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Sample records for stable catalytically cracked

  1. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  2. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  3. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  4. The uniqueness of stable crack growth data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1981-01-01

    The paper addresses the uniqueness of the stable crack growth relation, with particular reference to creep crack growth and stress corrosion crack growth, where it is the pattern to use laboratory data which relates the stress intensity K to the crack growth rate dc/dt. Simple models are used to define the conditions under which the K versus dc/dt data is unique. Extensive use is made of the Dugdale-Bilby-Cottrell-Swinden (DBCS) model, in which the yield accompanying crack growth is assumed to be confined to an infinitesimal thin strip coplanar with the growing crack. The DBCS model can be modified to give an incremental growth criterion, which is in the form of a differential equation relating the stress intensity to crack length. The conditions under which this equation gives a unique relation between stress intensity and crack length are then investigated. (orig./HP)

  5. Catalytic oxidative cracking of hexane as a route to olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyadjian, C.A.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic oxidative cracking of naphtha is conceptually an alternative process to steam cracking. The performance of sol–gel synthesized Li/MgO in oxidative cracking of hexane as a model compound of naphtha, has been studied and compared to that of conventionally prepared catalyst. At a temperature

  6. Radioisotope applications on fluidized catalytic cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used to trace the flow of all the phases of Fluidized Catalytic Cracking process in oil refineries. The gaseous phases, steam, hydrocarbon vapour and air, are generally traced using a noble-gas isotope, 41 Ar, 79 Kr or 85 Kr. An appropriate tracer for the catalyst is produced by irradiating a catalyst sample in a nuclear reactor. The activation products, 140 La and 24 Na provide appropriate radioactive 'labels' for the catalyst, which is reinjected into the FCC. An advantage of this approach is that it facilitates the study of the behaviour of different particle size fractions. Radioisotopes as sealed sources of gamma radiation are used to measure catalyst density variations and density distributions in critical parts of the unit. An important trend in radioisotope applications is the increasing use of the information they produce as inputs to or as validation of, mathematical process models. In line with the increasing sophistication of the models, the technology is undergoing continuous refinement. Developments include the investigation of more efficient, more convenient tracers, the introduction of systems to facilitate more rapid and comprehensive data acquisition and software refinements for enhanced data analysis

  7. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for

  8. The catalytic cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolysis char on tar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Z.; Huibin, H.; Xiangling, S.; Zhenhua, M.; Lei, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of different pyrolysis conditions for tar catalytic cracking will be analyzed according to the lignite pyrolysis char as catalyst on pyrolytic tar in this paper. The pyrolysis char what is the by-product of the cracking of coal has an abundant of pore structure and it has good catalytic activity. On this basis, making the modified catalyst when the pyrolysis char is activation and loads Fe by impregnation method. The cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolytic tar is explored by applying gas chromatograph to analyze splitting products of tar. The experimental results showed that: (1) The effect of tar cracking as the pyrolysis temperature, the heating rate, the volatilization of pyrolysis char and particle size increasing is better and better. The effect of the catalytic and cracking of lignite pyrolysis char in tar is best when the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature, the volatiles of pyrolysis char, particle size is in specific conditions.(2) The activation of pyrolysis char can improve the catalytic effect of pyrolysis char on the tar cracking. But it reduces the effect of the tar cracking when the pyrolysis char is activation loading Fe. (author)

  9. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As... Catalytic Cracking Units 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  10. Stable propagation of interacting crack systems and modeling of damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Tabbara, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents general thermodynamic criteria for the stable states and stable path of structures with an interacting system of cracks. In combination with numerical finite element results for various cracked structure geometries, these criteria indicate that the crack response path of structures may exhibit bifurcations, after which the symmetry of the crack system is broken and some cracks grow preferentially. The problem is of interest for the prediction of ultimate loads, ductility and energy absorption capability of nuclear concrete structures as well as structures made of composites and ceramics

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Uuu of... - Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic...

  12. Catalytic Cracking of Used Palm Oil using Composite Zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.H.; Tye, C.T.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid expansion of human society implies greater energy demand and environmental issues. In face of depletion energy resources, research is being carried out widely in order to convert the plant oil into biofuel. In this research, the production of liquid biofuels via catalytic cracking of used palm oil in the presence of composite zeolite was studied. The performance of composite zeolite of different properties in the reaction has been evaluated. The catalytic cracking reactions were carried out in a batch reactor at reaction temperature of 350 degree Celsius for an hour. In the present study, adjusting the ratio of meso porous coating to microporous zeolite and magnesium loading on composite zeolite catalyst were found to be able to increase the gasoline fraction and overall conversion of the reaction. (author)

  13. 40 CFR 63.1564 - What are my requirements for metal HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1564 What are my... emissions from catalytic cracking units? 63.1564 Section 63.1564 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1565 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1565 What... HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units? 63.1565 Section 63.1565 Protection of Environment...

  15. Catalytic Cracking of Palm Oil Over Zeolite Catalysts: Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. Twaiq and S. Bhatia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of palm oil was conducted in a fixed bed micro-reactor over HZSM-5, zeolite ? and ultrastable Y (USY zeolite catalysts. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of cracking reaction variables such as temperature, weight hourly space velocity, catalyst pore size and type of palm oil feed of different molecular weight on the conversion, yield of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and BTX aromatics in the organic liquid product.  Statistical Design of Experiment (DOE with 24 full factorial design was used in experimentation at the first stage.  The nonlinear model and Response Surface Methodology (RSM were utilized in the second stage of experimentation to obtain the optimum values of the variables for maximum yields of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and aromatics.  The HZSM-5 showed the best performance amongst the three catalysts tested.  At 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1, the highest experimental yields of gasoline and aromatics were 28.3 wt.% and 27 wt.%, respectively over the HZSM-5 catalyst.  For the same catalyst, the statistical model predicted that the optimum yield of gasoline was 28.1 wt.% at WHSV of 1.75 h-1 and 623 K.  The predicted optimum yield of gasoline was 25.5 wt.% at 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1.KEY WORDS: Catalytic Cracking, Palm Oil, Zeolite, Design Of Experiment, Response Surface Methodology.

  16. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(b)(5), you shall meet each requirement in the...

  17. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(4), you shall meet each...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 3 Table 3 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  19. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 13 Table 13 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(c)(1), you shall meet each...

  20. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the following...

  1. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the following...

  2. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 6 Table 6 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(c)(1), you shall meet each requirement in the...

  3. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 10 Table 10 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  4. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for example, gasoline). In this process, metal deposition and intrusion is a major cause for irreversible catalyst deactivation and shifts in product distribution. We used x-ray nanotomography of industrial FCC particles at differing degrees of deactivation to quantify changes in single-particle macroporosity and pore connectivity, correlated to iron and nickel deposition. Our study reveals that these metals are incorporated almost exclusively in near-surface regions, severely limiting macropore accessibility as metal concentrations increase. Because macropore channels are “highways” of the pore network, blocking them prevents feedstock molecules from reaching the catalytically active domains. Consequently, metal deposition reduces conversion with time on stream because the internal pore volume, although itself unobstructed, becomes largely inaccessible. PMID:26601160

  5. Catalytic Cracking of Diesel Fuel for Army Field Burners. Part 1. Feasibility of Producing Gaseous Fuel From Diesel Fuel Via Catalytic Cracking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryu, Jae

    1999-01-01

    .... The objective of this report (Part I) was to experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of a catalytic cracking process to produce hydrogen and light hydrogen molecules from diesel with a minimal yield of heavy hydrocarbon residues...

  6. Petroleum Refineries (Catalytic Cracking, Catalytic Reforming and Sulfur Recovery Units): National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    learn more about the NESHAP for catalytic cracking and reforming units, as well as sulfur recovery units in petroleum refineries by reading the rule history, rule summary, background information documents, and compliance information

  7. A Mesopore-Dependent Catalytic Cracking ofn-Hexane Over Mesoporous Nanostructured ZSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, M; Ahmed, M I; Qamaruddin, M; Asif, M; Sanhoob, M; Muraza, O; Khan, M Y

    2018-08-01

    Herein, pore size, crystalinity, and Si/Al ratio of mesoporous ZSM-5 (MFI) nanocrystals was controlled by synthesis parameters, such as surfactant concentration ([3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl] hexa-decyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), sodium hydroxide concentrations, synthesis temperature and time. The morphology, surface structure and composition of the MFI particles was systematically investigated. More notably, the mesopore-dependent catalytic activity of ZSM-5 was evaluated by studying the cracking of n-hexane. The findings suggest the porosity has pronounced impact on the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability of ZSM-5 nanocrystals. Critical surface attributes such as nature of acid sites (Brønsted and Lewis), concentration, and strength are obtained by the infrared study of adsorbed probe molecules (pyridine) and the temperature programmed desorption. In spite of being weaker in Si/Al ratio or acidic strength, mesoporous catalysts showed more stable and efficient cracking of n-hexane suggesting that acidity seems not the predominant factor operative in the activity, selectivity and stability.

  8. The investigation of reducing PAHs emission from coal pyrolysis by gaseous catalytic cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulong; Zhao, Ruifang; Zhang, Chun; Li, Guanlong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic cracking method of PAHs for the pyrolysis gaseous products is proposed to control their pollution to the environment. In this study, the Py-GC-MS is used to investigate in situ the catalytic effect of CaO and Fe2O3 on the 16 PAHs from Pingshuo coal pyrolysis under different catalytic temperatures and catalyst particle sizes. The results demonstrate that Fe2O3 is effective than that of CaO for catalytic cracking of 16 PAHs and that their catalytic temperature corresponding to the maximum PAHs cracking rates is different. The PAHs cracking rate is up to 60.59% for Fe2O3 at 600°C and is 52.88% at 700°C for CaO. The catalytic temperature and particle size of the catalysts have a significant effect on PAHs cracking rate and CaO will lose the capability of decreasing 16 PAHs when the temperature is higher than 900°C. The possible cracking process of 16 PAHs is deduced by elaborately analyzing the cracking effect of the two catalysts on 16 different species of PAHs.

  9. The Investigation of Reducing PAHs Emission from Coal Pyrolysis by Gaseous Catalytic Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking method of PAHs for the pyrolysis gaseous products is proposed to control their pollution to the environment. In this study, the Py-GC-MS is used to investigate in situ the catalytic effect of CaO and Fe2O3 on the 16 PAHs from Pingshuo coal pyrolysis under different catalytic temperatures and catalyst particle sizes. The results demonstrate that Fe2O3 is effective than that of CaO for catalytic cracking of 16 PAHs and that their catalytic temperature corresponding to the maximum PAHs cracking rates is different. The PAHs cracking rate is up to 60.59% for Fe2O3 at 600°C and is 52.88% at 700°C for CaO. The catalytic temperature and particle size of the catalysts have a significant effect on PAHs cracking rate and CaO will lose the capability of decreasing 16 PAHs when the temperature is higher than 900°C. The possible cracking process of 16 PAHs is deduced by elaborately analyzing the cracking effect of the two catalysts on 16 different species of PAHs.

  10. Catalytic cracking of iso-hexene over sapo-34 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Z.; Shu, Q.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic cracking of model feed compound, iso-hexene (2-methyl-1-pentene) was experimentally studied over 100% pure SAPO-34 zeolite catalyst. The critical focus was given to obtain maximum propylene selectivity. The product distributions were analyzed at temperature between 450-600 degree C. time-on-stream (TOS) from 1 to 5 min. and at WHSV = 7.9 h/sub -1/ The reaction behavior was quantified on both direct and indirect carbenium ion mechanisms owing to catalyst's small pore diameter with respect to 2-methyl-l-pentene kinetic diameter. The propylene yield and selectivity obtained was 41.2% and 43.1% respectively. with higher overall olefins selectivity 90.3%. The small pore size and week surface acid sites of 1000 percent pure SAPO-34 catalyst were found to be suitable for light olefins production and eliminate chances of bimolecular reactions. It was observed that both conversion and selectivity were strongly effected by TOS, as coke precursors become dominant and deactivate catalyst at higher TOS. (author)

  11. Formalization of hydrocarbon conversion scheme of catalytic cracking for mathematical model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, G.; Ivashkina, E.; Ivanchina, E.; Kiseleva, S.; Stebeneva, V.

    2015-11-01

    The issue of improving the energy and resource efficiency of advanced petroleum processing can be solved by the development of adequate mathematical model based on physical and chemical regularities of process reactions with a high predictive potential in the advanced petroleum refining. In this work, the development of formalized hydrocarbon conversion scheme of catalytic cracking was performed using thermodynamic parameters of reaction defined by the Density Functional Theory. The list of reaction was compiled according to the results of feedstock structural-group composition definition, which was done by the n-d-m-method, the Hazelvuda method, qualitative composition of feedstock defined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and individual composition of catalytic cracking gasoline fraction. Formalized hydrocarbon conversion scheme of catalytic cracking will become the basis for the development of the catalytic cracking kinetic model.

  12. Database implementation to fluidized cracking catalytic-FCC process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Antonio Otavio de; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Santos, Valdemir A. dos

    2009-01-01

    A process of Fluidized Cracking Catalytic (FCC) was developed by our research group. A cold model FCC unit, in laboratory scale, was used for obtaining of the data relative to the following parameters: air flow, system pressure, riser inlet pressure, rise outlet pressure, pressure drop in the riser, motor speed of catalyst injection and density. The measured of the density is made by gamma ray transmission. For the fact of the process of FCC not to have a database until then, the present work supplied this deficiency with the implementation of a database in connection with the Matlab software. The data from the FCC unit (laboratory model) are obtained as spreadsheet of the MS-Excel software. These spreadsheets were treated before importing them as database tables. The application of the process of normalization of database and the analysis done with the MS-Access in these spreadsheets treated revealed the need of an only relation (table) for to represent the database. The Database Manager System (DBMS) chosen has been the MS-Access by to satisfy our flow of data. The next step was the creation of the database, being built the table of data, the action query, selection query and the macro for to import data from the unit FCC in study. Also an interface between the application 'Database Toolbox' (Matlab2008a) and the database was created. This was obtained through the drivers ODBC (Open Data Base Connectivity). This interface allows the manipulation of the database by the users operating in the Matlab. (author)

  13. 40 CFR 60.105a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units. (iii) The owner or operator shall install, operate... for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking units (FCU). 60.105a Section 60.105a... and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking units (FCU). (a) FCCU and...

  14. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63...

  15. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to New Source Performance Standard (NSPS... From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for Carbon Monoxide...

  16. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standard... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for...

  17. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 7 Table 7 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(c)(1...

  18. Kinetic and catalytic performance of a BI-porous composite material in catalytic cracking and isomerisation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2012-01-10

    Catalytic behaviour of pure zeolite ZSM-5 and a bi-porous composite material (BCM) were investigated in transformation of m-xylene, while zeolite HY and the bi-porous composite were used in the cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB). The micro/mesoporous material was used to understand the effect of the presence of mesopores on these reactions. Various characterisation techniques, that is, XRD, SEM, TGA, FT-IR and nitrogen sorption measurements were applied for complete characterisation of the catalysts. Catalytic tests using CREC riser simulator showed that the micro/mesoporous composite catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity as compared with the conventional microporous ZSM-5 and HY zeolite for transformation of m-xylene and for the catalytic cracking of TIPB, respectively. The outstanding catalytic reactivity of m-xylene and TIPB molecules were mainly attributed to the easier access of active sites provided by the mesopores. Apparent activation energies for the disappearance of m-xylene and TIPB over all catalysts were found to decrease in the order: EBCM>EZSM-5 and EBCM>EHY, respectively. © 2012 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

  19. Catalytic cracking of bio-oil to organic liquid product (OLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, K L; Tamidi, A M; Yusup, S; Lee, K T; Ahmad, M M

    2010-11-01

    The main objective of this paper is to find the optimum operating condition to upgrade the EFB-derived pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) to liquid fuel, mainly gasoline using Taguchi Method. From the analysis that has been done, it is found that the optimum operating condition for heterogeneous catalytic cracking process is at 400 degrees C, 15min of reaction time using 30g of catalyst weight where operating at this condition produced the highest yield of gasoline fraction which is 91.67 wt.%. This observation proves that EFB-derived pyrolysis oil could be upgraded via heterogeneous catalytic cracking to produce gasoline.

  20. Using spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalyst as pozzolanic addition — a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Torres Castellanos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalyst is an oil industry by product from fluidised-bed catalytic cracking units. This residue is mainly formed by an active component (faujasite type zeolite Y in an amorphous aluminosilicate matrix. It mainly consists of up to 90% silica and alumina. This paper reports an extensive literature review regarding the characterisation and mechanical and durability properties of mortar and concrete added to this material. FCC has been studied lately due to its pozzolanic characteristics and the good performance of concrete mixtures using FCC as cement replacement.

  1. Catalytic and thermal cracking processes of waste cooking oil for bio-gasoline synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewanto, Muhammad Andry Rizki; Januartrika, Aulia Azka; Dewajani, Heny; Budiman, Arief

    2017-03-01

    Non-renewable energy resources such as fossil fuels, and coal were depleted as the increase of global energy demand. Moreover, environmental aspect becomes a major concern which recommends people to utilize bio-based resources. Waste cooking oil is one of the economical sources for biofuel production and become the most used raw material for biodiesel production. However, the products formed during frying, can affect the trans-esterification reaction and the biodiesel properties. Therefore, it needs to convert low-quality cooking oil directly into biofuel by both thermal and catalytic cracking processes. Thermal and catalytic cracking sometimes are regarded as prospective bio-energy conversion processes. This research was carried out in the packed bed reactor equipped with 2 stages preheater with temperature of reactor was variated in the range of 450-550°C. At the same temperature, catalytic cracking had been involved in this experiment, using activated ZSM-5 catalyst with 1 cm in length. The organic liquid product was recovered by three stages of double pipe condensers. The composition of cracking products were analyzed using GC-MS instrument and the caloric contents were analyzed using Bomb calorimeter. The results reveal that ZSM-5 was highly selective toward aromatic and long aliphatic compounds formation. The percentage recovery of organic liquid product from the cracking process varies start from 8.31% and the optimal results was 54.08%. The highest heating value of liquid product was resulted from catalytic cracking process at temperature of 450°C with value of 10880.48 cal/gr and the highest product yield with 54.08% recovery was achieved from thermal cracking process with temperature of 450°C.

  2. Design of four-point SENB specimens with stable crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn; Kildegaard, Casper; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2018-01-01

    A four-point single-edge-notch-beam (SENB) test specimen loaded in displacement control (fixed grip) is proposed for studying crack deflection at bi-material interfaces. In order to ensure stable crack growth, a novel analytical model of the four-point SENB specimen in fixed grip is derived...... and compared with numerical models. Model results show that the specimen should be short and thick, and the start-crack length should be deep for the crack to propagate stable towards the bi-material interface. Observations from experimental tests of four-point SENB specimens with different start-crack lengths......, confirmed that the crack grows stable if the start-crack length is deep and unstable if not....

  3. Catalyst Particles for Fluid Catalytic Cracking Visualized at the Individual Particle Level by Micro-Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.

    2011-01-01

    In this PhD research the investigation of the reactivity and acidity of Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalysts at the level of an individual catalyst particles is described. A range of micro-spectroscopic techniques has been applied to visualize both the active zeolite component within the

  4. Dispersion and Orientation of Zeolite ZSM-5 Crystallites within a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Catalyst Particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprung, Christoph; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was employed to selectively visualize the dispersion and orientation of zeolite ZSM-5 domains inside a single industrially applied fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst particle. Large ZSM-5 crystals served as a model system together with the acid-catalyzed

  5. Fluid catalytic cracking: recent developments on the grand old lady of zeolite catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, E.T.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073717398; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is one of the major conversion technologies in the oil refinery industry. FCC currently produces the majority of the world's gasoline, as well as an important fraction of propylene for the polymer industry. In this critical review, we give an overview of the latest

  6. Production of C(3)/C(4) Olefins from n-Hexane: Conceptual design of a catalytic oxidative cracking process and comparison to steam cracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyadjian, C.A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; van den Berg, Henderikus

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual design of the catalytic oxidative cracking (COC) of hexane as a model compound of naphtha is reported. The design is based on experimental data which are elaborated through a structural design method to a process flow sheet. The potential of COC as an alternative to steam cracking (SC)

  7. Parametric study on catalytic cracking of LDPE to liquid fuel over ZSM-5 zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.L.; Tuan Abdullah, T.A.; Ngadi, N.; Ahmad, A.; Inuwa, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Catalytic cracking of low density polyethylene in fixed bed reactor was studied. • Full factorial design involving five parameters and two responses was used. • Regression models were developed for LDPE conversion and liquid product yield. • Liquid product at optimized run contained C4–C8 aliphatic compounds. • Alkyl radicals combine with minor amount of benzenes during cracking. - Abstract: Pyrolysis or cracking of plastic waste is considered as a potential solution to the environmental problems brought about by plastic waste, with the production of hydrocarbon fuel as a value added benefit. In order to explore the potentials of such process, parametric study have been conducted on the catalytic cracking of LDPE dissolved in benzene in a fixed bed reactor. The five factors studied were temperature (A), catalyst mass (B), feed flow rate (C), carrier gas flow rate (D), as well as concentration of LDPE solution (E), while the responses were LDPE conversion (Y 1 ) and liquid yield (Y 2 ). The parametric study showed that four out of five factors (A, B, C and D) have significant effects on Y 1 and Y 2 . The optimum conditions that produced maximum responses for Y 1 and Y 2 simultaneously are 600 °C (A), 0.10 g catalyst (B), 1 ml/s LDPE solution (C), 80 ml/min N 2 flow (D). The numerical values for Y 1 and Y 2 were 98.6% and 99.5%, respectively. Analysis on products composition indicated that catalytic cracking of LDPE in fixed bed reaction generally produced high amount of aliphatic branched-chain compounds, together with moderate amount of cyclic compounds. Aromatization of LDPE cracking products is less due to the short retention time of the compounds on the catalysts bed.

  8. Large stable crack growth in fracture mechanics specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, W.; Fricke, S.; Veith, H.

    1992-01-01

    This is a report on the crack resistance behaviour of the STE 460 steel on CT 25 and CCT 25 samples with side notches according to the J concept, from the J-controlled area to a crack growth of about 8 mm. Numerical simulation of the ductile crack growth controlled by J R curves for EVZ models of the sample geometries make an analysis possible of how well the standards, guidelines and proposals for determining the remote field J integral from experimental data agree with the numerical calculation of J from the stresses and distortions for large crack growth. With the stress, distortion and deformation fields available from the simulation with fine elementing in the ligament, the J concept for large ductile crack growth expanded by the multi-axiality parameter h is explained and the behaviour of other fracture parameters such as the crack tip opening (CTOD) and the crack opening angle (CTOA) for large crack growth are shown. (orig./DG) [de

  9. PEMBUATAN BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK GORENG BEKAS DENGAN PROSES CATALYTIC CRACKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil is a source of energy which is not be renewable. This fact motivates so much countries ineconomizing on fuel. Many researches have been done to gets another fuel substitute the crude oil.Biodiesel is represented as fuel instead of diesel fuel, and it is produced from vegetable oil. In the otherside, ex-cooking oil is waste-product from food industry, restaurant and household which is potential tobe alternative fuels because of the high contents of carbon and hydrogen atoms. Commonly the biodieselmade from vegetable oil by esterification and transesterification process. But if using esterification andtransesterification process to ex-cooking oil material, it is not economically feasible because the processmakes another reaction between alkaly catalist and oil to produce soap. One of biodiesel process iscatalytic cracking of the ex-cooking oil. This research is aimed to analyze zeolite catalist size effect(0.125mm; 0.3375mm; 0.425mm; 0.85mm; 1.18mm, and acid concentration on the product (2N; 3N;4N. This result shows that at 4N acid concentration and 0.125 mm zeolite catalist size is optimal whichcan reach diesel specification.

  10. Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Ted; Agblevor, Foster; Battaglia, Francine; Klein, Michael

    2013-01-18

    The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

  11. An experimental and analytical study of ductile fracture and stable crack-growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselier, G.

    1978-01-01

    A study is described, the objectives of which were to define a numerical model for stable crack growth, to calibrate the model by tensile tests, and to obtain agreement between corresponding numerical calculations and experiments on cracked specimens. The model was based on a finite element program with a critical state at the crack tip defined by a ductility curve: equivalent plastic strain versus stress triaxiality. The curve was determined by tests on notched tensile specimens of a low alloy rotor steel. The critical states corresponded to the initiation of a crack at the centre of the specimens. Three point bend tests were also performed and experimental and numerical load displacement curves and crack growth versus displacement curves were compared. Agreement with experiments on cracked specimens was obtained by simple fittings of the 'ductility' curve in the high triaxiality area. Results are discussed and it is indicated where future progress might be made in numerical modelling of cracked bodies. (author)

  12. Fuel and engine characterization study of catalytically cracked waste transformer oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasanna Raj Yadav, S.; Saravanan, C.G.; Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Roberts, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Waste resources such as WTO and waste fly ash have been effectively harnessed. • WTO has been catalytically cracked using fly ash catalyst for the first time. • Characteristics of a diesel engine were evaluated for CCWTO-diesel blends. • BTE and PHRR were increased by 7.4% and 13.2%, respectively, for CCWTO 50. • HC and CO emissions were reduced for CCWTO 50 with the increased NO X emission. - Abstract: This research work targets on the effective utilization of WTO (waste transformer oil) in a diesel engine and thereby, reducing the environmental problems caused by its disposal into open land. The novelty of the work lies in adoption of catalytic cracking process to chemically treat WTO, wherein waste fly ash has been considered as a catalyst for the first time. Interestingly, both the oil and catalyst used are waste products, enabling reduction in total fuel cost and providing additional benefit of effective waste management. With the considerable token that use of activated fly ash as catalyst requires lower reaction temperature, catalytic cracking was performed only in the range of 350–400 °C. As a result of this fuel treatment process, the thermal and physical properties of CCWTO (catalytically cracked waste transformer oil), as determined by ASTM standard methods, were found to be agreeable for its use in a diesel engine. Further, FTIR analysis of CCWTO discerned the presence of essential hydrocarbons such as carbon and hydrogen. From the experimental investigation of CCWTO – diesel blends in a diesel engine, performance and combustion characteristics were shown to be improved, with a notable increase in BTE (brake thermal efficiency) and PHRR (peak heat release rate) for CCWTO 50 by 7.4% and 13.2%, respectively, than that of diesel at full load condition. In the same note, emissions such as smoke, HC (hydrocarbon) and CO (carbon monoxide) were noted to be reduced at the expense of increased NO X (nitrogen oxides) emission

  13. Kinetic Study on Catalytic Cracking of Rubber Seed (Hevea brasiliensis Oil to Liquid Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wara Dyah Pita Rengga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reaction kinetics of catalytic cracking of rubber seed oil to liquid fuels has been investigated. The reac-tion was performed with sulfuric acid as catalyst at temperatures of 350-450 oC and the ratio of oil-catalyst of 0-2 wt.% for 30-90 minutes. Kinetics was studied using the model of 6-lump parameters. The parameters were rubber seed oil, gasoline, kerosene, diesel, gas, and coke. Analysis of experimen-tal data using regression models to obtain reaction rate constants. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors were then calculated based on the Arrhenius equation. The simulation result illus-trated that the six-lump kinetic model can well predict the product yields of rubber seed oil catalytic cracking. The product has high selectivity for gasoline fraction as liquid fuel and the smallest amount of coke. The constant indicates that secondary reactions occurred in diesel products compared to gaso-line and kerosene. The predicted results indicate that catalytic cracking of rubber seed oil had better be conducted at 450 oC for 90 minutes using 0.5 wt.% catalyst. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 3rd December 2013; Revised: 5th December 2014; Accepted: 7th December 2014How to Cite: Rengga, W.D.P., Handayani, P.A., Kadarwati, S., Feinnudin, A.(2015. Kinetic Study on Catalytic Cracking of Rubber Seed (Hevea brasiliensis Oil  to Liquid Fuels. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 50-60. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.5852.50-60Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.5852.50-60

  14. Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance study of transport properties of fluid catalytic cracking catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kortunov, P.; Vasenkov, S.; Kärger, J.; Fé Elía, M.; Perez, M.; Stöcker, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Theodorou, D.; Drescher, B.; McElhiney, G.; Bernauer, B.; Krystl, V.; Kočiřík, Milan; Zikánová, Arlette; Jirglová, Hana; Berger, C.; Gläser, R.; Weitkamp, J.; Hansen, E. W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2005), s. 233-237 ISSN 0730-725X Grant - others:TROCAT project - European Community(DE) G5RD-CT-2001-00520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : pulsed-field gradient * nuclear magnetic resonance * fluid catalytic cracking catalyst Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.361, year: 2005

  15. Modelling and parameter estimation in reactive continuous mixtures: the catalytic cracking of alkanes - part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. PEIXOTO

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentation kinetics is employed to model a continuous reactive mixture of alkanes under catalytic cracking conditions. Standard moment analysis techniques are employed, and a dynamic system for the time evolution of moments of the mixture's dimensionless concentration distribution function (DCDF is found. The time behavior of the DCDF is recovered with successive estimations of scaled gamma distributions using the moments time data.

  16. The Catalytic Activity of Modified Zeolite Lanthanum on the Catalytic Cracking of Al-Duara Atmospheric Distillation Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Khalifa Esgair

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric residue fluid catalytic cracking was selected as a probe reaction to test the catalytic performance of modified NaY zeolites and prepared NaY zeolites. Modified NaY zeolites have been synthesized by simple ion exchange methods. Three samples of modified zeolite Y have been obtained by replacing the sodium ions in the original sample with lanthanum and the weight percent added are 0.28, 0.53, and 1.02 respectively. The effects of addition of lanthanum to zeolite Y in different weight percent on the cracking catalysts were investigated using an experimental laboratory plant scale of fluidized bed reactor. The experiments have been performed with weight hourly space velocity (WHSV range of 6 to 24 h-1, and the range of temperature from 450 to 510 oC. The activity of the catalyst with 1.02 wt% lanthanum has been shown to be much greater than that of the sample parent NaY. Also it was observed that the addition of the lanthanum causes an increase in the thermal stability of the zeolite.

  17. Increasing Octane Value in Catalytic Cracking of n-Hexadecane with Addition of *BEA Type Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iori Shimada

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, multifunctional catalysts were developed by adding *BEA or MFI zeolite with high Si/Al ratio to a residual fluidized catalytic cracking (RFCC catalyst and tested in the catalytic cracking of n-hexadecane, which is a heavy crude oil model compound, for the purpose of increasing the octane value of produced gasoline under the strong hydrogen transfer activity of the RFCC catalyst. Reaction products analysis revealed that the addition of *BEA zeolite to the RFCC catalyst increased the yields of olefins and multi-branched paraffins, which resulted in improvement of the octane value without sacrificing gasoline yield. On the contrary, the addition of MFI zeolite decreased the gasoline yield because it cracks the gasoline range olefins into LPG range olefins. In general, it is difficult to increase the yield of multi-branched molecules because the multi-branched molecule is more easily cracked than linear molecules. Our results suggest the possibility for the selective acceleration of isomerization reaction by the addition of less acidic *BEA zeolite to the RFCC catalyst.

  18. Effects of Dealumination and Desilication of Beta Zeolite on Catalytic Performance in n-Hexane Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic cracking of n-hexane to selectively produce propylene on Beta zeolite was carried out. The H-Beta (HB (Si/Al = 77 zeolite showed higher catalytic stability and propylene selectivity than the Al-rich HB (Si/Al = 12, due to its smaller number of acid sites, especially Lewis acid sites (LAS. However, catalytic stability and propylene selectivity in high n-hexane conversions were still not satisfactory. After dealumination with HNO3 treatment, catalytic stability was improved and propylene selectivity during high n-hexane conversions was increased. On the other hand, catalytic stability was not improved after desilication with NaOH treatment, although mesopores were formed. This may be related to the partially destroyed structure. However, propylene selectivity in high n-hexane conversions was increased after alkali treatment. We successfully found that the catalytic stability was improved and the propylene selectivity in high n-hexane conversions was further increased after the NaOH treatment followed by HNO3 treatment. This is due to the decrease in the number of acid sites and the increase in mesopores which are beneficial to the diffusion of coke precursor.

  19. Stable and unstable crack growth in pressure vessel models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.C.; Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    Three identical steel pressure vessels with 254-mm (10-in.) dia, 38-mm (1.5-in.) wall thicknesses and long, deep machined and sharpened axially oriented flaws were tested at three different temperatures. The vessels were assembled by electron-beam welding cylindrical sections with substantially different toughnesses due to different heat treatments. Crack extension initiated in relatively brittle sections, and the cracks extended both stably and unstably, depending on test temperature, toward the tougher sections where crack arrest did and did not occur. Charpy impact specimens and both slow-bend and dynamic precracked Charpy specimens were used for material characterization. The behavior of the vessels is described and related to the Charpy data

  20. A finite element analysis of stable crack growth in inhomogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, N.; Sakai, T.; Nakagaki, M.; Sasaki, T.

    1993-01-01

    The finite element method was applied to generation phase analyses for stable crack growth in inhomogeneous materials. Experimental data on stable crack growth in bimaterial CT specimens, which were composed of a base metal and a weld metal, were numerically simulated using the node-release technique, and the variations of the fracture mechanics parameters such as J-integral. T*-integral. J-circumflex-integral and CTOA were calculated. The effects of the fusion line and the weld on the near crack fracture mechanics parameters were discussed. (author)

  1. X-ray Fluorescence Tomography of Aged Fluid-Catalytic-Cracking Catalyst Particles Reveals Insight into Metal Deposition Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalirai, Samanbir; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2015-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray fluorescence tomography was used to investigate metal poison deposition in individual, intact and industrially deactivated fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles at two differing catalytic life-stages. 3D multi-element imaging, at submicron resolution was achieved by using a

  2. Experimental and numerical investigations of stable crack growth of axial surface flaws in a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocks, W.; Krafka, H.; Mueller, W.; Wobst, K.

    1988-01-01

    In connection with the problem of the transferability of parameters obtained experimentally with the help of fracture-mechanical test specimens and used for the initiation and the stable propagation of cracks in cases of pulsating stress and of the elasto-plastic behaviour of construction components, a pressure vessel with an inside diameter of 1500 mm, a cylindrical length of 3000 mm and a wall thickness of 40 mm was hydraulically loaded with the help of internal pressure in the first stage, to attain an average crack growth of 1 mm at Δ a ≅, the loading taking place at about 21deg C. This stress-free annealed vessel exhibited an axial semielliptical vibration-induced surface crack about 181 mm long and 20 mm deep, as a test defect, in a welded circular blank made of the steel 20MnMoNi 55. The fractographic analysis of the first stable crack revealed that its growth rate of Δa was highest in the area of transition from the weak to the strong bend of the crack front (55deg m /σ v (average principal stress: σ m , Mises' reference stress: σ v v). A comparison of the experimental with the numerical results from the first stable crack shows that the local stable crack growth Δa cannot be calculated solely with reference to J, because Δa appears to depend essentially on the quotient σ m /σ v . (orig./MM) [de

  3. Catalytic cracking of the top phase fraction of bio-oil into upgraded liquid oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunarno [Chemical Engineering Department, Riau University, Kampus Binawidya KM 12,5 Pekanbaru 28293 (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Department, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur,Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Rochmadi,; Mulyono, Panut [Chemical Engineering Department, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur,Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Budiman, Arief, E-mail: abudiman@ugm.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur,Yogyakarta 55281(Indonesia); Center for Energy Studies, Gadjah Mada University, Sekip K1A, Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-03

    The energy consumption is increasing, while oil reserves as a primary energy resource are decreasing, so that is the reason seeking alternative energy source is inevitable. Biomass especially oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) which is abundant in Indonesia can be processed into bio-oil by pyrolysis process. The potential for direct substitution of bio-oil for petroleum may be limited due to the high viscosity, high oxygen content, low heating value, and corrosiveness. Consequently, upgrading of the bio-oil before use is inevitable to give a wider variety of applications of its liquid product. Furthermore, upgrading process to improve the quality of bio-oil by reduction of oxygenates involves process such as catalytic cracking. The objective of this research is to study the effect of operation temperature on yield and composition of upgraded liquid oil and to determine physical properties. Bio-oil derived from EFB was upgraded through catalytic cracking using series tubular reactor under atmospheric pressure on a silica-alumina catalyst. Results show that increasing temperature from 450 to 600 °C, resulting in decreasing of upgraded liquid oil (ULO) yield, decreasing viscosity and density of ULO, but increasing in calorimetric value of ULO. The increasing temperature of cracking also will increase the concentration of gasoline and kerosene in ULO.

  4. Catalytic cracking of the top phase fraction of bio-oil into upgraded liquid oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarno, Rochmadi, Mulyono, Panut; Budiman, Arief

    2016-06-01

    The energy consumption is increasing, while oil reserves as a primary energy resource are decreasing, so that is the reason seeking alternative energy source is inevitable. Biomass especially oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) which is abundant in Indonesia can be processed into bio-oil by pyrolysis process. The potential for direct substitution of bio-oil for petroleum may be limited due to the high viscosity, high oxygen content, low heating value, and corrosiveness. Consequently, upgrading of the bio-oil before use is inevitable to give a wider variety of applications of its liquid product. Furthermore, upgrading process to improve the quality of bio-oil by reduction of oxygenates involves process such as catalytic cracking. The objective of this research is to study the effect of operation temperature on yield and composition of upgraded liquid oil and to determine physical properties. Bio-oil derived from EFB was upgraded through catalytic cracking using series tubular reactor under atmospheric pressure on a silica-alumina catalyst. Results show that increasing temperature from 450 to 600 °C, resulting in decreasing of upgraded liquid oil (ULO) yield, decreasing viscosity and density of ULO, but increasing in calorimetric value of ULO. The increasing temperature of cracking also will increase the concentration of gasoline and kerosene in ULO.

