of β-hydroxyesters synthesized by the capping of terminal epoxy groups of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) with palmitic (C16), stearic (C18), or behenic (C22) fatty acids self-assemble forming a crystalline phase. Above a particular concentration solutions of these esters in a variety of solvents led to supramolecular (physical) gels below the crystallization temperature of alkyl chains. A form-stable phase change material (FS-PCM) was obtained by blending the ester derived from behenic acid with eicosane. A blend containing 20 wt % ester was stable as a gel up to 53 °C and exhibited a heat storage capacity of 161 J/g, absorbed during the melting of eicosane at 37 °C. Thermally reversible light scattering (TRLS) films were obtained by visible-light photopolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate-ester blends (50 wt %) in the gel state at room temperature. The reaction was very fast and not inhibited by oxygen. TRLS films consisted of a cross-linked methacrylic network interpenetrated by the supramolecular network formed by the esters. Above the melting temperature of crystallites formed by alkyl chains, the film was transparent due to the matching between refractive indices of the methacrylic network and the amorphous ester. Below the crystallization temperature, the film was opaque because of light dispersion produced by the organic crystallites uniformly dispersed in the material. Of high significance for application was the fact that the contrast ratio did not depend on heating and cooling rates.

  2. Statistic analysis of grouping in evaluation of the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in effluent from uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.

    2013-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) is a uranium mine off. The statistical analysis of clustering was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physico-chemical variables in their effluents. The use of cluster analysis proved effective in the evaluation, allowing to identify groups of chemical elements in physico-chemical variables and group analyzes (element and variables ). As a result, we can say, based on the analysis of the data, a strong link between Ca and Mg and between Al and TR 2 O 3 (rare earth oxides) in the UTM effluents. The SO 4 was also identified as strongly linked to total solids and dissolved and these linked to electrical conductivity. Other associations existed, but were not as strongly linked. Additional collections for seasonal evaluation are required so that assessments can be confirmed. Additional statistics analysis (ordination techniques) should be used to help identify the origins of the groups identified in this analysis. (author)

  3. A chemically stable analogue, 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin, with similar effects to epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) in man.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Grady, J; Hedges, A; Whittle, B J; Al-Sinawi, L A; Mekki, Q A; Burke, C; Moody, S G; Moti, M J; Hassan, S

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin, a chemically stable analogue of epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) were studied, in comparison with epoprostenol, both in vitro and in vivo in man. In vitro 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin and epoprostenol inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, the endoperoxide analogue U46619 and arachidonic acid. The potency of 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin relative to epoprostenol was comparable in ADP and collagen-aggregated platelet rich plasma (PRP), 9 be...

  4. Development of form stable Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coated thermal phase change material for solar water heater applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munusamy, Y.; Shanmugam, S.; Shi-Ying, Kee

    2018-04-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is one of the most popular and widely used thermal energy storage material in solar water heater because it able to absorb and release a large amount of latent heat during a phase change process over a narrow temperature range. However the practical application of PCM is limited by two major issues; 1) leakage which leads to material loss and corrosion of tank and 2) large volume change during phase change process which cause pressure build up in the tank. In this work, form-stable PCM was prepared by coating myristic acid with Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to prevent leakage of PCM. PMMA was mixed with different weight percentage (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 wt%) of dicumyl peroxide (DCP). The purpose of adding DCP to PMMA is to crosslink the polymer and to increase the mechanical strength of PMMA to hold the myristic acid content inside the coating during the phase change process. Leakage test results showed that PMMA mixed with 0.1% DCP exhibit 0% leakage. This result is further supported by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) images and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis results, where a compact and uniform coating without cracks were formed for PCM coated with PMMA with 0.1% DCP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results shows that the melting point of form-stable PCM is 55°C, freezing point is 50°C, the latent heat of melting and freezing is 67.59 J/g.

  5. The chemical fate of 212Bi-DOTA formed by β- decay of 212Pb(DOTA)2-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Kumar, K.; Gansow, O.A.

    1993-01-01

    The increasing use of inert metal complexes in radioimmunotherapy prompted us to explore the potential use of 212 Pb chelates. Herein, we report a study of the chemical fate of the 212 Bi-DOTA complex formed by β - decay of 212 Pb(DOTA) 2- (H 4 DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid). To assure that both parent and daughter complexes were thermally stable, kinetic studies were performed with 203 Pb(II) and 206 Bi(III) which showed that both lead and bismuth complexes with DOTA undergo chemical exchange only very slowly in aqueous solution at pH 4-10. To investigate whether the complex ion which results from decay of 212 Pb(DOTA) 2- was intact and also stable, solutions initially containing only this ion were analyzed for amounts of DOTA-complexed and uncomplexed 212 Bi after attaining transient equilibrium with 212 Bi. The fraction of 212 Bi radioactivity not complexed to DOTA, vide infra, was found to be 36±2%. This value represents the fraction of breakup of 212 Bi(DOTA) - formed from β - decay of the parent complex. By considering the various extranuclear processes responsible for kinetic and electronic excitation of the 212 Bi daughter, break-up of the 212 Bi-DOTA complex is ascribed to the internal conversion of γ-rays emitted by the excited 212 Bi nuclide. (orig.)

  6. Perception and the strongest sensory memory trace of multi-stable displays both form shortly after the stimulus onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the relation between perception and sensory memory of multi-stable structure-from-motion displays. The latter is an implicit visual memory that reflects a recent history of perceptual dominance and influences only the initial perception of multi-stable displays. First, we established the earliest time point when the direction of an illusory rotation can be reversed after the display onset (29-114 ms). Because our display manipulation did not bias perception towards a specific direction of illusory rotation but only signaled the change in motion, this means that the perceptual dominance was established no later than 29-114 ms after the stimulus onset. Second, we used orientation-selectivity of sensory memory to establish which display orientation produced the strongest memory trace and when this orientation was presented during the preceding prime interval (80-140 ms). Surprisingly, both estimates point towards the time interval immediately after the display onset, indicating that both perception and sensory memory form at approximately the same time. This suggests a tighter integration between perception and sensory memory than previously thought, warrants a reconsideration of its role in visual perception, and indicates that sensory memory could be a unique behavioral correlate of the earlier perceptual inference that can be studied post hoc.

  7. The Response of Duckweed (Lemna minor L. Roots to Cd and Its Chemical Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of duckweed (Lemna minor L. roots to Cd and its chemical forms was investigated. The relative root growth rate and concentrations of Cd and its different chemical forms in the root, that is, ethanol-extractable (FE-Cd, HCl-extractable (FHCl-Cd, and residual fractions (Fr-Cd, were quantified. Weibull model was used to unravel the regression between the relative root elongation (RRL with chemical forms of Cd. Parameters assessed catalase (CAT, peroxidases (POD, and superoxide dismutase (SOD, as well as malondialdehyde (MDA and total antioxidant capacity (A-TOC. Our results show that both the relative root growth rate and relative frond number were affected by Cd concentrations. The chemical forms of Cd were influenced by Cd content in the medium. Relative root elongation (RRL showed a significant correlation with chemical forms of Cd. Additionally, POD and SOD increased at lower Cd concentrations followed by a decrease at higher Cd concentrations (at more than 5 μM Cd. Moreover, MDA and A-TOC increased and CAT decreased with increasing Cd exposure. Furthermore, CAT showed a significant correlation with FHCl-Cd. Taken together, it can be concluded that the chemical forms of Cd are statistically significant predictors of Cd toxicity to duckweed and to the other similar aquatic plants.

  8. Numerical and experimental study on temperature control of solar panels with form-stable paraffin/expanded graphite composite PCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Zigeng; Huang, Zhaowen; Xie, Ning; Gao, Xuenong; Xu, Tao; Fang, Yutang; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A passive cooling PV-PCM system was developed. • Form-stable paraffin/EG composite PCM with high thermal conductivity was utilized. • Numerical simulation on the temperature of PV-PCM panel was carried out. • Effects of density were studied under the given weather conditions. - Abstract: Performance of photovoltaic (PV) panels is greatly affected by its operating temperature. And traditional active and passive cooling methods usually suffer from the disadvantages of external energy consumption, uneven temperature distribution and low thermal conductivity of phase change materials (PCMs). In this work, a PV-PCM system was developed to control the temperature of a PV panel by applying high thermal conductive form-stable paraffin (ZDJN-28)/EG composite PCM. The temperature, output voltage and power of a conventional PV panel and the PV-PCM panel were measured and compared. A numerical simulation model established by CFD software FLUENT was used to simulate the temperature change process of the PV-PCM panel with different material densities under the same conditions as experiment. The experiment results showed that compared with the temperature of the conventional PV panel, the temperature of the PV-PCM panel is kept below 50 °C for 200 min extended by 146 min with output power averagely increased by 7.28% in heating process. Simulated temperatures were in good agreement with experimental temperatures and indicated that the higher the density of the PCM is, the better the temperature management performance the PV panel could achieve. Besides, the PCM with density of 900 kg/m 3 was found sufficient to achieve a good temperature management performance when the average ambient temperature below 25 °C with the highest solar irradiation of 901 w/m 2 . In summary, this work is of great importance in the design of a PV-PCM system for temperature management of PV panels.

  9. Chemically and Thermally Stable High Energy Density Silicone Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal energy storage systems with 300 -- 1000 kJ/kg energy density through either phase changes or chemical heat absorption are sought by NASA. This proposed...

  10. Preparation and thermal properties of mineral-supported polyethylene glycol as form-stable composite phase change materials (CPCMs) used in asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Lin, Feipeng; Liu, Ruohua; Xiao, Ting; Zheng, Jianlong; Qian, Guoping; Liu, Hongfu; Wen, Pihua

    2017-12-05

    Three kinds of mineral-supported polyethylene glycol (PEG) as form-stable composite phase change materials (CPCMs) were prepared to choose the most suitable CPCMs in asphalt pavements for the problems of asphalt pavements rutting diseases and urban heat islands. The microstructure and chemical structure of CPCMs were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and XRD. Thermal properties of the CPCMs were determined by TG and DSC. The maximum PEG absorption of diatomite (DI), expanded perlite (EP) and expanded vermiculite (EVM) could reach 72%, 67% and 73.6%, respectively. The melting temperatures and latent heat of CPCMs are in the range of 52-55 °C and 100-115 J/g, respectively. The results show that PEG/EP has the best thermal and chemical stability after 100 times of heating-cooling process. Moreover, crystallization fraction results show that PEG/EP has slightly higher latent heats than that of PEG/DI and PEG/EVM. Temperature-adjusting asphalt mixture was prepared by substituting the fine aggregates with PEG/EP CPCMs. The upper surface maximum temperature difference of temperature-adjusting asphalt mixture reaches about 7.0 °C in laboratory, and the surface peak temperature reduces up to 4.3 °C in the field experiment during a typical summer day, indicating a great potential application for regulating pavement temperature field and alleviating the urban heat islands.

  11. Development of a stable cell line with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis for screening environmental chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Christina T.; Beames, Burton; Alex Merrick, B.; Martin, Negin; Romeo, Charles; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a stable cell line with intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis. • The ERRα repressor, XCT790, down regulates this pathway. • Phytoestrogen, genisten stimulates this pathway. - Abstract: The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) play critical roles in the control of several physiological functions, including the regulation of genes involved in energy homeostasis. However, little is known about the ability of environmental chemicals to disrupt or modulate this important bioenergetics pathway in humans. The goal of this study was to develop a cell-based assay system with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis that could be used as a screening assay for detecting such chemicals. To this end, we successfully generated several stable cell lines expressing PGC-1α and showed that the reporter driven by the native ERRα hormone response unit (AAB-Luc) is active in these cell lines and that the activation is PGC-1α-dependent. Furthermore, we show that this activation can be blocked by the ERRα selective inverse agonist, XCT790. In addition, we find that genistein and bisphenol A further stimulate the reporter activity, while kaempferol has minimal effect. These cell lines will be useful for identifying environmental chemicals that modulate this important pathway

  12. Development of a stable cell line with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis for screening environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Christina T., E-mail: teng1@niehs.nih.gov [DNTP, BioMolecular Screening Branch, Division, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Beames, Burton; Alex Merrick, B. [DNTP, BioMolecular Screening Branch, Division, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Martin, Negin; Romeo, Charles [DIR, Viral Core Lab, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Jetten, Anton M. [DIR Laboratory of Respiratory Biology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • We developed a stable cell line with intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis. • The ERRα repressor, XCT790, down regulates this pathway. • Phytoestrogen, genisten stimulates this pathway. - Abstract: The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) play critical roles in the control of several physiological functions, including the regulation of genes involved in energy homeostasis. However, little is known about the ability of environmental chemicals to disrupt or modulate this important bioenergetics pathway in humans. The goal of this study was to develop a cell-based assay system with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis that could be used as a screening assay for detecting such chemicals. To this end, we successfully generated several stable cell lines expressing PGC-1α and showed that the reporter driven by the native ERRα hormone response unit (AAB-Luc) is active in these cell lines and that the activation is PGC-1α-dependent. Furthermore, we show that this activation can be blocked by the ERRα selective inverse agonist, XCT790. In addition, we find that genistein and bisphenol A further stimulate the reporter activity, while kaempferol has minimal effect. These cell lines will be useful for identifying environmental chemicals that modulate this important pathway.

  13. Technogenic radionuclides of Chernobyl NPP accidental release and their physical and chemical forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lypska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of radionuclides in the vertical soil profile on the nearest Chernobyl NPP zone of alienation was investigated. It is showed experimentally that the main activity of radionuclides is concentrated in the topsoil (10 сm. Coefficients of accumulation of 137Cs and 90Sr radionuclides by plants are estimated. The physico-chemical forms of radionuclides in soil and plants were defined using the method of sequential chemical extraction. It was established that the main contents of 137Cs and 90Sr in soils are represented in non-exchange and fixed forms, in plants - mainly in exchange-adsorption and organic forms.

  14. Radiation stable, hybrid, chemical vapor infiltration/preceramic polymer joining of silicon carbide components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, Hesham E., E-mail: hesham.khalifa@ga.com [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Ct., San Diego 92121, CA (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge 37831, TN (United States); Jacobsen, George M.; Deck, Christian P.; Back, Christina A. [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Ct., San Diego 92121, CA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    This paper reports on a nuclear-grade joining material for bonding of silicon carbide-based components. The joint material is fabricated via a hybrid preceramic polymer, chemical vapor infiltration process. The joint is comprised entirely of β-SiC and results in excellent mechanical and permeability performance. The joint strength, composition, and microstructure have been characterized before and after irradiation to 4.5 dpa at 730 °C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The hybrid preceramic polymer-chemical vapor infiltrated joint exhibited complete retention of shear strength and no evidence of microstructural evolution or damage was detected following irradiation.

  15. Chemically stable Dy–Y double substituted barium zirconate with high proton conductivity and improved sinterability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paydar, M.H., E-mail: paaydar@shirazu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nishimura, Ch. [Hydrogen Materials Unit, Environment and Energy Materials Division, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kobayashi, K. [Advanced Ceramics Group, Materials Processing Unit, Advanced Key Technologies Division, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • BaZr{sub (0.8−x)}Dy{sub x}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) powders were synthesized by a wet chemical route. • The ability of the synthesized powders in uptaking water was determined. • Chemical stability of the synthesized powders was evaluated under in wet and CO{sub 2} atmosphere. • The conductivity of the sintered pellets was measured by AC impedance spectroscopy. • It was shown that Dy-doped BZY20 ceramic has excellent proton conductivity. • It was proved that Dy-doped BZY20 ceramic has good chemical stability. • It was concluded that Dy-doped BZY20 electrolyte can be considered as a promising electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cell applications. - Abstract: Novel proton conductors BaZr{sub (0.8−x)}Dy{sub x}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} (BZ{sub 0.8−x}D{sub x}Y20, 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) with high proton conductivity, chemical stability and improved sinterability are developed by partially substituting the Zr site of the 20 mol% Y-doped barium zirconate (BZY20) with Dy. A modified Pechini method was applied to synthesize the BZ{sub 0.8−x}D{sub x}Y20 powders. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the well-calcined powders indicated that the specimens with 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2 possessed a single-phase of cubic perovskite-type oxides. Stability tests under both CO{sub 2} and moist air atmospheres demonstrated that the excellent chemical stability of the base BZY20 material was not influenced by the introduction of Dy. High density pellets with larger grain sizes were obtained at temperatures lower than those commonly employed for the base Y-doped barium zirconate compound. The proton conductivities, measured in different oxidizing and reducing, dry and humidified atmospheres by impedance spectroscopy, were significantly influenced by the Dy amount. In overall, BaZr{sub (0.8−x)}Dy{sub x}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} solid solutions having Dy ∼ 5–10% showed excellent chemical stability and high conductivity (above 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at

  16. Isotopic Abundance and Chemical Purity Analysis of Stable Isotope Deuterium Labeled Sudan I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Yin-ping;LEI Wen;ZHENG Bo;DU Xiao-ning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is important that to analysis of the isotopic abundance and chemical purity of Sudan I-D5, which is the internal standard of isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The isotopic abundance of Sudan I-D5 is detected by “mass cluster” classification method and LC-MS. The repeatability and reproducibility experiments were carried out by using different mass spectrometers and different operators. The RSD was less than 0.1%, so the repeatability and reproducibility were satisfactory. The accuracy and precision of the isotopic abundance analysis method was good with the results of F test and t test. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC had been used for detecting the chemical purity of Sudan I-D5 as external standard method.

  17. Behavior of radon, chemical compounds and stable elements in underground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, N.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, M.B.E.; Pena, P.; Armienta, M.A.; Godinez, L.; Seidel, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The radon behavior, chemical compounds, major and trace elements in water samples of four springs and three wells of urban and agricultural zones around the Jocotitlan volcano and El Oro region was determined, both of them located in the medium part of the Mexican neo-volcanic axis. The 222 Rn was measured by the liquid scintillation method, the analysis of major components was realized with conventional chemical techniques, while the trace elements were quantified using an Icp-Ms. The average values of the radon concentrations obtained during one year were constant relatively, in an interval from 0.97 to 4.99 Bq/lt indicating a fast transport from the reload area toward the sampling points. the compounds, major and trace elements showed differences which indicate distinct origins of water from the site studies. (Author)

  18. The effects of early diagenesis on the chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiker, E.C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of modern and ancient buried wood show that there is a linear correlation between carbohydrate content and the stable carbon isotope composition as carbohydrates are preferentially degraded during early diagenesis. As the carbohydrate content decreases, the delta 13 C value of the degraded wood decreases 1 to 2 per mil, approaching the value of the residual lignin. These results indicate that carbohydrate degradation products are lost and not incorporated into the aromatic structure as lignin is selectively preserved during early diagenesis of wood. These results also indicate that attempts to quantify terrestrial inputs to modern sedimentary organic matter based on delta 13 C values should consider the possibility of a 1 to 2 per mil decrease in the delta 13 C value of degraded wood. (author)

  19. Determination of mixing characteristics of the river Kabul and the river Indus using physico-chemical and stable isotope parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, R.M.; Hussain, Q.M.; Sajjad, M.I.; Hussain, S.D.; Latif, Z.

    1990-11-01

    This report presents a comparative study on the usefulness of stable isotope parameters (hydrogen and oxygen) versus the physico-chemical parameters (electrical conductivity, temperature, pH value) of water to determine the extent of mixing of the river Kabul with the river Indus near Attock. In view of the sampling techniques employed in the present investigations, electrical conductivity and temperature are found to be the best field parameters for a quick estimate of mixing path length. However, the stable isotopes of the water molecule, due to their greater sensitivity and measuring accuracy, provide a better scenario of mixing characteristics as compared to the physico-chemical parameters. It appears that under normal flow condition, it takes about 5 km channel distance for complete mixing of the Kabul river water in the Indus river channel. A computer code MIXABC is developed to determine the percentage contribution of one river water along a mixing channel in the other river. Details of the source programs are presented. The code can be used on any IBM-compatible microsystem. (author)

  20. Chemical forms of 35S in KCl crystals doped with elementary 35S. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddock, A.G.; Todorovsky, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    KCl crystals have been doped with 35 S at low chemical concentrations. Upon solution of the doped crystals in cyanide solution and analysis by the method of Kasrai and Maddock, the 35 S appears in the same chemical forms as are found for the 35 S produced in similar crystals by the (n, p) reaction. Reactions are suggested whereby these products may be produced. (orig.)

  1. Chemical form of tumor-tropic 99mTc-DL-homocysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, A.; Okada, S.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of the chemical forms of 99m Tc-complexes provide important information for the development of a new tumor-tropic 99m Tc-labeled radiopharmaceutical. We attempted to determine the chemical form of 99m Tc-DL-homocysteine ( 99m Tc-Hcy) which was previously reported to be tumor-tropic. By analyzing the functional residues of Hcy in the 99m Tc-Hcy molecule, it was estimated that the sulfhydryl and amino residues participated in the chelate formation. Gel filtration analysis of 99m Tc-Hcy indicated that its molecular size was bigger than that of 99m Tc-penicillamine monomer. The analysis also indicated that 99m Tc-Hcy complex seemed to be a relatively small oligomer. Although an uncertainty remains on the valency of Tc in 99m Tc-Hcy molecule and the accurate molecular size of this complex, its putative chemical form is described. (author)

  2. Neural-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells incorporated into muscle stuffed vein scaffold forms a stable living nerve conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nur Hidayah; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Ng, Min-Hwei; Htwe, Ohnmar; Idrus, Ruszymah B H; Roohi, Sharifah; Naicker, Amaramalar S; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2012-10-01

    Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps have donor site morbidity and possible neuroma formation resulting in development of various methods of bridging nerve gaps without using autologous nerve grafts. We have fabricated an acellular muscle stuffed vein seeded with differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a substitute for nerve autografts. Human vein and muscle were both decellularized by liquid nitrogen immersion with subsequent hydrolysis in hydrochloric acid. Human MSCs were subjected to a series of treatments with a reducing agent, retinoic acid, and a combination of trophic factors. The differentiated MSCs were seeded on the surface of acellular muscle tissue and then stuffed into the vein. Our study showed that 35-75% of the cells expressed neural markers such as S100b, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), p75 NGF receptor, and Nestin after differentiation. Histological and ultra structural analyses of muscle stuffed veins showed attachment of cells onto the surface of the acellular muscle and penetration of the cells into the hydrolyzed fraction of muscle fibers. We implanted these muscle stuffed veins into athymic mice and at 8 weeks post-implantation, the acellular muscle tissue had fully degraded and replaced with new matrix produced by the seeded cells. The vein was still intact and no inflammatory reactions were observed proving the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the conduit. In conclusion, we have successfully formed a stable living nerve conduit which may serve as a substitute for autologous nerves. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: Evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, hardly any data is available for organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates while this is an ecologically important group with a unique fossil record. We performed dilute batch experiments with four harmful dinoflagellate species known for their ability to form organic cysts: Alexandrium tamarense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum. Cells were grown at a range of dissolved CO2 concentrations characterizing past, modern and projected future values (∼5-50 μmol L-1), representing atmospheric pCO2 of 180, 380, 800 and 1200 μatm. In all tested species, 13C fractionation depends on CO2 with a slope of up to 0.17‰ (μmol L)-1. Even more consistent correlations were found between 13C fractionation and the combined effects of particulate organic carbon quota (POC quota; pg C cell-1) and CO2. Carbon isotope fractionation as well as its response to CO2 is species-specific. These results may be interpreted as a first step towards a proxy for past pCO2 based on carbon isotope ratios of fossil organic dinoflagellate cysts. However, additional culture experiments focusing on environmental variables other than pCO2, physiological underpinning of the recorded response, testing for possible offsets in 13C values between cells and cysts, as well as field calibration studies are required to establish a reliable proxy.

  4. The behavior of various chemical forms of nickel in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry under different chemical modification approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Various organic and inorganic Ni forms were investigated using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Experiments without chemical modification showed a wide range of characteristic mass values for Ni (from 6.7 to 29 pg) and the importance of interaction with graphite. With the aim of achieving signal unification of organic Ni forms, different ways of chemical modification were tested. Some rules that govern the behavior of Ni were found and confirmed a significant role of the organic component of the analyte molecule in the analytical process. The application of air as an internal furnace gas in the pyrolysis phase and the Pd modifier injected with the sample solution improved the signal of porphyrins, while the application of iodine and methyltrioctylammonium chloride was required for organic compounds containing oxygen-bound Ni atoms. The Ni signal was strongly diminished when an aqueous solution containing hydrochloric acid was measured with the Pd modifier injected over the sample. Using the developed analytical methods, the range of characteristic mass values for various Ni forms totally dissolved in organic or aqueous solution was 6.5–7.9 pg. - Highlights: ► Some rules that govern behavior of organic Ni forms during GFAAS analysis were found. ► Interaction with graphite can significantly influence evaporation of porphyrins. ► Determination of Ni in form of porphyrins needs Pd organic modifier and air ashing. ► Determination of Ni in O-bound organic compounds needs pretreatment with I2+MTOACl. ► Chemical modification for GFAAS determination of Ni in HCl-containing solution.

  5. Chemical and mechanical performance properties for various final waste forms -- PSPI scoping study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Larsen, E.D.; Sears, J.W.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is obtaining data on the performance properties of the various final waste forms that may be chosen as primary treatment products for the alpha-contaminated low-level and transuranic waste at the INEL's Transuranic Storage Area. This report collects and compares selected properties that are key indicators of mechanical and chemical durability for Portland cement concrete, concrete formed under elevated temperature and pressure, sulfur polymer cement, borosilicate glass, and various forms of alumino-silicate glass, including in situ vitrification glass and various compositions of iron-enriched basalt (IEB) and iron-enriched basalt IV (IEB4). Compressive strength and impact resistance properties were used as performance indicators in comparative evaluation of the mechanical durability of each waste form, while various leachability data were used in comparative evaluation of each waste form's chemical durability. The vitrified waste forms were generally more durable than the non-vitrified waste forms, with the iron-enriched alumino-silicate glasses and glass/ceramics exhibiting the most favorable chemical and mechanical durabilities. It appears that the addition of zirconia and titania to IEB (forming IEB4) increases the leach resistance of the lanthanides. The large compositional ranges for IEB and IEB4 more easily accommodate the compositions of the waste stored at the INEL than does the composition of borosilicate glass. It appears, however, that the large potential variation in IEB and IEB4 compositions resulting from differing waste feed compositions can impact waste form durability. Further work is needed to determine the range of waste stream feed compositions and rates of waste form cooling that will result in acceptable and optimized IEB or IEB4 waste form performance. 43 refs

  6. Preparation and properties of lauric acid/silicon dioxide composites as form-stable phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Guiyin; Li Hui; Liu Xu

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable lauric acid (LA)/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) composite phase change materials were prepared using sol-gel methods. The LA was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, with the SiO 2 acting as the supporting material. The structural analysis of these form-stable LA/SiO 2 composite phase change materials was carried out using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR). The microstructure of the form-stable composite phase change materials was observed by a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus (TGA), respectively. The SEM results showed that the LA was well dispersed in the porous network of SiO 2 . The DSC results indicated that the melting latent heat of the form-stable composite phase change material is 117.21 kJ kg -1 when the mass percentage of the LA in the SiO 2 is 64.8%. The results of the TGA showed that these materials have good thermal stability. The form-stable composite phase change materials can be used for thermal energy storage in waste heat recovery and solar heating systems.

  7. A study of physical and chemical forms of 7BE in air particulates of Damascus city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Al-Kharfan, K.; Hasan, M.

    1999-01-01

    Physical and chemical forms of 7B e in air particulates of Damascus city during 1997-1998 have been studied. Results have shown that 7B e is mainly attached to particulates having 0.95 μ diameters. In addition, a difference between 7B e concentrations in air particulates collected by TSP filters and PM10 filters has been observed. This difference could be used to evaluate the amount of 7B e due to air suspension. Moreover, results have also shown that the chemical forms of 7B e differ from one month to another according to weather conditions, 7B e was found to be in an exchangeable form in wet months and undissolved form in dry months. (author)

  8. Stable isotope and chemical compositions of European and Australasian ciders as a guide to authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James F; Yates, Hans S A; Tinggi, Ujang

    2015-01-28

    This paper presents a data set derived from the analysis of bottled and canned ciders that may be used for comparison with suspected counterfeit or substitute products. Isotopic analysis of the solid residues from ciders (predominantly sugar) provided a means to determine the addition of C4 plant sugars. The added sugars were found to comprise cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, glucose, or combinations. The majority of ciders from Australia and New Zealand were found to contain significant amounts of added sugar, which provided a limited means to distinguish these ciders from European ciders. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the whole ciders (predominantly water) were shown to be controlled by two factors, the water available to the parent plant and evaporation. Analysis of data derived from both isotopic and chemical analysis of ciders provided a means to discriminate between regions and countries of manufacture.

  9. Cost-effective fabrication of thermal- and chemical-stable ZIF-9 nanocrystals at ammonia atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Arash; Mansournia, Mohammadreza

    2017-12-01

    In this study, room temperature synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework-9 (ZIF-9) nanocrystals is reported for the first time at ammonia atmosphere in the absence of any organic additive. High thermal stability of the as-fabricated ZIF-9 up to 300 °C is illustrated by TG and XRD data. Also, the chemical resistance of product to harsh and severe solvothermal conditions introduces it to be an objective as potential material in many applications. Besides, the modest microporosity of the as-obtained ZIF-9 materials attracts more attentions for further investigation compared to those fabricated in organic solvents. By and large, the represented low-cost and room temperature synthetic method can be applicable in the large scale preparation of ZIF-9 for potentially practical utilization.

  10. The Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework integrates plant litter decomposition with soil organic matter stabilization: do labile plant inputs form stable soil organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrufo, M Francesca; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Boot, Claudia M; Denef, Karolien; Paul, Eldor

    2013-04-01

    The decomposition and transformation of above- and below-ground plant detritus (litter) is the main process by which soil organic matter (SOM) is formed. Yet, research on litter decay and SOM formation has been largely uncoupled, failing to provide an effective nexus between these two fundamental processes for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling and storage. We present the current understanding of the importance of microbial substrate use efficiency and C and N allocation in controlling the proportion of plant-derived C and N that is incorporated into SOM, and of soil matrix interactions in controlling SOM stabilization. We synthesize this understanding into the Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework. This framework leads to the hypothesis that labile plant constituents are the dominant source of microbial products, relative to input rates, because they are utilized more efficiently by microbes. These microbial products of decomposition would thus become the main precursors of stable SOM by promoting aggregation and through strong chemical bonding to the mineral soil matrix. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Mixing of fluids in hydrothermal ore-forming (Sn,W) systems: stable isotope and rare earth elements data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushchevskaya, T. M.; Popova, J. A.; Velivetskaya, T. A.; Ignatiev, A. V.; Matveeva, S. S.; Limantseva, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental and physico-chemical modeling data witness to important role of mixing of different type of fluids during tin and tungsten ore formation in hydrothermal systems. Mixing of magmatogeneous fluids, exsolved from granite melts, with exogenic, initially meteoric waters in hydrothermal ore-forming systems may change chemical composition of ore-forming fluid, causing cassiterite and/or wolframite precipitation (Heinrich, 1990; Sushchevskaya, Ryzhenko, 2002). We studied the process of genetically different fluids mixing for two economic Sn-W deposits, situated in the Iultin ore region (North-East of Russia, Chukotka Penninsula). The Iultin and Svetloe deposits are located in the apical parts of close situated leucogranite stocks, formed at the final stage of the Iultin complex emplacement. Both deposits are composed of a series of quartz veins among the flyschoid rocks (T 1-2), cut by the dikes (K1) of lamprophyre, granodiorite porphyre and alpite. The veins of the deposits are dominated by the productive quartz-wolframite-cassiterite-arsenopyrite-muscovite mineral assemblage. Topaz, beryl, fluorite, and albite occur sporadically. The later sulfide (loellingite-stannite-chalcopyrite) and quartz-fluorite-calcite assemblages show insignificant development. The preore quartz veinlets in host hornfels contain disseminated iron sulfides, chalcopyrite, muscovite. Isotopic (H, O, Ar) study of minerals, supplemented by oxygen isotope data of host granites and metamorphic rocks gave us possibility to conclude, that at the Iultin and the Svetloye deposits fluid mixing was fixed on the early stages of deposit formation and could be regarded as probable cause of metal (W, Sn) precipitation. During postore time the intensive involvement of isotopically light exogenic waters have changed: a) the initial character of oxygen isotope zonality; b) the initial hydrogen isotope composition of muscovites, up to meteoric calculated values for productive fluid (while the δ18O

  12. Stable isotope and hydro chemical variability along the Calueque-Oshakati Canal in the Cuvelai-Etosha Basin, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeniger, Paul; Beyer, Matthias; Gaj, Marcel; Hamutoko, Josefina; Uugulu, Shoopi; Wanke, Heike; Huber, Markus; Lohe, Christoph; Quinger, Martin; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Since 1973 Kunene River water (currently between 47 and 63 Million m3 per year [1]) is carried from the Calueque Dam in Angola along a 150 km concrete canal to Oshakati in the Cuvelai-Etosha Basin which supplies the most densely populated area of Namibia with drinking water. Backup storage is held in the Olushandja Dam and in water towers at Ogongo, Oshakati and Ondangwa and about 4,000 km of pipelines radiate out from purification schemes and supply most of the people and the livestock [2, 3]. The canal is open along most of its course to Oshakati, allowing livestock and people living nearby to make free use of the water. During the rainy season, flood water from the vast Oshana drainage system swashes into the canal bearing a potential health risk when consumed untreated. Within the SASSCAL project (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management - www.sasscal.org) water samples were collected during a field campaign from 18th to 20th November 2013 right before the onset of the rainy season 2013/14, to gain information on water evolution, evaporation and mixing influences as well as to characterize input concentrations for indirect recharge in this area. Water samples were collected at 14 sites along the canal (about every 10 km) and the Kunene River for stable water isotopes (deuterium and oxygen-18) and hydro chemical analyzes. Coordinates and altitude, temperature, conductivity, pH-value, and oxygen content were measured in the field. Hydro chemical and stable isotope analyzes were conducted later on in the laboratory. For stable isotopes a Picarro L2120-i water vapor analyzer was used with accuracies of 0.2o and 0.8o for δ18O and δ2H, respectively. Further campaigns within and after the rainy season are planned. A discussion of isotope and hydro chemical evolution of canal water in comparison to local rain and available groundwater composition will be presented. [1] Directorate of Rural Water Supply (2004

  13. Chemical form of transuranic elements in underground environment and its effect on adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tomo

    1990-01-01

    Many of the transuranic elements such as Np, Pu and Am contained in high-level radioactive wastes are highly dangerous to humans and have extremely long lives. Therefore, safety evaluation of them is highly important after their disposal into the ground. Particularly important processes include the migration of these transuranic elements in near and far fields. The migration of a nuclide depends largely on its chemical form in the underground environment. The present report first describes various chemical forms of transuranic elements in underground environments and outlines their migration behaviors. Techniques that have recently become available for determining their chemical forms include photo-acoustic spectroscopy, thermal lensing spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence, photo-acoustic detection of light scattering, auto-correlation photon spectroscopy, and laser-induced time-resolved spectrofluorometry. Chemical forms of these elements are then discussed focusing on underground environmental conditions, pH-Eh diagram, deposition/dissolution, formation of complex, formation of colloid, and organic complexes. Migration is discussed in relation to ions, insoluble matters, and colloids. (N.K.)

  14. Instructions for the Tier I Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Tier I form is to provide State and local officials and the public with information on the general chemical hazard types and locations at your facility, if above reporting thresholds.

  15. Carbon-14, tritium, stable isotope and chemical measurements on thermal waters from the Tauranga region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.; McGill, R.C.; Taylor, C.B.; Whitehead, N.E.; Downes, C.J.

    1984-03-01

    The chemical compositions of groundwater from the Tauranga region are affected to varying degrees by reducing conditions due to buried organic matter. The levels of some dissolved constituents are also affected by mixing with sea water contained within the rocks and by rock-water interaction. Dissolved gas compositions range from oxygen-bearing to methane-bearing reflecting the varying redox conditions. Excess air may be present but further experiments are necessary to confirm this. Apparent ages deduced from carbon-14 measurements (corrected using 12C dilution and 13C fractionation methods) range from 2-25,000 years, suggesting that some of the waters were recharged during late Pleistocene or early Holocene time. ΔD and Δ18 O values of the oldest waters are slightly more negative than those of younger samples; this may indicate recharge during a cooler climate, in agreement with the 14C ages. Very low but significantly non-zero tritium contents (TR=(0.007-0.059)+-0.007) were measured using the high tritium-enrichment facilities at INS and the very low-background counters at the University of Bern. The tritium is thought to derive from contamination or nuclear reactions in the aquifer rocks rather than from recharge water

  16. Subsurface injection of dissolved ferric chloride to form a chemical barrier: Laboratory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.; Morris, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A chemical barrier is a permeable zone of reactive materials emplaced in the subsurface to remove ground-water contaminants while allowing clean ground water to pass through. Because dissolved ferric chloride hydrolyzes to amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide when it contacts calcite (CaCO 3 ), it may be viable to emplace a zone of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (an absorbent for U, Mo, and other inorganic contaminants) into calcite-bearing geologic units by injecting ferric chloride through wells. For a chemical barrier to be successful, it must remain permeable and must be immobile. This investigation monitored chemical compositions, hydraulic conductivity, and iron mobility in laboratory columns and in a two-dimensional tank to determine the viability of injecting ferric chloride to form an amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide chemical barrier. The authors introduced a ferric chloride solution (1,345 mg/1[0.024 m] Fe) to calcite-bearing alluvial gravel to form a chemical barrier of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide, followed by solutions contaminated with U and Mo. The simulated chemical barriers decreased U and Mo concentrations to less than 0.05 mg/l (2.1 x 10 -7 m) and 0.01 (1.0 x 10 -7 m), respectively; however, the breakthrough front is spread out with concentrations increasing to more than regulatory guideline values sooner than predicted. The hydraulic conductivity of calcite-bearing alluvial gravel decreased substantially during ferric chloride introduction because of the formation of carbon dioxide but increased to within factors of 1 to 5 of the original value as synthetic ground water flowed through the system. Amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide that formed in these experiments remained immobile at flow rates exceeding those typical of ground water. These laboratory results, in conjunction with site-specific characterization data, can be used to design chemical barriers emplaced by injection of ferric chloride

  17. A Tri-Layer Proton-Conducting Electrolyte for Chemically Stable Operation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Traversa, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Two BaZr0.7Pr0.1Y0.2O3-δ (BZPY) layers were used to sandwich a BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BCY) layer to produce a tri-layer electrolyte consisting of BZPY/BCY/BZPY. The BZPY layers significantly improved the chemical stability of the BCY electrolyte layer, which was not stable when tested alone, suggesting that the BZPY layer effectively protected the BCY layer from CO2 reaction, which is the major problem of BCY-based materials. A fuel cell with this sandwiched electrolyte supported on a Ni-based composite anode showed a reasonable cell performance, reaching 185 mW cm-2 at 700 oC, in spite of the relatively large electrolyte thickness (about 65 µm).

  18. A Tri-Layer Proton-Conducting Electrolyte for Chemically Stable Operation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-10-07

    Two BaZr0.7Pr0.1Y0.2O3-δ (BZPY) layers were used to sandwich a BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BCY) layer to produce a tri-layer electrolyte consisting of BZPY/BCY/BZPY. The BZPY layers significantly improved the chemical stability of the BCY electrolyte layer, which was not stable when tested alone, suggesting that the BZPY layer effectively protected the BCY layer from CO2 reaction, which is the major problem of BCY-based materials. A fuel cell with this sandwiched electrolyte supported on a Ni-based composite anode showed a reasonable cell performance, reaching 185 mW cm-2 at 700 oC, in spite of the relatively large electrolyte thickness (about 65 µm).

  19. Use of silicon for skin and hair care: an approach of chemical forms available and efficacy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Lidiane Advincula; Addor, Flavia; Campos, Patrícia Maria Berardo Gonçalves Maia

    2016-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element on Earth, and the third most abundant trace element in human body. It is present in water, plant and animal sources. On the skin, it is suggested that silicon is important for optimal collagen synthesis and activation of hydroxylating enzymes, improving skin strength and elasticity. Regarding hair benefits, it was suggested that a higher silicon content in the hair results in a lower rate of hair loss and increased brightness. For these beneficial effects, there is growing interest in scientific studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of using dietary supplements containing silicon. Its use aims at increasing blood levels of this element and improving the skin and its annexes appearance. There are different forms of silicon supplements available and the most important consideration to be made in order to select the best option is related to safety and bioavailability. Silicon supplements are widely used, though there is wide variation in silicon bioavailability, ranging from values below 1% up to values close to 50%, depending on the chemical form. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the scientific literature related to the different chemical forms of silicon supplements available and the limitations and recent progress in this field. According to reported studies, among the different chemical forms available, the orthosilicic acid (OSA) presents the higher bioavailability, whereas the others forms have absorption inversely proportional to the degree of polymerization. However, clinical studies evaluating safety and efficacy are still lacking. PMID:27438201

  20. Use of silicon for skin and hair care: an approach of chemical forms available and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Lidiane Advincula de; Addor, Flavia; Campos, Patrícia Maria Berardo Gonçalves Maia

    2016-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element on Earth, and the third most abundant trace element in human body. It is present in water, plant and animal sources. On the skin, it is suggested that silicon is important for optimal collagen synthesis and activation of hydroxylating enzymes, improving skin strength and elasticity. Regarding hair benefits, it was suggested that a higher silicon content in the hair results in a lower rate of hair loss and increased brightness. For these beneficial effects, there is growing interest in scientific studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of using dietary supplements containing silicon. Its use aims at increasing blood levels of this element and improving the skin and its annexes appearance. There are different forms of silicon supplements available and the most important consideration to be made in order to select the best option is related to safety and bioavailability. Silicon supplements are widely used, though there is wide variation in silicon bioavailability, ranging from values below 1% up to values close to 50%, depending on the chemical form. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the scientific literature related to the different chemical forms of silicon supplements available and the limitations and recent progress in this field. According to reported studies, among the different chemical forms available, the orthosilicic acid (OSA) presents the higher bioavailability, whereas the others forms have absorption inversely proportional to the degree of polymerization. However, clinical studies evaluating safety and efficacy are still lacking.

  1. Chemical composition shape form and size of suspended solids in the atmosphere carried by rain water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturbe G, J.L.; Lopez M, B.E.; Torre O, J. De la

    2001-01-01

    The interest of this work is to know about shape form, size and chemical composition of the suspended solids in the atmosphere of Toluca city and which are carried by the rains. The harvest of the samples was carried out during january to november 1999. The separation of the particulate matter from the rain water was realized through centrifugation. The solids were analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy to know the shape form and size and the chemical composition was determined by X-ray dispersive energy in general form and of some particles individually analysed. The p H was measured to the solutions and the quantification of some dissolved ions by the Icp technique was realized. The results of the solids showed C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, P, K, Ca, Ti and Fe. Moreover they present sizes which varying from a ten of nanometers until some tens of microns. (Author)

  2. Uncertainty of inhalation dose coefficients for representative physical and chemical forms of iodine-131

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Richard Paul, III

    Releases of radioactive material have occurred at various Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities and facilities associated with the nuclear fuel cycle in the generation of electricity. Many different radionuclides have been released to the environment with resulting exposure of the population to these various sources of radioactivity. Radioiodine has been released from a number of these facilities and is a potential public health concern due to its physical and biological characteristics. Iodine exists as various isotopes, but our focus is on 131I due to its relatively long half-life, its prevalence in atmospheric releases and its contribution to offsite dose. The assumption of physical and chemical form is speculated to have a profound impact on the deposition of radioactive material within the respiratory tract. In the case of iodine, it has been shown that more than one type of physical and chemical form may be released to, or exist in, the environment; iodine can exist as a particle or as a gas. The gaseous species can be further segregated based on chemical form: elemental, inorganic, and organic iodides. Chemical compounds in each class are assumed to behave similarly with respect to biochemistry. Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratories have demonstrated that 131I is released as a particulate, as well as in elemental, inorganic and organic chemical form. The internal dose estimate from 131I may be very different depending on the effect that chemical form has on fractional deposition, gas uptake, and clearance in the respiratory tract. There are many sources of uncertainty in the estimation of environmental dose including source term, airborne transport of radionuclides, and internal dosimetry. Knowledge of uncertainty in internal dosimetry is essential for estimating dose to members of the public and for determining total uncertainty in dose estimation. Important calculational steps in any lung model is regional estimation of deposition fractions

  3. Stable isotope, chemical, and mineral compositions of the Middle Proterozoic Lijiaying Mn deposit, Shaanxi Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsueh-Wen; Hein, James R.; Ye, Jie; Fan, Delian

    1999-01-01

    The Lijiaying Mn deposit, located about 250 km southwest of Xian, is a high-quality ore characterized by low P and Fe contents and a mean Mn content of about 23%. The ore deposit occurs in shallow-water marine sedimentary rocks of probable Middle Proterozoic age. Carbonate minerals in the ore deposit include kutnahorite, calcite, Mn calcite, and Mg calcite. Carbon (−0.4 to −4.0‰) and oxygen (−3.7 to −12.9‰) isotopes show that, with a few exceptions, those carbonate minerals are not pristine low-temperature marine precipitates. All samples are depleted in rare earth elements (REEs) relative to shale and have negative Eu and positive Ce anomalies on chondrite-normalized plots. The Fe/Mn ratios of representative ore samples range from about 0.034 to deep ocean-floor during the Cenozoic. Because the Lijiaying precursor mineral formed in a shallow-water marine environment, the atmospheric oxygen content during the Middle Proterozoic may have been lower than it has been during the Cenozoic.

  4. The XPS study of physical and chemical forms of neptunium group on the surface of minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption behavior and the physical and chemical forms of neptunium on the surface of minerals of the two chlorate samples, biotite and kaolin, with different contents of Fe(II was studied. The liquid-liquid extraction and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to identify the valence forms of neptunium. On the basis of the obtained data the quantitative elemental composition of the surface of the studied minerals, as well as the ionic composition of the formed neptunium complexes was determined. It was shown that the Np(IV and Np(VI containing compounds did not form, while the complexes Np(VO+ -hydroxyl did form on the surface. The oxygen ions bonded with iron and oxygen belonging to water and/or of carboxyl were suggested to be present in the equatorial plane of the neptunyl group NpO+.

  5. Spinel dissolution via addition of glass forming chemicals. Results of preliminary experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Increased loading of high level waste in glass can lead to crystallization within the glass. Some crystalline species, such as spinel, have no practical impact on the chemical durability of the glass, and therefore may be acceptable from both a processing and a product performance standpoint. In order to operate a melter with a controlled amount of crystallization, options must be developed for remediating an unacceptable accumulation of crystals. This report describes preliminary experiments designed to evaluate the ability to dissolve spinel crystals in simulated waste glass melts via the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs).

  6. The Absence of a Mature Cell Wall Sacculus in Stable Listeria monocytogenes L-Form Cells Is Independent of Peptidoglycan Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Patrick; Borisova, Marina; Schneider, Alexander; Ayala, Juan A; Mayer, Christoph; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J; Briers, Yves

    2016-01-01

    L-forms are cell wall-deficient variants of otherwise walled bacteria that maintain the ability to survive and proliferate in absence of the surrounding peptidoglycan sacculus. While transient or unstable L-forms can revert to the walled state and may still rely on residual peptidoglycan synthesis for multiplication, stable L-forms cannot revert to the walled form and are believed to propagate in the complete absence of peptidoglycan. L-forms are increasingly studied as a fundamental biological model system for cell wall synthesis. Here, we show that a stable L-form of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes features a surprisingly intact peptidoglycan synthesis pathway including glycosyl transfer, in spite of the accumulation of multiple mutations during prolonged passage in the cell wall-deficient state. Microscopic and biochemical analysis revealed the presence of peptidoglycan precursors and functional glycosyl transferases, resulting in the formation of peptidoglycan polymers but without the synthesis of a mature cell wall sacculus. In conclusion, we found that stable, non-reverting L-forms, which do not require active PG synthesis for proliferation, may still continue to produce aberrant peptidoglycan.

  7. Metal nanoinks as chemically stable surface enhanced scattering (SERS) probes for the analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, A; Saviello, D; McAuliffe, M A P; Mirabile, A; Lewis, L; Iacopino, D

    2017-06-07

    Metal nanoinks constituted by Ag nanoparticles and Au nanorods were employed as probes for the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) analysis of a blue BIC ballpoint pen. The dye components of the pen ink were first separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and subsequently analysed by SERS at illumination wavelengths of 514 nm and 785 nm. Compared to normal Raman conditions, enhanced spectra were obtained for all separated spots, allowing easy identification of phthalocyanine Blue 38 and triarylene crystal violet in the ink mixture. A combination of effects such as molecular resonance, electromagnetic and chemical effects were the contributing factors to the generation of spectra enhanced compared to normal Raman conditions. Enhancement factors (EFs) between 5 × 10 3 and 3 × 10 6 were obtained, depending on the combination of SERS probes and laser illumination used. In contrast to previous conflicting reports, the metal nanoinks were chemically stable, allowing the collection of reproducible spectra for days after deposition on TLC plates. In addition and in advance to previously reported SERS probes, no need for additional aggregating agents or correction of electrostatic charge was necessary to induce the generation of enhanced SERS spectra.

  8. Long-term fertilization alters chemically-separated soil organic carbon pools: Based on stable C isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaolin; He, Ping; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools under the influence of long-term fertilization is essential for predicting carbon (C) sequestration. We combined soil chemical fractionation with stable C isotope analyses to investigate the C dynamics of the various SOC pools after 25 years of fertilization. Five types of soil samples (0-20, 20-40 cm) including the initial level (CK) and four fertilization treatments (inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, IN; balanced inorganic fertilizer, NPK; inorganic fertilizer plus farmyard manure, MNPK; inorganic fertilizer plus corn straw residue, SNPK) were separated into recalcitrant and labile fractions, and the fractions were analysed for C content, C:N ratios, δ13C values, soil C and N recalcitrance indexes (RIC and RIN). Chemical fractionation showed long-term MNPK fertilization strongly increased the SOC storage in both soil layers (0-20 cm = 1492.4 gC m2 and 20-40 cm = 1770.6 gC m2) because of enhanced recalcitrant C (RC) and labile C (LC). The 25 years of inorganic fertilizer treatment did not increase the SOC storage mainly because of the offsetting effects of enhanced RC and decreased LC, whereas no clear SOC increases under the SNPK fertilization resulted from the fast decay rates of soil C.