  5. Catalytic cracking of the top phase fraction of bio-oil into upgraded liquid oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunarno; Rochmadi,; Mulyono, Panut; Budiman, Arief

    2016-01-01

    The energy consumption is increasing, while oil reserves as a primary energy resource are decreasing, so that is the reason seeking alternative energy source is inevitable. Biomass especially oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) which is abundant in Indonesia can be processed into bio-oil by pyrolysis process. The potential for direct substitution of bio-oil for petroleum may be limited due to the high viscosity, high oxygen content, low heating value, and corrosiveness. Consequently, upgrading of the bio-oil before use is inevitable to give a wider variety of applications of its liquid product. Furthermore, upgrading process to improve the quality of bio-oil by reduction of oxygenates involves process such as catalytic cracking. The objective of this research is to study the effect of operation temperature on yield and composition of upgraded liquid oil and to determine physical properties. Bio-oil derived from EFB was upgraded through catalytic cracking using series tubular reactor under atmospheric pressure on a silica-alumina catalyst. Results show that increasing temperature from 450 to 600 °C, resulting in decreasing of upgraded liquid oil (ULO) yield, decreasing viscosity and density of ULO, but increasing in calorimetric value of ULO. The increasing temperature of cracking also will increase the concentration of gasoline and kerosene in ULO.

  6. Synthesis and utilization of catalytically cracked cashew nut shell liquid in a diesel engine

    KAUST Repository

    Vedharaj, S.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, CNSL (Cashew nut shell liquid), an economically viable feedstock among the other contemporary resources, has been considered as an appropriate source of alternate fuel. Herein, CNSL was extracted from cashew nut outer shell, a waste product, through a unique approach of steam treatment process followed by mechanical crushing technique. In contrast to the past studies that have attempted to use unprocessed CNSL directly as substitute for diesel, this study has resorted to use processed CNSL by cracking it using zeolite catalyst. Thus, both the extraction of CNSL from cashew nut outer shell and processing of it through catalytic cracking process to help synthesize CC-CNSL (catalytically cracked CNSL) are different, which underscores the significance of the current work. In wake of adopting such distinct methodologies with fuel characterization, the properties of CC-CNSL such as viscosity and calorific value were figured out to be improved. Subsequently, CC-CNSL20 (20% CC-CNSL and 80% diesel) was tested at different fuel injection pressure such as 200 bar, 235 bar, 270 bar and 300 bar so as to optimize its use in a single cylinder diesel engine. From the engine experimental study, CC-CNSL20 was found to evince better engine performance than diesel and the composite emissions of CO (carbon monoxide), HC (hydrocarbon), NOX (oxides of nitrogen) and smoke, computed based on ISO 8178 D2 standard test cycle, were found to be better than diesel and incompliance with the legislative norms for genset.

  7. Fuel and engine characterization study of catalytically cracked waste transformer oil

    KAUST Repository

    Prasanna Raj Yadav, S.

    2015-05-01

    This research work targets on the effective utilization of WTO (waste transformer oil) in a diesel engine and thereby, reducing the environmental problems caused by its disposal into open land. The novelty of the work lies in adoption of catalytic cracking process to chemically treat WTO, wherein waste fly ash has been considered as a catalyst for the first time. Interestingly, both the oil and catalyst used are waste products, enabling reduction in total fuel cost and providing additional benefit of effective waste management. With the considerable token that use of activated fly ash as catalyst requires lower reaction temperature, catalytic cracking was performed only in the range of 350-400°C. As a result of this fuel treatment process, the thermal and physical properties of CCWTO (catalytically cracked waste transformer oil), as determined by ASTM standard methods, were found to be agreeable for its use in a diesel engine. Further, FTIR analysis of CCWTO discerned the presence of essential hydrocarbons such as carbon and hydrogen. From the experimental investigation of CCWTO - diesel blends in a diesel engine, performance and combustion characteristics were shown to be improved, with a notable increase in BTE (brake thermal efficiency) and PHRR (peak heat release rate) for CCWTO 50 by 7.4% and 13.2%, respectively, than that of diesel at full load condition. In the same note, emissions such as smoke, HC (hydrocarbon) and CO (carbon monoxide) were noted to be reduced at the expense of increased NOx (nitrogen oxides) emission. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Catalytic Cracking of Lactide and Poly(Lactic Acid) to Acrylic Acid at Low Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrade, Frédéric G; van Krieken, Jan; Verkuijl, Bastiaan J V; Bouwman, Elisabeth

    2017-05-09

    Despite being a simple dehydration reaction, the industrially relevant conversion of lactic acid to acrylic acid is particularly challenging. For the first time, the catalytic cracking of lactide and poly(lactic acid) to acrylic acid under mild conditions is reported with up to 58 % yield. This transformation is catalyzed by strong acids in the presence of bromide or chloride salts and proceeds through simple S N 2 and elimination reactions. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  9. Characterization of deactivated catalytic cracking catalyst and evaluation as absorbent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valt, R.B.G.; Kaminari, N.M.S.; Cordeiro, B.; Ponte, M.J.J.S.; Ponte, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main uses of catalysts in the petroleum industry is in step catalytic cracking, which after use and regeneration cycles generates large quantities of waste material. In this research the deactivated FCC catalyst was characterized before and after the electrokinetic remediation process, in order to assess the change of its structure and possible adsorptive capacity. Analyses of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and BET surface area measurement were performed. The analysis showed no structural change due to the process employed and that electrokinetic remediation has recovered 42% of adsorption capacity of the material, by removing about 89% of heavy metals adhered initially in the catalyst surface. (author)

  10. Standard test method for determination of resistance to stable crack extension under low-constraint conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This standard covers the determination of the resistance to stable crack extension in metallic materials in terms of the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOAc), ψc and/or the crack-opening displacement (COD), δ5 resistance curve (1). This method applies specifically to fatigue pre-cracked specimens that exhibit low constraint (crack-length-to-thickness and un-cracked ligament-to-thickness ratios greater than or equal to 4) and that are tested under slowly increasing remote applied displacement. The recommended specimens are the compact-tension, C(T), and middle-crack-tension, M(T), specimens. The fracture resistance determined in accordance with this standard is measured as ψc (critical CTOA value) and/or δ5 (critical COD resistance curve) as a function of crack extension. Both fracture resistance parameters are characterized using either a single-specimen or multiple-specimen procedures. These fracture quantities are determined under the opening mode (Mode I) of loading. Influences of environment a...

  11. BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM PALM OLEIN BY CATALYTIC CRACKING PROCESS USING ZSM-5 CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondang Tambun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of fossil energy reserves raises the potential in the development of renewable fuels from vegetable oils. Indonesia is the largest palm oil producer in the world, where palm oil can be converted into biofuels such as biogasoline, kerosene and biodiesel. These biofuels are environmentally friendly and free of the content of nitrogen and sulfur through catalytic cracking process. In this research, palm olein is used as feedstock using catalytic cracking process. ZSM-5 is used as a catalyst, which has a surface area of 425 m2/g and Si/Al ratio of 50. Variables varied are the operating temperature of 375 oC - 450 °C and reaction time of 60 minutes - 150 minutes. The result shows that the highest yield of liquid product is 84.82%. This yield is obtained at a temperature of 400 °C and reaction time of 120 minutes. The yield of the liquid product in the operating conditions consisting of C6-C12 amounted to 19.47 %, C14-C16 amounted to 16.56 % and the C18-C28 amounted to 48.80 %.

  12. Polystyrene Plastic Waste Conversion into Liquid Fuel with Catalytic Cracking Process Using Al2O3 as Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Kholidah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in energy consumption and an increase in the plastic waste generation are two major problems that arise along with economic growth and the increase in population. Styrofoam is one type of polystyrene plastic waste that can be processed into liquid fuels by cracking process. In this study, the cracking process of polystyrene plastic waste into liquid fuel carried by the catalytic cracking process using Al2O3 as a catalyst. This study aimed to determine the effect of the catalyst weight, length of cracking time and range of temperature in the catalytic cracking process of polystyrene plastic waste into liquid fuel toward the mass and characteristics of liquid fuels produced and to determine the composition of liquid fuels produced. The catalytic cracking process of polystyrene plastic waste with catalyst was done in the fixed bed type reactor by heating the reactor with a heater, where the process took place at temperature of 150°C, 200°C, 250°C and 300°C and the length of the process was varied into 20, 40, and 60 minutes and the catalyst weight was also varied, which were 4%, 6% and 8%, while the styrofoam weight was 250 grams. From the research, the highest mass of liquid fuel derived from polystyrene catalytic cracking process was in the amount of 48.8 grams and liquid yield percentage of 19.5% at temperature of  250°C, cracking time of 60 minutes and weight of 8% catalyst, while the characteristics of liquid fuel that were approaching the characteristics of gasoline was at temperatures of 250°C, cracking time of 60 minutes and weight of 6% catalyst, in which each value of density of 0.763 g/ml, specific gravity of 0.778 and oAPI gravity of 50.2. While other liquid fuels obtained from the cracking of polystyrene were still within the tolerance range characteristic properties of gasoline. Liquid fuels produced from the catalytic cracking process was analyzed using a GC-MS, in which the analysis results indicated that liquid

  13. High octane gasoline components from catalytic cracking gasoline, propylene, and isobutane by disproportionation, clevage and alkylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, R.

    1980-07-08

    A process is described for producing high octane value gasoline which comprises in a disproportionation zone subjecting propylene and a mixture of propylene and ethylene obtained as hereinafter delineated to disproportionation conditions to produce a stream containing ethylene and a stream containing butenes, passing the ethylene-containing stream from said disproportionation zone together with a catalytic cracking gasoline to a cleavage zone under disproportionation conditions and subjecting the mixture of hydrocarbons therin to cleavage to produce said mixture of propylene and ethylene, a C/sub 5//sup +/ gasoline-containing product and butenes and wherein the butenes obtained in the overall operation of the disproportionation zone and the cleavage zone are passed to an alkylation zone wherein said butenes are used to alkylate an isoparaffin to produce additional high octane value product.

  14. Catalytic cracking of Arabian Light VGO over novel zeolites as FCC catalyst additives for maximizing propylene yield

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hussain, A. I.; Aitani, A.; Kubů, Martin; Čejka, Jiří; Al-Khattaf, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, MAR 2016 (2016), s. 226-239 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : catalytic cracking * FCC additives * 10-ring zeolites Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2016

  15. Structure and acidity of individual Fluid Catalytic Cracking catalyst particles studied by synchrotron-based infrared micro-spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31406592X; Soulimani, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313889449; Ruiz Martinez, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386405; van der Bij, H.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328201294; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2013-01-01

    A synchrotron-based infrared micro-spectroscopy study has been conducted to investigate the structure as well as the Brønsted and Lewis acidity of Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst particles at the individual particle level. Both fresh and laboratory-deactivated catalyst particles have been

  16. Staining of fluid-catalytic cracking catalysts: Localising Brønsted acidity within a single catalyst particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31406592X; Ruiz Martinez, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386405; van Leeuwen, S.L.; van der Beek, D.; Bergwerff, J.A.; Knowles, W.V.; Vogt, Eelco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073717398; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2012-01-01

    A time-resolved in situ micro-spectroscopic approach has been used to investigate the Brønsted acidic properties of fluid-catalytic-cracking (FCC) catalysts at the single particle level by applying the acid-catalysed styrene oligomerisation probe reaction. The reactivity of individual FCC components

  17. Probing the different life stages of a fluid catalytic cracking particle with integrated laser and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315886528; Buurmans, I.L.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31406592X; Agronskaia, A.V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183239830; Geus, J.W.; Gerritsen, H.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071548777; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2013-01-01

    While cycling through a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit, the structure and performance of FCC catalyst particles are severely affected. In this study, we set out to characterize the damage to commercial equilibrium catalyst particles, further denoted as ECat samples, and map the different

  18. Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy Correlates Structure of Fluid Catalytic Cracking Particles to Brønsted Acidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315886528; Buurmans, I.L.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31406592X; Geus, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412538024; Agronskaia, A.V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183239830; Ruiz Martinez, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386405; Gerritsen, H.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071548777; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2012-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the main industrial process used worldwide to convert crude oil fractions into fuels and important base chemicals, such as light olefins.[1] This is achieved by using micron-sized spherical catalyst particles of complex composition. Zeolitic material, usually

  19. Laboratory Production of Biofuels and Biochemicals from a Rapeseed Oil through Catalytic Cracking Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siauw H; Shi, Yu; Heshka, Nicole E; Zhang, Yi; Little, Edward

    2016-09-02

    The work is based on a reported study which investigates the processability of canola oil (bio-feed) in the presence of bitumen-derived heavy gas oil (HGO) for production of transportation fuels through a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) route. Cracking experiments are performed with a fully automated reaction unit at a fixed weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 8 hr(-1), 490-530 °C, and catalyst/oil ratios of 4-12 g/g. When a feed is in contact with catalyst in the fluid-bed reactor, cracking takes place generating gaseous, liquid, and solid products. The vapor produced is condensed and collected in a liquid receiver at -15 °C. The non-condensable effluent is first directed to a vessel and is sent, after homogenization, to an on-line gas chromatograph (GC) for refinery gas analysis. The coke deposited on the catalyst is determined in situ by burning the spent catalyst in air at high temperatures. Levels of CO2 are measured quantitatively via an infrared (IR) cell, and are converted to coke yield. Liquid samples in the receivers are analyzed by GC for simulated distillation to determine the amounts in different boiling ranges, i.e., IBP-221 °C (gasoline), 221-343 °C (light cycle oil), and 343 °C+ (heavy cycle oil). Cracking of a feed containing canola oil generates water, which appears at the bottom of a liquid receiver and on its inner wall. Recovery of water on the wall is achieved through washing with methanol followed by Karl Fischer titration for water content. Basic results reported include conversion (the portion of the feed converted to gas and liquid product with a boiling point below 221 °C, coke, and water, if present) and yields of dry gas (H2-C2's, CO, and CO2), liquefied petroleum gas (C3-C4), gasoline, light cycle oil, heavy cycle oil, coke, and water, if present.

  20. Application of stable crack growth in fracture assessment of defects in ductile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillstroem, Peter

    2009-06-01

    This report goes through the use of methods/standards, which consider stable (J-controlled) crack growth. We have demonstrated the following: - ASME XI, App. C, App. H, which deals with analysis of stainless steel and ferritic piping, take account of stable growth. In App. C, this corresponds to the inclusion of stable growth up to Δa ∼ 10 mm. - R6-method, BS 7910:1999 and ASME XI, Code Case N-494, contains an established formalism to take account of stable growth. A prerequisite is that you have access to relevant and authentic material data in the form of fracture resistance K k /J k and J r curves. - All of the above methods/standards are applicable in the nuclear context. We reported also that required to produce relevant and valid data (fracture resistance K k /J k and J r curves) to be used for the analysis of stable growth. This report does not specify how much stable crack that can be counted at a Safety Assessment

  1. Forecasting the zeolite-containing catalyst activity in catalytic cracking technology taking into account the feedstock composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashkina, Elena; Nazarova, Galina; Shafran, Tatyana; Stebeneva, Valeriya

    2017-08-01

    The effect of the feedstock composition and the process conditions on the current catalyst activity in catalytic cracking technology using a mathematical model is performed in this research. The mathematical model takes into account the catalyst deactivation by coke for primary and secondary cracking reactions. The investigation results have shown that the feedstock has significant effect on the yield and the content of coke on the catalyst. Thus, the relative catalyst activity is significantly reduced by 7.5-10.7 %. With increasing the catalytic cracking temperature due to the catalyst flow temperature rising, the coke content and the yield per feedstock increase and the catalyst activity decreases by 5.3-7.7%. Rising the process temperature together with the catalyst circulation ratio contributes to increase of the coke yield per feedstock in the catalytic cracking and decrease of the coke content on the catalyst. It is connected with the catalyst flow rising to the riser and the contact time decreasing in the reaction zone. Also, the catalyst activity decreases in the range of 3.8-5.5% relatively to the regenerated catalyst activity (83 %).

  2. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spending time in a rehab facility or getting cognitive-behavioral therapy or other treatments. Right now, there are no medicines to treat a crack addiction. If you smoke crack, talking with a counselor ...

  3. Catalytic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of dealuminated Y-zeolites impregnated by 0.5 wt% Pt catalysts promoted by different amounts of Ni, Pd or Cr (0.3 and 0.6 wt% were prepared and characterized as hydrocracking catalysts. The physicochemical and structural characterization of the solid catalysts were investigated and reported through N2 physisorption, XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and TEM techniques. Solid catalysts surface acidities were investigated through FT-IR spectroscopy aided by pyridine adsorption. The solid catalytic activities were evaluated through hydroconversion of n-hexane and n-heptane employing micro-catalytic pulse technique directly connected to a gas chromatograph analyzer. The thermal stability of the solids was also investigated up to 800 °C. Crystallinity studies using the XRD technique of all modified samples proved analogous to the parent Y-zeolite, exhibiting nearly an amorphous and microcrystalline character of the second metal oxides. Disclosure of bimetallic catalysts crystalline characterization, through XRD, was not viable. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms for all samples concluded type I adsorption isotherms, without any hysteresis loop, indicating that the entire pore system is composed of micropores. TEM micrographs of the solid catalysts demonstrate well-dispersed Pt, Ni and Cr nanoparticles having sizes of 2–4 nm and 7–8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity results indicate that the bimetallic (0.5Pt–0.3Cr/D18H–Y catalyst is the most active towards n-hexane and n-heptane isomerization while (0.5Pt–0.6Ni/D18H–Y catalyst can be designed as most suitable as a cracking catalyst.

  4. Thermal and catalytic cracking of ethylene in presence of CaO, MgO, zeolite and calcined dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taralas, G.; Sjoestroem, K.; Jaeraas, S.; Bjoernbom, E. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1993-12-31

    The subject of the present work is to study the effect of catalysts such as calcined dolomite (CaO.MgO), CaO (quicklime), MgO and Zeolite (EKZ-4) on the cracking of ethylene in the presence and absence of steam. N-heptane, toluene, naphthalene, thiophene have been some suitable model compounds for studies of the thermal and catalytic decomposition of tar. Previous results showed that the reaction scheme of the thermal decomposition of n-heptane was consistent with the high yield of ethylene observed in thermal decomposition of n-heptane. The effect of the reactor wall and the ferric impurities in the dolomite are also subjects of the research in this study. The results may also throw some additional light on the nature of the gas-phase thermal and catalytic reactions occurring in the use of dolomite as tar cracking catalysts. 28 refs

  5. Conversion of Isoprenoid Oil by Catalytic Cracking and Hydrocracking over Nanoporous Hybrid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Kimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al2O3 and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT, hydrocracking (HC, and catalytic cracking (CC of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al2O3/H-USY and ns Al2O3/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al2O3]/ns Al2O3/H-beta were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al2O3/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products.

  6. Optimizing the Production of Renewable Aromatics via Crop Oil Catalytic Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clancy Kadrmas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available While HZSM-5 catalytic cracking of crop oil toward aromatics have been well documented, this work adds to this body of knowledge with a full acid byproduct analysis that provides improved mass balance closure along with a design of experiment optimization of reaction conditions. Fatty acids are an inevitable byproduct when converting any triglyceride oil, but are most often overlooked; despite the impact fatty acids have on downstream processing. Acid analysis verified that only short chain fatty acids, mainly acetic acid, were present in low quantities when all feed oil was reacted. When relatively high fatty acid amounts were present, these were mainly uncracked C16 and C18 fatty acids. Optimization is a balance of aromatics formation vs. unwanted gas products, coke and residual fatty acids. A design of experiments approach was used to provide insight into where the optimal reaction conditions reside for HZSM-5 facilitated reactions. These conditions can then form the basis for further development into a commercially viable process for the production of renewable aromatics and other byproducts.

  7. ACIDIC REMOVAL OF METALS FROM FLUIDIZED CATALYTIC CRACKING CATALYST WASTE ASSISTED BY ELECTROKINETIC TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. G. Valt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOne of the main uses of catalysts in the oil industry is in the fluidized catalytic cracking process, which generates large quantities of waste material after use and regeneration cycles and that can be treated by the electrokinetic remediation technique, in which the contaminant metals are transported by migration. In this study, deactivated FCC catalyst was characterized before and after the electrokinetic remediation process to evaluate the amount of metal removed, and assess structural modifications, in order to indicate a possible use as an adsorbent material. The analyses included pH measurement and the concentration profile of vanadium ions along the reactor, X-ray microtomography, X-ray fluorescence, BET analysis and DTA analysis. The results indicated that 40% of the surface area of the material was recovered in relation to the disabled material, showing an increase in the available area for the adsorption. The remediation process removed nearly 31% of the vanadium and 72% of the P2O5 adhering to the surface of the catalyst, without causing structural or thermal stability changes.

  8. Catalytic cracking of vegetable oil with metal oxides for biofuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yigezu, Zerihun Demrew; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Biofuel was synthesized from vegetable oil by catalytic cracking. • Performance of six different metal catalysts was studied. • Influence of temperature and reaction time on the process was evaluated. • Methyl and ethyl esters are the major components of the biofuel synthesized. - Abstract: This study presents the utilization of metal oxides for the biofuel production from vegetable oil. The physical and chemical properties of the diesel-like products obtained, and the influence of reaction variables on the product distribution were investigated. Six different metal oxides (Co 3 O 4 , KOH, MoO 3 , NiO, V 2 O 5 , and ZnO) were employed as catalysts and the results indicated that the metal oxides are suitable for catalyzing the conversion of oil into organic liquid products (OLPs). The maximum conversion (87.6%) was obtained with V 2 O 5 at 320 °C in 40 min whereas a minimum conversion (55.1%) was obtained with MoO 3 at 390 °C in 30 min. The physical characteristics of the product obtained (density, specific gravity, higher heat value, flash point and kinematic viscosity), were in line with ASTM D6751 (B100) standards. The hydrocarbons majorly present in the product were found to be methyl and ethyl esters. Furthermore, OLPs obtained were distilled and separated into four components. The amount of light hydrocarbons, gasoline, kerosene and heavy oil like components obtained were 18.73%, 33.62%, 24.91% and 90.93%, respectively

  9. Fluid catalytic cracking: recent developments on the grand old lady of zeolite catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is one of the major conversion technologies in the oil refinery industry. FCC currently produces the majority of the world's gasoline, as well as an important fraction of propylene for the polymer industry. In this critical review, we give an overview of the latest trends in this field of research. These trends include ways to make it possible to process either very heavy or very light crude oil fractions as well as to co-process biomass-based oxygenates with regular crude oil fractions, and convert these more complex feedstocks in an increasing amount of propylene and diesel-range fuels. After providing some general background of the FCC process, including a short history as well as details on the process, reactor design, chemical reactions involved and catalyst material, we will discuss several trends in FCC catalysis research by focusing on ways to improve the zeolite structure stability, propylene selectivity and the overall catalyst accessibility by (a) the addition of rare earth elements and phosphorus, (b) constructing hierarchical pores systems and (c) the introduction of new zeolite structures. In addition, we present an overview of the state-of-the-art micro-spectroscopy methods for characterizing FCC catalysts at the single particle level. These new characterization tools are able to explain the influence of the harsh FCC processing conditions (e.g. steam) and the presence of various metal poisons (e.g. V, Fe and Ni) in the crude oil feedstocks on the 3-D structure and accessibility of FCC catalyst materials. PMID:26382875

  10. Studies on the behaviour of different spent fluidized-bed catalytic cracking catalysts on Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soriano, L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluidized-bed catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC it is a residue from the industry of the petroleum that shows a high pozzolanic reactivity and, in cementing matrix, it significantly improves their mechanical behaviour as well as durability. In this research a comparative study on residues of catalyst from different sources has been carried out, in order to know if these residues can be used jointly in an indiscriminate way or, on the contrary, it is necessary to classify them according to their characteristics. Thus, a study on five different FCC residues, supplied from different companies, has been carried out, and their physical-chemical characteristics, pozzolanic reactivity by means of thermogravimetric analysis and the evolution of the mechanical strength of mortars were studied. After analyzing all the aspects, it can be concluded that no significant differences among the different tested catalysts were found.El catalizador de craqueo catalítico (FCC es un residuo de la industria del petróleo que posee una elevada reactividad puzolánica y en matrices cementicias mejora de manera importante los aspectos mecánicos así como de durabilidad. En este trabajo se realiza un estudio comparativo sobre residuos de catalizador de distintos orígenes, para poder conocer si se pueden utilizar conjuntamente de forma indiscriminada o por el contrario hay que catalogarlos según su origen. Para ello, se realizó un estudio sobre cinco residuos de catalizador de craqueo catalítico distintos, suministrados por diferentes empresas y se estudiaron sus características fisicoquímicas, reactividad puzolánica a través de estudios termogravimétricos y la evolución de las resistencias mecánicas en morteros. Tras analizar todos los aspectos se concluye que no existen diferencias significativas entre los distintos catalizadores empleados.

  11. Impact of catalytically cracked jatropha oil using CeO2 and SiO2 as catalysts on DI diesel engine performance and emission characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylswamy Thirunavukkarasu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The biooil is thermally cracked under catalytic environment in a catalytic cracking process. This process is able to replace the transesterification process to match the biofuel properties with diesel. In this study the silicon dioxide and cerium oxide were chosen as catalyst for cracking the jatropha vegetable oil. The catalytically cracked jatropha biofuel gas is delivered at constant rate to the inlet manifold of the diesel engine. Before and after cracking, the characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The condensed cracked jatropha biofuel properties were analyzed with the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis, and it matches with the diesel fuel. From the experimental results, the increase in brake thermal efficiency of the engine with higher oxides of nitrogen emission was observed compared with diesel for both the catalytically cracked jatropha biofuels. Notably, SiO2 as catalyst showed the better mixing towards homogeneity with higher performance and emission results than the CeO2 as catalyst.

  12. Catalytic Cracking of Triglyceride-Rich Biomass toward Lower Olefins over a Nano-ZSM-5/SBA-15 Analog Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Hoan Vu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of triglyceride-rich biomass toward C2–C4 olefins was evaluated over a hierarchically textured nano-ZSM-5/SBA-15 analog composite (ZSC-24 under fluid catalytic cracking (FCC conditions. The experiments were performed on a fully automated Single-Receiver Short-Contact-Time Microactivity Test unit (SR-SCT-MAT, Grace Davison at 550 °C and different catalyst-to-oil mass ratios (0–1.2 g∙g−1. The ZSC-24 catalyst is very effective for transformation of triglycerides to valuable hydrocarbons, particularly lower olefins. The selectivity to C2–C4 olefins is remarkably high (>90% throughout the investigated catalyst-to-oil ratio range. The superior catalytic performance of the ZSC-24 catalyst can be attributed to the combination of its medium acid site amount and improved molecular transport provided by the bimodal pore system, which effectively suppresses the secondary reactions of primarily formed lower olefins.

  13. The current status and perspectives of biofuel production via catalytic cracking of edible and non-edible oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Yee Kang; Bhatia, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    Biofuel development has gained the attention of researchers in recent years owing to the rate of depletion of fossil fuels. Several processes are currently employed in the conventional production of different biofuels: the production of biodiesel is catalytically performed either through the transesterification of triglycerides using alcohol or the deoxygenative ecofining of triglycerides in a non-alcohol environment; bio-oil is produced by the pyrolysis of biomass; bio-ethanol is produced by the fermentation of sugars obtained from starch or cellulosic based biomass, while bio-gasoline is produced from the catalytic cracking of triglycerides. Owing to the enormous dependency of transport vehicles running on gasoline engines, the development of bio-gasoline may well reduced the dependence of the fuel market on fossil fuels. The present article summarizes recent progresses and future prospects of biofuel production via catalytic cracking technology. This technology can be implemented in current petroleum refineries with minor modifications. However, reactor design and catalyst choice are important issues and have to be addressed before successful implementation of this technology in commercial ventures.

  14. On the Fracture Toughness and Stable Crack Growth in Shape Memory Alloys Under Combined Thermomechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jape, Sameer Sanjay

    yielded results similar to those obtained experimentally, viz. stable crack growth with transformation toughening, dependence of failure cycle on bias load and catastrophic failure during cooling, and are explained using classical fracture mechanics theories. Influence of TRIP as a monotonically accumulating irrecoverable plastic strain on the crack-tip mechanical fields in case of stationary and advancing cracks is also investigated using the same computational tools. Thermomechanical coupling in shape memory alloys, which is an important factor when utilized as solid-state actuators manifests itself through the generation and absorption of latent of transformation and leads to non-uniform temperature distribution. The effect of this coupling vis-a-vis the mechanics of static and advancing cracks is also analyzed using the energetics based approach.

  15. Multidimensional gas chromatography for the characterization of permanent gases and light hydrocarbons in catalytic cracking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Cortes, H J; Shellie, R A

    2013-01-04

    An integrated gas chromatographic system has been successfully developed and implemented for the measurement of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbons in one single analysis. These analytes are frequently encountered in critical industrial petrochemical and chemical processes like catalytic cracking of naphtha or diesel fuel to lighter components used in gasoline. The system employs a practical, effective configuration consisting of two three-port planar microfluidic devices in series with each other, having built-in fluidic gates, and a mid-point pressure source. The use of planar microfluidic devices offers intangible advantages like in-oven switching with no mechanical moving parts, an inert sample flow path, and a leak-free operation even with multiple thermal cycles. In this way, necessary features such as selectivity enhancement, column isolation, column back-flushing, and improved system cleanliness were realized. Porous layer open tubular capillary columns were employed for the separation of hydrocarbons followed by flame ionization detection. After separation has occurred, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were converted to methane with the use of a nickel-based methanizer for detection with flame ionization. Flow modulated thermal conductivity detection was employed to measure oxygen and nitrogen. Separation of all the target analytes was achieved in one single analysis of less than 12 min. Reproducibility of retention times for all compounds were found to be less than 0.1% (n=20). Reproducibility of area counts at two levels, namely 100 ppm(v) and 1000 ppm(v) over a period of two days were found to be less than 5.5% (n=20). Oxygen and nitrogen were found to be linear over a range from 20 ppm(v) to 10,000 ppm(v) with correlation coefficients of at least 0.998 and detection limits of less than 10 ppm(v). Hydrocarbons of interest were found to be linear over a range from 200 ppb(v) to 1000 ppm(v) with correlation

  16. Flow dynamics study of catalyst powder in catalytic cracking unit for troubleshooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelgaonkar Vivek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma scanning and radiotracer applications are very effective and inexpensive tools to understand and optimize the process as well as troubleshoot the various types of problems in many chemical, petrochemical industries and refineries. These techniques are non-invasive; hence, the problems can be pinpointed online, which leads to reduce the downtime, schedule the shutdown and maintenance of the plant equipment, rendering huge economic benefits. In a leading refinery of India, the catalytic cracking unit (CCU was malfunctioning. It was suspected by the refinery engineers that the catalyst powder was being carried over to the fractionator, which could have led to erosion of the fractionator column internals resulting in their rupture, and consequentially, to the fire hazard. To understand the flow behaviour of the catalyst powder and to ensure the mechanical integrity, catalyst accumulation and choking, both radiotracer study and gamma scanning of the CCU reactor was carried out. The reactor consists of a riser, three primary cyclones and three secondary cyclones. Gamma scanning of the reactor was carried out with the help of an automatic gamma scanner using 1.8 GBq of Co-60 sealed source. Results showed that the catalyst powder was accumulated in one of the secondary cyclones and uneven density distribution was observed in another secondary cyclone. The radiotracer study was carried out using the irradiated catalyst powder as a radiotracer, which contains 0.9 GBq of Na-24. The radiotracer was injected in the reactor through the specially fabricated injection system. Radiation measurement was done using the thermally insulated and collimated NaI(Tl scintillation detectors located at various strategic locations coupled to a multi-detector data acquisition system. The data were mathematically analysed. It was confirmed that the catalyst powder was accumulated in one of the secondary cyclones with no flow downwards. This resulted in excess powder

  17. CFD Flow and Heat Transfer Simulation for Empty and Packed Fixed Bed Reactor in Catalytic Cracking of Naphtha

    OpenAIRE

    D. Salari; A. Niaei; P. Chitsaz Yazdi; M. Derakhshani; S. R. Nabavi

    2007-01-01

    This work aims to test the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to fixed bed catalytic cracking reactors. Studies of CFD with a fixed bed design commonly use a regular packing with N=2 to define bed geometry. CFD allows us to obtain a more accurate view of the fluid flow and heat transfer mechanisms present in fixed bed equipment. Naphtha was used as feedstock and the reactor length was 80cm. It is divided in three sections that catalyst bed packed in the middle section ...

  18. Numerical simulation of stable fatigue crack growth rate using a cohesive zone model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silitonga, S.; Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Snijder, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the remaining fatigue life of a structure with crack(s) is generally conducted by the fracture mechanics method. This method is aimed at predicting the crack growth and final fracture due to fluctuating loads. The crack growth curve required for these calculations is constructed on the

  19. Stable crack growth during over stressing or proof testing of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njo, D.H.

    1985-07-01

    In an earlier study several years ago an attempt has been made by a study group in Switzerland formed by representatives of utilities, manufacturers, inspection agency and the licensing authority to evaluate systematically the advantages and disadvantages of a proof test for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) taking into account the different aspects involved. In this study, the present day practice in the requirements regarding proof testing in several countries with nuclear power plants were assessed. Using the method of fracture mechanics, taking into account the proof test conditions and material behaviour at hand, qualified quantitative statements were then sought for. One of the important findings of the study was that a sufficiently accurate determination of stable crack growth (SCG) during proof testing is a necessary precondition for a qualified quantitative statement. At that time this requirement could not be met. The aim of the present exercise of collecting available information on SCG was twofold: to get an overview of the present day requirements on pre-service and in-service proof testing of reactor pressure vessels in different countries with NPPs; to collect data on stable crack growth due to over stressing during proof tests to be used in the quantitative assessment, using fracture mechanics methods, and the potential benefit, if any, of proof tests. In the framework of the present study, the originally stipulated aims could not be achieved. It turned out to be a very complex and difficult problem, where various important aspects are little known and could not be assessed without further comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigations

  20. DRASTIC ENHANCEMENT OF PROPENE YIELD FROM 1-HEXENE CATALYTIC CRACKING USING A SHAPE INTENSIFIED MESO-SAPO-34 CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZEESHAN NAWAZ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A shape intensified Meso-SAPO-34 catalyst was designed and used to improve the yield and selectivity of propene from 1-hexene cracking. The propene was produced with an optimal selectivity of 73.9 wt.% with high feed conversion 98.2 wt.% at 14 per hour WHSV. Robust exponential control of the stereochemistry was observed over the Meso-SAPO-34 shape selective catalyst’s cracking. The influence of the operating parameters on 1-hexene catalytic cracking, such as reaction temperature, time-on-stream effect on product distribution and conversion variations were systematically studied. The yield of propene and conversion rapidly increased with the reaction temperature, until 575oC. Shape intensification and topological integration of SAPO-34 increases the diffusion opportunities for feed, and this phenomenon was found to be responsible for drastic increase in 1-hexene conversion and propene yield. One other reason for this increase is the suppression of surface reactions (isomerization and hydride transfer owing to better diffusion opportunities. About 55 wt.% propene yield and higher total olefins content was achieved over Meso-SAPO-34.

  1. Presentation of a new plant design, based on an internally circulating fluidized bed system for catalytic cracking; Fluid Catalytic Cracking: Entwicklung einer neuartigen FCC-Anlage mit intern zirkulierendem Wirbelschichtsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhold, A.; Fimberger, W.; Hofbauer, H. [Technische Univ. Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik, Brennstofftechnik und Umwelttechnik

    1998-09-01

    An internally circulating fluidized bed system was developed for use as a catalytic cracking system. The plant (hot unit) was conceived for a feed rate of 1 to 4 kg/h. The hot unit was developed based on data obtained from literature (e.g. temperature, cat to oil ratio and contact time). Important fluid dynamic parameters, such as the circulation rate and the gas separation efficiency between reaction and regeneration zone were determined in an acrylic model (cold unit) at room temperature. Scaling relationships based on the theory of Glicksman were used as much as possible to design the cold unit in order to give similitude between cold and hot unit. Important parameters influencing the catalyst circulation rate could be determined exactly. Gas separation efficiency measurements between reaction and regeneration zone proved the safety of the system. The setting of the parameters during the trials was determined based on data from the cold unit and literature (e.g. temperature, cat to oil ratio, and contact time). The trials in the hot unit were carried out with vacuum gas oil and FCC-equilibrium catalyst. The experiments ran successfully and the analysis of the cracking products matched expectations. Furthermore the new system can also be used as a plant for other reactions such as catalytic alkylation and isomerisation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein intern zirkulierendes Wirbelschichtsystem zur Durchfuehrung des Fluid Catalytic Cracking Verfahrens wurde entwickelt. Die Technikumsanlage wurde fuer eine Feedrate von ca. 1 bis 4 kg/h ausgelegt. Basierend auf Daten aus der Literatur (z.B. Temperatur, Kat-Oel-Verhaeltnis und Kontaktzeit) wurde das Heissmodell aus einer Spezialstahllegierung gefertigt und aufgebaut. Wichtige stroemungsmechanische Parameter, wie die Umlaufrate und Gastrenneffizienz zwischen dem Reaktor und dem Regenerator, wurden in einem Modell aus Acrylglas (sogenanntes Kaltmodell) bei Raumtemperatur bestimmt. Um die Aehnlichkeit zwischen dem Kalt- und dem

  2. The Production of Vinyl Acetate Monomer as a Co-Product from the Non-Catalytic Cracking of Soybean Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Valuable chemical by-products can increase the economic viability of renewable transportation fuel facilities while increasing the sustainability of the chemical and associated industries. A study was performed to demonstrate that commercial quality chemical products could be produced using the non-catalytic cracking of crop oils. Using this decomposition technique generates a significant concentration of C2−C10 fatty acids which can be isolated and purified as saleable co-products along with transportation fuels. A process scheme was developed and replicated in the laboratory to demonstrate this capability. Using this scheme, an acetic acid by-product was isolated and purified then reacted with ethylene derived from renewable ethanol to generate a sample of vinyl acetate monomer. This sample was assessed by a major chemical company and found to be of acceptable quality for commercial production of polyvinyl acetate and other products.

  3. Conversion of toluene to benzene and mixed xylenes on old Thermofor Catalytic Cracking Units (TCC) in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Alfonso; Usachev, Nikolai Y.; Kalinin, Valera P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry]. E-mails: romero@orc.ru; ny@ioc.ac.ru

    2004-07-01

    World demand on toluene was in regression during the last years due to environmental and economical reasons, and there is a surplus of this compound from the processing to the petrochemical products. Disproportionation and transalkylation for the production of benzene and xylenes from toluene are now important industrial processes (Ikai Wang, 1999.). We analyze here the possibility of processing toluene on the Russian 43-102 'Houdry' type continuous Catalytic Cracking units (TCC), by studying the behaviour of EMCAT-100 catalyst on the disproportionation of toluene under the VHSV, temperature and catalyst/feed mass ratio characteristic for 43-102 facilities. Our previous results show that toluene disproportionation could be carried out on the Russian TCC units. (author)

  4. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Meredith, Will; Sun, Cheng-Gong; Snape, Colin E.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made. Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations. PMID:19662175

  5. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Sephton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made.Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations.

  6. Catalytic thermal cracking of post-consumer waste plastics to fuels: Part 1 - Kinetics and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of waste plastics such as prescription bottles (polypropylene/PP), high density polyethylene, landfill liners (polyethylene/PE), packing materials (polystyrene/PS), and foams (polyurethane/PU) into crude plastic...

  7. Catalytic thermal cracking of postconsumer waste plastics to fuels. 2. Pilot-scale thermochemical conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic gasoline and diesel fuels were prepared via catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene and polypropylene plastics followed by distillation of plastic crude oils. Reaction conditions optimized using a 2 L batch reactor were applied to pilot-scale production of plastic crude ...

  8. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya

    2015-06-11

    Fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) units in refineries process heavy feedstock obtained from crude oil distillation. While cracking feed, catalysts get deactivated due to coke deposition. During catalyst regeneration by burning coke in air, nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed. The increase in nitrogen content in feed over time has resulted in increased NOx emissions. To predict NOx concentration in flue gas, a reliable model for FCC regenerators is needed that requires comprehensive understanding and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics for the proposed pathways are evaluated using transition state theory. It is observed that the addition of O2 on coke is favored only when the free radical is present on the carbon atom instead of nitrogen atom. Thus, NOx formation during coke oxidation does not result from the direct attack by O2 on N atoms of coke, but from the transfer of an O atom to N from a neighboring site. The low activation energies required for NO formation indicate that it is more likely to form than NO2 during coke oxidation. The favorable pathways for NOx formation that can be used in FCC models are identified. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  9. PREPARATION AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY FOR ISOPROPYL BENZENE CRACKING OF Co, Mo AND Co/Mo-Al2O3-PILLARED MONTMORILLONITE CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanudin Hasanudin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been prepared Co, Mo and Co/Mo-Al2O3-pillared montmorillonite catalysts using montmorillonite clay  as raw material. The structure and porosity of the catalysts were determined using N2 adsorption-desorption and FT-IR spectroscopy analysis methods. Isopropyl benzene cracking using these catalysts were used to test the catalytic activity and performance of Co, Mo and Co/Mo-Al2O3-pillared montmorillonites.  Characterization results showed that pillarization resulted in the increase of the total pore volume and specific surface area of the clay. Meanwhile, transition metals (Co, Mo and Co/Mo loaded on Al2O3-pillared monmorillonites could increase the catalytic activity of the catalysts for isopropyl benzene cracking significantly.   Keywords: pillared monmorillonite, isopropyl benzene  and cracking catalyst

  10. Maximizing light olefins production in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) units; Maximizacao de olefinas leves em unidades de craqueamento catalitico fluido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Ricardo D.M.; Pinho, Andrea de Rezende [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is widely spread over the ten PETROBRAS refineries in its thirteen industrial units. The importance of the FCC process resides on its high gasoline output, being the main supplier of this important product to the system. Additionally, FCC process is the main source of light hydrocarbons in the LPG range, including light olefins. The increasing demand for ethylene, propylene and butylenes was encouraging to concentrate the research efforts on studies about alternatives for the traditional FCC process. In the present work, the proposals from main licensors (UOP, KBR, Stone and Webster) for a light-olefins-driven FCC process (Petrochemical FCC) will be compared. Furthermore, the catalytic route for light olefins production in FCC units is also described. An additive based on ZSM- 5 zeolite, which is produced following a PETROBRAS proprietary technology, is being largely applied into the catalyst inventories of all FCC units. An analysis of different scenarios was performed to estimate the maximum potential of light olefins production from the highest possible ZSM-5 additive usage. More specifically for the case of ethylene, which production is also boosted by the same type of additive, studies are being conducted with the objective of recovering it from a C2 stream using specific units to do the splitting (UPGR). The search for increasing light olefins production in the refining processes is in line with PETROBRAS strategic plan which targeted for the company a more intense activity in the Brazilian petrochemical market (author)

  11. Synthesis ZrO2-Montmorillonite and Application as Catalyst in Catalytic Cracking of Heavy Fraction of Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Is Fatimah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on synthesis and characterization of ZrO2-Montmorillonit and its application as catalyst in heavy fraction of crude oil (HFCO conversion has been investigated. Synthesis of catalyst was done by pillarization of ZrO2 into silicate interlayer of montmorillonite structure. The success in synthesis is shown by XRD and BET surface area measurement in that basal spacing d001 was increase after pillarization. Activity test of material was showed that ZrO2 dispersion affected catalytic activity in liquid production and the activity was increased asn increasing temperature in the range of 473K-673K. Composition of liquid product indicated that ZrO2-Montmorillonit tend to produce kerosene related to metal oxide distribution in synthesis. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 3 June 2008, Accepted: 15 July 2008][How to Cite: I. Fatimah, K. Wijaya, K. H. Setyawan. (2008. Synthesis ZrO2-Montmorillonite and Application as Catalyst in Catalytic Cracking of Heavy Fraction of Crude Oil. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3(1-3: 9-13.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7118.9-13][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7118.9-13 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7118

  12. Synthesis ZrO2-Montmorillonite and Application as Catalyst in Catalytic Cracking of Heavy Fraction of Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoirul Himmi Setyawan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on synthesis and characterization of ZrO2-Montmorillonit and its application as catalyst in heavyfraction of crude oil (HFCO conversion has been investigated. Synthesis of catalyst was done by pillarizationof ZrO2 into silicate interlayer of montmorillonite structure. The success in synthesis is shown by XRDand BET surface area measurement in that basal spacing d001 was increase after pillarization. Activitytest of material was showed that ZrO2 dispersion affected catalytic activity in liquid production and the activitywas increased asn increasing temperature in the range of 473K-673K. Composition of liquid productindicated that ZrO2-Montmorillonit tend to produce kerosene related to metal oxide distribution in synthesis. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 3 June 2008, Accepted: 15 July 2008][How to Cite: I. Fatimah, K. Wijaya, K. H. Setyawan. (2008. Synthesis ZrO2-Montmorillonite and Application as Catalyst in Catalytic Cracking of Heavy Fraction of Crude Oil. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3(1-3: 9-13. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.17.9-13

  13. Indentation studies on Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]-stabilized ZrO[sub 2]; 2: Toughness determination from stable growth of indentation-induced cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dransmann, G.W.; Steinbrech, R.W. (Inst. fuer Reaktorwerkstoffe, Juelich (Germany)); Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F. (Univ. de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias); Dominguez-Rodriguez, A. (Univ. de Sevilla (Spain). Dept. de Fisic Materia Condensada); Heuer, A.H. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Stable indentation cracks were grown in four-point bend tests to study the fracture toughness of two Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]-stabilized ZrO[sub 2] ceramics containing 3 and 4 mol% Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]. By combining microscopic in situ stable crack growth observations at discrete stresses with crack profile measurements, the dependence of toughness on crack extension was determined from crack extension plots, which graphically separate the crack driving residual stress intensity and applied stress intensity factors. Both materials exhibit steeply rising R-curves, with a plateau toughness of 4.5 and 3.1 MPa[center dot]m[sup 1/2] for the 3- and 4-mol% materials, respectively. The magnitude of the plateau toughness reflects the fraction of tetragonal grain contributing to transformation toughening.

  14. Transportation fuel production by combination of LDPE thermal cracking and catalytic hydroreforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escola, J.M.; Aguado, J.; Serrano, D.P.; Briones, L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • h-Beta samples were impregnated with Ni nitrate to achieve Ni contents of 1.5%, 4%, 7% and 10%. • Larger and more easily reducible metal particles were obtained on Ni 7%/h-Beta and Ni 10%/h-Beta. • Higher Ni contents increased the amount of gases at the expenses of diesel fractions. • Maximum selectivity to automotive fuels (∼81%) was obtained with Ni 7%/h-Beta. • Ni loading also enhanced olefins saturation up to Ni 7%/h-Beta. - Abstract: Fuel production from plastics is a promising way to reduce landfilling rates while obtaining valuable products. The usage of Ni-supported hierarchical Beta zeolite (h-Beta) for the hydroreforming of the oils coming from LDPE thermal cracking has proved to produce high selectivities to gasoline and diesel fuels (>80%). In the present work, the effect of the Ni loading on Ni/h-Beta is investigated in the hydroreforming of the oils form LDPE thermal cracking. h-Beta samples were impregnated with Ni nitrate, calcined and reduced in H 2 up to 550 °C to achieve different Ni contents: 1.5%, 4%, 7% and 10%. Larger and more easily reducible metal particles were obtained on Ni 7%/h-Beta and Ni 10%/h-Beta. Hydroreforming tests were carried out in autoclave reactor at 310 °C, under 20 bar H 2 , for 45 min. Ni content progressively increased the amount of gases at the expenses of diesel fractions, while gasoline remained approximately constant about 52–54%. Maximum selectivity to automotive fuels (∼81%) was obtained with Ni 7%/h-Beta. Ni loading also enhanced olefins saturation up to Ni 7%/h-Beta. High cetane indices (71–86) and octane numbers (89–91) were obtained over all the catalysts. Regarding the different studied Ni contents, Ni 7%/h-Beta constitutes a rather promising catalyst for obtaining high quality fuels from LDPE thermal cracking oils

  15. Modelling of FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking) risers with six lumps; Modelo de elevadores de Unidades de Craqueamento Catalitico com cinetica de seis classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldessar, Fabio; Negrao, Cezar O. Ribeiro; Palu, Claudia [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Parana (CEFET-PR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The current work presents a mathematical model of an ascendant flow vertical reactor (riser) of a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit. The two-phase flow (gas-solid) and the cracking reactions are admitted one-dimensional and steady state. Mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are considered for each phase (solid and gas). A six-lump kinetic model is employed to evaluate gasoil, gasoline, GLP, fuel gas, light cycle oil and coke fractions. The model results are compared to experimental values from a pilot plant and to another model found in the literature. The results are in good agreement, showing the model has great potential. (author)

  16. Effect of Particle Size Upon Pt/SiO2 Catalytic Cracking of n-Dodecane Under Supercritical Conditions: in situ SAXS and XANES Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungwon; Lee, Sungsik; Kumbhalkar, Mrunmayi; Wiaderek, Kamila M.; Dumesic, James A; Winans, Randall E.

    2017-01-01

    The endothermic cracking and dehydrogenation of n-dodecane is investigated over well-defined nanometer size platinum catalysts supported on SiO2 to study the particle size effects in the catalytic cracking reaction, with simultaneous in situ monitoring of the particle size and oxidation state of the working catalysts by in situ SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering) and XAS (X-ray absorption spectroscopy). The selectivity toward olefins products was found dominant in the 1 nm size platinum catalysts, whereas paraffins are dominant in the 2 nm catalysts. This reveals a strong correlation between catalytic performance and catalyst size as well as the stability of the nanoparticles in supercritical condition of n-dodecane. The presented results suggest that controlling the size and geometric structure of platinum nanocatalysts could lead to a fundamentally new level of understanding of nanoscale materials by monitoring the catalysts in realistic reaction conditions.

  17. Life cycle assessment of hydrogenated biodiesel production from waste cooking oil using the catalytic cracking and hydrogenation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junya; Aoki, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Yamada, Kazuo; Sakai, Shin-ichi

    2015-04-01

    There is a worldwide trend towards stricter control of diesel exhaust emissions, however presently, there are technical impediments to the use of FAME (fatty acid methyl esters)-type biodiesel fuel (BDF). Although hydrogenated biodiesel (HBD) is anticipated as a new diesel fuel, the environmental performance of HBD and its utilization system have not been adequately clarified. Especially when waste cooking oil is used as feedstock, not only biofuel production but also the treatment of waste cooking oil is an important function for society. A life cycle assessment (LCA), including uncertainty analysis, was conducted to determine the environmental benefits (global warming, fossil fuel consumption, urban air pollution, and acidification) of HBD produced from waste cooking oil via catalytic cracking and hydrogenation, compared with fossil-derived diesel fuel or FAME-type BDF. Combined functional unit including "treatment of waste cooking oil" and "running diesel vehicle for household waste collection" was established in the context of Kyoto city, Japan. The calculation utilized characterization, damage, and integration factors identified by LIME2, which was based on an endpoint modeling method. The results show that if diesel vehicles that comply with the new Japanese long-term emissions gas standard are commonly used in the future, the benefit of FAME-type BDF will be relatively limited. Furthermore, the scenario that introduced HBD was most effective in reducing total environmental impact, meaning that a shift from FAME-type BDF to HBD would be more beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Principal component analysis in an experimental cold flow model of a fluid catalytic cracking unit by gammametry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Janeo Severino C. de; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Santos, Valdemir A. dos; Souza, Jose Edson G. de; Luna-Finkler, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of riser of a cold flow model of a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) was investigated. The experimental data were obtained by the nuclear technique of gamma transmission. A gamma source was placed diametrically opposite to a detector in any straight section of the riser. The gas-solid flow through riser was monitored with a source of Americium-241 what allowed obtaining information of the axial solid concentration without flow disturbance and also identifying the dependence of this concentration profile with several independent variables. The MatLab R and Statistica R software were used. Statistica tool employed was the Principal Components Analysis (PCA), that consisted of the job of the data organization, through two-dimensional head offices to allow extract relevant information about the importance of the independent variables on axial solid concentration in a cold flow riser. The variables investigated were mass flow rate of solid, mass flow rate of gas, pressure in the riser base and the relative height in the riser. The first two components reached about 98 % of accumulated percentage of explained variance. (author)

  19. Performance under sulfate attack of concrete additioned with fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FCC and metakaolin (MK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Torres Castellanos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the evaluation of the performance of concrete added with Fluid Catalytic Cracking Catalyst residue (FCC from a Colombian petroleum company, under sulfate attack, is presented. The results of this concrete are compared with the results of Metakaolin (MK added concrete. The analysis of the pozzolanic materials included the determination of the particle size, the pozzolanic activity and the chemical and mineralogical composition. Different percentages of FCC were used as Portland cement replacement in proportions of 0, 10, 20 and 30%; similarly concrete added with 20% of MK as replacement was elaborated. Compressive strength and performance under sulfate attack were evaluated. Results showed that concrete with FCC and MK as well as control concrete had similar behavior; however its expansion was higher. In addition, the performance of the two types of concrete (FCC y MK under sulfate attack was comparable; this could be due to fact that FCC and MK showed similarities regarding of their chemical and mineralogical composition. Importantly, after 360 days of exposure the specimens with MK and FCC showed no significant deterioration.

  20. Catalytic cracking of non-edible sunflower oil over ZSM-5 for hydrocarbon bio-jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianhui; Wei, Lin; Julson, James; Qiao, Qiquan; Dubey, Ashish; Anderson, Gary

    2015-03-25

    Non-edible sunflower oils that were extracted from sunflower residual wastes were catalytically cracked over a ZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed-bed reactor at three different reaction temperatures: 450°C, 500°C and 550°C. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, FT-IR, BET and SEM. Characterizations of the upgraded sunflower oils, hydrocarbon fuels, distillation residues and non-condensable gases were carried out. The effect of the reaction temperature on the yield and quality of liquid products was discussed. The results showed that the reaction temperature affected the hydrocarbon fuel yield but had a minor influence on its properties. The highest conversion efficiency from sunflower oils to hydrocarbon fuels was 30.1%, which was obtained at 550°C. The reaction temperature affected the component content of the non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gases generated at 550°C contained the highest content of light hydrocarbons (C1-C5), CO, CO2 and H2. Compared to raw sunflower oils, the properties of hydrocarbon fuels including the dynamic viscosity, pH, moisture content, density, oxygen content and heating value were improved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved PI-PD control design using predictive functional optimization for temperature model of a fluidized catalytic cracking unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hongbo; Li, Haisheng

    2017-03-01

    Proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control is widely used in industry because of its simple structure and convenient implementation. However, PID control is suitable for small time delay systems; while if too large delay is encountered, PID control may not obtain the desired performance. Proportional-integral-proportional-derivative (PI-PD) control is a modified of PID control and can get improved control performance; however, due to the complex controller parameter tuning, the PI-PD control is used in a limited scope. Inspired by the advantage of predictive functional control (PFC), a new PI-PD control design using PFC optimization is proposed in this paper. The proposed method not only inherits the advantage of PFC, which does well in coping with the time delay, but also has the same structure as the PI-PD controller. The proposed method is tested on the preheated temperature control of crude oil in a fluidized catalytic cracking unit. The results show that the proposed controller improves control performance compared with typical PID control and PI-PD control. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparation of fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion as anti-collapse agent for drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqiang Xiong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion (FCCSE was prepared by using interfacial complexes generation method that was simple and versatile. The critical factors influencing the sample preparation process were optimized, for instance, the optimum value of the mixed hydrophile-lipophile balance of compound emulsifier was 11.36, the content of compound emulsifier was 4 wt%, the emulsification temperature was 75 °C, the agitation speed was 200 rpm, and the emulsification time was 30–45 min. The performance as a drilling fluid additive was also investigated with respect to rheological properties, filtration loss and inhibition of FCCSE. Experimental results showed that FCCSE was favorable to inhibiting clay expansion and dispersion and reducing fluid loss. Furthermore, it had good compatibility with other additives and did not affect the rheological properties of drilling fluids. FCCSE exhibited better performance than the available emulsified asphalt. It has a promising application as anti-collapse agent in petroleum and natural gas drilling.

  3. Influence of crystallite size and shape of zeolite ZSM-22 on its activity and selectivity in the catalytic cracking of n-octane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bager, F.; Ernst, S. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry, Chemical Technology

    2013-11-01

    Light olefins belong to the major building blocks for the petrochemical industry, particularly for the production of polymers. It has become necessary to increase the production of light olefins specifically in the case for propene with so called 'on-purpose propene' technologies. One possible route is to increase the amount of propene that can be obtained from Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) by optimizing the catalyst through introducing new additives, which offer a high selectivity to propene. Zeolite ZSM-22 samples with different crystallite sizes and morphologies have been synthesized via hydrothermal syntheses and characterized by powder X-Ray diffraction, nitrogen physisorption, atomic absorption spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The zeolites in the Broensted-acid form have been tested as catalysts in the catalytic cracking of n-octane as a model hydrocarbon. Clear influences of the crystallite size on the deactivation behavior have been observed. Larger crystals of zeolite ZSM-22 produce an increased amount of coke deposits resulting in a faster deactivation of the catalyst. The experimental results suggest that there is probably some influence of pore diffusion on the catalytic activity of the ZSM-22 sample with the large crystallite size. However a noticeable influence on the general product distribution could not be observed. (orig.)

  4. A graded catalytic-protective layer for an efficient and stable water-splitting photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jing; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Ferrere, Suzanne; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Yan, Yong; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Young, James L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Achieving solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies above 15% is key for the commercial success of photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices. While tandem cells can reach those efficiencies, increasing the catalytic activity and long-term stability remains a significant challenge. Here we show that annealing a bilayer of amorphous titanium dioxide (TiOx) and molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) deposited onto GaInP2 results in a photocathode with high catalytic activity (current density of 11 mA cm-2 at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode under 1 sun illumination) and stability (retention of 80% of initial photocurrent density over a 20 h durability test) for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Microscopy and spectroscopy reveal that annealing results in a graded MoSx/MoOx/TiO2 layer that retains much of the high catalytic activity of amorphous MoSx but with stability similar to crystalline MoS2. Our findings demonstrate the potential of utilizing a hybridized, heterogeneous surface layer as a cost-effective catalytic and protective interface for solar hydrogen production.

  5. Corrosion rate of steel embedded in blended Portland and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payá, J.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the corrosion levels in steel bars embedded in mortars made with a blend of Portland cement and (0-20% spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R, with a variable (0.3-0.7 water/binder (w/b ratio. The specimens were stored in the following conditions: relative humidity of 40, 80 or 100% and CO2 concentrations of 5 and 100%. The steel corrosion rate was measured with polarization resistance techniques. In the absence of aggressive agents, the steel was found to remain duly passivated in mortars with an FC3R content of up to 15% under all the conditions of relative humidity tested. The reinforcement corrosion level in mortars with a w/b ratio of 0.3 and 15% FC3R subjected to accelerated carbonation was similar to the level observed in the unblended Portland cement control mortar.En este trabajo se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosión de barras de acero embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland con relación agua/material cementante (a/mc variable (0,3-0,7, en los que parte del cemento (0-20% se sustituyó por catalizador de craqueo usado (FC3R. Las condiciones de conservación de las probetas elaboradas fueron las siguientes: distintas humedades relativas (40, 80 y 100% y dos concentraciones de CO2 (5 y 100%. La velocidad de corrosión de los aceros se midió mediante la técnica de resistencia de polarización. Se ha podido determinar que, bajo las distintas condiciones de humedad relativa y ausencia de agresivo, los aceros se mantuvieron correctamente pasivados en los morteros con contenidos de FC3R de hasta el 15%. El nivel de corrosión que presenta el refuerzo embebidos en morteros con sustitución de un 15% de cemento por FC3R y relación a/mc 0,3, al ser sometidos a un proceso de carbonatación acelerada, era muy similar al mostrado por el mortero patrón, sin FC3R.

  6. Multiple crack detection in 3D using a stable XFEM and global optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathos, Konstantinos; Chatzi, Eleni; Bordas, Stéphane P. A.

    2018-02-01

    A numerical scheme is proposed for the detection of multiple cracks in three dimensional (3D) structures. The scheme is based on a variant of the extended finite element method (XFEM) and a hybrid optimizer solution. The proposed XFEM variant is particularly well-suited for the simulation of 3D fracture problems, and as such serves as an efficient solution to the so-called forward problem. A set of heuristic optimization algorithms are recombined into a multiscale optimization scheme. The introduced approach proves effective in tackling the complex inverse problem involved, where identification of multiple flaws is sought on the basis of sparse measurements collected near the structural boundary. The potential of the scheme is demonstrated through a set of numerical case studies of varying complexity.

  7. OPTIMATION OF TIME AND CATALYST/FEED RATIO IN CATALYTIC CRACKING OF WASTE PLASTICS FRACTION TO GASOLINE FRACTION USING Cr/NATURAL ZEOLITE CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wega Trisunaryanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimation of time and catalyst/feed ratio in catalytic cracking of waste plastics fraction to gasoline fraction using Cr/Natural Zeolite catalyst has been studied.The natural zeolite was calcined by using nitrogen gas at 500 oC for 5 hours. The chromium supported on to the zeolite was prepared by ion exchange methode with Cr(NO33.9H2O solution with chromium/zeolite concentration of 1% (w/w. The zeolite samples were then calcined  with nitrogen gas at 500 oC for 2 hours, oxidyzed with oxygen gas and reduced with hydrogen at 400 oC for 2 hours. The characterization of the zeolite catalyst by means of Si/Al ratio by UV-Vis spectroscopy, acidity with pyridine vapour adsorption and Na, Ca and Cr contents by atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS. The catalyst activity test was carried out in the cracking process of waste plastics fraction with boiling point range of 150 - 250 °C (consisted of C12 - C16 hydrocarbons at 450 oC for 30 min, 60 min and 90 min, and catalyst/feed ratio 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, ¼ (w/w. The result of catalyst activity test  showed  that  the maximum number  conversion of gasoline fraction (C5-C11 is 53,27% with relatively low coke formation using 1/3 catalyst/feed ratio and the cracking time of 60 min.. This  catalyst has  Si/Al ratio = 1,21 (w/w , acidity = 0,16 mmol/g and Na content = 0,81%, Ca content = 0,15% and Cr content 0,24%.   Keywords: zeolite, catalytic cracking, gasoline, chromium.

  8. Production of filamentous carbon and H{sub 2} by solarthermal catalytic cracking of CH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillov, V.; Kuvshinov, G. [Boreskov Inst. of Catalysis (Russian Federation); Reller, A. [Hamburg Univ., Hamburg (Germany); Steinfeld, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytic thermal decomposition of methane has been experimentally studied using high-temperature solar process heat. Nickel catalyst particles, fluidized in methane, were directly irradiated at the PSI solar furnace. Carbon deposition consisted of randomly interlaced filaments that grew as fibers and hollow nanotubes (of approx. 30 nm diameter) originating at each catalytic particle. (author) 4 figs., 7 refs.

  9. Prediction of gasoline yield in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC riser using k-epsilon turbulence and 4-lump kinetic models: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ahsan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC is an essential process for the conversion of gas oil to gasoline. This study is an effort to model the phenomenon numerically using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, heavy density catalyst and 4-lump kinetic model. Geometry, boundary conditions and dimensions of industrial riser for catalytic cracking unit are conferred for 2D simulation using commercial CFD code FLUENT 6.3. Continuity, momentum, energy and species transport equations, applicable to two phase solid and gas flow, are used to simulate the physical phenomenon as efficient as possible. This study implements and predicts the use of the granular Eulerian multiphase model with species transport. Time accurate transient problem is solved with the prediction of mass fraction profiles of gas oil, gasoline, light gas and coke. The output curves demonstrate the breaking of heavy hydrocarbon in the presence of catalyst. An approach proposed in this study shows good agreement with the experimental and numerical data available in the literature.

  10. High performing and stable supported nano-alloys for the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to γ-valerolactone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenhao; Sankar, Meenakshisundaram; Beale, Andrew M.; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-03-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a key platform molecule in many biorefinery schemes, into γ-valerolactone is considered as one of the pivotal reactions to convert lignocellulose-based biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we report on the development of highly active, selective and stable supported metal catalysts for this reaction and on the beneficial effects of metal nano-alloying. Bimetallic random alloys of gold-palladium and ruthenium-palladium supported on titanium dioxide are prepared with a modified metal impregnation method. Gold-palladium/titanium dioxide shows a marked,~27-fold increase in activity (that is, turnover frequency of 0.1 s-1) compared with its monometallic counterparts. Although ruthenium-palladium/titanium dioxide is not only exceptionally active (that is, turnover frequency of 0.6 s-1), it shows excellent, sustained selectivity to γ-valerolactone (99%). The dilution and isolation of ruthenium by palladium is thought to be responsible for this superior catalytic performance. Alloying, furthermore, greatly improves the stability of both supported nano-alloy catalysts.

  11. Hexene catalytic cracking over 30% sapo-34 catalyst for propylene maximization: influence of reaction conditions and reaction pathway exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Nawaz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Higher olefins are produced as a by product in a number of refinery processes and are one of the potential raw materials to produce propylene. In the present study, FCC model feed compound was considered to explore the olefin cracking features and options to enhance propylene using 30% SAPO-34 zeolite as catalyst in a micro-reactor. The superior selectivity of propylene (73 wt% and higher total olefin selectivity was obtained over 30% SAPO-34 catalyst than over Y or ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts. The thermodynamical constraints were found to be relatively less serious in the case of 1-hexene conversion. Most of the 1-hexene follows a direct cracking pathway to give two propylene molecules, due to weak acid sites and better diffusion opportunities. The higher temperature and short residence time could also suppress the hydrogen transfer reactions. From OPE (olefins performance envelop the products were classified as primary, secondary, or both. Iso-hexene (2-methyl-2-pentene cracking was also analyzed in order to justify a shape selective effect of the SAPO-34 catalyst. A detailed integrated reaction network together with an associated mechanism was proposed and discussed in detail for their fundamental importance in understanding the olefin cracking processes over SAPO-34.

  12. Application of stable crack growth in fracture assessment of defects in ductile materials; Tillaempning av stabil spricktillvaext vid brottmekanisk bedoemning av defekter i sega material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillstroem, Peter (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    This report goes through the use of methods/standards, which consider stable (J-controlled) crack growth. We have demonstrated the following: - ASME XI, App. C, App. H, which deals with analysis of stainless steel and ferritic piping, take account of stable growth. In App. C, this corresponds to the inclusion of stable growth up to DELTAa approx 10 mm. - R6-method, BS 7910:1999 and ASME XI, Code Case N-494, contains an established formalism to take account of stable growth. A prerequisite is that you have access to relevant and authentic material data in the form of fracture resistance K{sub k}/J{sub k} and J{sub r} curves. - All of the above methods/standards are applicable in the nuclear context. We reported also that required to produce relevant and valid data (fracture resistance K{sub k}/J{sub k} and J{sub r} curves) to be used for the analysis of stable growth. This report does not specify how much stable crack that can be counted at a Safety Assessment

  13. Optimization of the fluid catalytic cracking unit performance by application of a high motor Octane catalyst and reduction of gasoline vapour pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavdarov, I.; Stratiev, D.; Shishkova, I.; Dinkov, R.; Petkov, P.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) gasoline is the main contributor to the refinery gasoline pool in the LUKOIL Neftohim Burgas (LNB) refinery. Next in quantity contributor in the refinery gasoline pool is the reformate. The FCC gasoline sensitivity (MON-RON) is about 12 points. The reformer gasoline sensitivity is 11 points. The high sensitivity of the main contributors to the LNB refinery gasoline pool leads to a shortage in the motor octane number. For that reason a selection of an FCC catalyst that is capable of increasing the motor octane number of the FCC gasoline was performed. The application of this catalyst in the LNB FCC unit has led to an increase of the motor octane number of the FCC gasoline by 0.5 points, which enabled the refinery to increase the production of automotive gasolines by 1.3 % and to increase the share of premium automotive gasoline by 5 %. This had an effect of improvement of the refinery economics by a six figure number of US $ per year. The optimization of the FCC gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) during the winter season, consisting in a reduction of the RVP from 60 to 50 kPa and an increase of the FCC C 4 olefins yield, has led to an augmentation of high motor octane number alkylate production. As a result the refinery economics was improved by a five figure number of US $ per year. key words: FCC gasoline motor octane number, gasoline RVP, FCC operation profitability

  14. Submicron sized water-stable metal organic framework (bio-MOF-11) for catalytic degradation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Muhammad Rizwan; Vijay, Periasamy; Tadé, Moses O; Sun, Hongqi; Wang, Shaobin

    2018-04-01

    Water-stable and active metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are important materials for mitigation of water contaminants via adsorption and catalytic reactions. In this study, a highly water-stable Co-based MOF, namely bio-MOF-11-Co, was synthesized by a simplified benign method. Moreover, it was used as a catalyst in successful activation of peroxymonsulfate for catalytic degradation of sulfachloropyradazine (SCP) and para-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HBA) as representatives of pharmaceuticals and personal care products, respectively. The bio-MOF-11-Co showed rapid degradation of both p-HBA and SCP and could be reused multiple times without losing the activity by simply water washing. The effects of catalyst and PMS loadings as well as temperature were further studied, showing that high catalyst and PMS loadings as well as temperature produced faster kinetic degradation of p-HBA and SCP. The generation of highly reactive and HO radicals during the degradation was investigated by quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance. A plausible degradation mechanism was proposed based on the functionalities in the bio-MOF-11-Co. The availability of electron rich nucleobase adenine reinforced the reaction kinetics by electron donation along with cobalt atoms in the bio-MOF-11-Co structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The importance of the accessibility concept in catalytic cracking reactions; A importancia do conceito de acessibilidade nas reacoes de craqueamento catalitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa-Aguiar, E.F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas]|[Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Valle, M.L.M.

    1996-12-31

    The concept of accessibility in cracking catalysis is presented. Data concerning catalysts with different levels of accessibility are discussed, showing that more accessible catalysts are able to provide higher olefin yields. Also, improved accessibility is apparently responsible for better bottoms conversion. Therefore, the concept of improved accessibility seems to be the most important one to achieve maximum yields in the cracking process, mainly nowadays, when refineries are introducing short contact times. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ke

    2015-03-11

    Reactively sputtered nickel oxide (NiOx) films provide transparent, antireflective, electrically conductive, chemically stable coatings that also are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxidation of water to O2(g). These NiOx coatings provide protective layers on a variety of technologically important semiconducting photoanodes, including textured crystalline Si passivated by amorphous silicon, crystalline n-type cadmium telluride, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Under anodic operation in 1.0 M aqueous potassium hydroxide (pH 14) in the presence of simulated sunlight, the NiOx films stabilized all of these self-passivating, high-efficiency semiconducting photoelectrodes for >100 h of sustained, quantitative solar-driven oxidation of water to O2(g). © 2015, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

  17. A biomimetic synthesis of stable gold nanoparticles derived from aqueous extract of Foeniculum vulgare seeds and evaluation of their catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Manoj Kumar; Kataria, Jyoti; Sharma, Shweta

    2017-10-01

    A facile biomimetic approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using aqueous extract of fennel ( Foeniculum vulgare) seeds have been reported in this article. The seeds of F. vulgare are rich in various plant secondary metabolites (phytochemicals) such as polyphenolic acids, flavonoids, and saponins. The phytochemicals of F. vulgare seeds play dual role of reducing and stabilizing agents. The formation of gold nanoparticles was evidenced from the appearance of intense purple color at room temperature with λ max around 550 nm in the UV-Vis absorption spectra. The stable AuNPs were further characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The synthesized nanoparticles were observed to be polydispersed, spherical and ranged from 10 to 30 nm with an average size of 20 ± 2 nm, as obtained from TEM images. The catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles was investigated by studying the reduction of anthropogenic dyes such as methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (Rh-B) with sodium borohydride. Results showed the possible applications of biogenic AuNPs in environment related problems.

  18. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    The Dugdale crack model is widely used in materials science to predict strength of defective (cracked) materials. A stable Dugdale crack in an elasto-plastic material is prevented from spreading by uniformly distributed cohesive stresses acting in narrow areas at the crack tips. These stresses...... are assumed to be self created by local materials flow. The strength sigma_CR predictid by the Dugdale model is sigma_CR =(E Gamma_CR/phi1)^½ where E and 1 are Young’s modulus and crack half-length respectively of the material considered. The so-called critical strain energy rate is Gamma_CR = sigma......) by a constant flow stress (sigma_L). A number of materials, however, do not at all exhibit this kind of flow. Such materials are considered in this paper by Modified Dugdale crack models which apply for any cohesive stress distribution in crack front areas. Formally modified Dugdale crack models exhibit...

  19. Effects of crack tip plasticity on fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.B.

    1996-01-01

    A simple model for fatigue crack propagation has been proposed based on the modified Dugdale model of crack tip plasticity and energy balance approach to stable crack propagation. To verify the proposed model, fatigue tests were performed on the specimens of Type 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718. To measure the effect of crack tip bluntness on the fatigue crack propagation, specimens of different thickness were used. Results show that the theoretical prediction of fatigue crack propagation agreed well with the experimental test results. It is suggested that the prediction of fatigue crack propagation should take account of the different plasticity related to the variation of specimen thickness, stress state and material's tearing modulus in the crack tip region. (orig.)

  20. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  1. 40 CFR 63.1566 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units? 63.1566 Section 63.1566 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1566 What...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1567 - What are my requirements for inorganic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units? 63.1567 Section 63.1567 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1567 What...