  9. Bioaccumulation and chemical forms of cadmium, copper and lead in aquatic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JinZhao Hu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The cadmium(Cd, copper(Cu and lead(Pb accumulation, as well as their relative content of different chemical forms in Sagittaria sagittifolia L. and Potamogeton crispus L. were determined. The results showed that both the plants had the ability to accumulate large amounts of Cd, Cu and Pb, and they absorbed metals in dose-dependent manners. The roots of S. sagittifolia appeared more sensitive to Cd and Pb than the leaves of P. crispus. The potential of Cu uptake by these two plant tissues was similar. Under the same concentration, the uptake of Cu for both the plants was higher than Pb and Cd, while that of Pb was lowest. The Cd, Cu and Pb existed with various forms in the plants. Cd and Pb were mainly in the NaCl extractable form in S. sagittifolia and P. crispus. The HAc and ethanol extractable Cu were the main forms in the root, whereas the ethanol extractable form was the dominant chemical form in the caulis and bulb of the S. sagittifolia L.

  10. PEG/SiO2–Al2O3 hybrid form-stable phase change materials with enhanced thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Bingtao; Wu, Cheng; Qiu, Meige; Zhang, Xiwen; Zhang, Shufen

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of form-stable PEG/SiO 2 phase change material (PCM) was enhanced by in situ doping of Al 2 O 3 using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to characterize the structure, and the crystal performance was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) were used to determine the thermal properties. The phase change enthalpy of PEG/SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 reached 124 J g −1 , and thermal conductivity improved by 12.8% for 3.3 wt% Al 2 O 3 in the PCM compared with PEG/SiO 2 . The hybrid PCM has excellent thermal stability and form-stable effects. - Highlights: • The PEG/SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 hybrid form-stable phase change material (PCM) was obtained through the sol–gel method. • The inexpensive aluminum nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used as sol precursors. • This organic–inorganic hybrid process can effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of PCMs. • The PCM exhibited high thermal stability and excellent form-stable effects

  11. PEG/SiO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hybrid form-stable phase change materials with enhanced thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Bingtao, E-mail: tangbt@dlut.edu.cn; Wu, Cheng; Qiu, Meige; Zhang, Xiwen; Zhang, Shufen

    2014-03-01

    The thermal conductivity of form-stable PEG/SiO{sub 2} phase change material (PCM) was enhanced by in situ doping of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to characterize the structure, and the crystal performance was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) were used to determine the thermal properties. The phase change enthalpy of PEG/SiO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reached 124 J g{sup −1}, and thermal conductivity improved by 12.8% for 3.3 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the PCM compared with PEG/SiO{sub 2}. The hybrid PCM has excellent thermal stability and form-stable effects. - Highlights: • The PEG/SiO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hybrid form-stable phase change material (PCM) was obtained through the sol–gel method. • The inexpensive aluminum nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used as sol precursors. • This organic–inorganic hybrid process can effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of PCMs. • The PCM exhibited high thermal stability and excellent form-stable effects.

  12. Chemical forms and discharge ratios to stack and sea of tritium from Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Miyabe, Kenjiro

    2002-03-01

    Chemical forms and discharge ratios to stack and sea of tritium form Tokai Reprocessing Plant of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) were investigated by analyzing monitoring data. It was ascertained that approximately 70-80% of tritium discharged from the main stack was tritiated water vapor (HTO) and approximately 20-30% was tritiated hydrogen (HT) as a result of analyzing the data taken from reprocessing campaign's in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000 and 2001, and also that the amount of tritium released from the stack was less than 1% of tritium inventory in spent fuel and the amount of tritium released into sea was approximately 20-40% of inventory. (author)

  13. Effects of chemical form of sodium on the product characteristics of alkali lignin pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Da-liang; Yuan, Hong-you; Yin, Xiu-li; Wu, Chuang-zhi; Wu, Shu-bin; Zhou, Zhao-qiu

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Na as organic bound form or as inorganic salts form on the pyrolysis products characteristics of alkali lignin were investigated by using thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR), tube furnace and thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results of TG-FTIR and tube furnace indicated that the two chemical forms Na reduced the releasing peak temperature of CO and phenols leading to the peak temperature of the maximum mass loss rate shifted to low temperature zone. Furthermore, organic bound Na obviously improved the elimination of alkyl substituent leading to the yields of phenol and guaiacol increased, while inorganic Na increased the elimination of phenolic hydroxyl groups promoting the formation of ethers. It was also found the two chemical forms Na had different effects on the gasification reactivity of chars. For inorganic Na, the char conversion decreased with increasing the char forming temperature, while organic bound Na was opposite. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exhalation of I-131 after radioiodine therapy: time dependence and chemical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomaecker, K.; Fischer, T.; Eschner, W.; Gaidouk, M.I.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: The change of both amount and chemical forms of radioiodine exhaled in the air of rooms with patients on the therapy ward should be investigated depending on radioactivity applied, time after application, and kind of thyroid disease. Methods: The air of ward-rooms of 62 patients with thyroid carcinoma, Graves' Disease, and autonomy which received different therapy doses, was investigated with an portable constant air flow sampler. Different chemical iodine species (organic, elemental, aerosol bound) were collected during 8 hr in various filters until 3 days after application of the radioiodine capsule, according to their chemical form. The radioactivity in the filters was measured with a well counter on defined time points after application. Results: The radioactivity exhaled was between 0,008 and 0,03% related to activity of radioiodine applied. The percentage of radioiodine exhaled related to the activity applied, differed significantly depending on disease and changed as follows: Grave's disease > autonomy > carcinoma. The exhalation of radioiodine became stronger with increasing applied activities and showed an exponential decrease with time. The most part of radioiodine was present in organic bound form. This organic portion decreased with time in favour of the other iodine species. Conclusion: The degree of accumulation of radioiodine orally applied within thyroid seems to be in direct proportion to the extend of its exhalation. Further measurements directly in the breathing air of RIT-patients are necessary, in order to clarify the relationship between degree of thyroid uptake and quantity as well as chemical form of radioiodine exhaled. (orig.) [de

  15. Preparation and properties studies of halogen-free flame retardant form-stable phase change materials based on paraffin/high density polyethylene composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yibing; Wei Qufu; Huang Fenglin; Gao Weidong

    2008-01-01

    The halogen-free flame retardant form-stable phase change materials (PCM) based on paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites were prepared by using twin-screw extruder technique. The structures and properties of the form-stable PCM composites based on intumescent flame retardant system with expandable graphite (EG) and different synergistic additives, such as ammonium polyphosphate (APP) and zinc borate (ZB) were characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), dynamic Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Cone calorimeter test. The TGA results showed that the halogen-free flame retardant form-stable PCM composites produced a larger amount of charred residue at 700 deg. C, although the onset of weight loss of the halogen-free flame retardant form-stable PCM composites occurred at a lower temperature due to the thermal decomposition of flame retardant. The DSC measurements indicated that the additives of flame retardant had little effect on the thermal energy storage property, and the temperatures of phase change peaks and the latent heat of the paraffin showed better occurrence during the freezing process. The dynamic FTIR monitoring results revealed that the breakdowns of main chains (HDPE and paraffin) and formations of various residues increased with increasing thermo-oxidation temperature. It was also found from the Cone calorimeter tests that the peak of heat release rate (PHRR) decreased significantly. Both the decrease of the PHRR and the structure of charred residue after combustion indicated that there was a synergistic effect between the EG and APP, contributing to the improved flammability of the halogen-free flame retardant form-stable PCM composites

  16. Study on thermal property of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid/vermiculite composite as form-stable phase change material for energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The form-stable composite phase change material of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite was prepared by vacuum impregnation method for thermal energy storage. The maximum mass fraction of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture retained in vermiculite was determined as 50 wt% without melted phase change material seepage from the composite phase change material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope and scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the prepared lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material, and the results indicate that lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture was well confined into the layer porous structure of vermiculite by physical reaction. The melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats were measured by differential scanning calorimeter as 31.4°C and 30.3°C, and 75.8 and 73.2 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test showed that there was no significant change in the thermal properties of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material after 1000 thermal cycles. Moreover, 2 wt% expanded graphite was added to improve the thermal conductivity of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material. All results indicated that the prepared lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material had suitable thermal properties and good thermal reliability for the application of thermal energy storage in building energy efficiency.

  17. Properties of form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide/expanded graphite phase change composites prepared by sol–gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Wu, Zhishen; Tan, Jinmiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite PCM was prepared with sol–gel method. ► The thermal conductivity of SiO 2 /paraffin/EG is 94.7% higher than paraffin. ► The latent heat of paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite is 104.4 J/g. -- Abstract: A form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 )/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by sol–gel method. Silica gel acts as the supporting material and EG is used to increase the thermal conductivity. The mass fractions of silicon oxide and graphite are 20.8% and 7.2%, respectively. The composite PCM was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Thermal properties and thermal stability of the composite PCM were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The result shows that paraffin was well dispersed in the network of silica gel and there is no chemical reaction between them. The phase change temperature of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 27.53 °C and 27.72 °C, respectively. The latent heat of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 112.8 J/g and 104.4 J/g, respectively. The thermal conductivity of the SiO 2 /paraffin composite and the SiO 2 /paraffin/EG composite are 28.2% and 94.7% higher than that of paraffin.

  18. Simulation study of the chemical forms of neptunium and plutonium in groundwater from a borehole in the northwest region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yingming; Jin Yuren; Wang Zhiqiang; Liu Dongxu; Liu Wei; Liu Yan

    2009-01-01

    According to physics-chymistry characteristic of groundwater from a borehole in the northwest region, we performed simulation study of the chemical forms of neptunium and plutonium by the geochemistry modeling program EQ3/6. The main conclusions are as follows: the main chemical form of neptunium in the groundwater is Np(V)'s NpO 2 + , subordination chemical forms are NpO 2 Cl, NpO 2 CO 3 - , NpO 2 OH, NpO 2 SO 4 - ; the main existing form of plutonium in the groundwater is Pu(IV)'s Pu(OH)5-and subordination chemical form is Pu(V)'s PuO 2 + . In addition,the temperature, pH and Eh also have different impacts on the chemical form of neptunium and plutonium. (authors)

  19. Preschool Children’s Memory for Word Forms Remains Stable Over Several Days, but Gradually Decreases after Six Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Ruth Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research on word learning has focused on children’s ability to identify a target object when given the word form after a minimal number of exposures to novel word-object pairings. However, relatively little research has focused on children’s ability to retrieve the word form when given the target object. The exceptions involve asking children to recall and produce forms, and children typically perform near floor on these measures. In the current study, 3- to 5-year-old children were administered a novel test of word form that allowed for recognition memory and manual responses. Specifically, when asked to label a previously trained object, children were given three forms to choose from: the target, a minimally different form, and a maximally different form. Children demonstrated memory for word forms at three post-training delays: 10 minutes (short-term, 2 to 3 days (long-term, and 6 months to 1 year (very long-term. However, children performed worse at the very long-term delay than the other time points, and the length of the very long-term delay was negatively related to performance. When in error, children were no more likely to select the minimally different form than the maximally different form at all time points. Overall, these results suggest that children remember word forms that are linked to objects over extended post-training intervals, but that their memory for the forms gradually decreases over time without further exposures. Furthermore, memory traces for word forms do not become less phonologically specific over time; rather children either identify the correct form, or they perform at chance.

  20. Physico-chemical forms and migration in continental waters of radium from uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, P.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in knowledge of the physico-chemical forms and migration of radium in continental waters are reviewed and recommendations for future research in this field are given. Computations of solution equilibria based on the reported and newly determined stability constants and solubilities of radium compounds show that a significant percentage of dissolved radium can exist in some waste and natural waters as an RaSO 4 ion pair, besides a significant percentage of Ra 2+ ions. The formation of a solid phase consisting mainly of sparingly soluble radium compounds can be excluded in waste and natural waters. Model experiments revealed that radium can be bound in complexes with some as yet unidentified ligands, probably of organic nature. Direct determinations of the physico-chemical forms of radium in surface and groundwaters were mostly confined to the analysis of the ratio of dissolved to particulate forms of radium. Ratios from 0.01 to 100 were found, depending on the type of water examined. Recently a newly suggested method of selective dissolution was applied to characterize the nature of particulate forms of radium in surface waters. Migration of radium is reviewed, covering the release of radium from its source, its transport in ground and surface waters and its deposition in various sinks. Factors influencing radium release from the sources into the hydrosphere are discussed. The following processes affecting radium migration are discussed: adsorption of dissolved radium on suspended solids and bottom sediments, coprecipitation of radium with solids formed in waste waters or in natural waters, sedimentation of particulate forms of radium in reservoirs and streams, resuspension of bottom sediments and dissolution of radium from suspended solids or bottom sediments

  1. Effect of water and gluten on physico-chemical properties and stability of ready to eat shelf-stable pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diantom, Agoura; Carini, Eleonora; Curti, Elena; Cassotta, Fabrizio; D'Alessandro, Alessandro; Vittadini, Elena

    2016-03-15

    A multi-analytical and multi-dimensional approach was used to investigate the effect of moisture and gluten on physico-chemical properties of shelf-stable ready to eat (RTE) pasta. Moisture and frozen water contents were not affected by formulation nor storage time. Hardness and retrograded amylopectin significantly increased during storage in all samples, more markedly in pasta with the lowest moisture content. Higher amounts of water and gluten reduced pasta hardening and contributed to control RTE pasta quality. (1)H FID became steeper in all samples during storage, but no effect of high moisture and gluten levels was observed on the mobility of these protons. Three proton T2 populations were observed (population C, population D and population E). Population C and D were not resolved during all storage. (1)H T2 relaxation time of the most abundant population (population E) shifted to shorter times and the amount of protons increased during storage, more importantly in the samples with lower moisture and gluten content. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemically stable Au nanorods as probes for sensitive surface enhanced scattering (SERS) analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Abeer; Saviello, Daniela; McAuliffe, Micheal A. P.; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Mirabile, Antonio; Proto, Antonio; Lewis, Liam; Iacopino, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Au nanorods were used as an alternative to commonly used Ag nanoparticles as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes for identification of dye composition of blue BIC ballpoint pens. When used in combination with Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), Au nanorod colloids allowed identification of the major dye components of the BIC pen ink, otherwise not identifiable by normal Raman spectroscopy. Thanks to their enhanced chemical stability compared to Ag colloids, Au nanorods provided stable and reproducible SERS signals and allowed easy identification of phthalocyanine and triarylene dyes in the pen ink mixture. These findings were supported by FTIR and MALDI analyses, also performed on the pen ink. Furthermore, the self-assembly of Au nanorods into large area ordered superstructures allowed identification of BIC pen traces. SERS spectra of good intensity and high reproducibility were obtained using Au nanorod vertical arrays, due to the high density of hot spots and morphological reproducibility of these superstructures. These results open the way to the employment of SERS for fast screening analysis and for quantitative analysis of pens and faded pens which are relevant for the fields of forensic and art conservation sciences.

  3. 13C NMR Chemical Shifts of the Triclinic and Monoclinic Crystal forms of Valinomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori; McGeorge, Gary; Orendt, Anita M.; Grant, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Two different crystalline polymorphs of valinomycin, the triclinic and monoclinic forms, have been studied by high resolution, solid state 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Although the two polymorphs of the crystal are remarkably similar, there are distinct differences in the isotropic chemical shifts between the two spectra. For the triclinic form, the carbon chemical shift tensor components for the alpha carbons adjacent to oxygen in the lactic acid and hydroxyisovaleric acid residues and the ester carbonyls of the valine residue were obtained using the FIREMAT experiment. From the measured components, it was found that the behavior of the isotropic chemical shift, δ iso , for valine residue ester carbonyl carbons is predominately influenced by the intermediate component, δ 22 . Additionally it was found that the smallest shift component, δ 33 , for the L-lactic acid (L-Lac) and D-α-hydroxyisovaleric acid (D-Hyi) C α -O carbon was significantly displaced depending upon the nature of individual amino acid residues, and it is the δ 33 component that governs the behavior of δ iso in these alpha carbons

  4. Form-stable paraffin/high density polyethylene composites as solid-liquid phase change material for thermal energy storage: preparation and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites as form-stable, solid-liquid phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy storage and with determination of their thermal properties. In such a composite, the paraffin (P) serves as a latent heat storage material and the HDPE acts as a supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin because of providing structural strength. Therefore, it is named form-stable composite PCM. In this study, two kinds of paraffins with melting temperatures of 42-44 deg. C (type P1) and 56-58 deg. C (type P2) and latent heats of 192.8 and 212.4 J g -1 were used. The maximum weight percentage for both paraffin types in the PCM composites without any seepage of the paraffin in the melted state were found as high as 77%. It is observed that the paraffin is dispersed into the network of the solid HDPE by investigation of the structure of the composite PCMs using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The melting temperatures and latent heats of the form-stable P1/HDPE and P2/HDPE composite PCMs were determined as 37.8 and 55.7 deg. C, and 147.6 and 162.2 J g -1 , respectively, by the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore, to improve the thermal conductivity of the form-stable P/HDPE composite PCMs, expanded and exfoliated graphite (EG) by heat treatment was added to the samples in the ratio of 3 wt.%. Thereby, the thermal conductivity was increased about 14% for the form-stable P1/HDPE and about 24% for the P2/HDPE composite PCMs. Based on the results, it is concluded that the prepared form-stable P/HDPE blends as composite type PCM have great potential for thermal energy storage applications in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties and improved thermal conductivity. Furthermore, these composite PCMs added with EG can be considered cost effective latent heat storage materials since they do not require encapsulation and extra cost to enhance

  5. A comparative study on the raft chemical properties of various alginate antacid raft-forming products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmar, Peter W; Gil-Gonzalez, Diana; Fisher, Jeanine; Flint, Lucy; Rainforth, Daniel; Moreno-Herrera, Antonio; Potts, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Research to measure the chemical characterization of alginate rafts for good raft performance and ascertain how formulation can affect chemical parameters. A selection of alginate formulations was investigated all claiming to be proficient raft formers with significance between products established and ranked. Procedures were selected which demonstrated the chemical characterization allowing rafts to effectively impede the reflux into the esophagus or in severe cases to be refluxed preferentially into the esophagus and exert a demulcent effect, with focus of current research on methods which complement previous studies centered on physical properties. The alginate content was analyzed by a newly developed HPLC method. Methods were used to determine the neutralization profile and the acid neutralization within the raft determined along with how raft structure affects neutralization. Alginate content of Gaviscon Double Action (GDA) within the raft was significantly superior (p raft acid neutralization capacity were GDA and Rennie Duo, the latter product not being a raft former. Raft structure was key and GDA had the right level of porosity to allow for longer duration of neutralization. Alginate formulations require three chemical reactions to take place simultaneously: transformation to alginic acid, sodium carbonate reacting to form carbon dioxide, calcium releasing free calcium ions to bind with alginic acid providing strength to raft formation. GDA was significantly superior (p <.0001) to all other comparators.

  6. Ultrathin silicon dioxide layers with a low leakage current density formed by chemical oxidation of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuha,; Kobayashi, Takuya; Maida, Osamu; Inoue, Morio; Takahashi, Masao; Todokoro, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2002-10-01

    Chemical oxidation of Si by use of azeotrope of nitric acid and water can form 1.4-nm-thick silicon dioxide layers with a leakage current density as low as those of thermally grown SiO2 layers. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves for these ultrathin chemical SiO2 layers have been measured due to the low leakage current density. The leakage current density is further decreased to approx1/5 (cf. 0.4 A/cm2 at the forward gate bias of 1 V) by post-metallization annealing at 200 degC in hydrogen. Photoelectron spectroscopy and C-V measurements show that this decrease results from (i) increase in the energy discontinuity at the Si/SiO2 interface, and (ii) elimination of Si/SiO2 interface states and SiO2 gap states.

  7. Multicomponent chemical imaging of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms with broadband CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Christopher M; Lee, Young Jong; Camp, Charles H; Liu, Zhen; Heddleston, John; Canfield, Nicole; Rhodes, Timothy A; Hight Walker, Angela R; Marsac, Patrick J; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2013-09-03

    We compare a coherent Raman imaging modality, broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) microscopy, with spontaneous Raman microscopy for quantitative and qualitative assessment of multicomponent pharmaceuticals. Indomethacin was used as a model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and was analyzed in a tabulated solid dosage form, embedded within commonly used excipients. In comparison with wide-field spontaneous Raman chemical imaging, BCARS acquired images 10× faster, at higher spatiochemical resolution and with spectra of much higher SNR, eliminating the need for multivariate methods to identify chemical components. The significant increase in spatiochemical resolution allowed identification of an unanticipated API phase that was missed by the spontaneous wide-field method and bulk Raman spectroscopy. We confirmed the presence of the unanticipated API phase using confocal spontaneous Raman, which provided spatiochemical resolution similar to BCARS but at 100× slower acquisition times.

  8. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of thorium in Brassica juncea var. foliosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sai; Kai, Hailu; Zha, Zhongyong; Fang, Zhendong; Wang, Dingna; Du, Liang; Zhang, Dong; Feng, Xiaojie; Jin, Yongdong; Xia, Chuanqin

    2016-06-01

    Brassica juncea var. foliosa (B. juncea var. foliosa) is a promising species for thorium (Th) phytoextraction due to its large biomass, fast growth rate and high tolerance toward Th. To further understand the mechanisms of Th tolerance, the present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Th found in B. juncea var. foliosa Our results indicated that in both roots and leaves, Th contents in different parts of the cells follow the order of cell wall > membranes and soluble fraction > organelles. In particular, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Th was abundantly located in cell walls of the roots. Additionally, when plants were exposed to different concentrations of Th, we have found that Th existed in B. juncea var. foliosa with different chemical forms. Much of the Th extracted by 2% acetic acid (HAc), 1 M NaCl and HCl in roots with the percentage distribution varied from 47.2% to 62.5%, while in leaves, most of the Th was in the form of residue and the subdominant amount of Th was extracted by HCl, followed by 2% HAc. This suggested that Th compartmentation in cytosol and integration with phosphate or proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the tolerance of B. juncea var. foliosa to the stress of Th. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H. (Saskatchewan)

    2013-04-08

    Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

  10. Y-doped BaZrO3 as a chemically stable electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cell using an Y-doped BaZrO3 electrolyte film, which has been demonstrated to be chemically stable, was successfully fabricated for the first time and showed a promising electrolysis performance.

  11. An easily sintered, chemically stable, barium zirconate-based proton conductor for high-performance proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Wenping; Shi, Zhen; Liu, Mingfei; Bi, Lei; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Yttrium and indium co-doped barium zirconate is investigated to develop a chemically stable and sintering active proton conductor for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ possesses a pure cubic perovskite structure. The sintering

  12. Alternative forms of energy transmission from OTEC plants. [Chemical and electrical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopka, A.; Biederman, N.; Talib, A.; Yudow, B.

    1977-01-01

    The transmission of OTEC-derived chemical and electrical energy is compared. The chemical energy-carriers considered are the following: gaseous and liquid hydrogen, liquid ammonia, methanol, gasoline, hydrazine hydrate, anhydrous hydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), 1,7-Octadiyne, and tetrahydrodicyclopentadiene. The assessment assumes that each of the above energy carriers were transported by barge and/or pipeline. The delivered costs were then compared with transmission of electricity by submarine cables. Because chemical and electrical energy are not equivalent, however, their comparison can only be done after the outputs are converted to a common form. Thus, in addition to presenting the delivered cost and overall energy efficiency of the chemical energy-carriers, we have provided a discussion of the equipment, costs, and efficiencies of converting the hydrogen and ammonia delivered into electricity, and the electricity delivered into hydrogen and ammonia. A concise technical assessment and economic analysis of components associated with the conversion, storage, transportation, and shore-based receiving facilities for the conversion of OTEC mechanical energy to chemical energy is provided and compared to the conversion and transmission of electrical power. Results concerning the hydrogen and ammonia analysis were determined as part of the OTEC program at IGT from May 1975 through May 1976 under Contract No. NSF-C1008 (AER-75-00033) with the National Science Foundation and ERDA. Information concerning carbonaceous fuels and high-energy fuels production was developed as part of the current IGT OTEC program under Contract No. E(49-18)-2426 with ERDA.

  13. High-field/ high-frequency EPR study on stable free radicals formed in sucrose by gamma-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elka R; Pardi, Luca; Jeschke, Gunnar; Gatteschi, Dante; Sorace, Lorenzo; Yordanov, Nicola D

    2006-06-01

    The EPR spectrum of sucrose irradiated by high-energy radiation is complex due to the presence of more than one radical species. In order to decompose the spectrum and elucidate the radical magnetic parameters a high-field (HF(-)EPR) study on stable free radicals in gamma-irradiated polycrystalline sucrose (table sugar) was performed at three different high frequencies--94, 190 and 285 GHz as well as at the conventional X-band. We suggest a presence of three stable radicals R1, R2 and R3 as the main radical species. Due to the increase of g-factor resolution at high fields the g-tensors of these radicals could be extracted by accurate simulations. The moderate g-anisotropy suggests that all three radicals are carbon-centred. Results from an earlier ENDOR study on X-irradiated sucrose single crystals (Vanhaelewyn et al., Appl Radiat Isot, 52, 1221 (2000)) were used for analyzing of the spectra in more details. It was confirmed that the strongest hyperfine interaction has a relatively small anisotropy, which indicates either the absence of alpha-protons or a strongly distorted geometry of the radicals.

  14. XPS and SEM studies of chromium oxide films chemically formed on stainless steel 316 L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, P.; Marinova, T.

    2000-01-01

    The structure and composition of chromium oxide films formed on stainless steel by immersion in a chromium electrolyte have been studied by SEM and XPS. Cr 2 O 3 crystallites in the range 30-150 nm are fully developed and cover the whole surface. The chemical composition in the depth and the thickness of the oxide layer have been determined by XPS sputter profiles. The oxide film can be described within the framework of a double layer consisting of a thin outer hydrated layer and an inner layer of Cr 2 O 3 . (orig.)

  15. The chemical form of plutonium in foodstuffs - its influence on gastro-intestinal uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is given of some studies of the chemical form of plutonium in food eaten by man and how this may influence gastrointestinal uptake. Phytate ligands, present in many foods, bind strongly to plutonium. High levels of enzyme phytase in rat intestines enhance the gastrointestinal uptake of plutonium phytate in rats compared to rabbits. Taking into account 1) the low levels of phytase in human intestine and 2) the possibility of competing precipitation reactions, it would seem unlikely that the phytate-mediated elevation of plutonium uptake seen in rats will apply to humans. (U.K.)

  16. Chemical form of plutonium in foodstuffs - its influence on gastro-intestinal uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.R. (National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK))

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is given of some studies of the chemical form of plutonium in food eaten by man and how this may influence gastrointestinal uptake. Phytate ligands, present in many foods, bind strongly to plutonium. High levels of enzyme phytase in rat intestines enhance the gastrointestinal uptake of plutonium phytate in rats compared to rabbits. Taking into account 1) the low levels of phytase in human intestine and 2) the possibility of competing precipitation reactions, it would seem unlikely that the phytate-mediated elevation of plutonium uptake seen in rats will apply to humans.

  17. Chemical insight into origin of forming-free resistive random-access memory devices

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, X.

    2011-09-29

    We demonstrate the realization of a forming-step free resistive random access memory (RRAM) device using a HfOx/TiOx/HfOx/TiOxmultilayer structure, as a replacement for the conventional HfOx-based single layer structure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), along with electron energy loss spectroscopy(EELS)analysis has been carried out to identify the distribution and the role played by Ti in the RRAM stack. Our results show that Ti out-diffusion into the HfOx layer is the chemical cause of forming-free behavior. Moreover, the capability of Ti to change its ionic state in HfOx eases the reduction-oxidation (redox) reaction, thus lead to the RRAM devices performance improvements.

  18. The influence of the chemical form of technetium on its uptake by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, L.R. van; Desmet, G.M.; Cremers, A.

    1986-01-01

    Spinach plants, grown on a Steiner nutrient solution containing TcO 4 - at different concentrations, show a linear relationship between the concentration in the nutrient solution and the amount of Tc in the plant (concentration range O Bq/ml-58 Bq/ml). When Tc is added to the plants as a Tc-cysteine complex, less amounts of Tc are present in the plants. The Tc present in the plants is mainly due to the uptake of TcO 4 - , formed by reoxidation of the Tc-cysteine complex in the nutrient solution. Plant tissue analysis together with a mathematical analysis of the uptake, show some evidences for TcO 4 - as the most important chemical form of Tc taken up by the plants. (author)

  19. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of thorium in Brassica juncea var. foliosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Sai; Kai, Hailu; Zha, Zhongyong; Fang, Zhendong; Wang, Dingna; Du, Liang; Zhang, Dong; Feng, Xiaojie; Jin, Yongdong; Xia, Chuanqin

    2016-01-01

    Brassica juncea var. foliosa (B. juncea var. foliosa) is a promising species for thorium (Th) phytoextraction due to its large biomass, fast growth rate and high tolerance toward Th. To further understand the mechanisms of Th tolerance, the present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Th found in B. juncea var. foliosa Our results indicated that in both roots and leaves, Th contents in different parts of the cells follow the order of cell wall > membranes and soluble fraction > organelles. In particular, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Th was abundantly located in cell walls of the roots. Additionally, when plants were exposed to different concentrations of Th, we have found that Th existed in B. juncea var. foliosa with different chemical forms. Much of the Th extracted by 2% acetic acid (HAc), 1 M NaCl and HCl in roots with the percentage distribution varied from 47.2% to 62.5%, while in leaves, most of the Th was in the form of residue and the subdominant amount of Th was extracted by HCl, followed by 2% HAc. This suggested that Th compartmentation in cytosol and integration with phosphate or proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the tolerance of B. juncea var. foliosa to the stress of Th. - Highlights: • Brassica juncea var. foliosa can adapt to the stress of Th(<200 μM) under hydroponic condition. • Th was selectively distributed on cell wall, membranes and soluble fraction. • Th mainly existed in low-toxicity forms which were benefit for Th tolerance.

  20. The aquatic toxicity and chemical forms of coke plant effluent cyanide -- Implications for discharge limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibay, R.; Rupnow, M.; Godwin-Saad, E.; Hall, S.

    1995-01-01

    Cyanide is present in treated cokemaking process waters at concentrations as high as 8.0 mg/L. In assessing options for managing the discharge of a treated effluent, the development and implementation of discharge limits for cyanide became a critical issue. A study was initiated to evaluate possible alternatives to cyanide permit limits at the US Steel Gary Works Facility. The objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluation the forms of cyanide present in coke plant effluent; (2) determine whether these forms of cyanide are toxic to selected aquatic organisms; (3) compare the aquatic toxicity of various chemical forms of cyanide; (4) identify if the receiving water modifies cyanide bioavailability; and (5) confirm, with respect to water quality-based effluent limits, an appropriate analytical method for monitoring cyanide in a coke plant effluent. The results of aquatic toxicity tests and corresponding analytical data are presented. Toxicity tests were conducted with various pure chemical forms of cyanide as well as whole coke plant effluent (generated from a pilot-scale treatment system). Test species included the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) and Daphnia magna (D. magna). Analytical measurements for cyanide included total, weak acid dissociable, diffusible cyanide and selected metal species of cyanide. The findings presented by the paper are relevant with respect to the application of cyanide water quality criteria for a coke plant effluent discharge, the translation of these water quality-based effluent limits to permit limits, and methods for compliance monitoring for cyanide

  1. Molecular abundances and C/O ratios in chemically evolving planet-forming disk midplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eistrup, Christian; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Exoplanet atmospheres are thought be built up from accretion of gas as well as pebbles and planetesimals in the midplanes of planet-forming disks. The chemical composition of this material is usually assumed to be unchanged during the disk lifetime. However, chemistry can alter the relative abundances of molecules in this planet-building material. Aims: We aim to assess the impact of disk chemistry during the era of planet formation. This is done by investigating the chemical changes to volatile gases and ices in a protoplanetary disk midplane out to 30 AU for up to 7 Myr, considering a variety of different conditions, including a physical midplane structure that is evolving in time, and also considering two disks with different masses. Methods: An extensive kinetic chemistry gas-grain reaction network was utilised to evolve the abundances of chemical species over time. Two disk midplane ionisation levels (low and high) were explored, as well as two different makeups of the initial abundances ("inheritance" or "reset"). Results: Given a high level of ionisation, chemical evolution in protoplanetary disk midplanes becomes significant after a few times 105 yr, and is still ongoing by 7 Myr between the H2O and the O2 icelines. Inside the H2O iceline, and in the outer, colder regions of the disk midplane outside the O2 iceline, the relative abundances of the species reach (close to) steady state by 7 Myr. Importantly, the changes in the abundances of the major elemental carbon and oxygen-bearing molecules imply that the traditional "stepfunction" for the C/O ratios in gas and ice in the disk midplane (as defined by sharp changes at icelines of H2O, CO2 and CO) evolves over time, and cannot be assumed fixed, with the C/O ratio in the gas even becoming smaller than the C/O ratio in the ice. In addition, at lower temperatures (C/O ratios of exoplanets to where and how the atmospheres have formed in a disk midplane, chemical evolution needs to be considered and

  2. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE NEARBY UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Coziol, R.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Neri-Larios, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the metallicity (O/H) and nitrogen abundance (N/O) of a sample of 122,751 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For all these galaxies we have also determined their morphology and obtained a comprehensive picture of their star formation history (SFH) using the spectral synthesis code STARLIGHT. The comparison of the chemical abundance with the SFH allows us to describe the chemical evolution of the SFGs in the nearby universe (z ≤ 0.25) in a manner consistent with the formation of their stellar populations and morphologies. A high fraction (45%) of the SFGs in our sample show an excess abundance of nitrogen relative to their metallicity. We also find this excess to be accompanied by a deficiency of oxygen, which suggests that this could be the result of effective starburst winds. However, we find no difference in the mode of star formation of the nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor SFGs. Our analysis suggests that they all form their stars through a succession of bursts of star formation extended over a period of few Gyr. What produces the chemical differences between these galaxies seems therefore to be the intensity of the bursts: the galaxies with an excess of nitrogen are those that are presently experiencing more intense bursts or have experienced more intense bursts in their past. We also find evidence relating the chemical evolution process to the formation of the galaxies: the galaxies with an excess of nitrogen are more massive, and have more massive bulges and earlier morphologies than those showing no excess. Contrary to expectation, we find no evidence that the starburst wind efficiency decreases with the mass of the galaxies. As a possible explanation we propose that the loss of metals consistent with starburst winds took place during the formation of the galaxies, when their potential wells were still building up, and consequently were weaker than today, making starburst winds more

  3. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Phytolacca americana L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Xiaoping; Dou Changming [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Chen Yingxu, E-mail: yingxu_chen@hotmail.com [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Chen Xincai; Shi Jiyan; Yu Mingge; Xu Jie [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Non-point Source Pollution Control, Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Phytolacca americana L. (pokeweed) is a promising species for Cd phytoextraction with large biomass and fast growth rate. To further understand the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance and detoxification, the present study investigated subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in pokeweed. Subcellular fractionation of Cd-containing tissues indicated that both in root and leaves, the majority of the element was located in soluble fraction and cell walls. Meanwhile, Cd taken up by pokeweed existed in different chemical forms. Results showed that the greatest amount of Cd was found in the extraction of 80% ethanol in roots, followed by 1 M NaCl, d-H{sub 2}O and 2% HAc, while in leaves and stems, most of the Cd was extracted by 1 M NaCl, and the subdominant amount of Cd was extracted by 80% ethanol. It could be suggested that Cd compartmentation with organo-ligands in vacuole or integrated with pectates and proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the adaptation of pokeweed to Cd stress.

  4. CHEMICAL SEGREGATION TOWARD MASSIVE HOT CORES: THE AFGL2591 STAR-FORMING REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Zhang, Q. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Viti, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Martin-Pintado, J. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Ctra. de Torrejon a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); De Wit, W.-J., E-mail: ijimenez-serra@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: jmartin@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: wdewit@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-07-01

    We present high angular resolution observations (0.''5 Multiplication-Sign 0.''3) carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward the AFGL2591 high-mass star-forming region. Our SMA images reveal a clear chemical segregation within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core, where different molecular species (Types I, II, and III) appear distributed in three concentric shells. This is the first time that such a chemical segregation is ever reported at linear scales {<=}3000 AU within a hot core. While Type I species (H{sub 2}S and {sup 13}CS) peak at the AFGL2591 VLA 3 protostar, Type II molecules (HC{sub 3}N, OCS, SO, and SO{sub 2}) show a double-peaked structure circumventing the continuum peak. Type III species, represented by CH{sub 3}OH, form a ring-like structure surrounding the continuum emission. The excitation temperatures of SO{sub 2}, HC{sub 3}N, and CH{sub 3}OH (185 {+-} 11 K, 150 {+-} 20 K, and 124 {+-} 12 K, respectively) show a temperature gradient within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 envelope, consistent with previous observations and modeling of the source. By combining the H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH images, representative of the three concentric shells, we find that the global kinematics of the molecular gas follow Keplerian-like rotation around a 40 M{sub Sun} star. The chemical segregation observed toward AFGL2591 VLA 3 is explained by the combination of molecular UV photodissociation and a high-temperature ({approx}1000 K) gas-phase chemistry within the low extinction innermost region in the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core.

  5. Surface chemical compositions and dispersity of starch nanocrystals formed by sulfuric and hydrochloric acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were -23.1 and -5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to -32.3 and -10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to -24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample.

  6. Surface chemical compositions and dispersity of starch nanocrystals formed by sulfuric and hydrochloric acid hydrolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benxi Wei

    Full Text Available Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4 and hydrochloric acid (HCl hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were -23.1 and -5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to -32.3 and -10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to -24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample.

  7. Surface Chemical Compositions and Dispersity of Starch Nanocrystals Formed by Sulfuric and Hydrochloric Acid Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were −23.1 and −5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to −32.3 and −10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to −24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample. PMID:24586246

  8. Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Tropak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease result from mutations in either the evolutionarily related HEXA or HEXB genes encoding respectively, the α- or β-subunits of β-hexosaminidase A (HexA. Of the three Hex isozymes, only HexA can interact with its cofactor, the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP, and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. A major impediment to establishing gene or enzyme replacement therapy based on HexA is the need to synthesize both subunits. Thus, we combined the critical features of both α- and β-subunits into a single hybrid µ-subunit that contains the α-subunit active site, the stable β-subunit interface and unique areas in each subunit needed to interact with GM2AP. To facilitate intracellular analysis and the purification of the µ-homodimer (HexM, CRISPR-based genome editing was used to disrupt the HEXA and HEXB genes in a Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line stably expressing the µ-subunit. In association with GM2AP, HexM was shown to hydrolyze a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative both in cellulo and in vitro. Gene transfer studies in both Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff mouse models demonstrated that HexM expression reduced brain GM2 ganglioside levels.

  9. Construction of a hybrid β-hexosaminidase subunit capable of forming stable homodimers that hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropak, Michael B; Yonekawa, Sayuri; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Thompson, Patrick; Wakarchuk, Warren; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don

    2016-01-01

    Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease result from mutations in either the evolutionarily related HEXA or HEXB genes encoding respectively, the α- or β-subunits of β-hexosaminidase A (HexA). Of the three Hex isozymes, only HexA can interact with its cofactor, the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. A major impediment to establishing gene or enzyme replacement therapy based on HexA is the need to synthesize both subunits. Thus, we combined the critical features of both α- and β-subunits into a single hybrid µ-subunit that contains the α-subunit active site, the stable β-subunit interface and unique areas in each subunit needed to interact with GM2AP. To facilitate intracellular analysis and the purification of the µ-homodimer (HexM), CRISPR-based genome editing was used to disrupt the HEXA and HEXB genes in a Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line stably expressing the µ-subunit. In association with GM2AP, HexM was shown to hydrolyze a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative both in cellulo and in vitro. Gene transfer studies in both Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff mouse models demonstrated that HexM expression reduced brain GM2 ganglioside levels. PMID:26966698

  10. Effect of gavaged chemical form of 241Am on its retention in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The retention of 241 Am in mice 48 h after administration by gavage is reported here. The 241 Am was given to mice in the form of either 241 Am nitrate or 241 Am citrate. The 241 Am was also injected into rats in the same form. The homogenized livers of those rats were subsequently administered by gavage to another group of mice. The retention of 241 Am citrate was 1.5 X 10(-2)% of the original dose and was the highest among the compounds examined. The retention of biologically incorporated 241 Am into the liver as 241 Am nitrate and as 241 Am citrate was 2.4 X 10(-3) and 2.6 X 10(-3)%, respectively, and was similar to the retention of 241 Am nitrate, which was 2.8 X 10(-3)%. The ratio of the retention in the carcass to that in the liver for the 241 Am citrate was lower than that of the 241 Am nitrate and the biologically incorporated 241 Am. This difference indicates that the distribution of 241 Am in the animal body depends on the chemical form administered. The retention of liver-incorporated 241 Am as citrate after autolysis of the liver is similar to that of fresh liver-incorporated 241 Am citrate

  11. Deactivating Chemical Agents Using Enzyme-Coated Nanofibers Formed by Electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    7.3mM/mg). Key words Coaxial electrospinning, DFPase, Enzyme, chemical warfare , nanofiber, decontamination . Introduction Chemical warfare ...Krile, R.; Nishioka, M.; Taylor, M.; Riggs, K.; Stone, H. Decontamination of Toxic Industrial Chemicals and Chemical Warfare Agents On Building...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 MATS COATINGS ELECTROSPINNING CHEMICAL WARFARE

  12. A functional form-stable phase change composite with high efficiency electro-to-thermal energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wenhao; Huang, Xinyu; Li, Kai; Yao, Ruimin; Chen, Renjie; Zou, Ruqiang

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The thermal conductivity of PU was enhanced to 43 times of the pristine value by encapsulation in a PGF, PU@PGF can be used for highly efficient electro-to-heat energy conversion and storage with the highest energy storage efficiency up to 85%. - Highlights: • The composite exhibits an in-situ solid-solid phase change behavior. • The enthalpy of polyurethane is enhanced within the matrix. • The thermal conductivity of the composite is 43 times as much as that of the polyurethane. • Supercooling of polyurethane is greatly reduced. • The composite is applied to cold protection as a wear layer. - Abstract: A novel solid-to-solid phase change composite brick was prepared by combination of polyurethane (PU) and pitch-based graphite foam (PGF). The carbonaceous support, which can be used for mass production, not only greatly improves the thermal conductivity but promote electro-to-heat conversion efficiency of organic phase change materials (PCMs). Our composite retained the enthalpy of PCM and exhibited a greatly reduced supercooling temperature. The novel composite was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The enthalpy of polyurethane has increased about 8.6% after infiltrating into graphite foam. The composite was very stable during thermal cycle test, and the electro-to-heat conversion efficiency achieves to 85% at lower voltages (1.5–1.8 V), which can vastly reduce energy consumption. The as-prepared composite was used in a wear layer to test its performance comparing with normal fabric.

  13. Old and stable soil organic matter is not necessarily chemically recalcitrant: Implications for modeling concepts and temperature sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleber, M.; Nico, P.S.; Plante, A.; Filley, T.; Kramer, M.; Swanston, C.; Sollins, P.

    2010-03-01

    Soil carbon turnover models generally divide soil carbon into pools with varying intrinsic decomposition rates. Although these decomposition rates are modified by factors such as temperature, texture, and moisture, they are rationalized by assuming chemical structure is a primary controller of decomposition. In the current work, we use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation to explore this assumption. Specifically, we examined material from the 2.3-2.6 kg L{sup -1} density fraction of three soils of different type (Oxisol, Alfisol, Inceptisol). The density fraction with the youngest {sup 14}C age (Oxisol, 107 years) showed the highest relative abundance of aromatic groups and the lowest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio as determined by NEXAFS. Conversely, the fraction with the oldest C (Inceptisol, 680 years) had the lowest relative abundance of aromatic groups and highest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio. This sample also had the highest proportion of thermally labile materials as measured by DSC, and the highest ratio of substituted fatty acids to lignin phenols as indicated by CuO oxidation. Therefore, the organic matter of the Inceptisol sample, with a {sup 14}C age associated with 'passive' pools of carbon (680 years), had the largest proportion of easily metabolizable organic molecules with low thermodynamic stability, whereas the organic matter of the much younger Oxisol sample (107 years) had the highest proportion of supposedly stable organic structures considered more difficult to metabolize. Our results demonstrate that C age is not necessarily related to molecular structure or thermodynamic stability, and we suggest that soil carbon models would benefit from viewing turnover rate as codetermined by the interaction between substrates, microbial actors, and abiotic driving variables. Furthermore, assuming that old carbon is composed

  14. Screening nitrogen-rich bases and oxygen-rich acids by theoretical calculations for forming highly stable salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Gong, Xuedong

    2014-08-04

    Nitrogen-rich heterocyclic bases and oxygen-rich acids react to produce energetic salts with potential application in the field of composite explosives and propellants. In this study, 12 salts formed by the reaction of the bases 4-amino-1,2,4-trizole (A), 1-amino-1,2,4-trizole (B), and 5-aminotetrazole (C), upon reaction with the acids HNO3 (I), HN(NO2 )2 (II), HClO4 (III), and HC(NO2 )3 (IV), are studied using DFT calculations at the B97-D/6-311++G** level of theory. For the reactions with the same base, those of HClO4 are the most exothermic and spontaneous, and the most negative Δr Gm in the formation reaction also corresponds to the highest decomposition temperature of the resulting salt. The ability of anions and cations to form hydrogen bonds decreases in the order NO3 (-) >N(NO2 )2 (-) >ClO4 (-) >C(NO2 )3 (-) , and C(+) >B(+) >A(+) . In particular, those different cation abilities are mainly due to their different conformations and charge distributions. For the salts with the same anion, the larger total hydrogen-bond energy (EH,tot ) leads to a higher melting point. The order of cations and anions on charge transfer (q), second-order perturbation energy (E2 ), and binding energy (Eb ) are the same to that of EH,tot , so larger q leads to larger E2 , Eb , and EH,tot . All salts have similar frontier orbitals distributions, and their HOMO and LUMO are derived from the anion and the cation, respectively. The molecular orbital shapes are kept as the ions form a salt. To produce energetic salts, 5-aminotetrazole and HClO4 are the preferred base and acid, respectively. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Transformation processes influencing physico-chemical forms of radionuclides and trace elements in natural water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Riise, G.; Oughton, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess short and long term consequences of radionuclides and trace elements introduced to aquatic systems, knowledge on source terms, key factors and key processes influencing the speciation is essential. The mobility, bioavailability and subsequent transfer into food chains depend on the physico-chemical forms on radionuclides and trace metals. In addition, transformation processes and especially the interaction with natural organic matter (NOM) influences the distribution pattern. Furthermore, the prevailing climate conditions, e.g. episodic events and temperature are vital for fluxes and for the kinetics of the transformation processes. In the present work processes in catchments and processes associated with acidification, episodic events, climate conditions (temperature) and mixing zone phenomena influencing the speciation of radionuclides and trace metals are highlighted. These processes should be highly relevant for assessing far field consequences of radionuclides potentially released from disposal sites. (authors). 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. XPS and EPXMA investigation and chemical speciation of aerosol samples formed in LWR core melting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Jenett, H.; Kaufmann, R.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1985-09-01

    Aerosol samples consisting of fission products and elements of light water reactor structural materials were collected during simulating in a laboratory scale the heat-up phase of a core melt accident. The aerosol particles were formed in a steam atmosphere at temperatures between 1200 and 1900 0 C of the melting charge. The investigation of the samples by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) permitted the chemical speciation of the detected aerosol constituents silver, cadmium, indium, tellurium, iodine, and cesium. A comparison of the elemental analysis results obtained from XPS with those achieved from electron probe X-ray micro analysis (EPXMA) revealed that aerosol particle surface and aerosol particle bulk are principally composed of the same elements and that these compositions vary with release temperature. In addition, quantitative differences between the composition of surface and bulk have only been observed for those aerosol samples which were collected at higher melting charge temperatures. In order to obtain direct information on chemical species below the surface selected samples were argon ion bombarded. Changes in composition and chemistry were monitored by XPS, and the results were interpreted in light of the effects, which were observed when appropriate standard samples were sputtered. (orig.) [de

  17. Production and chemical composition of grasses and legumes cultivated in pure form, mixed or in consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Cortiana Tambara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the edible biomass and chemical composition of forages grown on pure form, as a grass mix, and in grass-legume consortia. The following species were tested: white oats (Avena sativa, black oats (Avena strigosa, ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, forage peanut (Arachis pintoi, white clover (Trifolium repens, and red clover (Trifolium pratense. The experiment consisted of sixteen treatments arranged in a completely randomized design. The parameters measured were total dry matter (PMST, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF, and crude protein (CP. No significant differences in PMST were found among the consortia (p > 0.05. Only the pure cultivated white clover (p > 0.05 was comparable to the consortia in terms of biomass production. The three legumes had the lowest average NDF values (p > 0.05, based on their contributions to the total NDF content of the consortia along the cuts. The ADF content increased for all treatments during the cuts. The results indicate that in pasture, legumes increase protein content, and forage consortia increase both the pasture production and the grazing period. Their chemical composition is adequate for boosting livestock production in pastures.

  18. MODELING THE ATOMIC-TO-MOLECULAR TRANSITION AND CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TURBULENT STAR-FORMING CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bisbas, Thomas G.; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6B (United Kingdom); Bell, Tom A., E-mail: stella.offner@yale.edu [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10

    We use 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemistry code for modeling photodissociation regions (PDRs), to post-process hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent, star-forming clouds. We focus on the transition from atomic to molecular gas, with specific attention to the formation and distribution of H, C{sup +}, C, H{sub 2}, and CO. First, we demonstrate that the details of the cloud chemistry and our conclusions are insensitive to the simulation spatial resolution, to the resolution at the cloud edge, and to the ray angular resolution. We then investigate the effect of geometry and simulation parameters on chemical abundances and find weak dependence on cloud morphology as dictated by gravity and turbulent Mach number. For a uniform external radiation field, we find similar distributions to those derived using a one-dimensional PDR code. However, we demonstrate that a three-dimensional treatment is necessary for a spatially varying external field, and we caution against using one-dimensional treatments for non-symmetric problems. We compare our results with the work of Glover et al., who self-consistently followed the time evolution of molecule formation in hydrodynamic simulations using a reduced chemical network. In general, we find good agreement with this in situ approach for C and CO abundances. However, the temperature and H{sub 2} abundances are discrepant in the boundary regions (A{sub v} {<=} 5), which is due to the different number of rays used by the two approaches.

  19. Foliar stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in woody Mediterranean species with different life form and post-fire regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura-Mas, S; Lloret, F

    2010-01-01

    Wildfire is an important ecological disturbance factor in most Mediterranean ecosystems. In the Mediterranean Basin, most shrub species can regenerate after fire by resprouting or seeding. Here, we hypothesize that post-fire regenerative syndromes may potentially co-vary with traits directly related to functional properties involved in resource use. Thus, seeders with a shorter life span and smaller size would have lower water-use efficiency (WUE) than re-sprouting species and would take up nutrients such as nitrogen from more superficial parts of the soil. To test this hypothesis, we compared leaf (13)C and (15)N signatures from 29 co-existing species with different post-fire regeneration strategies. We also considered life form as an additional explanatory variable of the differences between post-fire regenerative groups. Our data support the hypothesis that seeder species (which mostly evolved in the Quaternary under a Mediterranean climate) have lower WUE and less stomatal control than non-seeders (many of which evolved under different climatic conditions in the Tertiary) and consequently greater consumption of water per unit biomass. This would be related to their smaller life forms, which tend to have lower WUE and shorter life and leaf lifespan. Differences in (15)N also support the hypothesis that resprouters have deeper root systems than non-resprouters. The study supports the hypothesis of an overlap between plant functional traits and plant attributes describing post-disturbance resilience.