  3. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  4. Multifaceted effects of HZSM-5 (Proton-exchanged Zeolite Socony Mobil-5) on catalytic cracking of pinewood pyrolysis vapor in a two-stage fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; Wang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    The pinewood was pyrolyzed in the first reactor at a heating rate of 10°Cmin(-1) from room temperature to 700°C, and the vapor was allowed to be cracked through the second reactor in a temperature range of 450-750°C without and with HZSM-5. Attempts were made to determine a wide spectrum of gaseous and liquid products, as well as the mass and element partitions to gas, water, bio-oil, coke and char. HZSM-5 showed a preferential deoxygenation effect via the facilitated decarbonylation and decarboxylation with the inhibited dehydration at 550-600°C. This catalyst also displayed a high selectivity for the formations of aromatic hydrocarbons and olefins by the promoted hydrogen transfer to these products at 550-600°C. The bio-oil produced with HZSM-5 at 500-600°C had the yields of 14.5-16.8%, the high heat values of 39.1-42.4MJkg(-1), and the energy recoveries of 33-35% (all dry biomass basis). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people realize that cracking knuckles produces a funny noise and may repeat cracking just to produce the ... main areas of exercise are aerobic exercise and resistance News Categories Ankylosing Spondylitis News Fibromyalgia News Gout ...

  6. La conversion des résidus et huiles lourdes : au carrefour du thermique et du catalytique Conversion of Residues and Heavy Oils At the Crossroads of Thermal Cracking and Catalytic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Page J. F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article passe en revue les diverses familles de procédés de conversion des résidus et huiles lourdes. Tous les résultats semblent converger pour accréditer l'idée que dans tous ces procédés, y compris les procédés dits catalytiques, l'essentiel de la conversion des espèces de poids moléculaire élevé, résines et asphaltènes, procède par mécanisme radicalaire : la clef de la conversion profonde, c'est paradoxalement la maîtrise de la condensation radicalaire de ces espèces. Hydrogène seul, hydrogène en présence de solvant donneur, d'additifs ou encore mieux de catalyseurs, sont les armes dont dispose tout raffineur pour affirmer cette maîtrise, dans la mesure où il ne tient pas à fabriquer du coke. Tous ces procédés de conversion des résidus donnent par ailleurs naissance à des produits craqués dont la nature et la distribution rappellent celles des produits de première distillation du pétrole brut dont est issu le résidu soumis au craquage. This article reviews the different families of conversion processes for residues and heavy oils. All the results seem to converge to support the idea that in all these processes, including so-called catalytic processes, most of the conversion of high-molecular-weight species (resins and asphaltenes operates by a radical mechanism. The key to in-depth conversion is, paradoxically, the mastery of the radical condensation of these species. Hydrogen alone, hydrogen in the presence of a donor solvent, of additives or, better yet, of catalysts, are the arms at the disposal of all refiners to assert this mastery, to the extent that they do not want to manufacture coke. All such conversion processes for residues also give rise to cracked products whose nature and distribution recall those of first-distillation products of crude oil, from which the residue comes that is subjected to cracking.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of stable [(NHC)H][ZnXY2] (NHC=N-Heterocyclic carbene, X, Y=Cl, Br) species

    KAUST Repository

    Santoro, Orlando

    2016-06-04

    The synthesis and characterization of imidazol(in)ium-based zinc(II) halide salts are reported. These compounds present interesting structural features and exhibit high stability. Their catalytic activity was explored in the methylation of amines with CO2 and PhSiH3.

  8. Modelling fluidized catalytic cracking unit stripper efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    García-Dopico M.; García A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents our modelling of a FCCU stripper, following our earlier research. This model can measure stripper efficiency against the most important variables: pressure, temperature, residence time and steam flow. Few models in the literature model the stripper and usually they do against only one variable. Nevertheless, there is general agreement on the importance of the stripper in the overall process, and the fact that there are few models maybe i...

  9. Supercritical Catalytic Cracking of Hydrocarbon Feeds Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    occurs, as is evident by the darkening in the transmission image, the absorption of the incoming light in the SRS image and the decrease in signal of...b) wide-angle powder XRD patterns of as- synthesized PMZ-1. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. could be indexed to the (100...can be indexed to the d[200] of the MFI-type framework structure. (c) Enlarged image of the region marked by a rectangle in (b) confirms the

  10. Poly-thiosemicarbazide/gold nanoparticles catalytic membrane: In-situ growth of well-dispersed, uniform and stable gold nanoparticles in a polymeric membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a method that achieves the highest loading, published so far, of non-agglomerated and well-distributed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) inside a polymeric membrane. The method uses poly-thiosemicarbazide (PTSC) as the starting material for fabricating the membranes. This polymer contains one chelate site per monomeric unit, resulting in a high content of adsorption sites. This helps to achieve such high loading without agglomeration, along with the strong interaction of the chelate sites with the metal ions and the fact that they are distributed homogeneously along the membrane structure. The simple and scalable three-step procedure developed in this work resulted in a PTSC membrane containing 33.5 wt.% Au/PTSC in the form of 2.9 nm AuNPs. The membrane demonstrated catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-Aminophenol (4-AP). © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Enhanced propylene production in FCC by novel catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, C.P.; Harris, D.; Xu, M.; Fu, J. [BASF Catalyst LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking is expected to increasingly supply the additional incremental requirements for propylene. The most efficient route to increase propylene yield from an FCC unit is through the use of medium pore zeolites such as ZSM-5. ZSM-5 zeolite cracks near linear olefins in the gasoline range to LPG olefins such as propylene and butylenes. This paper will describe catalytic approaches to increase gasoline range olefins and the chemistry of ZSM-5 to crack those olefins. The paper will also describe novel catalytic materials designed to increase propylene. (orig.)

  12. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units...

  13. 40 CFR Table 15 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Catalytic Reforming Units 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As...

  14. Seleção de concretos refratários densos antierosivos para unidades de craqueamento catalítico fluidizado de petróleo Selection of dense antierosive refractory castables for fluid catalytic cracking units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. S. Serra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Na indústria petroquímica a unidade de craqueamento catalítico fluidizado de petróleo é um importante equipamento para aplicação de concretos refratários devido à necessidade de se obter produtos especializados. Normalmente, a seleção destes materiais é baseada na análise química e em medidas de densidade aparente, resistência mecânica por compressão uniaxial e erosimetria a frio. Para avaliação dos requisitos de seleção usuais, cinco concretos de alta alumina, sendo três de baixo teor de cimento e dois convencionais de uso comercial, foram avaliados por resistência à compressão e erosimetria a frio. Testes complementares que atualmente não são utilizados no processo de seleção também foram realizados, tais como: resistência ao choque térmico, módulo de ruptura a quente e exposição em atmosfera de CO. A análise mostrou que as especificações vigentes são baseadas principalmente na experiência com a utilização de produtos não originalmente projetados para esta aplicação e que o desenvolvimento de produtos mais adequados é inibido pelas restrições das especificações atuais. Também se verificou que a seleção é limitada pela falta de ensaios que avaliem o desempenho em condições mais próximas das de uso. Neste sentido, o teste de resistência à deposição de carbono pela exposição em atmosfera de CO mostrou-se interessante por contribuir para uma melhor seleção dos concretos refratários densos antierosivos.In the petrochemical industry the fluidized catalytic cracking unit is an important vessel for refractory castables application due the necessity of obtaining specialized products. Usually, the selection of these materials is based on the chemical analysis, apparent density, cold crushing strength and cold erosion test. For the evaluation of the present selection requirements, five high-alumina castables, being three of low cement and two conventional of commercial use, were

  15. Cracking oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelgemann, W.

    1933-12-19

    A volatile spirit suitable for use as petrol and containing aromatic and aliphatic constituents is obtained by cracking crude oils, asphalts, and creosotes, in presence of catalysts comprising a halogenated oxygen compound of nitrogen, e.g. nitrosyl chloride, and calcium oxide. The method of carrying out the process and the apparatus used are the same as described in Specification 430,748.

  16. Cracking oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelgemann, W.

    1933-12-19

    A volatile spirit suitable for use as petrol and containing aromatic and aliphatic constituents is obtained by cracking crude oils, asphalts, and creosotes, in presence of catalysts comprising a halogenated oxygen compound of nitrogen and a mixture of iron and aluminum chlorides. The method of carrying out the process and the apparatus used are the same as described in Specification 430,748.

  17. Mechanism of HIV reverse transcriptase inhibition by zinc: formation of a highly stable enzyme-(primer-template) complex with profoundly diminished catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenstermacher, Katherine J; DeStefano, Jeffrey J

    2011-11-25

    Several physiologically relevant cations including Ca(2+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) have been shown to inhibit HIV reverse transcriptase (RT), presumably by competitively displacing one or more Mg(2+) ions bound to RT. We analyzed the effects of Zn(2+) on reverse transcription and compared them to Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Using nucleotide extension efficiency as a readout, Zn(2+) showed significant inhibition of reactions with 2 mM Mg(2+), even when present at only ∼5 μM. Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) were also inhibitory but at higher concentrations. Both Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) (but not Ca(2+)) supported RT incorporation in the absence of Mg(2+) with Mn(2+) being much more efficient. The maximum extension rates with Zn(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+) were ∼0.1, 1, and 3.5 nucleotides per second, respectively. Zinc supported optimal RNase H activity at ∼25 μM, similar to the optimal for nucleotide addition in the presence of low dNTP concentrations. Surprisingly, processivity (average number of nucleotides incorporated in a single binding event with enzyme) during reverse transcription was comparable with Zn(2+) and Mg(2+), and single RT molecules were able to continue extension in the presence of Zn(2+) for several hours on the same template. Consistent with this result, the half-life for RT-Zn(2+)-(primer-template) complexes was 220 ± 60 min and only 1.7 ± 1 min with Mg(2+), indicating ∼130-fold more stable binding with Zn(2+). Essentially, the presence of Zn(2+) promotes the formation of a highly stable slowly progressing RT-(primer-template) complex.

  18. Password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Χριστοφάκης, Μιχαήλ Κ.

    2014-01-01

    Information security is the next big thing in computers society because of the rapidly growing security incidents and the outcomes of those. Hacking and cracking existed even from the start of the eighties decade when there was the first step of the interconnection through the internet between humans. From then and ever after there was a big explosion of such incidents mostly because of the worldwide web which was introduced in the early nineties. Following the huge steps forward of computers...

  19. An analysis for crack layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehanobish, K.; Botsis, J.; Moet, A.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uncontrolled crack propagation and crack arrest is considered with respect to crack layer (CL) translational stability. CL propagation is determined by the difference between the energy release rate and the amount of energy required for material transformation, and necessary and sufficient conditions for CL instability are derived. CL propagation in polystyrene is studied for two cases. For the case of remotely applied fixed load fatigue, the sufficient condition of instability is shown to be met before the necessary condition, and the necessary condition controls the stability. For the fixed displacement case, neither of the instability conditions are met, and CL propagation remains stable, resulting in crack arrest.

  20. Self-Stable WP/C Support with Excellent Cocatalytic Functionality for Pt: Enhanced Catalytic Activity and Durability for Methanol Electro-Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yaqiang; Sun, Ye; Pan, Siyu; Dai, Ying; Hao, Liang; Zou, Jinlong

    2016-12-14

    To endow catalyst support with excellent stability and cocatalytic activity toward methanol, oxidation reaction (MOR) is an effective way to strengthen the electrocatalytic activity of Pt-based catalysts. Tungsten phosphide/3D-corrugated porous carbon (WP/C) composite as Pt-support and cocatalyst for MOR is prepared via a synchronous synthesis method. Porous 3D-tufted structure and high surface area of WP/C with abundant oxygen-containing groups (such as C-O-C, C-O-H, or C-OH) can significantly improve the exposure of active sites, which enlarge the contact area with electrolyte and facilitate the mass transfer and absorption of methanol for promoting the MOR activity in acidic electrolyte. Pt-WP/C exhibits a considerably higher mass activity (1559.3 mA mg Pt -1 ) for MOR than that of Pt/C (488.2 mA mg Pt -1 ), owing to the special activity of W δ+ and P δ- sites for the decomposition reaction of water. With the introduction of W species, more available P species (passivated or not) are activated for further enhancing the cocatalytic activity of WP for MOR. Furthermore, the CO tolerance and durability of Pt-WP/C are also remarkable, which should benefit from the fast surface transport of adsorbed CO on different crystalline faces of WP and the extremely stable WP-C structure originating from the existence of P-P chains between the adjacent WP particles, respectively. The design of the porous structure and cocatalytic effect of this catalyst support (WP/C) provides a promising method to drastically enhance MOR activity.

  1. Adaptive numerical modeling of dynamic crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adouani, H.; Tie, B.; Berdin, C.; Aubry, D.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an adaptive numerical strategy that aims at developing reliable and efficient numerical tools to model dynamic crack propagation and crack arrest. We use the cohesive zone theory as behavior of interface-type elements to model crack. Since the crack path is generally unknown beforehand, adaptive meshing is proposed to model the dynamic crack propagation. The dynamic study requires the development of specific solvers for time integration. As both geometry and finite element mesh of the studied structure evolve in time during transient analysis, the stability behavior of dynamic solver becomes a major concern. For this purpose, we use the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, well-known to provide a natural framework to manage meshes that evolve in time. As an important result, we prove that the space-time discontinuous Galerkin solver is unconditionally stable, when the dynamic crack propagation is modeled by the cohesive zone theory, which is highly non-linear. (authors)

  2. Fatigue crack growth in mode II of adhesively joined composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biel, Anders; Toftegaard, Helmuth Langmaack

    2017-01-01

    , experiments are performed to derive material data for a crack propagation in shear i.e. in mode II. The shear loading of the crack is achieved by use of double cantilever beam specimens loaded with uneven bending moments. The experiments are performed under a constant cyclic displacement. An initial mode I...... loading is used to make the crack start in the adhesive. The crack length is measured using a load synchronized camera. Due to the shear loading the crack deviates from the adhesive layer into the laminate. A stable crack propagation is detected in the laminate. No influence have been detected due...... to an increasing crack length. It is also observed that the crack is trapped in the laminate; if the loading is changed to mode I the crack continues to propagate in the laminate....

  3. 40 CFR Table 18 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 18 Table 18 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(2) and (3), you...

  4. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the following...

  5. 40 CFR Table 26 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 26 Table 26 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(b)(4), you shall meet each...

  6. 40 CFR Table 19 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 19 Table 19 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(7), you shall meet each...

  7. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 24 Table 24 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  8. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 27 Table 27 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(c)(1), you shall meet...

  9. 40 CFR Table 25 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 25 Table 25 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(b)(2) and (3), you...

  10. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 20 Table 20 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(c)(1), you shall meet each...

  11. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units 23 Table 23 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(a)(2), you shall meet each...

  12. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 28 Table 28 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63...

  13. 40 CFR Table 17 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 17 Table 17 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  14. Study of gas-solid contact in an ultra-rapid reactor for cumene catalytic cracking; Etude du contact gaz-solide dans un reacteur a co-courant descendant par la mise en oeuvre du craquage catalytique du cumene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, J.

    1996-11-05

    Few studies have been carried out on the notion of gas-solid contact in ultra-rapid reactors. Both gas and solid move in the reactor and the contact can be directly estimated when using a chemical reaction such as cumene cracking. It`s a pure and light feedstock whose kinetics can be determined in a fixed bed. The study was carried out on a downflow ultra-rapid reactor (ID = 20 mm, length = 1 m) at the University of Western Ontario. It proved that the quench and the ultra-rapid separation of gas and solid must be carefully designed in the pilot plant. Cumene conversion dropped when reducing gas-solid contact, which led to push the temperature over 550 deg. C and increase the cat/oil ratio at 25 working at solid mass fluxes below 85 kg/m{sup 2}.s. Change of selectivity at very short residence time were also observed due to deactivation effects. Experiments made by Roques (1994) with phosphorescent pigments on the Residence Time Distribution of solids gave Hydrodynamic data on a cold flow copy of the pilot plant. Experiments made on packed bed gave kinetic data on the cracking of cumene. These data were combined to optimize a mono dimensional plug flow model for cumene cracking. (author)

  15. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  16. Intimately coupled hybrid of graphitic carbon nitride nanoflakelets with reduced graphene oxide for supporting Pd nanoparticles: A stable nanocatalyst with high catalytic activity towards formic acid and methanol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenyao; Yao, Qiushi; Wu, Xiaodong; Fu, Yongsheng; Deng, Kaiming; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Intimately coupled hybrid of g-C 3 N 4 nanoflakelets with rGO is fabricated via an in situ chemical synthesis approach. • The detailed forming process of CNNF-G composite is carefully investigated. • The Pd-CNNF-G composite exhibits exceptional catalytic activity and durability. • The real fuel cells have been assembled to evaluate the performance of the electrocatalysts. • The effects of g-C 3 N 4 nanoflakelets on Pd atom were investigated by DFT computations. - Abstract: A novel nitrogen-rich support material (CNNF-G) consisting of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) nanoflakelets (CNNF) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is designed and fabricated for loading Pd nanoparticles. Structural characterizations indicates that the CNNF is formed via splitting decomposition of the g-C 3 N 4 polymer on rGO at higher temperatures and the resulting CNNF is intimately coupled to the rGO sheets. The CNNF can provide more exposed edge sites and active nitrogen species for the high dispersion of Pd NPs. It is found that the Pd NPs with an average diameter of 3.92 nm are uniformly dispersed on CNNF-G sheets. DFT computations reveal that CNNF can trap Pd adatom and thus act as a Pd nucleation site at which Pd atoms tend to accumulate to form Pd clusters. The Pd-CNNF-G nanocatalyst exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity for both formic acid and methanol oxidation reactions, including large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) values, significantly high forward peak current densities, and reliable stability and durability, far outperforming the Pd-graphene, commercial activated carbon-supported Pd catalyst or Pd-carbon nanotubes. Such a stable Pd/CNNF-G nanocatalyst may bring new design opportunities for high-performance direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) in the future.

  17. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  18. Cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tanumihardja

    2009-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome is usually found in daily dental practice. The incidence of cracks teeth tends to increasing. People are living longer and keeping their teeth longer. As a consequence, people have more complex restoration and endodontic treatment, leaving teeth more prone to cracks. In addition, stressful lives may provoke unconscious habits such as clenching and bruxism which can induce cracks in teeth. However, many cracks teeth can be saved nowadays when the character...

  19. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  20. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 21 Table 21 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63...

  1. Prevention of shrinkage cracking in tight concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvaredo, A.M.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that crack formation and propagation in concrete members subjected to restrained shrinkage can be realistically predicted by means of a comprehensive approach including a diffusion analysis and fracture mechanics considerations. The conditions for stable crack propagation regarding dimensions of the concrete member, degree of restraint to the imposed deformation and material properties are discussed. Guidelines on the prevention of shrinkage cracking of concrete structures are given. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs

  2. Characterization of mixed mode crack opening in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas Sejersbøl; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Olesen, John Forbes

    2012-01-01

    In real concrete structures cracks often open in mixed mode after their initiation. To capture the direct material behavior of a mixed mode crack opening a stiff biaxial testing machine, capable of imposing both normal and shear loads on a given crack area, has been applied. The opening and sliding...... components of the mixed mode displacement are measured using a custom made orthogonal gauge, and the measurements are used directly as the closed loop control signals. A double notch, concrete specimen is used for the crack investigation. The tests are divided into two steps, a pure Mode I opening step......, where a macro crack is initiated in the specimen followed by the mixed mode opening step. The high stiffness of the set-up together with the closed control loop ensures a stable crack initiation followed by a controllable mixed mode opening. The deep notches result in a plane crack, only influenced...

  3. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  4. The crack growth resistance of thin steel sheets under eccentric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ľ AMBRIŠKO

    2018-03-10

    Mar 10, 2018 ... for crack initiation were also estimated. The relation between Ji and J0.2 was assessed using the basic mathe- matical and statistical methods. This relation was described by a linear regression model. Keywords. Cold-formed steel; thin sheet; stable crack growth; R-curve; videoextensometry. 1. Introduction.

  5. The crack growth resistance of thin steel sheets under eccentric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ľ AMBRIŠKO

    MS received 1 August 2016; revised 13 July 2017; accepted 31 July 2017; published online 10 March 2018. Abstract. The stable crack growth in thin steel sheets is the topic of this paper. The crack ..... [26] Ambriško L', Kandra T and Pešek L 2011 Rating indentation and deformation characteristics laser welds. Chem. Listy.

  6. Craqueamento catalítico de polietileno em condições de refinaria: produção de frações combustíveis Catalytic cracking of polyethylene under refinery conditions: production of combustible fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Ribeiro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado em uma unidade de teste de microatividade para estudar o processo de craqueamento catalítico das cargas combinadas de polietileno de baixa densidade e polietileno de alta densidade com vaselina, frente a catalisadores comerciais de FCC (alta e baixa atividades, para avaliar a produção das frações combustíveis (gasolina, diesel e resíduo. As cargas combinadas de PEBD e PEAD/vaselina foram processadas em condições de refinaria. Para as cargas de PEBD/vaselina, a 2, 6 e 10% p/p, a produção da fração gasolina foi favorecida pelo catalisador de alta atividade, enquanto que a carga de PEAD/vaselina a 2% p/p, para produção da mesma fração, o catalisador de baixa atividade apresentou melhor eficiência. Todas as cargas combinadas, nas diversas concentrações, mostraram que o material inerte (caulim apresenta maior atuação, na produção da fração resíduo, indicando a ocorrência preferencial de craqueamento térmico.This work was carried out in an unit of microactivity test, to study the process of combined feeds of low density and high density polyethylenes with vaseline and commercial FCC catalysts (of low and of high activities, to evaluate the production of fuel fractions (gasoline, diesel and residue. The combined feeds of PEBD and PEAD/vaseline, at different concentrations, were processed under refinery conditions. For feeds of PEBD/vaseline at 2, 6 and 10% w/w, production of the gasoline fraction was favored with the high-activity catalyst, while for the PEAD/vaseline feed at 2%, in the production of the same fraction, the low-activity catalyst presented better performance. For all the combined feeds, in all concentrations, the inert material showed better performance for the production of residue fraction, indicating the preferential occurrence of thermal cracking.

  7. Evaluation of the crack plane equilibrium model for predicting plastic fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Smith, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Crack Plane Equilibium (CPE) model is a simple model for predicting the initiation of crack growth in ductile materials. The CPE model is evaluated for center-crack tension specimens and for pipe specimens containing part-through circumferential cracks emanating from the inside surface of the pipe. The model is based upon requiring equilibrium between the applied loads and an assumed stress distribution in the uncracked ligament near the crack tip. Required fracture parameters are the ultimate tensile strength and a process zone size at the crack tip that is determined from simple fracture tests. Crack growth initiation for the crack and specimen geometries studied is predicted with sufficient accuracy to warrant extending the CPE model for investigating other geometries and for predicting stable crack growth and the onset of unstable crack growth

  8. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  9. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  10. Fictitious Crack Model of Concrete Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Dahl, H.

    1989-01-01

    , and an alternative energy formulation is given so that it is possible to distinguish between stable and unstable situations. The reformulated substructure method is implemented on computer to give a multilinear stress crack opening displacement relation for the material in the fracture zone, and some qualitative...

  11. Cumene cracking on modified mesoporous material type MCM-41

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AlMCM-41 materials, the method of its exchange mode and its grains form were investigated for the mesoporous catalytic activity in the cumene (i.e. isopropylbenzene) cracking reaction. Benzene, propylene and xylene derivatives are the main ...

  12. Quasi-brittle fracture diagram of structured bodies in the presence of edge cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V. M.; Demeshkin, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Neuber-Novozhilov approach is used to obtain necessary and sufficient fracture criteria. Using a modified Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale model, simple relations for the critical fracture parameters are derived for opening mode edge cracks for the case where the diameter of the prefracture zone coincides with the diameter of the plasticity zone. These relations are suitable for studying fracture where the crack length is negligibly small. A fracture diagram using critical stresses under both criteria is proposed for a wide range of crack length. At a certain level of loading, three regions are identified, in the first of which the crack is stable, in the second, the crack extends but remains stable, and in the third, the crack is unstable. Experimental data on the fracture of specimens with edge cracks are obtained. It is established that the theoretical critical fracture curves are in good agreement with the obtained critical parameters for flat tensile specimens with two collinear edge cracks.

  13. Uso do resíduo de catalisador de processo de craqueamento catalítico fluído de hidrocarbonetos em refratários silicoaluminosos Use of catalyst waste from hydrocarbon fluid catalytic cracking process in alumina-silica refractories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Garcia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou o desenvolvimento de metodologia para o aproveitamento do resíduo de catalisador de craqueamento de hidrocarbonetos, na produção de refratários silicoaluminosos. Esse resíduo foi utilizado em substituição às matérias-primas convencionais, com o conseqüente ganho ambiental e econômico. Com base em composições químicas e mineralógicas, foram selecionadas formulações de massas refratárias, as quais foram queimadas em temperaturas similares às utilizadas para queima de refratários silicoaluminosos comerciais. A análise das propriedades tecnológicas apresentadas, dentre as formulações propostas, definiu que a formulação que continha 15% em peso de catalisador gasto, obteve as melhores características, sendo estas semelhantes às de um material refratário comercial.This work aimed the development of methodology for the utilization of the residue of catalyst from of hydro-carbons catalytic cracking process in the production of alumina-silica refractory. This residue was used in substitution of part of conventional raw materials, with the consequent ambient and economic profit. It was selected some formulations based on the chemical and mineralogical compositions of refractory masses. They were fired in similar temperatures to the ones used for production of commercial refractories. The analysis of the technological properties of the formulations proposed, defined that the composition that contained 15% wt of catalyst waste got the best characteristics. The final product showed technical parameters similar to the ones of commercial refractory material.

  14. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  15. The cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Fractured molars and premolars are very common. Fractures usually result from cracks that develop and slowly extend until the tooth separates into buccal and lingual fragments. Sometimes, as these cracks expand, the patient exhibits symptoms of what is commonly referred to as "cracked tooth syndrome" (CTS). When CTS occurs, an opportunity exists to diagnose and treat these patients, to relieve their discomfort and prevent sequelae that would require more extensive treatment.

  16. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  17. Effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure influences fatigue crack growth rate and must be included in the design of components. Plasticity induced crack closure is intimately linked with the crack tip plastic deformation, which becomes residual as the crack propagates. The objective here is to study numerically the effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields. The transient effect observed at the beginning of crack propagation is linked to the hardening behavior of material. The effect of mesh refinement is studied, and a singular behavior is evident, which is explained by the sharp crack associated with mesh topology, composed of a regular pattern of square elements. The plastic zone size measured perpendicularly to crack flank in the residual plastic wake is quantified and compared with literature models. Finally, the removal of material at the first node behind crack tip with load cycling was observed for plane strain state and some hardening models in plane stress state.

  18. Crack tip strain evolution and crack closure during overload of a growing fatigue crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Qiang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fatigue crack growth is retarded after an overload, which has been explained either by plasticity-induced crack closure or near-tip residual stress. However, any interpretation of overload effect is insufficient if strain evolution in front of crack tip is not properly considered. The current understanding of overload-induced retardation lacks the clarification of the relationship between crack closure at crack wake and strain evolution at crack tip. In this work, a material with low work hardening coefficient was used to study the effect of overload on crack tip strain evolution and crack closure by in-situ SEM observation and digital image correlation technique. Crack opening displacement (COD and crack tip strain were measured before and after the overload. It was observed that the evolution of crack tip strain follows the crack opening behaviour behind the crack tip, indicating a smaller influence of overload on micro-mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack growth. After the overload, plastic strain accumulation was responsible for crack growth. The strain at a certain distance to crack tip was mapped, and it was found that the crack tip plastic zone size correlated well with crack growth rate during post-overload fatigue crack propagation.

  19. Biogasoline Production from Palm Oil Via Catalytic Hydrocracking over Gamma-Alumina Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anondho Wijanarko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bio gasoline conversion from palm oil is an alternative energy resources method which can be substituted fossil fuel base energy utilization. Previous research resulted that palm oil can be converted into hydrocarbon by catalytic cracking reaction with γ-alumina catalyst. In this research, catalytic cracking reaction of palm oil by γ-alumina catalyst is done in  a stirrer batch reactor with the oil/catalyst weight ratio variation of 100:1, 75:1, and 50:1; at suhue variation of 260 to 340oC and reaction time variation of 1 to 2 hour. Post cracking reaction, bio gasoline yield could be obtained after 2 steps batch distillation. Physical property test result such as density and viscosity of this cracking reaction product and commercial gasoline tended a closed similarity. According to result of the cracking product's density, viscosity and FTIR, it  can conclude that optimum yield of the palm oil catalytic cracking reaction could be occurred when oil/catalyst weight  ratio 100:1 at 340 oC in 1.5 hour and base on this bio gasoline's FTIR, GC and GC-MS identification results, its  hydrocarbons content was resembled to the commercial  gasoline. This palm oil catalytic cracking reaction shown 11.8% (v/v in yield and 28.0% (v/v in conversion concern to feed palm oil base and produced a 61.0 octane number's biogasoline.

  20. JP-8 Catalytic Cracking for Compact Fuel Processors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    ...), kerosene, and diesel to produce hydrogen for fuel cell use, several issues arise. First, these fuels have high sulfur content, which can poison and deactivate components of the reforming process and the fuel cell stack...

  1. Modeling Of A Fluid Catalytic Cracking (Fcc) Riser Reactor - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Modeling, Design and Management of Engineering Systems. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Influence of material ductility and crack surface roughness on fracture instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khezrzadeh, Hamed; Wnuk, Michael P; Yavari, Arash

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis for fractal cracks. First, the Westergaard stress functions are proposed for semi-infinite and finite smooth cracks embedded in the stress fields associated with the corresponding self-affine fractal cracks. These new stress functions satisfy all the required boundary conditions and according to Wnuk and Yavari's (2003 Eng. Fract. Mech. 70 1659-74) embedded crack model they are used to derive the stress and displacement fields generated around a fractal crack. These results are then used in conjunction with the final stretch criterion to study the quasi-static stable crack extension, which in ductile materials precedes the global failure. The material resistance curves are determined by solving certain nonlinear differential equations and then employed in predicting the stress levels at the onset of stable crack growth and at the critical point, where a transition to the catastrophic failure occurs. It is shown that the incorporation of the fractal geometry into the crack model, i.e. accounting for the roughness of the crack surfaces, results in (1) higher threshold levels of the material resistance to crack propagation and (2) higher levels of the critical stresses associated with the onset of catastrophic fracture. While the process of quasi-static stable crack growth (SCG) is viewed as a sequence of local instability states, the terminal instability attained at the end of this process is identified with the global instability. The phenomenon of SCG can be used as an early warning sign in fracture detection and prevention.

  3. Hexane cracking over steamed phosphated zeolite H-ZSM-5 : Promotional effect on catalyst performance and stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Bij, Hendrik E.; Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Wang, Jian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    The nature behind the promotional effect of phosphorus on the catalytic performance and hydrothermal stability of zeolite H-ZSM-5 has been studied using a combination of 27Al and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption tomography and n-hexane catalytic cracking, complemented with NH3

  4. Cracking the Gender Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennison, Betina Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Why do men continue to fill most of the senior executive positions and seats in the board of directors in Western corporations? Almost everyone agrees that diversity is good, many women are coming down the pipeline, and companies, states and international organizations and institutions have done...... in leadership management, we must become more aware and take advantage of this complexity. We must crack the codes in order to crack the curve....

  5. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  6. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  7. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  8. BWR crack control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immel, R.

    1981-01-01

    Cooperative research by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Boiling Water Reactor Owners Group (BWROG) may be finding a solution to the problem of stress corrosion cracking in reactor piping, which had caused 254 cracks in BWRs around the world by 1981. Welded joints of type-304 stainless steel in BWR recirculation systems are particularly vulnerable to microscopic stress corrosion cracking, which differs from fatigue cracking because it occurs when electrochemical processes break down the protective film in the zones affected by welding heat. The cracking is not hazardous to the public because it takes place within the containment building and causes leaks that are quickly detected. About one percent of welds crack, causing downtime and personnel exposure. The EPRI-BWROG project used a model of stress, water condition, and steel sensitization to find out the causes, develop remedies, and get the remedies into the field. Among the remedies are the adaptive learning network, an automated, microprocessor-controlled ultrasonic testing system that is scheduled for field testing and utility application in 1982. 2 figures

  9. Natural zeolite bitumen cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznicki, S.M.; McCaffrey, W.C.; Bian, J.; Wangen, E.; Koenig, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate how low cost heavy oil upgrading in the field could reduce the need for diluents while lowering the cost for pipelining. Low cost field upgrading could also contribute to lowering contaminant levels. The performance of visbreaking processes could be improved by using disposable cracking agents. In turn, the economics of field upgrading of in-situ derived bitumen would be improved. However, in order to be viable, such agents would have to be far less expensive than current commercial cracking catalysts. A platy natural zeolite was selected for modification and testing due to its unique chemical and morphological properties. A catalyst-bearing oil sand was then heat-treated for 1 hour at 400 degrees C in a sealed microreactor. Under these mild cracking conditions, the catalyst-bearing oil sand produced extractable products of much lower viscosity. The products also contained considerably more gas oil and middle distillates than raw oil sand processed under the same conditions as thermal cracking alone. According to model cracking studies using hexadecane, these modified mineral zeolites may be more active cracking agents than undiluted premium commercial FCC catalyst. These materials hold promise for partial upgrading schemes to reduce solvent requirements in the field. tabs., figs.

  10. Crack Growth along Interfaces in Porous Ceramic Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    Crack growth along porous ceramic layers was studied experimentally. Double cantilever beam sandwich specimens were loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope enabling in situ observations...... of various mechanisms associated with crack growth. The macroscopic fracture energy of the interface between dense lanthanum strontium chromite and a porous lanthanum strontium manganite was measured to lie in the range of 1.4-3.8 J/m(2). Several micromechanisms were observed ahead of, or in the wake of...

  11. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  12. A consistent partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Jesper L.; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2007-01-01

    Present extended finite element method (XFEM) elements for cohesive crack growth may often not be able to model equal stresses on both sides of the discontinuity when acting as a crack-tip element. The authors have developed a new partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth with extra...... enrichments to the cracked elements. The extra enrichments are element side local and were developed by superposition of the standard nodal shape functions for the element and standard nodal shape functions for a sub-triangle of the cracked element. With the extra enrichments, the crack-tip element becomes...... capable of modelling variations in the discontinuous displacement field on both sides of the crack and hence also capable of modelling the case where equal stresses are present on each side of the crack. The enrichment was implemented for the 3-node constant strain triangle (CST) and a standard algorithm...

  13. The stability of through-wall circumferential cracks in cylindrical pipes subjected to bending loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1983-01-01

    Tada, Paris and Gamble have used the tearing modulus approach to show that when a circumferential through-wall crack exists in a 304 SS circular cylindrical pipe, and the pipe is subjected to an applied bending moment, then crack growth requires the rotation at the pipe-ends to be increased, (i.e. crack growth is stable), unless the pipe length is unduly large. On this basis it was concluded that unstable fracture is unlikely to occur in BWR SS piping, when the system is designed in accord with the ASME Code load levels for normal operation and anticipated transients. The Tada-Paris-Gamble analysis focuses on the inter-relation between instability and the onset of crack extension, and does not specifically consider the possibility that a crack might become unstable after some stable crack extension. The paper addresses this aspect of the crack stability problem using a crack tip opening angle criterion for crack extension, which has similarities with the tearing modulus approach. The results show that unstable fracture should not occur even after some stable crack extension, again provided that the pipe length is not unduly large. In other words, guillotine failure of a pipe in a BWR system is unlikely, even though the ASME Code limiting stress levels as might be exceeded, as may be the case with a very severe earthquake. (orig./HP)

  14. Samarium ion exchanged montmorillonite for high temperature cumene cracking reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binitha, N.N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nano material Montmorillonite clay is cation exchanged with samarium and its catalytic influence in cumene cracking reaction is investigated. Effect of exchange with sodium ions on further exchange with samarium ions is also noted. Acidity measurements are done using TPD of ammonia. The retention of basic structure is proved from FTIR spectra and XRD patterns. Elemental analysis result shows that samarium exchange has occurred, which is responsible for the higher catalytic activity. Surface area and pore volume remains more or less unaffected upon exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates the enhanced thermal stability on exchanging. Cumene cracking reaction is carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed glass reactor at 673 K. The predominance of Bronsted acidity is confirmed from high selectivity to benzene. (author)

  15. High-throughput investigation of catalysts for JP-8 fuel cracking to liquefied petroleum gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenbaugh, John E; Kim, Sungtak; Sasmaz, Erdem; Lauterbach, Jochen

    2013-09-09

    Portable power technologies for military applications necessitate the production of fuels similar to LPG from existing feedstocks. Catalytic cracking of military jet fuel to form a mixture of C₂-C₄ hydrocarbons was investigated using high-throughput experimentation. Cracking experiments were performed in a gas-phase, 16-sample high-throughput reactor. Zeolite ZSM-5 catalysts with low Si/Al ratios (≤25) demonstrated the highest production of C₂-C₄ hydrocarbons at moderate reaction temperatures (623-823 K). ZSM-5 catalysts were optimized for JP-8 cracking activity to LPG through varying reaction temperature and framework Si/Al ratio. The reducing atmosphere required during catalytic cracking resulted in coking of the catalyst and a commensurate decrease in conversion rate. Rare earth metal promoters for ZSM-5 catalysts were screened to reduce coking deactivation rates, while noble metal promoters reduced onset temperatures for coke burnoff regeneration.

  16. Nonlinear crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshun, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic features of the deformation and failure of actual materials in the vicinity of a crack tip are due to their physical nonlinearity in the stress-concentration zone, which is a result of plasticity, microfailure, or a nonlinear dependence of the interatomic forces on the distance. Therefore, adequate models of the failure mechanics must be nonlinear, in principle, although linear failure mechanics is applicable if the zone of nonlinear deformation is small in comparison with the crack length. Models of crack mechanics are based on analytical solutions of the problem of the stress-strain state in the vicinity of the crack. On account of the complexity of the problem, nonlinear models are bason on approximate schematic solutions. In the Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale nonlinear model, one of the best known, the actual two-dimensional plastic zone (the nonlinearity zone) is replaced by a narrow one-dimensional zone, which is then modeled by extending the crack with a specified normal load equal to the yield point. The condition of finite stress is applied here, and hence the length of the plastic zone is determined. As a result of this approximation, the displacement in the plastic zone at the abscissa is nonzero

  17. Catalytic Oligopeptide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zijian; Noda, Hidetoshi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Kumagai, Naoya

    2018-02-02

    Waste-free catalytic assembly of α-amino acids is fueled by a multiboron catalyst that features a characteristic B 3 NO 2 heterocycle, providing a versatile catalytic protocol wherein functionalized natural α-amino acid units are accommodated and commonly used protecting groups are tolerated. The facile dehydrative conditions eliminate the use of engineered peptide coupling reagents, exemplifying a greener catalytic alternative for peptide coupling. The catalysis is sufficiently robust to enable pentapeptide synthesis, constructing all four amide bond linkages in a catalytic fashion.

  18. Treatment of Cracked Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalifah, Shaymaa; Alkandari, Halimah; Sharma, Prem N; Moule, Alex J

    2017-09-01

    Although many options are proposed for the treatment of cracked posterior teeth, most treatment decisions are not evidence based. Thus, considerable individual variation can occur regarding treatment recommendations for the same scenario. To our knowledge, there are no studies in the literature assessing practitioners' attitudes toward the treatment of cracked teeth. This research recorded variations between general practitioners and specialist groups regarding the treatment approaches of cracked teeth. In a cross-sectional structured questionnaire survey, 32 prosthodontists, 34 endodontists, and 29 general practitioners working in public and private dental health services in Kuwait were assessed regarding their treatment approach to 5 different clinical cracked tooth scenarios. Chosen treatment options varied greatly. Within each scenario, there was a wide range in treatment preferences across all groups and within each group, especially with respect to asymptomatic cracked teeth. Overall, treatment approaches did not relate to specialty training. Statistically significant differences were noticed between endodontists and general practitioners, in case of crowning teeth, in scenario 3 (P = .032), and in extracting teeth for scenario 5 (P = .048). This study highlights that, despite suggested guidelines, there are large differences in the approach to treatment planning for cracked teeth by practitioners and specialists, both as a whole and within each group. Further multicountry studies involving larger dental populations are needed to determine factors that influence practitioners' treatment choices and/or whether better or more widely accepted guidelines need to be established. More prospective well-controlled clinical case-based research with long-term follow-ups is required. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fatigue crack growth characteristics of the pressure vessel steel SA 508 Cl. 3 in various environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. G.; Kim, I. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Y. S.; Kim, J. W.; Park, C. Y. [Korea Electric Power Reserch Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Fatigue tests in air and in room temperature water were performed to obtain comparable data and stable crack measuring conditions. In air environment, fatigue crack growth rate was increased with increasing temperature due to an increase in crack tip oxidation rate. In room temperature water, the fatigue crack growth rate was faster than in air and crack path varied on loading conditions. In simulated light water reactor (LWR) conditions, there was little environmental effect on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) at low dissolved oxygen or at high loading frequency conditions. While the FCGR was enhanced at high oxygen condition, and the enhancement of crack growth rate increased as loading frequency decreased to a critical value. In fractography, environmentally assisted cracks, such as semi-cleavage and secondary intergranular crack, were found near sulfide inclusions only at high dissolved oxygen and low loading frequency condition. The high crack growth rate was related to environmentally assisted crack. These results indicated that environmentally assisted crack could be formed by the Electrochemical effect in specific loading condition.

  20. Diffusion in fluid catalytic cracking catalysts on various displacement scales and its role in catalytic performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kortunov, P.; Vasenkov, S.; Kärger, J.; Fé Elía, M.; Perez, M.; Stöcker, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Theodorou, D.; Drescher, B.; McElhiney, G.; Bernauer, B.; Krystl, V.; Kočiřík, Milan; Zikánová, Arlette; Jirglová, Hana; Berger, C.; Gläser, R.; Weitkamp, J.; Hansen, E. W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 9 (2005), s. 2466-2474 ISSN 0897-4756 Grant - others:TROCAT project - European Community(DE) G5RD-CT-2001-00520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FCC catalyst * adsorption * zeolite Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.818, year: 2005

  1. Microstructural modelling of creep crack growth from a blunted crack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; Giessen, E. van der

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crack tip blunting on the initial stages of creep crack growth is investigated by means of a planar microstructural model in which grains are represented discretely. The actual linking-up process of discrete microcracks with the macroscopic crack is simulated, with full account of the

  2. Linear Cracking in Bridge Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Concrete cracking in bridge decks remains an important issue relative to deck durability. Cracks can allow increased penetration of chlorides, which can result in premature corrosion of the reinforcing steel and subsequent spalling of the concrete de...

  3. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  4. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebeena Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  5. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, Sivakumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-08-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  6. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, SivaKumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  7. Mechanisms for Solidification Crack Initiation and Growth in Aluminum Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglio, N.; Cross, C. E.

    2009-11-01

    In the present work, mechanisms are proposed for solidification crack initiation and growth in aluminum alloy 6060 arc welds. Calculations for an interdendritic liquid pressure drop, made using the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) model, demonstrate that cavitation as a liquid fracture mechanism is not likely to occur except at elevated levels of hydrogen content. Instead, a porosity-based crack initiation model has been developed based upon pore stability criteria, assuming that gas pores expand from pre-existing nuclei. Crack initiation is taken to occur when stable pores form within the coherent dendrite region, depending upon hydrogen content. Following initiation, crack growth is modeled using a mass balance approach, controlled by local strain rate conditions. The critical grain boundary liquid deformation rate needed for solidification crack growth has been determined for a weld made with a 16 pct 4043 filler addition, based upon the local strain rate measurement and a simplified strain rate partitioning model. Combined models show that hydrogen and strain rate control crack initiation and growth, respectively. A hypothetical hydrogen strain rate map is presented, defining conceptually the combined conditions needed for cracking and porosity.

  8. Carbonate-type cracking in an FCC Wet gas compressor station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabel, E. (Asesoria Tech, C.A., P.O. Box 66501, Caracas (VE)); Bhattacharjee, S. (Refineria Isla (Curazao), P.O. Box 3843, Curacao (AN)); Pazos, N. (Intevep, P.O. Box 76343, Los Teques (VE))

    1991-07-01

    The petroleum refinery industry is becoming increasingly aware of hydrogen-related damage that can be induced by wet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and amine on equipment and piping fabricated from carbon and low-alloy steel. This paper reports that cracking of second-stage knock-out drum of a fluid catalytic cracking wet gas compressor station has been studied. Carbonate-type cracking mechanism in carbon steel has been identified as responsible for the intergranular and branched cracks that produced the leakage of the vessel. The gas containing CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, ammonia, and cyanides, plus water and sludge trapped in the gas inlet support, assisted by stress concentration due to welding configuration, have been identified as responsible for such a type of cracking.

  9. Biogasoline Production from Palm Oil Via Catalytic Hydrocracking over Gamma-Alumina Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Anondho Wijanarko; Dadi Mawardi; Mohammad Nasikin

    2010-01-01

    Bio gasoline conversion from palm oil is an alternative energy resources method which can be substituted fossil fuel base energy utilization. Previous research resulted that palm oil can be converted into hydrocarbon by catalytic cracking reaction with γ-alumina catalyst. In this research, catalytic cracking reaction of palm oil by γ-alumina catalyst is done in  a stirrer batch reactor with the oil/catalyst weight ratio variation of 100:1, 75:1, and 50:1; at suhue variation of 260 to 340...

  10. Microemulsion prepared Ni88Pt12 for methane cracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2017-01-16

    Monodispersed NiPt nanoparticles of 10 nm were synthesized by water-in-oil microemulsion. The Ni-Pt alloy structure was stable during the thermal treatment between 330 and 1037 °C, whereas the relatively low temperature range of 600-700 °C was favorable for methane cracking to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes.

  11. Stability and dynamics of rotor system with 45° slant crack on shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanli; Si, Xiaohui; Chu, Fulei

    2011-06-01

    Crack on a shaft is one of the common damages in a rotor system. In this paper, transverse vibrations are calculated to compare the influences of transverse crack and slant crack on the rotor system. Results show that the vibration amplitude of the rotor system with a 45° slant crack on the shaft is larger than that with a transverse crack when the two types of crack have the same depth and the rotor system runs in the same condition. Stability and dynamic characteristics of the rotor system with a 45° slant crack on the shaft under torsional excitation are analyzed by considering opening and closing of the crack. It is shown that the instability of the transverse vibration of the rotor system increases with increasing difference between the bending stiffness in two main directions, and the vibration is stable when the two bending stiffness are identical. The spectrum analysis of the steadystate response reveals that the gravity and the eccentricity produce different frequency components, and when the two bending stiffness are identical, the multiple frequency components of the torsional excitation disappear. Further investigation shows that the vibration amplitudes in combined frequencies increase rapidly in transversal, torsional, and axial vibration with increasing slant crack depth. The results are helpful for the understanding the dynamic behavior of a rotor system with a slant crack on a shaft and can be used for the detection of the slant crack on a shaft.

  12. Concrete Cracking Prediction Including the Filling Proportion of Strand Corrosion Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Dai, Lizhao; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling proportion of corrosion products and the twisting shape of the strand. Experimental data on cracking angle, crack width, and corrosion loss obtained from accelerated corrosion tests of concrete beams are presented. The proposed model is verified by experimental data. Results show that the filling extent of corrosion products varies with crack propagation. The rust filling extent increases with the propagating crack until a critical width. Beyond the critical width, the rust-filling extent remains stable. Using stirrups can decrease the critical crack width. Stirrups can restrict crack propagation and reduce the rust filling. The tangent of the cracking angle increases with increasing corrosion loss. The prediction of corrosion-induced crack is sensitive to the rust-filling extent. PMID:28772367

  13. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Ponzoni, Lucio M.E.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (t inc ), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  14. Choked flow through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feburie, V.; Giot, M.; Granger, S.; Seynhaeve, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The leaks through steam-generator cracks are the subject of a research carried out in cooperation between EDF and UCL. A software called ECREVISSE to predict the mass flow rate has been developed and has been successfully validated. The purpose of the paper is to present the mathematical model used in ECREVISSE as well as some comparison between the results and the presently available data. The model takes into account the persistence of some metastable liquid in the crack and the special flow pattern which appears in such particular geometry. Although the model involves the use of several correlations (friction, heat transfer), no adjustment of parameters against the data has been needed, neither in the single-phase part of the flow, or in the two-phase part. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs

  15. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  16. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the

  17. Distributed password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Crumpacker, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Password cracking requires significant processing power, which in today's world is located at a workstation or home in the form of a desktop computer. Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) is the conduit to this significant source of processing power and John the Ripper is the key. BOINC is a distributed data processing system that incorporates client-server relationships to generically process data. The BOINC structu...

  18. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  19. Generator rotor dovetail cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the presentation the dovetail control and recommended arrangements of the large steam turbine generators are described. The company General Electric established a complete package comprising working schedule of rotor control and solutions of the problems of the dovetail cracking of the large steam turbine generator rotors with long-term operation. A part of the article is also the recommended packet including more items. (author)

  20. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  1. Hydrocarbon conversion with cracking catalyst having co-combustion promoters lanthanum and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csicsery, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A composition useful in hydrocarbon conversion processes such as catalytic cracking comprises 0.05 to 10 weight percent lanthanum associated with a refractory support. The composition may also include 0.02 to 10 weight percent iron. The refractory support is a zeolitic crystalline aluminosilicate

  2. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  3. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  4. Crack retardation by load reduction during fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Nam, Ki Woo; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Do, Jae Yoon

    2003-01-01

    Fracture life and crack retardation behavior were examined experimentally using CT specimens of aluminum alloy 5083. Crack retardation life and fracture life were a wide difference between 0.8 and 0.6 in proportion to ratio of load reduction. The wheeler model retardation parameter was used successfully to predict crack growth behavior. By using a crack propagation rule, prediction of fracture life can be evaluated quantitatively. A statistical approach based on Weibull distribution was applied to the test data to evaluate the dispersion in the retardation life and fracture life by the change of load reduction

  5. Fracture Resistance Measurement Method for in situ Observation of Crack Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, A.; Jørgensen, O.

    1998-01-01

    A special test fixture has been developed for fracture mechanical testing of brittle materials inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The fixture loads a double cantilever beam specimen with pure bending moments and provides stable crack growth. Crack growth is detected by in situ...... observation and acoustic emission, As an example, crack growth in a cubic-phase yttria-stabilized zirconia is detected easily by in situ observation of the crack-tip region, Many fracture toughness measurements are obtained for each specimen, giving high confidence in the measured fracture toughness value......, In situ observation is useful for the study of toughening mechanisms and subcritical crack-growth behavior and to sort out erroneous measurements (e.g., due to crack branching)....

  6. Suppression of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Duralumin by Cavitation Peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated in the present paper that cavitation peening which is one of the mechanical surface modification technique can suppress fatigue crack propagation in duralumin. The impacts produced when cavitation bubble collapses can be utilised for the mechanical surface modification technique in the same way as laser peening and shot peening, which is called “cavitation peening”. Cavitation peening employing a cavitating jet in water was used to treat the specimen made of duralumin Japanese Industrial Standards JIS A2017-T3. After introducing a notch, fatigue test was conducted by a load-controlled plate bending fatigue tester, which has been originally developed. The fatigue crack propagation behavior was evaluated and the relationship between the fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range was obtained. From the results, the fatigue crack propagation rate was drastically reduced by cavitation peening and the fatigue life of duralumin plate was extended 4.2 times by cavitation peening. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation can be suppressed by 88% in the stable crack propagation stage by cavitation peening.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, W.; Turnbull, A.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.03 and is structured as follows: General aspects of SCC testing; Non-precracked specimens; Precracked specimens - the fracture mechanics approach to SCC; Crack growth measurement; Limitations of the LEFM approach to SCC; The use of SCC data; Guide to selection of mechanical scc test method

  8. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  9. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  10. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune

    In this paper the problem of describing the asymptotic fields around a slowly growing crack in a linearly viscoelastic material is considered. It is shown that for plane mixed mode problems the asymptotic fields must be described by 6 parameters: 2 stress intensity factors and 4 deformation...... intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  11. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  12. Sealing And Filling Cracks In Asphalt Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The primary objective of the crack treatment experiment was to determine the most effective and economical materials and methods for conducting crack-sealing and crack-filling operations. Secondary objectives included the identification of performanc...

  13. Fatigue crack closure: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, R. M. J.

    1990-09-01

    The phenomenon of fatigue crack closure is now recognized as one of the most influential mechanisms operating during fatigue. This literature survey traces the development of research into fatigue crack closure and has been divided to present the two major approaches. The first part covers early work carried out between 1970 to 1980 which, broadly speaking, adopted a 'continuum' approach. The second part covers the period 1980 to 1988 when a mechanistic approach was widely adopted. The survey has highlighted, firstly, the critical nature of experimental technique in the achievement of a meaningful measurement of crack closure load and secondly, that a diversity of mechanisms may operate to produce closure. Particular attention has been given to crack closure in aluminum alloys and also to work relating crack closure to the corrosion fatigue situation.

  14. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  15. Coping with cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenati, F W

    1996-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome typically poses a diagnostic challenge for the dentist. Symptoms include tenderness to biting on certain foods, often poorly localized, and occasional thermal sensitivity. Knowing where to look for this entity, especially in the mandibular molar region, can be especially helpful. Treatment of the tooth depends on the degree of pulpal involvement and the extent of the crack. Cuspal coverage is required of all cracked posterior teeth that are retainable. Root canal therapy is included if symptoms persist or if pulpal pathosis exists at the outset. Cracks extending beyond the osseous crest indicate a poor prognosis. Armed with this knowledge, the dentist can overcome many cracked tooth dilemmas, resulting in satisfaction for both patient and practitioner alike.

  16. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  17. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  18. Tensile cracks in creeping solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, H.; Rice, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The loading parameter determining the stress and strain fields near a crack tip, and thereby the growth of the crack, under creep conditions is discussed. Relevant loading parameters considered are the stress intensity factor K/sub I/, the path-independent integral C*, and the net section stress sigma/sub net/. The material behavior is modelled as elastic-nonlinear viscous where the nonlinear term describes power law creep. At the time t = 0 load is applied to the cracked specimen, and in the first instant the stress distribution is elastic. Subsequently, creep deformation relaxes the initial stress concentration at the crack tip, and creep strains develop rapidly near the crack tip. These processes may be analytically described by self-similar solutions for short times t. Small scale yielding may be defined. In creep problems, this means that elastic strains dominate almost everywhere except in a small creep zone which grows around the crack tip. If crack growth ensues while the creep zone is still small compared with the crack length and the specimen size, the stress intensity factor governs crack growth behavior. If the calculated creep zone becomes larger than the specimen size, the stresses become finally time-independent and the elastic strain rates can be neglected. In this case, the stress field is the same as in the fully-plastic limit of power law hardening plasticity. The loading parameter which determines the near tip fields uniquely is then the path-independent integral C*.K/sub I/ and C* characterize opposite limiting cases. The case applied in a given situation is decided by comparing the creep zone size with the specimen size and the crack length. Besides several methods of estimating the creep zone size, a convenient expression for a characteristic time is derived, which characterizes the transition from small scale yielding to extensive creep of the whole specimen

  19. Buckling Analysis of Edge Cracked Sandwich Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Mohammed Hussein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents mainly the buckling load of sandwich plates with or without crack for different cases. The buckling loads are analyzed experimentally and numerically by using ANSYS 15. The experimental investigation was to fabricate the cracked sandwich plate from stainless steel and PVC to find mechanical properties of stainless steel and PVC such as young modulus. The buckling load for different aspect ratio, crack length, cracked location and plate without crack found. The experimental results were compared with that found from ANSYS program. Present of crack is decreased the buckling load and that depends on crack size, crack location and aspect ratio.

  20. The stability of growth of a through-wall circumferential crack in a cylindrical pipe subjected to bending deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1987-01-01

    Tada, Paris and Gamble have used the tearing modulus approach to examine the stability of growth of a through-wall circumferential crack in a 304 stainless steel circular cylindrical pipe subject to bending deformation. They showed that crack growth is stable, in the sense that growth requires the rotation imposed at the pipe-ends to be increased, provided the pipe length is less than a critical length Lsub(c), which is given by their analysis. The Tada-Paris-Gamble analysis focuses on the question of the stability, or otherwise, of crack growth at the onset of crack extension. The analysis does not consider the possibilities that (a) instability might occur after some stable crack growth, and (b) arrest might occur after some unstable growth. A study of these aspects of the circumferential crack growth problem using the tearing modulus approach is precluded by the geometry dependence of the J-crack growth resistance curve. Consequently the present paper uses a crack tip opening angle criterion to describe crack growth, and thereby demonstrates that possibilities (a) and (b) should both occur, depending on the initial crack length and pipe length. In terms of relevance to the technologically important problem of cracking in Boiling Water Reactor piping, the important conclusion stemming from the paper's analysis is that stability of crack growth after the onset of crack extension is assured if the pipe length is less than a critical length L'sub(c). L'sub(c) is less than Lsub(c), the critical length relevant to the onset of crack extension, but it is still appreciably greater than the pipe run lengths in actual reactor piping systems, and safety against guillotine failure of a pipe is therefore generally assured. (author)

  1. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  2. Experimental and numerical analysis of the intercept method for evaluating stable crack extension in a steel C(T) specimen; Analisis experimental y numerico del metodo del intercepto para evaluar la extension estable de grieta en una probeta C(T) de acero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, J. R.; Leiva, R.; Labbe, F.

    2009-07-01

    A new method for evaluating the crack size in a fracture mechanics test which only has force-displacement data P-{nu}, is introduced. this method consists in generating P-{nu} data of an A 508 C(T) specimen, and a two-dimensional finite element model, it is shown that the method contributes to generate relevant data concerning the evolution of the crack size in a test. The results obtained with the method make it possible to construct a J-R curve which is practically identical to that constructed with the original experimental data. (Author) 11 refs.

  3. Relation Between Acid and Catalytic Properties of Chlorinated Gamma-Alumina. a 31p Mas Nmr and Ftir Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the effect of chlorine on the surface properties of gamma-alumina, especially on their acid properties. The use of FTIR spectroscopy and 31P MAS NMR of adsorbed trimethylphosphine allows to propose a chlorination mechanism. To correlate the surface properties of these chlorinated gamma-alumina with their catalytic properties, we have used a model reaction, the cracking of n-heptane under reforming conditions. The analysis of the correlation between acid properties determined by 31P MAS NMR and the catalytic results (in terms of activities and selectivities allows to identify which sites are involved in the cracking reaction.

  4. Effects of different level addition of zeolite ZSM-5 additive on quality and composition of the dry gas, LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) and gasoline, produced in FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking); Efeito dos diferentes niveis de adicao de aditivos de ZSM-5 na qualidade e composicao do gas combustivel, GLP e gasolina produzidos em FCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastiani, Raquel; Pimenta, Ricardo D.M.; Almeida, Marlon B.B.; Lau, Lam Y. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The effects of the addition of different level of ZSM-5 additives on different FCC catalysts formulations have been studied on laboratory scale FST (Fluidized Simulation Test). The main objective of the present work is to perform a qualitative identification of the main parameters of FCC catalyst which affect the ZSM-5 additives performance concerning quality and composition of Dry Gas, LPG and Gasoline. The product composition of each test was analyzed by PIANO groups separated by carbon number. The effect of ZSM-5 on products composition was evaluated. The results showed that the ZSM-5 additive cracks gasoline range olefins and isoparaffins into Dry Gas and LPG, favoring the formation of ethylene, propylene and butylenes, while the absolute yield of gasoline aromatics changes little. The aromatics fraction in gasoline, MON and RON numbers in gasoline increase. The ZSM-5 effectiveness is negatively affected by high levels of rare earth on FCC catalyst (RE-USY). Higher hydrogen transfer provides lower olefins (higher than C6) formation, which are the most reactive species for ZSM-5 cracking. (author)

  5. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  7. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  8. Synthesis of cracked Calophyllum inophyllum oil using fly ash catalyst for diesel engine application

    KAUST Repository

    Muthukumaran, N.

    2015-04-16

    In this study, production of hydrocarbon fuel from Calophyllum inophyllum oil has been characterized for diesel engine application, by appraising essential fuel processing parameters. As opposed to traditional trans-esterification process, the reported oil was cracked using a catalyst, as the latter improves the fuel properties better than the former. In a bid to make the production process economically viable, a waste and cheap catalyst, RFA (raw fly ash), has been capitalized for the cracking process as against the conventional zeolite catalyst. The fuel production process, which is performed in a fixed bed catalytic reactor, was done methodologically after comprehensively studying the characteristics of fly ash catalyst. Significantly, fly ash characterization was realized using SEM and EDS, which demarcated the surface and internal structures of fly ash particles before and after cracking. After the production of hydrocarbon fuel from C. inophyllum oil, the performed compositional analysis in GC-MS revealed the presence of esters, parfins and olefins. Followed by the characterization of catalytically cracked C. inophyllum oil, suitable blends of it with diesel were tested in a single cylinder diesel engine. From the engine experimental results, BTE (brake thermal efficiency) of the engine for B25 (25% cracked C. inophyllum oil and 75% diesel) was observed to be closer to diesel, while it decreased for higher blends. On the other hand, emissions such as HC (hydrocarbon), CO (carbon monoxide) and smoke were found to be comparable for B25 with diesel. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thresholds of time dependent intergranular crack growth in a nickel disc alloy Alloy 720Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hangyue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At high temperatures in air, introducing a dwell period at the peak stress of fatigue cycles promotes time dependent intergranular crack growth which can increase crack growth rates by upto a few orders of magnitude from the rates of transgranular fatigue crack growth in superalloys. It is expected that time dependent intergranular crack growth in nickel-based superalloys may not occur below a critical mechanical driving force, ΔKth−IG, analogous to a fatigue threshold (ΔKth and a critical temperature, Tth. In this study, dwell fatigue crack growth tests have been carefully designed and conducted on Alloy 720Li to examine such thresholds. Unlike a fatigue threshold, the threshold stress intensity factor range for intergranular crack growth is observed to be highly sensitive to microstructure, dwell time and test procedure. The near threshold crack growth behaviour is made complex by the interactions between grain boundary oxidation embrittlement and crack tip stress relaxation. In general, lower ΔKth−IG values are associated with finer grain size and/or shorter dwell times. Often a load increasing procedure promotes stress relaxation and tends to lead to higher ΔKth−IG. When there is limited stress relaxation at the crack tip, similar ΔKth−IG values are measured with load increasing and load shedding procedures. They are generally higher than the fatigue threshold (ΔKth despite faster crack growth rates (da/dN in the stable crack growth regime. Time dependent intergranular crack growth cannot be activated below a temperature of 500 ∘C.

  10. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  11. Fatigue pre-cracking and fracture toughness in polycrystalline tungsten and molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuya; Nakadate, Kazuhito; Matsuo, Satoru; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2018-01-01

    Fatigue pre-cracking performance and fracture toughness in polycrystalline tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) have been investigated in relation to grain boundary (GB) configuration with respect to the crack advance direction. Sub-sized, single edge notched bend (SENB) specimens with three different orientations, R-L (ASTM notation) for a forged Mo rod and L-S and T-S for a rolled W plate, were pre-cracked in two steps: fully uniaxial compression fatigue loading to provoke crack initiation and its stable growth from the notch root, and subsequent 3-point bend (3PB) fatigue loading to extend the crack. The latter step intends to minimize the influence of the residual tensile stresses generated during compression fatigue by moving the crack tip away from the plastic zone. It is shown that fatigue pre-cracking performance, especially pre-crack extension behavior, is significantly affected by the specimen orientation. The R-L orientation, giving the easiest cracking path, permitted crack extension completely beyond the plastic zone, while the L-S and T-S orientations with the thickness cracking direction of the rolled plate sustained the crack lengths around or possibly within the plastic zone size due to difficulty in crack advance through an aligned grain structure. Room temperature fracture toughness tests revealed that the 3PB fatigued specimens exhibited appreciably higher fracture toughness by about 30% for R-L, 40% for L-S and 60% for T-S than the specimens of each orientation pre-cracked by compression fatigue only. This indicates that 3PB fatigue provides the crack tip front out of the residual tensile stress zone by crack extension or leads to reduction in the residual stresses at the crack tip front. Strong dependence of fracture toughness on GB configuration was evident. The obtained fracture toughness values are compared with those in the literature and its strong GB configuration dependence is discussed in connection with the appearance of pop-in.

  12. Subsurface metals fatigue cracking without and with crack tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Shanyavskiy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue regime for metals was considered and mechanisms of the subsurface crack origination were introduced. In many metals first step of crack origination takes place with specific area formation because of material pressing and rotation that directed to transition in any volume to material ultra-high-plasticity with nano-structure appearing. Then by the border of the nano-structure takes place volume rotation and fracture surface creates with spherical particles which usually named Fine-Granular-Area. In another case there takes place First-Smooth-Facet occurring in area of origin due to whirls appearing by the one of the slip systems under discussed the same stress-state conditions. Around Fine-Granular-Area or First-Smooth-Facet there plastic zone appeared and, then, subsurface cracking develops by the same manner as for through cracks. In was discussed quantum-mechanical nature of fatigue crack growth in accordance with Yang’s modulus quantization for low level of deformations. New simply equation was considered for describing subsurface cracking in metals out of Fine-Granular-Area or Fist-Smooth-Facet.

  13. On the Short Surface Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in a Fine-Grained WC-Co Cemented Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Mikado

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the fatigue crack growth (FCG behavior of short surface cracks in a fine-grained cemented carbide with a length of less than 1 mm was investigated. The rotating bending and the four-point bending fatigue tests were carried out at stress ratios of R = −1 and R = 0.1 (R = maximum stress/minimum stress. It was found that a short surface crack had a longer stable fatigue crack growth area than a long through-thickness crack; the FCG behaviors of the two types of crack are clearly different. Furthermore, the FCG path of short surface cracks was investigated in detail to study the interaction between fatigue cracks and microstructures of the cemented carbide such as WC grains and the Co phase. At a low Kmax (Kmax = the maximum stress intensity factor, it was found that fatigue crack growth within WC grains is difficult because of a small driving force; instead, crack growth is along the brittle WC/WC interface. On the other hand, at a high Kmax, WC grain breakage often occurs, since the driving force of FCG is large, and the fatigue crack grows linearly.

  14. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  15. Crackscope : automatic pavement cracking inspection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The CrackScope system is an automated pavement crack rating system consisting of a : digital line scan camera, laser-line illuminator, and proprietary crack detection and classification : software. CrackScope is able to perform real-time pavement ins...

  16. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested by...

  17. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  18. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-11-19

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported. The USY catalyst (FCC-Y) was modified by steaming to form a significantly lower acidity catalyst (FCC-SY). The current study shows that the FCC-SY catalyst favors EB disproportionation more than cracking. A comparison has been made between the results of EB conversion over the lowly acidic catalyst (FCC-SY) and the highly acidic catalyst (FCC-Y) under identical conditions. It was observed that increase in catalyst acidity favored cracking of EB at the expense of disproportionation. Kinetic parameters for EB disappearance during disproportionation reaction over the FCC-SY catalyst were calculated using the catalyst activity decay function based on time on stream (TOS). © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  19. Shapes formed by interacting cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in dental enamel and cleaved silicon to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated stress geometries and different microscopic mechanisms, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths. We investigate the origins of this widely observed ``en passant'' crack pattern by fracturing a rectangular slab which is notched on each long side and subjected to quasi-static uniaxial strain from the short side. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until they pass each other, after which they curve and release a lens-shaped fragment. We find that, for materials with diverse mechanical properties, each curve has an approximately square-root shape, and that the length of each fragment is twice its width. We are able to explain the origins of this universal shape with a simple geometrical model.

  20. Premature asphalt concrete pavement cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has identified hot mix asphalt concrete : (HMAC) pavements that have displayed top-down cracking within three years of construction. The objective of : the study was to evaluate the top-down cr...

  1. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari (Boeing)

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  2. Cracks in Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  3. The cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christoper D; McConnell, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of the cracked tooth syndrome (CTS). The condition refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth that occasionally extends into the pulp. A lack of awareness of the condition coupled with its varied clinical features can make diagnosis of CTS difficult. Common symptoms include an uncomfortable sensation or pain from a tooth that occurs while chewing hard foods and which ceases when the pressure is withdrawn. The patient is often unable to identify the offending tooth or quadrant involved, and may report a history of numerous dental procedures with unsatisfactory results. Successful diagnosis and management requires an awareness of the existence of CTS and the appropriate diagnostic tests. Management options depend on the nature of the symptoms and extent of the lesion. These options include routine monitoring, occlusal adjustments, placement of a cast restoration and endodontic treatment. A decision flowchart indicating the treatment options available to the dental practitioner is presented.

  4. Treatment of a cracked tooth with a resin-ionomer restoration and a connective tissue graft: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R J

    2000-12-01

    Treatment of a cracked tooth can be difficult and unpredictable. Quite often, the most predictable treatment possible is simply extraction. This is a case report of the treatment of a cracked tooth with a resin-ionomer restoration and a connective tissue with partial-thickness double pedicle graft. The crack was detected during a routine root coverage procedure using this type of graft. A resin-ionomer was used to repair the crack. Then, the root coverage procedure was completed. Complete root coverage was obtained, including the portion of the root that was repaired. The results remained stable and the tooth treated remained asymptomatic. Clinically, the treatment was a success.

  5. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    OpenAIRE

    J. Marková; M. Holický

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceabi...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of type silicoaluminophosphates catalytic support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, C.E.T.; Carvalho, M.W.N.C.; Pereira, K.R.O.

    2010-01-01

    The refining processes, the catalytic hydrocracking is the future of diesel oil in Brazil and the first units are already scheduled to be inaugurated. Among the catalysts used in this process, silicoaluminophosphates (SAPO's) have considerable potential for use as they have been effective in the isomerization of n-alkanes, the isomerization of olefins and alkylation of aromatics. Because of this, the objective is to develop catalysts that will be used in hydrocracking reactions. The media like SAPO-5 were synthesized with different ratios silicon/aluminum, which is used as a catalytic support and have the function of crack organic molecules, since it has acidic character. The materials were characterized by techniques: X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis and textural by BET. After summarizing the media found that they had agreements with the crystalline phases presented in the literature.(author)

  7. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    OpenAIRE

    Niken Chatarina; Siswanto Yudi; Widodo; Tjahjono Elly

    2017-01-01

    The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and s...

  8. Influência da forma e do processo de obtenção do entalhe na carga máxima e na energia de fratura de argamassas utilizando o método da cunha para propagação estável de trinca Influence of notch shape and preparation on the maximum load and fracture energy of mortars evaluated by the wedge splitting method for stable crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ribeiro

    2009-06-01

    angle. The square shaped notches were prepared in two ways: one mechanically with a diamond disc tool and the other using blades as cores during the molding of the mortars. A PVC mold equipped with internal steel blades was created to produce samples notched and grooved in the mortar molding process. Stable conditions of crack propagation were established based on preliminary tests. The crack was found to propagate along an imaginary plane defined by the lateral grooves in the sample. The results indicated that the notch providing the best conditions of crack propagation stability is the V-shaped notch produced in the molding of the sample.

  9. Analysis of fatigue crack propagation behaviour in SiC particulate Al2O3 whisker reinforced hybrid MMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, AKM Asif; Arai, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of a cast hybrid metal matrix composite (MMC) was investigated and compared with the crack propagation behaviour of MMC with Al 2 O 3 and Al alloy in this article. Three dimensional (3D) surface analysis is carried out to analyze the crack propagation mechanism. All three materials clearly show near threshold and stable crack growth regions, but the rapid crack growth region is not clearly understood. The crack propagation resistance is found higher in hybrid MMC than that of MMC with Al 2 O 3 whisker and the Al alloy in the low ΔK region. The crack propagation in the hybrid MMC in the near-threshold region is directed by the debonding of reinforcement-matrix followed by void nucleation in the Al alloy matrix. Besides, the crack propagation in the stable- or midcrack-growth region is controlled by the debonding of particle-matrix and whisker-matrix interface caused by the cycle-by-cycle crack growth along the interface. The transgranular fracture of the reinforcement and void formation are also observed. Due to presence of large volume of inclusions and the microstructural inhomogeneity, the area of striation formation is reduced in the hybrid MMC, caused the unstable fracture. (paper)

  10. Improvement of water management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell thanks to cathode cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karst, Nicolas; Bouillon, Pierre [STMicroelectronics, Indre et Loire, 16 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Faucheux, Vincent; Martinent, Audrey; Simonato, Jean-Pierre [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA) LITEN-DTNM, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-08-15

    The role of cathodic structure on water management was investigated for planar micro-air-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The electrical results demonstrate the possibility to decrease, with the same structure, both cell drying and cell flooding according to the environmental and operation conditions. Thanks to a simultaneous study of internal resistance and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) images, we demonstrate the advantageous influence of the presence of crack in cathodic catalytic layer on water management. On the one hand, the gold layer used as cathodic current collector is in contact with the electrolyte in the cracked zones which allows water maintenance within the electrolyte. It allows to decrease the cell drying and thus strongly increase the electrical performances. For cells operated in a 10% relative humidity atmosphere at 30 C and at a potential of 0.5 V, the current density increases from 28 mA cm{sup -2} to 188 mA cm{sup -2} (+570%) for the cell with a cathodic cracked network. On the other hand, the reduction in oxygen barrier diffusion due to the cathodic cracks allows to improve oxygen diffusion. In flooding state, the current densities were higher for a cell with a cracked network. For cells operating in a 70% relative humidity atmosphere at 30 C and at a potential of 0.2 V, a current density increase from 394 mA cm{sup -2} to 456 mA cm{sup -2} (16%) was noted for the cell with a cathodic cracked network. Microscopic observations allowed us to visualize water droplets growth mechanism in cathodic cracks. It was observed that the water comes out of the crack sides and partially saturates the cracks before emerging on cathodic collector. These results demonstrate that cathode structuration is a key parameter that plays a major role in the water management of PEMFCs. (author)

  11. Crack growth and fracture behaviour of stress corrosion cracks of turbine generator steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger; Vahle.