  20. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  1. Effects of Land Use on Concentrations and Chemical Forms of Phosphorus in Different-Size Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, E. H.; Demisie, W.; Zhang, M.

    2017-12-01

    Land use has been recognized as an important driver of environmental change on all spatial and temporal scales. This study was conducted to determine the effects of land uses on phosphorus concentration in bulk soil and in water-stable aggregates in different soils. The study was conducted on three soil types (Ferrosols, Cambosols, and Primosols), which were collected from three different locations from southeast China and under three land uses (Uncultivated, Vegetable and forest land) the region is characterized as a hill and plain area. Accordingly, a total of 24 soil samples were collected. The results showed that average contents of total P were 0.55-1.55 g/kg, 0.28-1.03 g/kg and 0.14-0.8 g/kg for the soils: Cambosols, Ferrosols and Primosols respectively. Vegetable and forest land led to higher total phosphorus contents in these soils than in the uncultivated land. An aggregate fraction of >2 mm under forest land made up the largest percentage (30 up to 70%), whereas the size fraction phosphorus, organic phosphorus and Olsen P and phosphorus forms in the soils. It implies that the conversion of natural ecosystem to vegetable land increased the phosphorus proportion in the soils, which could have negative impact on the environmental quality.

  2. Characterization of polymethyl methacrylate/polyethylene glycol/aluminum nitride composite as form-stable phase change material prepared by in situ polymerization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Jiaoqun; Zhou, Weibin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Form-stable PMMA/PEG/AlN PCMs were prepared by in situ polymerization method. → AlN additive effectively enhanced the heat transfer property of composite PCMs. → The composites exhibited desirable thermal performance and electric insulativity. → The composites were available for the thermal management of electronic device. - Abstract: This work was focused on the preparation and characterization of a new type of form-stable phase change material (PCM) employed in thermal management. Using the method of in situ polymerization, polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as the PCM and aluminum nitride (AlN) serving as the thermal conductivity promoter were uniformly encapsulated and embedded inside the three-dimensional network structure of PMMA matrix. When the mass fraction of PEG was below 70%, the prepared composite PCMs remained solid without leakage above the melting point of the PEG. XRD and FT-IR results indicated that the PEG was physically combined with PMMA matrix and AlN additive and did not participate in the polymerization. Thermal analysis results showed that the prepared composite PCMs possess available latent heat capacity and thermal stability, and the AlN additive was able to effectively enhance the heat transfer property of organic PCM. Moreover, the volume resistivity of composite achieved (5.92 ± 0.16) x 10 10 Ω cm when the mass ratio of AlN was 30%. To sum up, the prepared form-stable PCMs were competent for the thermal management of electronic device due to their acceptable thermal performance and electric insulativity.

  3. Characterization of Cellulase Enzyme Inhibitors Formed During the Chemical Pretreatments of Rice Straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Kalavathy

    Production of fuels and chemicals from a renewable and inexpensive resource such as lignocellulosic biomass is a lucrative and sustainable option for the advanced biofuel and bio-based chemical platform. Agricultural residues constitute the bulk of potential feedstock available for cellulosic fuel production. On a global scale, rice straw is the largest source of agricultural residues and is therefore an ideal crop model for biomass deconstruction studies. Lignocellulosic biofuel production involves the processes of biomass conditioning, enzymatic saccharification, microbial fermentation and ethanol distillation, and one of the major factors affecting its techno-economic feasibility is the biomass recalcitrance to enzymatic saccharification. Preconditioning of lignocellulosic biomass, using chemical, physico-chemical, mechanical and biological pretreatments, is often practiced such that biomass becomes available to downstream processing. Pretreatments, such as dilute acid and hot water, are effective means of biomass conversion. However, despite their processing importance, preconditioning biomass also results in the production of carbohydrate and lignin degradation products that are inhibitory to downstream saccharification enzymes. The saccharification enzyme cocktail is made up of endo-cellulase, exo-cellulase and beta-glucosidase enzymes, whose role is to cleave cellulose polymers into glucose monomers. Specifically, endo-cellulase and exo-cellulase enzymes cleave cellulose chains in the middle and at the end, resulting in cellobiose molecules, which are hydrolyzed into glucose by beta-glucosidase. Unfortunately, degradation compounds generated during pretreatment inhibit the saccharification enzyme cocktail. Various research groups have identified specific classes of inhibitors formed during biomass pretreatment and have studied their inhibitory effect on the saccharification cocktail. These various research groups prepared surrogate solutions in an attempt to

  4. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in the edible seaweed, Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanfang; Wu, Jifa; Shang, Derong; Ning, Jinsong; Zhai, Yuxiu; Sheng, Xiaofeng; Ding, Haiyan

    2015-02-01

    The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd were investigated in the edible seaweed, Porphyra yezoensis. The seaweed was exposed to different Cd concentrations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0mgl(-1)) for up to 96h. In both the controls (no Cd added) and treatment groups, 41.2-79.2% of Cd was localised in the cell wall, and the proportion of Cd in the cell wall increased with increasing concentrations of Cd and exposure time. In the control groups, 74.8% of Cd was extracted by 1M NaCl, followed by 2% acetic acid, HAC (18.9%). In the treatment groups, most Cd was extracted by 2% HAC. The proportion of Cd extracted by 2% HAC increased with exposure to increasing concentrations of Cd and over time. Cell wall deposition and forming of precipitates with phosphate may be a key strategy to reduce Cd toxicity in P. yezoensis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical sanitizers to control biofilms formed by two Pseudomonas species on stainless steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Soares Caixeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens on AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence of reconstituted skim milk under different temperatures was conducted, and the potential of three chemical sanitizers in removing the mono-species biofilms formed was compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in skim milk at 28 °C presented better growth rate (10.4 log CFU.mL-1 when compared with 3.7 and 4.2 log CFU.mL-1 for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens cultivated at 7 °C, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed biofilm when cultivated at 28 °C. However, only the adhesion of P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens was observed when incubated at 7 °C. The sodium dichloroisocyanurate was the most efficient sanitizer in the reduction of the adhered P. aeruginosa cells at 7 and 28 °C and those on the biofilm, respectively. The hydrogen peroxide was more effective in the reduction of adhered cells of P. fluorescens at 7 °C.

  6. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  7. Phytotoxicity, uptake, and accumulation of silver with different particle sizes and chemical forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quah, Bryan [Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Musante, Craig; White, Jason C. [The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Department of Analytical Chemistry (United States); Ma, Xingmao, E-mail: xma@civil.tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, Zachry Department of Civil Engineering (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The antimicrobial property of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) makes it one of the most commonly encountered nanomaterials in commercial products. Consequently, its detection in the environment is highly likely and its potential toxicity has been heavily investigated. While it is now generally agreed that AgNP itself exerts unique toxicity to plants in addition to that of dissolved silver ion, the accumulation and fate of different forms of silver in plant tissues are unknown. This study investigates the phytotoxicity, accumulation, and transport of Ag with different physical and chemical characteristics (e.g., ionic, nanoparticles, and bulk) in two agricultural crop species: Glycine max (soybean) and Triticum aestivum (wheat). The results showed that different forms of Ag demonstrated differential toxicity in these two species, with the Ag{sup +} at the same nominal concentration displaying the strongest effect on plant growth. Exposure to 5 mg/L of elemental Ag in different forms all resulted in significant deposition on the root surface but its morphology and distribution patterns varied considerably. The Ag transport efficiency from roots to shoots differed with both Ag type and plant species. Notably, the upward transport of AgNPs (20–50 nm) was considerably more substantial than that of bulk Ag (1–3 µm). Cell fractionation studies confirmed that all types of Ag were internalized, with the plant cell wall as the predominant place for element accumulation. The findings demonstrate that Ag toxicity and in planta fate vary with particle type and that such considerations are likely necessary to adequately assess food safety concerns upon NP exposure.

  8. The influence of the chemical form of technetium on its uptake by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Loon, L.R.; Desmet, G.M.; Cremers, A.

    1985-01-01

    Spinach plants, grown on a Steiner nutrient solution containing TcO/sup -//sub 4/ at different concentrations, show a linear relationship between the concentration in the nutrient solution and the amount of Tc in the plant (concentration range O Bq/ml-58 Bq/ml). When Tc is added to the plants as a Tc-cysteine complex, less amounts of Tc are present in the plants. The Tc present in the plants is mainly due to the uptake of TcO/sup -//sub 4/, formed by reoxidation of the Tc-cysteine complex in the nutrient solution. Plant tissue analysis together with a mathematical analysis of the uptake, show some evidences for for TcO/sup -//sub 4/ as the most important chemical form of Tc taken up by the plants. In the case of anionic complexes, it's impossible to study only the uptake of the complex. Due to rexodization of the complexed Tc, a mixture of TcO/sup -//sub 4/ and the complex is present in the nutrient solution. In the case of cationic complexes, the TcO/sup -//sub 4/ can be removed from the nutrient solution by an anion exchange resin, so that only the complexed form of Tc is present in the nutrient solution. Its uptake by plants can be studied without interference of TcO/sup -//sub 4/. Uptake of Tc-complexes is possible, but the uptake rate (or transfer factor) is lower by two order of magnitude as compared with TcO/sup -//sub 4/

  9. A Thermally Stable Form of Bacterial Cocaine Esterase: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Treatment of Cocaine Abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Remy L.; Nance, Mark R.; Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Woods, James H. (Michigan); (Michigan-Med); (Kentucky)

    2010-09-03

    Rhodococcal cocaine esterase (CocE) is an attractive potential treatment for both cocaine overdose and cocaine addiction. CocE directly degrades cocaine into inactive products, whereas traditional small-molecule approaches require blockade of the inhibitory action of cocaine on a diverse array of monoamine transporters and ion channels. The usefulness of wild-type (wt) cocaine esterase is hampered by its inactivation at 37 C. Herein, we characterize the most thermostable form of this enzyme to date, CocE-L169K/G173Q. In vitro kinetic analyses reveal that CocE-L169K/G173Q displays a half-life of 2.9 days at 37 C, which represents a 340-fold improvement over wt and is 15-fold greater than previously reported mutants. Crystallographic analyses of CocE-L169K/G173Q, determined at 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, suggest that stabilization involves enhanced domain-domain interactions involving van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. In vivo rodent studies reveal that intravenous pretreatment with CocE-L169K/G173Q in mice provides protection from cocaine-induced lethality for longer time periods before cocaine administration than wt CocE. Furthermore, intravenous administration (pretreatment) of CocE-L169K/G173Q prevents self-administration of cocaine in a time-dependent manner. Termination of the in vivo effects of CoCE seems to be dependent on, but not proportional to, its clearance from plasma as its half-life is approximately 2.3 h and similar to that of wt CocE (2.2 h). Taken together these data suggest that CocE-L169K/G173Q possesses many of the properties of a biological therapeutic for treating cocaine abuse but requires additional development to improve its serum half-life.

  10. How Do Polyethylene Glycol and Poly(sulfobetaine) Hydrogel Layers on Ultrafiltration Membranes Minimize Fouling and Stay Stable in Cleaning Chemicals?

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu

    2017-05-18

    We compare the efficiency of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer on poly(ether imide) (PEI) hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane surfaces in terms of filtration performance, fouling minimization and stability in cleaning solutions. Two previously established different methods toward the two different chemistries (and both had already proven to be suited to reduce fouling significantly) are applied to the same PEI membranes. The hydrophilicity of PEI membranes is improved by the modification, as indicated by the change of contact angle value from 89° to 68° for both methods, due to the hydration layer formed in the hydrogel layers. Their pure water flux declines because of the additional permeation barrier from the hydrogel layers. However, these barriers increase protein rejection. In the exposure at a static condition, grafting PEG or poly(sulfobetaine) reduces protein adsorption to 23% or 11%, respectively. In the dynamic filtration, the hydrogel layers minimizes the flux reduction and increases the reversibility of fouling. Compared to the pristine PEI membrane that can recover its flux to 42% after hydraulic cleaning, the PEG and poly(sulfobetaine) grafted membranes can recover their flux up to 63% and 94%, respectively. Stability tests show that the poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer is stable in acid, base and chlorine solutions, whereas the PEG hydrogel layer suffers alkaline hydrolysis in base and oxidation in chlorine conditions. With its chemical stability and pronounced capability of minimizing fouling, especially irreversible fouling, protective poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layers have great potential for various membrane-based applications.

  11. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, Daniel A., E-mail: dfrick@gfz-potsdam.de [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Schuessler, Jan A. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Geological Science, Freie Universität Berlin, 12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-28

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ{sup 30}Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ{sup 30}Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g{sup −1}-range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  12. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, Daniel A.; Schuessler, Jan A.; Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von

    2016-01-01

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ 30 Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ 30 Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g −1 -range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  13. Technetium-99 cycling in maple trees: Characterization of changes in chemical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Lomax, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Prior field studies near an old radioactive waste disposal site at Oak Ridge, TN, indicated that following root uptake, metabolism by deciduous trees rendered 99Tc less biogeochemically mobile than expected, based on chemistry of the pertechnetate (TcO-4) anion. Subsequently, the form of technetium (Tc) in maple tree (Acer sp.) sap, leaves, wood and forest leaf litter was characterized using one or more of the following methods: dialysis, physical fractionation, chemical extraction, gel permeation chromatography, enzymatic extraction, or thin layer chromatography (TLC) on silica gel. Chromatography (Sephadex G-25) of TcO-4 incubated in vitro with tree sap showed it to behave similar to TcO-4 anion. When labeled wood and leaf tissues were processed using a tissue homogenizer, 15% and 40%, respectively, of the Tc was solubilized into phosphate buffer. Most (65% to 80%) of the solubilized Tc passing a 0.45-micron filter also passed through an ultrafiltration membrane with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 10,000 atomic mass units (amu). A majority (72% to 80%) of the Tc in wood could be chemically removed by successive extractions with ethanol, water and weak mineral acid. These same extractants removed only 23% to 31% of the Tc from maple leaves or forest floor leaf litter. Most of the Tc in leaves and leaf litter was removed only by strongly alkaline reagents typically used to release structural polysaccharides (hemicelluloses) from plant tissues. Chromatography (Sephadex G-25) of the ethanol-water extract from wood and the alkaline extract from leaves demonstrated that Tc in these extracts was not principally TcO-4 but was complexed with molecules greater than 1000 amu. Incubations of leaf and wood homogenates with protease approximately doubled the amount of Tc released from contaminated tissues

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of form-stable dodecane/hydrophobic fumed silica composite phase change materials for cold energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiajie; Ling, Ziye; Fang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Form-stable dodecane/fumed silica composite for cold storage is prepared. • A suggesting hypothesis that explains infiltration mechanism is proposed. • The performance of the composite phase change material is investigated. • Numerical simulation of system is carried out and results fit well. - Abstract: A kind of form-stable composite phase change materials used for cold thermal energy storage is prepared by absorbing dodecane into the hydrophobic fumed silica. With relatively suitable pore diameter and hydrophobic groups, hydrophobic fumed silica is beneficial to the penetration and infiltration of dodecane and the leakage problem solving. Scanned by electron micrographs and Fourier transformation infrared, the composite phase change material is characterized to be just physical penetration. Besides, the differential scanning calorimeter and thermo gravimetric analysis reveals the high enthalpy, good thermal stability and cycling performance of this composite phase change material. What’s more, Hot-Disk thermal constants analyzer demonstrates that the composite phase change material has low thermal conductivity which is desired in cold storage application. In the experiment, a cold energy storage system is set up and the results from the experiment show that the system has excellent performance of cold storage by incorporating composite phase change material. Apart from that, the experimental data is found to have a great agreement with the numerical simulation which is carried out by using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT.

  15. The extent of chemically enriched gas around star-forming dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sean

    2018-01-01

    Supernovae driven winds are often invoked to remove chemically enriched gas from galaxies to match the low metallicities of dwarf galaxies. In such shallow potential wells, outflows may produce massive amounts of enriched halo gas (circum-galactic medium or CGM) and pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM). I will present a survey of the CGM and IGM around 18 star-forming field dwarf galaxies with stellar masses of log M*/M⊙ ≈ 8 ‑ 9 at z ≈ 0.2. Eight of these have CGM probed by quasar absorption spectra at projected distances, d, less than the host virial radius, Rh. Ten are probed at d/Rh = 1 ‑ 3 to study the surrounding IGM. The absorption measurements include neutral hydrogen (H I), the dominant silicon ions for diffuse cool gas (T ∼ 104 K; Si II, Si III, and Si IV), more highly ionized carbon (C IV), and highly ionized oxygen (O VI). The metal absorption from the CGM of the dwarf galaxies is less common and ≈ 4× weaker compared to massive star-forming galaxies though O VI absorption is still common. None of the dwarfs probed at d/Rh = 1 ‑ 3 have definitive metal-line detections. Combining the available silicon ions, we estimate that the cool CGM accounts for only 2 ‑ 6% of the expected silicon budget. CGM absorption from O VI can account for ≈ 8% of the expected oxygen budget. As O VI traces an ion with expected equilibrium ion fractions of 0.2, this highly ionized phase of the CGM may represent a significant metal reservoir even for dwarf galaxies not expected to maintain gravitationally shock heated hot halos.

  16. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS: RESULTS FROM THE MALT90 SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoq, Sadia; Jackson, James M.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Claysmith, Christopher [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Guzmán, Andrés [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Whitaker, J. Scott [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Rathborne, Jill M. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW (Australia); Vasyunina, Tatiana; Vasyunin, Anton, E-mail: shoq@bu.edu, E-mail: jackson@bu.edu, E-mail: patricio@bu.edu, E-mail: claysmit@bu.edu, E-mail: jonathan.b.foster@yale.edu, E-mail: aguzmanf@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: scott@bu.edu, E-mail: rathborne@csiro.au, E-mail: tv3h@virginia.edu, E-mail: aiv3f@virginia.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The chemical changes of high-mass star-forming regions provide a potential method for classifying their evolutionary stages and, ultimately, ages. In this study, we search for correlations between molecular abundances and the evolutionary stages of dense molecular clumps associated with high-mass star formation. We use the molecular line maps from Year 1 of the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) Survey. The survey mapped several hundred individual star-forming clumps chosen from the ATLASGAL survey to span the complete range of evolution, from prestellar to protostellar to H II regions. The evolutionary stage of each clump is classified using the Spitzer GLIMPSE/MIPSGAL mid-IR surveys. Where possible, we determine the dust temperatures and H{sub 2} column densities for each clump from Herschel/Hi-GAL continuum data. From MALT90 data, we measure the integrated intensities of the N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, HCN and HNC (1-0) lines, and derive the column densities and abundances of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and HCO{sup +}. The Herschel dust temperatures increase as a function of the IR-based Spitzer evolutionary classification scheme, with the youngest clumps being the coldest, which gives confidence that this classification method provides a reliable way to assign evolutionary stages to clumps. Both N{sub 2}H{sup +} and HCO{sup +} abundances increase as a function of evolutionary stage, whereas the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) to HCO{sup +} (1-0) integrated intensity ratios show no discernable trend. The HCN (1-0) to HNC(1-0) integrated intensity ratios show marginal evidence of an increase as the clumps evolve.

  17. 76 FR 31824 - Chemical Mixtures Containing Listed Forms of Phosphorus and Change in Application Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... industrial product where sodium hypophosphite is in a chemical mixture in combination with resins. The... majority of the chemical mixtures that will become subject to this rulemaking have large industrial uses... others from exposure to the toxic chemicals left behind. Executive Order 12988 This regulation meets the...

  18. Efficacy of various chemical disinfectants on biofilms formed in spacecraft potable water system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing C; Dudinsky, Lynn A; Garcia, Veronica M; Ott, Charlie M; Castro, Victoria A

    2010-07-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the Station. In-flight pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony-forming units (CFU) ml(-1). Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with nonsterile water and left at room temperature for more than 1 month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, including Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides, and Cupriavidus pauculus. After incubation for 5 days, the hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. The disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts after exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% H2O2 solution or a mixture of 3% H2O2 and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to <1 CFU ml(-1) for a period of up to 3 months.

  19. Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong tolerance mechanisms to Cadmium: Subcellular distribution, chemical forms and thiol pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Bosen; Xie Xiangyu; Weiss, Dominik J.; Liu Jingchun; Lu Haoliang; Yan Chongling

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cadmium tolerance mechanisms of Kandelia obovata was investigated systematacially. ► Thiol pool can play roles in cadmium detoxification mechanisms. ► Increasing cadmium treatment strength caused proportional increase of cadmium uptake. ► More than half of cadmium was localized in cell walls, and lowest in membranes. ► Sodium chloride and acetic acid extractable fractions were dominant. - Abstract: In order to explore the detoxification mechanisms adopted by mangrove under cadmium (Cd) stress, we investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd, in addition to the change of the thiol pools in Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong, which were cultivated in sandy culture medium treated with sequential Cd solution. We found that Cd addition caused a proportional increase of Cd in the organs of K. obovata. The investigation of subcellular distribution verified that most of the Cd was localized in the cell wall, and the lowest was in the membrane. Results showed sodium chloride and acetic acid extractable Cd fractions were dominant. The contents of non-protein thiol compounds, Glutathione and phytochelatins in K. obovata were enhanced by the increasing strength of Cd treatment. Therefore, K. obovata can be defined as Cd tolerant plant, which base on cell wall compartmentalization, as well as protein and organic acids combination.

  20. Transport, ultrastructural localization, and distribution of chemical forms of lead in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Shen, Hong; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Xianwen; Li, Chao; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb), a ubiquitous but highly toxic heavy metal (HM), is harmful to human health through various pathways including by ingestion of contaminated vegetables. Radish is a worldwide root vegetable crop with significant health and nutritional benefits. However, little is known about Pb translocation and distribution within radish plants after its uptake by the roots. In this study, Pb stress was induced using Pb(NO3)2 in hydroponic culture, aiming to characterize the transport, ultrastructural localization, and distribution of chemical forms of Pb in different tissues of radish. The results showed that the majority of Pb (85.76-98.72%) was retained in underground organs including lateral roots, root heads and taproot skins, while a small proportion of Pb was absorbed by root flesh (0.44-1.56%) or transported to the shoot (1.28-14.24%). A large proportion of Pb (74.11-99.30%) was integrated with undissolved Pb oxalate, protein and pectates forming Pb-phosphate complexes. Moreover, a low-Pb-accumulating line of radish showed a higher proportion of Pb in water-soluble form compared with a high-Pb-accumulating line. Subcellular distribution analysis showed that a large proportion of Pb was bound to cell wall fraction in lateral roots (71.08-80.40%) and taproot skin (46.22-77.94%), while the leaves and roots had 28.36-39.37% and 27.35-46.51% of Pb stored in the soluble fraction, respectively. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed Pb precipitates in intercellular space, cell wall, plasma lemma and vacuoles. Fractionation results also showed the accumulation of Pb on the cell wall, intercellular space and vacuole, and low uptake of undissolved Pb oxalate, protein, pectates and Pb-phosphate complexes, which might be due to low transport efficiency and Pb tolerance of radish. These findings would provide insight into molecular mechanism of Pb uptake and translocation in radish and facilitate development of low-Pb-content cultivars in root vegetable

  1. Transport, ultrastructural localization and distribution of chemical forms of lead in radish (Raphanus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eWang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb, a ubiquitous but highly toxic heavy metal, is harmful to human health through various pathways including by ingestion of contaminated vegetables. Radish is a worldwide root vegetable crop with significant health and nutritional benefits. However, little is known about Pb translocation and distribution within radish plants after its uptake by the roots. In this study, Pb stress was induced using Pb(NO32 in hydroponic culture, aiming to characterize the transport, ultrastructural localization and distribution of chemical forms of Pb in different tissues of radish. The results showed that the majority of Pb (85.76–98.72% was retained in underground organs including lateral roots, root heads and taproot skins, while a small proportion of Pb was absorbed by root flesh (0.44–1.56% or transported to the shoot (1.28-14.24%. A large proportion of Pb (74.11–99.30% was integrated with undissolved Pb oxalate, protein and pectates forming Pb-phosphate complexes. Moreover, a low-Pb-accumulating line of radish showed a higher proportion of Pb in water-soluble form compared with a high-Pb-accumulating line. Subcellular distribution analysis showed that a large proportion of Pb was bound to cell wall fraction in lateral roots (71.08–80.40% and taproot skin (46.22–77.94%, while the leaves and roots had 28.36–39.37% and 27.35–46.51% of Pb stored in the soluble fraction, respectively. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed Pb precipitates in intercellular space, cell wall, plasma lemma and vacuoles. Fractionation results also showed the accumulation of Pb on the cell wall, intercellular space and vacuole, and low uptake of undissolved Pb oxalate, protein, pectates and Pb–phosphate complexes, which might be due to low transport efficiency and Pb tolerance of radish. These findings would provide insight into molecular mechanism of Pb uptake and translocation in radish and facilitate development of low

  2. Quantum chemical studies on molecular structural conformations and hydrated forms of salicylamide and O-hydroxybenzoyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandan, K.; Kolandaivel, P.; Kumaresan, R.

    Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods have been employed to study the molecular structural conformations and hydrated forms of both salicylamide (SAM) and O-hydroxybenzoyl cyanide (OHBC). Molecular geometries and energetics have been obtained in the gaseous phase by employing the Møller-Plesset type 2 MP2/6-311G(2d,2p) and B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) levels of theory. The presence of an electron-releasing group (SAM) leads to an increase in the energy of the molecular system, while the presence of an electron-withdrawing group (OHBC) drastically decreases the energy. Chemical reactivity parameters (η and μ) have been calculated using the energy values of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) obtained at the Hartree-Fock (HF)/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory for all the conformers and the principle of maximum hardness (MHP) has been tested. The condensed Fukui functions have been calculated using the atomic charges obtained through the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis scheme for all the optimized structures at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory, and the most reactive sites of the molecules have been identified. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory for all the conformers in the gaseous phase on the basis of the method of Cheeseman and coworkers. The calculated chemical shift values have been used to discuss the delocalization activity of the electron clouds. The dimeric structures of the most stable conformers of both SAM and OHBC in the gaseous phase have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory, and the interaction energies have been calculated. The most stable conformers of both compounds bear an intramolecular hydrogen bond, which gives rise to the formation of a pseudo-aromatic ring. These conformers have been allowed to interact with the water molecule. Special emphasis has been given to analysis of the

  3. Selenium and arsenic in biology: their chemical forms and biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Morita, M; Fuwa, K

    1992-01-01

    Based on the recent development of analytical methods, sensitive systems for the analysis and speciation of selenium and arsenic have been established. A palladium addition technique was developed for the accurate determination of selenium in biological samples using graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis. For the speciation of the elements, combined methods of HPLC either with ICP-AES or with ICP-MS were found to work well. These systems were applied to the elucidation of the chemical form of the elements in natural samples. Some chemical properties of the selenium-mercury complex in dolphin liver were elucidated: i.e., it was a cationic, water-soluble, low molecular weight compound containing selenium and mercury in a 1:1 molar ratio, and was shown to be different from a known selenium-mercury complex, bis(methylmercuric)selenide. The major selenium compound excreted in human urine was revealed to be other than any of those previously identified (TMSe, selenate, and selenite). TMSe, a suspected major metabolite in urine, was found, if at all, in low levels. The major water-soluble, and lipid-soluble arsenic compounds in a brown seaweed, U. pinnatifida (WAKAME), were rigorously identified, and the results were compared with other data on marine algae and animals. The major organic arsenic compounds (termed "arseno-sugars") in marine algae commonly contain 5-deoxy-5-dimethylarsinyl-ribofuranoside moiety. There are various kinds of arseno-sugar derivatives containing different side-chains attached to the anomeric position of the sugar, and the distribution of each arsenic species seems to be related to algal species. The arseno-sugar (A-XI) is present in every alga so far examined, is metabolized to lipids, and possibly may play some specific role in the algal cells. On the other hand, the major arsenic compound in fish, crustacea and molluscs has been identified as arsenobetaine, which is an arseno-analog of glycinebetaine, a very common osmo-regulator in

  4. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  5. Energetics and chemical bonding of the 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical and its protonated form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hue Minh Thi Nguyen; Hoeltzl, Tibor; Gopakumar, G.; Veszpremi, Tamas; Peeters, Jozef; Minh Tho Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were applied to investigate the electronic structure of the parent 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical (C 6 H 3 , TDB) and its anion (C 6 H 3 - ), cation (C 6 H 3 + ) and protonated form (C 6 H 4 + ). Our results obtained using the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by second-order multi-state multi-configuration perturbation theory, MS-CASPT2, and MRMP2 in conjunction with the large ANO-L and 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set, confirm and reveal the followings: (i) TDB has a doublet 2 A 1 ground state with a 4 B 2 - 2 A 1 energy gap of 29kcal/mol, (ii) the ground state of the C 6 H 3 - anion in the triplet 3 B 2 being 4kcal/mol below the 1 A 1 state. (iii) the electron affinity (EA), ionization energy (IE) and proton affinity (PA) are computed to be: EA=1.6eV, IE=7.2eV, PA=227kcal/mol using UB3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)+ZPE; standard heat of formation ΔH f(298K,1atm) (TDB)=179+/-2kcal/mol was calculated with CBS-QB3 method. An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis of the structure reveals that the topology of the electron density is similar in all compounds: hydrogens connect to a six-membered ring, except for the case of the 2 A 2 state of C 6 H 4 + (MBZ + ) which is bicyclic with fused five- and three-membered rings. Properties of the chemical bonds were characterized with Electron Localization Function (ELF) analysis, as well as Wiberg indices, Laplacian and spin density maps. We found that the radicals form separate monosynaptic basins on the ELF space, however its pair character remains high. In the 2 A 1 state of TDB, the radical center is mainly localized on the C1 atom, while in the 2 B 2 state it is equally distributed between the C3 and C5 atoms and, due to the symmetry, in the 4 B 2 state the C1, C2 and C3 atoms have the same radical character. There is no C3-C5 bond in the 2 A 1 state of TDB, but the interaction between these atoms is strong. The ground state of cation C 6 H 3 + (DHP), 1 A 1 , is

  6. Energetics and chemical bonding of the 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical and its protonated form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hue Minh Thi Nguyen [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Faculty of Chemistry, University of Education, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoeltzl, Tibor [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Technology and Economics Gellert ter 4, H-1521-Budapest (Hungary); Gopakumar, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Veszpremi, Tamas [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Technology and Economics Gellert ter 4, H-1521-Budapest (Hungary); Peeters, Jozef [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Minh Tho Nguyen [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: minh.nguyen@chem.kuleuven.be

    2005-09-19

    Quantum chemical calculations were applied to investigate the electronic structure of the parent 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, TDB) and its anion (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup -}), cation (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup +}) and protonated form (C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +}). Our results obtained using the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by second-order multi-state multi-configuration perturbation theory, MS-CASPT2, and MRMP2 in conjunction with the large ANO-L and 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set, confirm and reveal the followings: (i) TDB has a doublet {sup 2}A{sub 1} ground state with a {sup 4}B{sub 2}-{sup 2}A{sub 1} energy gap of 29kcal/mol, (ii) the ground state of the C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup -} anion in the triplet {sup 3}B{sub 2} being 4kcal/mol below the {sup 1}A{sub 1} state. (iii) the electron affinity (EA), ionization energy (IE) and proton affinity (PA) are computed to be: EA=1.6eV, IE=7.2eV, PA=227kcal/mol using UB3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)+ZPE; standard heat of formation {delta}H{sub f(298K,1atm)}(TDB)=179+/-2kcal/mol was calculated with CBS-QB3 method. An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis of the structure reveals that the topology of the electron density is similar in all compounds: hydrogens connect to a six-membered ring, except for the case of the {sup 2}A{sub 2} state of C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +} (MBZ{sup +}) which is bicyclic with fused five- and three-membered rings. Properties of the chemical bonds were characterized with Electron Localization Function (ELF) analysis, as well as Wiberg indices, Laplacian and spin density maps. We found that the radicals form separate monosynaptic basins on the ELF space, however its pair character remains high. In the {sup 2}A{sub 1} state of TDB, the radical center is mainly localized on the C1 atom, while in the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state it is equally distributed between the C3 and C5 atoms and, due to the symmetry, in the {sup 4}B{sub 2} state the C1, C2 and C3 atoms have the same

  7. Influence of chemical form, feeding regimen, and animal species on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Cohen, N.; Ralston, L.G.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Ayres, L.

    1985-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of chemical form and feeding regimen on the gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of plutonium in adult mice at plutonium concentrations relevant to the establishment of drinking water standards. Mean fractional GI absorption values in fasted adult mice were: Pu(VI) bicarbonate, 15 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) bicarbonate, 20 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) nitrate (pH2), 17 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) citrate, 24 x 10 -4 ; and Pu(IV) polymer, 3 x 10 -4 . Values in fed adult mice were: Pu(VI) bicarbonate, 1.4 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) polymer, 0.3 x 10 -4 . Pu(VI) is the oxidation state in chlorinated drinking waters and Pu(IV) is the oxidation state in many untreated natural waters. To assess the validity of extrapolating data from mice to humans, we also determined the GI absorption of Pu(VI) bicarbonate in adult baboons with a dual-isotope method that does not require animal sacrifice. Fractional GI absorption values obtained by this method were 23 +- 10 x 10 -4 for fasted baboons (n=5) and 1.4 +- 0.9 x 10 -4 for fed baboons (n=3). We have so far validated this method in one baboon and are currently completing validation in two additional animals. At low plutonium concentrations, plutonium oxidation state [Pu(VI) vs Pu(IV)] and administration medium (bicarbonate vs nitrate vs citrate) had little effect on the GI absorption of plutonium in mice. Formation of Pu(IV) polymers and animal feeding decreased the GI absorption of plutonium 5- to 10-fold. The GI absorption of Pu(VI) bicarbonate in both fed and fasted adult baboons appeared to be the same as in fed and fasted adult mice, respectively. 17 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Efficacy of Various Chemical Disinfectants on Biofilms Formed in Spacecraft Potable Water System Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Willy; Garcia, Veronica; Castro, Victoria; Ott, Mark; Duane

    2009-01-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the vehicle. Pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with non-sterile water and left at room temperature for over one month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, which included Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides., and Cupriavidus pauculus. After 5 days of incubation, these hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide, colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. Disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts following exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% hydrogen peroxide solution or a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to less than 1 CFU/ml for a period of up to 2 months. Testing results indicated that hydrogen peroxide and mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and colloidal silver have tremendous potential as alternative disinfectants for ISS water systems.

  9. HYDROLYSIS OF STARCH BY THERMO-AND PH-STABLE GLUCOAMYLASE AT CHANGE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Grigirov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regularity of the change rate of the enzymatic reactions depending on different temperatures, pH values in the formation and decay of the enzyme-substrate complex was investigated. Found that the kinetics of hydrolysis of starch by the action of heat and pH stable glucoamylases is complex as evidenced by the change in the value Km, which is a measure of the affinity of the enzyme to the substrate, active centers studied glucoamylases and starch undergo conformational changes at pH 4,0-5,0; 4,5-5,5 and a temperature of 60-65 °C.

  10. Heavy stable isotopes of oxyanion-forming metals and metalloids (Cr, Se, U, Sb, and Te) as indicators of redox reactions: Theory, systematics, and the outlook for practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    The complex chemical behaviors of Cr, Se, U, Sb, and Te present challenges as we try to understand, predict, and/or manipulate their mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity in the environment. Redox reactions are particularly important and complex. In natural systems, aqueous concentrations and speciation can be used to infer the occurrence and rates of redox reactions, but are often of limited usefulness, for example when a reaction product is insoluble and its production is not readily observed in the field. Stable isotope ratio shifts in these elements can provide direct evidence for the occurrence of reduction, a critically important process that usually renders their soluble and mobile oxidized forms insoluble (or less soluble, in the case of Sb). Reduction kinetics differ between isotopes, and the remaining unreacted, oxidized contaminant becomes progressively shifted in its isotope ratio as reduction proceeds, providing a direct indicator of reduction in natural systems. Estimates of the extent of reduction are possible, but carry considerable uncertainty: The magnitude of isotopic fractionation induced by a reaction depends on the reaction mechanism and conditions, and thus prediction of fractionation factors for specific locations is uncertain. Furthermore, the simple Rayleigh distillation model is inaccurate due to complex reactive transport dynamics in aquifers and surface water systems. Nonetheless, useful estimates of reduction rates have been made and should be increasingly helpful as they are combined with other methods in environmental studies. Oxidation is less consistent in generating isotopic fractionation; this can be understood in terms of fundamental kinetic considerations. Furthermore, the reduced forms are usually solid and this further limits isotopic fractionation during oxidation. Sorption processes in some cases induce isotopic fractionation, but generally of smaller magnitude than reduction because bonding changes are relatively small

  11. Synthesis and thermal properties of the MA/HDPE composites with nano-additives as form-stable PCM with improved thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yaojie; Su, Di; Huang, Xiang; Alva, Guruprasad; Liu, Lingkun; Fang, Guiyin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • MA/HDPE composites with nano-additives were prepared for thermal conductivity enhancement. • Microstructure and chemical structure of the FSPCM were analyzed. • Thermal properties and thermal reliability of the FSPCM were investigated. • Thermal conductivity of the FSPCM can be enhanced by adding NAO and NG. - Abstract: For the purpose of improving the thermal conductivity of the form–stable phase change materials (FSPCM), two types of nano–powders with high thermal conductivity were added into the samples. In the modified FSPCM, myristic acid (MA) was used as a solid–liquid phase change material (PCM), high density polyethylene (HDPE) acted as supporting material to prevent the leakage of the melted MA. Nano–Al 2 O 3 (NAO) and nano–graphite (NG) were the additives for thermal conductivity enhancement. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT–IR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were used to analyze the microstructure, chemical structure and crystalline phase of the samples, respectively. Furthermore, the specific latent heat and phase transition temperature, thermal conductivity and thermal reliability were investigated using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermal conductivity meter and thermo–gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed that the MA was uniformly absorbed in the HDPE matrices and there was no leakage during the melting process when the mass fraction of the MA in the MA/HDPE composite was less than 70%. The DSC results revealed that the modified FSPCM have a constant phase change temperature and high specific latent heat. The thermal conductivity of the FSPCM was measured in the solid (30 °C) and liquid (60 °C) states of the MA. When the mass fraction of nano–powder additives is 12%, the thermal conductivities of the FSPCM increase by 95% (NAO) and 121% (NG) at 30 °C. It is anticipated that the FSPCM possess a potential application for thermal energy

  12. An easily sintered, chemically stable, barium zirconate-based proton conductor for high-performance proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Wenping

    2014-07-25

    Yttrium and indium co-doped barium zirconate is investigated to develop a chemically stable and sintering active proton conductor for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ possesses a pure cubic perovskite structure. The sintering activity of BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ increases significantly with In concentration. BaZr0.8Y0.15In0.05O3- δ (BZYI5) exhibits the highest total electrical conductivity among the sintered oxides. BZYI5 also retains high chemical stability against CO2, vapor, and reduction of H2. The good sintering activity, high conductivity, and chemical stability of BZYI5 facilitate the fabrication of durable SOFCs based on a highly conductive BZYI5 electrolyte film by cost-effective ceramic processes. Fully dense BZYI5 electrolyte film is successfully prepared on the anode substrate by a facile drop-coating technique followed by co-firing at 1400 °C for 5 h in air. The BZYI5 film exhibits one of the highest conductivity among the BaZrO3-based electrolyte films with various sintering aids. BZYI5-based single cells output very encouraging and by far the highest peak power density for BaZrO3-based proton-conducting SOFCs, reaching as high as 379 mW cm-2 at 700 °C. The results demonstrate that Y and In co-doping is an effective strategy for exploring sintering active and chemically stable BaZrO3-based proton conductors for high performance proton-conducting SOFCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fabrication of radiation sources for educational purposes from chemical fertilizers using compressing and forming method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2008-01-01

    Chemical fertilizers contain potassium, which is composed of a small amount of naturally occurring potassium-40. The potassium-40 radionuclide emits beta and gamma radiation. Three brands of chemical fertilizer were used to fabricate disk-shaped radiation sources and the fabricated radiation sources were examined for applicability to an educational radiation course. In the examination, tests to determine dependence of count rate on distance, shielding thickness, and shielding materials were conducted using the radiation sources. Results showed that radiation sources fabricated from the three brands of chemical fertilizer were equivalent for explaining radiation characteristics, particularly those related to the dependence of radiation strength on distance and shielding thickness. The relation between shielding effect and mass density can be explained qualitatively. Thus, chemical fertilizer radiation sources can be a useful teaching aid for educational courses to better promote understanding of radiation characteristics and the principles of radiation protection. (author)

  14. Stable isotope (2H, 17O, 18O) and hydro chemical patterns of precipitation collected in weekly resolution at Hannover, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeniger, Paul; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations of stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) in precipitation were initiated in May 2008 at the Federal Institute of Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in Hannover, Germany. In 2014 all precipitation samples were re-analyzed because a purchase of a new laser spectrometer (Picarro L2140-i) now allowed measurements of δ17O and a calculation of the 17O-excess parameter. Starting in October 2015 a routine analysis of hydro chemical parameters was added whenever enough sample aliquot was available (major ions, trace elements). A discussion of the stable isotope data of the seven year series of weekly precipitation samples (n = 370) will be presented. Beneath general patterns (seasonality and trends) we also focus on importance of amount weighing procedures, corrections for minor rain amounts, aspects of sample storage and re-analyzes, as well as impacts through changes in analytical equipment (IRMS, CRD spectroscopy) which is visible from the data. For stable isotopes a Thermo Fisher delta plus IRMS (Gasbench and H-Device) was used until 2011 and from 2012 on a Picarro L2120-i water vapor analyzer with long-term accuracies for quality check samples better than 0.2‰ and 0.8‰ for δ18O and δ2H, respectively.

  15. Preparation and properties of 1-tetradecanol/1,3:2,4-di-(3,4-dimethyl) benzylidene sorbitol gelatinous form-stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Tuo; Song, Jian; Niu, Libo; Feng, Rongxiu

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The 1,3:2,4-di-(3,4-dimethyl) benzylidene sorbitol can self-assemble to form three-dimensional network and immobilized the 1-tetradecanol. As a result, the gel-to-sol transition temperature of the composite PCM increased and the 1-tetradecanol leakage decreased. Highlights: ► First used of 1,3:2,4-di-(3,4-dimethyl) benzylidene sorbitol in alcohol-based PCMs. ► A new method of doping with exfoliated graphite is presented. ► A possible mechanism for decreasing leakage has been proposed based on SEM results. ► The prepared composite PCMs showed a high-energy storage density. ► The addition of exfoliated graphite enhanced the thermal conductivity of the PCMs. - Abstract: A 1-tetradecanol (TD)/1,3:2,4-di-(3,4-dimethyl) benzylidene sorbitol (DMDBS) composite was prepared as a novel form-stable phase change material (PCM), and the properties of the composites such as the gel-to-sol transition temperature, the latent heat, the microstructure and the thermal storage performance were characterized. The composite was prepared by impregnating DMDBS into TD and the maximum feasible weight percentage of TD was determined to be 94.2 wt%. The gel-to-sol transition temperature of the composite PCM was 158.3–180.0 °C, which is well above the melting point of 1-tetradecanol. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to determine the melting and freezing enthalpies of 1-tetradecanol in the composite PCM and the values are 218.5 and 215.3 J g −1 , respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that 1-tetradecanol dispersed in the three-dimensional network formed by DMDBS. The relationship between the amount of DMDBS additive and the leakage was also discussed. The thermal conductivity of the composite PCM was improved by doping with exfoliated graphite

  16. The One-Pot Directed Assembly of Cylinder-Forming Block Copolymer on Adjacent Chemical Patterns for Bimodal Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Liu, Chi-Chun; Liu, Dong; Nealey, Paul F; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2017-09-01

    The direct self-assembly of cylinder-forming poly(styrene-block-methyl-methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) block copolymer is successfully assembled into two orientations, according to the underlying guiding pattern in different areas. Lying-down and perpendicular cylinders are formed, respectively, depending on the design of chemical pattern: sparse line/space pattern or hexagonal dot array. The first chemical pattern composed of prepatterned cross-linked polystyrene (XPS) line/space structure has a period (L S ) equal to twice the intercylinder period of the block copolymer (L 0 ). The PS-b-PMMA thin film on the prepared chemical template after thermal annealing forms a lying-down cylinder morphology when the width of the PS strips is less than the width of PS block in the PS-b-PMMA block copolymer. The morphology is only applicable at the discrete thickness of the PS-b-PMMA film. In addition to forming the lying-down cylinders directly on the XPS guiding pattern, the cylinder-forming block copolymer can also be assembled in a perpendicular way on the second guiding pattern (the hexagonal dot array). The block copolymer films are registered into two orientations in a single directed self-assembly process. The features of the assembled patterns are successfully transferred down to the silicon oxide substrate. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A comparison of outcomes involving highly cohesive, form-stable breast implants from two manufacturers in patients undergoing primary breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Mark L; Jewell, James L

    2010-01-01

    Although there have been reports of single-surgeon outcomes with highly cohesive, form-stable silicone gel implants in women undergoing primary breast augmentation, there has been only one study published that compares the outcomes between the Allergan 410 and the Mentor CPG devices. The goal of the study is to compare outcomes in each cohort and to determine if quality systems and processes would have an impact on lowering the surgical revision rate, as compared to published reports for round gel implants and form-stable implants. Patients selected for the study were required to meet predefined inclusion criteria and general indications for breast augmentation. All subjects were treated uniformly with extensive informed consent prior to surgery. The entire process of breast augmentation (patient assessment, informed consent, the surgical procedure itself and postoperative instructions) was identical between the two groups. Patients were not randomized, as the studies did not start at the same time. The process for management of each patient was based on adaptation of the Toyota Production System and Lean Manufacturing, with emphasis on achieving operational excellence in the use of planning templates for surgery, including accurate management of patient expectations regarding size outcome. Outcomes data included physical breast measurements, quality of life metrics, and patient/surgeon satisfaction assessment. Adverse events were compared against published data for breast implants. Follow-up ranged between 20-77 months (Allergan 410) and 16-77 months (Mentor CPG). The outcome data indicate that these devices produce natural-appearing breasts with extremely low aggregate reoperation rate (4.2%). Only 0.8% of the reoperations were attributable to surgeon-related factors. There were no reoperations to correct mismanaged size expectations during the course of each study. There were 13 pregnancies and no difficulties with lactation were reported. Rippling (lateral

  18. Long-term stable water vapor permeation barrier properties of SiN/SiCN/SiN nanolaminated multilayers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at extremely low pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the water vapor permeation barrier properties of 30-nm-thick SiN/SiCN/SiN nanolaminated multilayer structures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 7 mTorr. The derived water vapor transmission rate was 1.12 × 10 −6 g/(m 2 day) at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity, and this value was maintained up to 15 000 h of aging time. The X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the nanolaminated film was composed of an amorphous phase. A mixed phase was observed upon performing high resolution transmission electron microscope analysis, which indicated that a thermodynamically stable structure was formed. It was revealed amorphous SiN/SiCN/SiN multilayer structures that are free from intermixed interface defects effectively block water vapor permeation into active layer

  19. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on chemical form, behavior and environmental risk of Zn, Pb and Cd in biochar produced from phytoremediation residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Yao, Wenlin; Li, Ronghua; Ali, Amjad; Du, Juan; Guo, Di; Xiao, Ran; Guo, Zhanyu; Zhang, Zengqiang; Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the chemical forms, behavior and environmental risk of heavy metal (HMs) Zn, Pb and Cd in phytoremediation residue (PMR) pyrolyzed at 350 °C, 550 °C and 750 °C, respectively. The behavior of HMs variation during the PMR pyrolysis process was analyzed and the potential HMs environmental risk of phytoremediation residue biochars (PMB) was assessed which was seldom investigated before. The results showed that the pyrolysis temperature increase decreased the soluble/exchangeable HMs fraction and alleviated the HMs bioavailability. When the temperature was over 550 °C, the adsorbed Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) were turned into oxides forms and concentrated in PMB with more stable forms exhibiting lower risk assessment code and potential ecological risk index. The ecotoxicity test showed higher pyrolysis temperature favored the reduction of PMB ecotoxicity. It is suggested that pyrolysis temperature above 550°C may be suitable for thermal treatment of PMR with acceptable environmental risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Form-stable LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite phase change material (PCM) for mid-low temperature thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Zhu; Leng, Guanghui; Ye, Feng; Ge, Zhiwei; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Li; Huang, Yun; Ding, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The figure (a) displays the microstructure of calcium silicate and the inset figure is the LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM. Calcium silicate is used as a porous skeleton material which could absorb large amounts of the nitrate PCM in voids and prevent the PCM from leakage during phase change process. Figure (b) shows the heat capacity of the composite PCM and the inset figure is the DSC curve of the composite. It indicates that this composite has a low melting point (103.5 °C) and good energy storage property. Based on the novel LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM, this work involves fabrication process, thermal and microstructural characterization, and chemical and physical stability measurements. - Highlights: • A novel LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM was prepared. • It has a low melting point (103.5 °C) and could remain stable until 585.5 °C. • It could keep form-stable without leakage during phase change process. • Thermal conductivity of the composite PCM reaches up to 1.177 W m"−"1 K"−"1. • It shows good thermal reliability after 1000 times heating and cooling cycling. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel form-stable LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM was developed by cold compression and sintering. The eutectic quaternary nitrate is used as PCM, while calcium silicate is used as structural supporting material. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) shows the PCM and the supporting material have good chemical compatibility. This composite PCM has a low melting point (103.5 °C) and remain stable without decomposition until 585.5 °C. Moreover, this composite shows excellent long term stability after 1000 melting and freezing cycles. Thermal conductivity of the composite was measured to be 1.177 W m"−"1 K"−"1, and that could be increased by adding thermal conductivity enhancers into the composite

  1. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Fungal contributions to Stable Soil Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton-Warburton, L. M.; Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal organic carbon (OC) can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2-month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Members of the Zygomycota and Ascomycota were among the dominant fungal groups involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycota. At the end of the 2-month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibited varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16, C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue while others maintained steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (C18) or increased in concentration throughout the degradation sequence (C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to rapidly and significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker

  2. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Microbial Contributions to Stable Soil OC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.; Egerton-Warburton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal OC can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2 month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. Additionally, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes were among the dominant fungal species involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycetes. At the end of the 2 month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibit varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16 and C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue, others maintaining steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (e.g. C18), and some increasing in concentration throughout the degradation (e.g. C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties, including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker distributions, and OC turnover times.