    1989-01-01

    The object of this investigation was the quantifying of the behaviour of cracks which were induced during service under corrosive media. To investigate the influence of stress corrosion crack configurations on stress intensity factor, six different test materials from 2 and 3.5% NiCrMoV and 2% Cr/1% Ni steels were chosen. The stress corrosion cracks were induced at wedge loaded compact tension specimens in a corrosive media in the laboratory. Fracture mechanics tests as well as fatigue crack growth tests were performed at these specimens. All stress corrosion cracks have an intercrystalline path and a crack length longer than 1 mm; they are multiple and have branched cracks tips. The fracture mechanics tests at these stress corrosion cracks induced in the laboratory and during service of components show that their stress intensity factor is 30 to 70% smaller than the stress intensity factor calculated for single straight cracks too. Theoretical calculations arrived to the same results. Crack initiation and growth behaviour under cyclic loading starting from these stress corrosion cracks results in that the load or the stress intensity range ΔK has to be increased three times larger than the ΔK-threshold value to induce crack initiation. The crack growth velocity influenced by multiple crack tips and multiple growing cracks from these crack tips is much lower than the crack growth velocity of a normal fatigue crack (one crack tip). (orig./MM) With 32 figs

  12. Catalytic destruction of tar in biomass derived producer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiqin; Brown, Robert C.; Suby, Andrew; Cummer, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate catalytic destruction of tar formed during gasification of biomass, with the goal of improving the quality of the producer gas. This work focuses on nickel based catalysts treated with alkali in an effort to promote steam gasification of the coke that deposits on catalyst surfaces. A tar conversion system consisting of a guard bed and catalytic reactor was designed to treat the producer gas from an air blown, fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The guard bed used dolomite to crack the heavy tars. The catalytic reactor was used to evaluate three commercial steam reforming catalysts. These were the ICI46-1 catalyst from Imperial Chemical Industry and Z409 and RZ409 catalysts from Qilu Petrochemical Corp. in China. A 0.5-3 l/min slipstream from a 5 tpd biomass gasifier was used to test the tar conversion system. Gas and tar were sampled before and after the tar conversion system to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Changes in gas composition as functions of catalytic bed temperature, space velocity and steam/TOC (total organic carbon) ratio are presented. Structural changes in the catalysts during the tests are also described

  13. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  14. Molecular Self-Assembly Strategy for Generating Catalytic Hybrid Polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Fang, Justin; Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Pike, Douglas H; Nanda, Vikas; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, catalytic peptides were introduced that mimicked protease activities and showed promising selectivity of products even in organic solvents where protease cannot perform well. However, their catalytic efficiency was extremely low compared to natural enzyme counterparts presumably due to the lack of stable tertiary fold. We hypothesized that assembling these peptides along with simple hydrophobic pockets, mimicking enzyme active sites, could enhance the catalytic activity. Here we fused the sequence of catalytic peptide CP4, capable of protease and esterase-like activities, into a short amyloidogenic peptide fragment of Aβ. When the fused CP4-Aβ construct assembled into antiparallel β-sheets and amyloid fibrils, a 4.0-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) compared to neat CP4 peptide was observed. The enhanced catalytic activity of CP4-Aβ assembly could be explained both by pre-organization of a catalytically competent Ser-His-acid triad and hydrophobic stabilization of a bound substrate between the triad and p-NPA, indicating that a design strategy for self-assembled peptides is important to accomplish the desired functionality.

  15. Improved cracking characteristics of bitumen through advanced froth treatment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, S.H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada); Dabros, T. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Advanced Separation Technologies Laboratory; Humphries, A. [Albemarle Catalysts Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the dominant refinery conversion process for producing transportation fuels. Feed to the FCC unit is heavy gas oil (HGO). Its quality depends on the crude used and the processes involved. Bitumen-derived crude (BDC), including synthetic crude oil (SCO) is less superior to produce FCC feed than stocks from conventional sources. As a result, North American refiners have limited the use of BDC in their conventional FCC-based operations. This paper examined the improved cracking characteristics of bitumen through an advanced froth treatment process. This involved processing of the bitumen with paraffinic solvent in froth treatment with removal of some asphaltenes, CCR precursors, and metals. The paper discussed the experimental and subsequent results and discussion, including cracking characteristics; product quality; synergetic effect; and economic benefits. It was concluded that the poisoning effect by some deleterious components such as nitrogen compounds in feeds on the catalyst could be reduced or compensated for by higher C/O ratios (more catalyst per unit weight of feed). In addition, as conversion increased, sulfur in gasoline decreased slightly and linearly with more or less the same magnitude for the two bitumens. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  16. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  17. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic stainless steels, titanium alloys and high strength aluminium alloys is discussed. (author)

  18. Paths of interactive cracks in creep conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nowak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains plane strain analysis of uniformly stretched plate working in creep condition. The plate contains initial defects in forms of central and/or edge cracks working in mode I. These cracks are modelled by attributing critical value of damage parameter to preset points and therefore resulting in stresses set to zero (material does not support any loading. The Continuum Damage Mechanics constitutive equations are used to describe the creep crack growth problem and Finite Element Method Abaqus system is applied to solve corresponding boundary and initial value problem. Analysis of different initial cracks configuration has been performed. The crack path is defined by points in which damage parameter equals to critical one. Time to failure of the plate with single initial crack is achieved when the crack path spans its width. This time is calculated and compared to the time to failure of initially uncracked structure. For the plate with multiple cracks the paths starting from different cracks can develop independently until they merge and/or span the plate width. In each case the damage field is analysed and the direction of crack path development is determined. The analysis of crack propagation allows for determination of a distance between initial cracks for which the interaction between them is negligible. It is demonstrated that Continuum Damage Mechanics approach allows not only to model the development of initially existing cracks but also initiation of new, cross-spanning cracks and their kinking and branching.

  19. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  20. Simulation of Chloride Diffusion in Cracked Concrete with Different Crack Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride-induced corrosion of steel rebar is one of the primary durability problems for reinforced concrete structures in marine environment. Furthermore, if the surfaces of concrete structures have cracks, additional chloride can penetrate into concrete through cracked zone. For chloride ingression into cracked concrete, former researches mainly focus on influence of crack width on chloride diffusion coefficients. Other crack characteristics, such as chloride depth, crack shape (equal-width crack or tapered crack, crack density, and spacing, are not studied in detail. To fill this gap, this paper presents a numerical procedure to simulate chloride ingression into cracked concrete with different crack geometry characteristics. Cracked concrete is divided into two parts, sound zone and cracked zone. For stress-free concrete, the diffusion coefficient of sound zone is approximately assumed to be the same as sound concrete, and the diffusion coefficient of cracked zone is expressed as a piecewise function of crack width. Two-dimensional finite element method is used to determine chloride concentration. It is found that, with the increasing of crack width, crack depth, and crack amount, chloride ingression will aggravate. The analysis results generally agree with experimental results.

  1. Effect of Feed Composition Changing at Naphtha Catalytic Reforming Unit Due to Involvement of Gasoline Fraction Obtained by Diesel Fuels Hydrodewaxing into the Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Belinskaya, Natalia Sergeevna; Ivanchina, Emilia Dmitrievna; Ivashkina, Elena Nikolaevna; Frantsina, Evgeniya Vladimirovna; Silko, Galina Yurievna

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary products of hydrodewaxing process is stable gasoline, which is characterized by low octane number on the one hand. On the other hand, it contains a significant amount of iso-paraffins (on average 45% wt.) and naphthenes (on average 25% wt.), which are reagents in the naphtha catalytic reforming process primary reactions. Feasibility of stable gasoline obtained by means of diesel fuel catalytic hydrodewaxing process involving into the processing at the naphtha catalytic refo...

  2. Recent advances in fatigue crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEvily, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the recent advances in the understanding of the fatigue crack growth process have resulted from an improved realization of the importance of fatigue crack closure in the crack growth process. Two basic crack closure processes have been identified. One of which is known as plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure (PIFCC), and the other is roughness-induced fatigue crack closure (RIFCC). Both forms occur in all alloys, but PIFCC is a surface-related process which is dominant in aluminum alloys such as 2024-T3, whereas RIFCC is dominant in most steels and titanium alloys. A proposed basic equation governing fatigue crack growth is derived where K/sub max/ is the maximum stress intensity factor in a loading cycle and K/sub op/ is the stress intensity factor at the crack opening level. is the range of the stress intensity factor at the threshold level which is taken to correspond to a crack growth rate of 10-11 m/cycle. The material constant A has units of (MPa)-2, and therefore Eq. 1 is dimensionally correct. Eq.1 has been successfully used in the analysis of both long and short cracks, but in the latter case modification is needed to account for elastic-plastic behavior, the development of crack closure, and the Kitagawa effect which shows that the fatigue strength rather than the threshold level is the controlling factor determining the rate of fatigue crack growth in the very short fatigue crack growth range. Eq. 1 is used to show that The non-propagating cracks observed by Frost and Dugdale resulted from crack closure. The behavior of cracks as short as 10 microns in length can be predicted. Fatigue notch sensitivity is related to crack closure. Very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) behavior is also associated with fatigue crack closure. (author)

  3. Correction to the crack extension direction in numerical modelling of mixed mode crack paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucht, Tore; Aliabadi, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    In order to avoid introduction of an error when a local crack-growth criterion is used in an incremental crack growth formulation, each straight crack extension would have to be infinitesimal or have its direction corrected. In this paper a new procedure to correct the crack extension direction...... is proposed in connection with crack growth analyzed by the Dual Boundary Element Method (DBEM). The proposed correction procedure and a reference correction procedure already described in the literature are evaluated by solving two different computational crack growth examples. In the two examples...... it is found that analyses of the crack paths performed with the proposed crack. correction procedure using big increments, of crack extension Are in excellent agreement with analyses of the crack paths performed by using very small increments of crack extension. Furthermore, it is shown that the reference...

  4. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  5. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  6. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  7. The Reflective Cracking in Flexible Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pais Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reflective cracking is a major concern for engineers facing the problem of road maintenance and rehabilitation. The problem appears due to the presence of cracks in the old pavement layers that propagate into the pavement overlay layer when traffic load passes over the cracks and due to the temperature variation. The stress concentration in the overlay just above the existing cracks is responsible for the appearance and crack propagation throughout the overlay. The analysis of the reflective cracking phenomenon is usually made by numerical modeling simulating the presence of cracks in the existing pavement and the stress concentration in the crack tip is assessed to predict either the cracking propagation rate or the expected fatigue life of the overlay. Numerical modeling to study reflective cracking is made by simulating one crack in the existing pavement and the loading is usually applied considering the shear mode of crack opening. Sometimes the simulation considers the mode I of crack opening, mainly when temperature effects are predominant.

  8. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  9. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  10. Effectiveness of two reflection crack attenuation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Asphalt overlays are one of the most common tools for rehabilitating existing asphalt and concrete pavements. : However, the performance of new overlays is often jeopardized by the cracking distress in the existing : pavement. This existing cracking ...

  11. Investigation of reflective cracking mitigation techniques : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    When new asphalt is placed over concrete or : asphalt pavement, cracks or joints in the old : layer can appear in the new overlay; this is : called reflective cracking (RC). In current Florida : practice, an asphalt rubber membrane interlayer : (ARMI...

  12. Cracking of SHCC due to reinforcement corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savija, B.; Lukovic, M.; Pacheco Farias, J.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Saouma, V.; Bolander, J.; Landis, E.

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important deterioration mechanism affecting reinforced concrete infrastructures. After corrosion starts, expansive pressures are exerted onto the surrounding concrete, causing cracking and spalling of the cover concrete. The amount of cover cracking can possibly

  13. The cracked tooth syndrome: an elusive diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türp, J C; Gobetti, J P

    1996-10-01

    The authors review the literature and present a case of cracked tooth syndrome. Special emphasis is placed on diagnostic problems associated with this syndrome. The case report demonstrates classic and atypical features of cracked tooth syndrome.

  14. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewicki, David

    1998-01-01

    .... Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered...

  15. Influence of de-aluminating techniques of Y zeolite on its physico-chemical properties and on its catalytic performances in N-decane hydro-cracking; Influence des techniques de desalumination de la zeolithe Y sur ses proprietes physico-chimiques et sur ses performances catalytiques en hydrocraquage du N-decane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gola, A.

    1996-12-16

    De-aluminated HY samples with constant amounts of framework aluminium and varying amounts of extra framework aluminium have been prepared and characterized. The influence of extra framework aluminium (EFAL) species in hydrocracking of n-decane at a hydrogen pressure of 60 bars has been evaluated. The methods used to de-aluminate the Y zeolite involved high temperature steaming followed by treatments with aqueous solutions of nitric acid, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SIF{sub 6}(AHFS) or Na{sub 2}EDTA to control the elimination of the EFAI. The chemical composition of the resulting samples indicates that only AHFS and Na{sub 2}EDTA are able to eliminate controlled amounts of EFAI without de-aluminating the framework. Several types of EFAI are detected, their localisation is proposed and their ease of extraction by the different reagents is investigated. Treatment with nitric acid or Na{sub 2}EDTA leads to increase of the meso-porous volume whereas AHFS leads to a silicon deposit and very low meso-porous volumes. The number and strength of acid sites in all treated samples is higher than in the steamed zeolite. Hydrocracking of n-decane under high hydrogen pressure (60 bars) at 260 deg C was chosen as a test reaction. The catalysts were prepared by two methods: mechanical mixing of the zeolite with alumina supported platinum and incipient wetness impregnation of platinum on the zeolite. It is shown that the proximity of acid and metallic sites in the latter leads to high yields of isomerization products. The amount and nature of the EFAI, and the meso-porous texture of the samples studied, have little influence on the catalytic properties (in terms of selectivity or acidity) of de-aluminated zeolite Y. Only the steamed zeolite shows in some conditions a lower activity and selectivity towards isomerized products. (author) 145 refs.

  16. Crack path morphology in dual phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, M.

    1995-01-01

    The crack path morphology in low carbon, low alloy dual phase steel has been investigated. Thermomechanical processing and inter critical heat treatments were used to vary proportion, morphology, and distribution of the ferrite and martensite phases. The tortuous morphology of crack path was observed in unrolled material at high delta K. In thermo mechanically processed material, the crack tended to cross martensite frequently and crack path become less circuitous. (author)

  17. Comparison of crack arrest methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The ASTM Cooperative Test Program Data were used to compare the static (K/sub Ia/) and dynamic (K/sud ID/, K/sub IDm/) approaches to crack arrest. K/sub Ia/ is not dependent on K/sub Q/. This is consistent with the requirements of the static approach, but not the dynamic one which requires that K/sub Ia/ decrease with K/sub Q/ if K/sub ID/ (= K/sub IDm/) is a constant. K/sub ID/ increases systematically with K/sub Q/ at a rate that is consistent with calculations based on the use of a constant value for K/sub Ia/ which is equal to its measured mean value. Only in the limiting case of very short crack jumps (associated with very low average crack speeds) can K/sub ID/ be identified as a minimum value at which K/sub ID/ = K/sub IDm/. In this case K/sub IDm/ approx. K/sub Ia/ approx. K/sub Im/. The latter is the idealized minimum value of K that will support the continued propagation of a running crack

  18. Crack detection using image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, M.A.A

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contains five main subjects in eight chapters and two appendices. The first subject discus Wiener filter for filtering images. In the second subject, we examine using different methods, as Steepest Descent Algorithm (SDA) and the Wavelet Transformation, to detect and filling the cracks, and it's applications in different areas as Nano technology and Bio-technology. In third subject, we attempt to find 3-D images from 1-D or 2-D images using texture mapping with Open Gl under Visual C ++ language programming. The fourth subject consists of the process of using the image warping methods for finding the depth of 2-D images using affine transformation, bilinear transformation, projective mapping, Mosaic warping and similarity transformation. More details about this subject will be discussed below. The fifth subject, the Bezier curves and surface, will be discussed in details. The methods for creating Bezier curves and surface with unknown distribution, using only control points. At the end of our discussion we will obtain the solid form, using the so called NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline); which depends on: the degree of freedom, control points, knots, and an evaluation rule; and is defined as a mathematical representation of 3-D geometry that can accurately describe any shape from a simple 2-D line, circle, arc, or curve to the most complex 3-D organic free-form surface or (solid) which depends on finding the Bezier curve and creating family of curves (surface), then filling in between to obtain the solid form. Another representation for this subject is concerned with building 3D geometric models from physical objects using image-based techniques. The advantage of image techniques is that they require no expensive equipment; we use NURBS, subdivision surface and mesh for finding the depth of any image with one still view or 2D image. The quality of filtering depends on the way the data is incorporated into the model. The data should be treated with

  19. Surface aspects of pitting and stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhan, J. S., Jr.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The pitting and stress corrosion cracking of a stable austenitic stainless steel in aqueous chloride environments were investigated using a secondary ion mass spectrometer as the primary experimental technique. The surface concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, the hydroxide, and chloride ion, magnesium or sodium, chromium and nickel were measured as a function of potential in both aqueous sodium chloride and magnesium chloride environments at room temperature and boiling temperatures. It was found that, under anodic conditions, a sharp increase in the chloride concentration was observed to occur for all environmental conditions. The increase may be associated with the formation of an iron chloride complex. Higher localized chloride concentrations at pits and cracks were also detected with an electron microprobe.

  20. Assessment of cracking in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, Anders; Norrgaard, K.; Lagerstroem, J.; Embring, G.; Tice, D.R.

    2001-08-01

    During the refueling in 2000, indications were observed by non-destructive testing at four locations in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzle to safe end weld in Ringhals 4. All indications were confined to the outlet nozzle (hotleg) oriented at 25 deg, a nozzle with documented repair welding. Six boat samples were removed from the four locations, and the samples were subsequently subjected to a metallographic examination. The objectives were to establish the fracture morphology, and if possible the root cause for cracking. The examination revealed that cracks were present at all four boat sample locations and that they all were confined to the weld metal, alloy 182. Cracking extended in the axial direction of the safe-end. There was no evidence of any cracks extending into the RPV-steel, or the stainless steel safe-end. All cracking was interdendritic and significantly branched. Among others, these observations strongly suggested crack propagation mainly was caused by interdendritic stress corrosion cracking. In addition, crack type defects and isolated areas on the fracture surfaces suggested the presence of hot cracking, which would have been formed during fabrication. The reason for crack initiation could not be established based on the boat samples examined. However, increased stress levels due to repair welding, cold work from grinding, and defects produced during fabrication, e. g. hot cracks, may alone or in combination have contributed to crack initiation

  1. A FLUID PRESSURE-LOADED SINGLE CRACK LOCATED IN A ROCK MASSIF PROPAGATION TRAJECTORY CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherdantsev N.V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The task solving results of a single crack filled with liquid under pressure propagation in a rock mass are presented. The rock mass is loaded with an unequal component gravitational field of stresses and represents a homogeneous elastic medium. The causes of the crack occurrence and its loading by internal pressure are not considered. In the task set, the rock mass is under conditions of a flat deformed state. In this paper, the effect of the opening on the stressed state of the rock mass and on crack propagation trajectory is not considered. The task is solved within the framework of classical concepts of the state of a crack, its stable and unstable growth in an infinite plate of brittle material, based on the theories of Griffiths - Irwin. Based on the results of the studies carried out, crack propagation trajectories are constructed for a number of the crack to the horizon inclination angle values, the characteristics associated with the strength of the enclosing rocks. An analysis is given of the critical pressures change during the crack intergrowth

  2. Investigation of the stress distribution around a mode 1 crack with a novel strain gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, M.; Khatibi, G.

    2017-01-01

    Stress concentrations at the tip of a sharp crack have extensively been investigated in the past century. According to the calculations of Inglis, the stress ahead of a mode 1 crack shows the characteristics of a singularity. This solution is exact in the framework of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). From the viewpoint of multiscale modelling, however, it is evident that the stress at the tip of a stable crack cannot be infinite, because the strengths of atomic bonds are finite. In order to prevent the problem of this singularity, a new version of strain gradient elasticity is employed here. This theory is implemented in the commercial FEM code ABAQUS through user subroutine UEL. Convergence of the model is proved through consecutive mesh refinement. In consequence, the stresses ahead of a mode 1 crack become finite. Furthermore, the model predicts a size effect in the sense “smaller is stronger”.

  3. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  4. A procedure for safety assessment of components with cracks - Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.; Bergman, M.; Brickstad, B.; Dahlberg, L.; Nilsson, F.; Sattari-Far, I.

    1996-01-01

    In this handbook a procedure is described which can be used both for assessment of detected cracks or crack like defects or for defect tolerance analysis. The procedure can be used to calculate possible crack growth due to fatigue or stress corrosion and to calculate the reserve margin for failure due to fracture and plastic collapse. For ductile materials, the procedure gives the reserve margin for initiation of stable crack growth. Thus, an extra reserve margin, unknown to size, exists for failure in components made of ductile materials. The procedure was developed for operative use with the following objectives in mind: The procedure should be able to handle both linear and non-linear problems without any a priori division; The procedure shall ensure uniqueness of the safety assessment; The procedure should be well defined and easy to use; The conservatism of the procedure should be well validated; The handbook that documents the procedure should be so complete that for most assessments access to any other fracture mechanics literature should not be necessary. The method utilized is based on the R6-method developed at Nuclear Electric plc. This method can in principle be used for all metallic materials. It is, however, more extensively verified for steel alloys only. The method is not intended for use in temperatures where creep deformation is of importance. The first edition of the handbook was released in 1990 and the second in 1991. This third edition has been extensively revised. A Windows-based program (SACC) has been developed which can perform the assessments described in the book including calculation of crack growth due to stress corrosion and fatigue. 52 refs., 27 figs., 35 tabs

  5. Synthesis and activity evaluation of heterometallic nano oxides integrated ZSM-5 catalysts for palm oil cracking to produce biogasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Mushtaq; Farhana, Rafida; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A 2-step process is used to synthesize nano oxides integrated ZSM-5 catalysts. • 82% yield of integrated ZSM-5 catalysts is possible at low temperature and pressure. • 59% yield of biogasoline is possible thorough catalytic cracking process. - Abstract: Biofuels produced from palm oil have shown great potential as a useful fossil fuel substitute and are environmental friendly. Utilization of palm oil as biofuel requires zeolite based catalytic technology that facilitates selective conversion of substrates to desired products, including biogasoline and biodiesel. However, the synthesis and integration of suitable zeolite based supported catalysts for the desired products are the key challenges in biofuel production. The alternative to overcome these problems is to use nano heterometallic materials supported on zeolite catalysts. In this study, Zeolite Socony Mobile-5 (ZSM-5) based catalysts loaded with heterometallic nano oxides were synthesized. Next, the catalysts used for the palm oil cracking to produce biogasoline were characterized by field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) analysis. Taguchi method was used to assess and optimize the catalytic cracking process. The catalytic cracking results illustrated that under optimized conditions, ZSM-5 (30), Fe–Zn–Cu–ZSM-5 (31), Fe–Zn–Cu–ZSM-5 (32) and Fe–Zn–ZSM-5 (33) yielded 14%, 59%, 49% and 56% biogasoline, respectively. Higher efficiency of Fe–Zn–Cu–ZSM-5 (31) might be attributed to higher content of loaded metal oxides as compared to the other synthesized catalysts. The yield of biogasoline in this study, catalyzed by Fe–Zn–Cu–ZSM-5 (31), was 8% more than the literature values. Therefore, the present study proved that the newly developed Fe–Zn–Cu–ZSM-5 (31) was an efficient

  6. Cracking behavior of structural slab bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baah, Prince

    Bridge deck cracking is a common problem throughout the United States, and it affects the durability and service life of concrete bridges. Several departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States prefer using continuous three-span solid structural slab bridges without stringers over typical four-lane highways. Recent inspections of such bridges in Ohio revealed cracks as wide as 0.125 in. These measured crack widths are more than ten times the maximum limit recommended in ACI 224R-01 for bridge decks exposed to de-icing salts. Measurements using digital image correlation revealed that the cracks widened under truck loading, and in some cases, the cracks did not fully close after unloading. This dissertation includes details of an experimental investigation of the cracking behavior of structural concrete. Prism tests revealed that the concrete with epoxy-coated bars (ECB) develops the first crack at smaller loads, and develops larger crack widths compared to the corresponding specimens with uncoated (black) bars. Slab tests revealed that the slabs with longitudinal ECB developed first crack at smaller loads, exhibited wider cracks and a larger number of cracks, and failed at smaller ultimate loads compared to the corresponding test slabs with black bars. To develop a preventive measure, slabs with basalt and polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete were also included in the test program. These test slabs exhibited higher cracking loads, smaller crack widths, and higher ultimate loads at failure compared to the corresponding slab specimens without fibers. Merely satisfying the reinforcement spacing requirements given in AASHTO or ACI 318-11 is not adequate to limit cracking below the ACI 224R-01 recommended maximum limit, even though all the relevant design requirements are otherwise met. Addition of fiber to concrete without changing any steel reinforcing details is expected to reduce the severity and extent of cracking in reinforced concrete bridge decks.

  7. Converting sugars to sugar alcohols by aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C [Richland, WA; Werpy, Todd A [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of converting sugars to their corresponding sugar alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation in the aqueous phase. It has been found that surprisingly superior results can be obtained by utilizing a relatively low temperature (less than 120.degree. C.), selected hydrogenation conditions, and a hydrothermally stable catalyst. These results include excellent sugar conversion to the desired sugar alcohol, in combination with long life under hydrothermal conditions.

  8. Comparison of thermal cracking and hydro-cracking yield distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, S.; Sayles, S. [KBC Advanced Technologies Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Operators of bitumen upgraders are faced with the challenge of obtaining maximum performance from existing equipment whose performance is already pushed to the limits. The main constraint is the primary upgrader processes, notably coking and hydrocracking. Under the current economic conditions, funding for new equipment is difficult. However, changes can be made to optimize unit performance by better understanding the basic kinetics in thermal cracking and hydrocracking. This paper reviewed the yield distribution differences between thermal cracking and hydrocracking to provide insight into the basic components of operational changes. The objective was to compare yields, product quality distributions and the elemental balances. The opportunities to increase production and improve performance were then analyzed quantitatively within the existing unit equipment limits. tabs., figs.

  9. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  10. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  11. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  12. CRACK REASON ANALYSIS OF DAMAGED CARBONITRIDED PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kocúrová

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of a damaged part, which was designed for use in a mechanical clutch of a car. The crack in the part was found during the production inspection. The aim of metallographic and fractography analyses of the fracture surfaces was to discover the reasons for the crack. The reason for creating the crack was the formation of smaller cracks in the production during pressing process of the semiproduct. These cracks even grew after the following thermochemical treatment. The fracture was initiated during the straightening process of quenched part.

  13. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289 degree C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 degree C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections

  15. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  16. Development of redox stable, multifunctional substrates for anode supported SOFCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Ramos, Tania

    2017-01-01

    upon redox cycling, while other properties such as catalytic activity for methane reforming and/or water gas shift, thermal conductivity in addition to electronic conductivity for current pickup are highly wanted for SOFC applications. In order to combine the advantages of a redox stable anode...

  17. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  18. The cracked tooth: histopathologic and histobacteriologic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricucci, Domenico; Siqueira, José F; Loghin, Simona; Berman, Louis H

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis and treatment planning of cracked teeth depend on the understanding of how cracks affect the surrounding tissues. This study evaluated the dentin and pulp conditions in teeth affected by cracks and attrition. Specimens under investigation included 12 cracked posterior teeth and 8 teeth with severe attrition. These teeth were obtained consecutively in a private practice and were extracted for reasons not related to this study. Teeth were processed for histopathologic and histobacteriologic analyses. Cracks were histologically detected in all specimens, including the teeth with severe attrition. The cracks in all teeth were colonized by bacterial biofilms. One tooth showed several craze lines in the enamel, one of which reached dentin to a shallow depth. In some teeth, the crack ended in the dentin. Dentinal tubules were invaded by bacteria, especially when the crack extended perpendicularly into the dentin. Severe accumulations of inflammatory cells were present in the pulp zone subjacent to tubules involved with the crack. In many cases, the crack extended to the pulp, leading to reactions with intensities ranging from acute inflammation to total pulpal necrosis. Symptoms occurred in most cases in which the pulp was affected. In some cases, polymorphonuclear neutrophils were seen migrating from the pulp into the crack space and facing the bacterial biofilm located therein. Severe pulp reactions were also observed when the crack extended to the pulp chamber floor. Cracks are always colonized with bacterial biofilms. The pulp tissue response varies according to the location, direction, and extent of the crack. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fatigue crack monitoring in train track steel structures using plastic optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.; Li, D.; Kuang, K. S. C.

    2017-10-01

    Plastic optical fiber (POF) sensors have shown excellent potential for damage detection and structural health monitoring in a variety of engineering structures. This paper discusses the feasibility of using POF sensors in conjunction with a signal-processing algorithm capable of detecting and monitoring fatigue-induced cracks in train track steel structures in real time. The POF sensor, which was modified from an existing design to increase the signal sensitivity, allows for accurate detection of a fatigue crack developed in a specimen, and was found to compare well to the reference acoustic emission (AE) sensors and crack opening displacement (COD) gauge attached to the specimen. The crack-detection technique, which relies on capturing the intensity variation of the POF sensor, was not susceptible to any signal fluctuations commonly associated with intensity-based optical fiber sensors. The results show that the technique has potential for use in detecting the initiation and propagation of specific segments of a structure vulnerable to cracking due to external cyclic loading, e.g. at welded joints in train tracks under train loads or offshore structures subject to wave loads. The POF sensor system is composed of inexpensive parts (LED light source, photodetectors, and data acquisition units) and can easily be installed to the host structure. To validate the proposed damage-detection technique, the instrumented specimens are subjected to cyclic loading in order to induce stable crack propagation in the specimen. A COD gauge and AE were used for the purpose of calibration and comparison. The results show remarkable resemblance in terms of crack initiation and propagation identification exhibited by all three types of sensors, highlighting the potential of the proposed sensor for crack initiation detection and subsequent monitoring of crack propagation.

  20. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  1. Crack, sex work, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, T

    1999-01-01

    South Africa's long isolation, and perhaps deliberate efforts by the apartheid government, have led to an unusual pattern of drug abuse in the country. Drugs not commonly used in other countries, such as Mandrax and Welconol, are widespread in South Africa, while the street drugs commonly found in other countries, such as cocaine and heroin, have been relatively rare. However, this is changing, as international drug traffickers now import a broad range of drugs, including heroin and cocaine. Demand for these drugs has been established in South Africa, including among the urban lower classes. Immigration, especially of other Africans and particularly Nigerians, has accelerated the trend. While both mandrax and crack cocaine are smoked, the former is a sedative and the latter is a stimulant with pro-sexual effects. These sexual effects, together with very strong addictive potential, have led to very high HIV seroprevalence in user populations. Addiction often leads female users into prostitution, with prostitutes being a prime conduit for the spread of both the drug and HIV infection. Desperate to earn funds to meet their crack consumption needs, drug-addicted female prostitutes in South Africa service many clients and engage in practices shunned by their nonaddicted peers, such as unprotected and anal sex. There will be serious long-term effects of crack cocaine consumption, together with prostitution, upon all of South African society.

  2. Maximum conversion of heavy hydrocarbons. Product stability dictates thermal and catalytic conversion rates of residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennico, A.; Peries, J.P. (Institut Francais du Petrole, 92 - Rueil Malmaison (France)); Laurent, J.; Espeillac, M.

    1992-01-01

    The maximum conversion achieved by thermal cracking is limited by the fuel stability. The same holds for catalytic hydrotreating. ASVAHL has studied for many years the relation between conversion and product stability in thermal and catalytic processes. Thermal Mode: Several solutions are proposed to increase the conversion of the TERVAHL T visbreaking process such as the use of hydrogen (TERVAHL H) and possibly the addition of a few ppm of a dispersed catalyst (TERVAHL C). Catalytic Mode: The conversion of the HYVAHL residue hydrotreating process may be increased either by adding a hydrovisbreaking furnace before the hydrotreating step (HYVAHL T) or by adding an existing visbreaking downstream the hydrotreating step. These various routes enable the ASVAHL processes to maximize the marketable light product quantities in function of the residue to be upgraded and the fuel qualities to be assured. (orig.).

  3. Thermal and catalytic ASVAHL processes under hydrogen pressure for converting heavy crudes and conventional residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peries, J.P.; Quignard, A.; Farjon, C.; Laborde, M.

    This article describes the comparative performances of thermal ASVAHL processes (TERVAHL T, TERVAHL H, TERVAHL HC) and catalytic ASVAHL processes (HYVAHL F, HYVAHL C) for two types of processing: (1) degasolined Boscan crude (basis of studies for transportation feasibility), and (2) Safaniya vacuum residue (basis of studies for residue refining). The results reveal the importance of the amount of fixed hydrogen, which affects the conversion obtained and the quality of the residues. The introduction of a TERVAHL HC soluble catalyst or one in catalytic suspension (catalytic hydrovisbreaking) or the use of a supported catalyst (HYVAHL hydrotreatment) enhances the activation of hydrogen. The combination of cracking, polycondensation and hydrogen reactions together with the operating conditions (temperatures, residence time and pressure) are what will define the conversion limits for a given stability of residues.

  4. Fracture mechanics parameters calculation for semielliptical underclad cracks postulated in the cylindrical part of the WWER pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matkovskij, V.V.; Akbashev, I.F.

    2015-01-01

    The requirements of brittle fracture failure resistance are fulfilled if the cracks postulated in RPV structure remain stable within all project cases. This requirements are stated in terms of fracture mechanics parameters such as J-integral or stress intensity factor. The case of semielliptical underclad cracks postulated in a cylindrical part of WWER pressure vessel is investigated. The analytical solution for fracture mechanics parameters estimation along the crack front in the ferritic vessel was developed on the basis of finite element calculation results. The amplification of the elastic stress intensity factor with respect to effect of plasticity is introduced [ru

  5. Radiation-initiated thermal cracking of n-octane vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Shingo; Tamura, Takaaki; Oshima, Keiichi; Oshima, Yunosuke.

    1975-01-01

    The radiation-initiated thermal cracking (RTC) of n-octane vapor was studied at temperatures from 184 to 551 0 C and at atmospheric pressure. Vapor-phase ionic chain reactions, which were completely suppressed by the addition of ammonia, were found to proceed simultaneously with radical chain reactions. The main ionic chain products were C 3 -- C 5 paraffins and olefins, containing large quantities of branched products and β-olefins which were not formed by the thermal cracking of n-octane. For example, the G-values of isobutane and isopentane reached 82 and 78, respectively, at 524 0 C. The proportion of the ionic chain products to the overall products was about 10 mol%. Isomerization of C 8 H 17 + ion, its thermal decomposition, and subsequent hydride ion transfer reaction from n-octane molecule to the fragment ion are proposed for the ionic chain mechanism. Carrier ions are carbonium ions of C 3 -- C 5 . Several similarities are pointed out between the ionic products from the RTC and those from catalytic reactions over acidic sites. (auth.)

  6. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect...... of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption...... as the overall performance of the crack arresters....

  7. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  8. Simulation of stress corrosion crack growth in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, K. I.; Park, J. H.; Joo, J. W.; Shin, E. S.; Kim, H. D.; Chung, H. S.

    2000-01-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth is simulated after assuming a small axial surface crack inside a S/G tube. Internal pressure and residual stresses are considered as applied forces. Stress intensity factors along crack front, variation of crack shape and crack growth rate are obtained and discussed. It is noticed that the aspect ratio of the crack is not depend on the initial crack shape but depend on the residual stress distribution

  9. Controlling fatigue crack paths for crack surface marking and growth investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is well known that fatigue crack growth in metals that display confined slip, such as high strength aluminium alloys, develop crack paths that are responsive to the loading direction and the local microstructural orientation, it is less well known that such paths are also responsive to the loading history. In these materials, certain loading sequences can produce highly directional slip bands ahead of the crack tip and by adjusting the sequence of loads, distinct fracture surface features or progression marks, even at very small crack depths can result. Investigating the path a crack selects in fatigue testing when particular combinations of constant and variable amplitude load sequences are applied is providing insight into crack growth. Further, it is possible to design load sequences that allow very small amounts of crack growth to be measured, at very small crack sizes, well below the conventional crack growth threshold in the aluminium alloy discussed here. This paper reports on observations of the crack path phenomenon and a novel test loading method for measuring crack growth rates for very small crack depths in aluminium alloy 7050-T7451 (an important aircraft primary structural material. The aim of this work was to firstly generate short- crack constant amplitude growth data and secondly, through the careful manipulation of the applied loading, to achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in the material being investigated. A particular focus of this work is the identification of the possible sources of crack growth retardation and closure in these small cracks. Interpreting these results suggests a possible mechanism for why small fatigue crack growth through this material under variable amplitude loading is faster than predicted from models based on constant amplitude data alone.

  10. Characterization of the roles of electrochemistry, convection and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, P.L.; Young, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the role of ionic current flow within a crack and near the crack tip is fundamental to modeling of environmentally assisted crack advance. Critical conceptual issues and models related to ionic current flow within cracks, and the associated ''crevice'' chemistry and metal oxidation that results, are presented and examined in the light of experimental evidence. Various advanced techniques have been developed to evaluate the roles of electrochemistry, transport, and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking, with emphasis on high temperature ''pure'' water. These include high resolution crack length measurement by dc potential drop performed simultaneously with microsampling, electrochemical microprobe mapping, microinjection of species, and micropolarization of the crack. Conceptual issues addressed include the importance of the corrosion potential vs. oxidant concentration, the absence of oxidants and associated low corrosion potential within cracks, the location and role of macrocell currents associated with potential gradients from differential aeration cells, the localized nature of the microcell currents associated with dissolution at the crack tip, the importance of pH and adsorbed species on repassivation and crack advance, and the role of convection in crack chemistry and crack advance. Correct concepts are shown to be an essential pre-cursor to quantitative modeling

  11. Online Bridge Crack Monitoring with Smart Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benniu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed.

  12. Fluid structural response of axially cracked cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnich, M.R.; Simoneh, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    The fluid structural (FS) response of a cylindrical pressure vessel to a suddenly occurring longitudinal through-wall crack is predicted. The effects of vessel internals and depressurization of the compressed water on dynamic crack opening displacements are investigated. A three dimensional (3D) structural finite element model is used as a basis for the development of a two dimensional (2D) FS model. A slice of the vessel taken at the crack midspan and normal to the cylinder axis is modeled. Crack opening displacements are compared between the 2D and 3D models, between the different assumptions about fluid depressurization, and between the static and dynamic solutions. The results show that effects of dynamic amplification associated with the sudden opening of the crack in the cylinder are largely offset by the local depressurization of the fluid adjacent to the crack

  13. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  14. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  15. A probabilistic model of brittle crack formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Probability of a brittle crack formation in an elastic solid with fluctuating strength is considered. A set Omega of all possible crack trajectories reflecting the fluctuation of the strength field is introduced. The probability P(X) that crack penetration depth exceeds X is expressed as a functional integral over Omega of a conditional probability of the same event taking place along a particular path. Various techniques are considered to evaluate the integral. Under rather nonrestrictive assumptions, the integral is reduced to solving a diffusion-type equation. A new characteristic of fracture process, 'crack diffusion coefficient', is introduced. An illustrative example is then considered where the integration is reduced to solving an ordinary differential equation. The effect of the crack diffusion coefficient and of the magnitude of strength fluctuations on probability density of crack penetration depth is presented. Practical implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  16. Numerical simulation of ductile-brittle behaviour of cracks in aluminium and bcc iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharopoulos, Marios

    2017-01-01

    The principal aim of the present dissertation is to investigate the role of sharp cracks on the mechanical behaviour of crystals under load at the atomic scale. The question of interest is how a pure crystal, which contains a single crack in mechanical equilibrium, deforms. Two metals were considered: aluminium, ductile at any temperature below its melting point, and iron, being transformed from ductile to brittle upon decreasing temperature below T=77 K. Cohesive forces in both metals were modeled via phenomenological n-body potentials. A (010)[001] mode I nano-crack was introduced in the perfect crystalline lattice of each of the studied metals by using appropriate displacements ascribed by anisotropic elasticity. At T=0 K, equilibrium crack configurations were obtained via energy minimization with a mixed type of boundary conditions. Both models revealed that the crack configurations remained stable under a finite range of applied stresses due to the lattice trapping effect. The present thesis proposes a novel approach to interpret the intrinsic mechanical behaviour of the two metallic systems under loading. In particular, the ductile or brittle response of a crystalline system can be determined by examining whether the lattice trapping barrier of a pre-existing crack is sufficient to cause the glide of pre-existing static dislocations on the available slip systems. Simulation results along with experimental data demonstrate that, according to the model proposed, aluminium and iron are ductile and brittle at T=0 K, respectively. (author) [fr

  17. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  18. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    equilibrium H content for unstressed exposure of the superalloy in a given H2 pressure ( PH2 ) and temperature (T) environment, coupled with enhancement...CRACKING OF HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS Richard P. Ganqloff August, 2003 Page 72 of 194 decreasing pH , H2S addition, temperature , and other chemical variables...mechanism for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and sulfide stress cracking for alloys in aqueous H2S -bearing electrolytes. Electrochemical reactions leading

  19. Energy analysis of crack-damage interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Wu, Shaofu

    1989-01-01

    The energy release rates associated with a main crack propagating into a surrounding damage zone, and a damage zone translation relative to the main crack, as well as an energy of interaction between the two are analyzed. The displacement and stress fields for the crack-damage interaction problem are reconstructed employing a semi-empirical stress analysis and experimental evaluation of the average craze density in the crazed zone.

  20. DBEM crack propagation for nonlinear fracture problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Citarella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional crack propagation simulation is performed by the Dual Boundary Element Method (DBEM. The Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs along the front of a semi elliptical crack, initiated from the external surface of a hollow axle, are calculated for bending and press fit loading separately and for a combination of them. In correspondence of the latter loading condition, a crack propagation is also simulated, with the crack growth rates calculated using the NASGRO3 formula, calibrated for the material under analysis (steel ASTM A469. The J-integral and COD approaches are selected for SIFs calculation in DBEM environment, where the crack path is assessed by the minimum strain energy density criterion (MSED. In correspondence of the initial crack scenario, SIFs along the crack front are also calculated by the Finite Element (FE code ZENCRACK, using COD, in order to provide, by a cross comparison with DBEM, an assessment on the level of accuracy obtained. Due to the symmetry of the bending problem a pure mode I crack propagation is realised with no kinking of the propagating crack whereas for press fit loading the crack propagation becomes mixed mode. The crack growth analysis is nonlinear because of normal gap elements used to model the press fit condition with added friction, and is developed in an iterative-incremental procedure. From the analysis of the SIFs results related to the initial cracked configuration, it is possible to assess the impact of the press fit condition when superimposed to the bending load case.

  1. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  2. Fatigue crack growth detect, assess, avoid

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, Hans Albert

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to fatigue crack growth, based on practical examples. It discusses the essential concepts of fracture mechanics, fatigue crack growth under constant and variable amplitude loading and the determination of the fracture-mechanical material parameters. The book also introduces the analytical and numerical simulation of fatigue crack growth as well as crack initiation. It concludes with a detailed description of several practical case studies and some exercises. The target group includes graduate students, researchers at universities and practicing engineers.

  3. Crack growth in linearly viscoelastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    A computational method for the analysis of initiation and quasi-static extension of a crack in a linearly viscoelastic medium subjected to a tensile mode of deformation is presented. A fracture process zone of Dugdale type is assumed in front of the crack tip. Viscoelastic and viscoplastic deformations of the fracture process zone are analyzed, and crack initiation and crack growth are considered to follow a fracture criterion of critical energy release rate. Examples are given for demonstration of the computational method. (orig.)

  4. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  5. Semi-empirical crack tip analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Ben Ouezdon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimentally observed crack opening displacements are employed as the solution of the multiple crack interaction problem. Then the near and far fields are reconstructed analytically by means of the double layer potential technqiue. Evaluation of the effective stress intensity factor resulting from the interaction of the main crack and its surrounding crazes in addition to the remotely applied load is presented as an illustrative example. It is shown that crazing (as well as microcracking) may constitute an alternative mechanism to Dugdale-Berenblatt models responsible for the cancellation of the singularity at the crack tip.

  6. On governing equations for crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Botsis, J.

    1988-01-01

    Results of analysis on damage distribution of a crack layer, in a model material, supported the self-similarity hypothesis of damage evolution which has been adopted by the crack layer theory. On the basis of measurements of discontinuity density and the double layer potential technique, a solution to the crack damage interaction problem has been developed. Evaluation of the stress intensity factor illustrated the methodology. Analysis of experimental results showed that Arrhenius type constitutive relationship described very well the expansion of the active zone of a crack layer.

  7. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  8. T-stresses for internally cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, T.

    1997-12-01

    The failure of cracked components is governed by the stresses in the vicinity of the crack tip. The singular stress contribution is characterised by the stress intensity factor K, the first regular stress term is represented by the so-called T-stress. T-stress solutions for components containing an internal crack were computed by application of the Bundary Collocation Method (BCM). The results are compiled in form of tables or approximative relations. In addition a Green's function of T-stresses is proposed for internal cracks which enables to compute T-stress terms for any given stress distribution in the uncracked body. (orig.) [de

  9. Fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, P. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Laird, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ramamurty, U. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering; Suresh, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Campbell, G.H.; King, W.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitchell, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for Materials Science

    1999-04-01

    The process of fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials is reviewed placing emphasis in results derived for pure FCC metals with wavy slip behavior. The relationship between Persistent Slip Bands (PSB`s) and crack initiation will be examined for both single crystals and polycrystals, including the conditions for inter- and transgranular crack nucleation and their connection to type of loading, crystallography and slip geometry. The latter has been found to be an important parameter in the nucleation of intergranular cracks in polycrystals subjected to high strain fatigue, whereby primary slip bands with long slip lengths impinging on a grain boundary produce intergranular crack nucleation under the right conditions. Recent results related to intergranular crack nucleation in copper bicrystals and crack nucleation in Cu/Sapphire interfaces indicate that this mechanism controls crack nucleation in those simpler systems as well. Furthermore, it is found that under multiple slip conditions the crack nucleation location is controlled by the presence of local single slip conditions and long slip lengths for a particular Burgers vector that does not have to be in the primary slip system.

  10. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-08-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed

  11. Modelling of environmentally assisted cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Saario, T.; Ehrnsten, U.; Haenninen, H.; Itaeaho, M.; Piippo, J.

    1998-01-01

    During the use of nuclear reactors the properties of the structural materials change. Variations in the operation environment, such as changes in water chemistry, may enhance the development and growth of flaws. Neutron radiation causes embrittlement for in-core vessel materials. Radiation, together with water chemistry, increases the possibility of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels and superalloys used in the reactor internal parts. Research on structural materials endeavours to study the ageing mechanisms of materials, and the possibilities and methods of preventing or forecasting the damage caused to structures by ageing. (orig.)

  12. Effect of aluminium distribution in the framework of ZSM-5 on hydrocarbon transformation. Cracking of 1-butene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sazama, Petr; Dědeček, Jiří; Gábová, Vendula; Wichterlová, Blanka; Spoto, G.; Bordiga, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 2 (2008), s. 180-189 ISSN 0021-9517 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040308; GA AV ČR KAN100400702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : H-ZSM-5 * Al destribution * catalytic cracking * zeolite acidity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.167, year: 2008

  13. HZSM-5 CATALYST FOR CRACKING PALM OIL TO BIODIESEL: A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH AND WITHOUT PT AND PD IMPREGNATION

    OpenAIRE

    Agus Budianto; Danawati Hari Prajitno; Achmad Roesyadi; Kusno Budhikarjono

    2014-01-01

    The Needs of healthy environment and green energy poses a great demand for alternative energy. Biofuel is one of the alternative energy products that are environmentally friendly. Biofuel can be made from plant oils, especially palm oil. Cracking of palm oil into biofuel is constrained by the availability of catalysts. Moreover the available catalyst still gives a low yield. This research aims to study the effect of Pt and Pd impregnation into HZSM-5 catalyst on the catalytic properties. Anot...

  14. Study on the structural integrity of a PWR vessel according to the ductile cracking instability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarpani, Jose Ricardo; Spinelli, Dirceu

    1996-01-01

    Analytical predictions of PWR vessel instability have been made according to Linear Elastic criterion K lC and Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Ji, J 50 and J inst . Special attention was given to the influence of crack depth and length on both approaches, as well as to the data extrapolation procedures on elasto-plasticity. Simple and didactic format has been supplied for the results evaluation in terms of internal pressure, wall-through strain gradient and ductile stable crack extension. (author)

  15. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... of an uncorrelated ancilla system. This removes a restriction on the standard notion of decoupling, which becomes important for structureless resources, and yields a tight characterization in terms of the max-mutual information. Catalytic decoupling naturally unifies various tasks like the erasure of correlations...

  16. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...

  17. Mesoporous Zeolite Single Crystals for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, Claus H.; Kustova, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...... transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport....

  18. Oxidative catalytic dimerization of methane: Syngas process alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvi, G.

    1991-01-01

    A review of research progress relative to the direct conversion of methane into liquid hydrocarbons through oxidative catalytic dimerization indicates that high carbon (C 2 ) yields can be obtained in experimental conditions in which there is a high linear gas velocity, i.e., velocities greater than 0.45 m/s, at temperatures ranging between 800 and 850 degrees C, and with volumetric methane/oxygen ratios of 2 to 10. The high linear velocities have the function of preventing back-mixing phenomena and consequent product degradation. The suitable integration of dimerization (exothermic) with cracking (endothermic) of ethane to ethylene and higher olefins, as well as, oligomerization of the olefins to liquid hydrocarbons (synthesis fuels) can allow for the development of an very interesting process from both technical and economic points of view, especially for those countries with a mix of abundant natural gas reserves and scarce petroleum resources

  19. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  20. Nucleation of squat cracks in rail, calculation of crack initiation angles in three dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeimi, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model of wheel-track system is developed for nucleation of squat-type fatigue cracks in rail material. The model is used for estimating the angles of squat cracks in three dimensions. Contact mechanics and multi-axial fatigue analysis are combined to study the crack initiation mechanism

  1. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oligomerization of Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Oliver Dennis

    increased with temperature, with 17 wt.% observed at 190ºC. Higher reaction temperatures led to the formation of odd-numbered oligomers primarily due to acid-catalyzed cracking reactions. In the range of space velocities tested, a moderate WHSV of 2.0 hr-1 resulted in a local maximum of 10.6 wt.% of liquid hydrocarbon yield. A moderate nickel loading of 3.4 wt.% also resulted in the highest liquid yield out of the three loadings tested (10.6 wt.%). The variation in nickel loading revealed the importance of having a synergistic balance of nickel and acid sites on the catalyst to maximize ethylene conversion and maintain high liquid hydrocarbon yield. Lastly, we used supercritical ethylene as both a solvent and as a reactant for ethylene oligomerization over two silica-alumina type catalysts: Ni-Hbeta and Ni-Al-SBA-15. Specifically, the effect of pressure and temperature on the overall conversion and product selectivity were evaluated in the range from 0 to 65 bar and 30 to 120ºC. At subcritical conditions, the ethylene conversion reached a plateau of around 50%. By increasing the pressure past the critical point of ethylene, the conversion drastically increased to 71%. The increased conversion can be attributed to the solubility of certain oligomers, namely butene, in supercritical ethylene that promotes desorption from catalytic active site before further oligomerization. We also tested a mesoporous catalyst, Ni-Al-SBA-15 and observed conversion trends analogous to that of Ni-Hbeta. At supercritical conditions, ethylene oligomerization over Ni-Al-SBA-15 was more selective towards the butene product, with nearly 74 wt.% butenes observed. The catalyst activity increased with temperature from 30ºC to 120ºC. The experiment conducted at 30ºC showed very little activity and ethylene conversion, however it effectively heavy molecular weight species from the catalyst. This condition, albeit being not effective for ethylene oligomerization, could be implemented as an in

  2. HZSM-5 CATALYST FOR CRACKING PALM OIL TO BIODIESEL: A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH AND WITHOUT PT AND PD IMPREGNATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Budianto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Needs of healthy environment and green energy poses a great demand for alternative energy. Biofuel is one of the alternative energy products that are environmentally friendly. Biofuel can be made from plant oils, especially palm oil. Cracking of palm oil into biofuel is constrained by the availability of catalysts. Moreover the available catalyst still gives a low yield. This research aims to study the effect of Pt and Pd impregnation into HZSM-5 catalyst on the catalytic properties. Another aim is to obtain the operating conditions of the catalytic cracking process of palm oil into biofuel which gives the highest yield and selectivity, especially for biodiesel and biogasoline fractions. Catalytic cracking process was carried out in a micro fixed bed reactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm. The reactor was filled with a catalyst. The results of the study successfully prove that Pt and Pd impregnated into HZSM-5 catalyst can increase the yield and selectivity of biodiesel. Pd and Pt are highly recommended to increase the yield and selectivity of biodiesel.

  3. A model for the riser of a FCC unit based on the kinetics of cracking and deactivation from lab tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Frances, E. (Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain))

    1990-08-01

    Catalytic cracking of heavy oil fractions (FCC) is a well-known process in oil refineries and there are already a lot of books and publications about the different aspects concerned in it. The authors concentrate here only on the modeling of the reactor for catalytic cracking of a FCC Unit (FCCU) or of a pilot plant which is a transfer-line or riser reactor. This riser reactor in FCCUs is a vertical pipe of about 1 m. diameter and 10-30 m. height. The hot catalyst coming from the regenerator at about 710 C is contacted first with steam to fluidize it and then, some meters above, with the preheated feedstock at about 300 C. This first oil-catalyst contact is essential. Its mixing temperature is about 530-600 C; it is very difficult to measure and it is about 20-80 C higher than the riser exit temperature. A mathematical model of the riser reactor is developed in this paper. The mathematical model considers various parameters among which are (1) expension factor (flow increase along riser height), (2) molecular weight, (3) temperature along the riser height, (4) catalyst residence time in the riser, and (5) conversion. Calculated results using the mathematical model agree quite well with experimental data in the fluid catalytic cracking unit.

  4. [Crack path in dental amalgams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oualint, S; Lagouvardos, P; Vougiouklakis, G

    1990-12-01

    The need of amalgam to resist fracture becomes a more evident necessity when restoration margins are taken into consideration. Marginal microcracks permit bacteria to pass beneath the restoration resulting in cement base dessalution, secondary caries and pulp inflammation. Fracture toughness of amalgam is usually studied indirectly from the maximum force required to fracture the amalgam, during compressive, tensile or bend stresses, through its ability to deform plastically or its surface hardness. Important information on fracture toughness of amalgams can be also taken from metallographic studies of their microstructures, during or after the formation of a crack. This study was planned to evaluate the microcracks produced on the surface of different amalgams, with a Vickers pyramid head of a hardness tester and their relation to the different phases of the amalgam structure. Seven amalgams were studied: Amalcap-F, Tytin, Cupralloy, Ana-2000 and three experimental combinations of them, in order to have in the same amalgam different alloy particles, for evaluation purposes. The result showed that the structure elements, that mainly assist crack formation and propagation, are voids and gamma 2-phase, while elements that resist fracture are alloy particles (gamma-phase) in conventional amalgams, eutectic spheres in admixed high copper amalgams and eta'-phase crystals in single melt high copper amalgams.

  5. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  6. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies ...

  7. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  8. Catalytic carboxyester hydrolysis by diaminodiphenols

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Two diaminodiphenols, 1 and 2, have been examined as catalysts for the hydrolysis of 4- nitrophenyl acetate (NA) and 4-nitrophenylphosphate (NP) in aqueous-acetonitrile (25% acetonitrile v/v) media at 35ºC, I = 1·0 mol dm–3. The compound 1 enhances the hydrolysis rate of NA more than 105 times. Its catalytic efficiency ...

  9. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so ...

  10. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  11. Optimization of Reactor Temperature and Catalyst Weight for Plastic Cracking to Fuels Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with effect of reactor temperature and catalyst weight on performance of plastic waste cracking to fuels over modified catalyst waste as well as their optimization. From optimization study, the most operating parameters affected the performance of the catalytic cracking process is reactor temperature followed by catalyst weight. Increasing the reactor temperature improves significantly the cracking performance due to the increasing catalyst activity. The optimal operating conditions of reactor temperature about 550 oC and catalyst weight about 1.25 gram were produced with respect to maximum liquid fuel product yield of 29.67 %. The liquid fuel product consists of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C4-C13 with favorable heating value (44,768 kJ/kg. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 10th July 2010, Revised: 18th September 2010, Accepted: 19th September 2010[How to Cite: I. Istadi, S. Suherman, L. Buchori. (2010. Optimization of Reactor Temperature and Catalyst Weight for Plastic Cracking to Fuels Using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 103-111. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.797.103-111][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.797.103-111 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/797

  12. Olefins from conventional and heavy feedstocks: Energy use in steam cracking and alternative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Tao; Patel, Martin; Blok, Kornelis

    2006-01-01

    Steam cracking for the production of light olefins, such as ethylene and propylene, is the single most energy-consuming process in the chemical industry. This paper reviews conventional steam cracking and innovative olefin technologies in terms of energy efficiency. It is found that the pyrolysis section of a naphtha steam cracker alone consumes approximately 65% of the total process energy and approximately 75% of the total exergy loss. A family portrait of olefin technologies by feedstocks is drawn to search for alternatives. An overview of state-of-the-art naphtha cracking technologies shows that approximately 20% savings on the current average process energy use are possible. Advanced naphtha cracking technologies in the pyrolysis section, such as advanced coil and furnace materials, could together lead to up to approximately 20% savings on the process energy use by state-of-the-art technologies. Improvements in the compression and separation sections could together lead to up to approximately 15% savings. Alternative processes, i.e. catalytic olefin technologies, can save up to approximately 20%

  13. Equivalence of the final stretch and crack tip opening angle criteria for plane strain crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1981-01-01

    The equivalence of the final stretch and crack tip opening angle criteria, as applied to the Dugdale-Bilby-Cottrell-Swinden type model for Mode I plane strain crack growth, is demonstrated. This equivalence is independent of the plastic zone size, geometrical parameters, and the stress distribution within the fracture process zone, if the yield stress is sufficiently low and the crack growth resistance is sufficiently high. The results therefore provide further support for the viability of crack tip opening angle as a crack growth chracterizing parameter. 7 refs

  14. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: a microscale study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of concrete cracking upon reinforcement corrosion is complex. Cracks allow fast penetration of chlorides, potentially leading to a shorter initiation period of reinforcement corrosion. Structural regulations control acceptable crack width values based on the exposure class of the

  15. Crack growth by micropore coalescence at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beere, W.

    1981-01-01

    At high temperatures in the creep regime the stress distribution around a crack is different from the low temperature elastically generated distribution. The stress distribution ahead of the crack is calculated for a crack preceded by an array of growing cavities. The cavities maintain a displacement wedge ahead of the crack. When the displacement wedge is less than one-tenth the crack length the driving force for crack growth is similar to an all elastically loaded crack. When the deforming wedge exceeds the crack length the net section stress controls crack growth. An expression is derived for a crack growing by the growth and coalescence of cavities situated in the crack plane. It is predicted that at high temperatures above a critical stress intensity, the crack propagates in a brittle fashion. (author)

  16. Research notes : keeping steel bars anchored in cracked girders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at Oregon State University fabricated large-size reinforced concrete beams each with an intentional crack made by positioning a plastic sheet in the formwork when the beams were cast. By maintaining control over crack location, crack angl...

  17. Extended FEM modeling of crack paths near inclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2012-01-01

    the effects on the crack path when changing the relative stiffness between inclusion and matrix material, the relative distance between initial crack and inclusion, and the size of the inclusion. Both edge cracks and internal cracks are studied. An example with an internal crack near an inclusion is presented......, where both crack tips propagate at different growth rates until one crack tip eventually stops growing, as the related energy release rate drops below the critical value. In another example, only one crack tip propagates initially, but eventually, the energy release rate of the second crack tip becomes...... critical, and both crack tips propagate. Finally, an example of two cracks near an inclusion is presented in which up to four crack tips propagate simultaneously....

  18. Crack Monitoring of Operational Wind Turbine Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Marcus; McAlorum, Jack; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; McKeeman, Iain; Rubert, Tim

    2017-08-21

    The degradation of onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundations is usually assessed via above-ground inspections, or through lengthy excavation campaigns that suspend wind power generation. Foundation cracks can and do occur below ground level, and while sustained measurements of crack behaviour could be used to quantify the risk of water ingress and reinforcement corrosion, these cracks have not yet been monitored during turbine operation. Here, we outline the design, fabrication and field installation of subterranean fibre-optic sensors for monitoring the opening and lateral displacements of foundation cracks during wind turbine operation. We detail methods for in situ sensor characterisation, verify sensor responses against theoretical tower strains derived from wind speed data, and then show that measured crack displacements correlate with monitored tower strains. Our results show that foundation crack opening displacements respond linearly to tower strain and do not change by more than ±5 μ m. Lateral crack displacements were found to be negligible. We anticipate that the work outlined here will provide a starting point for real-time, long-term and dynamic analyses of crack displacements in future. Our findings could furthermore inform the development of cost-effective monitoring systems for ageing wind turbine foundations.

  19. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  20. Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Crack Growth Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gansted, L.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the B-model developed in [J. L. Bogdanoff and F. Kozin, Probabilistic Models of Cumulative Damage. John Wiley, New York (1985)] a new numerical model incorporating the physical knowledge of fatigue crack propagation is developed. The model is based on the assumption that the crack...

  1. Crack Formation in Grouted Annular Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the present analysis is to identify the reason for extensive crack formation which occurred during an annulus grouting performance test, to evaluate possible consequences of the cracking, and to recommend measures to be taken in order to avoid similar problems in the future....

  2. Positioning Community Art Practices in Urban Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschelden, Griet; Van Eeghem, Elly; Steel, Riet; De Visscher, Sven; Dekeyrel, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the position of community art practices and the role of practitioners in urban cracks. Community art practices raise possibilities for a reconceptualisation of the concept of community and an extension of the concept of art in public space. Urban cracks are conceptualised as spatial, temporal and relational manifestations of…

  3. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    V Shankar et al. Although much research experience exists on the nature of hot cracking in stainless steels ... that crack-resistant weld deposits could be produced if the composition is adjusted to result in 5–35% fer- .... A large volume of literature is devoted to the prediction and measurement of δ-ferrite in stainless steel ...

  4. Quenching cracks - formation and possible causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.; Mueller, H.; Voehringer, O.

    1976-01-01

    The most important principles controlling the martensitic hardening of steels containing carbon are presented, and their effects on the cracks formed by tempering are discussed. Micro-crack formation, influenced by any increase in the carbon content, is dependent on the variations of martensitic morphology; this factor is of decisive importance. Apart from micro residual stresses, macro residual stresses become increasingly involved in the crack development. This is dependent on the given content of carbon and increase in the dimensions of the samples. Based on the empirical values gained from experience about cracks formed by tempering and using a schematic diagram, the constructive influences on the propensity to cracks formed by tempering, with regard to materials and processing, are evaluated. Also the effects of thermic, mechanical and chemical after-treatments upon the propensity to tempering cracks are discussed. In conclusion, the problem of the formation of cracks in hardened parts, i.e. the elongation of the cracks under static stress, is treated briefly. (orig.) [de

  5. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING REPAIRS TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending.... 11.1, section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (all incorporated by reference; see 46...

  6. Uncertainty Quantification in Fatigue Crack Growth Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Sankararaman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to quantify the uncertainty in fatigue crack growth prognosis, applied to structures with complicated geometry and subjected to variable amplitude multi-axial loading. Finite element analysis is used to address the complicated geometry and calculate the stress intensity factors. Multi-modal stress intensity factors due to multi-axial loading are combined to calculate an equivalent stress intensity factor using a characteristic plane approach. Crack growth under variable amplitude loading is modeled using a modified Paris law that includes retardation effects. During cycle-by-cycle integration of the crack growth law, a Gaussian process surrogate model is used to replace the expensive finite element analysis. The effect of different types of uncertainty – physical variability, data uncertainty and modeling errors – on crack growth prediction is investigated. The various sources of uncertainty include, but not limited to, variability in loading conditions, material parameters, experimental data, model uncertainty, etc. Three different types of modeling errors – crack growth model error, discretization error and surrogate model error – are included in analysis. The different types of uncertainty are incorporated into the crack growth prediction methodology to predict the probability distribution of crack size as a function of number of load cycles. The proposed method is illustrated using an application problem, surface cracking in a cylindrical structure.

  7. Preventing cracks when casting steel slag ladles

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, M.; Shvetsov, V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the improvement of large steel casting technology where slag ladle casting is taken as an example. The temperature measurement of the crystallization process of casting is held. The causes of the formation of cracks are reviewed. To prevent the formation of cracks the recommendations are developed to improve the casting technology.

  8. Crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, D.K.M.; Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for estimating the decrease in crack-initiation toughness, from a reference plane strain value, due to positive straining along the crack front of a circumferential flaw in a reactor pressure vessel is presented in this study. This method relates crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions with material failure at points within a distance of a few crack-tip-opening displacements ahead of a crack front, and involves the formulation of a micromechanical crack-initiation model. While this study is intended to address concerns regarding the effects of positive out-of- plane straining on ductile crack initiation, the approach adopted in this work can be extended in a straightforward fashion to examine conditions of macroscopic cleavage crack initiation. Provided single- parameter dominance of near-tip fields exists in the flawed structure, results from this study could be used to examine the appropriateness of applying plane strain fracture toughness to the evaluation of circumferential flaws, in particular to those in ring-forged vessels which have no longitudinal welds. In addition, results from this study could also be applied toward the analysis of the effects of thermal streaming on the fracture resistance of circumferentially oriented flaws in a pressure vessel. 37 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  10. Field cracking performance of airfield rigid pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Mehta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses cracking in airport pavements as studied in Construction Cycle 6 of testing carried out at the National Airport Pavement Testing Facility by the Federal Aviation Administration. Pavements of three different flexural strengths as well as two different subgrades, a soft bituminous layer and a more rigid layer known as econocrete, were tested. In addition to this, cracking near two types of isolated transition joints, a reinforced edge joint and a thickened edge joint, was considered. The pavement sections were tested using a moving load simulating that of an aircraft. It has been determined that the degree of cracking was reduced as the flexural strength of the pavement was increased and that fewer cracks formed over the econocrete base than over the bituminous base. In addition, the thickened edge transition joint was more effective in preventing cracking at the edges compared to the reinforced edge joint.

  11. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  12. On fatigue crack growth in ductile materials by crack-tip blunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    One of the basic mechanisms for fatigue crack growth in ductile metals is that depending on crack-tip blunting under tensile loads and re-sharpening of the crack-tip during unloading. In a standard numerical analysis accounting for finite strains it is not possible to follow this process during...... many cycles, as severe mesh distortion at the crack-tip results from the huge geometry changes developing during the cyclic plastic straining. In the present numerical studies, based on an elastic-perfectly plastic material model, crack growth computations are continued up to 200 full cycles by using...... remeshing at several stages of the plastic deformation. Three different values of the load ratio R = K-min/K-max are considered. It is shown that the crack-up opening displacement, CTOD, typically undergoes a transient behaviour, with no crack closure during many cycles, before a steady-state cycling...

  13. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  14. Cracked tooth diagnosis and treatment: An alternative paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Mamoun, John S.; Napoletano, Donato

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of cracked teeth, and explores common clinical examples of cracked teeth, such as cusp fractures, fractures into tooth furcations, and root fractures. This article provides alternative definitions of terms such as cracked teeth, complete and incomplete fractures and crack lines, and explores the scientific rationale for dental terminology commonly used to describe cracked teeth, such as cracked tooth syndrome, structural versus nonstructural cr...

  15. Fatigue crack growth of aluminium alloy 7075-T651 under non-proportional mixed mode I and II loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate fatigue growth behaviour in AA7075-T651 under non-proportional mixed mode I and II loads. Fatigue tests were performed under cyclic tension and torsion using a thin-walled tubular specimen with a key-hole style crack starter. After the generation of a single-side mode I pre-crack, varied forms of mixed mode loads were applied, which in most cases led to a short distance coplanar growth followed by a long and stable crack path deviation. It was found that under most of the non-proportional mixed mode load cases, the direction of the deviated crack path could not be reasonably predicted using the commonly accepted maximum tangential stress criterion. Meanwhile, in some cases, the crack path directions could be approximately predicted using the maximum shear stress criterion. It was also confirmed for the first time that a long, stable and noncoplanar shear mode fatigue crack growth could be produced in AA7075T651 under non-proportional mixed mode I and II loads. ©2016 Commonwealth of Australia

  16. Paraben degradation using catalytic ozonation over volcanic rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, João F; Quinta-Ferreira, Maria Emília; Costa, Raquel; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M; Martins, Rui C

    2018-03-01

    Parabens are widely used as antimicrobial and preservatives in pharmaceutical and personal care products and are continuously reaching the water streams. Conventional wastewater treatments are proven inefficient on the removal of this kind of contaminants from wastewater. Therefore, catalytic ozonation appears as a suitable option, due to the oxidant power of ozone and its high capacity of hydroxyl radical generation in the presence of a suitable catalyst. The main drawback of catalytic ozonation is related with the choice of stable and active catalysts at low cost. On this way, two volcanic rocks were tested to enhance the removal of a mixture of parabens by ozonation, improving their degradation. Indeed, catalytic ozonation with volcanic rock allowed total paraben degradation using a transferred ozone dose (TOD) of 55 mg/L which corresponds to a reduction of about threefold the amount of TOD comparatively with single ozonation (170 mg/L of TOD). Due to the presence of semiconductors on volcanic rock composition, the effect of UVA irradiation on paraben degradation was analyzed. The neutral and basic conditions enhanced catalytic ozonation comparatively to acid conditions. Higher pH values allowed a total methylparaben degradation with 35 mg O 3 /L, whereas for low pH values, 55 mg O 3 /L was required. The use of a radical scavenger proven that hydroxyl radicals are the main responsible for paraben degradation with catalytic ozonation. This was confirmed through the analysis of the by-products, where 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-diHBA), 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and hydroquinone were quantified.

  17. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  18. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  19. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  20. FIB-SEM Tomography Probes the Mesoscale Pore Space of an Individual Catalytic Cracking Particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-01-01

    The overall performance of a catalyst particle strongly depends on the ability of mass transport through its pore space. Characterizing the three-dimensional structure of the macro- and mesopore space of a catalyst particle and establishing a correlation with transport efficiency is an essential

  1. Catalytic cracking of vacuum gasoil overSVR, ITH, and MFI zeolites as FCC catalyst additives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hussain, A. I.; Palani, A.; Aitani, A. M.; Čejka, Jiří; Shamzhy, Mariya; Kubů, Martin; Al-Khattaf, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 161, JUN 2017 (2017), s. 23-32 ISSN 0378-3820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-30898P Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ith * mfi * Light olefins * FCC additives Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2016

  2. Specifications for a pilot-plant catalytic cracking installation with dust catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.; Nonnenmacher, H.

    1952-11-05

    An outline of the operation and specifications for the proposed plant is presented. (In working up the specifications, reference had been made to previous American experience, among other things.) The contemplated throughput for the plant was to be 100 to 200 kg of oil and 200 to 400 kg of dust catalyst per hour. The process was to be carried out by mixing hot, regenerated catalyst into streams of reaction-temperature steam and then also heated oil vapors, by introducing the mixed-vapor stream into the reaction chamber consisting of horizontal tubes, and then after the reaction by separating out first the dust catalyst for regeneration and then the gases and oils for distillation and stabilization. After the dust was separated out in centrifugal and electrical separators, it was to have all adsorbed oil driven off by superheated steam and then was to be mixed with heated circulating gas and introduced into the regenerator oven and then carried back into the beginning of the process. The temperature in the reaction chamber and most of the system was to be 420/sup 0/C to 490/sup 0/C; through the regenerator it was to be increased from 450/sup 0/ to 550/sup 0/ and then be cooled again to the temperature in the reaction chamber. Pressure in the system was to be about 2 atm., but the system was to be built to withstand 5 atm. The process would have required 5 to 20 kg steam in each vessel, 115 cubic meters of air per hour through the system, and 600 cubic meters of circulating gas per hour through the system, as well as nitrogen as a purge gas. Many specifications for individual parts of the system are given in the report, and a diagram of the system is included. 1 diagram

  3. Catalytic cracking of fast and tail gas reactive pyrolysis bio-oils over HZSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    While hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of pyrolysis oil is well understood as an upgrading method, the high processing pressures associated with it alone justify the exploration of alternative upgrading solutions, especially those that could adapt pyrolysis oils into the existing refinery infrastructure. Ca...

  4. Dual catalyst bed concept for catalytic partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, J.J.; Mujeebur Rahuman, M.S.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2004-01-01

    A system with two catalyst beds instead of one single metal catalyst bed is proposed for catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM) to synthesis gas. In this dual catalyst bed system, an irreducible stable oxide, such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is used in the first catalyst bed to

  5. Investigations of leak opening and outflow behaviour on straight pipes with circumferential cracks with internal pressure and bending load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Hoefler, A.; Hunger, H.