  3. A global survey of the stable isotope and chemical compositions of bottled and canned beers as a guide to authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J F; Yates, H S A; Tinggi, U

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a dataset, derived from the analysis of 162 bottled and canned beers from around the globe, which may be used for comparison with suspected counterfeit or substitute products. The data comprise δ2H and δ18O compositions of the whole beer and δ13C compositions of the dry residue (mostly sugar) together with the concentrations of five anions (F, Cl, NO3, SO4, PO4) and seven cations (Ca, K, Mg, SiO2, V, Mn, Sr). A strong correlation, consistent with natural waters but offset from the Global Meteoric Water Line, was observed between the δ2H/δ18O composition of the beers. The extent of the offset could be explained by the brewing process and the alcohol and sugars present in the beers. Correlations between inorganic analytes were consistent with the addition of salts in the brewing process. Beers were classified as follows: ale, lager, stout or wheat-beer and the chemical composition was found to be characteristic of the assigned type, with lagers being the most readily classified. A combination of chemical and isotopic data was found to be characteristic of the geographical origin (on a continental scale) and could most easily identify beers from Australasia or Europe. A global map of δ18O data revealed a geo-spatial distribution that mirrored existing maps of the isotopic composition of annual precipitation. This confirmed a commonsense view that local precipitation will be the primary source for the water used in brewing. Using this isoscape (or alcoscape) it may be possible to assess the geographical origins of samples for which genuine comparative samples cannot be obtained. Copyright © 2014 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A reconsideration for forming mechanism of optic fiber probe fabricated by static chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiru; Shen, Ruiqi

    2016-07-01

    The studies on the mechanism of static chemical etching are supplemented in this paper. Surface tension and diffusion effect are both taken into account. Theoretical analysis and data fitting show that the slant angle of the liquid-liquid interface leads to the maximum liquid rising, when diffusion effect is negligible.

  5. Hsp90α forms a stable complex at the cilium neck for the interaction of signalling molecules in IGF-1 receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhong; Zou, Xinle; Wei, Zhuang; Wu, Yuan; Li, Rongxia; Zeng, Rong; Chen, Zhengjun; Liao, Kan

    2015-01-01

    The primary cilium is composed of an axoneme that protrudes from the cell surface, a basal body beneath the membrane and a transition neck in between. It is a sensory organelle on the plasma membrane, involved in mediating extracellular signals. In the transition neck region of the cilium, the microtubules change from triplet to doublet microtubules. This region also contains the transition fibres that crosslink the axoneme with the membrane and the necklace proteins that regulate molecules being transported into and out of the cilium. In this protein-enriched, complex area it is important to maintain the correct assembly of all of these proteins. Here, through immunofluorescent staining and protein isolation, we identify the molecular chaperone Hsp90α clustered at the periciliary base. At the transition neck region, phosphorylated Hsp90α forms a stable ring around the axoneme. Heat shock treatment causes Hsp90α to dissipate and induces resorption of cilia. We further identify that Hsp90α at the transition neck region represents a signalling platform on which IRS-1 interacts with intracellular downstream signalling molecules involved in IGF-1 receptor signalling. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Thermal and electrical conductivity enhancement of graphite nanoplatelets on form-stable polyethylene glycol/polymethyl methacrylate composite phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Jiaoqun; Zhou, Weibing; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets (GnPs), obtained by sonicating the expanded graphite, were employed to simultaneously enhance the thermal (k) and electrical (σ) conductivity of organic form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs). Using the method of in situ polymerization upon ultrasonic irradiation, GnPs serving as the conductive fillers and polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as the phase change material (PCM) were uniformly dispersed and embedded inside the network structure of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), which contributed to the well package and self-supporting properties of composite FSPCMs. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated that the GnPs were physically combined with PEG/PMMA matrix and did not participate in the polymerization. The GnPs additives were able to effectively enhance the k and σ of organic FSPCM. When the mass ratio of GnP was 8%, the k and σ of FSPCM changed up to 9 times and 8 orders of magnitude over that of PEG/PMMA matrix, respectively. The improvements in both k and σ were mainly attributed to the well dispersion and large aspect ratio of GnPs, which were endowed with benefit of forming conducting network in polymer matrix. It was also confirmed that all the prepared specimens possessed available thermal storage density and thermal stability. -- Highlights: ► GnPs were employed to simultaneously enhance the k and σ of organic FSPCMs. ► PEG/PMMA/GnPs composite FSPCMs were prepared by in situ polymerization method. ► The composite FSPCMs exhibited well package and self-supporting properties. ► GnPs additives effectively enhanced the k and σ of composite FSPCMs. ► All the composites possessed available thermal storage density and thermal stability.

  7. Thermally Stable Ni-rich Austenite Formed Utilizing Multistep Intercritical Heat Treatment in a Low-Carbon 10 Wt Pct Ni Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Zhang, Xian J.; Ghosh, Gautam; Seidman, David N.

    2017-08-01

    Austenite reversion and its thermal stability attained during the transformation is key to enhanced toughness and blast resistance in transformation-induced-plasticity martensitic steels. We demonstrate that the thermal stability of Ni-stabilized austenite and kinetics of the transformation can be controlled by forming Ni-rich regions in proximity of pre-existing (retained) austenite. Atom probe tomography (APT) in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic modeling elucidates the role of Ni-rich regions in enhancing growth kinetics of thermally stable austenite, formed utilizing a multistep intercritical ( Quench- Lamellarization- Tempering (QLT)-type) heat treatment for a low-carbon 10 wt pct Ni steel. Direct evidence of austenite formation is provided by dilatometry, and the volume fraction is quantified by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results indicate the growth of nm-thick austenite layers during the second intercritical tempering treatment (T-step) at 863 K (590 °C), with austenite retained from first intercritical treatment (L-step) at 923 K (650 °C) acting as a nucleation template. For the first time, the thermal stability of austenite is quantified with respect to its compositional evolution during the multistep intercritical treatment of these steels. Austenite compositions measured by APT are used in combination with the thermodynamic and kinetic approach formulated by Ghosh and Olson to assess thermal stability and predict the martensite-start temperature. This approach is particularly useful as empirical relations cannot be extrapolated for the highly Ni-enriched austenite investigated in the present study.

  8. Anion Transport in a Chemically Stable, Sterically Bulky alpha-C Modified Imidazolium Functionalized Anion Exchange Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-24

    AEM is often inconvenient, as ambient carbon dioxide (at publication time, 400 ppm) will react with the OH− to form a mixture of CO3 2− and HCO3 − in... crystal . Spectra were obtained in the range 500−4000 cm−1, with 256 scans and a resolution of 8 cm−1. Figure 1. Structure of 1,4,5-trimethyl-2-(2,4,6...pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG NMR) on an AVANCEIII NMR spectrometer with a 5 mm Bruker single -axis DIFF60L Z-diffusion probe. The

  9. Preparation, thermal and flammability properties of a novel form-stable phase change materials based on high density polyethylene/poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/organophilic montmorillonite nanocomposites/paraffin compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yibing; Song Lei; He Qingliang; Yang Dandan; Hu Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The paraffin is one of important thermal energy storage materials with many desirable characteristics (i.e., high heat of fusion, varied phase change temperature, negligible supercooling, self-nucleating, no phase segregation and cheap, etc.), but has low thermal stability and flammable. Hence, a novel form-stable phase change materials (PCM) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE)/poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA)/organophilic montmorillonite (OMT) nanocomposites and paraffin are prepared by twin-screw extruder technique. The structures of the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites and the form-stable PCM are evidenced by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results of XRD and TEM show that the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites form the ordered intercalated nanomorphology. The form-stable PCM consists of the paraffin, which acts as a dispersed phase change material and the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites, which acts as the supporting material. The paraffin disperses in the three-dimensional net structure formed by HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites. The thermal stability, latent heat and flammability properties are characterized by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), dynamic Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and cone calorimeter, respectively. The TGA and dynamic FTIR analyses indicate that the incorporation of suitable amount of OMT into the form-stable PCM increase the thermal stability. The DSC results show that the latent heat of the form-stable PCM has a certain degree decrease. The cone calorimeter shows that the heat release rate (HRR) has remarkably decreases with loading of OMT in the form-stable PCM, contributing to the improved flammability properties

  10. Chemical and Charge Imbalance Induced by Radionuclide Decay: Effects on Waste Form Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jaffe, John E.; Jiang, Weilin; Strachan, Denis M.

    2011-04-01

    This is a milestone document covering the activities to validate theoretical calculations with experimental data for the effect of the decay of 90Sr to 90Zr on materials properties. This was done for a surragate waste form strontium titanate.

  11. Elucidating Adverse Nutritional Implications of Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Mycotoxins through Stable Isotope Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owino, Victor O; Cornelius, Carolin; Loechl, Cornelia U

    2018-03-23

    Multiple drivers of the double burden of malnutrition (DBM) include a rapid shift from predominantly plant-based diets to energy-dense foods based on meats, milk, animal fats and vegetable oils. The shift to overweight and obesity is driven by increased exposure to mass media, urbanization, technological advances in food processing, rising income and increased population density associated with increased access to cheap foods. At the same time, undernutrition persists mainly due to food insecurity and lack of access to safe water, sanitation and adequate health care. All known nutrition interventions result in only one third reduction in stunting. Little consideration has been given to hazardous exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and microbial toxins as major components of the malnutrition-causal framework. These hazards include microbial toxins, for example, mycotoxins, and environmental pollutants such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), some of which are known to disrupt the endocrine system. These hazards sit at the cross road of undernutrition and overweight and obesity since the exposure cuts across the critical window of opportunity (the first 1000 days). In this review, we update on the role of food and environmental contaminants, especially EDCs and aflatoxins, in child growth and on the implications for metabolic dysfunction and disease risk in later life, and discuss potential applications of nuclear and isotopic techniques to elucidate the underlying biological mechanisms, outcome indicators, as well as occurrence levels.

  12. Radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope compositions of chemically fractionated soil organic matter in a temperate-zone forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Iida, Takao; Asano, Tomohiro

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the role of soil organic matter in terrestrial carbon cycle, carbon isotope compositions in soil samples from a temperate-zone forest were measured for bulk, acid-insoluble and base-insoluble organic matter fractions separated by a chemical fractionation method. The measurements also made it possible to estimate indirectly radiocarbon ( 14 C) abundances of acid- and base-soluble organic matter fractions, through a mass balance of carbon among the fractions. The depth profiles of 14 C abundances showed that (1) bomb-derived 14 C has penetrated the first 16 cm mineral soil at least; (2) Δ 14 C values of acid-soluble organic matter fraction are considerably higher than those of other fractions; and (3) a significant amount of the bomb-derived 14 C has been preserved as the base-soluble organic matter around litter-mineral soil boundary. In contrast, no or little bomb-derived 14 C was observed for the base-insoluble fraction in all sampling depths, indicating that this recalcitrant fraction, accounting for approximately 15% of total carbon in this temperate-zone forest soil, plays a role as a long-term sink in the carbon cycle. These results suggest that bulk soil organic matter cannot provide a representative indicator as a source or a sink of carbon in soil, particularly on annual to decadal timescales

  13. Determination of chemical forms of C-14 in liquid discharges from nuclear power plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Světlík, Ivo; Fejgl, M.; Povinec, P. P.; Kořínková, Tereza; Tomášková, Lenka; Pospíchal, J.; Kurfiřt, M.; Striegler, R.; Kaufmanová, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 177, OCT (2017), s. 256-260 ISSN 0265-931X Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : analytical routines * dissolved organic forms of C-14 (DIC) * dissolved inorganic forms of C-14 (DOC) * Nuclear power plant (NPP) * liquid releases Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Environment al sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2016

  14. Bitumen coating as a tool for improving the porosity and chemical stability of simulated cement-waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Coating process of simulated cement-based waste form with bitumen was evaluated by performing physical and chemical experimental tests. X-ray diffraction (X-RD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and electron microscope investigations were applied on coated and non-coated simulated waste forms. Experimental results indicated that coating process improved the applicable properties of cement-based waste form such as porosity and leachability. Diffusion coefficients and leach indecies of coated specimens were calculated and show acceptable records. It could be stated that coating cemented waste form by bitumen emulsion, isolate the radioactive contaminants, thus reduces their back release to surrounding and in consequently save the environment proper and safe

  15. Chemical durability and characterization of nuclear waste forms in a hydrothermal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braithwaite, J.W.; Johnstone, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical durability of a simulated copper borosilicate waste glass and titanate waste ceramic has been studied in hydrothermal environments which could possibly be encountered in a bedded salt or sub-sealed waste isolation repository. The major parameters investigated which affect matrix corrosion and cesium solubilization include solution saturation and equilibrium phenomena, solution composition (especially the Mg +2 ion concentration), pH, particle size, temperature, and time

  16. Chemical composition of sublates (difficultly soluble substances) which form on interaction of polyvalent metal ions with potassium alkylcarboxylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Skryleva, T.L.; Sazonova, V.F.

    1996-01-01

    The pH value is considered for its effect on chemical composition of sublates which form on interaction of fatty acid collectors (potassium alkylcarboxylate) with polyvalent ions of Ni, An, Cu and Be. It is shown that interaction of these ions with fatty acid collectors in weakly acid, neutral and weakly alkaline solutions is accompanied by formation of medium soaps. Acid soaps are formed in more acid solutions, while in more alkaline-basic soaps. Domains of stability for medium soaps of Ni, Zn, Cu and Be are determined. 17 refs.; 4 figs

  17. Purification of hydrogen under a free or combined form in a gaseous mixture, by chemical reactions with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron Charles, M.

    1988-03-01

    Within the framework of the european fusion program, we are dealing with the purification of hydrogen (tritium) under a free or combined form, from a H 2 , N 2 , NH 3 , CH 4 , O 2 , gaseous mixture. The process consists in cracking the hydrogenated molecules and absorbing the impurities by chemical reactions with uranium, without holding back hydrogen. In the temperature range: 950 K [fr

  18. The study of chemical forms of mercury in human hair and other bio-environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzer, K.; Benes, P.

    1995-01-01

    The results of the continued studies on methods of analysis for forms of mercury in hair, and of the distribution of mercury among inorganic and organic forms in human hair are described. A new method for determining methylmercury has been developed, based on the selective leaching of methylmercury from hair using 2M hydrochioric acid. This method was used, in combination with the determination of mercury by atomic absorption spectrometry, for the analysis of mercury forms in three samples of human hair and two samples of fish homogenate. Good reproducibility of parallel determinations was obtained. The results were compared with literature data for the samples, or with the results of the analysis of the same samples by extraction method described earlier. Good agreement was also found between these methods. Further experiments were concerned with the study of the effect of radiation sterilization on the forms of mercury in hair, of the speciation of 203 Hg formed by irradiation of hair in nuclear reactor and with the labelling of a large batch of human hair with methylmercury. (author)

  19. Novel Bioactive Titanate Layers Formed on Ti Metal and Its Alloys by Chemical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kokubo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium titanate formed on Ti metal by NaOH and heat treatments induces apatite formation on its surface in a body environment and bonds to living bone. These treatments have been applied to porous Ti metal in artificial hip joints, and have been used clinically in Japan since 2007. Calcium titanate formed on Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta alloy by NaOH, CaCl2, heat, and water treatments induces apatite formation on its surface in a body environment. Titanium oxide formed on porous Ti metal by NaOH, HCl, and heat treatments exhibits osteoinductivity as well as osteoconductivity. This is now under clinical tests for application to a spinal fusion device.

  20. Chemical durability and degradation mechanisms of HT9 based alloy waste forms with variable Zr content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-30

    In Corrosion studies were undertaken on alloy waste forms that can result from advanced electrometallurgical processing techniques to better classify their durability and degradation mechanisms. The waste forms were based on the RAW3-(URe) composition, consisting primarily of HT9 steel and other elemental additions to simulate nuclear fuel reprocessing byproducts. The solution conditions of the corrosion studies were taken from an electrochemical testing protocol, and meant to simulate conditions in a repository. The alloys durability was examined in alkaline and acidic brines.

  1. Preparation, morphology and thermal properties of electrospun fatty acid eutectics/polyethylene terephthalate form-stable phase change ultrafine composite fibers for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yibing; Ke Huizhen; Lin Liang; Fei Xiuzhu; Wei Qufu; Song Lei; Hu Yuan; Fong Hao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Electrospun binary fatty acid eutectics/PET ultrafine composite fibers were prepared. ► Fatty acid eutectics had appropriate phase transition temperature and heat enthalpy. ► Their morphological structures and thermal properties were different from each other. ► Composite fibers could be innovative form-stable PCMs for thermal energy storage. - Abstract: The ultrafine composite fibers based on the composites of binary fatty acid eutectics and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) with varied fatty acid eutectics/PET mass ratios (50/100, 70/100, 100/100 and 120/100) were fabricated using the technique of electrospinning as form-stable phase change materials (PCMs). The five binary fatty acid eutectics including LA–MA, LA–PA, MA–PA, MA–SA and PA–SA were prepared according to Schrader equation, and then were selected as an innovative type of solid–liquid PCMs. The results characterized by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the prepared binary fatty acid eutectics with low phase transition temperatures and high heat enthalpies for climatic requirements were more suitable for applications in building energy storage. The structural morphologies, thermal energy storage and thermal stability properties of the ultrafine composite fibers were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. SEM images revealed that the electrospun binary fatty acid eutectics/PET ultrafine composite fibers possessed the wrinkled surfaces morphologies compared with the neat PET fibers with cylindrical shape and smooth surfaces; the grooves or ridges on the corrugated surface of the ultrafine composite fibers became more and more prominent with increasing fatty acid eutectics amount in the composite fibers. The fibers with the low mass ratio maintained good structural morphologies while the quality became worse when the mass ratio is too high (more than 100/100). DSC measurements

  2. Cu Nanoparticles Improved Thermal Property of Form-Stable Phase Change Materials Made with Carbon Nanofibers and LA-MA-SA Eutectic Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaofei; Cai, Yibing; Huang, Cong; Gu, Ying; Zhang, Junhao; Qiao, Hui; Wei, Qufu

    2018-04-01

    A novel form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs) was fabricated by incorporating fatty acid eutectics with electrospun carbon nanofibers (CNFs) surface-attached with copper (Cu) nanoparticles. Three different Cu/CNFs mats were made through combining the technique and principle of electrospinning, pre-oxidation/carbonization and in-situ reduction, while lauric-myristic-stearic acid (LA-MA-SA) ternary eutectic mixture was prepared as the model PCM. The morphology and crystal structure of Cu/CNFs were characterized by Fourier transfer infrared (FT-IR) spectra, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The results showed that Cu nanoparticles dispersed uniformly on the surface of CNFs mats without agglomeration, and Cu/CNFs mats could provide the mechanical support for FSPCMs and effectively prevent the flow/leakage of molten fatty acid. Morphological structures, as well as the properties of thermal energy storage and thermal energy storage/retrieval rates, of the resulting FSPCMs were investigated by SEM, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and measurement of melting/freezing times, respectively. The results indicated that the fabricated FSPCMs exhibited desired structural morphology, and LA-MA-SA well dispersed in three-dimensional porous structure of Cu/CNFs mats. The melting and crystallization enthalpies of the fabricated FSPCMs were in the range of 117.1-140.7 kJ/kg and 117.2-142.4 kJ/kg, respectively. In comparison with melting/freezing times of LA-MA-SA ternary eutectic mixture, the melting/freezing times of fabricated FSPCMs were respectively decreased ~27.0-49.2% and ~44.1-63.0%. The fabricated FSPCMs possessed good thermal energy storage/retrieval property, and might have great potential for renewable energy storage applications.

  3. Chemical and physical environmental conditions underneath mat- and canopy-forming macroalgae, and their effects on understorey corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, Claudine; Fabricius, Katharina E; Schaffelke, Britta; Humphrey, Craig

    2010-09-13

    Disturbed coral reefs are often dominated by dense mat- or canopy-forming assemblages of macroalgae. This study investigated how such dense macroalgal assemblages change the chemical and physical microenvironment for understorey corals, and how the altered environmental conditions affect the physiological performance of corals. Field measurements were conducted on macroalgal-dominated inshore reefs in the Great Barrier Reef in quadrats with macroalgal biomass ranging from 235 to 1029 g DW m(-2) dry weight. Underneath mat-forming assemblages, the mean concentration of dissolved oxygen was reduced by 26% and irradiance by 96% compared with conditions above the mat, while concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and soluble reactive phosphorous increased by 26% and 267%, respectively. The difference was significant but less pronounced under canopy-forming assemblages. Dissolved oxygen declined and dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity increased with increasing algal biomass underneath mat-forming but not under canopy-forming assemblages. The responses of corals to conditions similar to those found underneath algal assemblages were investigated in an aquarium experiment. Coral nubbins of the species Acropora millepora showed reduced photosynthetic yields and increased RNA/DNA ratios when exposed to conditions simulating those underneath assemblages (pre-incubating seawater with macroalgae, and shading). The magnitude of these stress responses increased with increasing proportion of pre-incubated algal water. Our study shows that mat-forming and, to a lesser extent, canopy-forming macroalgal assemblages alter the physical and chemical microenvironment sufficiently to directly and detrimentally affect the metabolism of corals, potentially impeding reef recovery from algal to coral-dominated states after disturbance. Macroalgal dominance on coral reefs therefore simultaneously represents a consequence and cause of coral reef degradation.

  4. Chemical and physical environmental conditions underneath mat- and canopy-forming macroalgae, and their effects on understorey corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Hauri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbed coral reefs are often dominated by dense mat- or canopy-forming assemblages of macroalgae. This study investigated how such dense macroalgal assemblages change the chemical and physical microenvironment for understorey corals, and how the altered environmental conditions affect the physiological performance of corals. Field measurements were conducted on macroalgal-dominated inshore reefs in the Great Barrier Reef in quadrats with macroalgal biomass ranging from 235 to 1029 g DW m(-2 dry weight. Underneath mat-forming assemblages, the mean concentration of dissolved oxygen was reduced by 26% and irradiance by 96% compared with conditions above the mat, while concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and soluble reactive phosphorous increased by 26% and 267%, respectively. The difference was significant but less pronounced under canopy-forming assemblages. Dissolved oxygen declined and dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity increased with increasing algal biomass underneath mat-forming but not under canopy-forming assemblages. The responses of corals to conditions similar to those found underneath algal assemblages were investigated in an aquarium experiment. Coral nubbins of the species Acropora millepora showed reduced photosynthetic yields and increased RNA/DNA ratios when exposed to conditions simulating those underneath assemblages (pre-incubating seawater with macroalgae, and shading. The magnitude of these stress responses increased with increasing proportion of pre-incubated algal water. Our study shows that mat-forming and, to a lesser extent, canopy-forming macroalgal assemblages alter the physical and chemical microenvironment sufficiently to directly and detrimentally affect the metabolism of corals, potentially impeding reef recovery from algal to coral-dominated states after disturbance. Macroalgal dominance on coral reefs therefore simultaneously represents a consequence and cause of coral reef degradation.

  5. Quality of life in chemical warfare survivors with ophthalmologic injuries: the first results form Iran Chemical Warfare Victims Health Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Batool; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Montazeri, Ali

    2009-01-19

    Iraq used chemical weapons extensively against the Iranians during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988). The aim of this study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQOL) in people who had ophthalmologic complications due to the sulfur mustard gas exposure during the war. The Veterans and Martyrs Affair Foundation (VMAF) database indicated that there were 196 patients with severe ophthalmologic complications due to chemical weapons exposure. Of these, those who gave consent (n = 147) entered into the study. Quality of life was measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and scores were compared to those of the general public. In addition logistic regression analysis was performed to indicate variables that contribute to physical and mental health related quality of life. The mean age of the patients was 44.8 (SD = 8.7) ranging from 21 to 75 years. About one-third of the cases (n= 50) reported exposure to chemical weapons more than once. The mean exposure duration to sulfur mustard gas was 21.6 years (SD = 1.2). The lowest scores on the SF-36 subscales were found to be: the role physical and the general health. Quality of life in chemical warfare victims who had ophthalmologic problems was significantly lower than the general public (P chemical warfare victims with ophthalmologic complications suffer from poor health related quality of life. It seems that the need for provision of health and support for this population is urgent. In addition, further research is necessary to measure health related quality of life in victims with different types of disabilities in order to support and enhance quality of life among this population.

  6. Quality of life in chemical warfare survivors with ophthalmologic injuries: the first results form Iran Chemical Warfare Victims Health Assessment Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iraq used chemical weapons extensively against the Iranians during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988. The aim of this study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQOL in people who had ophthalmologic complications due to the sulfur mustard gas exposure during the war. Methods The Veterans and Martyrs Affair Foundation (VMAF database indicated that there were 196 patients with severe ophthalmologic complications due to chemical weapons exposure. Of these, those who gave consent (n = 147 entered into the study. Quality of life was measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and scores were compared to those of the general public. In addition logistic regression analysis was performed to indicate variables that contribute to physical and mental health related quality of life. Results The mean age of the patients was 44.8 (SD = 8.7 ranging from 21 to 75 years. About one-third of the cases (n= 50 reported exposure to chemical weapons more than once. The mean exposure duration to sulfur mustard gas was 21.6 years (SD = 1.2. The lowest scores on the SF-36 subscales were found to be: the role physical and the general health. Quality of life in chemical warfare victims who had ophthalmologic problems was significantly lower than the general public (P Conclusion The study findings suggest that chemical warfare victims with ophthalmologic complications suffer from poor health related quality of life. It seems that the need for provision of health and support for this population is urgent. In addition, further research is necessary to measure health related quality of life in victims with different types of disabilities in order to support and enhance quality of life among this population.

  7. Chemical insight into origin of forming-free resistive random-access memory devices

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, X.; Fang, Z.; Li, K.; Bosman, M.; Raghavan, N.; Li, X.; Yu, H. Y.; Singh, N.; Lo, G. Q.; Zhang, Xixiang; Pey, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the realization of a forming-step free resistive random access memory (RRAM) device using a HfOx/TiOx/HfOx/TiOxmultilayer structure, as a replacement for the conventional HfOx-based single layer structure. High-resolution transmission

  8. Micromorphology and stable-isotope geochemistry of historical pedogenic siderite formed in PAH-contaminated alluvial clay soils, Tennessee, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, J.A.; Fowle, D.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, J.J.; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400-450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (FeCO3) was present and whether siderite occurrence was related to organic contaminant distribution. Samples from shallow depths were generally more heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than those at greater depth. The upper 1 m in most boreholes consisted of mixtures of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth) consisted of highly structured clays exhibiting fine subangular blocky ped structures, as well as redox-related features. Pedogenic siderite was abundant in the upper 2 m of most cores and in demonstrably historical (< 100 years old) soil matrices. Two morphologies were identified: (1) sphaerosiderite crystal spherulites ranging from 10 to 200 um in diameter, and (2) coccoid siderite comprising grape-like "clusters" of crystals 5-20 ??n in diameter. The siderite, formed in both macropores and within fine-grained clay matrices, indicates development of localized anaerobic, low-Eh conditions, possibly due to microbial degradation of organic contaminants. Stable-isotope compositions of the siderite have ??13C values spanning over 25%o (+7 to - 18%o VPDB) indicating fractionation of DIC by multiple microbial metabolic pathways, but with relatively constant ??18O values from (-4.8 ?? 0.66%o VPDB) defining a meteoric sphaerosiderite line (MSL). Calculated isotope equilibrium water ??18O values from pedogenic siderites at the CCP site are from 1 to 5 per mil lighter than the groundwater ??18O values that we estimate for the site. If confirmed by field studies in progress, this observation might call for a reevaluation of

  9. Chemical stability of nonwetting, low adhesion self-assembled monolayer films formed by perfluoroalkylsilanization of copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, E; DeRose, J A; Hoffmann, P; Bhushan, B; Mathieu, H J

    2007-03-21

    A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) has been produced by reaction of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyldimethylchlorosilane (PFMS) with an oxidized copper (Cu) substrate and investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), friction force microscopy (FFM), a derivative of AFM, and contact angle measurement. FFM showed a significant reduction in the adhesive force and friction coefficient of PFMS modified Cu (PFMS/Cu) compared to unmodified Cu. The perfluoroalkyl SAM on Cu is found to be extremely hydrophobic, yielding sessile drop static contact angles of more than 130 degrees for pure water and a "surface energy" (which is proportional to the Zisman critical surface tension for a Cu surface with 0 rms roughness) of 14.5 mJm2(nMm). Treatment by exposure to harsh conditions showed that PFMS/Cu SAM can withstand boiling nitric acid (pH=1.8), boiling water, and warm sodium hydroxide (pH=12, 60 degrees C) solutions for at least 30 min. Furthermore, no SAM degradation was observed when PFMS/Cu was exposed to warm nitric acid solution for up to 70 min at 60 degrees C or 50 min at 80 degrees C. Extremely hydrophobic (low surface energy) and stable PFMS/Cu SAMs could be useful as corrosion inhibitors in micro/nanoelectronic devices and/or as promoters for antiwetting, low adhesion surfaces or dropwise condensation on heat exchange surfaces.

  10. Chemical stability of nonwetting, low adhesion self-assembled monolayer films formed by perfluoroalkylsilanization of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoque, E.; DeRose, J. A.; Hoffmann, P.; Bhushan, B.; Mathieu, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) has been produced by reaction of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyldimethylchlorosilane (PFMS) with an oxidized copper (Cu) substrate and investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), friction force microscopy (FFM), a derivative of AFM, and contact angle measurement. FFM showed a significant reduction in the adhesive force and friction coefficient of PFMS modified Cu (PFMS/Cu) compared to unmodified Cu. The perfluoroalkyl SAM on Cu is found to be extremely hydrophobic, yielding sessile drop static contact angles of more than 130 degree sign for pure water and a 'surface energy' (which is proportional to the Zisman critical surface tension for a Cu surface with 0 rms roughness) of 14.5 mJ/m 2 (nM/m). Treatment by exposure to harsh conditions showed that PFMS/Cu SAM can withstand boiling nitric acid (pH=1.8), boiling water, and warm sodium hydroxide (pH=12, 60 degree sign C) solutions for at least 30 min. Furthermore, no SAM degradation was observed when PFMS/Cu was exposed to warm nitric acid solution for up to 70 min at 60 degree sign C or 50 min at 80 degree sign C. Extremely hydrophobic (low surface energy) and stable PFMS/Cu SAMs could be useful as corrosion inhibitors in micro/nanoelectronic devices and/or as promoters for antiwetting, low adhesion surfaces or dropwise condensation on heat exchange surfaces

  11. Tungsten as a Chemically-Stable Electrode Material on Ga-Containing Piezoelectric Substrates Langasite and Catangasite for High-Temperature SAW Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri K. Rane

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of tungsten on piezoelectric substrates La3Ga5SiO14 (LGS and Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS have been investigated as a potential new electrode material for interdigital transducers for surface acoustic wave-based sensor devices operating at high temperatures up to 800 °C under vacuum conditions. Although LGS is considered to be suitable for high-temperature applications, it undergoes chemical and structural transformation upon vacuum annealing due to diffusion of gallium and oxygen. This can alter the device properties depending on the electrode nature, the annealing temperature, and the duration of the application. Our studies present evidence for the chemical stability of W on these substrates against the diffusion of Ga/O from the substrate into the film, even upon annealing up to 800 °C under vacuum conditions using Auger electron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, along with local studies using transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, the use of CTGS as a more stable substrate for such applications is indicated.

  12. Modification degrees at specific sites on heparan sulphate: an approach to measure chemical modifications on biological molecules with stable isotope labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengliang L.; Lech, Miroslaw

    2005-01-01

    Chemical modification of biological molecules is a general mechanism for cellular regulation. A quantitative approach has been developed to measure the extent of modification on HS (heparan sulphates). Sulphation on HS by sulphotransferases leads to variable sulphation levels, which allows cells to tune their affinities to various extracellular proteins, including growth factors. With stable isotope labelling and HPLC-coupled MS, modification degrees at various O-sulphation sites could be determined. A bovine kidney HS sample was first saturated in vitro with 34S by an OST (O-sulphotransferase), then digested with nitrous acid and analysed with HPLC-coupled MS. The 34S-labelled oligosaccharides were identified based on their unique isotope clusters. The modification degrees at the sulphotransferase recognition sites were obtained by calculating the intensities of isotopic peaks in the isotope clusters. The modification degrees at 3-OST-1 and 6-OST-1 sites were examined in detail. This approach can also be used to study other types of chemical modifications on biological molecules. PMID:15743272

  13. A mobile sampler for mesuring the concentration of radionuclides and their physico chemical forms in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzano, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Bortoluzzi, S.; Montealto, M.; Nocente, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the realization of a sampler for concentrating radionuclides from large volume of natural waters with the purpose to determine their concentration levels and their physico-chemical forms. Sample is pumped at a flow rate of about 0.5 m 3 /h through a set of sequential filters with different pore sizes to achieve separation of 'particulate' from 'dissolved' forms. Filtered samples is then passed through sequential beds of cation and anion exchange resins and activated alumina to obtain separation of dissolved forms on the basis of their charge. Ammonium Hexacianocobalt Ferrate (NCFC is used as a selective exchanger for Cesium isotopes. Filter and exchangers are measured by computerized gamma spectrometry. Detection limits are of a few tenths of Bq per cubic meter of sample. The main results obtained during radioecological surveys are also presented

  14. Performance analysis of the incremental sheet forming on PMMA using a combined chemical and mechanical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, R.; Gagliardi, F.; Ambrogio, G.; Filice, F.; Russo, P.

    2017-10-01

    Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF) has been widely investigated highlighting advantages as low-cost, higher formability and greater process flexibility if compared to traditional processes [1]. Recent works have proven the SPIF feasibility for polymers processing. Experimental researches have been carried out with the aim to investigate the influence of several working variables, i.e. spindle speed, tool diameter, step depth, etc., on the final quality of the formed parts [2, 3]. The processed thermoplastic materials are characterized by glass temperatures close to the room temperature and, therefore, SPIF has been performed without external thermal source, exploiting mostly the friction heat generated during the forming phases. In the proposed work, the attention has been focused on extruded poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sheets, which are characterized by a glass temperature of more than 100 °C. Because of that, an experimental equipment has been designed and the PMMA sheets have been placed on the top of chamber with controlled temperature before SPIF beginning. The temperature on the upper face of the sheets has been monitored by thermocamera, which has been properly set by matching its readings with the ones extracted by a thermocouple in contact with the sheets. SPIF at different temperatures has been carried out by changing both the heater temperature and the process parameters which have an influence on the workpiece heating. The influence of the highlighted process conditions on the worked parts and on the process feasibility has been investigated. Furthermore, examinations on the quality of the formed parts have been performed pointing out the effects that different process conditions have on surface integrity.

  15. CdS nanowires formed by chemical synthesis using conjugated single-stranded DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, S. N.; Sahu, S. N.; Nozaki, S.

    2018-03-01

    CdS nanowires were successfully grown by chemical synthesis using two conjugated single-stranded (ss) DNA molecules, poly G (30) and poly C (30), as templates. During the early stage of the synthesis with the DNA molecules, the Cd 2+ interacts with Poly G and Poly C and produces the (Cd 2+)-Poly GC complex. As the growth proceeds, it results in nanowires. The structural analysis by grazing angle x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the zinc-blende CdS nanowires with the growth direction of . Although the nanowires are well surface-passivated with the DNA molecules, the photoluminescence quenching was caused by the electron transfer from the nanowires to the DNA molecules. The quenching can be used to detect and label the DNAs.

  16. Chemical and biological characterisation of biofilms formed on different substrata in Tisza river (Hungary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroepfl, Krisztina; Vladar, Peter; Szabo, Katalin; Acs, Eva; Borsodi, Andrea K.; Szikora, Szilvia; Caroli, Sergio; Zaray, Gyula

    2006-01-01

    Natural biofilms were simultaneously grown on granite, polished granite, andesite, polycarbonate and Plexi-glass substrata for six weeks in the Tisza River. Biofilm production and abundance of algae were influenced by the substratum. Magnitude of the substratum effect was andesite < polished granite < Plexi-glass < granite < polycarbonate. The benthic diatom community on polycarbonate had a high population of Achnantes helvetica. Bacterial activity was similar among substrates for 95 different carbon sources. The concentrations of essential elements and heavy metal pollutants (Zn, Ni, Pb and Cu) were highest in biofilms on polished granite or granite. On basis of algological, bacteriological and chemical investigations, as well as literature data, the Plexi-glass substratum is recommended for biomonitoring of river benthic microbiota. - The Plexi-glass substrate is recommended for monitoring river benthic microbiota

  17. Chemical and biological characterisation of biofilms formed on different substrata in Tisza river (Hungary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroepfl, Krisztina [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1518, Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Vladar, Peter [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1518, Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Szabo, Katalin [Department of Microbiology, Eoetvoes University, H-1518, Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Acs, Eva [Danube Research Station of Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-2131 Goed (Hungary); Borsodi, Andrea K. [Department of Microbiology, Eoetvoes University, H-1518, Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Szikora, Szilvia [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Eoetvoes University, H-1518, Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Caroli, Sergio [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, 00161 Roma, Viale Regina Elena, 299 (Italy); Zaray, Gyula [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1518, Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary) and Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Eoetvoes University, H-1518, Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary)]. E-mail: zaray@ludens.elte.hu

    2006-11-15

    Natural biofilms were simultaneously grown on granite, polished granite, andesite, polycarbonate and Plexi-glass substrata for six weeks in the Tisza River. Biofilm production and abundance of algae were influenced by the substratum. Magnitude of the substratum effect was andesite < polished granite < Plexi-glass < granite < polycarbonate. The benthic diatom community on polycarbonate had a high population of Achnantes helvetica. Bacterial activity was similar among substrates for 95 different carbon sources. The concentrations of essential elements and heavy metal pollutants (Zn, Ni, Pb and Cu) were highest in biofilms on polished granite or granite. On basis of algological, bacteriological and chemical investigations, as well as literature data, the Plexi-glass substratum is recommended for biomonitoring of river benthic microbiota. - The Plexi-glass substrate is recommended for monitoring river benthic microbiota.

  18. RECOGNITION OF MAIN PROCESSES FORMING CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF THE SUPRAŚL RIVER WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Skorbiłowicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify and define the processes that affect the variability of the chemical composition of Supraśl river water at selected measuring points. One of the recognized multivariate statistical methods was used for identification. The research area covered the Suprasl river. Four measuring points were selected on the river – Michałowo, Gródek, Nowodworce, Dzikie. The measuring points were selected in such a way to take into account the impact of the most intense interaction located along the river. Changes in concentration were determined on the basis of monthly analyzes of water samples collected from the Supraśl river in 2003–2012 by the Regional Inspectorate for Environmental Protection (RIEP in Białystok. The analyses were performed in the RIEP laboratory in Bialystok, which has implemented and maintained a management system that meets the requirements of the norm PN-EN ISO/IEC 17025 + Ap.1:2007 approved by the certificate AB 165. The water samples were subject to determinations of dissolved oxygen concentration, BOD5, CODMn, CODCr, NH3, N-NH4+, NKieldahl, NO3-, N-NO3-, NO2-, N-NO2-, Ntot., PO43-, Ptot and electrical conductivity value. The monthly sum of precipitation was read based on data from the Weather Service “IMGW-PIB Monitor”. The research and analysis results allowed to identify the self-cleaning, nitrification, and de-nitrification processes, as well as enrichment affecting the variability of the chemical composition of the Supraśl river water. The results from the factor analysis showed some prevailing of enrichment processes over internal changes in the aquatic environment of the Supraśl river.

  19. Validation and comparison of EuroQoL-5 dimension (EQ-5D) and Short Form-6 dimension (SF-6D) among stable angina patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing; Han, Yuerong; Zhao, Fei-Li; Zhou, Jin; Chen, Zhijun; Sun, He

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Several preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments have been published and widely used in different populations. However no consensus has emerged regarding the most appropriate instrument in therapeutic area of stable angina. This study compared and validated the psychometric properties of two generic preference-based instruments, the EQ-5D and SF-6D, among Chinese stable angina patients. Methods Convergent validity of the EQ-5D and SF-6D was examined with ...

  20. Compound forming extractants, solvating solvents and inert solvents IUPAC chemical data series

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y; Kertes, A S

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium Constants of Liquid-Liquid Distribution Reactions, Part III: Compound Forming Extractants, Solvating Solvents, and Inert Solvents focuses on the compilation of equilibrium constants of various compounds, such as acids, ions, salts, and aqueous solutions. The manuscript presents tables that show the distribution reactions of carboxylic and sulfonic acid extractants and their dimerization and other reactions in the organic phase and extraction reactions of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The book also states that the inorganic anions in these solutions are irrelevant, since they d

  1. Wet oxidative degradation of cellulosic wastes 5- chemical and thermal properties of the final waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskander, S.B.; Saleh, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the residual solution arising from the wet oxidative degradation of solid organic cellulosic materials, as one of the component of radioactive solid wastes, using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Were incorporated into ordinary Portland cement matrix. Leaching as well as thermal characterizations of the final solidified waste forms were evaluated to meet the final disposal requirements. Factors, such as the amount of the residual solution incorporated, types of leachant. Release of different radionuclides and freezing-thaw treatment, that may affect the leaching characterization. Were studied systematically from the data obtained, it was found that the final solid waste from containing 35% residual solution in tap water is higher than that in ground water or sea water. Based on the data obtained from thermal analysis, it could be concluded that incorporating the residual solution form the wet oxidative degradation of cellulosic materials has no negative effect on the hydration of cement materials and consequently on the thermal stability of the final solid waste from during the disposal process

  2. Surface morphology and preferential orientation growth of TaC crystals formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Xiang, E-mail: Xiong228@sina.co [State Key Lab for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen Zhaoke; Huang Baiyun; Li Guodong [State Key Lab for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zheng Feng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xiao Peng; Zhang Hongbo [State Key Lab for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2009-04-02

    TaC film was deposited on (002) graphite sheet by isothermal chemical vapor deposition using TaCl{sub 5}-Ar-C{sub 3}H{sub 6} mixtures, with deposition temperature 1200 {sup o}C and pressure about 200 Pa. The influence of deposition position (or deposition rate) on preferential orientation and surface morphology of TaC crystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy methods. The deposits are TaC plus trace of C. The crystals are large individual columns with pyramidal-shape at deposition rate of 32.4-37.3 {mu}m/h, complex columnar at 37.3-45.6 {mu}m/h, lenticular-like at 45.6-54.6 {mu}m/h and cauliflower-like at 54.6-77.3 {mu}m/h, with <001>, near <001>, <110> and no clear preferential orientation, respectively. These results agree in part with the preditions of the Pangarov's model of the relationship between deposition rate and preferential growth orientation. The growth mechanism of TaC crystals in <001>, near <001>, <111> and no clear preferential orientation can be fairly explained by the growth parameter {alpha} with Van der Drift's model, deterioration model and Meakin model. Furthermore, a nucleation and coalescence model is also proposed to explain the formation mechanism of <110> lenticular-like crystals.

  3. Chemical form of tritium released from solid breeder materials and the influences of it on a bred tritium recovery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukubo, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Nishida, Y.; Kinjyo, T.; Tanifuji, Takaaki; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Enoeda, Mikio

    2004-01-01

    The ratio of HTO in total tritium was measured at release of the bred tritium to the purge gas with hydrogen using the thermal release after irradiation method, where neutron irradiation was performed at JRR-3 reactor in JAERI or KUR reactor in Kyoto University. It is experimentally confirmed in this study that not a small portion of bred tritium is released to the purge gas in the form of HTO form ceramic breeder materials even when hydrogen is added to the purge gas. The chemical composition is to be decided by the competitive reaction at the grain surface of a ceramic breeder material where desorption reaction, isotope exchange reaction 1, isotope exchange reaction 2 and water formation reaction are considered to take part. Observation in this study implies that it is necessary to have a bred tritium recovery system applicable for both HT and HTO form to recover whole bred tritium. The chemical composition also decides the amount of tritium transferable to the cooling water of the electricity generation system through the structural material in the blanket system. Permeation behavior of tritium through some structural materials at various conditions are also discussed. (author)

  4. Effect of aluminum on metabolism of organic acids and chemical forms of aluminum in root tips of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikka, Takashi; Ogawa, Tsuyoshi; Li, Donghua; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Akio

    2013-10-01

    Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) has relatively high resistance to aluminum (Al) toxicity than the various herbaceous plants and model plant species. To investigate Al-tolerance mechanism, the metabolism of organic acids and the chemical forms of Al in the target site (root tips) in Eucalyptus was investigated. To do this, 2-year old rooted cuttings of E. camaldulensis were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) containing Al (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0mM) salts for 5weeks; growth was not affected at concentrations up to 2.5mM even with Al concentration reaching 6000μgg(-1) DW. In roots, the citrate content also increased with increasing Al application. Concurrently, the activities of aconitase and NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase, which catalyze the decomposition of citrate, decreased. On the other hand, the activity of citrate synthase was not affected at concentrations up to 2.5mM Al. (27)Al-NMR spectroscopic analyses were carried out where it was found that Al-citrate complexes were a major chemical form present in cell sap of root tips. These findings suggested that E. camaldulensis detoxifies Al by forming Al-citrate complexes, and that this is achieved through Al-induced citrate accumulation in root tips via suppression of the citrate decomposition pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Jackson, Matthew I; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Combs, Gerald F

    2011-11-01

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability at nutritional doses. In this study, we found that two sources of L-selenomethionine (SeMet) and Se-enriched yeast each increased intracellular Se content more effectively than selenite or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Interestingly, SeMSC, SeMet, and digested Se-enriched yeast were transported at comparable efficacy from the apical to basolateral sides, each being about 3-fold that of selenite. In addition, these forms of Se, whether before or after traversing from apical side to basolateral side, did not change the potential to support glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Although selenoprotein P has been postulated to be a key Se transport protein, its intracellular expression did not differ when selenite, SeMSC, SeMet, or digested Se-enriched yeast was added to serum-contained media. Taken together, our data show, for the first time, that the chemical form of Se at nutritional doses can affect the absorptive (apical to basolateral side) efficacy and retention of Se by intestinal cells; but that, these effects are not directly correlated to the potential to support GPx activity.

  6. Chemical form of released tritium from molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} salt under neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Chemical forms of released tritium from FLIBE (the 2:1 mixture of LiF and BeF{sub 2}) by in-pile tritium release experiment were HT and TF and their proportion depended on the chemical composition of purge gas and the dehumidification time of specimen at high temperatures. The chemical form of tritium was determined by the thermodynamic equilibrium of the isotopic exchange reaction (T{sup +} + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sup +} + HT). (author)

  7. Chemical Form of Selenium in Naturally Selenium-Rich Lentils (Lens Culinaris L.) From Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thavarajah, D.; Vandenberg, A.; George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-06-04

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86--95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5--14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  8. Determination of chemical forms of 14C in liquid discharges from nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlik, I; Fejgl, M; Povinec, P P; Kořínková, T; Tomášková, L; Pospíchal, J; Kurfiřt, M; Striegler, R; Kaufmanová, M

    2017-10-01

    Developments of radioanalytical methods for determination of radiocarbon in wastewaters from nuclear power plants (NPP) with pressurized light water reactors, which would distinguish between the dissolved organic and inorganic forms have been carried out. After preliminary tests, the method was used to process pilot samples from wastewater outlets from the Temelín and Dukovany NPPs (Czech Republic). The results of analysis of pilot water samples collected in 2015 indicate that the instantaneous 14 C releases into the water streams would be about 7.10 -5 (Temelín) and 4.10 -6 (Dukovany) of the total quantity of the 14 C liberated into the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical form of selenium differentially influences DNA repair pathways following exposure to lead nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Shauna M; Horgan, Karina A; Murphy, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Lead, an environmental toxin is known to induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions in humans through a number of mechanisms including the deactivation of antioxidants thus leading to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage. Selenium on the other hand has been proven to play an important role in the protection of cells from free radical damage and oxidative stress, though its effects are thought to be form and dose dependent. As the liver is the primary organ required for metabolite detoxification, HepG2 cells were chosen to assess the protective effects of various selenium compounds following exposure to the genotoxic agent lead nitrate. Initially DNA damage was quantified using a comet assay, gene expression patterns associated with DNA damage and signalling were also examined using PCR arrays and the biological pathways which were most significantly affected by selenium were identified. Interestingly, the organic type selenium compounds (selenium yeast and selenomethionine) conferred protection against lead induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells; this is evident by reduction in the quantity of DNA present in the comet tail of cells cultured in their presence with lead. This trend also followed through the gene expression changes noted in DNA damage pathways analysed. These results were in contrast with those of inorganic sodium selenite which promoted lead induced DNA damage evident in both the comet assay results and the gene expression analysis. Over all this study provided valuable insights into the effects which various selenium compounds had on the DNA damage and signalling pathway indicating the potential for using organic forms of selenium such as selenium enriched yeast to protect against DNA damaging agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Behaviour of three chemical forms of tritium in the environment after release from inertial fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, M.; Perlado, J.M.; Sedano, L.

    2006-01-01

    In order to fully simulate the behaviour of elementary tritium (HT), tritiated water vapour (HTO) in the environment, it is necessary to take into account diffusion and deposition processes in the soil and vegetables. In addition this work also incorporates the penetration in the underground, re-emission and later conversion to organic tritium (OBT). The whole study has led to the conclusion that the behaviour of the tritium should be simulated using two well-differentiated studies: deterministic and probabilistic. Deterministic calculations are based on a fixed meteorological data given 'a priori'. The probabilistic study is based on measured real meteorological analysis every hour, and the probability that individuals can present dose for internal irradiation. Both options have been considered for a specific mediterranean environment of the system. Once the elementary tritium has been deposited in the soil, it can be oxidized by microbial action of the enzymes of the soil, and the resulting tritium form (in its oxidize form) goes back to the atmosphere. This process of re-emission is shown to be very important since it has been typically considered that the inhaled tritium is only, HTO, when, in fact part of that account is due to the HT converted to HTO and re-emitted to the atmosphere. Our calculations demonstrate that the HT contributes very significantly to the dose for inhalation through the re-emission processes. A final aspect of this work is the dosimetric analysis of the contamination through all ways: inhalation, re-emission and ingestion. Early and chronic doses have been assessed

  11. The Long-Term Study of Some mechanical and Chemical Properties of Polymer Modified Cement Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatta, H.A.; Eskander, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is a new experimental trend to study the long-term durability of polymer/cement/borate waste forms in storage and disposal sites during the long period of time. The data obtained indicate that all the samples of polymer modified cement waste forms immersed in both distilled and ground water (for more than 2700 days) show a slight increase in the compressive strength values. The chemical stability of the immobilized borate waste forms in distilled and ground water was studied. The cumulative leach fraction in percentage, of Cs-137 isotope from the final solidified waste forms in case of using ground water was lower than that in distilled water for all samples used and the presence of polymer lowered the percent release of radioactive Cs-137 isotope in all samples studied . The leach coefficients (Lc) and the leach indices (Li) of radioactive cesium-137 isotope for cement borate and polymer modified cement waste forms were also calculated. It was found that the leach indices values greater than 6

  12. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL HISTORY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE HERCULES CLUSTER: THE EFFECTS OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petropoulou, V.; Vilchez, J.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Cedres, B.; Papaderos, P.; Magrini, L.; Reverte, D.

    2011-01-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep Hα survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT and have obtained fundamental parameters of stellar components such as mean metallicity and age. The emission-line spectra were corrected for underlying stellar absorption using these spectral synthesis models. Line fluxes were measured and O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. We have derived the masses and total luminosities of the galaxies using available Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband photometry. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied by combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of the galaxies, and their existing H I data. Our Hercules SF galaxies are divided into three main subgroups: (1) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and nearly flat oxygen gradients, demonstrating the effect of ram-pressure stripping; (2) chemically evolved dwarfs/irregulars populating the highest local densities, possible products of tidal interactions in preprocessing events; and (3) less metallic dwarf galaxies that appear to be 'newcomers' to the cluster and are experiencing pressure-triggered star formation. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well-defined MZ and LZ sequences (for both O/H and N/O), though the dwarf/irregular galaxies located at the densest regions appear to be outliers to these global relations, suggesting a physical reason for the dispersion in these fundamental relations. The Hercules cluster appears to be currently assembling via the merger of smaller substructures, providing an ideal laboratory where the local

  13. Effect of chemical pollution on forms of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239,240Pu in arctic soil studied by sequential extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakainen, M; Riekkinen, I; Heikkinen, T; Jaakkola, T; Steinnes, E; Rissanen, K; Suomela, M; Thørring, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the forms of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239,240Pu occurring in different soil horizons using sequential extraction of samples taken from four sites located along a pollution gradient from the copper-nickel smelter at Monchegorsk in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, and from a reference site in Finnish Lapland in 1997. A selective sequential-leaching procedure was employed using a modification of the method of Tessier, Cambell and Bisson ((1979). Analytical Chemistry, 51, 844-851). For 137Cs the organic (O) and uppermost mineral (E1) layer were studied, for 90Sr and 239,240Pu only the uppermost organic layer (Of). The fraction of 137Cs occurring in readily exchangeable form in the organic layer was about 50% at the reference site and decreased as a function of pollution, being 15% at the most polluted site in the Kola Peninsula. There was a clear positive correlation in the O layer between the distance from the smelter and the percentage of 137Cs extracted in the readily exchangeable fraction (Spearman correlation rsp = 0.7805, p = 0.0001), whereas in the E1 layer no correlation was evident. The distribution of 90Sr in the Of layer was similar at all sites, with the highest amounts occurring in exchangeable form and bound to organic matter, whereas stable Sr showed a somewhat different distribution with the highest amount in the oxide fraction. Most of the 239,240Pu was bound to organic matter. Chemical pollution affected the exchangeable fraction of 239,240Pu, which was about 1% at the most polluted site and 4-6% at the other sites.

  14. Classification of distribution coefficient data by mineral components and chemical forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seiji; Kimura, Hideo; Matsuzuru, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    The use of distribution coefficient (Kd) in radionuclide transport model has been reported in a number of papers. However, Kd data cover a wide range even for a specific element. In this study the Kd data of neptunium, uranium and selenium, which are included in sorption database (SDB, OECD/NEA) of radionuclides, were classified by a solid phase and a dominant species in a solution. The aqueous species of these elements were estimated by a geochemical model. The Kd data classified by the analyzed speciation were tested by a nonparametric statistical method. The results of tests proved that the Kd data of neptunium or uranium, which covered a wide range, were influenced by the supersaturation of Np(OH) 4 (s) or schoepite. The Kd data of neptunium could be classified by the dominant aqueous species, NpO 2 + , NpO 2 CO 3 - , NpO 2 OH(aq) and Np(OH) 4 (aq). The Kd data of these four dominant species which are not equilibrated with supersaturated Np(OH) 4 (s) are less than 100 ml/g. The analyzed aqueous species of uranium were UO 2 (OH) 2 (aq) and UO 2 (CO 3 ) n 2-2n (n=2,3) in hexavalent state. It is suggested that the distribution coefficient of neptunium and uranium depends on dominant aqueous species or charged species, i.e., cationic, anionic and nonionic forms. The dominant aqueous species of selenium are HSe - , HSeO 3 - , SeO 3 2- and SeO 4 2- . The result of the nonparametric statistical test shows that the Kd value of HSeO 3 - is higher than of other anionic forms. However, the influence of the species, HSe - , SeO 3 2- and SeO 4 2- , on Kd values is not clearly identified. Considering the dominant species, the Kd of elements are in ranges of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude being in general narrower than those classified by mineral and rock types. (author)

  15. Arsenic in Ironite fertilizer: The absorption by hamsters and the chemical form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aposhian, M.M.; Koch, I.; Avram, M.D.; Chowdhury, U.K.; Smith, P.G.; Reimer, K.J.; Aposhian, H.V.; (Ariz); (Royal)

    2009-09-11

    We determined the gastrointestinal absorption of the arsenic in Ironite, a readily available fertilizer, for male hamsters (Golden Syrian), considered to be an excellent model for how the human processes inorganic arsenic. Urine and feces were collected after administering an aqueous suspension of Ironite by stomach tube. In addition, we studied the forms and oxidation states of arsenic in Ironite by synchrotron spectroscopic techniques. The absorption of the arsenic in Ironite (1-0-0) was 21.2% and the absorption relative to sodium arsenite was 31.0%. Our results using XANES spectra determinations indicate that Ironite contains scorodite (AsV) as well as previously reported arsenopyrite (As(-1)). Since the 1-0-0 Ironite is readily available for purchase, its risk assessment for children by professionals is recommended. This is especially important because it is used to fertilize large areas of grass in playgrounds and parks where children play. The absorption of the arsenic in it, the hand to mouth activity of children, and the potential of ground water contamination makes the use of 1-0-0 Ironite as a fertilizer a potential environmental hazard.

  16. Chemical structure of the adducts formed by the oxidation of benzidine in the presence of phenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephy, P.D.; Mason, R.P.; Eling, T.

    1982-01-01

    Bioactivation of carcinogens by peroxidases has received increasing attention since the discovery of the oxidation of carcinogens by prostaglandin hydroperoxidase. Benzidine and 3,5,3',5'-tetramethylbenzidine are oxidized by horseradish peroxidase and prostaglandin synthase to two-electron oxidation products (di-imines). Di-imines readily react with the phenolic anti-oxidant butylated hydroxyanisole to form adducts. In this paper, we have studied the oxidation of benzidine by horseradish peroxidase in the presence of phenolic compounds and characterized the resultant benzidine/phenol adducts. A benzidine/2,6-dimethylphenol adduct was isolated and characterized by mass spectrometry and high field n.m.r. The reaction of [ 14 C]benzidine in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and phenol yielded only the benzidine/phenol adduct. Our results indicate that the benzidine/phenol adducts are analogous to the indoaniline dyes, differing only in substitution of a biphenyl group for a benzene ring. The reaction of benzidine di-imine with endogenous phenols may represent a new pathway for detoxication, removing potentially harmful metabolites of benzidine

  17. Review of analytical techniques to determine the chemical forms of vapours and aerosols released from overheated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Nichols, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    A comprehensive review has been undertaken of appropriate analytical techniques to monitor and measure the chemical effects that occur in large-scale tests designed to study severe reactor accidents. Various methods have been developed to determine the chemical forms of the vapours, aerosols and deposits generated during and after such integral experiments. Other specific techniques have the long-term potential to provide some of the desired data in greater detail, although considerable efforts are still required to apply these techniques to the study of radioactive debris. Such in-situ and post-test methods of analysis have been also assessed in terms of their applicability to the analysis of samples from the Phebus-FP tests. The recommended in-situ methods of analysis are gamma-ray spectroscopy, potentiometry, mass spectrometry, and Raman/UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Vapour/aerosol and deposition samples should also be obtained at well-defined time intervals during each experiment for subsequent post-test analysis. No single technique can provide all the necessary chemical data from these samples, and the most appropriate method of analysis involves a complementary combination of autoradiography, AES, IR, MRS, SEMS/EDS, SIMS/LMIS, XPS and XRD

  18. Stable tetrabenzo-Chichibabin's hydrocarbons: Tunable ground state and unusual transition between their closed-shell and open-shell resonance forms

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Zebing; Sung, Youngmo; Bao, Nina; Tan, Davin; Lee, Richmond; Zafra, José Luis; Lee, Byungsun; Ishida, Masatoshi; Ding, Jun; Lõ pez Navarrete, Juan Teodomiro; Li, Yuan; Zeng, Wangdong; Kim, Dongho; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Webster, Richard D.; Casado, Juan; Wu, Jishan

    2012-01-01

    -shell PAH has been investigated for a long time. However, most of the studies are complicated by their inherent high reactivity. In this work, two new stable benzannulated Chichibabin's hydrocarbons 1-CS and 2-OS were prepared, and their electronic structure

  19. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization Alters Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms of Cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and Resists Cadmium Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25–60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg·kg−1 Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mg·kg−1 Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2–80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation. PMID:23139811

  20. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  1. Chemical Analysis of Cellular and Extracellular Carbohydrates of a Biofilm-Forming Strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulon, Charlène; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Filloux, Alain; Sadovskaya, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen, which causes persisting life-threatening infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Biofilm mode of growth facilitates its survival in a variety of environments. Most P. aeruginosa isolates, including the non-mucoid laboratory strain PA14, are able to form a thick pellicle, which results in a surface-associated biofilm at the air-liquid (A–L) interface in standing liquid cultures. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are considered as key components in the formation of this biofilm pellicle. In the non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strain PA14, the “scaffolding” polysaccharides of the biofilm matrix, and the molecules responsible for the structural integrity of rigid A–L biofilm have not been identified. Moreover, the role of LPS in this process is unclear, and the chemical structure of the LPS O-antigen of PA14 has not yet been elucidated. Principal Findings In the present work we carried out a systematic analysis of cellular and extracellular (EC) carbohydrates of P. aeruginosa PA14. We also elucidated the chemical structure of the LPS O-antigen by chemical methods and 2-D NMR spectroscopy. Our results showed that it is composed of linear trisaccharide repeating units, identical to those described for P. aeruginosa Lanýi type O:2a,c (Lanýi-Bergman O-serogroup 10a, 10c; IATS serotype 19) and having the following structure: -4)-α-L-GalNAcA-(1–3)-α-D-QuiNAc-(1–3)- α-L-Rha-(1-. Furthermore, an EC O-antigen polysaccharide (EC O-PS) and the glycerol-phosphorylated cyclic β-(1,3)-glucans were identified in the culture supernatant of PA14, grown statically in minimal medium. Finally, the extracellular matrix of the thick biofilm formed at the A-L interface contained, in addition to eDNA, important quantities (at least ∼20% of dry weight) of LPS-like material. Conclusions We characterized the chemical structure of the LPS O-antigen and showed that the O-antigen polysaccharide is

  2. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  3. Chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer formed on stainless steels in a glucose-oxidase solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marconnet, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: cyril.marconnet@yahoo.fr; Wouters, Y. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Miserque, F. [Laboratoire de Reactivite des Surfaces et des Interfaces, CEA Saclay, Bat. 391, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France); Dagbert, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: catherine.dagbert@ecp.fr; Petit, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, INPG, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Galerie, A. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Feron, D. [Service de Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, CEA Saclay, Bat. 458, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France)

    2008-12-01

    This article deals with the interaction between the passive layer formed on UNS S30403 and S31254 stainless steels and an enzymatic solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) and its substrate D-glucose. This enzymatic solution is often used to reproduce in laboratory the ennoblement occuring in non-sterile aerated aqueous environments because of the biofilm settlement on the surface of the metallic material. GOx catalyses the oxidation of D-glucose to gluconic acid by reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and produces an organic acid. Thanks to photocurrent measurements, XPS analysis and Mott-Schottky diagrams, it is here shown that such an environment generates modifications in the chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer: it induces a relative enrichment of the n-type semi-conducting phase containing chromium (chromine Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and an increase of the donors density in the space charge region.

  4. Chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer formed on stainless steels in a glucose-oxidase solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconnet, C.; Wouters, Y.; Miserque, F.; Dagbert, C.; Petit, J.-P.; Galerie, A.; Feron, D.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the interaction between the passive layer formed on UNS S30403 and S31254 stainless steels and an enzymatic solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) and its substrate D-glucose. This enzymatic solution is often used to reproduce in laboratory the ennoblement occuring in non-sterile aerated aqueous environments because of the biofilm settlement on the surface of the metallic material. GOx catalyses the oxidation of D-glucose to gluconic acid by reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and produces an organic acid. Thanks to photocurrent measurements, XPS analysis and Mott-Schottky diagrams, it is here shown that such an environment generates modifications in the chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer: it induces a relative enrichment of the n-type semi-conducting phase containing chromium (chromine Cr 2 O 3 ) and an increase of the donors density in the space charge region

  5. Chemical form of technetium in corn (Zea mays) and the gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated Tc by laboratory rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Myttenaere, C.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Bruwaene, R.

    1984-01-01

    The food chain availability of technetium incorporated into plant tissue, its chemical form in corn leaves, and the potential for gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated technetium was investigated. Technetium-95m was incorporated into corn leaves via root uptake. Chemical fractionation of the /sup 95m/Tc in leaves showed that 60% was extractable with boiling ethanol and weak mineral acids. The remainder was associated with cell walls and was extractable by harsh chemical treatment. Gel permeation chromatography of the cytosol, indicated that 50% of the /sup 95m/Tc co-chromatographed with anionic pertechnetate; however, it was impossible to distinguish if this pure pertechnetate or technetium complexed with organic molecules. Technetium-95m was administered to laboratory rats in a single dose as: (1) intravenous injection of pertechnetate, (2) pertechnetate mixed with standard laboratory food, and (3) a meal containing /sup 95m/Tc biologically incorporated into corn leaves. High concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were found in the thyroids, hair, kidneys, and liver of rats. Technetium rapidly disappeared from the liver, kidneys, and other tissues, but remained in the thyroids and hair. Urinary excretion of technetium decreased, and fecal excretion increased when technetium was fed to rats as a /sup 95m/Tc incorporated into corn leaves. The percent of the administered dose absorbed into thyroid gland and the kidneys was less when technetium was biologically incorporated into corn leaves than when pertechnetate was mixed with food. Biological incorporation of technetium into plants appears to reduce its potential for food chain transfer by decreasing its availability for gastrointestinal absorption. 5 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Chemical form of technetium in corn (Zea mays) and the gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated Tc by laboratory rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Myttenaere, C.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Bruwaene, R.

    1984-01-01

    The food chain availability of technetium incorporated into plant tissue, its chemical form in corn leaves, and the potential for gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated technetium was investigated. Technetium-95m was incorporated into corn leaves via root uptake. Chemical fractionation of the /sup 95m/Tc in leaves showed that 60% was extractable with boiling ethanol and weak mineral acids. The remainder was associated with cell walls and was extractable by harsh chemical treatment. Gel permeation chromatography of the cytosol, indicated that 50% of the /sup 95m/Tc co-chromatographed with anionic pertechnetate; however, it was impossible to distinguish if this pure pertechnetate or technetium complexed with organic molecules. Technetium-95m was administered to laboratory rats in a single dose as: (1) intravenous injection of pertechnetate, (2) pertechnetate mixed with standard laboratory food, and (3) a meal containing /sup 95m/Tc biologically incorporated into corn leaves. High concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were found in the thyroids, hair, kidneys, and liver of rats. Technetium rapidly disappeared from the liver, kidneys, and other tissues, but remained in the thyroids and hair. Urinary excretion of technetium decreased, and fecal excretion increased when technetium was fed to rats as a /sup 95m/Tc incorporated into corn leaves. The percent of the administered dose absorbed into thyroid gland and the kidneys was less when technetium was biologically incorporated into corn leaves than when pertechnetate was mixed with food. Biological incorporation of technetium into plants appears to reduce its potential for food chain transfer by decreasing its availability for gastrointestinal absorption. 5 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  7. Dew point, internal gas pressure, and chemical composition of the gas within the free volume of DWPF canistered waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J.R.; Herman, D.T.; Crump, S.; Miller, T.J.; McIntosh, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) produced 55 canistered waste forms containing simulated waste glass during the four Waste Qualification campaigns of the DWPF Startup Test Program. Testing of the gas within the free volume of these canisters for dew point, internal gas pressure, and chemical composition was performed as part of a continuing effort to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications. Results are presented for six glass-filled canisters. The dew points within the canisters met the acceptance criterion of < 20 degrees C for all six canisters. Factors influencing the magnitude of the dew point are presented. The chemical composition of the free volume gas was indistinguishable from air for all six canisters. Hence, no foreign materials were present in the gas phase of these canisters. The internal gas pressures within the sealed canisters were < 1 atm at 25 degrees C for all six canisters which readily met the acceptance criterion of an internal gas pressure of less than 1.5 atm at 25 degrees C. These results provided the evidence required to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications

  8. A study of chemical forms of polonium-210 and lead-210 in air particulates in phosphate mines and Tartous port

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Al-Kharfan, K.; Khalili, H.; Hasan, M.

    2003-03-01

    Chemical forms of polonium-210 and lead-210 in air particulates of two areas having different climate conditions (Phosphate mines and Tartous port) have been studied. Air particulates were collected at six periods covering the climate changes from September 2000 until February 2002. Total suspended particulates (TSP) concentration was varied between 1827 and 9722 μg/M 3 and 197 and 1135 μg/m 3 in phosphate mines and Tartous port respectively; all of these values were higher than the maximum permissible concentration according to the Syrian standard (120 μg/m 3 ). Results of 210 po and 210 Pb extraction from the air particulates using selective solutions have shown that inorganic and insoluble 210 Po and 210 Pb (attached to silica and not soluble in mineral acids) ratio was high in phosphate mine air particulates and reached a value of 94% and 77% respectively. While the amount of lead 210 attached to organic compounds has reached a value of 24%. In addition, small variations in total inorganic and insoluble 210 Po and 210 Pb during the year were observed with little differences between polonium 210 ratio in both Tartous port and phosphate mines, which indicated that variations in climate conditions may affect the chemical forms. In both cases, inorganic and insoluble polonium 210 and lead 210 ratio was high; this may lead to their attachment to lung cells and their transfer via body streams. Moreover, the date obtained in this study can be utilized to calculate the radiation dose due to inhalation of radon gas and its decay daughters in the Syrian phosphate sites. (author)

  9. Validation and comparison of EuroQoL-5 dimension (EQ-5D) and Short Form-6 dimension (SF-6D) among stable angina patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Han, Yuerong; Zhao, Fei-Li; Zhou, Jin; Chen, Zhijun; Sun, He

    2014-10-25

    Several preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments have been published and widely used in different populations. However no consensus has emerged regarding the most appropriate instrument in therapeutic area of stable angina. This study compared and validated the psychometric properties of two generic preference-based instruments, the EQ-5D and SF-6D, among Chinese stable angina patients. Convergent validity of the EQ-5D and SF-6D was examined with eight a priori hypotheses from stable angina patients in conjunction with Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ). Responsiveness was compared using the effect size (ES), relative efficiency (RE) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Agreement between the EQ-5D and SF-6D was tested using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot. Factors affecting utility difference were explored with multiple linear regression analysis. In 411 patients (mean age 68.08 ± 11.35), mean utility scores (SD) were 0.78 (0.15) for the EQ-5D and 0.68 (0.12) for the SF-6D. Validity was demonstrated by the moderate to strong correlation coefficients (Range: 0.368-0.594, Pstable-angina-specific health status than the EQ-5D (ES: 0.426 to 1.126). RE suggested that the SF-6D (RE: 44.8 to 177.8%) was more efficient than the EQ-5D except for physical function. Poor agreement between them was observed with ICC (0.448, Pstable angina patients. The SF-6D may be a more effective tool with lower ceiling effect and greater sensitivity. Further study is needed to compare other properties, such as reliability and longitudinal response.

  10. Influence of density on radiation-chemical yield of molecular hydrogen formed at radiolysis of aqueous solution of NaOH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarov, Y.D.; Hajiyeva, S.R.; Ramazanova, N.K.; Aliyev, S.M.; Alasgarov, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : In atom and nuclear energy the specialists knowledge about radiation-chemical yield of the initial products formed under the influence of ionizing rays on water is of great importance from the point of security. The radiation-chemical yields of molecular hydrogen have been defined according to the graph and the obtained results

  11. Resistance of pathogenic bacteria on the surface of stainless steel depending on attachment form and efficacy of chemical sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Min; Baek, Seung-Youb; Lee, Sun-Young

    2012-02-15

    Various bacteria including food spoilage bacteria and pathogens can form biofilms on different food processing surfaces, leading to potential food contamination or spoilage. Therefore, the survival of foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii) in different forms (adhered cells, biofilm producing in TSB, biofilm producing at RH 100%) on the surface of stainless steel and stored at various relative humidities (RH 23%, 43%, 68%, 85%, and 100%) at room temperature for 5 days was investigated in this study. Additionally, the efficacy of chemical sanitizers (chlorine-based and alcohol-based commercial sanitizers) on inhibiting various types of biofilms of E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus on the surface of stainless steel was investigated. The number of pathogens on the surface of stainless steel in TSB stored at 25°C for 7 days or RH 100% at 25°C for 7 days was significantly increased and resulted in the increase of 3 log(10) CFU/coupon after 1 day, and these levels were maintained for 7 days. When stainless steel coupons were stored at 25°C for 5 days, the number of pathogens on the surface of stainless steel was significantly reduced after storage at RH 23%, 43%, 68%, and 85%, but not at 100%. When the bacteria formed biofilms on the surface of stainless steel in TSB after 6 days, the results were similar to those of the attached form. However, levels of S. aureus and C. sakazakii biofilms were more slowly reduced after storage at RH 23%, 43%, 68%, and 85% for 5 days than were those of the other pathogens. Formation of biofilms stored at RH 100% for 5 days displayed the highest levels of resistance to inactivation. Treatment with the alcohol sanitizer was very effective at inactivating attached pathogens or biofilms on the surface of stainless steel. Reduction levels of alcohol sanitizer treatment ranged from 1.91 to 4.77 log and from 4.35 to 5.35 log CFU/coupon in E. coli

  12. Effect of chemical modification on behavior of various organic vanadium forms during analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of various organic V forms dissolved in xylene during analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was compared. The investigated analyte forms included compounds with vanadium at the oxidation state III, IV or V, as well as N, O or S atoms in molecules. Another group consisted of petroleum products containing naturally-occurring V species. Although the characteristic mass determined under different analytical conditions was in the very wide range from 11 up to 55 pg, some rules of V behavior were found. In the case of porphyrins and petroleum products, the application of Pd as a chemical modifier (xylene solution of Pd(II) acetylacetonate) seemed to be crucial. It was shown that Pd must be introduced to a furnace together with a sample. Pd injected and thermally pretreated before the sample injection was less effective for porphyrins and the petroleum products, but it increased signals of V compounds containing O as donor atom. The iodine pretreatment followed by the methyltrioctylammonium chloride (MTOACl) pretreatment was advantageous for these V forms. The air ashing in a graphite tube appeared to be important to improve decomposition of the petroleum products. No significant influence of the V oxidation state on the analytical signal was observed. The behavior of V contained in two Conostan oil standards, the single-element and the S21 multielement standard, was different in many situations. Probably, the joint action of other elements is responsible for this effect. In general, chemical modification was applied in the work for two reasons: to reduce the V volatility (in some cases losses at about 300 deg. C were observed) and to enhance the atomization efficiency. For routine analysis air ashing, modification by Pd introduced into the furnace together with the sample solution and petroleum products with known V content as standard is recommended. Using this procedure the characteristic mass varied from 16 to 19 pg for

  13. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  14. Adaptation of a Commonly Used, Chemically Defined Medium for Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberski, A. R.; Al-Noubi, M. N.; Rahman, Z. H.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling with stable isotopes is a prominent technique for comparative quantitative proteomics, and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is the most commonly used approach. SILAC is, however, traditionally limited to simple tissue culture regimens and only ra...

  15. Using variation in the chemical and stable isotopic composition of Zostera noltii to assess nutrient dynamics in a temperate seagrass meadow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadimitriou, S.; Kennedy, H.; Rodrigues, R.M.N.V.; Kennedy, D.P. [University of Wales, Bangor (United Kingdom). School of Ocean Sciences; Heaton, T.H.E. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom). NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory

    2006-10-15

    The influence of seasonality in growth and benthic organic matter remineralization on the chemical and isotopic composition of the seagrass Zostera noltii was investigated from March to November over the course of two years in a temperate meadow in North Wales, UK. The carbon (C{sub org}) and nitrogen (N{sub org}) concentrations in new {sub leaf} tissue ranged from 25 to 35 mmol C g{sup -1} and 2 to 5 mmol N g{sup -1}. Their stable isotopic composition ranged from -11.0 per thousand to -6.9 per thousand ({delta}{sup 13}C{sub leaf}) and +3.3 per thousand to +7.5 per thousand ({delta}{sup 15}N{sub leaf}), while the stable isotopic composition of sulphur in the new {sub leaf} ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub leaf}) ranged from -3.0 per thousand to +6.4 per thousand. The young seagrass tissues had lowest Norg, highest C:N, most depleted {delta}{sup 13}C{sub leaf}, and most enriched {delta}{sup 15}N{sub leaf} at the standing biomass maximum (approximately 150-200 g dry weight m{sup -2}) in the summer, reflecting the temporal imbalance between inorganic nutrient supply and plant demand imposed by seasonality in the growth rate. The most depleted {delta}{sup 34}S{sub leaf} was recorded in the same season. The isotopic composition of the seagrass tissues reflected that of the external inorganic source. The {delta}{sup 13}C{sub leaf} correlated (r{sup 2} {approx} 0.4) with the {delta}{sup 13}C of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the surface waters ({delta}{sup 13}C{sub DIC} range: -0.4 per thousand to +1.2 per thousand).The apparent carbon isotope enrichment factor of new leaf relative to the bulk seawater DIC ({epsilon} {sub seagrass-DIC} range: -11.2 to -8.1 per thousand) indicated reliance on direct HCO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake, especially early in the growing season (spring). The {delta}{sup 15}N{sub leaf} reflected the {delta}{sup 15}N of pore water ammonium ({delta}{sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} range: +6 per thousand to +10 per thousand; average: +7.4 {+-} 0.8 per thousand) as

  16. Hydrogen-permeable TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} membranes formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Heung Yong; Nam, Suk Woo; Yoon, Sung Pil [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Thin films of TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} were deposited on the inner surface of the porous support tubes by the decomposition of tetraisopropyl titanate (TIPT) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) at atmospheric pressure. Dense and hydrogen-permeable membranes were formed at 400-600{degrees}C. The permeation rate of H{sub 2} through the membrane at 600{degrees}C was about 0.3 cm{sup 3}(STP)/min-cm{sup 2}-atm and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} permeation ratio was above 1000. The permeation properties of the membranes were investigated at various deposition temperatures and TIPT/TEOS concentrations. Decomposition of TIPT alone at temperatures above 400{degrees}C produced porous crystalline TiO{sub 2} films which were not H{sub 2}-selective. Decomposition of TEOS, however produced H{sub 2}-permeable SiO{sub 2} films at 400-600{degrees}C but film deposition rate was very low. Addition of TIPT to the TEOS stream significantly accelerated the deposition rate and produced highly H{sub 2}-selective films. Increasing the TEPT/TEOS ratios increased the deposition rate. The TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} membranes have the permeation properties comparable to those of SiO{sub 2} membranes. The TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} membranes were stable and did not show significant densification during the treatment at high temperature.

  17. Comparative analysis of physico-chemical and gas sensing characteristics of two different forms of SnO_2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwoka, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Szuber, J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Two different forms of SnO_2 deposited on Si substrate. • Crystallinity and surface/subsurface morphology controlled by XRD, SEM and AFM. • Surface/subsurface chemistry including stoichiometry and contaminations derived from XPS. • Comparative analysis of gas sensor characteristics of SnO_2 in NO_2 atmosphere. • Correlations between physico-chemical properties and gas sensor characteristics. - Abstract: In this paper the results of studies of comparative studies on the crystallinity, morphology and chemistry combined with the gas sensor response of two different forms of tin dioxide (SnO_2) films prepared by the Rheotaxial Growth and Thermal Oxidation (RGTO) and by the Laser-enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (L-CVD) methods, respectively, are presented. For this purpose the X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. XRD studies for both samples show the contribution from the crystalline SnO_2 in the cassiterite rutile phase without any evident contribution from the tin oxide (SnO) phase. SEM and AFM studies show that the surface morphology of RGTO and L-CVD SnO_2 samples are characterized by grains/nanograins of different size and surface roughness. In turn XPS studies confirm that for both SnO_2 samples a slight nonstoichiometry with a relative [O]/[Sn] concentration of 1.8, and slightly different amount of C contamination at the surface of internal grains with relative [C]/[Sn] concentration of 3.5 and 3.2, respectively. This undesired C contamination cannot be ignored because it creates an uncontrolled barrier for the potential gas adsorption at the internal surface of sensor material. This is confirmed by the gas sensor response in NO_2 atmosphere of both SnO_2 samples because the sensitivity is evidently smaller for RGTO SnO_2 with respect to the L-CVD SnO_2 samples, whereas the response time showed a completely opposite tendency

  18. Hydrologic connections and dynamics of water movement in the classical Karst (Kras) Aquifer: evidence from frequent chemical and stable isotope sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    A review of past research on the hydrogeology of the Classical Karst (Kras) region and new information obtained from a two- year study using environmental tracers are presented in this paper. The main problems addressed are 1) the sources of water to the Kras aquifer resurgence zone-including the famous Timavo springs-under changing flow regimes; 2) a quantification of the storage volumes of the karst massif corresponding to flow regimes defined by hydrograph recessions of the Timavo springs; and 3) changing dynamics between deep phreatic conduit flow and shallow phreatic and epiphreatic storage within the aquifer resurgence zone as determined through changes in chemical and isotopic composition at springs and wells. Particular focus was placed on addressing the long-standing question of the influence of the Soca River on the ground waters of the aquifer resurgence zone. The results indicate that the alluvial aquifer supplied by the sinking of the Soca River on the northwestern edge of the massif contributes approximately 75% of the mean annual outflow to the smaller springs of the aquifer resurgence zone, and as much as 53% to the mean annual outflow of the Timavo springs. As a whole, the Soca River is estimated to contribute 56% of the average outflow of the Kras aquifer resurgence. The proportions of Soca River water increase under drier conditions, and decrease under wetter conditions. Time series analysis of oxygen stable isotope records indicate that the transit time of Soca River water to the Timavo springs, Sardos spring, and well B-4 is on the order of 1-2 months, depending on hydrological conditions. The total baseflow storage of the Timavo springs is estimated to be 518 million m3, and represents 88.5% of the storage capacity estimated for all flow regimes of the springs. The ratio of baseflow storage volume to the average annual volume discharged at the Timavo springs is 0.54. The Reka River sinking in Slovenia supplies substantial allogenic recharge to

  19. Modified calcium oxide as stable solid base catalyst for Aldol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly efficient and stable solid-base catalyst for Aldol condensation was ... was bonded on surface of CaO chemically and almost no Ca(OH)2 formed during the modification process. ... cation, corrosion and waste generation attract great.

  20. Chemical properties and GMR improvement of specular spin valves with nano-oxide layers, formed in ambient mixed gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quang, H D; Hien, N T; Oh, S K; Sinh, N H; Yu, S C

    2004-01-01

    Specular spin valves (SVs) containing nano-oxide layers (NOLs) structured as substrate/seed/AF/P 1 /NOL/P 2 /Cu/F/NOL, have been fabricated. The NOLs were formed by natural oxidation in different ambient atmospheres of pure oxygen, oxygen/nitrogen and oxygen/argon gas mixtures. The fabrication conditions were optimized to enhance the magnetoresistance (MR) ratio, to suppress the interlayer coupling fields (H f ) between the free and pinned layers, to suppress the high interface density of the NOL, to ease the control of the NOL thickness and to form a smooth NOL/P 2 interface for promoting specular electron scattering. The characteristics of our specular SVs are the MR ratio of 14.1%, the exchange bias field of 44-45 mT, and H f weaker than 1.0 mT. The optimal conditions for oxidation time, total oxidation pressure and the annealing temperature were found to be 300 s, 0.14 Pa (oxygen/argon = 80/20) and 250 deg. C, respectively. Also, the origin of thermal stability of MMn-based (M = Fe, Pt, Ir, etc) specular SVs has been explained in detail by chemical properties of NOL using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profile analyses. Thermal stability turns out to be caused by a decrease in MR ratios at high temperatures (>250 deg. C), which is a serious problem for device applications using the SV structure as a high density read head device

  1. Localization and chemical forms of cadmium in plant samples by combining analytical electron microscopy and X-ray spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre [Section d' Application des Traceurs, LITEN, CEA-Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France) and Environmental Geochemistry Group, LGIT, UMR 5559, Universite J. Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: mpisaure@ujf-grenoble.fr; Fayard, Barbara [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502 Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, ID-21, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Sarret, Geraldine [Environmental Geochemistry Group, LGIT, UMR 5559, Universite J. Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Pairis, Sebastien [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, UPR 5031, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Bourguignon, Jacques [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Vegetale, UMR 5168 CEA/CNRS/INRA/UJF, DRDC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2006-12-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a metal of high toxicity for plants. Resolving its distribution and speciation in plants is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance, trafficking and accumulation. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was exposed to cadmium under controlled conditions. Elemental distributions in the roots and in the leaves were determined using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX), and synchrotron-based micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), which offers a better sensitivity. The chemical form(s) of cadmium was investigated using Cd L{sub III}-edge (3538 eV) micro X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) spectroscopy. Plant {mu}-XANES spectra were fitted by linear combination of Cd reference spectra. Biological sample preparation and conditioning is a critical point because of possible artifacts. In this work we compared freeze-dried samples analyzed at ambient temperature and frozen hydrated samples analyzed at -170 deg. C. Our results suggest that in the roots Cd is localized in vascular bundles, and coordinated to S ligands. In the leaves, trichomes (epidermal hairs) represent the main compartment of Cd accumulation. In these specialized cells, {mu}-XANES results show that the majority of Cd is bound to O/N ligands likely provided by the cell wall, and a minor fraction could be bound to S-containing ligands. No significant difference in Cd speciation was observed between freeze-dried and frozen hydrated samples. This work illustrates the interest and the sensitivity of Cd L{sub III}-edge XANES spectroscopy, which is applied here for the first time to plant samples. Combining {mu}-XRF and Cd L{sub III}-edge {mu}-XANES spectroscopy offers promising tools to study Cd storage and trafficking mechanisms in plants and other biological samples.

  2. Chemical stability of seven years aged cement-PET composite waste form containing radioactive borate waste simulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.M., E-mail: hosamsaleh70@yahoo.com [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt); Tawfik, M.E. [Department of Polymers and Pigments, National Research Center, Dokki (Egypt); Bayoumi, T.A. [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt)

    2011-04-15

    Different samples of radioactive borate waste simulate [originating from pressurized water reactors (PWR)] have been prepared and solidified after mixing with cement-water extended polyester composite (CPC). The polymer-cement composite samples were prepared from recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste and cement paste (water/cement ratio of 40%). The prepared samples were left to set at room temperature (25 deg. C {+-} 5) under humid conditions. After 28 days curing time the obtained specimens were kept in their molds to age for 7 years under ambient conditions. Cement-polymer composite waste form specimens (CPCW) have been subjected to leach tests for both {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co radionuclides according to the method proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Leaching tests were justified under various factors that may exist within the disposal site (e.g. type of leachant, surrounding temperature, leachant behavior, the leachant volume to CPCW surface area...). The obtained data after 260 days of leaching revealed that after 7 years of aging the candidate cement-polymer composite (CPC) containing radioactive borate waste samples are characterized by adequate chemical stability required for the long-term disposal process.

  3. The variation of organ doses with the particle size and chemical form of an inhaled radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, B.W.; Adams, N.; Reissland, J.A.

    1979-04-01

    In this report, radiation doses to organs are calculated as a function of the particle size of the inhaled radioactive material. Aerosols with an Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) from 0.1 μm to 20 μm are considered and doses accumulated by various organs in periods ranging from 1 day to 70 years are given for 65 radionuclides. A computer program is used which calculates the transformations taking place in each organ per curie of inhaled nuclide from the basic radioactivity and metabolic data. The program also calculates the resulting doses both for the organ in which the transformations occur and from penetrating radiation emitted as a result of transformations in other organs. The effects of particle size and chemical form of the nuclides on the doses received by organs are discussed. Tables of doses accumulated by 10 specific organs and other organs together with effective whole body doses are given for particle sizes 0.1 μm, 1 μm and 10 μm (AMAD). (author)

  4. [Effects of Different Modifier Concentrations on Lead-Zinc Tolerance, Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms for Four Kinds of Woody Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-hua; Zhang, Fu-yun; Wu, Xiao-fu; Liang, Xi; Yuan, Si-wen

    2015-10-01

    Four kinds of lead-zinc tolerant woody plants: Nerium oleander, Koelreuteria paniculata, Paulownia and Boehmeria were used as materials to estimate their enrichment and transferable capacity of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and analyze the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Zn and Ph in different parts of plants, under different modifier concentrations (CK group: 100% lead-zinc slag plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved one: 85% of lead-zinc slag ± 10% peat ± 5% bacterial manure plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved two: 75% lead-zinc slag ± 20% peat ± 5% bacterial manure ± a small amount of phosphate). Results showed that: (1) The content of Pb, Zn in matrix after planting four kinds of plants was lower than before, no significant difference between improved one and improved two of Nerium oleander and Boehmeria was found, but improved two was better than improved one of Paulownia, while improved one was better than improved two of Koelreuteria paniculata; Four plants had relatively low aboveground enrichment coefficient of Pb and Zn, but had a high transfer coefficient, showed that the appropriate modifier concentration was able to improve the Pb and Zn enrichment and transfer ability of plants. (2) In subcellular distribution, most of Pb and Zn were distributed in plant cell wall components and soluble components while the distribution in cell organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and nucleus component were less. Compared with CK group, two improved group made soluble components of the cell walls of Pb fixation and retention of zinc role in the enhancement. (3) As for the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in plants, the main chemical forms of Pb were hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and ethanol extractable forms, while other chemical form contents were few, the main chemical forms of Zn were different based on plant type. Compared with CK group, the proportion of the active Pb chemical form in different plant

  5. Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTHs) are inactivated by binding to glass and cellulosic surfaces, and released in active form by a heat-stable polymer from cauliflower florets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Sandra C; Nguyen-Phan, Tu C; Fry, Stephen C

    2017-11-01

    Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity, which cuts and re-joins hemicellulose chains in the plant cell wall, contributing to wall assembly and growth regulation, is the major activity of XTH proteins. During purification, XTHs often lose XET activity which, however, is restored by treatment with certain cold-water-extractable, heat-stable polymers (CHPs), e.g. from cauliflower florets. It was not known whether the XTH-activating factor (XAF) present in CHPs works by promoting (e.g. allosterically) XET activity or by re-solubilising sequestered XTH proteins. We now show that XTHs in dilute solution bind to diverse surfaces (e.g. glass and cellulose), and that CHPs can re-solubilise the bound enzyme, re-activating it. Cell walls prepared from cauliflower florets, mung bean shoots and Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures each contained endogenous, tightly bound, inactive XTHs, which were likewise rapidly solubilised (within 0.5h) and thus activated by cauliflower XAF. We present a convenient quantitative assay for XAF acting on the native sequestered XTHs of Arabidopsis cell walls; using this assay, we show that CHPs from all plants tested possess XAF activity. The XAF activity of diverse CHPs does not correlate with their conductivity, showing that this activity is not a simple ionic effect. The XAF action of cauliflower CHPs was augmented by NaCl, although NaCl alone was much less effective than a CHP solution of similar conductivity, confirming that the cauliflower polymers did not simply exert a salt effect. We suggest that XAF is an endogenous regulator of XET action, modulating cell-wall loosening and/or assembly in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. Inferring the chemical form of 137Cs deposited by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident by measuring (137)Cs incorporated into needle leaves and male cones of Japanese cedar trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasashi, Tsutomu; Takenaka, Chisato; Sugiura, Yuki

    2016-05-15

    We hypothesized that the water-soluble (ionic) and water-insoluble (stable) radiocesium from the initial fallout of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident was distributed in various proportions in the surrounding areas and that this distribution was reflected in the trees that suffered deposition from the initial fallout. This study attempted to evaluate local variations in the chemical form of (137)Cs derived from the initial fallout of the FDNPP accident and whether its chemical form affected the radiocesium concentration in the tissues currently growing in trees, even after the initial fallout ceased. For these estimations, the ratio between the (137)Cs concentration in Cryptomeria japonica needle leaves in the tree crown, which existed before the FDNPP accident and subsequently directly exposed to the initial fallout ((137)Cs pre-accident N), and the amount of (137)Cs in the initial fallout itself ((137)Cs fallout) was determined ((137)Cs pre-accident N/(137)Cs fallout) at 66 sites. In addition, the (137)Cs ratios between the male cones produced in 2012 ((137)Cs male cone) and needle leaves that had elongated in the spring of 2011 ((137)Cs 2011N) was determined at 82 sites ((137)Cs male cone/(137) Cs 2011N). Most of the sites with lower (137)Cs pre-accident N /(137)Cs fallout ratios were distributed in eastern Fukushima, relatively close to the Pacific Ocean coastline. Lower (137)Cs pre-accident N/(137)Cs fallout and higher (137)Cs malecone/(137)Cs 2011N were found to be associated with higher proportions of (137)Cs in ionic forms. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis, and likely reflect regional variations in the chemical form of the deposited radiocesium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stable isotope composition of mercury forms in flue gases from a typical coal-fired power plant, Inner Mongolia, northern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Shunlin; Feng, Chaohui; Feng, Xinbin; Zhu, Jianming; Sun, Ruoyu; Fan, Huipeng; Wang, Lina; Li, Ruiyang; Mao, Tonghua; Zhou, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The first speciated Hg isotope ratios in coal combustion flue gases are presented. • Significant Hg isotope kinetic MDF was observed during Hg forms transformation. • Emitted gaseous Hg highly enriches in heavy Hg isotopes relative to feed coal. - Abstract: Mercury forms emitted from coal combustion via air pollution control devices are speculated to carry different Hg isotope signatures. Yet, their Hg isotope composition is still not reported. Here, we present the first onsite Hg isotope data for gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) and gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) of flue gases from a typical lignite-fired power plant (CFPP). Significant mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and insignificant mass independent fractionation (MIF) are observed between feed coal and coal combustion products. As compared to feed coal (δ 202 Hg = −2.04 ± 0.25‰), bottom ash, GEM and GOM in flue gases before and after wet flue gas desulfurization system significantly enrich heavy Hg isotopes by 0.7–2.6‰ in δ 202 Hg, while fly ash, desulfurization gypsum and waste water show slight but insignificant enrichment of light Hg isotopes. GEM is significantly enriched heavy Hg isotopes compared to GOM and Hg in fly ash. Our observations verify the previous speculation on Hg isotope fractionation mechanism in CFPPs, and suggest a kinetically-controlled mass dependent Hg isotope fractionation during transformation of Hg forms in flue gases. Finally, our data are compared to Hg isotope compositions of atmospheric Hg pools, suggesting that coal combustion Hg emission is likely an important atmospheric Hg contributor.

  8. Stable isotope composition of mercury forms in flue gases from a typical coal-fired power plant, Inner Mongolia, northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shunlin, E-mail: tangshunlin@hpu.edu.cn [Institute of Resources and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan Province, 454000 (China); Feng, Chaohui [Institute of Resources and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan Province, 454000 (China); Feng, Xinbin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Zhu, Jianming [Institute of Resources and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan Province, 454000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, 100086 (China); Sun, Ruoyu, E-mail: ruoyu.sun@tju.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Crust-Mantle Materials and Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Fan, Huipeng; Wang, Lina; Li, Ruiyang; Mao, Tonghua [Institute of Resources and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan Province, 454000 (China); Zhou, Ting [State Key Laboratory of Ore Deposit Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, 550002 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The first speciated Hg isotope ratios in coal combustion flue gases are presented. • Significant Hg isotope kinetic MDF was observed during Hg forms transformation. • Emitted gaseous Hg highly enriches in heavy Hg isotopes relative to feed coal. - Abstract: Mercury forms emitted from coal combustion via air pollution control devices are speculated to carry different Hg isotope signatures. Yet, their Hg isotope composition is still not reported. Here, we present the first onsite Hg isotope data for gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) and gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) of flue gases from a typical lignite-fired power plant (CFPP). Significant mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and insignificant mass independent fractionation (MIF) are observed between feed coal and coal combustion products. As compared to feed coal (δ{sup 202}Hg = −2.04 ± 0.25‰), bottom ash, GEM and GOM in flue gases before and after wet flue gas desulfurization system significantly enrich heavy Hg isotopes by 0.7–2.6‰ in δ{sup 202}Hg, while fly ash, desulfurization gypsum and waste water show slight but insignificant enrichment of light Hg isotopes. GEM is significantly enriched heavy Hg isotopes compared to GOM and Hg in fly ash. Our observations verify the previous speculation on Hg isotope fractionation mechanism in CFPPs, and suggest a kinetically-controlled mass dependent Hg isotope fractionation during transformation of Hg forms in flue gases. Finally, our data are compared to Hg isotope compositions of atmospheric Hg pools, suggesting that coal combustion Hg emission is likely an important atmospheric Hg contributor.

  9. Spectroscopic and first-principles calculation studies of the chemical forms of palladium ion in nitric acid solution for development of disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinta; Sato, Toshikazu; Yoshida, Tomoko; Nakaya, Masato; Yoshino, Masahito; Nagasaki, Takanori; Inaba, Yusuke; Takeshita, Kenji; Onoe, Jun

    2018-04-01

    We have investigated the chemical forms of palladium (Pd) ion in nitric acid solution, using XAFS/UV-vis spectroscopic and first-principles methods in order to develop the disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear liquid wastes (HLLW: radioactive metal ions in 2 M nitric acid solution). The results of theoretical calculations and XAFS/UV-vis spectroscopy indicate that Pd is a divalent ion and forms a square-planar complex structure coordinated with four nitrate ions, [Pd(NO3)4]2-, in nitric acid solution. This complex structure is also thermodynamically predicted to be most stable among complexes [Pd(H2O)x(NO3)4-x]x-2 (x = 0-4). Since the overall feature of UV-vis spectra of the Pd complex was independent of nitric acid concentration in the range 1-6 M, the structure of the Pd complex remains unchanged in this range. Furthermore, we examined the influence of γ-ray radiation on the [Pd(NO3)4]2- complex, using UV-vis spectroscopy, and found that UV-vis spectra seemed not to be changed even after 1.0 MGy irradiation. This implies that the Pd complex structure will be still stable in actual HLLW. These findings obtained above are useful information to develop the vitrification processes for disposal of HLLW.

  10. Unpredictably Stable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Failla, Virgilio; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    2014-01-01

    Is entrepreneurship a more stable career choice for high employment turnover individuals? We find that a transition to entrepreneurship induces a shift towards stayer behavior and identify job matching, job satisfaction and lock-in effects as main drivers. These findings have major implications...

  11. Field Trial on Pea ( Pisum Sativum L.) Grown on Sand Soil and Subjected to Water Regimes and Nitrogen Forms with Aid of 15 N Stable Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, A.E.; Abdel Aziz, H.A.; Al-Gindy, A.M.; Arafa, Y.E.

    2016-01-01

    A field experiment on sand soil was conducted to trace the effects of different water regimes on pea growth and nutritional values as fertilized with urea and ammonium sulfate fertilizers. 15 N/ 14 N isotope dilution technique was followed to distinguish between the different N proportions derived to pea plants and in the same time estimating the efficientuse of both two nitrogen forms (%NUE). Irrigation water regimes and fertilization treatments were applied under drip irrigation system. Two water regimes epresented 100% (W1) and 75% (W2) of water requirement in combination with three N fertilizer rates, i.e. N 0 , N 100 and N 75 were applied. Two nitrogen fertilizer forms represent urea and ammonium sulfate were performed. The overall means of seed yield as affected by nitrogen fertilization treatments reflected relative increase accounted for 45.8, and 38.7%; 41.7 and 36.2% over the unfertilized control for NU 100 , and NU 75 ; NAS 100 and NAS 75 , respectively. It seems that 100% water regime (W1) made nitrogen fertilizer, especially with high rate, more available for plant uptake comparing to the low water quantity regime. Pea crop had accumulated more nitrogen from urea comparing to ammonium sulfate fertilizer. Nitrogen uptake, in general, significantly correlated to application N rates. Water regime (W1) in combination with ammonium sulfate fertilizer resulted in the better percentage or absolute values of N derived from fertilizer by pea seeds. It was clear that efficient use of ammonium sulfate, to some extent, was affected by different wa - ter regimes. This holds true either at 100% (N1) or 75% (W2) application rates. On the other hand, urea added at rate of 75% was more efficiently used by seeds than those added at rate of 100% of the recommended N rate

  12. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Bsat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM, can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M and immersion times (6, 24 h of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200–300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  13. Behavior of Paramecium sp. in solutions containing Sr and Pb: Do Paramecium sp. alter chemical forms of those metals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Koka, Masahi; Satoh, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of Paramecium sp. (Paramecium bursaria) in aqueous solutions containing Sr and Pb was investigated to determine the role of protozoa in the migration of radionuclides in the environment. Precultured living cells of P. bursaria were exposed to aqueous solutions containing 0.01 or 0.05 mM Sr or Pb at pH 7 for 24 h. For comparison, pre-killed cells were treated with the metal solutions in the same way. Two-dimensional elemental mappings of cells were obtained by micro-PIXE. Aquatic species of Sr and Pb were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The amounts of Sr adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h and adsorbed on pre-killed cells were below the detection limit. Cells of P. bursaria adsorbed or took up a fraction of Pb. The Pb adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h in the Pb solution was barely detectable, while the Pb adsorbed on pre-killed cells was clearly mappable. These findings suggest that living cells of P. bursaria have functions that reduce adsorption or uptake of Pb on the cells. Quantitative and SEC-UV-ICP-MS analyses of the Sr and Pb in aqueous phases showed no clear evidences that living cells of P. bursaria alter the chemical form of Sr or Pb remaining in the aqueous phases after the cell-solution contact.

  14. Behavior of Paramecium sp. in solutions containing Sr and Pb: Do Paramecium sp. alter chemical forms of those metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Koka, Masahi; Satoh, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of Paramecium sp. (Paramecium bursaria) in aqueous solutions containing Sr and Pb was investigated to determine the role of protozoa in the migration of radionuclides in the environment. Precultured living cells of P. bursaria were exposed to aqueous solutions containing 0.01 or 0.05 mM Sr or Pb at pH 7 for 24 h. For comparison, pre-killed cells were treated with the metal solutions in the same way. Two-dimensional elemental mappings of cells were obtained by micro-PIXE. Aquatic species of Sr and Pb were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The amounts of Sr adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h and adsorbed on pre-killed cells were below the detection limit. Cells of P. bursaria adsorbed or took up a fraction of Pb. The Pb adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h in the Pb solution was barely detectable, while the Pb adsorbed on pre-killed cells was clearly mappable. These findings suggest that living cells of P. bursaria have functions that reduce adsorption or uptake of Pb on the cells. Quantitative and SEC-UV-ICP-MS analyses of the Sr and Pb in aqueous phases showed no clear evidences that living cells of P. bursaria alter the chemical form of Sr or Pb remaining in the aqueous phases after the cell-solution contact.

  15. Behavior of Paramecium sp. in solutions containing Sr and Pb: Do Paramecium sp. alter chemical forms of those metals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozai, Naofumi, E-mail: kozai.naofumi@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Sciences Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ohnuki, Toshihiko [Advanced Sciences Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Koka, Masahi; Satoh, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of Paramecium sp. (Paramecium bursaria) in aqueous solutions containing Sr and Pb was investigated to determine the role of protozoa in the migration of radionuclides in the environment. Precultured living cells of P. bursaria were exposed to aqueous solutions containing 0.01 or 0.05 mM Sr or Pb at pH 7 for 24 h. For comparison, pre-killed cells were treated with the metal solutions in the same way. Two-dimensional elemental mappings of cells were obtained by micro-PIXE. Aquatic species of Sr and Pb were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The amounts of Sr adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h and adsorbed on pre-killed cells were below the detection limit. Cells of P. bursaria adsorbed or took up a fraction of Pb. The Pb adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h in the Pb solution was barely detectable, while the Pb adsorbed on pre-killed cells was clearly mappable. These findings suggest that living cells of P. bursaria have functions that reduce adsorption or uptake of Pb on the cells. Quantitative and SEC-UV-ICP-MS analyses of the Sr and Pb in aqueous phases showed no clear evidences that living cells of P. bursaria alter the chemical form of Sr or Pb remaining in the aqueous phases after the cell-solution contact.

  16. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bsat, Suzan; Yavari, Saber Amin; Munsch, Maximilian; Valstar, Edward R; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2015-04-08

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH) treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M) and immersion times (6, 24 h) of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200-300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  17. The La Unión Au ± Cu prospect, Camagüey District, Cuba: fluid inclusion and stable isotope evidence for ore-forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Miriela María Ulloa; Moura, Márcia Abrahão; Olivo, Gema R.; Botelho, Nilson Francisquini; Kyser, T. Kurtis; Bühn, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The Camagüey district, Cuba, is known for its epithermal precious metal deposits in a Cretaceous volcanic arc setting. Recently, the La Unión prospect was discovered in the southern part of the district, containing gold and minor copper mineralization interpreted as porphyry type. Mineralization is hosted in a 73.0 ± 1.5 Ma calc-alkaline I-type oxidized porphyry quartz diorite intrusive within volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the early Cretaceous Guáimaro Formation. The porphyry is affected by propylitic alteration and crosscut by a network of quartz and carbonate veinlets and veins. Chlorite, epidote, sericite, quartz, and pyrite are the main minerals in the early veins which are cut by late carbonate and zeolite veins. Late barite pseudomorphously replaces pyrite. Gold is associated with pyrite as disseminations in the altered quartz diorite and in the veins, occurring as inclusions or filling fractures in pyrite with 4 g/t Au in bulk samples, and up to 900 ppm Au in in pyrite. Fluid inclusion and oxygen isotope data are consistent with a H2O-NaCl-(KCl) mineralizing fluid, derived from the quartz diorite magma, and trapped at least at 425°C and 1.2 kbar. This primary fluid unmixed into two fluid phases, a hypersaline aqueous fluid and a low-salinity vapor-rich fluid. Boiling during cooling may have played an important role in metal precipitation. Pyrite δ34S values for the La Unión prospect range between 0.71‰ and 1.31‰, consistent with a homogeneous magmatic sulfur source. The fluids in equilibrium with the mineralized rocks have estimated δ18O values from 8‰ to 11.8‰, calculated for a temperature range of 480-505°C. The tectonic environment of the La Unión prospect, its high gold and low copper contents, the physical-chemical characteristics of the mineralizing fluids and the isotopic signature of the alteration minerals and fluids indicate that the La Unión gold mineralization is similar to the porphyry gold type, even though the ore

  18. Efficient and Air-Stable Planar Perovskite Solar Cells Formed on Graphene-Oxide-Modified PEDOT:PSS Hole Transport Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Lin, Xuanhuai; Hou, Xian; Pan, Likun; Huang, Sumei; Chen, Xiaohong

    2017-10-01

    As a hole transport layer, PEDOT:PSS usually limits the stability and efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) due to its hygroscopic nature and inability to block electrons. Here, a graphene-oxide (GO)-modified PEDOT:PSS hole transport layer was fabricated by spin-coating a GO solution onto the PEDOT:PSS surface. PSCs fabricated on a GO-modified PEDOT:PSS layer exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.34%, which is higher than 11.90% of PSCs with the PEDOT:PSS layer. Furthermore, the stability of the PSCs was significantly improved, with the PCE remaining at 83.5% of the initial PCE values after aging for 39 days in air. The hygroscopic PSS material at the PEDOT:PSS surface was partly removed during spin-coating with the GO solution, which improves the moisture resistance and decreases the contact barrier between the hole transport layer and perovskite layer. The scattered distribution of the GO at the PEDOT:PSS surface exhibits superior wettability, which helps to form a high-quality perovskite layer with better crystallinity and fewer pin holes. Furthermore, the hole extraction selectivity of the GO further inhibits the carrier recombination at the interface between the perovskite and PEDOT:PSS layers. Therefore, the cooperative interactions of these factors greatly improve the light absorption of the perovskite layer, the carrier transport and collection abilities of the PSCs, and especially the stability of the cells.

  19. Inferring the chemical form of {sup 137}Cs deposited by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident by measuring {sup 137}Cs incorporated into needle leaves and male cones of Japanese cedar trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanasashi, Tsutomu, E-mail: kanasashi.tsutomu@g.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Takenaka, Chisato [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Sugiura, Yuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 765-1 Funaishikawa, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We hypothesized that the water-soluble (ionic) and water-insoluble (stable) radiocesium from the initial fallout of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident was distributed in various proportions in the surrounding areas and that this distribution was reflected in the trees that suffered deposition from the initial fallout. This study attempted to evaluate local variations in the chemical form of {sup 137}Cs derived from the initial fallout of the FDNPP accident and whether its chemical form affected the radiocesium concentration in the tissues currently growing in trees, even after the initial fallout ceased. For these estimations, the ratio between the {sup 137}Cs concentration in Cryptomeria japonica needle leaves in the tree crown, which existed before the FDNPP accident and subsequently directly exposed to the initial fallout ({sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}), and the amount of {sup 137}Cs in the initial fallout itself ({sup 137}Cs{sub fallout}) was determined ({sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout}) at 66 sites. In addition, the {sup 137}Cs ratios between the male cones produced in 2012 ({sup 137}Cs{sub male} {sub cone}) and needle leaves that had elongated in the spring of 2011 ({sup 137}Cs{sub 2011N}) was determined at 82 sites ({sup 137}Cs{sub male} {sub cone}/{sup 137} Cs{sub 2011N}). Most of the sites with lower {sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout} ratios were distributed in eastern Fukushima, relatively close to the Pacific Ocean coastline. Lower {sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accidentN}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout} and higher {sup 137}Cs{sub malecone}/{sup 137}Cs{sub 2011N} were found to be associated with higher proportions of {sup 137}Cs in ionic forms. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis, and likely reflect regional variations in the chemical form of the deposited radiocesium. - Highlights: • Study of spatial variation of ionic and stable {sup 137}Cs in the initial

  20. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  1. Antibacterial action of a heat-stable form of L-amino acid oxidase isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mui Li; Tan, Nget Hong; Fung, Shin Yee; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2011-03-01

    The major l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO, EC 1.4.3.2) of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom is known to be an unusual form of snake venom LAAO as it possesses unique structural features and unusual thermal stability. The antibacterial effects of king cobra venom LAAO were tested against several strains of clinical isolates including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli using broth microdilution assay. For comparison, the antibacterial effects of several antibiotics (cefotaxime, kanamycin, tetracycline, vancomycin and penicillin) were also examined using the same conditions. King cobra venom LAAO was very effective in inhibiting the two Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.78μg/mL (0.006μM) and 1.56μg/mL (0.012μM) against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, respectively. The MICs are comparable to the MICs of the antibiotics tested, on a weight basis. However, the LAAO was only moderately effective against three Gram-negative bacteria tested (P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and E. coli), with MIC ranges from 25 to 50μg/mL (0.2-0.4μM). Catalase at the concentration of 1mg/mL abolished the antibacterial effect of LAAO, indicating that the antibacterial effect of the enzyme involves generation of hydrogen peroxide. Binding studies indicated that king cobra venom LAAO binds strongly to the Gram-positive S. aureus and S. epidermidis, but less strongly to the Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa, indicating that specific binding to bacteria is important for the potent antibacterial activity of the enzyme. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. IMPACT OF THE CHEMICAL FORM OF IN-CONTAINMENT SOURCE ON FISSION PRODUCT RELEASE FROM WWER-1000/V-320 TYPE NPP CONTAINMENT DURING LOCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Kecek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power plant accidents may be followed by a release of fission products into the environment. This release is dependent on several phenomena, such as chemistry, pressure, type of the accident etc. The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of the chemical form of iodine on the fission product release into the environment.

  3. Relationship of Non-Structural Forms of Social Interaction with Problems of Social and Psychological Adaptation of Students Prone to Chemical Addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilemkhanova, Elvira N.

    2016-01-01

    The changes in contemporary social and cultural environment determine the necessity to increase the efficiency of adaptive mechanisms, especially for those categories of people who are subject to social risks. One of those categories is students prone to chemical addictions. To study the relationship of forms of social interaction with problems of…

  4. Stable Tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris [Fermilab

    2018-04-13

    For very heavy quarks, relations derived from heavy-quark symmetry imply novel narrow doubly heavy tetraquark states containing two heavy quarks and two light antiquarks. We predict that double-beauty states will be stable against strong decays, whereas the double-charm states and mixed beauty+charm states will dissociate into pairs of heavy-light mesons. Observing a new double-beauty state through its weak decays would establish the existence of tetraquarks and illuminate the role of heavy color-antitriplet diquarks as hadron constituents.

  5. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements.

  6. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  7. NMR characterization of simulated Hanford low-activity waste glasses and its use in understanding waste form chemical durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; McGrail, B.P.

    1999-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structural and chemical environments of B, Al, and Si in model Hanford low-activity waste glasses. The average 29 Si NMR peak position was found to systematically change with changing glass composition and structure. From an understanding of the structural roles of Al and B obtained from MAS-NMR experiments, the authors first developed a model that reliably predicts the distribution of structural units and the average 29 Si chemical shift value, δ, based purely on glass composition. A product consistency test (PCT) was used to determine the normalized elemental release (NL) from the prepared glasses. Comparison of the NMR and PCT data obtained from sodium boro-aluminosilicate glasses indicates that a rudimentary exponential relationship exists between the 29 Si chemical shift value, and the boron NL value

  8. Forming chemical composition of surface waters in the Arctic as "water - rock" interaction. Case study of lake Inari and river Paz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Sandimirov, Sergey; Pozhilenko, Vladimir; Ivanov, Stanislav; Maksimova, Viktoriia

    2017-04-01

    Due to the depletion of fresh water supplies and the deterioration of their quality as a result of anthropogenic impact on the Arctic ecosystems, the research questions of forming surface and ground waters, their interactions with the rocks, development of the foundations for their rational use and protection are of great fundamental and practical importance. The aim of the work is to evaluate the influence of the chemical composition of rocks of the northern part of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) shield on forming surface waters chemical composition (Lake Inari, river Paz) using physical-chemical modeling (Chudnenko, 2010, Selector software package). River Paz (Paatsjoki) is the largest river in North Fennoscandia and flows through the territory of three countries - Finland, Russia and Norway. It originates from Lake Inari, which a large number of streams and rivers flow into, coming from the mountain range of the northern Finland (Maanselkä hill). Within the catchment of inflows feeding the lake Inari and river Paz in its upper flow there are mainly diverse early Precambrian metamorphic and intrusive rocks of the Lapland granulite belt and its framing, and to a lesser extent - various gneisses and migmatites with relicts of amphibolites, granitic gneisses, plagioclase and plagio- and plagiomicrocline granites, and quartz diorites of Inari terrane (Meriläinen, 1976, fig 1; Hörmann et al, 1980, fig 1; Geologicalmap, 2001). Basing on the techniques developed earlier (Mazukhina, 2012), and the data of monitoring of the chemical composition of surface waters and investigation of the chemical composition of the rocks, physical-chemical modeling (FCM) (Selector software package) was carried out. FCM includes 34 independent components (Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-Fe-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-Ni-Pb-V-Ba-Co-Cr-Hg-As-Cd-H-O-e), 996 dependent components, of them 369 in aqueous solution, 76 in the gas phase, 111 liquid hydrocarbons, and 440 solid phases, organic and mineral

  9. Steam Electrolysis by Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with Chemically Stable BaZrO3-Based Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-07-17

    BaZrO3-based material was applied as the electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOECs). Compared with the instability of BaCeO3-based proton-conductors, BaZrO3-based material could be a more promising candidate for proton-conducting SOECs due to its excellent chemical stability under H2O conditions, but few reports on this aspect has been made due to the processing difficulty for BaZrO3. Our recent pioneering work has demonstrated the feasibility of using BaZrO3-based electrolyte for SOECs and the fabricated cell achieves relatively high cell performance, which is comparable or even higher than that for BaCeO3-based SOECs and offers better chemical stability. Cell performance can be further improved by tailoring the electrolyte and electrode. © The Electrochemical Society.

  10. Behavior of radon, chemical compounds and stable elements in underground water; Comportamiento de radon, compuestos quimicos y elementos estables en agua subterranea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, N.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, M.B.E.; Pena, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Armienta, M.A.; Godinez, L. [IGFUNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Seidel, J.L. [ISTEEM, M.S.E. Montpellier (France)

    2001-07-01

    The radon behavior, chemical compounds, major and trace elements in water samples of four springs and three wells of urban and agricultural zones around the Jocotitlan volcano and El Oro region was determined, both of them located in the medium part of the Mexican neo-volcanic axis. The {sup 222} Rn was measured by the liquid scintillation method, the analysis of major components was realized with conventional chemical techniques, while the trace elements were quantified using an Icp-Ms. The average values of the radon concentrations obtained during one year were constant relatively, in an interval from 0.97 to 4.99 Bq/lt indicating a fast transport from the reload area toward the sampling points. the compounds, major and trace elements showed differences which indicate distinct origins of water from the site studies. (Author)

  11. Chemical behaviors of tritium formed in a LiF-BeF2 mixture and its removal from a molten mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, J.; Moriyama, H.; Maeda, S.; Ohmura, T.; Moritani, K.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical behaviors of tritium formed in a LiF-BeF 2 mixture were studied using a radiometric method. Most of tritium was found to be present in the T + and T - states under no thermal treatment. The distribution of tritium in chemical states was explained by considering hot atom reactions and radiation chemical reactions. Tritium behaviors in a molten LiF-BeF 2 mixture were also studied at 873 K. In the presence of hydrogen, the isotopic exchange reaction which is TF + H 2 → HT + HF was observed to occur probably in the salt phase. The removal of tritium in a molten LiF-BeF 2 mixture was tried by sparging a gas in a melt for tritium purge, and the effects of the composition of purge gas and of the construction material of crucibles containing the melt on the removal rate were observed. (author)

  12. Chemical structure, biosynthesis and synthesis of free and glycosylated pyridinolines formed by cross-link of bone and synovium collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasia, Luigi; Rota, Paola; Anastasia, Mario; Allevi, Pietro

    2013-09-21

    This review focuses on the chemical structure, biosynthesis and synthesis of free and glycosylated pyridinolines (Pyds), fluorescent collagen cross-links, with a pyridinium salt structure. Pyds derive from the degradation of bone collagen and have attracted attention for their use as biochemical markers of bone resorption and to assess fracture risk prediction in persons suffering from osteoporosis, bone cancer and other bone or collagen diseases. We consider and critically discuss all reported syntheses of free and glycosylated Pyds evidencing an unrevised chemistry, original and of general utility, analysis of which allows us to also support a previously suggested non-enzymatic formation of Pyds in collagen better rationalizing and justifying the chemical events.

  13. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Jantzenm, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and synthetic zeolites are extremely versatile materials. They can adsorb a variety of liquids and gases, and also take part in cation exchange reactions. Zeolites have the ability to sequester ions in lattice positions or within their networks of channels and voids. The zeolites can host alkali, alkaline earth and a variety of higher valance cations. As such they may be a viable alternative for immobilization of low activity waste (LAW) salts and calcines. The process for synthesizing zeolites is well documented for pure starting materials. A reactive aluminosilicate is reacted with an alkaline hydroxide at low temperature (<300 C) to form a zeolite. Processing time and temperature and specific reactants determine the type of zeolite formed. Zeolites are easy to make, and can be synthesized from a wide variety of natural and man made materials. However, relatively little is known about the process if one of the starting materials is a poorly characterized complex mixture of oxides (waste) containing nearly every element in the periodic table. The purpose of this work is to develop a clearer understanding of the advantages and limitations of producing a zeolite waste form from radioactive waste. Dr. M. W. Grutzeck at the Pennsylvania State University is investigating the production of a zeolite waste form using nonradioactive simulants. Dr. C. M. Jantzen and J. M. Pareizs at the Savannah River Technology Center will use the results from simulant work as a starting point for producing a zeolite waste form from an actual Savannah River Site radioactive waste stream

  14. Physical, chemical, and structural evolution of zeolite-containing waste forms produced from metakaolinite and calcined HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareizs, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and synthetic zeolites are extremely versatile materials. They can adsorb a variety of liquids and gases, and also take part in cation exchange reactions. Zeolites have the ability to sequester ions in lattice positions or within their networks of channels and voids. The zeolites can host alkali, alkaline earth and a variety of higher valence cations. As such they may be a viable alternative for immobilization of low activity waste (LAW) salts and calcines. The process for synthesizing zeolites is well documented for pure starting materials. A reactive aluminosilicate is reacted with an alkaline hydroxide at low temperature to form a zeolite. Processing time and temperature and specific reactants determine the type of zeolite formed. Zeolites are easy to make, and can be synthesized from a wide variety of natural and man made materials. However, relatively little is known about the process if one of the starting materials is a poorly characterized complex mixture of oxides (waste) containing nearly every element in the periodic table. The purpose of this work is to develop a clearer understanding of the advantages and limitations of producing a zeolite waste form from radioactive waste. Dr. M. W. Grutzeck at the Pennsylvania State University is investigating the production of a zeolite waste form using non-radioactive simulants. Dr. C. M. Jantzen and J. M. Pareizs at the Savannah River Technology Center will use the results from simulant work as a starting point for producing a zeolite waste form from an actual Savannah River Site radioactive waste stream

  15. How Do Polyethylene Glycol and Poly(sulfobetaine) Hydrogel Layers on Ultrafiltration Membranes Minimize Fouling and Stay Stable in Cleaning Chemicals?

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu; Ulbricht, Mathias; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2017-01-01

    is improved by the modification, as indicated by the change of contact angle value from 89° to 68° for both methods, due to the hydration layer formed in the hydrogel layers. Their pure water flux declines because of the additional permeation barrier from

  16. Ruthenium recovery from acetic acid industrial effluent using chemically stable and high-performance polyethylenimine-coated polysulfone-Escherichia coli biomass composite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sok; Choi, Yoon-E; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The PEI-PSBF was fabricated and used for Ru recovery from industrial effluent. • PEI-PSBF was not swollen nor dissolved in the effluent. • PEI-PSBF showed superior sorption capacity to commercial resins. • Thin fiber type PEI-PSBF could be successfully applied in flow-through column. - Abstract: Recovery of precious metal ions from waste effluents is of high concern. In general, ruthenium (Ru) is used in the Cativa process as promoter for carbonylation catalyst and discharged into acetic acid effluent. In the present work, we have designed and developed polyethylenimine-coated polysulfone-bacterial biomass composite fiber (PEI-PSBF) to recover Ru from industrial effluent. The sorbent was manufactured by electrostatic attachment of polyethylenimine (PEI) to the surface of polysulfone-biomass composite fiber (PSBF), which was prepared through spinning of the mixture of polysulfone and Escherichia coli biomass in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) into water. Developed PEI-PSBF was highly stable in the acetic acid effluent. The maximum sorption capacity of the developed sorbent PEI-PSBF, coated with PEI (with M.W. of 75,000), was 121.28 ± 13.15 mg/g, which was much higher than those of ion exchange resins, TP214, Amberjet 4200, and M500. The PEI-PSBF could be successfully applied in the flow-through column system, showing 120 beds of breakthrough volume.

  17. Ruthenium recovery from acetic acid industrial effluent using chemically stable and high-performance polyethylenimine-coated polysulfone-Escherichia coli biomass composite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sok [Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonbuk 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-E, E-mail: yechoi@korea.ac.kr [Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeoung-Sang, E-mail: ysyun@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonbuk 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioprocess Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonbuk 54896 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • The PEI-PSBF was fabricated and used for Ru recovery from industrial effluent. • PEI-PSBF was not swollen nor dissolved in the effluent. • PEI-PSBF showed superior sorption capacity to commercial resins. • Thin fiber type PEI-PSBF could be successfully applied in flow-through column. - Abstract: Recovery of precious metal ions from waste effluents is of high concern. In general, ruthenium (Ru) is used in the Cativa process as promoter for carbonylation catalyst and discharged into acetic acid effluent. In the present work, we have designed and developed polyethylenimine-coated polysulfone-bacterial biomass composite fiber (PEI-PSBF) to recover Ru from industrial effluent. The sorbent was manufactured by electrostatic attachment of polyethylenimine (PEI) to the surface of polysulfone-biomass composite fiber (PSBF), which was prepared through spinning of the mixture of polysulfone and Escherichia coli biomass in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) into water. Developed PEI-PSBF was highly stable in the acetic acid effluent. The maximum sorption capacity of the developed sorbent PEI-PSBF, coated with PEI (with M.W. of 75,000), was 121.28 ± 13.15 mg/g, which was much higher than those of ion exchange resins, TP214, Amberjet 4200, and M500. The PEI-PSBF could be successfully applied in the flow-through column system, showing 120 beds of breakthrough volume.

  18. Trophic ecology in a Northern Brittany (Batz Island, France) kelp ( Laminaria digitata) forest, as investigated through stable isotopes and chemical assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Gauthier; Riera, Pascal; Leroux, Cédric

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at characterizing the relationships between the food web's structure and the nutritive value of basal food sources in a Northern Brittany (France) Laminaria digitata bed. Stable isotopes were used to identify the food sources consumed by benthic invertebrates, and the nutritive value of primary producers was assessed according to four descriptors (total organic matter, C/N ratio, proteins content, lipids content). Although the food web appeared to be based on a wide diversity of food sources, only Rhodophyta (red algae) and biofilms (epilithic and epiphytic) were heavily consumed by grazers. In contrast, Phaeophyta (brown algae), which are dominant in this habitat, have no specialized grazer (with the exception of Helcion pellucidum, specialized grazer of Laminaria digitata). This selective consumption may be related to the higher protein content and lower C/N ratio of Rhodophyta and biofilms, in comparison with Phaeophyta. Fresh brown algae are thus of poor nutritive value, but processes associated with their degradation are likely to improve this nutritive value, leading in the assimilation of detritus by filter-feeders, revealed by high δ13C in these consumers. Our results thus suggest that the nutritive value of basal food sources may be an important factor involved in the structuration of kelp-associated food webs.

  19. The influence of the physico-chemical form of the aerosol on the radiological consequences of notional accidental releases of radioactivity from a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.; Jones, J.A.; Simmonds, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The radiological consequences of a wide range of notional accidental releases from a 1300 MW(e) LMFBR (Liquid Metal-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor) were assessed in a study published by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) in 1977. In that study representative values were in general adopted for each of the important parameters while recognising that in reality they could vary considerably. The present study is concerned with the sensitivity of the predicted consequences to the physico-chemical form of the released aerosol. Of particular interest is the importance of a mixed sodium-transuranium element aerosol which may be formed in accidental releases of activity from sodium cooled FBRs. Two significant findings emerge from the study. First the predicted consequences in general are relatively insensitive to the range of physico-chemical forms analysed. For generic assessments therefore it is sufficient to assume the properties of the aerosol adopted in the initial study (1 μm AMAD and each element in the oxide form); the exception concerns the estimation of the incidence of early morbidity, and to a lesser extent early mortality, but only for a limited range of release composition. The second finding is that the radiological consequences are not, contrary to what might have been expected, significantly increased for the release of a mixed sodium-element aerosol

  20. Soluble and stable zethrenebis(dicarboximide) and its quinone

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Zhe

    2010-10-15

    Soluble and stable zethrenebis(dicarboximide) (1) was synthesized by an in situ Stille cross coupling/transannular cyclization reaction. 1 showed largely improved photostability and solubility compared with the very unstable zethrene and it also exhibited far-red absorption and emission with high photoluminescence quantum yield. Bromination of 1 with NBS/DMF gave its quinone form 2 via an unusual pathway. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Chemical forms of the fluorine and carbon in fly ashes recovered from electrostatic precipitators of pulverized coal-fired plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naoto Tsubouchi; Hidekazu Hayashi; Akiyuki Kawashima; Masahide Sato; Noboru Suzuki; Yasuo Ohtsuka [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials

    2011-01-15

    The functionalities of the fluorine and carbon present in fly ashes formed in pulverized coal combustion have been studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. The ash samples include 20-130 {mu}g/g-dry and 0.4-4.1 mass%-dry of fluorine and carbon elements, respectively, and these components are enriched at the outermost layer of the ash surface. The F consists of both inorganic and organic functionalities, and the proportion of the latter is as high as 84-98 mol%. The C has different types of surface oxygen species, such as carboxyl, lactone/acid anhydride and phenolic groups, and most of these groups decompose to CO{sub 2} or CO up to 700{sup o}C to yield carbon active sites. When the amount of the O-functional forms increases, the content of organic C-F forms tends to increase almost linearly. On the basis of the above results, it may be speculated as one possibility that the formation of covalent C-F bonds takes place mainly through secondary reactions between gaseous F-containing compounds (HF and/or F{sub 2}) in flue gas and carbon active sites produced below 700{sup o}C downstream of coal-fired boilers. 30 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Chemical form analysis of reaction products in Cs-adsorption on stainless steel by means of HAXPES and SEM/EDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobata, M.; Okane, T.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, E.; Ohwada, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamagami, H.; Osaka, M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, for the understandings of Cesium (Cs) adsorption behavior on structure materials in severe accidents in a light water nuclear reactor, the chemical state of Cs and its distribution on the surface of SUS304 stainless steel (SS) with different Si concentrations was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). As a result, it was found that Cs is selectively adsorbed at the site where Si distributes with a high concentration. CsFeSiO4 is the dominant Cs products in case of low Si content, while Cs2Si2O5 and Cs2Si4O9 are formed in addition to CsFeSiO4 in case of high Si content. The chemical forms of the Cs compounds produced in the adsorption process on the SS surface have a close correlation with the concentration and chemical states of Si originally included in SS.

  3. Chemical and structural analyses of subsurface crevices formed during spontaneous deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Daimon K, E-mail: dkheller@mmm.com; Fahrenholtz, William G., E-mail: billf@mst.edu; O' Keefe, Matthew J., E-mail: mjokeefe@mst.edu

    2011-11-15

    Subsurface crevices formed during the deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings were analyzed in cross-section to assess the effect of deposition and post-treatment on the structure and chemistry of phases present. An Al-O containing phase, believed to be amorphous Al(OH){sub 3}, was formed in crevices during coating deposition. Analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of up to 1.6 at.% chlorine within the Al-O phase, which was likely a product of soluble chlorides that were present in the coating solution. Cerium was not detected within crevices. After post-treatment in an 85 deg. C aqueous phosphate solution, the chloride concentration was reduced to {<=} 0.30 at.% and electron diffraction of the Al-O phase produced ring patterns, indicating it had crystallized. Some diffraction patterns could be indexed to gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), but others are believed to be a combination of hydrated aluminum hydroxides and/or oxides. Aluminum phosphate was not identified. Separately from its effect on cerium-based conversion coatings, phosphate post-treatment improved the corrosion resistance of Al 2024-T3 substrates by acting to crystallize Al(OH){sub 3} present on interior surfaces of crevices and by reducing the chloride concentration in this phase. - Highlights: {yields} Analysis of subsurface crevices formed during deposition of Ce-based conversion coatings. {yields} Phosphate post-treatment improved corrosion protection in salt spray testing. {yields} Post-treatment affected the composition and structure of regions within crevices. {yields} Crystallized Al(OH){sub 3} within crevices acted as a more effective barrier to chloride ions.

  4. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Spectrometry to Identify the Arsenic Chemical Forms in Mine Waste Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanitobua, Vitukawalu P.; Noller, Barry N.; Chiswell, Barry; Ng, Jack C.; Bruce, Scott L.; Huang, Daphne; Riley, Mark; Harris, Hugh H.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) gives arsenic form directly in the solid phase and has lower detection limits than extraction techniques. An important and common application of XANES is to use the shift of the edge position to determine the valence state. XANES speciation analysis is based on fitting linear combinations of known spectra from model compounds to determine the ratios of valence states and/or phases present. As(V)/As(III) ratios were determined for various Australian mine waste samples and dispersed mine waste samples from river/creek sediments in Vatukoula, Fiji

  5. Physico-chemical forms of natural radionuclides in drilled well waters and their removal by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaaramaa, K.

    2003-01-01

    Appreciable concentrations of natural uranium and its daughter radionuclides may occur in drinking water obtained from drilled wells when the bedrock contains these nuclides. Effective methods are needed to remove these radionuclides. A wide range of ion exchange materials, both organic and inorganic, were evaluated for the removal of 234,238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Po and 210 Pb from ground waters. Screenin tests were carried out, in which distribution coefficients (KD) were determined for the ion exchangers. The ion exchangers that gave the highest KD's were tested in column-mode experiments for the removal of the radionuclides from drilled well water. The most efficient exchanger for the removal of U from neutral and slightly alkaline waters was the strong base anion resin. The chelating aminophosphonate resin removed uranium very efficiently from slightly acidic water. As well, it was an efficient exchanger for the removal of toxic and harmful transition metals from drilled well waters. The strong and weak acid cation resins and zeolite A removed radium most efficiently. Large fractions of the total activity of polonium and lead were found to adsorb on equipment in the ion exchange studies. In investigation of this, the well waters were filtered through membranes to determine the soluble and particle-bound forms of 234,238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Po and 210 Pb. Eight of the waters were of Ca type and two were of Na-Cl type. Some of the waters also had high concentrations of Fe, Mn and humic substances. Uranium was present entirely in soluble form, probably as uranyl ion in soluble carbonate complexes. 226 Ra was in soluble form in the waters with low concentrations of Fe and Mn, but 10% of the total radium activity was bound to particles in Fe-Mn-rich waters. The speciation of Po is complex in natural waters; polonium was present in both soluble and particle-bound forms. A correlation was observed between the fractions of particle-bound 210 Po and the concentrations of iron in

  6. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael; Jantzen, Carol M.

    1999-01-01

    Natural and synthetic zeolites are extremely versatile materials. They can adsorb a variety of liquids and gases, and also take part in cation exchange reactions. Zeolites are easy to synthesize from a wide variety of natural and man made materials. One combination of starting materials that exhibits a great deal of promise is a mixture of metakaolinite and/or Class F fly ash and concentrated sodium hydroxide solution. Once these ingredients are mixed and cured at elevated temperatures, they react to form a hard, dense, ceramic-like material that contains significant amounts of crystalline tectosilicates (zeolites and feldspathoids). Zeolites have the ability to sequester ions in lattice positions or within their networks of channels and voids. As such they are nearly perfect waste forms, the zeolites can host alkali, alkaline earth and a variety of higher valance cations. In addition to zeolites, it has been found that the zeolites are accompanied by an alkali aluminosilicate hydrate matrix that is a host, not only to the zeolites, but to residual amounts of insoluble hydroxide phases as well. A previous publication has established the fact that a mixture of a calcined equivalent ICPP waste (sodium aluminate/hydroxide solution containing ∼3:1 Na:Al) and fly ash and/or metakaolinite could be cured at various temperatures to produce a monolith containing Zeolite A (80 C) or Na-P1 plus hydroxy sodalite (130 C) crystals dispersed in an alkali aluminosilicate hydrate matrix. Dissolution tests have shown these materials (so-called hydroceramics) to have superior retention for alkali, alkaline earth and heavy metal ions. The zeolitization process is a simple one. Metakaolinite and/or Class F fly ash is mixed with a caustic sodium-bearing calcine and enough water to make a thick paste. The paste is transferred to a metal canister and ''soaked'' for a few hours at 70-80 C prior to steam autoclaving the sample at ∼200 C for 6-8 hours. The waste form produced in this

  7. Chemical interactions study of antiretroviral drugs efavirenz and lamivudine concerning the development of stable fixed-dose combination formulations for AIDS treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Elionai C. de L.; Mussel, Wagner N.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Yoshida, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Lamivudine and efavirenz are among the most worldwide used drugs for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatment. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo-optical analysis (TOA) were used to study possible interactions between these drugs, aiming the development of a fixed-dose drug combination. DSC and TOA have evidenced significant shifts on the melting points of both drugs in the mixture, which may be due to interaction between them. Although DSC and TOA results indicated incompatibility between the drugs, FTIR spectra were mostly unmodified due to overlapping peaks. The ssNMR analyses showed significant changes in chemical shifts values of the mixture when compared with spectra of pure drugs, especially in the signals relating to the deficient electron carbon atoms of both drugs. These results confirm the interactions suggested by DSC and TOA, which is probably due to acid-base interactions between electronegative and deficient electron atoms of both lamivudine and efavirenz. (author)

  8. Optical-Electrical-Chemical Engineering of PEDOT:PSS by Incorporation of Hydrophobic Nafion for Efficient and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuang; Qiao, Wenyuan; Cheng, Tai; Zhang, Bing; Yao, Jianxi; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Ding, Yong; Tan, Zhan'ao; Dai, Songyuan

    2018-01-31

    In PIN-type perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the hydroscopicity and acidity of the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole transport layer (HTL) have critical influences on the device stability. To eliminate these problems, Nafion, the hydrophobic perfluorosulfonic copolymer, is incorporated into PEDOT:PSS by a simple spin-coating process. For the modified film, Nafion/PSSH (poly(styrene sulfonate) acid) acts as an electron-blocking layer on the surface and the PEDOT-rich domain tends to gather into larger particles with better interchain charge transfer inside the film. Consequently, the modified PEDOT:PSS HTL shows enhanced conductivity and light transmittance as well as more favorable work function, ending up with the increased short-circuit current density (J sc ) and open-circuit voltage (V oc ) of the device. Finally, PSCs with Nafion-modified HTLs achieve the best power conversion efficiency of 16.72%, with 23.76% improvement compared with PEDOT:PSS-only devices (13.51%). Most importantly, the device stability is obviously enhanced because of the hydrophobicity and chemical and mechanical stability of the Nafion polymer that is enriched on the surface of the PEDOT:PSS film.

  9. Chemical interactions study of antiretroviral drugs efavirenz and lamivudine concerning the development of stable fixed-dose combination formulations for AIDS treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Elionai C. de L.; Mussel, Wagner N.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Yoshida, Maria I., E-mail: mirene@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Quimica; Fialho, Silvia L.; Barbosa, Jamile; Fialho, Silvia L. [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    Lamivudine and efavirenz are among the most worldwide used drugs for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatment. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo-optical analysis (TOA) were used to study possible interactions between these drugs, aiming the development of a fixed-dose drug combination. DSC and TOA have evidenced significant shifts on the melting points of both drugs in the mixture, which may be due to interaction between them. Although DSC and TOA results indicated incompatibility between the drugs, FTIR spectra were mostly unmodified due to overlapping peaks. The ssNMR analyses showed significant changes in chemical shifts values of the mixture when compared with spectra of pure drugs, especially in the signals relating to the deficient electron carbon atoms of both drugs. These results confirm the interactions suggested by DSC and TOA, which is probably due to acid-base interactions between electronegative and deficient electron atoms of both lamivudine and efavirenz. (author)

  10. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-based semi-interpenetrating polymer networks as highly selective and chemically stable membranes for all vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Wei, L.; Zeng, Y. K.; Zhang, Z. H.

    2016-09-01

    Vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) with their high flexibility in configuration and operation, as well as long cycle life are competent for the requirement of future energy storage systems. Nevertheless, due to the application of perfluorinated membranes, VRFBs are plagued by not only the severe migration issue of vanadium ions, but also their high cost. Herein, we fabricate semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPNs), consisting of cross-linked polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polysulfone (PSF), as alternative membranes for VRFBs. It is demonstrated that the PVP-based SIPNs exhibit extremely low vanadium permeabilities, which contribute to the well-established hydrophilic/hydrophobic microstructures and the Donnan exclusion effect. As a result, the coulombic efficiencies of VRFBs with PVP-based SIPNs reach almost 100% at 40 mA cm-2 to 100 mA cm-2; the energy efficiencies are more than 3% higher than those of VRFBs with Nafion 212. More importantly, the PVP-based SIPNs exhibit a superior chemical stability, as demonstrated both by an ex situ immersion test and continuously cycling test. Hence, all the characterizations and performance tests reported here suggest that PVP-based SIPNs are a promising alternative membrane for redox flow batteries to achieve superior cell performance and excellent cycling stability at the fraction of the cost of perfluorinated membranes.

  11. Chemical forms of the fluorine, chlorine, oxygen and carbon in coal fly ash and their correlations with mercury retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Shuang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment (China); Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Shu, Yun [Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Songgeng, E-mail: sgli@ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tian, Gang; Huang, Jiayu [Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Fan, E-mail: zhangfan5188@vip.sina.com [Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Chlorine and fluorine are present mainly in an inorganic form on ash. • Correlations of carbon–oxygen complexes with mercury retention are established. • Concentrations of carbon–oxygen complexes on ash are related to coal type. • No effect of fluorine on mercury retention is observed. • Chlorine, fluorine and carbon in ash are enriched on surface. - Abstract: Fly ashes recovered from the particulate control devices at six pulverized coal boiler unites of China, are studied using an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with a particular focus on the functionalities of fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), carbon and oxygen on fly ash. It is found that the inorganic forms of F and Cl are predominant on the ash surface in comparison with their organics, and the proportion of organic Cl is relatively higher than that of organic F. Similar results are also obtained in the bulk by correlating the F and Cl contents with those of the unburnt carbon and other compositions in ash. Strong correlations of mercury retention with surface carbon–oxygen functional groups indicate that the C=O, OH/C−O and (O−C=O)−O on surface are of significant importance for mercury retention in fly ash. Their surface concentrations are related to coal type. The presence of Cl in fly ash helps with mercury retention. No obvious effect of F is observed.

  12. Sorption kinetics and chemical forms of Cd(II) sorbed by thiol-functionalized 2:1 clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malferrari, D.; Brigatti, M.F.; Laurora, A.; Pini, S.; Medici, L.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between Cd(II) in aqueous solution and two 2:1 expandable clay minerals (i.e., montmorillonite and vermiculite), showing different layer charge, was addressed via batch sorption experiments on powdered clay minerals both untreated and amino acid (cysteine) treated. Reaction products were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRDP), chemical analysis (elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectrophotometry), thermal analysis combined with evolved gasses mass spectrometry (TGA-MSEGA) and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy via extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) characterization. Sorption isotherms for Cd(II) in presence of different substrates, shows that Cd(II) uptake depends both on Cd(II) starting concentration and the nature of the substrate. Thermal decomposition of Cd-cysteine treated clay minerals evidences the evolution of H 2 O, H 2 S, NO 2 , SO 2 , and N 2 O 3 . These results are well consistent with XRDP data collected both at room and at increasing temperature and further stress the influence of the substrate, in particular cysteine, on the interlayer. EXAFS studies suggest that Cd(II) coordinates with oxygen atoms, to give monomer complexes or CdO molecules, either on the mineral surface and/or in the interlayer. For Cd-cysteine complexes EXAFS data agree with the existence of Cd-S clusters, thus suggesting a predominant role of the thiol group in the bonding of Cd with the amino acid

  13. Chemical crosslinking of acrylic acid to form biocompatible pH sensitive hydrogel reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Lim Sze; Ahmad, Ishak; Lazim, Mohd Azwani Shah Mat; Amin, Mohd. Cairul Iqbal Mohd

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to produce a novel pH and temperature sensitive hydrogel, composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and cellulose nanocrystal (CNC). CNC was extracted from kenaf fiber through a series of alkali and bleaching treatments followed by acid hydrolysis. The PAA was then subjected to chemical cross-linking using the cross-linking agent (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide) with CNC entrapped in PAA matrix. The mixture was casted onto petri dish to obtain disc shape hydrogel. The effects of reaction conditions such as the ratio of PAA and CNC on the swelling behavior of the hydrogel obtained towards pH and temperature were studied. The obtained hydrogel was further subjected to different tests such swelling test for swelling behaviour at different pH and temperature along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology analysis. The hydrogel obtained showed excellent pH sensitivity and obtained maximum swelling at pH 7. Besides that, hydrogel obtained showed significant increase in swelling ratio when temperature of swelling medium was increased from 25°C to 37°C. SEM micrograph showed that the pore size of the hydrogel decreases with increase of CNC content proving that the hydrogel structure became more rigid with addition of CNC. The PAA/CNC hydrogel with such excellent sensitivity towards pH and temperature can be developed further as drug carrier

  14. Chemical crosslinking of acrylic acid to form biocompatible pH sensitive hydrogel reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Lim Sze; Ahmad, Ishak; Lazim, Mohd Azwani Shah Mat [Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Amin, Mohd. Cairul Iqbal Mohd [Faculty of Pharmacy, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    The purpose of this study is to produce a novel pH and temperature sensitive hydrogel, composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and cellulose nanocrystal (CNC). CNC was extracted from kenaf fiber through a series of alkali and bleaching treatments followed by acid hydrolysis. The PAA was then subjected to chemical cross-linking using the cross-linking agent (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide) with CNC entrapped in PAA matrix. The mixture was casted onto petri dish to obtain disc shape hydrogel. The effects of reaction conditions such as the ratio of PAA and CNC on the swelling behavior of the hydrogel obtained towards pH and temperature were studied. The obtained hydrogel was further subjected to different tests such swelling test for swelling behaviour at different pH and temperature along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology analysis. The hydrogel obtained showed excellent pH sensitivity and obtained maximum swelling at pH 7. Besides that, hydrogel obtained showed significant increase in swelling ratio when temperature of swelling medium was increased from 25°C to 37°C. SEM micrograph showed that the pore size of the hydrogel decreases with increase of CNC content proving that the hydrogel structure became more rigid with addition of CNC. The PAA/CNC hydrogel with such excellent sensitivity towards pH and temperature can be developed further as drug carrier.

  15. Process for improving the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidberger, R.; Kirch, R.; Kock, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the process for the improvement of the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids or gases by ion exchange and adsorption, non-radioactive isotopes of the element to be isolated are added to the fluid before the isolation, whereas at the same time a large surplus of the non-radioactive isotopes to the radioactive isotopes is achieved by addition of only small quantities of compounds of the non-radioactive isotopes. (orig./RB) [de

  16. Complex chemical composition of colored surface films formed from reactions of propanal in sulfuric acid at upper troposphere/lower stratosphere aerosol acidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyngarden, A L; Pérez-Montaño, S; Bui, J V H; Li, E S W; Nelson, T E; Ha, K T; Leong, L; Iraci, L T

    Particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt %) in water. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles also contain a significant fraction of organic compounds of unknown chemical composition. Acid-catalyzed reactions of carbonyl species are believed to be responsible for significant transfer of gas phase organic species into tropospheric aerosols and are potentially more important at the high acidities characteristic of UT/LS particles. In this study, experiments combining sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) with propanal and with mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal at acidities typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that may have implications for aerosol properties. In order to identify the chemical processes responsible for the formation of the surface films, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to analyze the chemical composition of the films. Films formed from propanal were a complex mixture of aldol condensation products, acetals and propanal itself. The major aldol condensation products were the dimer (2-methyl-2-pentenal) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene that was formed by cyclization of the linear aldol condensation trimer. Additionally, the strong visible absorption of the films indicates that higher-order aldol condensation products must also be present as minor species. The major acetal species were 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trioxane and longer-chain linear polyacetals which are likely to separate from the aqueous phase. Films formed on mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal also showed evidence of products of cross-reactions. Since cross-reactions would be more likely than self-reactions under atmospheric conditions, similar reactions of aldehydes like propanal with common aerosol organic species like glyoxal

  17. Comparing electrical characteristics of in situ and ex situ Al2O3/GaN interfaces formed by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Silvia H.; Bisi, Davide; Tahhan, Maher; Gupta, Chirag; DenBaars, Steven P.; Keller, Stacia; Zanoni, Enrico; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2018-04-01

    Al2O3/n-GaN MOS-capacitors grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with in-situ- and ex-situ-formed Al2O3/GaN interfaces were characterized. Capacitors grown entirely in situ exhibited ˜4 × 1012 cm-2 fewer positive fixed charges and up to ˜1 × 1013 cm-2 eV-1 lower interface-state density near the band-edge than did capacitors with ex situ oxides. When in situ Al2O3/GaN interfaces were reformed via the insertion of a 10-nm-thick GaN layer, devices exhibited behavior between the in situ and ex situ limits. These results illustrate the extent to which an in-situ-formed dielectric/GaN gate stack improves the interface quality and breakdown performance.

  18. Chemically stable perovskites as cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells: La-doped Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O(3-δ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junyoung; Choi, Sihyuk; Jun, Areum; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Jeeyoung; Kim, Guntae

    2014-06-01

    Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O(3-δ) (BSCF) has won tremendous attention as a cathode material for intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC) on the basis of its fast oxygen-ion transport properties. Nevertheless, wide application of BSCF is impeded by its phase instabilities at intermediate temperature. Here we report on a chemically stable SOFC cathode material, La0.5Ba0.25Sr0.25Co0.8Fe0.2O(3-δ) (LBSCF), prepared by strategic approaches using the Goldschmidt tolerance factor. The tolerance factors of LBSCF and BSCF indicate that the structure of the former has a smaller deformation of cubic symmetry than that of the latter. The electrical property and electrochemical performance of LBSCF are improved compared with those of BSCF. LBSCF also shows excellent chemical stability under air, a CO2-containg atmosphere, and low oxygen partial pressure while BSCF decomposed under the same conditions. Together with this excellent stability, LBSCF shows a power density of 0.81 W cm(-2) after 100 h, whereas 25 % degradation for BSCF is observed after 100 h. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Changes in soil toxicity by phosphate-aided soil washing: effect of soil characteristics, chemical forms of arsenic, and cations in washing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Eun Hea; Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-01-01

    This study was set to investigate the changes in the toxicity of arsenic (As)-contaminated soils after washing with phosphate solutions. The soil samples collected from two locations (A: rice paddy and B: forest land) of a former smelter site were contaminated with a similar level of As. Soil washing (0.5 M phosphate solution for 2 h) removed 24.5% As, on average, in soil from both locations. Regardless of soil washing, Location A soil toxicities, determined using Microtox, were greater than that of Location B and this could be largely attributed to different soil particle size distribution. With soils from both locations, the changes in As chemical forms resulted in either similar or greater toxicities after washing. This emphasizes the importance of considering ecotoxicological aspects, which are likely to differ depending on soil particle size distribution and changes in As chemical forms, in addition to the total concentration based remedial goals, in producing ecotoxicologically-sound soils for reuse. In addition, calcium phosphate used as the washing solution seemed to contribute more on the toxic effects of the washed soils than potassium phosphate and ammonium phosphate. Therefore, it would be more appropriate to use potassium or ammonium phosphate than calcium phosphate for phosphate-aided soil washing of the As-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution and chemical forms of copper in the root cells of castor seedlings and their tolerance to copper phytotoxicity in hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wei; Bao, Jianguo; Zheng, Jin; Hu, Hongqin; Du, Jiangkun

    2015-05-01

    The subcellular localization and chemical forms of copper in castor (Ricinus communis L.) seedlings grown in hydroponic nutrient solution were identified by chemical extraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The wild castor seeds were harvested from an abandoned copper mine in Tonglu Mountain, Daye City of Hubei Province, China. The results revealed that (1) the seedlings grew naturally in MS liquid medium with 40.00 mg kg(-1) CuSO4, in which the seedling growth rate and biomass index were 0.14 and 1.23, respectively, which were the highest values among all the treatments. The copper content in castor seedlings increased along with elevated CuSO4 concentration in the medium, reaching a maximum value of 16 570.12 mg kg(-1)(DW) when exposed to 60.00 mg L(-1) CuSO4, where 91.31% of the copper was accumulated in roots. (2) The copper existed in various chemical forms in the roots of the castor seedlings. Copper of 67.66% was extracted from the components of cell walls, such as exchangeable acidic polar compounds, cellulose and lignin, protein and pectin, and less concentrated in cell cytoplasm and nuclei. (3) Furthermore, the root cell walls were thickened when the castor seedlings exposed to CuSO4, with a large amount of high-density electron bodies, attached to the thickened cell walls. In the cell walls, most copper was bound to the carboxyl (-COOH) and hydroxyl (-OH) groups of acidic polar compounds, cellulose, hemicellulose, and polysaccharides. The conclusion showed that castor exhibited a strong tolerance to copper, the copper were accumulated mainly in the root cell, the root cell walls of castor were the major location of patience and detoxification in copper stress.

  1. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  2. Comparative biogeochemical behaviors of iron-55 and stable iron in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimer, W.C.; Langford, J.C.; Jenkins, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric aerosols have demonstrated that much of the 55 Fe associated with the aerosol input to the oceans is present as either an amorphous or hydrous iron oxide or as very small particulate species attached to the surfaces of the large aerosol particles. By comparison, nearly all of the stable iron is bound in the mineral phase of aerosol particles. This difference in the chemical and physical forms of the radioactive and stable iron isotopes results in the 55 Fe being more biologically available than is the stable iron. This difference in availability is responsible for the transfer of a much higher specific activity 55 Fe to certain ocean organisms and man relative to the specific activity of the total aerosol or of sea water. This differential biological uptake of the radioactive element and its stable element counterpart points out that natural levels of stable elements in the marine environment may not effectively dilute radioelements or other stable elements of anthropogenic sources. The effectiveness of dilution by natural sources depends on the chemical and physical forms of the materials in both the source terms and the receiving environments. The large difference in specific activities of 55 Fe in aerosols and sea water relative to ocean organisms reflects the independent behaviors of 55 Fe and stable iron

  3. Improvement of radiological consequence estimation methodologies for NPP accidents in the ARGOS and RODOS decision support systems through consideration of contaminant physico-chemical forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.G.; Roos, P. [Technical University of Denmark - DTU (Denmark); Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences/CERAD - NMBU (Norway); Bujan, A.; Duranova, T. [VUJE, Inc. (Slovakia); Ikonomopoulos, A.; Andronopoulos, S. [National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' (Greece)

    2014-07-01

    The European standard computerized decision support systems RODOS and ARGOS, which are integrated in the operational nuclear emergency preparedness in practically all European countries, as well as in a range of non-European countries, are highly valuable tools for radiological consequence estimation, e.g., in connection with planning and exercising as well as in justification and optimization of intervention strategies. Differences between the Chernobyl and Fukushima accident atmospheric release source terms have demonstrated that differences in release conditions and processes may lead to very different degrees of volatilization of some radionuclides. Also the physico-chemical properties of radionuclides released can depend strongly on the release process. An example from the Chernobyl accident of the significance of this is that strontium particles released in the fire were oxidized and thus generally physico-chemically different from those released during the preceding explosion. This is reflected in the very different environmental mobility of the two groups of particles. The initial elemental matrix characteristics of the contaminants, as well as environmental parameters like pH, determine for instance the particle dissolution time functions, and thus the environmental mobility and potential for uptake in living organisms. As ICRP recommends optimization of intervention according to residual dose, it is crucial to estimate long term dose contributions adequately. In the EURATOM FP7 project PREPARE, an effort is made to integrate physico-chemical forms of contaminants in scenario-specific source term determination, thereby enabling consideration of influences on atmospheric dispersion/deposition, post-deposition migration, and effectiveness of countermeasure implementation. The first step in this context was to investigate, based on available experience, the important physico-chemical properties of radio-contaminants that might potentially be released to the

  4. Statistic analysis of grouping in evaluation of the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in effluent from uranium mining; Analise de agrupamento na avaliacao do comportamento de elementos quimicos estaveis e parametros fisico-quimicos em efluente de mineracao de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (GETA/LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Py Junior, Delcy de A.; Dores, Luis A. de C.B.; Campelo, Emanuele L.C.; Morais, Gustavo F. de; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.br, E-mail: kclecom@uol.com.br [lndustrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Pereira, Juliana R. de S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) is a uranium mine off. The statistical analysis of clustering was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physico-chemical variables in their effluents. The use of cluster analysis proved effective in the evaluation, allowing to identify groups of chemical elements in physico-chemical variables and group analyzes (element and variables ). As a result, we can say, based on the analysis of the data, a strong link between Ca and Mg and between Al and TR{sub 2}O{sub 3} (rare earth oxides) in the UTM effluents. The SO{sub 4} was also identified as strongly linked to total solids and dissolved and these linked to electrical conductivity. Other associations existed, but were not as strongly linked. Additional collections for seasonal evaluation are required so that assessments can be confirmed. Additional statistics analysis (ordination techniques) should be used to help identify the origins of the groups identified in this analysis. (author)

  5. Experimental study of the hydrothermal alteration of a chemical analogue of the French nuclear glass in a thermal gradient: characterization of newly formed phases and of matter transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Christophe

    1994-01-01

    As the most dangerous radioactive wastes are to be stored in deep geological layers after having been packaged in barrels made of borosilicate glasses, this research report addresses the study of the alteration of such glasses through the study of a chemical analogue. In order to experimentally model phenomena involved within a storage, the studied glass has been submitted to different thermal gradients between 320 and 150 C and during 3 to 5 months. These gradients comply with those met about the parcels, and allows the spatial evolution of the waste parcel at a given moment, as well as the evolution in time (progressive cooling of wastes) to be simultaneously simulated. The different phases formed within the gradient have been studied and characterized by scanning electronic microscopy, semi-quantitative microanalysis, and X-ray micro-diffraction [fr

  6. Chemical composition of surgical smoke formed in the abdominal cavity during laparoscopic cholecystectomy – Assessment of the risk to the patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz Dobrogowski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the exposure of patients to organic substances produced and identified in surgical smoke formed in the abdominal cavity during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Material and Methods: Identification of these substances in surgical smoke was performed by the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS with selective ion monitoring (SIM. The selected biomarkers of exposure to surgical smoke included benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene. Their concentrations in the urine samples collected from each patient before and after the surgery were determined by SPME-GC/MS. Results: Qualitative analysis of the smoke produced during laparoscopic procedures revealed the presence of a wide variety of potentially toxic chemicals such as benzene, toluene, xylene, dioxins and other substances. The average concentrations of benzene and toluene in the urine of the patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy, in contrast to the other determined compounds, were significantly higher after the surgery than before it, which indicates that they were absorbed. Conclusions: The source of the compounds produced in the abdominal cavity during the surgery is tissue pyrolysis in the presence of carbon dioxide atmosphere. All patients undergoing laparoscopic procedures are at risk of absorbing and excreting smoke by-products. Exposure of the patient to emerging chemical compounds is usually a one-time and short-term incident, yet concentrations of benzene and toluene found in the urine were significantly higher after the surgery than before it.

  7. Density and water content of nanoscale solid C–S–H formed in alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste and implications for chemical shrinkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Allen, Andrew J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste was analyzed using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The scattering response indicates that the microstructure consists of a uniform matrix of hydration product with a high surface area studded with unhydrated cores of slag particles. In contrast with portland cement paste, no surface fractal scattering regime was detected, and elevated temperature curing (at 60 °C) had no detectable effect on the microstructure at any length scale studied. The specific surface area of the AAS pastes is about 25% higher than that of a portland cement paste cured under the same conditions. The composition and mass density of the nanoscale solid C–S–H phase formed in the AAS paste was determined using a previously developed neutron scattering method, in conjunction with a hydration model. The result ((CaO) 0.99 –SiO 2 –(Al 2 O 3 ) 0.06 –(H 2 O) 0.97 , d = (2.73 ± 0.02) g/cm 3 ) is significantly lower in calcium and in water as compared to portland cement or pure tricalcium silicate paste. These values were used to calculate the chemical shrinkage that would result from complete hydration of the AAS paste. The result, (12.2 ± 1.5) cm 3 of volumetric shrinkage per 100 g of unhydrated cement, is about twice the amount of chemical shrinkage exhibited by normal cement pastes.

  8. Determination of iodine at ppt level in a nitric acid medium by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry: influence of the chemical forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, B.

    2001-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP/SFMS) was used to determine several chemical forms of iodine, at ppt level, in a nitric acid media. Ascorbic acid was added as a reducing agent in order to maintain iodine as iodide. In a preliminary approach, the influence of the chemical form was studied by comparing inorganic iodine (NaI) and organic iodine (CH3I). Different signal responses were observed. With a conventional sample introduction system, sensitivities obtained for iodo-methane could differ by a factor of 5. This was not caused by a problem of atomization or by a change in the ionization efficiency of the iodo-compound into the plasma. The low volatilization temperature of iodo-methane (315.5 K) seemed to be the main explanation of this phenomena. Actually, nebulization resulted in the volatilization of a 2% nitric acid solution containing iodo-methane. As a result, the transport efficiency of iodo-methane between the nebulizer and the torch was approaching 100%. A Direct Injection High Efficiency Nebulizer (DIHEN) allowed us to minimize the behavior difference between the two iodine species, but the sensitivity ratio was inverted and still differed by 20 - 40%. Moreover, the association of a guard electrode and the direct injection system was studied in order to apply these equipments to the determination of iodine. This association allowed us to improve the sensitivity by a factor of 10 and to minimize memory effects, when compared with a conventional system. Further studies indicated that signal responses obtained with different iodine-containing species, except for iodo-methane, were found to be similar. (author)

  9. Pharmaceutical optimization of lipid-based dosage forms for the improvement of taste-masking, chemical stability and solubilizing capacity of phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, Ezequiel; Langenheim, Mariana; Salerno, Claudia; Buontempo, Fabián; Bregni, Carlos; Carlucci, Adriana

    2014-06-01

    Microemulsions (MEs) and self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEEDS) containing phenobarbital (Phe) were developed to improve its chemical stability, solubilizing capacity and taste-masking in oral liquid dosage forms. Cremophor® RH40 and Labrasol® were used as surfactants for the screening of ME regions, Capmul® MCM L, Captex® 355, Imwitor® 408, Myglyol® 840 and Isopropyl myristate were the oil phases assayed; Transcutol® P, Polyethylene-glycol 400, glycerol, Propylene-glycol and ethanol the cosurfactants. Phe stability assay was carried out (20:4:20:56% and 20:4:35:41% (w/w); surfactant:oily phase:cosurfactant:water) for both surfactants; only one containing ethanol showed significant dismissing in its drug content. Solubility capacity for these selected formulations were also evaluated, an amount between 17 and 58 mg/mL of Phe could be loaded. At last, an optimized ME formulation with Cremophor® RH40 20%, Capmul® MCM L 4%, PEG 400 35% and sucralose 2% (w/w) was chosen in order to optimize taste-masking using an electronic tongue. Strawberry along with banana and tutti-frutti flavors plus mint flavor proved to be the best ones. Labrasol-based pre-concentrates were tested for (micro)emulsifying properties; all of them resulted to behave as SEDDS. In summary, a rationale experimental design conducted to an optimized ME for Phe oral pediatric administration which was able to load 5-fold times the currently used dose (4 mg/mL), with no sign of physical or chemical instability and with improved taste; SEDDS for capsule filling were also obtained. The biopharmaceutical advantages described for these dosage forms encourage furthering in vivo evaluation.

  10. Two dechlorinated chlordecone derivatives formed by in situ chemical reduction are devoid of genotoxicity and mutagenicity and have lower proangiogenic properties compared to the parent compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeay, Samuel; Billat, Pierre-André; Clere, Nicolas; Nesslany, Fabrice; Bristeau, Sébastien; Faure, Sébastien; Mouvet, Christophe

    2018-05-01

    Chlordecone (CLD) is a chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide, now classified as a persistent organic pollutant. Several studies have previously reported that chronic exposure to CLD leads to hepatotoxicity, neurotoxicity, raises early child development and pregnancy complications, and increases the risk of liver and prostate cancer. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) has been identified as a possible way for the remediation of soils contaminated by CLD. In the present study, the objectives were (i) to evaluate the genotoxicity and the mutagenicity of two CLD metabolites formed by ISCR, CLD-5a-hydro, or CLD-5-hydro (5a- or 5- according to CAS nomenclature; CLD-1Cl) and tri-hydroCLD (CLD-3Cl), and (ii) to explore the angiogenic properties of these molecules. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity were investigated using the Ames's technique on Salmonella typhimurium and the in vitro micronucleus micromethod with TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells. The proangiogenic properties were evaluated on the in vitro capillary network formation of human primary endothelial cells. Like CLD, the dechlorinated derivatives of CLD studied were devoid of genotoxic and mutagenic activity. In the assay targeting angiogenic properties, significantly lower microvessel lengths formed by endothelial cells were observed for the CLD-3Cl-treated cells compared to the CLD-treated cells for two of the three tested concentrations. These results suggest that dechlorinated CLD derivatives are devoid of mutagenicity and genotoxicity and have lower proangiogenic properties than CLD.

  11. New Polymorphic Forms of Pemetrexed Diacid and Their Use for the Preparation of Pharmaceutically Pure Amorphous and Hemipentahydrate Forms of Pemetrexed Disodium

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Olga; Łaszcz, Marta; Jatczak, Kamil; Witkowska, Anna; Bujak, Iwona; Groman, Aleksandra; Cybulski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of stable amorphous pemetrexed disodium of pharmaceutical purity as well as the process optimization for the preparation of the hemipentahydrate form of pemetrexed disodium are described. Analytical methods for the polymorphic and chemical purity studies of pemetrexed disodium and pemetrexed diacid forms were developed. The physicochemical properties of the amorphous and hydrate forms of pemetrexed disodium, as well as new forms of pemetrexed diacid (a key synthetic intermedia...

  12. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  13. Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Fitts, Jeff. P.; Jantzen, Carol. M.; Tang, G.

    2013-12-01

    A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 ?C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion

  14. Comparative analysis of physico-chemical and gas sensing characteristics of two different forms of SnO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwoka, M., E-mail: Monika.Kwoka@polsl.pl [Institute of Electronics, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Ottaviano, L. [CNR- SPIN & Department of Physics and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, 67100 (Italy); Szuber, J. [Institute of Electronics, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Two different forms of SnO{sub 2} deposited on Si substrate. • Crystallinity and surface/subsurface morphology controlled by XRD, SEM and AFM. • Surface/subsurface chemistry including stoichiometry and contaminations derived from XPS. • Comparative analysis of gas sensor characteristics of SnO{sub 2} in NO{sub 2} atmosphere. • Correlations between physico-chemical properties and gas sensor characteristics. - Abstract: In this paper the results of studies of comparative studies on the crystallinity, morphology and chemistry combined with the gas sensor response of two different forms of tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) films prepared by the Rheotaxial Growth and Thermal Oxidation (RGTO) and by the Laser-enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (L-CVD) methods, respectively, are presented. For this purpose the X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. XRD studies for both samples show the contribution from the crystalline SnO{sub 2} in the cassiterite rutile phase without any evident contribution from the tin oxide (SnO) phase. SEM and AFM studies show that the surface morphology of RGTO and L-CVD SnO{sub 2} samples are characterized by grains/nanograins of different size and surface roughness. In turn XPS studies confirm that for both SnO{sub 2} samples a slight nonstoichiometry with a relative [O]/[Sn] concentration of 1.8, and slightly different amount of C contamination at the surface of internal grains with relative [C]/[Sn] concentration of 3.5 and 3.2, respectively. This undesired C contamination cannot be ignored because it creates an uncontrolled barrier for the potential gas adsorption at the internal surface of sensor material. This is confirmed by the gas sensor response in NO{sub 2} atmosphere of both SnO{sub 2} samples because the sensitivity is evidently smaller for RGTO SnO{sub 2} with respect to the L-CVD SnO{sub 2} samples, whereas

  15. Physical and chemical differentiation of the luminous star-forming region W49A. Results from the JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Z.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Fuller, G. A.; Plume, R.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The massive and luminous star-forming region W49A is a well-known Galactic candidate to probe the physical conditions and chemistry similar to those expected in external starburst galaxies. Aims: We aim to probe the physical and chemical structure of W49A on a spatial scale of ~0.8 pc based on the JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey, which covers the frequency range between 330 and 373 GHz. Methods: The wide 2 × 2 arcmin field and the high spectral resolution of the HARP instrument on JCMT provides information on the spatial structure and kinematics of the cloud traced by the observed molecular lines. For species where multiple transitions are available, we estimate excitation temperatures and column densities using a population diagram method that takes beam dilution and optical depth corrections into account. Results: We detected 255 transitions corresponding to 63 species in the 330-373 GHz range at the center position of W49A. Excitation conditions can be probed for 14 molecules, including the complex organic molecules CH3CCH, CH3CN, and CH3OH. The chemical composition suggests the importance of shock, photon-dominated region (PDR), and hot core chemistry. Many molecular lines show a significant spatial extent across the maps including CO and its isotopologues, high density tracers (e.g., HCN, HNC, CS, HCO+), and tracers of UV irradiation (e.g., CN and C2H). The spatially extended species reveal a complex velocity-structure of W49A with possible infall and outflow motions. Large variations are seen between the subregions with mostly blue-shifted emission toward the eastern tail, mostly red-shifted emission toward the northern clump, and emission peaking around the expected source velocity toward the southwest clump. Conclusions: A comparison of column density ratios of characteristic species observed toward W49A to Galactic PDRs suggests that while the chemistry toward the W49A center is driven by a combination of UV irradiation and shocks, UV irradiation

  16. The application dosage of Azolla pinnata in fresh and powder form as organic fertilizer on soil chemical properties, growth and yield of rice plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawati, Mieke Rochimi; Damayani, Maya; Herdiyantoro, Diyan; Suryatmana, Pujawati; Anggraini, Derisfha; Khumairah, Fiqriah Hanum

    2018-02-01

    The yield of rice plants is strongly influenced by N fertilizer. Nitrogen in rice plants has roles in vegetative growth, tiller formation and increasing yield through rice protein formation. Nitrogen supplied from organic fertilizers is better than inorganic fertilizers that may have environmental problem effects. Organic fertilizers from Azolla pinnata water fern contain higher N than other organic fertilizers. Symbiosis between A. pinnata and the N-fixing cyanobacteria results in high content of nitrogen, 3 to 5%. A. pinnata can be added to the rice field as organic fertilizer in form of fresh biomass or composted. Composted form can be ground into powder which passes through 100 mesh sieve. Preparation of compost powder of A. pinnata is done to reduce the constraints of voluminous application of organic fertilizers and to improve the efficiency of its use. The objective of this research was to compare the effect of the use of fresh A. pinnata and compost powder of A. pinnata on some soil and plant chemical properties and rice yield. The treatments applied were fresh A. pinnata at the dose of 0, 10 and 20 ton ha-1 and A. pinnata compost powder at 12.5 and 25 kg ha-1. The results showed that incorporation of fresh A. pinnata at 20 tons ha-1 and its compost powder at 25 kg ha-1 increased the available P of soil, plant P content and tiller number, but did not affect the content of organic-C, total soil N, plant N content and rice yield. This study suggested the benefits of A. pinnata compost powder technology in organic fertilization of soil to increase the nutrient content of soil and rice plants.

  17. Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, E.M.; Lukens, W.W.; Fitts, J.P.; Jantzen, C.M.; Tang, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Multiphase ceramic waste form is composed of primarily of nepheline, nosean, and sodalite. • Rhenium is in the 7+ oxidation state and has partitioned to a mixed Re-bearing sodalite phase. • Mechanism of corrosion for the multiphase matrix is similar to other silicate minerals. • A mixed-anion sodalite phases controls Re release in the multiphase waste forms. - Abstract: A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium ( 99 Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO 4 ), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M 8 [Al 6 Si 6 O 24 ]X 2 , where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na 8 [AlSiO 4 ] 6 SO 4 ). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na 8 [Al 6 Si 6 O 24 ](ReO 4 ) 2 ). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99 Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 °C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate

  18. Biocompatibility of two model elastin-like recombinamer-based hydrogels formed through physical or chemical cross-linking for various applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Fonseca, Arturo; Ramos, Teresa L; González de Torre, Israel; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Muntión, Sandra; Arias, Francisco Javier; Del Cañizo, María Consuelo; Alonso, Matilde; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2018-03-01

    Biocompatibility studies, especially innate immunity induction, in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, and fibrosis, are often lacking for many novel biomaterials including recombinant protein-based ones, such as elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), and has not been extensively explored in the scientific literature, in contrast to traditional biomaterials. Herein, we present the results from a set of experiments designed to elucidate the preliminary biocompatibility of 2 types of ELRs that are able to form extracellular matrix-like hydrogels through either physical or chemical cross-linking both of which are intended for different applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Initially, we present in vitro cytocompatibility results obtained upon culturing human umbilical vein endothelial cells on ELR substrates, showing optimal proliferation up to 9 days. Regarding in vivo cytocompatibility, luciferase-expressing hMSCs were viable for at least 4 weeks in terms of bioluminescence emission when embedded in ELR hydrogels and injected subcutaneously into immunosuppressed mice. Furthermore, both types of ELR-based hydrogels were injected subcutaneously in immunocompetent mice and serum TNFα, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, confirming the lack of inflammatory response, as also observed upon macroscopic and histological evaluation. All these findings suggest that both types of ELRs possess broad biocompatibility, thus making them very promising for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine-related applications. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A Sub-Microanalysis Approach in Chemical Characterisation of Gold Nanorods Formed by a Novel Polymer-Immobilised Gold Seeds Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Kazemian Abyaneh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanorods (GNRs have been fabricated by a novel polymer-immobilised seed mediated method using ultraviolet (UV photoreduced gold-polymethylmethacrylate (Au–PMMA nanocomposites as a seed platform and characterised at sub-micron scale regime with synchrotron-based techniques; near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF mapping. In this report, it is shown that investigating polymer nanocomposites using combination of XRF mapping and NEXAFS spectromicroscopy can help to see the growth phenomenon from different perspective than conventional characterisation techniques. XRF maps are used to explore distribution of the constituent elements and showing how polymer matrix making stripe patterns along with regions where GNRs are formed. NEXAFS carbon (C K-edge spectra have been taken at three different stages of synthesis: (1 on Au–PMMA nanocomposites before UV irradiation, (2 after gold nanoparticles formation, and (3 after GNRs formation. It reveals how polymer matrix has been degraded during GNRs formation and avoiding chemically or physically damage to polymer matrix is crucial to control the formation of GNRs.

  20. Effects of pH and temperature on the deposition properties of stannate chemical conversion coatings formed by the potentiostatic technique on AZ91 D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsentriecy, Hassan H.; Azumi, Kazuhisa; Konno, Hidetaka

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pH and temperature of a stannate bath on the quality of stannate chemical conversion coatings formed on AZ91 D magnesium alloy by using the potentiostatic polarization technique at E = -1.1 V were investigated in order to improve uniformity and corrosion protection performance of the coating films. It was found that the uniformity and corrosion resistance of coating films deposited by potentiostatic polarization were closely associated with pH and temperature of the coating bath. The pH and temperature to obtain the best coating film were investigated as a function of corrosion protection performance evaluated by curves of potentiodynamic anodic polarization conducted in borate buffer solution. Scanning electron microscope observation and electrochemical corrosion tests of the stannate-coated samples confirmed significant improvement in uniformity and corrosion resistivity of coating films deposited by the potentiostatic technique by modifying the pH and temperature of the coating bath. It was also found that uniformity and corrosion resistivity of the coating films deposited by the potentiostatic technique were considerably improved compared to those of coatings deposited by the simple immersion method at the best conditions of pH and temperature of the coating bath

  1. Combining chemoinformatics with bioinformatics: in silico prediction of bacterial flavor-forming pathways by a chemical systems biology approach "reverse pathway engineering".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjin; Bienfait, Bruno; Sacher, Oliver; Gasteiger, Johann; Siezen, Roland J; Nauta, Arjen; Geurts, Jan M W

    2014-01-01

    The incompleteness of genome-scale metabolic models is a major bottleneck for systems biology approaches, which are based on large numbers of metabolites as identified and quantified by metabolomics. Many of the revealed secondary metabolites and/or their derivatives, such as flavor compounds, are non-essential in metabolism, and many of their synthesis pathways are unknown. In this study, we describe a novel approach, Reverse Pathway Engineering (RPE), which combines chemoinformatics and bioinformatics analyses, to predict the "missing links" between compounds of interest and their possible metabolic precursors by providing plausible chemical and/or enzymatic reactions. We demonstrate the added-value of the approach by using flavor-forming pathways in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as an example. Established metabolic routes leading to the formation of flavor compounds from leucine were successfully replicated. Novel reactions involved in flavor formation, i.e. the conversion of alpha-hydroxy-isocaproate to 3-methylbutanoic acid and the synthesis of dimethyl sulfide, as well as the involved enzymes were successfully predicted. These new insights into the flavor-formation mechanisms in LAB can have a significant impact on improving the control of aroma formation in fermented food products. Since the input reaction databases and compounds are highly flexible, the RPE approach can be easily extended to a broad spectrum of applications, amongst others health/disease biomarker discovery as well as synthetic biology.

  2. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  3. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Aug 21,2017 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, ...

  4. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...

  5. Preparation and properties of calcium-silicate filled resins for dental restoration. Part I: chemical-physical characterization and apatite-forming ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profeta, Andrea Corrado

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to measure dimensional changes due to hygroscopic expansion and the bioactivity of two experimental methacrylate-based dental adhesives either incorporating Bioglass 45S5 (3-E&RA/BG) or MTA (3-E&RA/WMTA). 3-E&RA/BG, 3-E&RA/WMTA and a control filler-free resin blend (3-E&RA) were formulated from commercially available monomers. Water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL) behaviour were evaluated by weighing material disks at noted intervals; the relationship between degree of hydration and the glass transition temperature (Tg) was investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In vitro apatite-forming ability as a function of soaking time in phosphate-containing solutions was also determined. Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate differences between groups for maximum WS, SL, net water uptake and the percentage change in Tg values. Post-ANOVA pair-wise comparisons were conducted using Mann-Whitney-U tests. 3-E&RA/BG and 3-E&RA/WMTA exhibited values of maximum WS and net water uptake that were significantly higher when compared to 3-E&RA. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in terms of SL between all the adhesives. The addition of the Bioglass 45S5 and MTA to the 3-E&RA showed no reduction of the Tg after 60 days of storage in deionized water. ATR Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) of the filled resin disks soaked in DPBS for 60 days showed the presence of carbonate ions in different chemical phases. Dentine bonding agents comprising calcium-silicates are not inert materials in a simulated oral environment and apatite formation may occur in the intra-oral conditions. A bioactive dental material which forms apatite on the surface would have several benefits including closure of gaps forming at the resin-dentine interface and potentially better bond strength over time (less degradation of bond).

  6. Effects of heat treatment and formulation on the phase composition and chemical durability of the EBR-II ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. E.; Dietz, N. L.; Janney, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II will be immobilized in a ceramic waste form (CWF). Tests are being conducted to evaluate the suitability of the CWF for disposal in the planned federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. In this report, the results of laboratory tests and analyses conducted to address product consistency and thermal stability issues called out in waste acceptance requirements are presented. The tests measure the impacts of (1) variations in the amounts of salt and binder glass used to make the CWF and (2) heat treatments on the phase composition and chemical durability of the waste form. A series of CWF materials was made to span the ranges of salt and glass contents that could be used during processing: between 5.0 and 15 mass% salt loaded into the zeolite (the nominal salt loading is 10.7%, and the process control range is 10.6 to 11.2 mass%), and between 20 and 30 mass% binder glass mixed with the salt-loaded zeolite (the nominal glass content is 25% and the process control range is 20 to 30 mass%). In another series of tests, samples of two CWF products made with the nominal salt and glass contents were reheated to measure the impact on the phase composition and durability: long-term heat treatments were conducted at 400 and 500 C for durations of 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year; short-term heat treatments were conducted at 600, 700, 800, and 850 C for durations of 4, 28, 52, and 100 hours. All of the CWF products that were made with different amounts of salt, zeolite, and glass and all of the heat-treated CWF samples were analyzed with powder X-ray diffraction to measure changes in phase compositions and subjected to 7-day product consistency tests to measure changes in the chemical durability. The salt loading had the greatest impact on phase composition and durability. A

  7. Fractionation of Stable Isotopes in Atmospheric Aerosol Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl

    -independent) fractionation processes of stable isotopes of C, N, O and S in order to investigate three different systems related to aerosols: 1. Post-depositional processes of nitrate in snow that obscure nitrate ice core records 2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol generated by ozonolysis of X...... reactions and undergo complex chemical and physical changes during their lifetimes. In order to assess processes that form and alter aerosols, information provided by stable isotopes can be used to help constrain estimates on the strength of aerosol sources and sinks. This thesis studies (mass...... as required. The kndings provide important results for the studies' respective felds, including a description of the isotopic fractionation and quantum yield of nitrate photolysis in snow, equilibrium fractionation in secondary organic aerosol and fractionation constants of different oxidation pathways of SO2....

  8. Effect of DA-6 and EDTA alone or in combination on uptake, subcellular distribution and chemical form of Pb in Lolium perenne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shanying; Wu, Qiuling; He, Zhenli

    2013-11-01

    The effects of growth-promoting hormone diethyl aminoethyl hexanoate (DA-6) and EDTA, either alone or in combination applied to original soil or lead (Pb) spiked soil on Pb phytoextraction, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in Lolium perenne were studied. EDTA addition alone significantly reduced plant biomass though it increased Pb accumulation (PDA-6 alone increased both plant biomass and Pb accumulation (PDA-6 being the most effective. DA-6 combined with EDTA compensated the adverse effect of the latter on plant growth, and resulted in a synergistic effect on Pb uptake and translocation, with the maximum accumulation occurring in the EDTA+10μM DA-6 treatment. At the subcellular level, about 35-66% of Pb was distributed in cell wall and 21-42% in soluble fraction, with a minority present in cellular organelles fraction. EDTA addition alone increased the proportion of Pb in soluble and cellular organelles fraction, while DA-6 detoxified Pb in plant by storing additional Pb in cell wall, and 10μM DA-6 was the most effective. Of the total Pb in plant shoot, 27-52% was NaCl extractable, 22-47% HAc extractable, followed by other fractions. Contrary to EDTA, DA-6 significantly decreased Pb migration in plant. These results suggest that Pb fixation by pectates and proteins in cell wall and compartmentalization by vacuole might be responsible for Pb detoxification in plant, and the combined use of EDTA and 10μM DA-6 appears to be optimal for improving the remediation efficiency of L. perenne for Pb contaminated soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemically stable and reusable nano zero-valent iron/graphite-like carbon nitride nanohybrid for efficient photocatalytic treatment of Cr(VI) and rhodamine B under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Zhiyu; Wen, Qingjuan; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Fuwei [Key Laboratory of Eco-materials Advanced Technology (Fuzhou University), Fujian Province University (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@fzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-materials Advanced Technology (Fuzhou University), Fujian Province University (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • NZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} efficiently photodegrades the organic/inorganic pollutants. • Fe{sup 0} improves the charge separation efficiency of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • A possible recover mechanism of nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was proposed. - Abstract: Graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) displays strong potential applications in visible-light photocatalytic for water treatment, but its applications are greatly restricted by high recombination probability of photo-generated electron-hole pairs, as well as a weak reduction ability toward the heavy metals. In this work, we reported the synthesis of nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nano-hybrid with highly efficiency toward the photodegradation of RhB and Cr(VI) under the visible light irradiation. The nZVI nanoparticles can well be immobilized and dispersed on the surface of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanosheets by a facile borohydride-reduction method. As-synthesized nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} has an improved photocatalytic activity much better than that of the pure g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, wherein over 92.9% of Cr(VI) and 99.9% of RhB can be removed by using nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The nZVI particles not only contributes to the reduction and immobilization of Cr(VI), but also accelerates the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of RhB due to a lower recombination rate of photoexcited holes and electrons. Moreover, nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} preserves superior photodegradation efficiency after five experimental cycles. It can be attributed that nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalyst is chemically stable, and part of nZVI can be recovered by g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. We believe that, the composite of nZVI-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} reported here could provide guidance for the design of efficient and reusable materials to remove both the organic compounds and heavy metal ions from waste waters.

  10. Quantification and Assessment of the Chemical Form of Residual Gadolinium in the Brain After Repeated Administration of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents: Comparative Study in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thomas; Apte, Chirag; Jost, Gregor; Schöckel, Laura; Lohrke, Jessica; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-07-01

    Multiple clinical and preclinical studies have reported a signal intensity increase and the presence of gadolinium (Gd) in the brain after repeated administration of Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). This bioanalytical study in rat brain tissue was initiated to investigate whether the residual Gd is present as intact GBCA or in other chemical forms by using tissue fractionation and chromatography. Rats were divided randomly in 6 groups of 10 animals each. They received 10 daily injections of 2.5 mmol/kg bodyweight of 1 of 5 different GBCAs: linear GBCAs such as gadodiamide (Omniscan; GE Healthcare), gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, Magnevist; Bayer), or gadobenate dimeglumine (Multihance; Bracco) and macrocyclic GBCAs such as gadobutrol (Gadovist; Bayer) and gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem; Guerbet) or saline. On days 3 and 24 after the last injection (p.i.), 5 randomly chosen animals of each group were killed by exsanguination, and their brains were excised and divided into cerebrum, pons, and cerebellum. The brain sections were homogenized by sonication in ice-cold buffer at pH 7.4. Soluble and insoluble fractions were separated by centrifugation, and the soluble fractions were further separated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The Gd concentration in all tissue fractions and in the GPC eluate was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In a recovery control experiment, all GBCAs were spiked to blank brain tissue and more than 94% recovery of Gd in the tissue fractions was demonstrated. Only traces of the administered Gd were found in the rat brain tissue on day 3 and day 24 p.i. In the animals treated with macrocyclic GBCAs, Gd was found only in the soluble brain fraction and was present solely as low molecular weight molecules, most likely the intact GBCA. In the animals treated with linear GBCAs Gd was found to a large extent in the insoluble tissue fraction. The Gd concentration in the soluble fraction was comparable to the

  11. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF THE CHEMICAL FORMS OF MERCURY AND OTHER TARGET POLLUTANTS IN COAL-FIRED BOILER FLUE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terence J. McManus, Ph.D.

    1999-06-30

    . (ATS) as a secondary DOE contractor on this project, assessed the sampling and analytical plans and the emission reports of the five primary contractors to determine how successful the contractors were in satisfying their defined objectives. ATS identified difficulties and inconsistencies in a number of sampling and analytical methodologies in these studies. In particular there was uncertainty as to the validity of the sampling and analytical methods used to differentiate the chemical forms of mercury observed in coal flue gas. Considering the differences in the mercury species with regard to human toxicity, the rate of transport through the ecosystem and the design variations in possible emission control schemes, DOE sought an accurate and reliable means to identify and quantify the various mercury compounds emitted by coal-fired utility boilers. ATS, as a contractor for DOE, completed both bench- and pilot-scale studies on various mercury speciation methods. The final validation of the modified Ontario-Hydro Method, its acceptance by DOE and submission of the method for adoption by ASTM was a direct result of these studies carried out in collaboration with the University of North Dakota's Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). This report presents the results from studies carried out at ATS in the development of analytical methods to identify and quantify various chemical species, particularly those of mercury, in coal derived flue gas. Laboratory- and pilot-scale studies, not only on mercury species, but also on other inorganics and organics present in coal combustion flue gas are reported.

  13. Development of stable isotope manufacturing in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokidychev, A.; Pokidycheva, M.

    1999-01-01

    For the past 25 years, Russia has relied heavily on the electromagnetic separation process for the production of middle and heavy mass stable isotopes. The separation of most light isotopes had been centered in Georgia which, after the collapse of the USSR, left Russia without this capability. In the mid-1970s, development of centrifuge technology for the separation of stable isotopes was begun. Alternative techniques such as laser separation, physical-chemical methods, and ion cyclotron resonance have also been investigated. Economic considerations have played a major role in the development and current status of the stable isotope enrichment capabilities of Russia

  14. Quantification and Assessment of the Chemical Form of Residual Gadolinium in the Brain After Repeated Administration of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thomas; Apte, Chirag; Jost, Gregor; Schöckel, Laura; Lohrke, Jessica; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Objective Multiple clinical and preclinical studies have reported a signal intensity increase and the presence of gadolinium (Gd) in the brain after repeated administration of Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). This bioanalytical study in rat brain tissue was initiated to investigate whether the residual Gd is present as intact GBCA or in other chemical forms by using tissue fractionation and chromatography. Materials and Methods Rats were divided randomly in 6 groups of 10 animals each. They received 10 daily injections of 2.5 mmol/kg bodyweight of 1 of 5 different GBCAs: linear GBCAs such as gadodiamide (Omniscan; GE Healthcare), gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, Magnevist; Bayer), or gadobenate dimeglumine (Multihance; Bracco) and macrocyclic GBCAs such as gadobutrol (Gadovist; Bayer) and gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem; Guerbet) or saline. On days 3 and 24 after the last injection (p.i.), 5 randomly chosen animals of each group were killed by exsanguination, and their brains were excised and divided into cerebrum, pons, and cerebellum. The brain sections were homogenized by sonication in ice-cold buffer at pH 7.4. Soluble and insoluble fractions were separated by centrifugation, and the soluble fractions were further separated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The Gd concentration in all tissue fractions and in the GPC eluate was measured by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. In a recovery control experiment, all GBCAs were spiked to blank brain tissue and more than 94% recovery of Gd in the tissue fractions was demonstrated. Results Only traces of the administered Gd were found in the rat brain tissue on day 3 and day 24 p.i. In the animals treated with macrocyclic GBCAs, Gd was found only in the soluble brain fraction and was present solely as low molecular weight molecules, most likely the intact GBCA. In the animals treated with linear GBCAs Gd was found to a large extent in the insoluble tissue fraction. The Gd concentration in

  15. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  16. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General Article Volume 21 Issue 9 September 2016 pp 803- ... Keywords. Evolutionary game theory, evolutionary stable state, conflict, cooperation, biological games.

  17. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  18. Toxic chemical release inventory reporting form R and instructions. Revised 1992 version. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Reporting is required to provide the public with information on the releases of listed toxic chemicals in their communities and to provide EPA with release information to assist the Agency in determining the need for future regulations. Facilities must report the quantities of both routine and accidental releases of listed toxic chemicals, as well as the maximum amount of the listed toxic chemical on-site during the calendar year and the amount contained in wastes transferred off-site. These instructions supplement and elaborate on the requirements in the reporting rule (40 CFR Part 372). Together with the reporting rule, they constitute the reporting requirements. All references in these instructions are to sections in the reporting rule unless otherwise indicated

  19. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process......This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...

  20. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-1 Surface Chemical and Solid Waste Dumping Area,. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The 100-B-1 waste site was a dumping site that was divided into two areas. One area was used as a laydown area for construction materials, and the other area was used as a chemical dumping area. The 100-B-1 Surface Chemical and Solid Waste Dumping Area site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations support future unrestricted land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  1. Public control of environmental health hazards (clinical and experimental studies of distal axonopathy--a frequent form of brain and nerve damage produced by environmental chemical hazards)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumburg, H.H.; Spencer, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies of the peripheral and central nervous system degeneration (distal dying-back axonopathy) in humans and experimental animals produced by acrylamide monomer and certain hydrocarbon compounds are summarized. The human distal axonopathies include: many of the naturally occurring, genetically determined system disorders/ certain nutritional disorders/ uremic neuropathy/ the neuropathies associated with some malignancies/ and the toxic neuropathies induced by industrial chemicals. The irreversible, subclinical, and clinical effects of distal axonopathies on the human central nervous system are examined. A morphological rationale for previously enigmatic clinical phenomena in the human toxic neuropathies is presented. Neuropathology is potentially useful in the screening of chemicals for neurotoxicity. (7 photos, 24 references)

  2. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  3. Thermally stable sintered porous metal articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombach, A.L.; Thellmann, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    A sintered porous metal article is provided which is essentially thermally stable at elevated temperatures. In addition, a method for producing such an article is also provided which method comprises preparing a blend of base metal particles and active dispersoid particles, forming the mixture into an article of the desired shape, and heating the so-formed article at sintering temperatures

  4. Species delimitation and evolution in morphologically and chemically diverse communities of the lichen-forming genus Xanthoparmelia (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) in western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Steven D; Johnson, Leigh; St Clair, Larry L

    2011-02-01

    Accurate species delimitation is important for understanding the diversification of biota and has critical implications for ecological and conservation studies. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that morphology-based species circumspection in lichenized fungi misrepresents fungal diversity. The foliose lichen genus Xanthoparmelia includes over 800 species displaying a complex array of morphological and secondary metabolite diversity. We used a multifaceted approach, applying phylogenetic, population genetic, and genealogical analyses to delimit species in a single well-supported monophyletic clade containing 10 morphologically and chemically diverse Xanthoparmelia species in western North America. Sequence data from four ribosomal and two low-copy, protein-coding markers, along with chemical and morphological data were used to assess species diversity. We found that traditionally circumscribed species are not supported by molecular data. Rather, all sampled taxa were better represented by three polymorphic population clusters. Our results suggest that secondary metabolite variation may have limited utility in diagnosing lineages within this group, while identified populations clusters did not reflect major phylogeographic or ecological patterns. In contrast to studies revealing previously undiscovered fungal lineages masked within lichen species circumscribed by traditional morphological and chemical concepts, the present study suggests that species diversity has been overestimated in the species-rich genus Xanthoparmelia.

  5. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  6. Uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    1998-01-01

    The most important fields of stable isotope use with examples are presented. These are: 1. Isotope dilution analysis: trace analysis, measurements of volumes and masses; 2. Stable isotopes as tracers: transport phenomena, environmental studies, agricultural research, authentication of products and objects, archaeometry, studies of reaction mechanisms, structure and function determination of complex biological entities, studies of metabolism, breath test for diagnostic; 3. Isotope equilibrium effects: measurement of equilibrium effects, investigation of equilibrium conditions, mechanism of drug action, study of natural processes, water cycle, temperature measurements; 4. Stable isotope for advanced nuclear reactors: uranium nitride with 15 N as nuclear fuel, 157 Gd for reactor control. In spite of some difficulties of stable isotope use, particularly related to the analytical techniques, which are slow and expensive, the number of papers reporting on this subject is steadily growing as well as the number of scientific meetings organized by International Isotope Section and IAEA, Gordon Conferences, and regional meeting in Germany, France, etc. Stable isotope application development on large scale is determined by improving their production technologies as well as those of labeled compound and the analytical techniques. (author)

  7. Preparation of stable alginate microcapsules coated with chitosan or polyethyleneimine for extraction of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outokesh, Mohammad; Mimura, Hitoshi; Niibori, Yuichi; Tanaka, Kouichi

    2006-05-01

    Stable alginate microcapsules in dried form containing bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) monothiophosphinic acid (HA) were prepared by coating of fresh alginate microcapsules with chitosan or polyethyleneimine (PEI). The thickness of coatings was estimated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), along with electron microscopy (SEM), as well as comparison of uptake percentage of coated and uncoated hollow capsules. Characterization of microcapsules was carried out by Ag(+) uptake experiments, destructive chemical analyses and thermogravimetric methods (TG and DTA). Chemical stability tests in HNO(3) and NaNO(3) media indicated that the coating with 4-double layer chitosan or mono-layer PEI led to an appreciable enhancement of impermeability in the range of pH > 1 or [Na(+)] microcapsules nearly completely hold their extractant content. Stable extractive microcapsules have an appreciable potential for the selective removal of heavy metal ions.

  8. Experimental Data related to physico-chemical forms of antimony 125 and silver 110m and to their transfers to a freshwater fish, the carp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, J.P.; Garnier, J.; Lambrechts, A.; Foulquier, L.

    1989-03-01

    The 125 Sb remains dissolved in the water but may be partly adsorbed on the sediment. No particulate and colloidal forms appear in the water, even in the presence of living organisms. The major part of the dissolved 125 Sb is fixed by anionic resin. 125 Sb accumulation by carp from water is a very weak phenomenon which results in a concentration factor of approximately 0.15. The best part of the 110m Ag brought in the water is rapidly adsorbed on all available surfaces and colloidal and particulate forms develop in the medium. The real dissolved forms represent less than 50 % of the water radioactivity and are essentially retained by anionic resin. The bioaccumulation, from water, of the 110m Ag by the carp results in a maximal concentration factor of about 140. The accumulation from food shows that trophic pathway may be as important as direct pathway in the transfer to fish [fr

  9. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  10. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree; Heuser, Alexander; Wombacher, Frank; Dietzel, Martin; Tipper, Edward; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  11. Comparison of three aerosol chemical characterization techniques utilizing PTR-ToF-MS: a study on freshly formed and aged biogenic SOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzelis, Georgios I.; Tillmann, Ralf; Hohaus, Thorsten; Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Xu, Kang-Ming; Schlag, Patrick; Schmitt, Sebastian H.; Wegener, Robert; Kaminski, Martin; Holzinger, Rupert; Wisthaler, Armin; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2018-03-01

    An intercomparison of different aerosol chemical characterization techniques has been performed as part of a chamber study of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation and aging at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction chamber). Three different aerosol sampling techniques - the aerosol collection module (ACM), the chemical analysis of aerosol online (CHARON) and the collection thermal-desorption unit (TD) were connected to proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometers (PTR-ToF-MSs) to provide chemical characterization of the SOA. The techniques were compared among each other and to results from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The experiments investigated SOA formation from the ozonolysis of β-pinene, limonene, a β-pinene-limonene mix and real plant emissions from Pinus sylvestris L. (Scots pine). The SOA was subsequently aged by photo-oxidation, except for limonene SOA, which was aged by NO3 oxidation. Despite significant differences in the aerosol collection and desorption methods of the PTR-based techniques, the determined chemical composition, i.e. the same major contributing signals, was found by all instruments for the different chemical systems studied. These signals could be attributed to known products expected from the oxidation of the examined monoterpenes. The sampling and desorption method of ACM and TD provided additional information on the volatility of individual compounds and showed relatively good agreement. Averaged over all experiments, the total aerosol mass recovery compared to an SMPS varied within 80 ± 10, 51 ± 5 and 27 ± 3 % for CHARON, ACM and TD, respectively. Comparison to the oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O : C) obtained by AMS showed that all PTR-based techniques observed lower O : C ratios, indicating a loss of molecular oxygen either during aerosol sampling or detection. The differences in total

  12. Comparison of three aerosol chemical characterization techniques utilizing PTR-ToF-MS: a study on freshly formed and aged biogenic SOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Gkatzelis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An intercomparison of different aerosol chemical characterization techniques has been performed as part of a chamber study of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA formation and aging at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction chamber. Three different aerosol sampling techniques – the aerosol collection module (ACM, the chemical analysis of aerosol online (CHARON and the collection thermal-desorption unit (TD were connected to proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometers (PTR-ToF-MSs to provide chemical characterization of the SOA. The techniques were compared among each other and to results from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS. The experiments investigated SOA formation from the ozonolysis of β-pinene, limonene, a β-pinene–limonene mix and real plant emissions from Pinus sylvestris L. (Scots pine. The SOA was subsequently aged by photo-oxidation, except for limonene SOA, which was aged by NO3 oxidation. Despite significant differences in the aerosol collection and desorption methods of the PTR-based techniques, the determined chemical composition, i.e. the same major contributing signals, was found by all instruments for the different chemical systems studied. These signals could be attributed to known products expected from the oxidation of the examined monoterpenes. The sampling and desorption method of ACM and TD provided additional information on the volatility of individual compounds and showed relatively good agreement. Averaged over all experiments, the total aerosol mass recovery compared to an SMPS varied within 80 ± 10, 51 ± 5 and 27 ± 3 % for CHARON, ACM and TD, respectively. Comparison to the oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O : C obtained by AMS showed that all PTR-based techniques observed lower O : C ratios, indicating a loss of molecular oxygen either during aerosol sampling or

  13. Corrosion resistance of multilayered magnesium phosphate/magnesium hydroxide film formed on magnesium alloy using steam-curing assisted chemical conversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Kudo, Ruriko; Omi, Takeshi; Teshima, Katsuya; Sonoda, Tsutomu; Shigematsu, Ichinori; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2012-01-01

    Anticorrosive multilayered films were successfully prepared on magnesium alloy AZ31 by chemical conversion treatment, followed by steam curing treatment. The crystal structures, chemical composition, surface morphologies, chemical bonding states of the film was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) measurements. All the films had thicknesses of ranging from 24 to 32 μm. The film had two layers that were composed of crystalline NH 4 MgPO 4 ·H 2 O, Mg 2 PO 4 OH·3H 2 O, Mg(OH) 2 and amorphous MgO. The outer layers include magnesium, oxygen, and phosphorous, and the inner layers include magnesium and oxygen. The corrosion resistant performances of the multilayered films in 5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution were investigated by electrochemical and gravimetric measurements. The potentiodynamic polarization curves revealed that the corrosion current density (j corr ) of all the film coated magnesium alloys decreased by more than four orders of magnitude as compared to that of the bare magnesium alloy, indicating that all the films had an inhibiting effect of corrosion reaction. Gravimetric measurements showed that the average corrosion rates obtained from the weight loss rates were estimated to be in the ranges of ca. 0.085–0.129 mm/y. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test revealed that the adhesion of our anticorrosive multilayered film to the magnesium alloy surface was very good.

  14. 47nm alumina–water nanofluid flow within boundary layer formed on upper horizontal surface of paraboloid of revolution in the presence of quartic autocatalysis chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Lare Animasaun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a modified version of buoyancy-induced model is considered to investigate the flow of 47nm alumina–water nanofluid along an upper surface of horizontal paraboloid of revolution in the presence of nonlinear thermal radiation, Lorentz force and quartic autocatalysis kind of homogeneous heterogeneous chemical reaction. The case of unequal diffusion coefficients of reactant A (bulk fluid and B (high concentration of catalyst at the surface in the presence of bioconvection is considered. Governing equation suitable to unravel the thermophoresis which takes place within the boundary layer is presented. Since chemical reactant B is of higher concentration at the surface more than the concept described as cubic autocatalytic, the suitable schemes are herein described as isothermal quartic autocatalytic reaction and first order reaction. The viscosity and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary with volume fraction (ϕ and suitable models for the case 0%⩽ϕ⩽0.8% are adopted. The transformed governing equations are solved numerically using Runge–Kutta fourth order along with shooting technique (RK4SM. Good agreement is obtained between the solutions of RK4SM and MATLAB bvp5c for a limiting case. The influence of some pertinent parameters on velocity, temperature, diffusion of motile microorganism, concentration of bulk fluid and catalyst is illustrated graphically and discussed.

  15. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  16. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  17. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  18. Stable radiographic scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Stable compositions which are useful in the preparation of Technetium-99m-based scintigraphic agents are discussed. They are comprised of ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester thereof in combination with a pertechnetate reducing agent or dissolved in oxidized pertechnetate-99m (sup(99m)TcO 4 - ) solution

  19. Some stable hydromagnetic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J L; Oberman, C R; Kulsrud, R M; Frieman, E A [Project Matterhorn, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1958-07-01

    We have been able to find and investigate the properties of equilibria which are hydromagnetically stable. These equilibria can be obtained, for example, by wrapping conductors helically around the stellarator tube. Systems with I = 3 or 4 are indicated to be optimum for stability purposes. In some cases an admixture of I = 2 fields can be advantageous for achieving equilibrium. (author)

  20. Chemical repair of trypsin-histidinyl radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.V.; Ruvarac, I.; Jankovic, I.; Josimovic, L.

    1991-01-01

    Oxyl radicals, such as hydroxyl, alkoxyl and peroxyl, react with biomolecules to produce bioradicals. Unless chemically repaired by suitable antioxidants, these bioradicals form stable products. This leads to loss of biological function of parent biomolecules with deleterious biological results, such as mutagenesis and cancer. Consequently, the understanding of the mechanisms of oxyl radical damage to biomolecules and chemical repair of such damage is crucial for the development of strategies for anticarcinogenesis and radioprotection. In this study the chemical repair of the histidinyl radical generated upon the trichloromethylperoxyl radical reaction with trypsin vas investigated by gamma radiolysis. The trypsin histidinyl radical is a resonance-stabilized heterocyclic free radical which was found to be unreactive with oxygen. The efficacy of the chemical repair of the trypsin-histidinyl radical by endogenous antioxidants which are electron donors (e.g. 5-hydroxytryptophan, uric acid) is compared to that of antioxidants which are H-atom donors (e. g. glutathione). 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Using quartz and plagioclase to gain insight into chemical and thermal evolution of the Rotoiti magma prior to the caldera-forming eruption {+-}55 ka, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Victoria [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Shane, Phil [School of Geography, Geology and Environmental Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Nairn, Ian [45 Summit Road, Rotorua RD5, New Zealand and GNS Science, Wairakei Research Centre, Taupo (New Zealand)], E-mail: Victoria.Smith@bristol.ac.uk

    2008-10-01

    The zoned plagioclase and quartz crystals within the multiple magmas that erupted during the {approx}55 ka Rotoiti caldera forming eruption appear to have had complex thermal and compositional histories. Compositional zoning suggests that magmatic systems were open, and received multiple pulses of hotter and more mafic magma. Limited diffusion across the crystals indicates that crystals did not dwell at magmatic temperatures for prolonged periods (<100 years), and suggest that the melts were generated and erupted quickly.

  2. Using quartz and plagioclase to gain insight into chemical and thermal evolution of the Rotoiti magma prior to the caldera-forming eruption ±55 ka, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Victoria; Shane, Phil; Nairn, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The zoned plagioclase and quartz crystals within the multiple magmas that erupted during the ∼55 ka Rotoiti caldera forming eruption appear to have had complex thermal and compositional histories. Compositional zoning suggests that magmatic systems were open, and received multiple pulses of hotter and more mafic magma. Limited diffusion across the crystals indicates that crystals did not dwell at magmatic temperatures for prolonged periods (<100 years), and suggest that the melts were generated and erupted quickly.

  3. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 116-C-3, 105-C Chemical Waste Tanks. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    The 116-C-3 waste site consisted of two underground storage tanks designed to receive mixed waste from the 105-C Reactor Metals Examination Facility chemical dejacketing process. Confirmatory evaluation and subsequent characterization of the site determined that the southern tank contained approximately 34,000 L (9,000 gal) of dejacketing wastes, and that the northern tank was unused. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling and modeling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also show that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  4. Simplified sample treatment for the determination of total concentrations and chemical fractionation forms of Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn in soluble coffees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Pawel; Stelmach, Ewelina; Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2014-11-15

    A simpler, and faster than wet digestion, sample treatment was proposed prior to determination of total concentrations for selected macro- (Ca, Mg) and microelements (Fe, Mn) in soluble coffees by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Samples were dissolved in water and acidified with HNO3. Precision was in the range 1-4% and accuracy was better than 2.5%. The method was used in analysis of 18 soluble coffees available on the Polish market. Chemical fractionation patterns for Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn in soluble coffees, as consumed, using a two-column solid-phase extraction method, determined Ca, Mg and Mn were present predominantly as cations (80-93% of total content). This suggests these elements are likely to be highly bioaccessible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The ancient Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not a new idea, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made substances. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (an impure thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite heated to ∼700 C containing traces of quartz and mica) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ((micro)m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and only just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick crumbly paste and then the paste is compacted and cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture will form a hard ceramic-like material containing distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its lack of porosity and vitreous appearance we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''

  6. Chemical properties of various organic electrolytes for lithium rechargeable batteries. Pt. 1.. Characterization of passivating layer formed on graphite in alkyl carbonate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Shoichiro; Asahina, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Yonei, Ayako; Yokoto, Kiyomi [Tsukuba Research Center, Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    The characteristics and reaction mechanisms of the passivating film formed on the surface of graphite were investigated in ethylene carbonate-diethyl carbonate solutions containing LiClO{sub 4}, LiPF{sub 6} and LiN(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}. The electron consumption resulting on the irreversible capacity of graphite was almost equivalent to that used in the one-electron reduction of Li{sup +} found in the film. The electrochemical reactions in the first discharge process may be divided into the following steps: (i) `initial film formation step` from 1.4 to 0.55 V; (ii) `main film formation step` from 0.55 to 0.2 V, and (iii) `lithium intercalation step from 0.2 to 0.0 V. Most of the passivating film is formed together with the lithium intercalation reaction at step (ii). The passivating film formed at this step contained a significant amount of organic film such as EtOCO{sub 2}Li, (CH{sub 2}OCO{sub 2}Li){sub 2}, etc. Through the consecutive formation of passivating film at steps (i) and (ii), lithium intercalation into graphite proceeds smoothly without further decomposition of organic electrolyte. (orig.)

  7. Study of the chemical chelates and anti-microbial effect of some metal ions in nanostructural form on the efficiency of antibiotic therapy "norfloxacin drug"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Mohamed, Mahmoud A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper has reviewed the chemical and biological impact resulting from the interaction between norfloxacin (norH) antibiotic drug and two lanthanide (lanthanum(III) and cerium(III)) metal ions, which prepared in normal and nano-features. La(III) and Ce(III) complexes were synthesized with chemical formulas [La(nor)3]·3H2O and [Ce(nor)3]·2H2O. Lanthanum and cerium(III) ions coordinated toward norH with a hexadentate geometry. The norH acts as deprotonated bidentate ligand through the oxygen atom of carbonyl group and the oxygen atom of carboxylic group. Elemental analysis, FT-IR spectral, electrical conductivity, thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements have been used to characterize the mentioned isolated complexes. The Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger integral methods are used to estimate the kinetic parameters for the major successive steps detectable in the TG curve. The brightness side in this study is to take advantage for the preparation and characterization of single phases of La2O3 and CeO2 nanoparticles using urea as precursors via a solid-state decomposition procedure. The norH ligand in comparison with both cases (normal and nano-particles) of lanthanide complexes were screened against for antibacterial (Escherichia Coli, Staphylococcus Aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Aspergillus Flavus and Candida Albicans) activities. The highest antibacterial and antifungal activities data of the nano-particles complexes were observed with more potent than the free norH and normal lanthanide complexes.

  8. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTIION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED SODUIM BEARING WASTE (HLW AND/OR LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not new, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made precursors. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (thermally dehydroxylated kaolin a mixture of kaolinite and smaller amounts of quartz and mica that has been heated to ∼700 C) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and water and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ((micro)m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick paste and then the paste is cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture forms a concrete-like ceramic material made up of distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its vitreous character we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''. Similar to zeolite powders, a hydroceramic is able to sequester cations in both lattice positions and within the channels and voids present in its tectosilicate framework structure. It can also accommodate a wide range of salt molecules (e.g., sodium nitrate) within these same openings thus rendering them insoluble. Due to its fine crystallite size and cementing character, the matrix develops significant physical strength. The obvious similarities between a hydroceramic waste form and a waste form based on solidified Portland cement grout are only superficial because

  9. Influence of pH on the chemical and structural properties of the oxide films formed on 316L stainless steel, alloy 600 and alloy 690 in high temperature aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, M.; Gosser, P.; Walls, M.G.; Rondot, B.; Pastol, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The oxide films formed on 316L stainless steel, alloy 600 and alloy 690 at 320 deg C in high temperature aqueous environments of different pH have been examined by glow discharge optical spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and capacitance measurements. The analytical study reveals that the films formed at pH 5 are mainly composed of chromium oxides. When the pH increases the chromium concentration decreases and those of the other two elements (Ni and Fe) tend to increase. The films formed at pH 5 on 316L stainless steel and alloy 600 are thick and powder-like. The film formed at the same pH on alloy 690 is thin and is composed of a compact protective inner layer and a less-compact outer layer formed by crystals of mixed iron-nickel-chromium oxides. The morphological appearance of the thick films and that of the thin films is very different. However, equivalent morphologies can be observed for the relatively thin duplex films formed at pH 8 and pH 9.5 on the 316L stainless steel and nickel-base alloys. The evolution of the chemical composition of the films is accompanied by important changes from the point of view of their semi-conductivity. (authors)

  10. Physico-chemical and mechanical characterization of in-situ forming xyloglucan gels incorporating a growth factor to promote cartilage reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispenza, Clelia; Todaro, Simona; Bulone, Donatella; Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Ghersi, Giulio; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Lo Presti, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    The development of growth factors is very promising in the field of tissue regeneration but specifically designed formulations have to be developed in order to enable such new biological entities (NBEs). In particular, the range of therapeutic concentrations is usually very low compared to other active proteins and the confinement in the target site can be of crucial importance. In-situ forming scaffolds are very promising solutions for minimally invasive intervention in cartilage reconstruction and targeting of NBEs. In this work injectable, in-situ forming gels of a temperature responsive partially degalactosylated xyloglucan (Deg-XG) incorporating the growth factor FGF-18 are formulated and characterized. In particular, injectability and shear viscosity at room temperature, time-to-gel at body temperature, morphology and mechanical properties of gels are investigated. The highly hydrophobic growth factor is favorably incorporated and retained by the gel. Gels undergo a slow erosion process when immersed in PBS at 37 °C that opens up their porous structure. The prolonged hydrothermal treatment leads to structural rearrangements towards tougher networks with increased dynamic shear modulus. Preliminary biological evaluations confirm absence of cytotoxicity and the ability of these scaffolds to host cells and promote their proliferation. - Highlights: • In-situ forming gels incorporating a growth factor are formulated and characterized. • The gel retains the growth factor and is colonized by chondrocytes. • Mechanical properties and porosity of gels are controlled by polymer concentration. • Incubation at 37 °C increases the gel strength and opens up the porous structure.

  11. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTIION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED SODUIM BEARING WASTE (HLW AND/OR LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2003-01-01

    Zeolites can adsorb liquids and gases, take part in catalytic reactions and serve as cation exchange media. They are commercially available as finely divided powders. Using zeolites to manage radioactive waste is not new, but a process by which zeolites can be made to act both as a host phase and a cementing agent is. It is notable that zeolites occur in nature as well consolidated/cemented deposits. The Romans used blocks of Neapolitan zeolitized tuff as a building material and some of these buildings are still standing. Zeolites are easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made precursor materials. The method of making a ''hydroceramic'' is derived from a process in which metakaolinite (thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite) is slurried with a dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution and then reacted for hours to days at mildly elevated temperatures (60-200 C). The zeolites that form in solution are finely divided powders containing micrometer sized crystals. However, if the process is changed and only enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution (e.g. 12 M) is added to the metakaolinite to give the mixture a putty-like consistency and the mixture is then cured under similar conditions, the mixture becomes a very hard ceramic-like material containing distinct tectosilicate crystallites (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous sodium aluminosilicate hydrate matrix. Due to the material's vitreous character, the composite has been called a hydroceramic. Similar to zeolite/feldspathoid powders, a hydroceramic is able to sequester cations and a wide range of salt molecules (e.g., nitrate, nitrite and sulfate) in lattice positions and within structural channels and voids thus rendering them ''insoluble'' and making them an ideal contingency waste form for solidifying radioactive waste. The obvious similarities between a hydroceramic waste form and a waste form based on solidified Portland-cement grout are superficial because their

  12. Fixation of tritium in a highly stable polymer form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.; Colombo, P.; Pruzansky, J.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the fixation of tritium comprises reacting tritiated water with calcium carbide to produce calcium hydroxide and tritiated acetylene, polymerizing the acetylene, and then incorporating the polymer in a solidifying matrix. 2 claims

  13. Chemical aspects of rubidium uranium sulphate for its use as a chemical standard for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Mudher, K.D.; Khandekar, R.R.; Krishnan, K.; Jayadevan, N.C.; Sood, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Rb 2 U(SO 4 ) 3 , a double sulphate of rubidium and uranium(IV) has been prepared and investigated for its use as a chemical standard for uranium. The compound can be easily prepared and crystallised in a pure form. The results of physico-chemical characterisation on preparation of 5-10 g. lots are described in this report. These studies suggest that the compound is anhydrous, stoichiometric, stable to atmospheric effects and easily soluble in acids and thus satisfies most of the criteria for a primary standard. (author). 13 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Quantum Chemical Investigation on the Antioxidant Activity of Neutral and Anionic Forms of Juglone: Metal Chelation and Its Effect on Radical Scavenging Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymard Didier Fouegue Tamafo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chelation ability of divalent Mg, Ca, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and monovalent Cu ions by neutral and anionic forms of juglone has been investigated at DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p level of theory in gas and aqueous phases. It is noteworthy that only the 1 : 1 stoichiometry was considered herein. The effects of these metals on the radical scavenging activity of neutral juglone were evaluated via the usual descriptors of hydrogen atom transfer. According to our results, metal chelation by the two forms of juglone was spontaneous and exothermic in both media. Based on the binding energies, Cu(II ion showed the highest affinity for the ligands. QTAIM analyses identified the metal-ligand bonds as intermediate type interactions in all the chelates, except those of Ca and Mg. It was also found that the chelates were better radical scavengers than the ligands. In the gas phase, the scavenging activity of the compounds was found to be governed by direct hydrogen atom transfer, the Co(II chelate being the most reactive. In the aqueous phase also, the sequential proton loss electron transfer was preferred by all the molecules, while the Cu(II chelates were the most reactive.

  15. Analysis of chemical bond states and electrical properties of stacked AlON/HfO{sub 2} gate oxides formed by using a layer-by-layer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Wonjoon; Lee, Jonghyun; Yang, Jungyup; Kim, Chaeok; Hong, Jinpyo; Nahm, Tschanguh; Byun, Byungsub; Kim, Moseok [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Stacked AlON/HfO{sub 2} thin films for gate oxides in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices are successfully prepared on Si substrates by utilizing a layer-by-layer technique integrated with an off-axis RF remote plasma sputtering process at room temperature. This off-axis structure is designed to improve the uniformity and the quality of gate oxide films. Also, a layer-by-layer technique is used to control the interface layer between the gate oxide and the Si substrate. The electrical properties of our stacked films are characterized by using capacitance versus voltage and leakage current versus voltage measurements. The stacked AlON/HfO{sub 2} gate oxide exhibits a low leakage current of about 10{sup -6} A/cm{sup 2} and a high dielectric constant value of 14.26 by effectively suppressing the interface layer between gate oxide and Si substrate. In addition, the chemical bond states and the optimum thickness of each AlON and HfO{sub 2} thin film are analyzed using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurement.

  16. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  17. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  18. On the Chemical Signature and Origin of Dicoppertrihydroxyformate (Cu2(OH)3HCOO) Formed on Copper Miniatures of 17th and 18th centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Alfredina; Teixeira, Dora Martins; Candeias, António J; Mirão, José; Rodrigues, Paulo Simões; Teixeira, Jorge Ginja

    2016-10-01

    A corrosion product rarely reported in the literature has been found on the copper support of three miniature paintings of the 17th and 18th centuries. This product, which has been identified as dicoppertrihydroxyformate (Cu2(OH)3HCOO), is an unusual basic copper formate found on copper artifacts. The identification and characterization of dicoppertrihydroxyformate was carried out directly over the corroded surface of the objects, using a nondestructive approach, which combines the integrated use of various microanalytical techniques. Using this approach, it was possible to obtain a set of new reference data about the natural form of Cu2(OH)3HCOO, that will enable its unambiguous identification in other similar objects. In this work, the probable causes that may have contributed to its formation are also discussed.

  19. Stability of the spherical form of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabry, A.A.

    1976-08-01

    An extension of the mass formula for a spherical nucleus in the drop model to include a largely deformed nucleus of different forms is investigated. It is found that although the spherical form is stable under small deformations from equilibrium, there exists for heavier nuclei another more favourable stable form, which can be approximated by two, or three touching prolate ellipsoids of revolution

  20. Use of criteria pollutants, active and passive mercury sampling, and receptor modeling to understand the chemical forms of gaseous oxidized mercury in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Edgerton, E.; Gustin, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    The highest mercury (Hg) wet deposition in the United States (US) occurs along the Gulf of Mexico, and in the southern and central Mississippi River Valley. Gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) is thought to be a major contributor due to its high water solubility and reactivity. Therefore, it is critical to understand the concentrations, potential for wet and dry deposition, and GOM compounds present in the air. Concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of GOM were measured at Outlying Landing Field (OLF), Florida, using a Tekran® 2537/1130/1135, and active and passive samplers using cation-exchange and nylon membranes. Relationships with Tekran® derived data must be interpreted with caution, since GOM concentrations can be biased low depending on the chemical compounds in air, and interferences with water vapor and ozone. Only gaseous elemental Hg and GOM are discussed here since the PBM measurement uncertainties are higher. Criteria air pollutants were concurrently measured and Tekran® data were assessed along with these using Principal Component Analysis to identify associations among air pollutants. Based on the diel pattern, high GOM concentrations at this site were associated with fossil fuel combustion and gas phase oxidation during the day, and gas phase oxidation and transport in the free troposphere. The ratio of GEM/CO at OLF (0.008 ng m-3 ppbv-1) was much higher than the numbers reported for the Western United States and central New York for domestic emissions or biomass burning (0.001 ng m-3 ppbv-1), which we suggest is indicative of a marine boundary layer source. Results from nylon membranes with thermal desorption analyses suggest five potential GOM compounds exist in this area, including HgBr2, HgO, Hg(NO3)2, HgSO4, and an unknown compound. This indicates that the site is influenced by different gaseous phase reactions and sources. A~high GOM event related to high CO but average SO2 suggests the air parcels moved from the free troposphere and across

  1. Stable black phosphorus quantum dots for alkali PH sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weilan; Song, Haizeng; Yan, Shancheng

    2018-01-01

    Black phosphorus, as a new two-dimensional material has been widely used in sensors, photovoltaic devices, etc. However, thin layered black phosphorus chemically degrades rapidly under ambient and aqueous conditions, which hinders the application of it in the chemical sensors. In this work, stable black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs) in solution are successfully synthesized by functionalization with 4-nitrobenzene-diazonium (4-NBD). The stable BPQDs are investigated by TEM, AFM, Raman, and UV-absorption. As a potential application, the stable BPQDs are used as sensors in alkali solution, which exhibit outstanding performance. Our work paves the way towards a new application with BPQDs in solution.

  2. Periodicity of the stable isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, J C A

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all stable (non-radioactive) isotopes are formally interrelated as the products of systematically adding alpha particles to four elementary units. The region of stability against radioactive decay is shown to obey a general trend based on number theory and contains the periodic law of the elements as a special case. This general law restricts the number of what may be considered as natural elements to 100 and is based on a proton:neutron ratio that matches the golden ratio, characteristic of biological and crystal growth structures. Different forms of the periodic table inferred at other proton:neutron ratios indicate that the electronic configuration of atoms is variable and may be a function of environmental pressure. Cosmic consequences of this postulate are examined. (author)

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Analysis of Trapa bispinosa: A Novel Adsorbent for the Removal of Cu (II) from Aqueous Solution in Chemically Treated Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, M.; Nadeem, R.; Saeed, M.; Zahoor, T.

    2013-01-01

    Current study explored biosorption mechanism and kinetics of Cu (II) onto Trapa bispinosa peels (TBPs) biomass in surfactant (SDS, CTAB, and Triton X-100), organic acid (CA, TA, AA) and in Native (N) form during batch experiment. Equilibrium sorption capacity was determined at various solution parameters like pH, contact time and initial concentration. Increment in sorption capacity was observed with increase in pH until maximum is achieved at pH 5. Optimized time and concentration were 120 minutes and 100 ppm respectively. Best fitted pseudo-second order kinetic model on the data showed that sorption of Cu (II) is rate-controlling. Sorption capacity (mg g-1) for Cu (II) ions increased while % removal decreased. SDS TBPs in comparison to all TBPs show highest sorption tendency as after SDS pretreatment TBPs surface is loaded with the negatively charged groups that provide more attachment sites for Cu (II) ions. Langmuir isotherm give best description of monolayer adsorption over the surface as it fitted better to data. FTIR analysis showed presence of functional groups like amine, carbonyl and hydroxyl groups. Ionization states of these functional groups are changed with pH. (author)

  4. The investigation on physico-chemical conditions of sulfides and sulfates based on petrographic and sulfur - oxygen stable isotope studies from the Darreh-Zar porphyry copper deposit, Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Parsapoor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Darreh-Zar porphyry copper deposit, located in the Urumieh – Dokhtar magmatic belt, lies about 10 km southeast of Sar-Cheshmeh porphyry copper deposit. The ore body with hydrothermally altered zones including potassic, chlorite-sericite, sericite, argillic and propylitic all related to the Darreh-Zar porphyry stock intruded the Eocene volcanic rocks. Pyrite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite, with different textures as disseminated and veinlet, are the major sulfide minerals and chalcocite and covellite are considered as the secondary minerals. Sulfur isotopic composition of the sulfates and sulfides studied fall on the magmatic values. Two different origins may be suggested for the gypsums studied: 1- hydration of anhydrite and 2- oxidation of pyrite during supergene enrichment. The stable isotopic data calculated on couple minerals (pyrite-anhydrite point to the formation temperature of about 485-515οC for the fluids involved in mineralization. The fluid responsible for mineralization suggests magmatic sources for all sulfide phases and reduced aqueous sulfur species. Isotopic zoning, based on the δ34S pyrite values, divided the area into the east and the west parts with negative and positive correlation against the depth, respectively. Also, a negative correlation is observed between the Cu and the δ34S in the eastern portion of the area.

  5. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--part 2: forensic inter-laboratory trial: bulk carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in a range of chemical compounds (Australia and New Zealand).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Maynard, Philip; Hill, David M; Andrew, Anita S; Neal, Ken; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Hope, Janet; Walker, G Stewart; Roux, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Comparability of data over time and between laboratories is a key issue for consideration in the development of global databases, and more broadly for quality assurance in general. One mechanism that can be utilized for evaluating traceability is an inter-laboratory trial. This paper addresses an inter-laboratory trial conducted across a number of Australian and New Zealand isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) laboratories. The main objective of this trial was to determine whether IRMS laboratories in these countries would record comparable values for the distributed samples. Four carbon containing and four nitrogen containing compounds were distributed to seven laboratories in Australia and one in New Zealand. The laboratories were requested to analyze the samples using their standard procedures. The data from each laboratory was evaluated collectively using International Standard ISO 13528 (Statistical methods for use in proficiency testing by inter-laboratory comparisons). "Warning signals" were raised against one participant in this trial. "Action signals" requiring corrective action were raised against four participants. These participants reviewed the data and possible sources for the discrepancies. This inter-laboratory trial was successful in providing an initial snapshot of the potential for traceability between the participating laboratories. The statistical methods described in this article could be used as a model for others needing to evaluate stable isotope results derived from multiple laboratories, e.g., inter-laboratory trials/proficiency testing. Ongoing trials will be conducted to improve traceability across the Australian and New Zealand IRMS community.

  6. Status of stable isotope enrichment, products, and services at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, W.S.; Tracy, J.G.; Collins, E.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Oak Ridge national laboratory (ORNL) has been supplying enriched stable and radioactive isotopes to the research, medical, and industrial communities for over 50 y. Very significant changes have occurred in this effort over the past several years, and, while many of these changes have had a negative impact on the availability of enriched isotopes, more recent developments are actually improving the situation for both the users and the producers of enriched isotopes. ORNL is still a major producer and distributor of radioisotopes, but future isotope enrichment operations to be conducted at the isotope enrichment facility (IEF)fwill be limited to stable isotopes. Among the positive changes in the enriched stable isotope area are a well-functioning, long-term contract program, which offers stability and pricing advantages; the resumption of calutron operations; the adoption of prorated conversion charges, which greatly improves the pricing of isotopes to small users; ISO 9002 registration of the IEF's quality management system; and a much more customer-oriented business philosophy. Efforts are also being made to restore and improve upon the extensive chemical and physical form processing capablities that once existed in the enriched stable isotope program. Innovative ideas are being pursued in both technical and administrative areas to encourage the beneficial use of enriched stable isotopes and the development of related technologies. (orig.)

  7. Status of stable isotope enrichment, products, and services at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Aaron, W.; Tracy, Joe G.; Collins, Emory D.

    1997-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been supplying enriched stable and radioactive isotopes to the research, medical, and industrial communities for over 50 y. Very significant changes have occurred in this effort over the past several years, and, while many of these changes have had a negative impact on the availability of enriched isotopes, more recent developments are actually improving the situation for both the users and the producers of enriched isotopes. ORNL is still a major producer and distributor of radioisotopes, but future isotope enrichment operations to be conducted at the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) will be limited to stable isotopes. Among the positive changes in the enriched stable isotope area are a well-functioning, long-term contract program, which offers stability and pricing advantages; the resumption of calutron operations; the adoption of prorated conversion charges, which greatly improves the pricing of isotopes to small users; ISO 9002 registration of the IEF's quality management system; and a much more customer-oriented business philosophy. Efforts are also being made to restore and improve upon the extensive chemical and physical form processing capablities that once existed in the enriched stable isotope program. Innovative ideas are being pursued in both technical and administrative areas to encourage the beneficial use of enriched stable isotopes and the development of related technologies.

  8. Status of stable isotope enrichment, products, and services at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, W.S.; Tracy, J.G.; Collins, E.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been supplying enriched stable and radioactive isotopes to the research, medical, and industrial communities for over 50 years. Very significant changes have occurred in this effort over the past several years, and, while many of these changes have had a negative impact on the availability of enriched isotopes, more recent developments are actually improving the situation for both the users and the producers of enriched isotopes. ORNL is still a major producer and distributor of radioisotopes, but future isotope enrichment operations conducted at the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) will be limited to stable isotopes. Among the positive changes in the enriched stable isotope area are a well-functioning, long-term contract program, which offers stability and pricing advantages; the resumption of calutron operations; the adoption of prorated conversion charges, which greatly improves the pricing of isotopes to small users; SIO 9002 registration of the IEF's quality management system; and a much more customer-oriented business philosophy. Efforts are also being made to restore and improve upon the extensive chemical and physical form processing capabilities that once existed in the enriched stable isotope program. Innovative ideas are being pursued in both technical and administrative areas to encourage the beneficial use of enriched stable isotopes and the development of related technologies

  9. Inter-specific competition, but not different soil microbial communities, affects N chemical forms uptake by competing graminoids of upland grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Medina-Roldán

    Full Text Available Evidence that plants differ in their ability to take up both organic (ON and inorganic (IN forms of nitrogen (N has increased ecologists' interest on resource-based plant competition. However, whether plant uptake of IN and ON responds to differences in soil microbial community composition and/or functioning has not yet been explored, despite soil microbes playing a key role in N cycling. Here, we report results from a competition experiment testing the hypothesis that soil microbial communities differing in metabolic activity as a result of long-term differences to grazing exposure could modify N uptake of Eriophorum vaginatum L. and Nardus stricta L. These graminoids co-occur on nutrient-poor, mountain grasslands where E. vaginatum decreases and N. stricta increases in response to long-term grazing. We inoculated sterilised soil with soil microbial communities from continuously grazed and ungrazed grasslands and planted soils with both E. vaginatum and N. stricta, and then tracked uptake of isotopically labelled NH(4 (+ (IN and glycine (ON into plant tissues. The metabolically different microbial communities had no effect on N uptake by either of the graminoids, which might suggest functional equivalence of soil microbes in their impacts on plant N uptake. Consistent with its dominance in soils with greater concentrations of ON relative to IN in the soluble N pool, Eriophorum vaginatum took up more glycine than N. stricta. Nardus stricta reduced the glycine proportion taken up by E. vaginatum, thus increasing niche overlap in N usage between these species. Local abundances of these species in mountain grasslands are principally controlled by grazing and soil moisture, although our results suggest that changes in the relative availability of ON to IN can also play a role. Our results also suggest that coexistence of these species in mountain grasslands is likely based on non-equilibrium mechanisms such as disturbance and/or soil heterogeneity.

  10. Metabolic studies in man using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Jung, K.; Krumbiegel, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this project, stable isotope compounds and stable isotope pharmaceuticals were used (with emphasis on the application of 15 N) to study several aspects of nitrogen metabolism in man. Of the many methods available, the 15 N stable isotope tracer technique holds a special position because the methodology for application and nitrogen isotope analysis is proven and reliable. Valid routine methods using 15 N analysis by emission spectrometry have been demonstrated. Several methods for the preparation of biological material were developed during our participation in the Coordinated Research Programme. In these studies, direct procedures (i.e. use of diluted urine as a samples without chemical preparation) or rapid isolation methods were favoured. Within the scope of the Analytical Quality Control Service (AQCS) enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies were prepared and are now available through the International Atomic Energy Agency. The materials are of special importance as the increasing application of stable isotopes as tracers in medical, biological and agricultural studies has focused interest on reliable measurements of biological material of different origin. 24 refs

  11. The effects of crystallization and residual glass on the chemical durability of iron phosphate waste forms containing 40 wt% of a high MoO3 Collins-CLT waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Hsien; Bai, Jincheng; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Brow, Richard K.; Szabo, Joe; Zervos, Adam

    2018-03-01

    The effects of cooling rate on the chemical durability of iron phosphate waste forms containing up to 40 wt% of a high MoO3 Collins-CLT waste simulant were determined at 90 °C using the product consistency test (PCT). The waste form, designated 40wt%-5, meets appropriate Department of Energy (DOE) standards when rapidly quenched from the melt (as-cast) and after slow cooling following the CCC (canister centerline cooling)-protocol, although the quenched glass is more durable. The analysis of samples from the vapor hydration test (VHT) and the aqueous corrosion test (differential recession test) reveals that rare earth orthophosphate (monazite) and Zr-pyrophosphate crystals that form on cooling are more durable than the residual glass in the 40wt%-5 waste form. The residual glass in the CCC-treated samples has a greater average phosphate chain length and a lower Fe/P ratio, and those contribute to its faster corrosion kinetics.

  12. Study of the chemical interaction between the beryllium powders of different particles size and the air in the temperature range 500-1000degC form the viewpoint of ITER safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, D.A. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konovalov, Y.V.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Levin, V.B.; Chekhlatov, G.M.; Khomutov, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Under an effect of some factors characteristic for the ITER- operating condition a dense beryllium facing plasma can transit into various forms, changing its structural states. As a result of the bombardment of beryllium plasma facing components by ion fluxes, the production of a dust including the particles from a few micrometers to a few millimeters in size is possible. The specific features in the behaviour of various beryllium forms under emergency conditions are of an essential interest from the viewpoint of ITER safety. Some grades of powders of different average particles size (14-31 micron) have been produced in a given study, and their chemical interaction at high temperatures with air (500-1100degC), test duration effects simulating the emergency situation at ITER in the first approximation have been studied. The temperature dependence of beryllium powders (different particles size after disc abrased) interaction with air in the temperature range 500-1000degC at the exposure of 5 hours long for each temperature and kinetic dependence of interaction of these powders with air at 800degC for the exposure from half an hour to 7 hours long were studied. An analysis of granulometric weight fraction in the metallic and oxidized beryllium powders with different particles size has been done by the photosedimentational technique with the instrument `Analysette-20`. Construction of a mathematical model for the chemical interaction of beryllium powders with air at high temperatures have been carried out. (author)

  13. Effects of volumetric expansion in molecular crystals: A quantum mechanical investigation on aspirin and paracetamol most stable polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kapil; Flurchick, Kenneth M.; Valenzano, Loredana

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a study performed at hybrid semi-empirical density functional level (B3LYP-D2*) of the physico-chemical properties of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in their most stable crystalline forms. It is shown how effects arising from volumetric expansions influence the properties of the materials. Structural, energetic, and vibrational properties are in good agreement with experimental values reported at temperatures far from 0 K. Results show that the proposed approach is reliable enough to reproduce effects of volumetric expansion on lattice energies and other measurable physico-chemical observables related to inter-molecular forces.

  14. New Polymorphic Forms of Pemetrexed Diacid and Their Use for the Preparation of Pharmaceutically Pure Amorphous and Hemipentahydrate Forms of Pemetrexed Disodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Michalak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of stable amorphous pemetrexed disodium of pharmaceutical purity as well as the process optimization for the preparation of the hemipentahydrate form of pemetrexed disodium are described. Analytical methods for the polymorphic and chemical purity studies of pemetrexed disodium and pemetrexed diacid forms were developed. The physicochemical properties of the amorphous and hydrate forms of pemetrexed disodium, as well as new forms of pemetrexed diacid (a key synthetic intermediate were studied by thermal analysis and powder X-ray diffraction. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography methods were used for the chemical purity and residual solvents determination. In order to study the polymorphic and chemical stability of the amorphous and hemipentahydrate forms, a hygroscopicity test (25 °C, 80% RH was performed. Powder diffraction and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses revealed that the amorphous character and high chemical purity were preserved after the hygroscopicity test. The hemipentahydrate form transformed completely to the heptahydrate form of pemetrexed disodium. Both pemetrexed disodium forms were produced with high efficiency and pharmaceutical purity in a small commercial scale. Amorphous pemetrexed disodium was selected for further pharmaceutical development. Two new polymorphs (forms 1 and 2 of pemetrexed diacid were used for the preparation of high purity amorphous pemetrexed disodium.

  15. Immobilization of actinides in stable mineral type and ceramic materials (high temperature synthesis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, O.; Konovalov, E.

    1996-05-01

    Alternative vitrification technologies are being developed in the world for the immobilization of high radioactive waste in materials with improved thermodynamic stability, as well as improved chemical and thermal stability and stability to radiation. Oxides, synthesized in the form of analogs to rock-forming minerals and ceramics, are among those materials that have highly stable properties and are compatible with the environment. In choosing the appropriate material, we need to be guided by its geometric stability, the minimal number of cations in the structure of the material and the presence of structural elements in the mineral that are isomorphs of uranium and thorium, actinoids found in nature. Rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium and calcium are therefore suitable. The minerals listed in the table (with the exception of the zircon) are pegatites by origin, i.e. they are formed towards the end of the magma crystallization of silicates form the residual melt, enriched with Ta, Nb, Ti, Zr, Ce, Y, U and Th. Uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures form part of the lattice of the mineral. These minerals, which are rather simple in composition and structure and are formed under high temperatures, may be viewed as natural physio-chemical systems that are stable and long-lived in natural environments. The similarity of the properties of actinoids and lanthanoids plays an important role in the geochemistry of uranium and thorium; however, uranium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} group of lanthanoids (the yttrium group) while thorium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}light{close_quotes} group (the cerium group). That is why rare earth minerals contain uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures.

  16. Platinum stable isotopes in ferromanganese crust and nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Loretta; Seward, Terry; Handler, Monica R.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crust and nodules are slow-growing chemical sediments that form by direct precipitation from seawater, resulting in a record of changing seawater chemistry. These sediments are the primary sink for platinum in the modern oxic marine environment, hosting well-documented enrichments over other platinum-group elements (PGEs): the Pt anomaly [1]. Platinum is a non-bio-essential, highly siderophile, transition metal with six stable isotopes (190Pt, 192Pt, 194Pt, 195Pt, 196Pt, and 198Pt) with several oxidation states (Pt0, Pt2+ and Pt4+). Platinum is generally considered to exist in the hydrosphere as Pt2+ although its behaviour in the marine environment is poorly constrained, and Pt4+may also be present. Variations in ocean redox state, together with changes in source fluxes to the oceans, may therefore lead to small variations (Leaching experiments conducted on platinum rich terrestrial materials underwent platinum stable isotopic measurement as an analogue for the Pt isotopic fractionation associated with continental weathering. [1] Hodge, V.F. et al. (1985) Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 72, 158-162. [2] Creech, J. et al. (2013) Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 28. 853-865.

  17. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine is a predominantly stable DNA modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Martin; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Yang, Xiaoping; Williams, Michael; Murrell, Adele; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-12-01

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) is an oxidation product of 5-methylcytosine which is present in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of most mammalian cells. Reduction of hmC levels in DNA is a hallmark of cancers. Elucidating the dynamics of this oxidation reaction and the lifetime of hmC in DNA is fundamental to understanding hmC function. Using stable isotope labelling of cytosine derivatives in the DNA of mammalian cells and ultrasensitive tandem liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry, we show that the majority of hmC is a stable modification, as opposed to a transient intermediate. In contrast with DNA methylation, which occurs immediately during replication, hmC forms slowly during the first 30 hours following DNA synthesis. Isotopic labelling of DNA in mouse tissues confirmed the stability of hmC in vivo and demonstrated a relationship between global levels of hmC and cell proliferation. These insights have important implications for understanding the states of chemically modified DNA bases in health and disease.

  18. Theory of stable allocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish Royal Academy awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics to Lloyd Shapley and Alvin Roth, for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design. These two American researchers worked independently from each other, combining basic theory and empirical investigations. Through their experiments and practical design they generated a flourishing field of research and improved the performance of many markets. Born in 1923 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Shapley defended his doctoral thesis at Princeton University in 1953. For many years he worked at RAND, and for more than thirty years he was a professor at UCLA University. He published numerous scientific papers, either by himself or in cooperation with other economists.

  19. Moltex Energy's stable salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, R.; Laurie, J.

    2016-01-01

    A stable salt reactor is a molten salt reactor in which the molten fuel salt is contained in fuel rods. This concept was invented in 1951 and re-discovered and improved recently by Moltex Energy Company. The main advantage of using molten salt fuel is that the 2 problematic fission products cesium and iodine do not exist in gaseous form but rather in a form of a salt that present no danger in case of accident. Another advantage is the strongly negative temperature coefficient for reactivity which means the reactor self-regulates. The feasibility studies have been performed on a molten salt fuel composed of sodium chloride and plutonium/uranium/lanthanide/actinide trichloride. The coolant fluid is a mix of sodium and zirconium fluoride salts that will need low flow rates. The addition of 1 mol% of metal zirconium to the coolant fluid reduces the risk of corrosion with standard steels and the addition of 2% of hafnium reduces the neutron dose. The temperature of the coolant is expected to reach 650 Celsius degrees at the exit of the core. This reactor is designed to be modular and it will be able to burn actinides. (A.C.)

  20. Bi-stable optical actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  1. Concentration factors of stable elements and radionuclides in Po river fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilli, M.; Ciceri, G.; Bozzani, A.; Guzzi, L.; Queirazza, G.

    1988-01-01

    The concentration factors (CF) of stable Co, Cs, Mn, Fe, Zn and Sr in different fish from six stretches in the middle course of the Po river (N. Italy) have been investigated. The space-time variation in water has been followed for 14 months. The investigation has been undertaken to study CF variations in the same fish species as a function of the physico-chemical form of the different elements in water (dissolved, dissolved and exchangeable fraction of the particulate, total). CF values of 103 Ru, 131 I and 134 - 137 Cs were also investigated for Cyprinus carpio reared, with artificial food, in two semi-natural environments

  2. Local Search Approaches in Stable Matching Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Walsh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The stable marriage (SM problem has a wide variety of practical applications, ranging from matching resident doctors to hospitals, to matching students to schools or, more generally, to any two-sided market. In the classical formulation, n men and n women express their preferences (via a strict total order over the members of the other sex. Solving an SM problem means finding a stable marriage where stability is an envy-free notion: no man and woman who are not married to each other would both prefer each other to their partners or to being single. We consider both the classical stable marriage problem and one of its useful variations (denoted SMTI (Stable Marriage with Ties and Incomplete lists where the men and women express their preferences in the form of an incomplete preference list with ties over a subset of the members of the other sex. Matchings are permitted only with people who appear in these preference lists, and we try to find a stable matching that marries as many people as possible. Whilst the SM problem is polynomial to solve, the SMTI problem is NP-hard. We propose to tackle both problems via a local search approach, which exploits properties of the problems to reduce the size of the neighborhood and to make local moves efficiently. We empirically evaluate our algorithm for SM problems by measuring its runtime behavior and its ability to sample the lattice of all possible stable marriages. We evaluate our algorithm for SMTI problems in terms of both its runtime behavior and its ability to find a maximum cardinality stable marriage. Experimental results suggest that for SM problems, the number of steps of our algorithm grows only as O(n log(n, and that it samples very well the set of all stable marriages. It is thus a fair and efficient approach to generate stable marriages. Furthermore, our approach for SMTI problems is able to solve large problems, quickly returning stable matchings of large and often optimal size, despite the

  3. Transuranium elements in organic chemical forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi

    1987-01-01

    It is very important to achive an understanding what role organic matter plays in the behavior of transuranium elements in the environment. This paper reports the studies on characteristics of fallout Pu and Am in soil closely related to soil organic matter, and interaction of humic acid and Am (III) in aqueous solution. From the results obtained, it was suggested that the humic acids had strong interaction with transuranium elements, but such soluble complexes were removed soon from the solution by coagulation and sorption on soil. (author)

  4. Formulation of stable protein powders by supercritical fluid drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jovanović, N.

    2007-01-01

    Protein pharmaceuticals are potent drugs for the treatment of several chronic and life-threatening diseases. However, the complex and sensitive nature of protein molecules requires special attention in the development of stable dosage forms. Developing stable aqueous protein formulations is often a

  5. Method for recovering or recirculating stable nitroxide radicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, Andre; Van Doren, Hendrik Arend; Bleeker, Ido Pieter; Gotlieb, Kornelis Fester.

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates fo a method for recovering stable nitroxide radicals, wherein at least a part of a reaction mixt. consisting of a soln. or suspension, or a filtrate or supernatant of a suspension, in which stable nitroxide radicals are present in non-solid form, is subjected to an azeotropic

  6. (EOI) Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Dorine Odongo

    COLLABORATING TECHNICAL AGENCIES: EXPRESSION OF INTEREST FORM. • Please read the information provided about the initiative and the eligibility requirements in the Prospectus before completing this application form. • Ensure all the sections of the form are accurately completed and saved in PDF format.

  7. Modular forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.; Edixhoven, B.; van der Geer, G.; Moonen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modular forms are functions with an enormous amount of symmetry that play a central role in number theory, connecting it with analysis and geometry. They have played a prominent role in mathematics since the 19th century and their study continues to flourish today. Modular forms formed the

  8. Stable isotope studies: Progress report, March 1985--August 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been carried out in the following areas: Stable Isotope Fractionation (1) Effects of chemical poisons and surface modifiers on polycrystalline platinum electrode surfaces have been investigated with a goal to develop a new form of heterogeneous catalyst for the hydrogen isotope exchange between dihydrogen and water. (2) A new nitrogen-15 fractionation process has been developed, based on the isotope exchange between liquid N 2 O 3 -N 2 O 4 mixture and their vapor phase at a subambient temperature and a raised pressure. (3) A closed chemical recycle process has been developed for use in connection with the refluxer in the Nitrox-type nitrogen-15 plant. Isotope Effects (1) The vapor pressure isotope effect (VPIE) study of liquid fluoromethanes have been completed. (2) The VPIE study of solid and liquid ammonia has been completed. (3) A theoretical foundation of the additivity for the vibrational zero-point energy (ZPE) has been developed. Studies of Liquid Ammonia. With an aim to study intermolecular interaction (and the inversion phenomenon, in particular) in liquid ammonia, and to further investigate various ammonia solutions, a molecular dynamics (MD) study has been initiated. An MD program has been completed, and force field functions have been developed for an ensemble of non-rigid ammonia molecules. 107 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs

  9. Food and Environmental Protection Laboratory, Seibersdorf: Discrimination of honey of different floral origins by a combination of various chemical parameters; Stable Isotopes Applied to Authenticating Honey; The use of analyte protectants in pesticide residue analytical work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zora Jandrić, Zora; Frew, Russell; Abrahim, Aiman; Maestroni, Britt; Ochoa, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    In the previous newsletter, we reported on research into methodology for the classification of honey of various floral and geographical origins using UPLC-QToF MS and MVA.The research on honey authenticity was expanded using multivariate data analysis of data generated by a number of different analytical techniques to discriminate honeys of different floral origins. The feasibility of a multivariate approach, including various chemical parameters and multivariate data analysis, for the discrimination of various honeys originating from one region, was explored. One of the earliest applications of nuclear techniques for food authenticity was the use of carbon isotopes to detect the addition of cheap sugars in honey in the 1970s. The principle is that the cheap sugar (fructose) is derived from corn and has a higher 13 C/ 12 C that the fructose from honey. This difference is due to the different photosynthetic pathways; corn is a C4 plant and that mechanism does not discriminate against the 13 C as much as the C3 pathway used by most honey-producing plants. Consequently the two plant types have quite different carbon isotope ratios. Thus measurements of the carbon isotope ratios can distinguish between the two sources of fructose. However, within each plant population there is natural variability in isotope ratios. This makes detecting the addition of small amounts of corn syrup difficult. The test was further refined by its developers to use 13 C/ 12 C measurements on protein purified from the honey as an internal reference, based on the fact that if the sugar and protein are from the same plant then they should be closely related in isotopic ratio. This refined method was adopted by the Association of Analytical Chemists as an official method (AOAC 998.12) and is part of the Codex Alimentarius standard for testing authenticity of honey. This test is generally reliable. However, some honey, notably New Zealand manuka, has a frequent fail rate. Manuka is a premium

  10. A model for a stable coronal loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoven, G.V.; Chiuderi, C.; Giachetti, R.

    1977-01-01

    We present here a new plasma-physics model of a stable active-region arch which corresponds to the structure observed in the EUV. Pressure gradients are seen, so that the equilibrium magnetic field must depart from the force-free form valid in the surrounding corona. We take advantage of the data and of the approximate cylindrical symmetry to develop a modified form of the commonly assumed sheared-spiral structure. The dynamic MHD behavior of this new pressure/field model is then evaluated by the Newcomb criterion, taken from controlled-fusion physics, and the results show short-wavelength stability in a specific parameter range. Thus we demonstrate the possibility, for pressure profiles with widths of the order of the magnetic-field scale, that such arches can persist for reasonable periods. Finally, the spatial proportions and magnetic fields of a characteristic stable coronal loop are described

  11. (2+1)-dimensional stable spatial Raman solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shverdin, M.Y.; Yavuz, D.D.; Walker, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the formation, propagation, and interaction of stable two-frequency (2+1)-dimensional solitons, formed in a Raman media driven near maximum molecular coherence. The propagating light is trapped in the two transverse dimensions

  12. Stable isotope enrichment: Current and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates the Isotope Enrichment Facility for the purpose of providing enriched stable isotopes, selected radioactive isotopes (including the actinides), and isotope-related materials and services for use in various research applications. ORNL is responsible for isotope enrichment and the distribution of approximately 225 nongaseous stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. Many enriched isotope products are of prime importance in the fabrication of nuclear targets and the subsequent production of special radionuclides. State-of-the-art techniques to achieve special isotopic, chemical, and physical requirements are performed at ORNL This report describes the status and capabilities of the Isotope Enrichment Facility and the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory as well as emphasizing potential advancements in enrichment capabilities

  13. Stable isotope enrichment - current and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates the Isotope Enrichment Facility for the purpose of providing enriched stable isotopes, selected radioactive isotopes (including the actinides), and isotope-related materials and services for use in various research applications. ORNL is responsible for isotope enrichment and the distribution of approximately 225 nongaseous stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. Many enriched isotope products are of prime importance in the fabrication of nuclear targets and the subsequent production of special radionuclides. State-of-the-art techniques to achieve special isotopic, chemical, and physical requirements are performed at ORNL. This report describes the status and capabilities of the Isotope Enrichment Facility and the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory as well as emphasizing potential advancements in enrichment capabilities. (orig.)

  14. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C [Idaho Falls, ID; Herring, J Stephen [Idaho Falls, ID; Grandy, Jon D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  15. [Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes in the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniak, Iu E; Grigor'ev, A I; Skuratov, V M; Ivanova, S M; Pokrovskiĭ, B G

    2006-01-01

    Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes was studied in 9 human subjects in a chamber with normal air pressure imitating a space cabin. Mass-spectrometry of isotopes in blood, urine, saliva, and potable water evidenced increases in the contents of heavy H isotope (deuterium) in the body liquids as compared with water. These results support one of the theories according to which the human organism eliminates heavy stable isotopes of biogenous chemical elements.

  16. One-dimensional stable distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Zolotarev, V M

    1986-01-01

    This is the first book specifically devoted to a systematic exposition of the essential facts known about the properties of stable distributions. In addition to its main focus on the analytic properties of stable laws, the book also includes examples of the occurrence of stable distributions in applied problems and a chapter on the problem of statistical estimation of the parameters determining stable laws. A valuable feature of the book is the author's use of several formally different ways of expressing characteristic functions corresponding to these laws.

  17. Stable dark energy stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Francisco S N

    2006-01-01

    The gravastar picture is an alternative model to the concept of a black hole, where there is an effective phase transition at or near where the event horizon is expected to form, and the interior is replaced by a de Sitter condensate. In this work a generalization of the gravastar picture is explored by considering matching of an interior solution governed by the dark energy equation of state, ω ≡ p/ρ < -1/3, to an exterior Schwarzschild vacuum solution at a junction interface. The motivation for implementing this generalization arises from the fact that recent observations have confirmed an accelerated cosmic expansion, for which dark energy is a possible candidate. Several relativistic dark energy stellar configurations are analysed by imposing specific choices for the mass function. The first case considered is that of a constant energy density, and the second choice that of a monotonic decreasing energy density in the star's interior. The dynamical stability of the transition layer of these dark energy stars to linearized spherically symmetric radial perturbations about static equilibrium solutions is also explored. It is found that large stability regions exist that are sufficiently close to where the event horizon is expected to form, so that it would be difficult to distinguish the exterior geometry of the dark energy stars, analysed in this work, from an astrophysical black hole

  18. Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

    2011-09-12

    The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

  19. Strontium stable isotope behaviour accompanying basalt weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K. W.; Parkinson, I. J.; Gíslason, S. G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The strontium (Sr) stable isotope composition of rivers is strongly controlled by the balance of carbonate to silicate weathering (Krabbenhöft et al. 2010; Pearce et al. 2015). However, rivers draining silicate catchments possess distinctly heavier Sr stable isotope values than their bedrock compositions, pointing to significant fractionation during weathering. Some have argued for preferential release of heavy Sr from primary phases during chemical weathering, others for the formation of secondary weathering minerals that incorporate light isotopes. This study presents high-precision double-spike Sr stable isotope data for soils, rivers, ground waters and estuarine waters from Iceland, reflecting both natural weathering and societal impacts on those environments. The bedrock in Iceland is dominantly basaltic, d88/86Sr ≈ +0.27, extending to lighter values for rhyolites. Geothermal waters range from basaltic Sr stable compositions to those akin to seawater. Soil pore waters reflect a balance of input from primary mineral weathering, precipitation and litter recycling and removal into secondary phases and vegetation. Rivers and ground waters possess a wide range of d88/86Sr compositions from +0.101 to +0.858. Elemental and isotope data indicate that this fractionation primarily results from the formation or dissolution of secondary zeolite (d88/86Sr ≈ +0.10), but also carbonate (d88/86Sr ≈ +0.22) and sometimes anhydrite (d88/86Sr ≈ -0.73), driving the residual waters to heavier or lighter values, respectively. Estuarine waters largely reflect mixing with seawater, but are also be affected by adsorption onto particulates, again driving water to heavy values. Overall, these data indicate that the stability and nature of secondary weathering phases, exerts a strong control on the Sr stable isotope composition of silicate rivers. [1] Krabbenhöft et al. (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 4097-4109. [2] Pearce et al. (2015) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 157, 125-146.

  20. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Chemical peels Overview Chemical peels: Overview Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do ... Overview Chemical peels: FAQs Chemical peels: Preparation FAQs Chemical peels: FAQs To help you decide whether this ...