    1989-01-01

    The experiments carried out so far on straight pipes with circumferential cracks and results of subsequent calculations from this experiment are introduced. The subsequent calculations are not yet completed at all points. From the experiments one can record that the selected crack sizes and stresses have guaranteed stable crack behaviour in all cases. The comparison of experimental and calculated crack openings shows satisfactory agreement (difference about 20% for experiment E22.03. The compared leak rates show differences of up to about 50% (in isolated cases even more). For small leak rates (0.01 to 0.1 kg/sec), one can expect a difference of about 100% between calculation and experiment. For medium leak rates, we regard a maximum difference of about 30% as achievable. For large leak rates, the achievable accuracy plays no part for the detectability. (orig./DG) [de

  6. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    solidification range, refinement in grain size from 63 to 51 {mu}m, centerline columnar grains disappearance, and decreased cooling rate from 113 to 89 C/s. Moreover, in order to make direct comparison with literature, castings of controlled mixtures of alloys 6060 and 4043 were also investigated, thereby simulating weld metal composition under controlled cooling conditions. Castings showed a different trend than welds with small increases in silicon content (i.e. increase in 4043 filler dilution) resulting in huge effect on microstructure, no effect on liquidus temperature, drop in solidus temperature from 577 C to 509 C, increase in quantity of interdendritic constituent from 2% to 14%, and different phase formation. Binary {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi, Mg{sub 2}Si, and Si phases are replaced with ternary {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi, {pi}-Al{sub 8}FeMg{sub 3}Si{sub 6}, and a low melting quaternary eutectic involving Mg{sub 2}Si, {pi}, and Si. Also, variation of the cooling conditions in castings revealed the existence of a critical cooling rate, above which the solidification path and microstructure undergo a major change. Cracking Model. Implementing the critical conditions for cracking into the Rappaz- Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) model revealed a pressure drop in the interdendritic liquid on the order of 10{sup -1} atm, originating primarily from straining conditions. Since, according to literature, a minimum of 1,760 atm is required to fracture pure aluminum liquid (theoretical), this demonstrates that cavitation as a liquid fracture mechanism is not likely to occur, even when accounting for dissolved hydrogen gas. Instead, a porosity-based crack initiation model has been developed based upon pore stability criteria, assuming that gas pores expand from pre-existing nuclei. Crack initiation is taken to occur when stable pores form within the coherent dendrite region, critical to crack initiation being weld metal hydrogen content. Following initiation, a mass-balance approach developed by Braccini

  7. Crack arrest tests for a new ASTM-standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillot, R.; Kalthoff, J.

    1980-01-01

    In order to quantitatively describe the procedures in crack arrest, the following two parameters must be known which can be determined either experimentally or analytically: 1. The crack arrest toughness which represents a measure of the capability of the material to stop running cracks and 2. the stress intensity factor at the peak of the crack of the running or stopping crack as a measure of the danger of the crack. As cracks propagate as long as the K factor is greater than the crack arrest toughness, there are principally two possibilities of influencing the arrest: either one makes sure that the crack is led into an increasingly tougher region, i.e. by material-specific measures, or by leading the crack into an area of reduced stress by constructive measures. Both possibilities for crack arrest are described by the same fracture mechanical formula. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Crack detection in a beam with an arbitrary number of transverse cracks using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaji, N. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrjoo, M. [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a crack detection approach is presented for detecting depth and location of cracks in beam-like structures. For this purpose, a new beam element with an arbitrary number of embedded transverse edge cracks, in arbitrary positions of beam element with any depth, is derived. The components of the stiffness matrix for the cracked element are computed using the conjugate beam concept and Betti's theorem, and finally represented in closed-form expressions. The proposed beam element is efficiently employed for solving forward problem (i.e., to gain precise natural frequencies and mode shapes of the beam knowing the cracks' characteristics). To validate the proposed element, results obtained by new element are compared with two-dimensional (2D) finite element results and available experimental measurements. Moreover, by knowing the natural frequencies and mode shapes, an inverse problem is established in which the location and depth of cracks are determined. In the inverse approach, an optimization problem based on the new finite element and genetic algorithms (GAs) is solved to search the solution. It is shown that the present algorithm is able to identify various crack configurations in a cracked beam. The proposed approach is verified through a cracked beam containing various cracks with different depths.

  9. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  10. Crack embryo formation before crack initiation and growth in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Koji; Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Crack growth measurements were performed in high temperature water and in air to examine the role of creep on IGSCC growth using cold rolled non-sensitized Type316(UNS S31600), TT690 alloy, MA600 alloy, and Carbon steel (STPT42). In addition, crack initiation tests were performed also in high temperature water and in air using specially designed CT specimen. The obtained major results are as follows: (1) TT690 did crack in intergranularly in hydrogenated high temperature water if material is cold worked in heavily. (2) Cold worked carbon steel also cracked in intergranularly in dearated high temperature water. (3) Intergranular crack growth was recognized on cold worked 316, TT690, MA600, and carbon steel even in air which might be crack embryo of IGSCC. (4) Simple Arrhenius type temperature dependence was observed on IGSCC in high temperature water and creep crack growth in air. This suggested that intergranular crack growth rate was determined by some thermal activated reaction. (5) Vacancy condensation was recognized at just ahead of the crack tips of IGSCC and creep crack of cold worked steel. This showed that IGSCC and creep crack growth was controlled by same mechanism. (6) Clear evidence of vacancies condensation was recognized at just beneath the surface before crack initiation. This proved that crack did initiate as the result of diffusion of vacancies in the solid. And the incubation time seems to be controlled by the required time for the condensation of vacancies to the stress concentrated zone. (7) Diffusion of subsituational atoms was also driven by stress gradient. This is the important knowledge to evaluate the SCC initiation after long term operation in LWR's. Based on the observed results, IGSCC initiation and growth mechanism were proposed considering the diffusion process of cold worked induced vacancies. (author)

  11. Catalytic Methane Decomposition over Fe-Al2O3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2016-05-09

    The presence of a Fe-FeAl2O4 structure over an Fe-Al2O3 catalysts is demonstrated to be vital for the catalytic methane decomposition (CMD) activity. After H2 reduction at 750°C, Fe-Al2O3 prepared by means of a fusion method, containing 86.5wt% FeAl2O4 and 13.5wt% Fe0, showed a stable CMD activity at 750°C for as long as 10h. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Catalytic Conversion of Bio-oil to Fuel for Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard

    The incitement for decreasing the modern society's dependency on fossil based fuel and energy is both environmentally and politically driven. Development of biofuels could be part of the future solution. The combination of ash pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of the produced bio-oil has been...... identied as a prospective route to bio-fuels. The upgrading is most favorably done by hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), producing bio-fuels at a quality equivalent to conventional fossil fuels. The topic of this Ph.D. thesis has been the development of active and stable catalysts for this reaction. In the search...

  13. Crack-resistant polyimide coating for high-capacity battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingshun; Wang, Shuo; Lee, Pui-Kit; He, Jieqing; Yu, Denis Y. W.

    2017-10-01

    Electrode cracking is a serious problem that hinders the application of many next-generation high-capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Even though nano-sizing the material can reduce fracturing of individual particles, capacity fading is still observed due to large volume change and loss of contact in the electrode during lithium insertion and extraction. In this study, we design a crack-resistant high-modulus polyimide coating with high compressive strength which can hold multiple particles together during charge and discharge to maintain contact. The effectiveness of the coating is demonstrated on tin dioxide, a high-capacity large-volume-change material that undergoes both alloy and conversion reactions. The polyimide coating improves capacity retention of SnO2 from 80% to 100% after 80 cycles at 250 mA g-1. Stable capacity of 585 mAh g-1 can be obtained even at 500 mA g-1 after 300 cycles. Scanning electron microscopy and in-situ dilatometry confirm that electrode cracking is suppressed and thickness change is reduced with the coating. In addition, the chemically-stable polyimide film can separate the surface from direct contact with electrolyte, improving coulombic efficiency to ∼100%. We expect the novel strategy of suppressing electrode degradation with a crack-resistant coating can also be used for other alloy and conversion-based anodes.

  14. Inorganic membranes and catalytic reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    1997-01-01

    Membrane reactors are reviewed with emphasis in their applications in catalysis field. The basic principles of these systems are presented as well as a historical development. The several kinds of catalytic membranes and their preparations are discussed including the problems, needs and challenges to be solved in order to use these reactors in commercial processes. Some applications of inorganic membrane reactors are also shown. It was concluded that these systems have a great potential for i...

  15. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  16. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  17. Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Tandon, R.

    2008-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured using constant stress rate testing in 2% and 95% RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and velocities for dry environments are approx. 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitivity to small changes in RH at low RH. Confidence intervals on parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. Crack Tip Mechanics in Distortion Gradient Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Martínez Pañeda, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    The important role of geometrically necessary dislocations in structural integrity assessment has encouraged an extensive use of strain gradient plasticity theories to characterize the behavior at the small scales involved in crack tip deformation. However, despite the popularity of Distortion...... Gradient Plasticity (DGP), the influence on crack tip mechanics of DGP's distinguishing features that entail superior modelling capabilities has not been investigated yet. In this work crack tip fields are thoroughly examined by implementing the higher order theory of DGP in an implicit finite element...

  19. Detection of fatigue cracks in cladded blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, G.P.; Cervantes, R.A.; Manning, R.C.; Takama, S.

    1986-01-01

    A nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) operates at high temperatures. Feedwater nozzles are susceptible to thermal fatigue; and, after a large number of plant startup/shutdown cycles, thermal fatigue cracking may be initiated at these nozzles. In order to address this problem, ultrasonic data were acquired from five cladded specimens with overall approximate 4-mm thick stainless steel cladding; the specimens contained one fatigue crack each. The study evaluates the application of signal processing and pattern recognition methods to discriminate between base metal-to-clad interface signals and fatigue crack signals. Details are presented

  20. Signal processing for underclad crack sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, R.; Lane, S.S.; Paradiso, T.J.; Quinn, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The techniques developed in this work provide a means of sizing underclad cracks and quality control methods for assessing the accuracy of the data. Data were collected with a minicomputer (LSI 11-02), a transient recorder (Biomaton 8100) and anti-aliasing filter. Three techniques were developed: the calibration curve, phase velocity and epicentral. The phase reversal characteristic in the data is a strong indication of the nature of the signal source. That is, cracks are clearly seperable from two isolated inclusions on the basis of observed phase reversal. These methods have been implemented on a computer and appear to provide an accurate rapid method to discriminate and size underclad cracks

  1. Cracks in high-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The reasons which account for the formation of in service cracks in castings made from Hadfield steel were discussed. To explain the source of existence of the nuclei of brittle fractures, the properties of cast steel were examined within the range of solidification temperatures, remembering that feeding of this material is specially difficult, causing microporosity in hot spots. This creates conditions promoting the formation of microcracks which tend to propagate during service conditions involving high dynamic stresses, and explains why the cracks are mainly characterized by a brittle nature. The reason for crack formation in service are micro-porosities formed during casting solidification.

  2. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  3. Investigation of polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol-titanium dioxide composite films for photo-catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaoqiang; Zhang, Hongyang; Song, Yuanqing; Zhang, Jianling; Yang, Haigang; Jiang, Long; Dan, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol-titanium dioxide (PPy/PVA-TiO2) composite films used as photo-catalysts were fabricated by combining TiO2 sol with PPy/PVA solution in which PPy was synthesized by in situ polymerization of pyrrole (Py) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and loaded on glass. The prepared photo-catalysts were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflection spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and photoluminescence (PL). The results indicate that the composites have same crystal structure as the TiO2 and extend the optic absorption from UV region to visible light region. By detecting the variation ratio, detected by ultraviolet-vis spectroscopy, of model pollutant rhodamine B (RhB) solution in the presence of the composite films under both UV and visible light irradiation, the photo-catalytic performance of the composite films was investigated. The results show that the PPy/PVA-TiO2 composite films show better photo-catalytic properties than TiO2 film both under UV and visible light irradiation, and the photo-catalytic degradation of RhB follows the first-order kinetics. The effects of the composition of composite films and the concentration of RhB on the photo-catalytic performance, as well as the possible photo-catalytic mechanism, were also discussed. By photo-catalytic recycle experiments, the structure stability of the PPy/PVA-TiO2 composite film was investigated and the results show that the photo-catalytic activity under both UV and visible light irradiation have no significant decrease after four times of recycle experiments, suggesting that the photo-catalyst film is stable during the photo-catalytic process, which was also confirmed by the XRD pattern and FT-IR spectra of the composite film before and after photo-catalytic.

  4. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water

  5. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Roesyadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and catalytic cracking process. HZSM-5 was synthesized using Plank methods. The characterization of the synthesized catalysts used AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and BET (Brunaueur Emmet Teller. The cracking was carried out in a fixed bed microreactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm which was filled with 0.6 gram catalyst. The Zn/HZSM-5 catalyst was recommended for cracking palm oil for the high selectivity to gasoline. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Selected Paper from International Conference on Chemical and Material Engineering (ICCME 2012Received: 28th September 2012; Revised: 19th November 2012; Accepted: 20th December 2012[How to Cite: A. Roesyadi, D. Hariprajitno, N. Nurjannah, S.D. Savitri, (2013. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (3: 185-190.(doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190 ] View in  |

  6. Catalytic dehydrogenation of isobutane in the presence of hydrogen over Cs-modified Ni2P supported on active carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanli; Sang, Huanxin; Wang, Kang; Wang, Xitao

    2014-10-01

    In this article, an environmentally friendly non-noble-metal class of Cs-Ni2P/active carbon (AC) catalyst was prepared and demonstrated to exhibit enhanced catalytic performance in isobutane dehydrogenation. The results of activity tests reveal that Ni/AC catalyst was highly active for isobutane cracking, which led to the formation of abundant methane and coke. After the introduction of phosphorus through impregnation with ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate and H2-temperature programmed reduction, undesired cracking reactions were effectively inhibited, and the selectivity to isobutene and stability of catalyst increased remarkably. The characterization results indicate that, after the addition of phosphorous, the improvement of dehydrogenation selectivity is ascribed to the partial positive charges carried on Ni surface in Ni2P particles, which decreases the strength of Nisbnd C bond between Ni and carbonium-ion intermediates and the possibility of excessive dehydrogenation. In addition, Cs-modified Ni2P/AC catalysts display much higher catalytic performance as compared to Ni2P/AC catalyst. Cs-Ni2P-6.5 catalyst has the highest catalytic performance, and the selectivity to isobutene higher than 93% can be obtained even after 4 h reaction. The enhancement in catalytic performance of the Cs-modified catalysts is mainly attributed to the function of Cs to improve the dispersion of Ni2P particles, transfer electron from Cs to Ni, and decrease acid site number and strength.

  7. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruml, Tomáš; Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš; Seitl, Stanislav; Polák, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 412, 1 (2011), s. 7-12 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1954; GA ČR GA101/09/0867 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ferritic-martensitic steel * long crack growth * small crack growth * crack closure Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.052, year: 2011

  8. Reverse microemulsion prepared Ni–Pt catalysts for methane cracking to produce COx-free hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2017-09-08

    A monodispersed 15 nm Ni9Pt1 catalyst synthesized via a reverse microemulsion method, shows a lower activation energy than both Ni and Pt catalysts during the methane cracking reaction. Thanks to the synergic effect of Ni–Pt alloy, this catalyst presents a stable H2 formation rate at 700 °C, and forms carbon nanotubes, anchoring the catalyst particles on top.

  9. Analysis of cracking in glass molds made of cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    The cracking in the parts of cast iron molds intended for glass is considered, and this cracking substantially affects the operation of glass-blowing equipment, maintainability, and the replacement of mold sets. The processes that cause cracking in the parts of glass molds and initiate crack growth are studied.

  10. Fatigue crack growth retardation in spot heated mild steel sheet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. A fatigue crack can be effectively retarded by heating a spot near the crack tip under nil remote stress condition. The subcritical spot heating at a proper position modifies the crack growth behaviour in a way, more or less, similar to specimen subjected to overload spike. It is observed that the extent of crack.

  11. Fatigue crack growth retardation in spot heated mild steel sheet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A fatigue crack can be effectively retarded by heating a spot near the crack tip under nil remote stress condition. The subcritical spot heating at a proper position modifies the crack growth behaviour in a way, more or less, similar to specimen subjected to overload spike. It is observed that the extent of crack growth retardation ...

  12. On the application of cohesive crack modeling in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    for a centrally cracked sheet is established applying semi-analytical, bridged and fictitious crack modeling. The semi-analytical crack model is compared with a FEM analysis and it is demonstrated, that the standard fictitious crack implementation in FEM packages (in this case DIANA) provides a good approximation...

  13. Investigation of Penetrant Inspection Corner Crack Detectability

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The corner crack size for penetrant inspection (PT) in NASA-STD-5009 is larger and has a different aspect ratio from the size historically used in NASA fracture...

  14. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Rail Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    In order to establish safe inspection periods of railroad rails, information on fatigue crack growth rates is required. These data should come from a sufficiently large sample of rails presently in service. The reported research consisted of the gene...

  15. Fatigue Crack Growth Properties of Rail Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Fatigue crack propagation properties of rail steels were determined experimentally. The investigation covered 66 rail steels. The effects of the following parameters were studied: stress ratio (ratio of minimum to maximum stress in a cycle), frequenc...

  16. Fatigue Crack Initiation Properties of Rail Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Fatigue crack initiation properties of rail-steels were determined experimentally. One new and four used rail steels were investigated. The effects of the following parameters were studied: stress ratio (ratio of minimum to maximum stress in a cycle)...

  17. Investigation of reflective cracking mitigation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In the state of Florida, an asphalt rubber membrane interlayer (ARMI) has been commonly used as a reflective cracking (RC) mitigation method, but inconsistent performance of an ARMI has been observed in the field. Moreover, the Heavy Vehicle Simulato...

  18. Cracking Advanced Encryption Standard-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashnil Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Password protection is a major security concern the world is facing today. While there are many publications available that discuss ways to protect passwords and data how widely user from around the world adhere to these rules are unknown. The novelty of this study is that this is the first time a review is done on software tools that can be used to crack Advanced Encryption Standards. Firstly the study does a review on top 10 software tools that are available to crack Advanced Encryption Standards. After which an analysis on two software tools was performed to see how long each software tool took to crack a password. The result of the study gives Advanced Encryption Standard researcher Network security researcher and the general public helpful information on how to strengthen advanced encryption standards and strengthen passwords that are hard for the software tools discussed above to crack.

  19. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    To determine the reliability of reinforced concrete structures based on visual inspection of corroding cracks on the surfaces of structures is of great interest. In the present study, models for the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures are presented with special emphasis on a model...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D...

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring of a fatigue crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, D. M.; Scott, W. R.; Davis, J.; Lee, E. U.; Boodey, J. B.; Kulowitch, P.

    AE monitoring is applied to crack detection in materials containing intermetallic compounds that have very small critical flaw sizes. The tests performed are simpler than structural monitoring since the source location is well defined and extraneous sources are limited. A correlation was found between defect propagation and AE events in the two titanium aluminide alloys studied. Because events that are apparently not crack related can occur, and because the number of events detected is threshold and gain-sensitive, the AE count alone is not an absolute measure of crack length. Parameters denoting the portion of the load cycle where events occur are valuable for identifying AE sources and cracking mechanisms. Pattern recognition algorithms can be developed on the basis of stored waveforms and load level parameters.

  1. Effect of notches on fatigue crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed results are given of the theoretical and experimental programme outline in the first report, GKSS 82/E/44. It is concluded that, in specimens of commercial engineering alloys (Steel DIN 1.6310 = 20MnMoNi 55, Al alloys) containing blunt, machined notches, the fatigue life depends on the time taken to propagate a crack from a surface defect, and the propagation rate depends on the plastic deformation range at the crack tip, which is characterised by the stress intensity range, once the crack has extended beyond the notch strain field. Areas in which this work may be extended, and refined, are discussed in detail. In particular, crack closure and environmental effects are considered, and the effect of cyclic softening is discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Minimization of reflection cracks in flexible pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the performance of fabrics used under overlays in an effort to minimize longitudinal and alligator cracking in flexible pavements. It is concluded, although the sample size is small, that the treatments will extend the pavement ...

  3. Dynamic Strain and Crack Monitoring Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new automated vehicle health monitoring sensor system capable of measuring loads and detecting crack, corrosion, and...

  4. Configurational forces and couples for crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarić Jovo P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the approach of Gurtin and Podio-Guidugli (1998, the problem of crack propagation based on the notion of configurational forces and couples in micropolar continua is considered. .

  5. Cracking the code of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, M; Nohria, N

    2000-01-01

    Today's fast-paced economy demands that businesses change or die. But few companies manage corporate transformations as well as they would like. The brutal fact is that about 70% of all change initiatives fail. In this article, authors Michael Beer and Nitin Nohria describe two archetypes--or theories--of corporate transformation that may help executives crack the code of change. Theory E is change based on economic value: shareholder value is the only legitimate measure of success, and change often involves heavy use of economic incentives, layoffs, downsizing, and restructuring. Theory O is change based on organizational capability: the goal is to build and strengthen corporate culture. Most companies focus purely on one theory or the other, or haphazardly use a mix of both, the authors say. Combining E and O is directionally correct, they contend, but it requires a careful, conscious integration plan. Beer and Nohria present the examples of two companies, Scott Paper and Champion International, that used a purely E or purely O strategy to create change--and met with limited levels of success. They contrast those corporate transformations with that of UK-based retailer ASDA, which has successfully embraced the paradox between the opposing theories of change and integrated E and O. The lesson from ASDA? To thrive and adapt in the new economy, companies must make sure the E and O theories of business change are in sync at their own organizations.

  6. Gold Incorporated Mesoporous Silica Thin Film Model Surface as a Robust SERS and Catalytically Active Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandakumari Chandrasekharan Sunil Sekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-small gold nanoparticles incorporated in mesoporous silica thin films with accessible pore channels perpendicular to the substrate are prepared by a modified sol-gel method. The simple and easy spin coating technique is applied here to make homogeneous thin films. The surface characterization using FESEM shows crack-free films with a perpendicular pore arrangement. The applicability of these thin films as catalysts as well as a robust SERS active substrate for model catalysis study is tested. Compared to bare silica film our gold incorporated silica, GSM-23F gave an enhancement factor of 103 for RhB with a laser source 633 nm. The reduction reaction of p-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride from our thin films shows a decrease in peak intensity corresponding to –NO2 group as time proceeds, confirming the catalytic activity. Such model surfaces can potentially bridge the material gap between a real catalytic system and surface science studies.

  7. Crack Growth Monitoring by Embedded Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Sensors: Fibre Reinforced Plastic Crack Growing Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; McGugan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a novel method to asses a crack growing/damage event in fibre reinforced plastic, or adhesive using Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors embedded in a host material. Different features of the crack mechanism that induce a change in the FBG response were identified. Double...... caused by the crack, and to correlate with the FBG sensor. A Material-Sensor model was developed in order to predict the sensor output response under a crack/delamination situation, which can be used as an analysis tool for future application of this measurement technology in more complex structures....

  8. The dislocation crack model, as applied to determining the crack toughness of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfuff, M.

    1982-01-01

    The representation of cracks by dislocations, which will be introduced and briefly applied to classical crack problems, reduces the calculation of the fracture toughness of plastically deformable solids to the calculation of the energy of continuous distributions of dislocations. The crack model introduced by Bilby, Cottrell and Swinden will be modified in order to take the conditions into account which are necessary to activate the dislocation sources at the crack tip. This leads to a fracture criterion which can be used to explain the high values of the fracture toughness measured for metalls and the characteristic brittle-to-ductile transition. (orig.) [de

  9. Fatigue crack threshold relevant to stress ratio, crack wake and loading histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Masakazu; Iwasaki, Akira; Kasahara, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation behavior was investigated in a low alloy steel which experienced several kind of loading histories. Both the effects of stress ratio, test temperature on the fatigue crack threshold, and the change in the threshold depending on the thermo-mechanical loading histories, were experimentally investigated. It was shown that the thermo-mechanical loading history left its effect along the prior fatigue crack wake resulting in the change of fatigue crack threshold. Some discussions are made on how this type of loading history effect should be treated from engineering point of view. (author)

  10. Crack Closure Effects on Fatigue Crack Propagation Rates: Application of a Proposed Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. F. O. Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural design taking into account fatigue damage requires a thorough knowledge of the behaviour of materials. In addition to the monotonic behaviour of the materials, it is also important to assess their cyclic response and fatigue crack propagation behaviour under constant and variable amplitude loading. Materials whenever subjected to fatigue cracking may exhibit mean stress effects as well as crack closure effects. In this paper, a theoretical model based on the same initial assumptions of the analytical models proposed by Hudak and Davidson and Ellyin is proposed to estimate the influence of the crack closure effects. This proposal based further on Walker’s propagation law was applied to the P355NL1 steel using an inverse analysis (back-extrapolation of experimental fatigue crack propagation results. Based on this proposed model it is possible to estimate the crack opening stress intensity factor, Kop, the relationship between U=ΔKeff/ΔK quantity and the stress intensity factor, the crack length, and the stress ratio. This allows the evaluation of the influence of the crack closure effects for different stress ratio levels, in the fatigue crack propagation rates. Finally, a good agreement is found between the proposed theoretical model and the analytical models presented in the literature.

  11. Terahertz non-destructive imaging of cracks and cracking in structures of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shujie; Li, Tongchun; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xiaoming; Qi, Huijun; Mu, Zhiyong

    2017-11-01

    Cracks and crack propagation in cement-based materials are key factors leading to failure of structures, affecting safety in construction engineering. This work investigated the application of terahertz (THz) non-destructive imaging to inspections on structures of cement-based materials, so as to explore the potential of THz imaging in crack detection. Two kinds of disk specimens made of plain cement mortar and UHMWPE fiber concrete were prepared respectively. A mechanical expansion load device was deployed to generate cracks and control the whole process of cracking. Experimental tests were carried out on cracked specimens by using a commercial THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) during loading. The results show that crack opening and propagation could be examined by THz clearly and the material factors influence the ability of crack resistance significantly. It was found that the THz imaging of crack initiation and propagation agrees with the practical phenomenon and supplies more information about damage of samples. It is demonstrated that the damage behavior of structures of cement-based materials can be successfully detected by THz imaging.

  12. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement has been postulated as a cause of stress corrosion cracking in numerous alloy systems. Such an interrelationship is useful in design considerations because it permits the designer and working engineer to relate the literature from both fields to a potential environmental compatibility problem. The role of hydrogen in stress corrosion of high strength steels is described along with techniques for minimizing the susceptibility to hydrogen stress cracking. (U.S.)

  13. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  14. A probabilistic approach to crack instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1989-01-01

    A probabilistic model of brittle fracture is examined with reference to two-dimensional problems. The model is illustrated by using experimental data obtained for 25 macroscopically identical specimens made of short-fiber-reinforced composites. It is shown that the model proposed here provides a predictive formalism for the probability distributions of critical crack depth, critical loads, and crack arrest depths. It also provides similarity criteria for small-scale testing.

  15. Fan blade crack diagnosis method study

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng Fu; Yinbo Gao

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a discrete mathematical model for fan blades and theoretically analyses the mathematical relationship between the location and depth of crack and fan blade natural frequency. On the basis of the blade mathematical model, using the theoretical computed natural frequency as the fault feature, this article proposes a fast and efficient fan blade crack fault diagnosis method. Transfer matrix method is used to calculate the first three-order blade natural frequencies under di...

  16. The Energy Dissipation of Propagating Cracks in Solnhofen Limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, A.; Kalthoff, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Crack propagation events are initiated in Solnhofen limestone under impact loading conditions. The Fracture energy respectively the fracture toughness and the velocity of propagating cracks are measured by means of an optimized strain gauge measuring technique. Cracks are accelerated to velocities in the range of 1500 m/s. The measured crack propagation energies/crack propagation toughnesses are significantly higher than the crack initiation energy/crack initiation toughness. Control measurements on the basis of a global energy approach by means of Charpy pendulum impact tests verify the found behaviour. The results explain characteristic peculiarities of the crack propagation behaviour of brittle fracture in rock. Keywords: Fracture energy, fracture toughness, crack propagation, crack velocity, rock

  17. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  18. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF). PMID:28169361

  19. Kaolin and commercial fcc catalysts in the cracking of loads of polypropylene under refinary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of Commercial FCC catalysts (low, medium and high activities was evaluated by the catalytic cracking process of combined feeds of polypropylene (PP and vaseline, using a microactivity test unit (M.A.T. for the production of fuel fractions (gasoline, diesel and residue. The PP/vaseline loads, at 2.0% and 4.0% wt, were processed under refinery conditions (load/catalyst ratio and temperature of process. For the PP/vaseline load (4.0% wt, the production of the gasoline fraction was favored by all catalysts, while the diesel fraction was favored by PP/vaseline load (2.0% wt, showing a preferential contact of the zeolite external surface with the end of the polymer chains for the occurrence of the catalytic cracking. All the loads produced a bigger quantity of the gaseous products in the presence of highly active commercial FCC catalyst. The improvement in the activity of the commercial FCC catalyst decreased the production of the liquid fractions and increased the quantity of the solid fractions, independent of the concentration of the loads. These results can be related to the difficulty of the polymer chains to access the catalyst acid sites, occurring preferentially end-chain scission at the external surface of the catalyst.

  20. Electron beam application for regeneration of catalysts used in refinery cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Fernando Mantovani; Duarte, Celina Lopes; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Salvador, Vera Lucia Ribeiro; Calvo, Wilson Aparecido Parejo

    2013-01-01

    A catalyst is a substance that alters the rate of a reaction. The process of catalysis is essential to the modern day manufacturing industry, mainly in Fluid Catalytic Cracking Process (FCC) units. However, long-term exploitation of oil and gas processing catalysts leads to formation of carbon-and sulfur-containing structures of coke and dense products on the catalyst surface. They block reactive catalyst sites and reduce the catalytic activity. The main advantage of radiation processing by electron beam (EB) and gamma rays is chain cracking reaction in crude oil. Otherwise, under exposure to ionic radiation, considerable structure modification of equilibrium silica-alumina catalyst from FCC process may occur, in addition to the removal of impurities. The conditions applied in the irradiation range (20-150 kGy) of gamma rays and electron beam were not sufficient to alter the structure of the catalyst, whether for removal of the contaminant nickel, a major contaminant of the FCC catalyst, either to rupture of the crystalline structure either for the future reutilization of chemical elements. Attenuated Total Reflectance - Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRFS) analysis were used to characterize and evaluate effects of radiation processing on equilibrium catalysts purification. To evaluate and comprehend the reactive catalyst sites, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and particle size distribution analyses were carried out. (author)

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  2. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Newman, Roger

    2010-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  4. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  5. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Wild Reed over a Zeolite-Based Waste Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung Lang Yoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast catalytic pyrolysis of wild reed was carried out at 500 °C. Waste fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC catalyst disposed from a petroleum refinery process was activated through acetone-washing and calcination and used as catalyst for pyrolysis. In order to evaluate the catalytic activity of waste FCC catalyst, commercial HY zeolite catalyst with a SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of 5.1 was also used. The bio-oil produced from pyrolysis was analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. When the biomass-to-catalyst ratio was 1:1, the production of phenolics and aromatics was promoted considerably by catalysis, whereas the content of oxygenates was affected little. Significant conversion of oxygenates to furans and aromatics was observed when the biomass-to-catalyst ratio of 1:10 was used. Activated waste FCC catalyst showed comparable catalytic activity for biomass pyrolysis to HY in terms of the promotion of valuable chemicals, such as furans, phenolics and aromatics. The results of this study imply that waste FCC catalyst can be an important economical resource for producing high-value-added chemicals from biomass.

  6. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  7. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  8. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X...... as the nanoparticles are reduced. The Cu/ZnO nanoparticles are tested on a  µ-reactor platform and prove to be active towards methanol synthesis, making it an excellent model system for further investigations into activity depended morphology changes....

  9. Catalytic Combustion of Ethyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZÇELİK, Tuğba GÜRMEN; ATALAY, Süheyda; ALPAY, Erden

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate over prepared metal oxide catalysts was investigated. CeO, Co2O3, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, and CeO-Co2O3 catalysts were prepared on monolith supports and they were tested. Before conducting the catalyst experiments, we searched for the homogeneous gas phase combustion reaction of ethyl acetate. According to the homogeneous phase experimental results, 45% of ethyl acetate was converted at the maximum reactor temperature tested (350 °C). All the prepare...

  10. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  11. Experimental investigation of interfacial crack arrest in sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading using a novel crack arresting device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J.H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A recently proposed face-sheet–core interface crack arresting device is implemented in sandwich beams and tested using the Sandwich Tear Test configuration. Fatigue loading conditions are applied to propagate the crack and determine the effect of the crack stopper on the fatigue growth rate...... the energy release rate, mode mixity and to simulate crack propagation and arrest of the crack. Finally, the effectiveness of the crack arresting device is demonstrated on composite sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading conditions....... and arrest of the crack. Digital image correlation is used through the duration of the fatigue experiment to track the strain evolution as the crack tip advances. The measured strains are related to crack tip propagation, arrest, and re-initiation of the crack. A finite element model is used to calculate...

  12. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  13. Biogenic Cracks in Porous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms growing on and inside porous rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of porous media. We designed a model porous medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the porous medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within porous medium until saturation of the porous space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and porous media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the porous sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model porous medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.

  14. Snow fracture: From micro-cracking to global failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Achille; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2017-04-01

    Slab avalanches are caused by a crack forming and propagating in a weak layer within the snow cover, which eventually causes the detachment of the overlying cohesive slab. The gradual damage process leading to the nucleation of the initial failure is still not entirely understood. Therefore, we studied the damage process preceding snow failure by analyzing the acoustic emissions (AE) generated by bond failure or micro-cracking. The AE allow studying the ongoing progressive failure in a non-destructive way. We performed fully load-controlled failure experiments on snow samples presenting a weak layer and recorded the generated AE. The size and frequency of the generated AE increased before failure revealing an acceleration of the damage process with increased size and frequency of damage and/or microscopic cracks. The AE energy was power-law distributed and the exponent (b-value) decreased approaching failure. The waiting time followed an exponential distribution with increasing exponential coefficient λ before failure. The decrease of the b-value and the increase of λ correspond to a change in the event distribution statistics indicating a transition from homogeneously distributed uncorrelated damage producing mostly small AE to localized damage, which cause larger correlated events which leads to brittle failure. We observed brittle failure for the fast experiment and a more ductile behavior for the slow experiments. This rate dependence was reflected also in the AE signature. In the slow experiments the b value and λ were almost constant, and the energy rate increase was moderate indicating that the damage process was in a stable state - suggesting the damage and healing processes to be balanced. On a shorter time scale, however, the AE parameters varied indicating that the damage process was not steady but consisted of a sum of small bursts. We assume that the bursts may have been generated by cascades of correlated micro-cracks caused by localization of

  15. Synthesis gas production via catalytic partial oxidation reforming of liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheekatamarla, P.K.; Finnerty, C.M. [NanoDynamics Energy Inc., 901 Fuhrmann Boulevard, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This work deals with the performance of waterless catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX)-based catalytic reformer system fed by different liquid fuels including ethanol, isooctane, hexadecane, synthetic JP8, kerosene and diesel for solid oxide fuel cell applications. The effect of different fuel components on product composition was studied and the operational parameters were optimized to provide a stable reforming performance. The system provided negligible pressure drop combined with the simpler system design due to the lack of water requirement making the POX reformer an attractive choice. (author)

  16. Structure of the Catalytic Trimer of Methanococcus jannaschii Aspartate Transcarbamoylase in an Orthorhombic Crystal Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitali,J.; Colaneri, M.

    2008-01-01

    Crystals of the catalytic subunit of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase in an orthorhombic crystal form contain four crystallographically independent trimers which associate in pairs to form stable staggered complexes that are similar to each other and to a previously determined monoclinic C2 form. Each subunit has a sulfate in the central channel. The catalytic subunits in these complexes show flexibility, with the elbow angles of the monomers differing by up to 7.4 between crystal forms. Moreover, there is also flexibility in the relative orientation of the trimers around their threefold axis in the complexes, with a difference of 4 between crystal forms.

  17. Structure of the catalytic trimer of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase in an orthorhombic crystal form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Jacqueline; Colaneri, Michael J

    2008-09-01

    Crystals of the catalytic subunit of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase in an orthorhombic crystal form contain four crystallographically independent trimers which associate in pairs to form stable staggered complexes that are similar to each other and to a previously determined monoclinic C2 form. Each subunit has a sulfate in the central channel. The catalytic subunits in these complexes show flexibility, with the elbow angles of the monomers differing by up to 7.4 degrees between crystal forms. Moreover, there is also flexibility in the relative orientation of the trimers around their threefold axis in the complexes, with a difference of 4 degrees between crystal forms.

  18. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  19. Catalytic processes towards the production of biofuels in a palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Thiam Leng; Bhatia, Subhash

    2008-11-01

    In Malaysia, there has been interest in the utilization of palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of environmental friendly biofuels. A biorefinery based on palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of biofuels has been proposed. The catalytic technology plays major role in the different processing stages in a biorefinery for the production of liquid as well as gaseous biofuels. There are number of challenges to find suitable catalytic technology to be used in a typical biorefinery. These challenges include (1) economic barriers, (2) catalysts that facilitate highly selective conversion of substrate to desired products and (3) the issues related to design, operation and control of catalytic reactor. Therefore, the catalytic technology is one of the critical factors that control the successful operation of biorefinery. There are number of catalytic processes in a biorefinery which convert the renewable feedstocks into the desired biofuels. These include biodiesel production from palm oil, catalytic cracking of palm oil for the production of biofuels, the production of hydrogen as well as syngas from biomass gasification, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) for the conversion of syngas into liquid fuels and upgrading of liquid/gas fuels obtained from liquefaction/pyrolysis of biomass. The selection of catalysts for these processes is essential in determining the product distribution (olefins, paraffins and oxygenated products). The integration of catalytic technology with compatible separation processes is a key challenge for biorefinery operation from the economic point of view. This paper focuses on different types of catalysts and their role in the catalytic processes for the production of biofuels in a typical palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery.

  20. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities