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Sample records for stable ankles sdm

  1. Manual Physical Therapy Following Immobilization for Stable Ankle Fracture: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Elizabeth E; Deyle, Gail D; Allen, Christopher; Petersen, Evan J; Croy, Theodore; Rivera, Kenneth P

    2015-09-01

    Case series. Ankle fractures commonly result in persistent pain, stiffness, and functional impairments. There is insufficient evidence to favor any particular rehabilitation approach after ankle fracture. The purpose of this case series was to describe an impairment-based manual physical therapy approach to treating patients with conservatively managed ankle fractures. Patients with stable ankle fractures postimmobilization were treated with manual physical therapy and exercise targeted at associated impairments in the lower limb. The primary outcome measure was the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Secondary outcome measures included the ankle lunge test, numeric pain-rating scale, and global rating of change. Outcome measures were collected at baseline (performed within 7 days of immobilization removal) and at 4 and 12 weeks postbaseline. Eleven patients (mean age, 39.6 years; range, 18-64 years; 2 male), after ankle fracture-related immobilization (mean duration, 48 days; range, 21-75 days), were treated for an average of 6.6 sessions (range, 3-10 sessions) over a mean of 46.1 days (range, 13-81 days). Compared to baseline, statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements were observed in Lower Extremity Functional Scale score (P = .001; mean change, 21.9 points; 95% confidence interval: 10.4, 33.4) and in the ankle lunge test (P = .001; mean change, 7.8 cm; 95% confidence interval: 3.9, 11.7) at 4 weeks. These changes persisted at 12 weeks. Statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in self-reported function and ankle range of motion were observed at 4 and 12 weeks following treatment with impairment-based manual physical therapy. All patients tolerated treatment well. Results suggest that this approach may have efficacy in this population. Therapy, level 4.

  2. Conservative Management for Stable High Ankle Injuries in Professional Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Derrick M; Trem, Anthony; Sheehan, Joseph; Salata, Michael J; Voos, James E

    High ankle "syndesmosis" injuries are common in American football players relative to the general population. At the professional level, syndesmotic sprains represent a challenging and unique injury lacking a standardized rehabilitation protocol during conservative management. PubMed, Biosis Preview, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, and EMBASE databases were searched using the terms syndesmotic injuries, American football, conservative management, and rehabilitation. Clinical review. Level 3. When compared with lateral ankle sprains, syndesmosis injuries result in significantly prolonged recovery times and games lost. For stable syndesmotic injuries, conservative management features a brief period of immobilization and protected weightbearing followed by progressive strengthening exercises and running, and athletes can expect to return to competition in 2 to 6 weeks. Further research investigating the efficacy of dry needling and blood flow restriction therapy is necessary to evaluate the benefit of these techniques in the rehabilitation process. Successful conservative management of stable syndesmotic injuries in professional American football athletes requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy, injury mechanisms, diagnosis, and rehabilitation strategies utilized in elite athletes.

  3. Ankle arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle surgery; Arthroscopy - ankle; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic ... Arthroscopy may be recommended for these ankle problems: Ankle pain. Arthroscopy allows the surgeon to explore what ...

  4. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  5. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, pankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (pankle instability (pankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (pankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX AND NUM-BER OF INVOLVED CORONARIES IN PATIENTS WITH STABLE ANGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of vascular disease which can involve peripheral and/or cardiac vessels. This study was conducted to evaluate the possible link between Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI and coronary vessel involvement in patients with stable angina.    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 on 120 individuals who were hospitalized in Chamran Heart Center and underwent coronary angiography. A questionnaire was completed to obtain demographic information, history of previous heart disease and smoking. Body height and weight, as blood pressure on hand and foot were measured. The patients underwent angiography and the extent of coronary involvement (> 75% was determined. After12-14-hour of fasting, blood sugar was obtained to measure total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. The Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABI was calculated as the ratio of the blood pressure in the ankles to the blood pressure in the arms. The data were analyzed by SPSS-15 using ANOVA, T-Student test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and discriminant analysis.    RESULTS: Samples were 46 women (38.33% and 74 men (61.67% with a mean age of 55.50 ± 10.49. Mean and SD of ABI in men and women was 0.72 ± 0.20 and 0.80 ± 0.19 with no significant difference (p = 0.012. The correlation between ABI and extent of coronary involvement was 0.47 (p < 0.0001. The group with lower ABI had the highest levels of coronary involvement (triple vessel, p < 0.05.     CONCLUSION: ABI had a significant relationship with the degree of coronary involvement and a significant predictive value. Therefore ABI seems to be a reliable indicator of high coronary risk.      Keywords: Ankle to brachial index, Coronary involvement, Stable angina.  

  7. Sharing decisions on SDM skills teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe

    decision making (SDM) are currently subjects to special attention in the Danish healthcare system. Recent research has shown that many Danish professionals find it difficult to implement SDM in their clinical practice. Following a pilot project for midwives in 2013, an interdisciplinary course...... for professionals involved in antenatal care and obstetrics was conducted. Aim The aim of the course was: • teaching a group of professionals the skills of SDM • enhancing the awareness of the complex task of SDM • developing competence within the group of professionals to secure an ongoing awareness and training...... had been participants in the pilot project. As the course’ activities were carried out the two midwives became increasingly involved in facilitating the teaching activities with their colleagues in the hope that the focus on communication skills development can be retained. Plan of the course...

  8. Interprofessional SDM train-the-trainer program "Fit for SDM": provider satisfaction and impact on participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Mirjam; Ehrhardt, Heike; Steger, Anne-Kathrin; Bengel, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the interprofessional SDM training program "Fit for SDM" in medical rehabilitation, which was implemented in two steps: (1) university staff trained providers in executive positions as trainers and (2) the providers trained their staff. For the evaluation of the first step a questionnaire for shared decision-making (SDM) skills and satisfaction with the training was completed by the providers in executive positions. A staff survey was used in a cluster-randomized controlled study to determine the overall impact of the train-the-trainer program on internal and external participation in the team. The providers in the six clinics evaluated their SDM competences and satisfaction very positively after training (step 1). External participation was enhanced by application of the training content, with significant changes recorded for females and nurses in particular. However, it had no direct influence on internal participation. This is the first interprofessional SDM train-the-trainer program in Germany to bridge interprofessionalism (internal participation) and SDM (external participation); it was implemented successfully and evaluated positively. Establishing interprofessional SDM training programs should be encouraged for all health care professionals. Implementation in the interprofessional setting should consider interprofessional team factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ankle instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krips, Rover; de Vries, Jasper; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The ankle joint is the most congruent joint of the human body. Stability is provided by the bony configuration of the ankle mortise and the talar dome and by the ankle ligaments. During ankle motions, rotation and translation around and along the movement axes occur. Soft tissue stability is

  10. Ankle Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Ankle ProblemsFollow this chart for more information about problems that can cause ankle pain. Our trusted Symptom Checker is written and ...

  11. SDM center technologies for accelerating scientific discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoshani, Arie; Altintas, Ilkay; Choudhary, Alok; Critchlow, Terence; Kamath, Chandrika; Ludaescher, Bertram; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steve; Ross, Rob; Samatova, Nagiza; Vouk, Mladen

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive, end-to-end data management solutions ranging from initial data acquisition to final analysis and visualization. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Our future focus is on improving the SDM framework to address the needs of ultra-scale science during SciDAC-2. Specifically, we are enhancing and extending our existing tools to allow for more interactivity and fault tolerance when managing scientists' workflows, for better parallelism and feature extraction capabilities in their data analytics operations, and for greater efficiency and functionality in users' interactions with local parallel file systems, active storage, and access to remote storage. These improvements are necessary for the scalability and complexity challenges presented by hardware and applications at ultra scale, and are complemented by continued efforts to work with application scientists in various domains

  12. Ankle Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Ankle Sprains KidsHealth / For Teens / Ankle Sprains What's in this ... How Do I Know if I Have a Sprain? If your ankle hurts enough after an injury that you need ...

  13. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle injury - aftercare; Ankle syndesmosis sprain - aftercare; Syndesmosis injury - aftercare; ATFL injury - aftercare; CFL injury - ...

  14. Stable Versus Unstable Grade II High Ankle Sprains: A Prospective Study Predicting the Need for Surgical Stabilization and Time to Return to Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D; Bamford, Richard; Petrie, Aviva; McCollum, Graham A

    2016-04-01

    To investigate grade II syndesmosis injuries in athletes and identify factors important in differentiating stable from dynamically unstable ankle sprains and those associated with a longer time to return to sports. Sixty-four athletes with an isolated syndesmosis injury (without fracture) were prospectively assessed, with a mean follow-up period of 37 months (range, 24 to 66 months). Those with an associated deltoid ligament injury or osteochondral lesion were included. Those whose injuries were considered stable (grade IIa) were treated conservatively with a boot and rehabilitation. Those whose injuries were clinically unstable underwent arthroscopy, and if instability was confirmed (grade IIb), the syndesmosis was stabilized. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging assessments of injury to individual ligaments were recorded, along with time to return to play. A power analysis estimated that each group would need 28 patients. All athletes returned to the same level of professional sport. The 28 patients with grade IIa injuries returned at a mean of 45 days (range, 23 to 63 days) compared with 64 days (range, 27 to 104 days) for those with grade IIb injuries (P < .0001). There was a highly significant relationship between clinical and magnetic resonance imaging assessments of ligament injury (anterior tibiofibular ligament [ATFL], anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament [AITFL], and deltoid ligament, P < .0001). Instability was 9.5 times as likely with a positive squeeze test and 11 times as likely with a deltoid injury. Combined injury to the anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament and deltoid ligament was associated with a delay in return to sports. Concomitant injury to the ATFL indicated a different mechanism of injury-the syndesmosis is less likely to be unstable and is associated with an earlier return to sports. A positive squeeze test and injury to the ATFL and deltoid ligament are important factors in differentiating stable from dynamically unstable grade

  15. Ankle replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total - discharge; Total ankle arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement - discharge; Osteoarthritis - ankle ... You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped ... an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were ...

  16. Ankle sprain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when ... swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many ...

  17. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2007-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one per 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  18. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter Aa; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2010-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  19. Sprained Ankles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is the most commonly sprained joint, followed by ... A walking cast may be necessary if the ankle or foot injury has been severe. Most grade 1 sprains will heal within two weeks without subsequent complications. ...

  20. Syndesmotic ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Sharon G

    2012-01-01

    Ankle sprain injuries are the most common type of joint sprain. The prevalence of ankle joint sprains accounts for 21% of joint injuries in the body. Although somewhat rare, high-ankle or syndesmotic ankle sprains occur in up to 15% of ankle trauma. This article will present the pathomechanics of the high-ankle or syndesmotic sprain.

  1. Efficient SDM-MIMO Stokes-space equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero, F. J.Vaquero; Zanaty, A.; Pittala, F.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel frequency-domain 6x6 MIMO Stokes-space equalizer and compare its performance to a 6x6 MIMO LMS architecture. This method is suited to overcome DSP complexity and laser linewidth issues in SDM transmission systems....

  2. Operative Fixation Options for Elective and Diabetic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Ankle arthrodesis remains one of the most definitive treatment options for end-stage arthritis, paralysis, posttraumatic and postinfectious conditions, failed total ankle arthroplasty, and severe deformities. The general aims of ankle arthrodesis are to decrease pain and instability, correct the accompanying deformity, and create a stable plantigrade foot. Several surgical approaches have been reported for ankle arthrodesis with internal fixation options. External fixation has also evolved for ankle arthrodesis in certain clinical scenarios. This article provides a comprehensive analysis of midterm to long-term outcomes for ankle arthrodesis using internal and/or external fixation each for elective and diabetic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. PENGEMBANGAN SDM KESEHATAN DI ERA DESENTRALISASI DAN MEKANISME PASAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widodo J Pudjirahardjo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Political changes in health policy, pertaining to the regional autonomy in lndonesia, have caused changes in the structural and funetional components in the health field at Provincial and District level. The role of District Health Office becomes very essential in manage the health program and resources, including health human resources. Since the variability of resources between inter-regional health system is veryenormous, and same problems are existed, thus government should develop the system atie scenario of human resources management system. The scenario needs support from a leader that has visionary and transformationalleadership as well as entrepreneur and professionalism mindset to tackling the health problems in the regional area. In conclusion, despite the important role of District Health Office in managing the health human resources as the anticipation of the impact ofdecentralization, the health workers should also take the opportunities and challenge to provide program and health services that suffice the needs and demands of society Key words: health human resource, policy, leadership, decentralization ABSTRAK Perubahan politik dalam kebijakan kesehatan, khususnya terkait dengan otonomi daerah di lndonesia, menyebabkan perubahan pada komponen struktural dan fungsional pada level Provinsi dan Kabupaten/Kota. Peran Dinas Kesehatan Kabupaten dan Kota menjadi sangat vital dalam mengelola program sekaligus dalam pengelolaan sumber daya, termasuk SDM kesehatan. Karena variabilitas sistem kesehatan antardaerah yang sangat besar serta adanya berbagai kendala yang harus dihadapi dalam penyelenggaraan desentralisasi, maka pemerintah daerah harus mengembangkan sistem pengelolaan SDM yang secara sistematis. Selain itu, diperlukan kepemimpinan yang visioner dan transformasional sekaligus ber-mindset profesional dan berjiwa enterprenuer yang dapat mendorong implementasi desentralisasi kesehatan. Dapat disimpulkan bahwa peran Dinas

  4. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Ankle Sprain Treatment Page Content Article Body Acute ankle and ... Pediatrics summarizing the treatment phases of rehabilitation for ankle sprain. Phase Summary Description I Phase I treatment involves ...

  5. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000548.htm Ankle fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An ankle fracture is a break in 1 or more ankle ...

  6. Clinical evaluation of a new noninvasive ankle arthrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauck, Tanja; Lohrer, Heinz; Gollhofer, Albert

    2010-06-01

    A nonradiographic arthrometer was developed to objectively quantify anterior talar drawer instability in stable and unstable ankles. Diagnostic validity of this device was previously demonstrated in a cadaver study. The aim of the present study was to validate the ankle arthrometer in an in vivo setting. Twenty-three subjects participated in the study. An orthopedic surgeon first performed a manual anterior talar drawer test to classify the subjects' ankles as stable or unstable. The subjects were then evaluated using the ankle arthrometer, and filled out a validated self-reported questionnaire (German version of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure [FAAM-G]). Ankle stiffness was calculated from the low linear region (40-60 N) of the load deformation curves obtained from the ankle arthrometer. Reliability testing of these stiffness values was done based on load deformation curves, with 150 and 200 N maximum anterior drawer loads applied in the ankle arthrometer. Using the manual anterior drawer test, 16 ankles were classified as stable and 7 were classified as unstable. Arthrometer stiffness analysis differentiated stable from unstable ankles (P = 0.00 and P = 0.01, respectively). Test-retest demonstrated an accurate reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.80). A significant correlation was found between both FAAM-G subscales and the arthrometer stiffness values (r = 0.43 and 0.54; P = 0.04 and 0.01). Discussion Subjects with and without mechanical ankle instability could be differentiated by ankle arthrometer stiffness analysis and the FAAM-G questionnaire results. This nonradiographic device may be relevant for screening athletes at risk for ankle injuries, for clinical follow-up studies, and implementing preventive strategies. Validity and reliability of the new ankle arthrometer is demonstrated in a small cohort in an in vivo setting.

  7. SPICE SDM: Innovative Approaches for Linear Motion and Heat Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relecom, Ken; Larcheveque, Cyril; Constant, Joël; Autissier, Nordahl; Pornin, Arnaud; Martini, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    The SPICE Door Mechanism (SDM) is foreseen to be flown on Solar Orbiter, to close the SPICE instrument aperture and shield it from the solar flux and from contamination. The environment it is exposed to is particularly extreme, as the Solar Orbiter mission will reach a distance of 0.28 AU (41’887’403.8 km) to the Sun, and the SPICE instrument will be looking directly at it. Because of its position at the far end of a cantilevered structure, the SDM is also exposed to amplified launch loads and must remain very light and compact. The cleanliness constraints are also very tight, as the mechanism is positioned directly at the aperture of the SPICE spectrometer.To tackle these issues, two novelties were introduced on the SPICE Door Mechanism:- A specifically engineered reflective coating toprotect the Aluminium door from the heat generatedby the solar flux- The use of miniature profile rail type linearbearings to support the door during launch andallow its motion during the missionThis paper details the design and verification approach applied for these two innovations and for the mechanism as a whole, as well as the results and findings from the testing carried out on the Bread Board, Qualification and Flight models.

  8. The Sherborne Developmental Movement (SDM) Teaching Model for Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Meirav; Walter, Ofra

    2012-01-01

    Previously, the Sherborne Developmental Movement (SDM) has been found to contribute to the development of emotional competencies in higher education. This study presents and evaluates a teaching model based on SDM for the development of emotional competencies in teacher education. The study examined the contributions of this model to the increase…

  9. Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... top of the talus is dome-shaped and... Softball Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Your feet ... ankles take a beating when you are playing softball. Softball players should be aware of the following ...

  10. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with ...

  11. Advancements in ankle arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Important progress has been made during the past 30 years in arthroscopic ankle surgery. Ankle arthroscopy has gradually changed from a diagnostic to a therapeutic tool. Most arthroscopic procedures can be performed by using the anterior working area with the ankle in dorsiflexion or plantar

  12. Complications in ankle arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zengerink, Maartje; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    To determine the complication rate for ankle arthroscopy. A review of a consecutive series of patients undergoing ankle arthroscopy in our hospital between 1987 and 2006 was undertaken. Anterior ankle arthroscopy was performed by means of a 2-portal dorsiflexion method with intermittent soft tissue

  13. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  14. Ankle Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one ... muscles and tendons move it. The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is ...

  15. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. The SDM 3 Circle Model: A Literature Synthesis and Adaptation for Shared Decision Making in the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennke, Stephanie; Yuan, Patrick; Monash, Brad; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Chua, Ian; Harman, Stephanie; Sakai, Debbie S; Khan, Adeena; Hilton, Joan F; Shieh, Lisa; Satterfield, Jason

    2017-12-01

    Patient engagement through shared decision-making (SDM) is increasingly seen as a key component for patient safety, patient satisfaction, and quality of care. Current SDM models do not adequately account for medical and environmental contexts, which may influence medical decisions in the hospital. We identified leading SDM models and reviews to inductively construct a novel SDM model appropriate for the inpatient setting. A team of medicine and pediatric hospitalists reviewed the literature to integrate core SDM concepts and processes and iteratively constructed a synthesized draft model. We then solicited broad SDM expert feedback on the draft model for validation and further refinement. The SDM 3 Circle Model identifies 3 core categories of variables that dynamically interact within an "environmental frame." The resulting Venn diagram includes overlapping circles for (1) patient/family, (2) provider/team, and (3) medical context. The environmental frame includes all external, contextual factors that may influence any of the 3 circles. Existing multistep SDM process models were then rearticulated and contextualized to illustrate how a shared decision might be made. The SDM 3 Circle Model accounts for important environmental and contextual characteristics that vary across settings. The visual emphasis generated by each "circle" and by the environmental frame direct attention to often overlooked interactive forces and has the potential to more precisely define, promote, and improve SDM. This model provides a framework to develop interventions to improve quality and patient safety through SDM and patient engagement for hospitalists. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  17. Bedrock hydrogeology Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling, SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations at two different locations, the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 concept. Site characterisation should provide all data required for an integrated evaluation of the suitability of the investigated site and an important component in the characterisation work is the development of a hydrogeological model. The hydrogeological model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It also provides input to the safety assessment. Another important use of the hydrogeological model is in the environmental impact assessment. This report presents the understanding of the hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at Forsmark reached following the completion of the surface-based investigations and provides a summary of the bedrock hydrogeological model and the underlying data supporting its development. It constitutes the main reference on bedrock hydrogeology for the site descriptive model concluding the surface-based investigations at Forsmark, SDM-site, and is intended to describe the hydraulic properties and hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at the site and to give the information essential for demonstrating understanding

  18. Geology Laxemar. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlgren, Carl-Henric (Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)); Curtis, Philip; Hermanson, Jan; Forssberg, Ola; Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Fox, Aaron; La Pointe, Paul (Golder Associates Inc (United States)); Drake, Henrik (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Triumf, Carl-Axel; Mattsson, Haakan; Thunehed, Hans (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); Juhlin, Christopher (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    The geological work during the SDM Site Laxemar modelling stage has involved the continued development of deterministic models for rock domains (RSM) and deformation zones (ZSM), the identification and deterministic modelling of fracture domains (FSM), and the development of statistical models for fractures and minor deformation zones (geological discrete fracture network (DFN) modelling). The geological DFN model addresses fractures/structures with a size of less than 1 km, which is the lower cut-off of structures included in the deterministic modelling of deformation zones. In order to take account of variability in data resolution, deterministic models for rock domains and deformation zones are presented in both regional and local scale model volumes, while the geological DFN model is valid only within specific fracture domains inside the Laxemar local model volume. The geological and geophysical data that constitute the basis for the SDM-Site Laxemar modelling work comprise all data that have been acquired from Laxemar, i.e. all data that were available at the data freeze for SDM-Site Laxemar at August 31, 2007. Selected quality controlled data from the complementary cored borehole KLX27A have also been utilised in the modelling work. Data from the following investigations were acquired during the complete site investigation between the data freezes for Laxemar 1.2 and SDM-Site Laxemar as defined above: A revised bedrock geological map at the ground surface. Geological and geophysical data from 40 new cored boreholes and 14 percussion boreholes. Sampling and subsequent modal and geochemical analytical work of bedrock samples taken in connection with excavations in southern Laxemar. Detailed mapping of fractures and rock units along 10 trench excavations and 2 large surface exposures (drill sites for KLX09 and KLX11A/KLX20A). Special studies involving more detailed characterisation of deformation zones identified in the geological single-hole interpretation

  19. Geology Laxemar. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, Carl-Henric; Curtis, Philip; Hermanson, Jan; Forssberg, Ola; Oehman, Johan; Fox, Aaron; La Pointe, Paul; Drake, Henrik; Triumf, Carl-Axel; Mattsson, Haakan; Thunehed, Hans; Juhlin, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    The geological work during the SDM Site Laxemar modelling stage has involved the continued development of deterministic models for rock domains (RSM) and deformation zones (ZSM), the identification and deterministic modelling of fracture domains (FSM), and the development of statistical models for fractures and minor deformation zones (geological discrete fracture network (DFN) modelling). The geological DFN model addresses fractures/structures with a size of less than 1 km, which is the lower cut-off of structures included in the deterministic modelling of deformation zones. In order to take account of variability in data resolution, deterministic models for rock domains and deformation zones are presented in both regional and local scale model volumes, while the geological DFN model is valid only within specific fracture domains inside the Laxemar local model volume. The geological and geophysical data that constitute the basis for the SDM-Site Laxemar modelling work comprise all data that have been acquired from Laxemar, i.e. all data that were available at the data freeze for SDM-Site Laxemar at August 31, 2007. Selected quality controlled data from the complementary cored borehole KLX27A have also been utilised in the modelling work. Data from the following investigations were acquired during the complete site investigation between the data freezes for Laxemar 1.2 and SDM-Site Laxemar as defined above: A revised bedrock geological map at the ground surface. Geological and geophysical data from 40 new cored boreholes and 14 percussion boreholes. Sampling and subsequent modal and geochemical analytical work of bedrock samples taken in connection with excavations in southern Laxemar. Detailed mapping of fractures and rock units along 10 trench excavations and 2 large surface exposures (drill sites for KLX09 and KLX11A/KLX20A). Special studies involving more detailed characterisation of deformation zones identified in the geological single-hole interpretation

  20. Enterprise Human Resources Integration-Statistical Data Mart (EHRI-SDM) Status Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Enterprise Human Resources Integration-Statistical Data Mart (EHRI-SDM) is a statistically cleansed sub-set of the data contained in the EHRI data warehouse. It...

  1. Enterprise Human Resources Integration-Statistical Data Mart (EHRI-SDM) Dynamics Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Enterprise Human Resources Integration-Statistical Data Mart (EHRI-SDM) is a statistically cleansed sub-set of the data contained in the EHRI data warehouse. It...

  2. Capacity for patterns and sequences in Kanerva's SDM as compared to other associative memory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, James D.

    1987-01-01

    The information capacity of Kanerva's Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) and Hopfield-type neural networks is investigated. Under the approximations used, it is shown that the total information stored in these systems is proportional to the number connections in the network. The proportionality constant is the same for the SDM and Hopfield-type models independent of the particular model, or the order of the model. The approximations are checked numerically. This same analysis can be used to show that the SDM can store sequences of spatiotemporal patterns, and the addition of time-delayed connections allows the retrieval of context dependent temporal patterns. A minor modification of the SDM can be used to store correlated patterns.

  3. Vladimir Byurchiev, Ankle Bones

    OpenAIRE

    Churyumov, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Vladimir says that today not many children play with ankle bones. He recalls when he was young, children played with bones more often. According to Vladimir, various games using ankle bones develop flexibility, agility, and muscle in children’s hands. Ankles bones are taken from the back legs of a cow or a sheep. It is possible to determine the age and health of animals by examining this particular bone. Arcadia

  4. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  5. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  6. Dutch Translation and Psychometric Testing of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) and Shared Decision Making Questionnaire-Physician Version (SDM-Q-Doc) in Primary and Secondary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg-Vandenbussche, Sumayah; Pieterse, Arwen H; Kroonenberg, Pieter M; Scholl, Isabelle; van der Weijden, Trudy; Luyten, Gre P M; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M; den Ouden, Henk; Carlier, Ingrid V E; van Vliet, Irene M; Zitman, Frans G; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    The SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc measure patient and physician perception of the extent of shared decision making (SDM) during a physician-patient consultation. So far, no self-report instrument for SDM was available in Dutch, and validation of the scales in other languages has been limited. The aim of this study was to translate both scales into Dutch and assess their psychometric characteristics. Participants were patients and their treating physicians (general practitioners and medical specialists). Patients (N = 182) rated their consultation using the SDM-Q-9, 43 physicians rated their consultations using the SDM-Q-Doc (N = 201). Acceptability, reliability (internal consistency), and the factorial structure of the instruments were determined. For convergent validity the CPSpost was used. Reliabilities of both scales were high (alpha SDM-Q-9 0.88; SDM-Q-Doc 0.87). The SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc total scores correlated as expected with the CPSpost (SDM-Q-9: r = 0.29; SDM-Q-Doc: r = 0.48) and were significantly different between the CPSpost categories, with lowest mean scores when the physician made the decision alone. Principal Component Analyses showed a two-component model for each scale. A confirmatory factor analysis yielded a mediocre, but acceptable, one-factor model, if Item 1 was excluded; for both scales the best indices of fit were obtained for a one-factor solution, if both Items 1 and 9 were excluded. The Dutch SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc demonstrate good acceptance and reliability; they correlated as expected with the CPSpost and are suitable for use in Dutch primary and specialised care. Although the best model fit was found when excluding Items 1 and 9, we believe these items address important aspects of SDM. Therefore, also based on the coherence with theory and comparability with other studies, we suggest keeping all nine items of the scale. Further research on the SDM-concept in patients and physicians, in different clinical settings and different countries, is

  7. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  8. Sprained ankle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint. Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, ...

  9. MAPPIN'SDM--the multifocal approach to sharing in shared decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Kasper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The wide scale permeation of health care by the shared decision making concept (SDM reflects its relevance and advanced stage of development. An increasing number of studies evaluating the efficacy of SDM use instruments based on various sub-constructs administered from different viewpoints. However, as the concept has never been captured in operable core definition it is quite difficult to link these parts of evidence. This study aims at investigating interrelations of SDM indicators administered from different perspectives. METHOD: A comprehensive inventory was developed mapping judgements from different perspectives (observer, doctor, patient and constructs (behavior, perception referring to three units (doctor, patient, doctor-patient-dyad and an identical set of SDM-indicators. The inventory adopted the existing approaches, but added additional observer foci (patient and doctor-patient-dyad and relevant indicators hitherto neglected by existing instruments. The complete inventory comprising a doctor-patient-questionnaire and an observer-instrument was applied to 40 decision consultations from 10 physicians from different medical fields. Convergent validities were calculated on the basis of Pearson correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Reliabilities for all scales were high to excellent. No correlations were found between observer and patients or physicians neither for means nor for single items. Judgements of doctors and patients were moderately related. Correlations between the observer scales and within the subjective perspectives were high. Inter-perspective agreement was not related to SDM performance or patient activity. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates the contribution to involvement made by each of the relevant perspectives and emphasizes the need for an inter-subjective approach regarding SDM measurement.

  10. Confidence assessment. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Laxemar). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface-based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. Procedures for this assessment have been progressively refined during the course of the site descriptive modelling, and applied to all previous versions of the Forsmark and Laxemar site descriptive models. They include assessment of whether all relevant data have been considered and understood, identification of the main uncertainties and their causes, possible alternative models and their handling, and consistency between disciplines. The assessment then forms the basis for an overall confidence statement. The confidence in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface based site investigations, has been assessed by exploring: - Confidence in the site characterization data base, - remaining issues and their handling, - handling of alternatives, - consistency between disciplines and - main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. Generally, the site investigation database is of high quality, as assured by the quality procedures applied. It is judged that the Laxemar site descriptive model has an overall high level of confidence. Because of the relatively robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in the Laxemar Site Descriptive model is judged to be high, even though details of the spatial variability remain unknown. The overall reason for this confidence is the wide spatial distribution of the data and the consistency between

  11. Confidence assessment. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Laxemar). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface-based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. Procedures for this assessment have been progressively refined during the course of the site descriptive modelling, and applied to all previous versions of the Forsmark and Laxemar site descriptive models. They include assessment of whether all relevant data have been considered and understood, identification of the main uncertainties and their causes, possible alternative models and their handling, and consistency between disciplines. The assessment then forms the basis for an overall confidence statement. The confidence in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface based site investigations, has been assessed by exploring: - Confidence in the site characterization data base, - remaining issues and their handling, - handling of alternatives, - consistency between disciplines and - main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. Generally, the site investigation database is of high quality, as assured by the quality procedures applied. It is judged that the Laxemar site descriptive model has an overall high level of confidence. Because of the relatively robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in the Laxemar Site Descriptive model is judged to be high, even though details of the spatial variability remain unknown. The overall reason for this confidence is the wide spatial distribution of the data and the consistency between

  12. Development and psychometric properties of the Shared Decision Making Questionnaire--physician version (SDM-Q-Doc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Isabelle; Kriston, Levente; Dirmaier, Jörg; Buchholz, Angela; Härter, Martin

    2012-08-01

    To develop and psychometrically test a brief instrument for assessing the physician's perspective of the shared decision-making process in clinical encounters. We adapted the 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) for patients to generate a new version for physicians (SDM-Q-Doc). The physician version was tested in clinical encounters between 29 physicians and 324 patients in German outpatient care contexts. Analyses of the extent to which the instrument was accepted, the reliability of the instrument, and the factorial structure of the scale were performed. Physicians showed a high level of acceptance toward the SDM-Q-Doc. Item discrimination parameters were above .4 for all but one item. An analysis of internal consistency yielded a Cronbach's α of .88. Factor analysis confirmed a one-dimensional structure. The results of this study suggest that the SDM-Q-Doc is a well-accepted and reliable instrument for assessing the physician's perspective during SDM processes in clinical encounters. To our knowledge, the SDM-Q-Doc is the first psychometrically tested scale available for assessing the physician's perspective. The SDM-Q-Doc can be used in studies that analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of SDM and as a quality indicator in quality assurance programs and health service assessments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 1.28 Tbaud Nyquist-OTDM Transmission over a 7-Core Fiber Using an On-Chip SDM Coupler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hao; Medhin, Ashenafi Kiros; Ye, Feihong

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated the first 1.28-Tbaud Nyquist-OTDM-SDM transmission over a 67.4 - km seven-core fiber with an aggregated data rate of 7.2 Tbit/s using a silicon SDM coupler. 10 - GHz control pulses were transmitted through the center core...

  14. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul [Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Dae Kyung Imaging Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized.

  15. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul; Lee, Sung Moon

    2017-01-01

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized

  16. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  17. Analysis of PITFL injuries in rotationally unstable ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Stephen J; Garner, Matthew R; Schottel, Patrick C; Hinds, Richard M; Loftus, Michael L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-04-01

    Reduction and stabilization of the syndesmosis in unstable ankle fractures is important for ankle mortise congruity and restoration of normal tibiotalar contact forces. Of the syndesmotic ligaments, the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL) provides the most strength for maintaining syndesmotic stability, and previous work has demonstrated the significance of restoring PITFL function when it remains attached to a posterior malleolus fracture fragment. However, little is known regarding the nature of a PITFL injury in the absence of a posterior malleolus fracture. The goal of this study was to describe the PITFL injury pattern based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative observation. A prospective database of all operatively treated ankle fractures by a single surgeon was used to identify all supination-external rotation (SER) types III and IV ankle fracture patients with complete preoperative orthogonal ankle radiographs and MRI. All patients with a posterior malleolus fracture were excluded. Using a combination of preoperative imaging and intraoperative findings, we analyzed the nature of injuries to the PITFL. In total, 185 SER III and IV operatively treated ankle fractures with complete imaging were initially identified. Analysis of the preoperative imaging and operative reports revealed 34% (63/185) had a posterior malleolus fracture and were excluded. From the remaining 122 ankle fractures, the PITFL was delaminated from the posterior malleolus in 97% (119/122) of cases. A smaller proportion (3%; 3/122) had an intrasubstance PITFL rupture. Accurate and stable syndesmotic reduction is a significant component of restoring the ankle mortise after unstable ankle fractures. In our large cohort of rotationally unstable ankle fractures without posterior malleolus fractures, we found that most PITFL injuries occur as a delamination off the posterior malleolus. This predictable PITFL injury pattern may be used to guide new methods for

  18. Confidence assessment. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Forsmark site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Forsmark). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. The confidence in the Forsmark site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface-based site investigations, have been assessed by exploring: Confidence in the site characterisation data base; Key remaining issues and their handling; Handling of alternative models; Consistency between disciplines; and, Main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. It is generally found that the key aspects of importance for safety assessment and repository engineering of the Forsmark site descriptive model are associated with a high degree of confidence. Because of the robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in Forsmark site descriptive model is judged to be high. While some aspects have lower confidence this lack of confidence is handled by providing wider uncertainty ranges, bounding estimates and/or alternative models. Most, but not all, of the low confidence aspects have little impact on repository engineering design or for long-term safety. Poor precision in the measured data are judged to have limited impact on uncertainties on the site descriptive model, with the exceptions of inaccuracy in determining the position of some boreholes at depth in 3-D space, as well as the poor precision of the orientation of BIPS images in some boreholes, and the poor precision of stress data determined by overcoring at the locations where the pre

  19. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) in the Dutch population with and without complaints of ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuurberg, Gwendolyn; Kluit, Lana; van Dijk, C Niek

    2018-03-01

    To develop a translated Dutch version of the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) and test its psychometric properties in a Dutch population with foot and ankle complaints. The CAIT was translated into the Dutch language using a forward-backward translation design. Of the 130 subsequent patients visiting the outpatient clinic for foot and ankle complaints who were asked to fill out a questionnaire containing the CAIT, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), and the numeric rating scale (NRS) pain, 98 completed the questionnaire. After a 1-week period, patients were asked to fill out a second questionnaire online containing the CAIT and NRS pain. This second questionnaire was completed by 70 patients. With these data, the construct validity, test-retest reliability, internal consistency, measurement error, and ceiling and floor effects were assessed. Additionally, a cut-off value to discriminate between stable and unstable ankles, in patients with ankle complaints, was calculated. Construct validity showed moderate correlations between the CAIT and FAOS subscales (Spearman's correlation coefficient (SCC) = 0.36-0.43), and the NRS pain (SCC = -0.55). The cut-off value was found at 11.5 points of the total CAIT score (range 0-30). Test-retest reliability showed to be excellent with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.94. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α = 0.86). No ceiling or floor effects were detected. Based on the results, the Dutch version of the CAIT is a valid and reliable questionnaire to assess ankle instability in the Dutch population and is able to differentiate between a functionally unstable and stable ankle. The tool is the first suitable tool to objectify the severity of ankle instability specific complaints and assess change in the Dutch population. Level of evidence II.

  20. 300 Gb/s IM/DD based SDM-WDM-PON with laserless ONUs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Fangdi; Morioka, Toshio; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2018-01-01

    A low-cost, high-speed SDM-WDM-PON architecture is proposed by using a multi-core fiber (MCF) and intensity modulation/directly detection (IM/DD). One of the MCF cores is used for sending laser sources from optical line terminal (OLT) to optical network unit (ONU), thus facilitating laserless...

  1. Peculiarities in Ankle Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Kaenkumchorn, Tanyaporn; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Wimmer, Markus A; Chubinskaya, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is the most common form of osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint. PTOA occurs as a result of several factors, including the poor regenerative capacity of hyaline articular cartilage as well as increased contact stresses following trauma. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and potential targets for treatment of PTOA in the ankle joint. Previous reviews primarily addressed clinical approaches to ankle PTOA, while the focus of the current article will be specifically on the newly acquired knowledge of the cellular mechanisms that drive PTOA in the ankle joint and means for potential targeted therapeutics that might halt the progression of cartilage degeneration and/or improve the outcome of surgical interventions. Three experimental treatment strategies are discussed in this review: (1) increasing the anabolic potential of chondrocytes through treatment with growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-7; (2) limiting chondrocyte cell death either through the protection of cell membrane with poloxamer 188 or inhibiting activity of intracellular proteases, caspases, which are responsible for cell death by apoptosis; and (3) inhibiting catabolic/inflammatory responses of chondrocytes by treating them with anti-inflammatory agents such as tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists. Future studies should focus on identifying the appropriate timing for treatment and an appropriate combination of anti-inflammatory, chondro- and matrix-protective biologics to limit the progression of trauma-induced cartilage degeneration and prevent the development of PTOA in the ankle joint.

  2. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... top of the talus is dome-shaped and... Softball Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Your feet ... ankles take a beating when you are playing softball. Softball players should be aware of the following ...

  3. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of ankle sprains treated with an orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simoni, C; Wetz, H H; Zanetti, M; Hodler, J; Jacob, H; Zollinger, H

    1996-03-01

    This is a prospective clinical study of treatment of ankle sprains with an ankle brace that permits ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of 20 degrees, but limits inversion and eversion for 6 weeks. The ankle brace is followed by physiotherapy for another 6 weeks. Thirty patients were evaluated with clinical examination and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before treatment and after 12 weeks of treatment. MR imaging revealed acute tears in the anterior talofibular ligament in all 30 ankles (100%) and tears in the calcaneofibular ligament in 25 of 30 ankles (83%). At 12 weeks after injury, MR evidence of healing was present for the anterior talofibular ligament in 22 of 30 ankles (73%) and for the calcaneofibular ligament in 23 of 25 ankles (92%). Postural sway analysis after therapy was used to quantify functional stability of the ankle. There was no correlation with MR findings, but there was a correlation with the subjective impression of functional instability. Twenty-eight of 30 patients (93%) had a functionally stable ankle after 12 weeks of treatment. MR findings after ankle sprain could not predict clinical outcome.

  4. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  5. [Eleven-Year Experience with Total Ankle Arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelka, S; Sosna, A; Vavřík, P; Jahoda, D; Barták, V; Landor, I

    2016-01-01

    frequent complication and had to be removed in six patients (4.5%). No early infection was recorded and late infection was treated in three patients. The prosthesis had to be removed and ankle arthrodesis performed in seven patients (5.3%). All had necrosis of the talus with ankle instability. In five, the retrograde nail Medin was used and extensive defects remaining after talar necrosis were filled with massive bone grafts obtained from a bone bank. One patient required tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis with external fixator; surgery in one case involved the use of a Zimmer Trabecular Metal Ankle Fusion Spacer with retrograde nail fixation. The development of cystic radiolucencies adjacent to tibial or talar components presents another post-operative complication. It was recorded mostly in the patients after AES implantation, in whom eight of 52 (15.3%) had these findings. DISCUSSION Total ankle arthroplasty is a complicated surgical procedure potentially associated with various technical problems. The occurrence of complications is indirectly related to the experience of the orthopaedist performing surgery; literature data show that the number of complication decreases with an increased frequency of ankle replacements done. CONCLUSIONS Total ankle arthroplasty, as every orthopaedic surgery, has its advantages and disadvantages. The positive aspects are pain relief and improved mobility of the ankle allowing for physiological gait. However, it shows a lower survivorship rate that the other large joint replacements. A successful outcome depends on the correct indication. The ankle should be stable, the talus without signs of necrosis and valgus or varus deviations of the ankle should not exceed 10 to 15 degrees. total ankle arthroplasty, re-implantation, aseptic loosening, retrograde nail, Trabecular Metal spacer, revision arthroplasty.

  6. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); MacKenzie, Angus B. (SUERC, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Suksi, Juhani (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-08-15

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  7. Capacity for patterns and sequences in Kanerva's SDM as compared to other associative memory models. [Sparse, Distributed Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The information capacity of Kanerva's Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) and Hopfield-type neural networks is investigated. Under the approximations used here, it is shown that the total information stored in these systems is proportional to the number connections in the network. The proportionality constant is the same for the SDM and Hopfield-type models independent of the particular model, or the order of the model. The approximations are checked numerically. This same analysis can be used to show that the SDM can store sequences of spatiotemporal patterns, and the addition of time-delayed connections allows the retrieval of context dependent temporal patterns. A minor modification of the SDM can be used to store correlated patterns.

  8. Refining a brief decision aid in stable CAD: cognitive interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly-Blake, Karen; Clark, Stacie; Dontje, Katherine; Olomu, Adesuwa; Henry, Rebecca C; Rovner, David R; Rothert, Marilyn L; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the results of cognitive interviews to refine the “Making Choices©” Decision Aid (DA) for shared decision-making (SDM) about stress testing in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We conducted a systematic development process to design a DA consistent with International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) focused on Alpha testing criteria. Cognitive interviews were conducted with ten stable CAD patients using the “think aloud” interview techniq...

  9. Efficient conversion of phenylpyruvic acid to phenyllactic acid by using whole cells of Bacillus coagulans SDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Ma, Cuiqing; Gao, Chao; Li, Fengsong; Qin, Jiayang; Zhang, Haiwei; Wang, Kai; Xu, Ping

    2011-04-20

    Phenyllactic acid (PLA), a novel antimicrobial compound with broad and effective antimicrobial activity against both bacteria and fungi, can be produced by many microorganisms, especially lactic acid bacteria. However, the concentration and productivity of PLA have been low in previous studies. The enzymes responsible for conversion of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) into PLA are equivocal. A novel thermophilic strain, Bacillus coagulans SDM, was isolated for production of PLA. When the solubility and dissolution rate of PPA were enhanced at a high temperature, whole cells of B. coagulans SDM could effectively convert PPA into PLA at a high concentration (37.3 g l(-1)) and high productivity (2.3 g l(-1) h(-1)) under optimal conditions. Enzyme activity staining and kinetic studies identified NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenases as the key enzymes that reduced PPA to PLA. Taking advantage of the thermophilic character of B. coagulans SDM, a high yield and productivity of PLA were obtained. The enzymes involved in PLA production were identified and characterized, which makes possible the rational design and construction of microorganisms suitable for PLA production with metabolic engineering.

  10. Efficient conversion of phenylpyruvic acid to phenyllactic acid by using whole cells of Bacillus coagulans SDM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojuan Zheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenyllactic acid (PLA, a novel antimicrobial compound with broad and effective antimicrobial activity against both bacteria and fungi, can be produced by many microorganisms, especially lactic acid bacteria. However, the concentration and productivity of PLA have been low in previous studies. The enzymes responsible for conversion of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA into PLA are equivocal.A novel thermophilic strain, Bacillus coagulans SDM, was isolated for production of PLA. When the solubility and dissolution rate of PPA were enhanced at a high temperature, whole cells of B. coagulans SDM could effectively convert PPA into PLA at a high concentration (37.3 g l(-1 and high productivity (2.3 g l(-1 h(-1 under optimal conditions. Enzyme activity staining and kinetic studies identified NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenases as the key enzymes that reduced PPA to PLA.Taking advantage of the thermophilic character of B. coagulans SDM, a high yield and productivity of PLA were obtained. The enzymes involved in PLA production were identified and characterized, which makes possible the rational design and construction of microorganisms suitable for PLA production with metabolic engineering.

  11. Complications of ankle fracture in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Liporace, Frank A; Gandhi, Ankur; Donley, Brian G; Pinzur, Michael S; Lin, Sheldon S

    2008-03-01

    Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus have long been recognized as a challenge to practicing clinicians. Complications of impaired wound healing, infection, malunion, delayed union, nonunion, and Charcot arthropathy are prevalent in this patient population. Controversy exists as to whether diabetic ankle fractures are best treated noninvasively or by open reduction and internal fixation. Patients with diabetes are at significant risk for soft-tissue complications. In addition, diabetic ankle fractures heal, but significant delays in bone healing exist. Also, Charcot ankle arthropathy occurs more commonly in patients who were initially undiagnosed and had a delay in immobilization and in patients treated nonsurgically for displaced ankle fractures. Several techniques have been described to minimize complications associated with diabetic ankle fractures (eg, rigid external fixation, use of Kirschner wires or Steinmann pins to increase rigidity). Regardless of the specifics of treatment, adherence to the basic principles of preoperative planning, meticulous soft-tissue management, and attention to stable, rigid fixation with prolonged, protected immobilization are paramount in minimizing problems and yielding good functional outcomes.

  12. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholmer, E.; Foged, N.; Jensen, J. Th.

    1978-01-01

    Arthrography was performed in 105 cases with freshly sprained ankles and signs of rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. They were subsequently operated upon. The arthrographic films were examined retrospectively to assess the value of different criteria for the differential diagnosis between rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament and combined rupture of this and the calcaneofibular ligament. The diagnostic value of arthrography was found to be high in isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament, and is acceptable in the combined ruptures. (Auth.)

  13. Acute ankle sprain in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers. Because of the relative frequency of this injury and its wide acceptance as a likely part of an active lifestyle, in many individuals it may not receive the careful attention it deserves. An extreme ankle range of motion and excellent ankle stability are fundamental to success in dance. Hence, following a proper treatment protocol is crucial for allowing a dancer who suffers an ankle sprain to return to dance as soon as possible without impaired function. This article reviews the basic principles of the etiology and management of ankle sprain in dancers. Key concepts are on-site examination and treatment, early restoration, dance-specific rehabilitation, and a carefully administered safe return to dance. Additionally, injuries that may occur in conjunction with ankle sprain are highlighted, and practical, clinically relevant summary concepts for dance healthcare professionals, dance scientists, dance teachers, and dancers are provided.

  14. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  15. Mobile ankle and knee perturbator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jacob Buus; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    A mobile ankle and knee perturbator has been developed. It consists of a functional joint with an integrated clutch. Four Bowden wires connect the joint to a powerful motor and a double pneumatic cylinder. When needed during any time of the gait cycle, it is possible to impose an ankle rotation by engaging the clutch and rotating the ankle or knee joint with a predefined displacement. The system is designed to investigate electrophysiological and biomechanical features of the human ankle or knee joint during gait.

  16. Functional Instability of the Ankle Joint: Etiopathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan ÖRSÇELİK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. Chronic ankle instability is a common complication of ankle sprains. Two causes of chronic ankle instability are mechanical instability and functional instability. It is important to understand functional instability etiopathogenesis of the ankle joint in order to guide diagnosis and treatment. This article aims to understand the etiopathogenesis of functional ankle instability.

  17. Investigating a training supporting shared decision making (IT'S SDM 2011: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiger Friedemann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Shared Decision Making (SDM is regarded as the best practice model for the communicative challenge of decision making about treatment or diagnostic options. However, randomized controlled trials focusing the effectiveness of SDM trainings are rare and existing measures of SDM are increasingly challenged by the latest research findings. This study will 1 evaluate a new physicians' communication training regarding patient involvement in terms of SDM, 2 validate SDMMASS, a new compound measure of SDM, and 3 evaluate the effects of SDM on the perceived quality of the decision process and on the elaboration of the decision. Methods In a multi-center randomized controlled trial with a waiting control group, 40 physicians from 7 medical fields are enrolled. Each physician contributes a sequence of four medical consultations including a diagnostic or treatment decision. The intervention consists of two condensed video-based individual coaching sessions (15min. supported by a manual and a DVD. The interventions alternate with three measurement points plus follow up (6 months. Realized patient involvement is measured using the coefficient SDMMASS drawn from the Multifocal Approach to the Sharing in SDM (MAPPIN'SDM which includes objective involvement, involvement as perceived by the patient, and the doctor-patient concordance regarding their judges of the involvement. For validation purposes, all three components of SDMMASS are supplemented by similar measures, the OPTION observer scale, the Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q and the dyadic application of the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS. Training effects are analyzed using t-tests. Spearman correlation coefficients are used to determine convergent validities, the influence of involvement (SDMMASS on the perceived decision quality (DCS and on the elaboration of the decision. The latter is operationalised by the ELAB coefficient from the UP24 (Uncertainty Profile, 24 items version

  18. Talofibular compartment of the ankle joint after recent ankle sprain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrand, A.; Mortensson, W.; Norman, O.

    1978-01-01

    The validity of predicting the condition of the anterior talofibular ligament from the shape of the lateral compartment of the ankle joint was investigated in patients with recent ankle sprain. The diagnostic value of the method was found to be restricted. (Auth.)

  19. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15?h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ank...

  20. Ultrasonography of ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peetrons, P.A.; Silvestre, A.; Cohen, M.; Creteur, V.

    2002-01-01

    The lateral collateral ligament of the ankle is a complex of 3 ligaments: The anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments and the calcaneofibular ligament; these ligaments work together to support the lateral aspect of the ankle. The anterior talofibular (ATF) ligament (Fig. 1) runs from the anterior of the talus. The probe is placed in a slightly oblique position from the malleolus toward the forefoot. The ligament is hyperechoic when its fibres are perpendicular to the ultrasound beam (anisotropy artifact is present in ligaments as well as in tendons). It is approximately 2 mm thick and, during examination, must be straight and tight from one insertion point to the other, as seen in Fig. 2. The posterior talofibular (PTF) ligament, which runs from the posterior part of the malleolus to the posterior part of the talus, is difficult to see on US, being partially or sometimes completely hidden by the malleolus. The calcaneofibular ligament forms the middle portion of the lateral collateral ligament. It is tight between the inferior part of the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus, and runs in a slightly posterior oblique direction toward the heel (Fig. 3). The ligament lies on the deep surface of the fibular tendons, forming a hammock to fall deep on the calcaneus surface (Fig. 4). The calcaneofibular ligament is approximately 2-3 nun thick and is hyperechoic in the distal two-thirds only because of the obliquity of the proximal part. When examining this ligament, it is mandatory that the ankle be flexed dorsally; this stretches the ligament so that it can be seen clearly. (author)

  1. Arthroscopy of the ankle joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Scholte, D.

    1997-01-01

    Ankle arthroscopy has become a standard procedure for a variety of indications. Joint distraction is applied by many authors. A recent retrospective multicentre study provoked the following questions. Is there an indication for diagnostic arthroscopy? Can arthroscopic surgery of the ankle joint be

  2. Ankle Fractures: The Operative Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hafiz Z

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ankle fractures are commonly seen in orthopaedic practice. This retrospective study of patients with ankle fractures who underwent surgical treatment in our institution from January 2000 to December 2003 was undertaken to analyze the common causes and patterns of ankle fractures; and the functional outcome of operative treatment for these fractures. Eighty patients were identified and reviewed. There were 65 male (81.3% and 15 female patients (18.7% with age ranging from 13 to 71 years old (mean, 32.3y. Common causes of ankle fractures were trauma (especially motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries and the osteoporotic bones in the elderly. Weber C (64.0% was the most common pattern of fracture at presentation. The most common operative treatment for ankle fractures was open reduction and internal fixation (73 patients, 91.2%. Excellent and good outcomes were achieved in 93.8% of cases when measured using the Olerud and Molander scoring system for foot and ankle. In conclusion, operative treatment for ankle fractures restores sufficient stability and allowed mobility of the ankle joint.

  3. Validation of SDM-Q-Doc Questionnaire to measure shared decision-making physician's perspective in oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, C; Ferrando, P J; Carmona-Bayonas, A; Lorenzo-Seva, U; Jara, C; Beato, C; García, T; Ramchandani, A; Castelo, B; Muñoz, M M; Garcia, S; Higuera, O; Mangas-Izquierdo, M; Jimenez-Fonseca, P

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Shared Decision-Making Questionnaire-Physician version (SDM-Q-Doc) in a sample of medical oncologists who provide adjuvant treatment to patients with non-metastatic resected cancer and the correlations between the total SDM-Q-Doc score and physician satisfaction with the information provided. Prospective, observational and multicenter study in which 32 medical oncologists and 520 patients were recruited. The psychometric properties, dimensionality, and factor structure of the SDM-Q-Doc were assessed. Exploratory factor analyses suggested that the most likely solution was two-dimensional, with two correlated factors: one factor regarding information and another one about treatment. Confirmatory factor analysis based on cross-validation showed that the fitted two-dimensional solution provided the best fit to the data. Reliability analyses revealed good accuracy for the derived scores, both total and sub-scale, with estimates ranging from 0.81 to 0.89. The results revealed significant correlations between the total SDM-Q-Doc score and physician satisfaction with the information provided (p Doc showed good psychometric properties and could be a helpful tool that examines physician's perspective of SDM and as an indicator of quality and satisfaction in patients with cancer.

  4. The management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Kline, Alex J

    2008-07-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have higher complication rates following both open and closed management of ankle fractures. Diabetic patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy have higher complication rates than both diabetic patients without these comorbidities and nondiabetic patients. Unstable ankle fractures in diabetic patients without neuropathy or vasculopathy are best treated with open reduction and internal fixation with use of standard techniques. Patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy are at increased risk for both soft-tissue and osseous complications, including delayed union and nonunion. Careful soft-tissue management as well as stable, rigid internal fixation are crucial to obtaining a good outcome. Prolonged non-weight-bearing and subsequently protected weight-bearing are recommended following both operative and nonoperative management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

  5. MRI of ankle sprain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Gen

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  6. MRI of ankle sprain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Gen [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  7. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  8. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  9. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES - IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important...... to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used...... balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). DESIGN: Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. METHODS: Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using...

  10. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES - IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. RESULTS: Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared......BACKGROUND: A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important...... to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used...

  11. The effects of total ankle replacement on ankle joint mechanics during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Wang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Three months after surgeries, the STAA patients experienced improvements in ankle function and gait parameters. The STAA ankle demonstrated improved ankle mechanics during daily activities such as walking.

  12. Gait Selection and Transition of Passivity-Based Bipeds with Adaptable Ankle Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Stable bipedal walking is one of the most important components of humanoid robot design, which can help us better understand natural human walking. In this paper, to study gait selection and gait transition of efficient bipedal walking, we proposed a dynamic bipedal walking model with an upper body, flat feet and compliant joints. The model can achieve stable cyclic motion with different walking gaits. The hip actuation and ankle stiffness behavior of the model are quite similar to those of human normal walking. In simulation, we studied the influence of hip actuation and ankle stiffness on walking performance of each gait. The effects of ankle stiffness on gait selection are also analyzed. Gait transition is realized by adjusting ankle stiffness during walking.

  13. Arthrography of the ankle sprains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee

    1985-01-01

    Ankle arthrography, by direct puncture of joint cavity, is considered to be a simple and accurate diagnostic method for a precise evaluation of ligamentous injury. Forty-seven cases of ankle arthrography were successively performed in the patients of acute ankle sprains. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how ankle arthrography can delineate the pathologic anatomy in such cases. The results are as follows: 1. Thirty cases among forty seven revealed the findings of ligament tears. 2. For better diagnostic accuracy, the arthrography should be performed within 72 hrs. after injury. 3. The anterior talofibular ligament tears were the most common (twenty-nine cases) of all and seventeen of them revealed tears without association of any other ligament tears. 4. There were ten cases of calcaneofibular ligament tears and nine of them were associated with anterior talofibular ligament tears. 5. Three cases of anterior tibiofibular and one deltoid ligament tears were demonstrated

  14. Postoperative MRI of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharabianlou Korth, M.; Fritz, L.B.

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative imaging of the ankle can be challenging, even for the experienced radiologist. Pathological and postoperative changes to the primarily complex anatomy of the ankle with its great variety of bone structures, tendons, ligaments, and soft tissue in a very limited space may cause great difficulty in differentiating underlying pathology from expected postoperative changes and artifacts, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Selecting the appropriate radiological modality is key to making the correct diagnosis. Therefore, knowledge of the initial and current symptoms is just as important as familiarity with the most frequently performed operations in the ankle. This article aims to give its reader a summary of the most important and frequently performed operation techniques of the ankle and discusses the expected appearance and possible complications in postoperative imaging. (orig.) [de

  15. Complications in ankle fracture surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ovaska, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Mikko Ovaska. Complications in Ankle Fracture Surgery. Helsinki Bone and Joint Research Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. Helsinki 2014. Ankle fractures are among the most frequently encountered surgically treated fractures. The operative treatment of this fracture may be associated with several complications. The most frequently encountered complications are related wound healing, and deep infection may have d...

  16. Geological discrete fracture network model for the Laxemar site. Site Descriptive Modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Pointe, Paul; Fox, Aaron (Golder Associates Inc (United States)); Hermanson, Jan; Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is performing site characterization at two different locations, Forsmark and Laxemar, in order to locate a site for a final geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. The program is built upon the development of Site Descriptive Models (SDMs) at specific timed data freezes. Each SDM is formed from discipline-specific reports from across the scientific spectrum. This report describes the methods, analyses, and conclusions of the modelling team in the production of the SDM-Site Laxemar geological discrete-fracture network (DFN) model. The DFN builds upon the work of other geological models, including the deformation zone and rock domain models. The geological DFN is a statistical model for stochastically simulating rock fractures and minor deformation zones at a scale of less than 1,000 m (the lower cut-off of the DZ models). The geological DFN is valid within six distinct fracture domains inside the Laxemar local model subarea: FSM{sub C}, FSM{sub E}W007, FSM{sub N}, FSM{sub N}E005, FSM{sub S}, and FSM{sub W}. The models are built using data from detailed surface outcrop maps, geophysical lineament maps, and the cored borehole record at Laxemar. The conceptual model for the SDM-Site Laxemar geological DFN model revolves around the identification of fracture domains based on relative fracture set intensities, orientation clustering, and the regional tectonic framework (including deformation zones). A single coupled fracture size/fracture intensity concept (the Base Model) based on a Pareto (power-law) distribution for fracture sizes was chosen as the recommended parameterisation. A slew of alternative size-intensity models were also carried through the fracture analyses and into the uncertainty and model verification analyses. Uncertainty is modelled by analysing the effects on fracture intensity (P32) that alternative model cases can have. Uncertainty is parameterised as a ratio between the P32 of the

  17. Geological discrete fracture network model for the Laxemar site. Site Descriptive Modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Pointe, Paul; Fox, Aaron; Hermanson, Jan; Oehman, Johan

    2008-10-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is performing site characterization at two different locations, Forsmark and Laxemar, in order to locate a site for a final geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. The program is built upon the development of Site Descriptive Models (SDMs) at specific timed data freezes. Each SDM is formed from discipline-specific reports from across the scientific spectrum. This report describes the methods, analyses, and conclusions of the modelling team in the production of the SDM-Site Laxemar geological discrete-fracture network (DFN) model. The DFN builds upon the work of other geological models, including the deformation zone and rock domain models. The geological DFN is a statistical model for stochastically simulating rock fractures and minor deformation zones at a scale of less than 1,000 m (the lower cut-off of the DZ models). The geological DFN is valid within six distinct fracture domains inside the Laxemar local model subarea: FSM C , FSM E W007, FSM N , FSM N E005, FSM S , and FSM W . The models are built using data from detailed surface outcrop maps, geophysical lineament maps, and the cored borehole record at Laxemar. The conceptual model for the SDM-Site Laxemar geological DFN model revolves around the identification of fracture domains based on relative fracture set intensities, orientation clustering, and the regional tectonic framework (including deformation zones). A single coupled fracture size/fracture intensity concept (the Base Model) based on a Pareto (power-law) distribution for fracture sizes was chosen as the recommended parameterisation. A slew of alternative size-intensity models were also carried through the fracture analyses and into the uncertainty and model verification analyses. Uncertainty is modelled by analysing the effects on fracture intensity (P32) that alternative model cases can have. Uncertainty is parameterised as a ratio between the P32 of the alternative model and the P

  18. How Does a Shared Decision-Making (SDM) Intervention for Oncologists Affect Participation Style and Preference Matching in Patients with Breast and Colon Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, Christiane; Nicolai, Jennifer; Gschwendtner, Kathrin; Müller, Nicole; Reuter, Katrin; Buchholz, Angela; Kallinowski, Birgit; Härter, Martin; Eich, Wolfgang

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this study are to assess patients' preferred and perceived decision-making roles and preference matching in a sample of German breast and colon cancer patients and to investigate how a shared decision-making (SDM) intervention for oncologists influences patients' preferred and perceived decision-making roles and the attainment of preference matches. This study is a post hoc analysis of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) on the effects of an SDM intervention. The SDM intervention was a 12-h SDM training program for physicians in combination with decision board use. For this study, we analysed a subgroup of 107 breast and colon cancer patients faced with serious treatment decisions who provided data on specific questionnaires with regard to their preferred and perceived decision-making roles (passive, SDM or active). Patients filled in questionnaires immediately following a decision-relevant consultation (t1) with their oncologist. Eleven of these patients' 27 treating oncologists had received the SDM intervention within the RCT. A majority of cancer patients (60%) preferred SDM. A match between preferred and perceived decision-making roles was reached for 72% of patients. The patients treated by SDM-trained physicians perceived greater autonomy in their decision making (p < 0.05) with more patients perceiving SDM or an active role, but their preference matching was not influenced. A SDM intervention for oncologists boosted patient autonomy but did not improve preference matching. This highlights the already well-known reluctance of physicians to engage in explicit role clarification. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00000539; Funding Source: German Cancer Aid.

  19. On-Chip SDM Switching for Unicast, Multicast and Traffic Grooming in Data Center Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamchevska, Valerija; Ding, Yunhong; Dalgaard, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of a novel photonic integrated circuit that facilitates multicast and grooming in an optical data center architecture. The circuit allows for on-chip spatial multiplexing and demultiplexing as well as fiber core switching. Using this device, we experimentally verify...... that multicast and/or grooming can be successfully performed along the full range of output ports, for different group size and different power ratio. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate SDM transmission and 5 Tbit/s switching using the on-chip fiber switch with integrated fan-in/fan-out devices and achieve...... errorfree performance (BER≤10-9) for a network scenario including simultaneous unicast/multicast switching and traffic grooming....

  20. Calculation of the nuclear fission data based on the framework of the QMD + SDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Jian; Iwamoto, O.; Fukahori, T.

    2002-01-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), statistical decay model (SDM) and the statistical fission theory were used to analyze the mass distribution of the fission products, the prompt fission neutron spectrum (x(E)) and the prompt fission neutron multiplicities (ν-bar pf (E)) caused by the intermediate energy nucleon-induced fission. The semi-empirical formula of energy level density parameter used in the statistical process was also studied. Very few adjustable parameters were included in the present method. By some physical analysis, it can be thought that the present results are reasonable. The x(E) and ν-bar pf (E) can be obtained in the intermediate energy region by the present method

  1. Recent admissions trends at UNLV-SDM: perspectives on recruitment of female and minority students at a new dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Jeremy; Hawley, Nathan; Kingsley, Karl; O'Malley, Susan; Ancajas, Christine C

    2008-11-01

    As the U.S. population continues to become more diverse, there has been a movement toward the recruitment of more diverse students into the dental profession. The purpose of this study was to assess the current and historical trends in diversity among dental school applicants and enrollees at a new dental institution, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine (UNLV-SDM). Applicant and enrollment data for the first four cohorts, sorted by gender and ethnicity, were retrieved and summarized by the Office of Admissions and Student Affairs at UNLV-SDM. The principal findings of this analysis revealed enrollment of females at UNLV-SDM was relatively consistent during this time interval, although significantly lower than the U.S. average of all dental schools. The enrollment of minorities at UNLV-SDM, however, was consistent and comparable to the U.S. average, although these percentages were disproportionately smaller than the percentage of minorities in the general population. Based upon these findings, a new model for outreach and recruitment of females and minorities was recently created, based in part upon evidence of successful strategies by dental educators at other institutions, in order to increase the enrollment of female and underrepresented minority students.

  2. Few-mode fiber, splice and SDM component characterization by spatially-diverse optical vector network analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Mendinueta, José Manuel Delgado; Klaus, Werner

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses spatially diverse optical vector network analysis for space division multiplexing (SDM) component and system characterization, which is becoming essential as SDM is widely considered to increase the capacity of optical communication systems. Characterization of a 108-channel ...... in the few-mode multi-core fiber and their impact on system IL and MDL are analyzed, finding splices to cause significant mode-mixing and to be non-negligible in system capacity analysis.......This paper discusses spatially diverse optical vector network analysis for space division multiplexing (SDM) component and system characterization, which is becoming essential as SDM is widely considered to increase the capacity of optical communication systems. Characterization of a 108-channel...... photonic lantern spatial multiplexer, coupled to a 36-core 3-mode fiber, is experimentally demonstrated, extracting the full impulse response and complex transfer function matrices as well as insertion loss (IL) and mode-dependent loss (MDL) data. Moreover, the mode-mixing behavior of fiber splices...

  3. Site description of the SFR area at Forsmark at completion of the site investigation phase. SDM-PSU Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-05-15

    The site descriptive model (SDM) presented in this report is an integrated model for bedrock geology, rock mechanics, bedrock hydrogeology and bedrock hydrogeochemistry of the site investigated in the SFR extension project (PSU). A description of the surface system is also included in the report. However, the surface system is not integrated with the other disciplines as new data regarding the surface system will not be available until after the completion of SDM-PSU. It is noted that SDM-PSU does not include all disciplines handled in SDM-Site Forsmark (SKB 2008b), the focus is to produce a site description that meets the needs of the SFR extension project. The overall objective of the SFR extension project is to have the application for the extension ready by 2013. This report presents an integrated site model incorporating the historic data acquired from the investigations for and construction of the existing SFR facility (1980-1986), as well as from the recent investigations for the planned extension of SFR (2008-2009). It also provides a summary of the abundant underlying data and the discipline-specific models that support the integrated site model. The description relies heavily on background reports concerning detailed data analyses and modelling in the different disciplines. It is noteworthy that the investigations conducted during the SFR extension project were guided by the choice of site prior to the investigations, which was based on the experience gained during the construction of the existing SFR facility.

  4. Site description of the SFR area at Forsmark at completion of the site investigation phase. SDM-PSU Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    The site descriptive model (SDM) presented in this report is an integrated model for bedrock geology, rock mechanics, bedrock hydrogeology and bedrock hydrogeochemistry of the site investigated in the SFR extension project (PSU). A description of the surface system is also included in the report. However, the surface system is not integrated with the other disciplines as new data regarding the surface system will not be available until after the completion of SDM-PSU. It is noted that SDM-PSU does not include all disciplines handled in SDM-Site Forsmark (SKB 2008b), the focus is to produce a site description that meets the needs of the SFR extension project. The overall objective of the SFR extension project is to have the application for the extension ready by 2013. This report presents an integrated site model incorporating the historic data acquired from the investigations for and construction of the existing SFR facility (1980-1986), as well as from the recent investigations for the planned extension of SFR (2008-2009). It also provides a summary of the abundant underlying data and the discipline-specific models that support the integrated site model. The description relies heavily on background reports concerning detailed data analyses and modelling in the different disciplines. It is noteworthy that the investigations conducted during the SFR extension project were guided by the choice of site prior to the investigations, which was based on the experience gained during the construction of the existing SFR facility

  5. Adaptive Rates of High-Spectral-Efficiency WDM/SDM Channels Using PDM-1024-QAM Probabilistic Shaping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hao; Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Da Ros, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate adaptive rates and spectral efficiencies in WDM/SDM transmission using probabilistically shaped PDM-1024-QAM signals, achieving up to 7-Tbit/s data rates per spatial-superchannel and up to 297.8-bit/s/Hz aggregate spectral efficiency using a 30-core fiber on 12.5 and 25GHz WDM grids...

  6. Ultrahigh-Spectral-Efficiency WDM/SDM Transmission Using PDM-1024-QAM Probabilistic Shaping With Adaptive Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hao; Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Da Ros, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) and space-division-multiplexed (SDM) transmission of probabilistically shaped polarization-division-multiplexed (PDM) 1024-state quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) channels over a 9.7-km single-mode 30-core fiber, achieving aggregated spectr...

  7. Knowledge Management System Untuk SDM Menggunakan Seci Model (Studi Kasus: Koperasi Karyawan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zuraidah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Koperasi Pegawai Badan Urusan Logistik adalah sebuah Koperasi yang bergerak dalam bidang jasa, simpan-pinjam. Knowledge Managment System tersebut, nampaknya sudah menjadi suatu kebutuhan mendasarkan untuk meningkatkan kualitas sumber daya manusia yang khususnya kepada karyawan. Knowledge management merupakan usaha untuk meningkatkan knowledge yang berguna dalam koperasi. Knowledge management tidak hanya merupakan pengaturan akan knowldge, namun lebih pada manajemen suatu koperasi dengan fokus khususnya terhadap knowledge, knowledge management dengan sebuah sistem, yang diharapkan dapat menjadi solusi dari kebutuhan aliran knowledge yang tidak dihalangi oleh batasan waktu dan tempat. Penelitian ini akan mengembangkan analisa knowledge management system dan merancang aplikasi dari analisa yang dikembangkan. Metodologi yang digunakan dengan model SECI dan melakukan analisa untuk mendapatkan knowledge management system tersebut. Analisa knowledge management system yang dihasilkan mendukung proses Sosialisasi, Eksternalisasi, Kombinasi, Internalisasi (SECI. Knowledge management system ini dikembangkan sebagai sarana sharing pada karyawan. Kata kunci: Knowledge Management System,SECI, Koperasi,SDM Abstract Employee Cooperative Agency of Logistics Affairs is a cooperative engaged in services, savings, and loans. Knowledge Managment System, it seems to have become a basic need to improve the quality of human resources, especially to employees. Knowledge management is an attempt to improve knowledge useful in cooperatives. Knowledge management is not only an arrangement of knowledge but rather the management of a cooperative with a particular focus on knowledge, knowledge management with a system, which is expected to be a solution of the needs of the flow of knowledge that is not hindered by time and space constraints. This research will develop the knowledge management system and design the application of the developed analysis. The methodology

  8. Site description of Laxemar at completion of the site investigation phase. SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken site characterisation in two different areas, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, in order to identify a suitable location for a geological repository of spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 method. The site investigations have been conducted in campaigns, punctuated by data freezes. After each data freeze, the site data have been analysed and modelling has been carried out with the overall purpose to develop a site descriptive model (SDM). The site descriptive model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It is also essential for safety assessment, since the SDM is the only source for site-specific input. Another important use of the site descriptive model is in the environmental impact assessment. An SDM is an integrated model of geology, thermal properties, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, bedrock transport properties and a description of the surface system. The site descriptive model compiled in the current report, SDM-Site Laxemar, presents an integrated understanding of the Laxemar-Simpevarp area (with special emphasis on the Laxemar subarea) at the completion of the surface-based investigations, which were conducted during the period 2002 to 2007. A summary is also provided of the abundant underlying data and the discipline specific models that support the site understanding. The description relies heavily on background reports that address, in particular, details of the data analyses and modelling of the different disciplines. The Laxemar-Simpevarp area is located in the province of Smaaland within the municipality of Oskarshamn, about 230 km south of Stockholm. The candidate area for site investigation is located along the shoreline of the strait of Kalmarsund, within a 1.8 billion year old suite of well preserved bedrock belonging to the Transscandinavian Igneous Belt formed during

  9. Site description of Laxemar at completion of the site investigation phase. SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken site characterisation in two different areas, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, in order to identify a suitable location for a geological repository of spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 method. The site investigations have been conducted in campaigns, punctuated by data freezes. After each data freeze, the site data have been analysed and modelling has been carried out with the overall purpose to develop a site descriptive model (SDM). The site descriptive model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It is also essential for safety assessment, since the SDM is the only source for site-specific input. Another important use of the site descriptive model is in the environmental impact assessment. An SDM is an integrated model of geology, thermal properties, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, bedrock transport properties and a description of the surface system. The site descriptive model compiled in the current report, SDM-Site Laxemar, presents an integrated understanding of the Laxemar-Simpevarp area (with special emphasis on the Laxemar subarea) at the completion of the surface-based investigations, which were conducted during the period 2002 to 2007. A summary is also provided of the abundant underlying data and the discipline specific models that support the site understanding. The description relies heavily on background reports that address, in particular, details of the data analyses and modelling of the different disciplines. The Laxemar-Simpevarp area is located in the province of Smaaland within the municipality of Oskarshamn, about 230 km south of Stockholm. The candidate area for site investigation is located along the shoreline of the strait of Kalmarsund, within a 1.8 billion year old suite of well preserved bedrock belonging to the Transscandinavian Igneous Belt formed during

  10. The origin of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codino, Antonio; Plouin, Francois

    2007-01-01

    The differential intensity of cosmic radiation shows a sequence of depressions referred to as knees in a large energy band above 10 15 eV. The global depression entailed in the complete spectrum with respect to the extrapolated intensity based on low energy data, amounts to a maximum factor of 8, occurring at 5x10 18 eV, where flux measurements exhibit a relative minimum, referred to as the ankle. It is demonstrated by a full simulation of cosmic ray trajectories in the Galaxy that the intensity minimum around the ankle energy is primarily due to the nuclear interactions of the cosmic ions with the interstellar matter and to the galactic magnetic field. Ankles signal the onset energies of the rectilinear propagation in the Milky Way at Earth, being for example, 4x10 18 eV for helium and 6x10 19 eV for iron. The ankle, in spite of its notable importance at Earth, is a local perturbation of the universal spectrum which, between the knee and the ankle, decreases by a round factor 10 9 regaining its unperturbed status above 10 19 eV

  11. Influence of ankle joint plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on lateral ankle sprain: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Kim, Kyungsoo; Batbaatar, Myagmarbayar; Lee, SuKyoung; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2018-05-01

    Understanding the mechanism of injury involved in lateral ankle sprain is essential to prevent injury, to establish surgical repair and reconstruction, and to plan reliable rehabilitation protocols. Most studies for lateral ankle sprain posit that ankle inversion, internal rotation, and plantarflexion are involved in the mechanism of injury. However, recent studies indicated that ankle dorsiflexion also plays an important role in the lateral ankle sprain mechanism. In this study, the contributions of ankle plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on the ankle joint were evaluated under complex combinations of internal and inversion moments. A multibody ankle joint model including 24 ligaments was developed and validated against two experimental cadaveric studies. The effects of ankle plantarflexion (up to 60°) and dorsiflexion (up to 30°) on the lateral ankle sprain mechanism under ankle inversion moment coupled with internal rotational moment were investigated using the validated model. Lateral ankle sprain injuries can occur during ankle dorsiflexion, in which the calcaneofibular ligament and anterior talofibular ligament tears may occur associated with excessive inversion and internal rotational moment, respectively. Various combinations of inversion and internal moment may lead to anterior talofibular ligament injuries at early ankle plantarflexion, while the inversion moment acts as a primary factor to tear the anterior talofibular ligament in early plantarflexion. It is better to consider inversion and internal rotation as primary factors of the lateral ankle sprain mechanism, while plantarflexion or dorsiflexion can be secondary factor. This information will help to clarify the lateral ankle sprain mechanism of injury.

  12. Site description of Forsmark at completion of the site investigation phase. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, has undertaken site characterisation in two different areas, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, in order to identify a suitable location for a geological repository of spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 method. The site investigations have been conducted in campaigns, punctuated by data freezes. After each data freeze, the site data have been analysed and modelling has been carried out with the overall purpose to develop a site descriptive model (SDM). The site descriptive model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It is also essential for safety assessment, since the model is the only source for site-specific input. Another important use of the site descriptive model is in the environmental impact assessment. An SDM is an integrated model for geology, thermal properties, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, bedrock transport properties and a description of the surface system. The site descriptive model compiled in the current report, SDM-Site, presents an integrated understanding of the Forsmark area at the completion of the surface-based investigations, which were conducted at Forsmark during the period 2002 to 2007. It also provides a summary of the abundant underlying data and the discipline-specific models that support the site understanding. The description relies heavily on background reports that address, in particular, details in data analyses and modelling in the different disciplines. The Forsmark area is located in northern Uppland within the municipality of Oesthammar, about 120 km north of Stockholm. The candidate area for site investigation is located along the shoreline of Oeregrundsgrepen, within the north-western part of a major tectonic lens that formed between 1.87 and 1.85 billion years ago during the Svecokarelian orogeny. The candidate area is approximately 6 km long and 2 km wide. The

  13. Site description of Forsmark at completion of the site investigation phase. SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, has undertaken site characterisation in two different areas, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, in order to identify a suitable location for a geological repository of spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 method. The site investigations have been conducted in campaigns, punctuated by data freezes. After each data freeze, the site data have been analysed and modelling has been carried out with the overall purpose to develop a site descriptive model (SDM). The site descriptive model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It is also essential for safety assessment, since the model is the only source for site-specific input. Another important use of the site descriptive model is in the environmental impact assessment. An SDM is an integrated model for geology, thermal properties, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, bedrock transport properties and a description of the surface system. The site descriptive model compiled in the current report, SDM-Site, presents an integrated understanding of the Forsmark area at the completion of the surface-based investigations, which were conducted at Forsmark during the period 2002 to 2007. It also provides a summary of the abundant underlying data and the discipline-specific models that support the site understanding. The description relies heavily on background reports that address, in particular, details in data analyses and modelling in the different disciplines. The Forsmark area is located in northern Uppland within the municipality of Oesthammar, about 120 km north of Stockholm. The candidate area for site investigation is located along the shoreline of Oeregrundsgrepen, within the north-western part of a major tectonic lens that formed between 1.87 and 1.85 billion years ago during the Svecokarelian orogeny. The candidate area is approximately 6 km long and 2 km wide. The

  14. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  15. The conservative treatment of ankle osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, A.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    In 70% to 78% of patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA), they present themselves with the sequelae of a traumatic event in the past. Ankle trauma occurs in many patients at a relatively young age. Consequently, the expected life span of many patients with ankle OA is relatively long. Many treatment

  16. Role of Ankle Arthroscopy in Management of Acute Ankle Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwok Bill; Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-11-01

    To report the operative findings of ankle arthroscopy during open reduction and internal fixation of acute ankle fractures. This was a retrospective review of 254 consecutive patients with acute ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of the fractures, and ankle arthroscopy was performed at the same time. The accuracy of fracture reduction, the presence of syndesmosis disruption and its reduction, and the presence of ligamentous injuries and osteochondral lesions were documented. Second-look ankle arthroscopy was performed during syndesmosis screw removal 6 weeks after the key operation. There were 6 patients with Weber A, 177 patients with Weber B, 51 patients with Weber C, and 20 patients with isolated medial malleolar fractures. Syndesmosis disruption was present in 0% of patients with Weber A fracture, 52% of patients with Weber B fracture, 92% of patients with Weber C fracture, and 20% of the patients with isolated medial malleolar fracture. Three patients with Weber B and one patient with Weber C fracture have occult syndesmosis instability after screw removal. Osteochondral lesion was present in no patient with Weber A fracture, 26% of the Weber B cases, 24% of the Weber C cases, and 20% of isolated medial malleolar fracture cases. The association between the presence of deep deltoid ligament tear and syndesmosis disruption (warranting syndesmosis screw fixation) in Weber B cases was statistically significant but not in Weber C cases. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of posterior malleolar fracture and syndesmosis instability that warrant screw fixation. Ankle arthroscopy is a useful adjuvant tool to understand the severity and complexity of acute ankle fracture. Direct arthroscopic visualization ensures detection and evaluation of intra-articular fractures, syndesmosis disruption, and associated osteochondral lesions and ligamentous injuries. Level IV, case series

  17. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Peter A J; Golanó, Pau; Clavero, Joan A; van Dijk, C Niek

    2010-05-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly limited by the overlying anatomy which includes the neurovascular bundle. We hypothesize that in ankle dorsiflexion the anterior neurovascular bundle will move away anteriorly from the ankle joint, whereas in ankle distraction the anterior neurovascular bundle is pulled tight towards the joint, thereby decreasing the safe anterior working area. Six fresh frozen ankle specimens, amputated above the knee, were scanned with computed tomography. Prior to scanning the anterior tibial artery was injected with contrast fluid and subsequently each ankle was scanned both in ankle dorsiflexion and in distraction. A special device was developed to reproducibly obtain ankle dorsiflexion and distraction in the computed tomography scanner. The distance between the anterior border of the inferior tibial articular facet and the posterior border of the anterior tibial artery was measured. The median distance from the anterior border of the inferior tibial articular facet to the posterior border of the anterior tibial artery in ankle dorsiflexion and distraction was 0.9 cm (range 0.7-1.5) and 0.7 cm (range 0.5-0.8), respectively. The distance in ankle dorsiflexion significantly exceeded the distance in ankle distraction (P = 0.03). The current study shows a significantly increased distance between the anterior distal tibia and the overlying anterior neurovascular bundle with the ankle in a slightly dorsiflexed position as compared to the distracted ankle position. We thereby conclude that the distracted ankle position puts the neurovascular structures more at risk for iatrogenic damage when performing anterior ankle arthroscopy.

  18. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Danish Translation and Cultural Adaption of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) patient version

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulbæk, Mette; Jørgensen, Marianne Johansson; Primdahl, Jette

    Background and aims Measure instruments that measure the extent to which patients are involved in the process of decision-making are developed and validated and being used worldwide. So far, no validated self-report instrument for the shared decision making (SDM) process is available in Denmark....... The German 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9, patient version) is used to measure the extent to which patients are involved in the process of decision-making. The questionnaire can be used in both research and clinical practice. It can be used when there are several treatment options...... conclusion A forward and backward translation were completed by four different translators and followed by an adjustment made by the expert panel. The expert panel included the three of the four translators, experts in health, instrument development and translation and an expert in the field of gynecology...

  20. Few-mode fiber, splice and SDM component characterization by spatially-diverse optical vector network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Simon; Mendinueta, José Manuel Delgado; Klaus, Werner; Sakaguchi, Jun; Olmos, Juan José Vegas; Awaji, Yoshinari; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur; Wada, Naoya

    2017-09-18

    This paper discusses spatially diverse optical vector network analysis for space division multiplexing (SDM) component and system characterization, which is becoming essential as SDM is widely considered to increase the capacity of optical communication systems. Characterization of a 108-channel photonic lantern spatial multiplexer, coupled to a 36-core 3-mode fiber, is experimentally demonstrated, extracting the full impulse response and complex transfer function matrices as well as insertion loss (IL) and mode-dependent loss (MDL) data. Moreover, the mode-mixing behavior of fiber splices in the few-mode multi-core fiber and their impact on system IL and MDL are analyzed, finding splices to cause significant mode-mixing and to be non-negligible in system capacity analysis.

  1. Masjid sebagai Agen Baznas: Analisa Potensi SDM Ta’mir Masjid di Kabupaten Jepara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Husni Arafat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ajaran Islam yang mewajibkan umatnya untuk mengeluarkan zakat memberikan potensi yang sangat besar bahkan mampu menjadikan umat Islam sebagai umat yang sangat mulia dan sejahtera, namun kenyataannya peranan dan fungsi zakat belum mampu menghantarkan umat islam menjadi umat yang sejahtera. Potensi zakat nasional sebanyak 217 trilyun dan hingga saat ini belum mampu tercapai. Salah satu faktor karena keterbatasan lembaga penyalur zakat sehingga  penyaluran zakat belum begitu mudah diakses oleh para muzakki. Disatu sisi, keberadaan masjid yang tersebar diseluruh lingkungan masyarakat mampu menjawab atas belum tercapainya jumlah potensi penerimaan zakat dengan menjadikan masjid sebagai agen badan zakat nasional. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui potensi sumber daya manusia (SDM dan kesanggupan sebagai agen penerimaan zakat oleh ta’mir masjid di Kabupaten Jepara. Metode penelitian ini menggunakan survei, kuesioner dan interview mendalam(indepth interview. Hasil penelitian ini takmir masjid mayoritas bersedia menjadi agen Baznas dalam menerima zakat maal namun memerlukan pembekalan pengetahuan, pemahaman dan standarisasi pengelolaan zakat, baik secara manual maupun secara on-line real time. Selain itu, sosialisasi kepada seluruh lapisan masyarakat terutama mereka yang sudah berkewajiban mengeluarkan zakat maal untuk disalurkan kepada organisasi pengelola zakat terdekat (masjid.

  2. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  3. Possible factors for ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabaković Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Classification of ankle fractures is commonly used for selecting an appropriate treatment and prognosing an outcome of definite management. One of the most used classifications is the Danis-Weber classification. To the best of our knowledge, in the available literature, there are no parameters affecting specific types of ankle fractures according to the Danis-Weber classification. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation of the following parameters: age, body weight, body mass index (BMI, height, osteoporosis, osteopenia and physical exercises with specific types of ankle fractures using the Danis-Weber classification. Methods. A total of 85 patients grouped by the Danis-Weber classification fracture types were analyzed and the significance of certain parameters for specific types of ankle fractures was established. Results. The proportion of females was significantly higher (p < 0.001 with a significantly higher age (59.9 years, SD ± 14.2 in relation to males (45.1 years, SD ± 12.8 (p < 0.0001. Type A fracture was most frequent in the younger patients (34.2 years, SD ± 8.6, and those with increased physical exercises (p = 0.020. In type B fracture, the risk factor was osteoporosis (p = 0.0180, while in type C fracture, body weight (p = 0.017 and osteoporosis (p = 0.004 were significant parameters. Conclusion. Statistical analysis using the Danis-Weber classification reveals that there are certain parameters suggesting significant risk factors for specific types of ankle fractures.

  4. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the S...

  5. Comparison of Multisegmental Foot and Ankle Motion Between Total Ankle Replacement and Ankle Arthrodesis in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Gyo; Kim, Eo Jin; Lee, Doo Jae; Bae, Kee Jeong; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Dong Yeon

    2017-09-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) and ankle arthrodesis (AA) are usually performed for severe ankle arthritis. We compared postoperative foot segmental motion during gait in patients treated with TAR and AA. Gait analysis was performed in 17 and 7 patients undergoing TAR and AA, respectively. Subjects were evaluated using a 3-dimensional multisegmental foot model with 15 markers. Temporal gait parameters were calculated. The maximum and minimum values and the differences in hallux, forefoot, hindfoot, and arch in 3 planes (sagittal, coronal, transverse) were compared between the 2 groups. One hundred healthy adults were evaluated as a control. Gait speed was faster in the TAR ( P = .028). On analysis of foot and ankle segmental motion, the range of hindfoot sagittal motion was significantly greater in the TAR (15.1 vs 10.2 degrees in AA; P = .004). The main component of motion increase was hindfoot dorsiflexion (12.3 and 8.6 degrees). The range of forefoot sagittal motion was greater in the TAR (9.3 vs 5.8 degrees in AA; P = .004). Maximum ankle power in the TAR (1.16) was significantly higher than 0.32 in AA; P = .008). However, the range of hindfoot and forefoot sagittal motion was decreased in both TAR and AA compared with the control group ( P = .000). Although biomechanical results of TAR and AA were not similar to those in the normal controls, joint motions in the TAR more closely matched normal values. Treatment decision making should involve considerations of the effect of surgery on the adjacent joints. Level III, case-control study.

  6. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  7. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  8. Exploratory Study for Continuous-time Parameter Estimation of Ankle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a parallel pathway model to describe ankle dynamics was proposed. This model provides a relationship between ankle angle and net ankle torque as the sum of a linear and nonlinear contribution. A technique to identify parameters of this model in discrete-time has been developed. However, these parameters are a nonlinear combination of the continuous-time physiology, making insight into the underlying physiology impossible. The stable and accurate estimation of continuous-time parameters is critical for accurate disease modeling, clinical diagnosis, robotic control strategies, development of optimal exercise protocols for longterm space exploration, sports medicine, etc. This paper explores the development of a system identification technique to estimate the continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed via simulation of a continuous-time model of ankle dynamics with typical parameters found in clinical studies. The results show that although this technique improves estimates, it does not provide robust estimates of continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. Due to this we conclude that alternative modeling strategies and more advanced estimation techniques be considered for future work.

  9. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurdeman, Shane R., E-mail: shanewurdeman@gmail.com [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Advanced Prosthetics Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68134 (United States); Myers, Sara A. [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Stergiou, Nicholas [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  10. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users

  11. Difference in balance measures between patients with chronic ankle instability and patients after an acute ankle inversion trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J. S.; Kingma, I.; Blankevoort, L.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular control of the ankle is disturbed in patients with chronic ankle instability due to an initial ankle inversion trauma. Static balance is assumed to be a measure for this disturbance. Functional (ankle) scores are another way to evaluate ankle impairment. The hypothesis was that there

  12. Effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with floppy paretic ankle muscles : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der Dymphy; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Postema, Klaas; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Hijmans, Juha Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with floppy ankle muscles paresis use ankle foot orthoses to improve their walking ability. Ankle foot orthoses also limit ankle range of motion thereby introducing additional problems. Insight in effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with

  13. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Muchin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for the recovery process was developed. Conclusions: the specially designed hydrokinesomechanotherapeutic device and monolasts are allow strictly controlled movement in all planes of the ankle joint, which contributes to the acceleration of the recovery; the conducted anthropometric and goniometric studies were indicate more rapid elimination of edema, increase movement amplitude, carries opposition to the development of contractures and muscle atrophy.

  14. Xanthomatous infiltration of ankle tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, C.G.; Disler, D.G.; Kremer, J.M.; Jennings, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of type II hyperbetalipoproteinemia in a patient whose diagnosis had been previously unrecognized, and who had previously been misdiagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and later gout. Radiographic and MR imaging features of the patient's ankles were pronounced but otherwise typical of xanthomatous infiltration. Radiologic assessment can be useful in permitting a specific diagnosis to be made in patients with periarticular and tendinous swelling. (orig.). With 4 figs

  15. Arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi Porro, R.; Zellner, A.; Puricelli, G.; Quaglia, R.; Chelazzi, G.

    1984-01-01

    Arthrography of the ankle joint was first carried out by Johnson and Palmer at the Military Hospital in Stockholm in 1940. Arthrography can be used for judging the integrity of the articular cartilage, of osteochondritis dissecans, arthritis or adhesive capsulitis. The literature shows, however, that more than 95% of the patients on whom this examination has been performed has suffered from acute trauma. (orig.) [de

  16. Difference in postural control between patients with functional and mechanical ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Henry; Li, Hong-Yun; Zhang, Jian; Hua, Ying-Hui; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2014-10-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries. Since the structural and pathological differences in mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and functional ankle instability (FAI) may not be the same, it may be better to treat these as separate groups. The purpose of this study was to compare the difference in postural sway between MAI and FAI in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Twenty-six patients with CAI and 14 healthy control participants were included in the study. The CAI patients were subdivided into MAI (15 patients) and FAI (11 patients) groups. Patients who were diagnosed with lateral ankle ligaments rupture by magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography were assigned to the MAI group. All participants performed single-limb postural sway tests 3 times on each leg with eyes closed and open. The average distances from the mean center of pressure position in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions were recorded and compared among the 3 groups. The unstable ankles in the MAI group showed significantly greater postural sway in the anterior, posterior, and medial directions compared with those in the control group with eyes closed. With eyes open, significantly greater postural sway was found in the anterior direction. In the FAI group, no difference was found in postural sway compared with those in the control group. The MAI group showed significantly greater postural sway in the anterior direction compared with the FAI group with eyes closed and open. No significant difference in postural sway was found between the unstable and stable ankles in the MAI or FAI groups, with or without vision. Patients with MAI have deficits in postural control, especially in anterior-posterior directions. However, no difference was found in postural sway in patients with FAI compared with healthy people. As MAI patients suffer from deficits in postural control, balance training should be applied in those patients. In addition, special training

  17. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Golanó, P.; Clavero, J.A.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly limited by the overlying anatomy which includes the neurovascular bundle. We hypothesize that in ankle dorsiflexion the anterior neurovascular bundle will move away anteriorly from the ankle joint, where...

  18. Outcome of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Narayana Gowda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle arthrodesis is still a gold standard salvage procedure for the management of ankle arthritis. There are several functional and mechanical benefits of ankle arthrodesis, which make it a viable surgical procedure in the management of ankle arthritis. The functional outcomes following ankle arthrodesis are not very well known. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical and radiographic evaluation of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis performed using Charnley′s compression device. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2009 a functional assessment of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females who had undergone ankle arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis and/or avascular necrosis (AVN talus (n=6, malunited bimalleolar fracture (n=4, distal tibial plafond fractures (n=3, medial malleoli nonunion (n=2. All the patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after an average followup of 2 years 8 months (range 1-5.7 years. Results: All patients had sound ankylosis and no complications related to the surgery. Scoring the patients with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scale, we found that 11 of the 15 had excellent results, two had good, and two showed fair results. They were all returned to their preinjury activities. Conclusion: We conclude that, the ankle arthrodesis can still be considered as a standard procedure in ankle arthritis. On the basis of these results, patients should be counseled that an ankle fusion will help to relieve pain and to improve overall function. Still, one should keep in mind that it is a salvage procedure that will cause persistent alterations in gait with a potential for deterioration due to the development of subtalar arthritis.

  19. Prospective Computed Tomographic Analysis of Osteochondral Lesions of the Ankle Joint Associated With Ankle Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nosewicz, Tomasz L.; Beerekamp, M. Suzan H.; de Muinck Keizer, Robert-Jan O.; Schepers, Tim; Maas, Mario; Niek van Dijk, C.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) associated with ankle fracture correlate with unfavorable outcome. The goals of this study were to detect OCLs following ankle fracture, to associate fracture type to OCLs and to investigate whether OCLs affect clinical outcome. 100 ankle fractures requiring operative

  20. Ankle taping can reduce external ankle joint moments during drop landings on a tilted surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Hopper, Luke S; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2017-09-20

    Ankle taping is commonly used to prevent ankle sprains. However, kinematic assessments investigating the biomechanical effects of ankle taping have provided inconclusive results. This study aimed to determine the effect of ankle taping on the external ankle joint moments during a drop landing on a tilted surface at 25°. Twenty-five participants performed landings on a tilted force platform that caused ankle inversion with and without ankle taping. Landing kinematics were captured using a motion capture system. External ankle inversion moment, the angular impulse due to the medio-lateral and vertical components of ground reaction force (GRF) and their moment arm lengths about the ankle joint were analysed. The foot plantar inclination relative to the ground was assessed. In the taping condition, the foot plantar inclination and ankle inversion angular impulse were reduced significantly compared to that of the control. The only component of the external inversion moment to change significantly in the taped condition was a shortened medio-lateral GRF moment arm length. It can be assumed that the ankle taping altered the foot plantar inclination relative to the ground, thereby shortening the moment arm of medio-lateral GRF that resulted in the reduced ankle inversion angular impulse.

  1. Total ankle arthroplasty: An imaging overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Chun, Ka Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  2. Evidence-based treatment for ankle injuries: a clinical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Hiller, Claire E; de Bie, Rob A

    2010-01-01

    The most common ankle injuries are ankle sprain and ankle fracture. This review discusses treatments for ankle sprain (including the management of the acute sprain and chronic instability) and ankle fracture, using evidence from recent systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. After ankle sprain, there is evidence for the use of functional support and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. There is weak evidence suggesting that the use of manual therapy may lead to positive short-t...

  3. Selection criteria for patients with chronic ankle instability in controlled research: a position statement of the international ankle consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribble, P.A.; Delahunt, E.; Bleakley, C.; Caulfield, B.; Docherty, C.L.; Fourchet, F.; Fong, D.; Hertel, J.; Hiller, C.; Kaminski, T.W.; McKeon, P.O.; Refshauge, K.M.; Wees, P.J. van der; Vicenzino, B.; Wikstrom, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Ankle Consortium is an international community of researchers and clinicians whose primary scholastic purpose is to promote scholarship and dissemination of research-informed knowledge related to pathologies of the ankle complex. The constituents of the International Ankle

  4. Geological evolution, palaeoclimate and historical development of the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederbaeck, Bjoern [ed.

    2008-06-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is undertaking site characterization at two different locations, the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site investigations started in 2002 and were completed in 2007. The analysis and modelling of data from the site investigations, which have taken place during and after these investigations, provide a foundation for the development of an integrated, multidisciplinary site descriptive model (SDM) for each of the two sites. A site descriptive model constitutes a description of the site and its regional setting, covering the current state of the geosphere and the biosphere, as well as those natural processes that affect or have affected their long-term development. Hitherto, a number of reports presenting preliminary site descriptive models for Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp have been published. In these reports, the evolutionary and historical aspects of the site were included in a separate chapter. The present report comprises a further elaboration of the evolutionary and historical information included in the preliminary SDM reports, but presented here in a separate, supplementary report to the final site description, SDM-Site. The report is common to the two investigated areas, and the overall objective is to describe the long-term geological evolution, the palaeoclimate, and the post-glacial development of ecosystems and of the human population at the two sites. The report largely consists of a synthesis of information derived from the scientific literature and other sources not related to the site investigations. However, considerable information from the site investigations that has contributed to our understanding of the past development at each site is also included. This unique synthesis of both published information in a regional perspective and new site-specific information breaks new ground in our understanding

  5. Geological evolution, palaeoclimate and historical development of the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederbaeck, Bjoern

    2008-06-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is undertaking site characterization at two different locations, the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site investigations started in 2002 and were completed in 2007. The analysis and modelling of data from the site investigations, which have taken place during and after these investigations, provide a foundation for the development of an integrated, multidisciplinary site descriptive model (SDM) for each of the two sites. A site descriptive model constitutes a description of the site and its regional setting, covering the current state of the geosphere and the biosphere, as well as those natural processes that affect or have affected their long-term development. Hitherto, a number of reports presenting preliminary site descriptive models for Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp have been published. In these reports, the evolutionary and historical aspects of the site were included in a separate chapter. The present report comprises a further elaboration of the evolutionary and historical information included in the preliminary SDM reports, but presented here in a separate, supplementary report to the final site description, SDM-Site. The report is common to the two investigated areas, and the overall objective is to describe the long-term geological evolution, the palaeoclimate, and the post-glacial development of ecosystems and of the human population at the two sites. The report largely consists of a synthesis of information derived from the scientific literature and other sources not related to the site investigations. However, considerable information from the site investigations that has contributed to our understanding of the past development at each site is also included. This unique synthesis of both published information in a regional perspective and new site-specific information breaks new ground in our understanding

  6. Ankle Joint Contact Loads and Displacement With Progressive Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kenneth J; Goeb, Yannick; Behn, Anthony W; Criswell, Braden; Chou, Loretta

    2015-09-01

    Ligamentous injuries to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis are predictive of long-term ankle dysfunction. Mild and moderate syndesmotic injuries are difficult to stratify, and the impact of syndesmosis injury on the magnitude and distribution of forces within the ankle joint during athletic activities is unknown. Eight below-knee cadaveric specimens were tested in the intact state and after sequential sectioning of the following ligaments: anterior-inferior tibiofibular, anterior deltoid (1 cm), interosseous/transverse (IOL/TL), posterior-inferior tibiofibular, and whole deltoid. In each condition, specimens were loaded in axial compression to 700 N and then externally rotated to 20 N·m torque. During axial loading and external rotation, both the fibula and the talus rotated significantly after each ligament sectioning as compared to the intact condition. After IOL/TL release, a significant increase in posterior translation of the fibula was observed, although no syndesmotic widening was observed. Mean tibiotalar contact pressure increased significantly after IOL/TL release, and the center of pressure shifted posterolaterally, relative to more stable conditions, after IOL/TL release. There were significant increases in mean contact pressure and peak pressure along with a reduction in contact area with axial loading and external rotation as compared to axial loading alone for all 5 conditions. Significant increases in tibiotalar contact pressures occur when external rotation stresses are added to axial loading. Moderate and severe injuries are associated with a significant increase in mean contact pressure combined with a shift in the center of pressure and rotation of the fibula and talus. Considerable changes in ankle joint kinematics and contact mechanics may explain why moderate syndesmosis injuries take longer to heal and are more likely to develop long-term dysfunction and, potentially, ankle arthritis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. The stress-tenogram in the diagnosis of ruptures of the lateral ligament of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.A.; Frenyo, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The stress-tenogram is a radiological technique for the investigation of injuries to the lateral ligament of the ankle, and combines the information previously provided by inversion and anterior stress radiographs, and the peroneal tenogram. It is designed to differentiate between stable and unstable ankles, and between isolated ruptures of the anterior talofibular ligament and combined tears of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. A high degree of diagnostic accuracy has been confirmed at operative repair in a group of thirty-two patients. (author)

  8. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  9. Neuromuscular control and ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Gregory M; Kaminski, Thomas W; Douex, Al T

    2009-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are common injuries in athletics and daily activity. Although most are resolved with conservative treatment, others develop chronic ankle instability (AI)-a condition associated with persistent pain, weakness, and instability-both mechanical (such as ligamentous laxity) and functional (neuromuscular impairment with or without mechanical laxity). The predominant theory in AI is one of articular deafferentation from the injury, affecting closed-loop (feedback/reflexive) neuromuscular control, but recent research has called that theory into question. A considerable amount of attention has been directed toward understanding the underlying causes of this pathology; however, little is known concerning the neuromuscular mechanisms behind the development of AI. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature on neuromuscular control in uninjured individuals and individuals with AI. Based on available research and reasonable speculation, it seems that open-loop (feedforward/anticipatory) neuromuscular control may be more important for the maintenance of dynamic joint stability than closed-loop control systems that rely primarily on proprioception. Therefore, incorporating perturbation activities into patient rehabilitation schemes may be of some benefit in enhancing these open-loop control mechanisms. Despite the amount of research conducted in this area, analysis of individuals with AI during dynamic conditions is limited. Future work should aim to evaluate dynamic perturbations in individuals with AI, as well as subjects who have a history of at least one LAS and never experienced recurrent symptoms. These potential findings may help elucidate some compensatory mechanisms, or more appropriate neuromuscular control strategies after an LAS event, thus laying the groundwork for future intervention studies that can attempt to reduce the incidence and severity of acute and chronic lateral ankle injury.

  10. Radiological aspects of sprained ankle syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis addresses several problems related to sprained ankle syndrome. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the imaging features of sprained ankles, found on new radiological modalities, and to assess the additional diagnostic understanding and treatment planning of helical CT as well as

  11. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  12. A novel tool for measuring ankle dorsiflexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; B Nielsen, Henrik; Lund, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    correlation coefficients (ICC). RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 24 patients: fifteen females and nine males post-immobilisation following surgery for ankle fractures. The mean age was 51.0 years, ranging from 22–92 years. All patients had sustained an AO classification 44- fracture of the ankle...

  13. Ankle and Other Signatures in Uhecr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    2015-03-01

    The interaction signatures of UHE protons propagating through CMB are discussed. Much attention is given to ankle, which starting from 1963 is usually interpreted as a feature of transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. We argue here that this interpretation is now excluded. It gives more credit to alternative explanation of the ankle as an intrinsic part of the pair-production dip.

  14. Ball-and-socket ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistoia, F.; Ozonoff, M.B.; Wintz, P.; Hartford Hospital, CT

    1987-01-01

    The ball-and-socket ankle joint is a malformation of the ankle in which the articular surface of the talus is hemispherical in both the anteroposterior and lateral projections and has a congruent, concave tibial articular surface. Fourteen patients with this condition were identified retrospectively. Thirteen patients were thought to have the congenital type of ball-and-socket ankle joint which in many was associated with tarsal coalition, short limb, and ray fusion and deletion anomalies. One case of the acquired type, demonstrating less geometric rounding of the talar margins, was seen in a patient with myelomeningocele, probably resulting from sensory and motor deficits. Although the exact etiology of the congenital type is unknown, its association with other malformations suggests that the ball-and-socket ankle joint results from an overall maldevelopment of the ankle and foot. (orig.)

  15. Channel Characteristics and Performance of MIMO E-SDM Systems in an Indoor Time-Varying Fading Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huu Phu Bui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems employ advanced signal processing techniques. However, the performance is affected by propagation environments and antenna characteristics. The main contributions of the paper are to investigate Doppler spectrum based on measured data in a typical meeting room and to evaluate the performance of MIMO systems based on an eigenbeam-space division multiplexing (E-SDM technique in an indoor time-varying fading environment, which has various distributions of scatterers, line-of-sight wave existence, and mutual coupling effect among antennas. We confirm that due to the mutual coupling among antennas, patterns of antenna elements are changed and different from an omnidirectional one of a single antenna. Results based on the measured channel data in our measurement campaigns show that received power, channel autocorrelation, and Doppler spectrum are dependent not only on the direction of terminal motion but also on the antenna configuration. Even in the obstructed-line-of-sight environment, observed Doppler spectrum is quite different from the theoretical U-shaped Jakes one. In addition, it has been also shown that a channel change during the time interval between the transmit weight matrix determination and the actual data transmission can degrade the performance of MIMO E-SDM systems.

  16. Combining SDM-Based Circuit Switching with Packet Switching in a Router for On-Chip Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Kuti Lusala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Hybrid router architecture for Networks-on-Chip “NoC” is presented, it combines Spatial Division Multiplexing “SDM” based circuit switching and packet switching in order to efficiently and separately handle both streaming and best-effort traffic generated in real-time applications. Furthermore the SDM technique is combined with Time Division Multiplexing “TDM” technique in the circuit switching part in order to increase path diversity, thus improving throughput while sharing communication resources among multiple connections. Combining these two techniques allows mitigating the poor resource usage inherent to circuit switching. In this way Quality of Service “QoS” is easily provided for the streaming traffic through the circuit-switched sub-router while the packet-switched sub-router handles best-effort traffic. The proposed hybrid router architectures were synthesized, placed and routed on an FPGA. Results show that a practicable Network-on-Chip “NoC” can be built using the proposed router architectures. 7 × 7 mesh NoCs were simulated in SystemC. Simulation results show that the probability of establishing paths through the NoC increases with the number of sub-channels and has its highest value when combining SDM with TDM, thereby significantly reducing contention in the NoC.

  17. Ankle fusion for definitive management of non-reconstructable pilon fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Vladimir; Thordarson, David B; Hertz, Jennifer

    2008-09-01

    Highly comminuted pilon fractures, especially with a compromised soft tissue envelope, present a challenging treatment scenario. This study presents our results for patients managed with ankle fusion rather than ORIF. Fourteen patients with ankle joint incongruence after non-reconstructable tibia pilon fractures were treated with primary tibiotalar arthrodesis using a fixed-angle cannulated blade plate. Delayed metaphyseal unions due to bone defects were treated concurrently. The subtalar joint was preserved in all cases. Metaphyseal healing and stable arthrodesis was obtained in each case. There was one case of blade plate breakage in a patient who still achieved successful arthrodesis without reoperation. Union was achieved at an average of 15 weeks. No secondary procedures were required to obtain union. All 14 patients were ambulatory at last followup. Average followup was 39 weeks. Primary ankle arthrodesis can be achieved using a cannulated blade plate to address a non-reconstructable articular surface and metaphyseal bone defects in complex tibia pilon fractures.

  18. Clinical tests of ankle plantarflexor strength do not predict ankle power generation during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Michelle; Williams, Gavin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between a clinical test of ankle plantarflexor strength and ankle power generation (APG) at push-off during walking. This is a prospective cross-sectional study of 102 patients with traumatic brain injury. Handheld dynamometry was used to measure ankle plantarflexor strength. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed to quantify ankle power generation at push-off during walking. Ankle plantarflexor strength was only moderately correlated with ankle power generation at push-off (r = 0.43, P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.58). There was also a moderate correlation between ankle plantarflexor strength and self-selected walking velocity (r = 0.32, P = 0.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.48). Handheld dynamometry measures of ankle plantarflexor strength are only moderately correlated with ankle power generation during walking. This clinical test of ankle plantarflexor strength is a poor predictor of calf muscle function during gait in people with traumatic brain injury.

  19. Reliability and smallest real difference of the ankle lunge test post ankle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simondson, David; Brock, Kim; Cotton, Susan

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and the smallest real difference of the Ankle Lunge test in an ankle fracture patient population. In the post immobilisation stage of ankle fracture, ankle dorsiflexion is an important measure of progress and outcome. The Ankle Lunge test measures weight bearing dorsiflexion, resulting in negative scores (knee to wall distance) and positive scores (toe to wall distance), for which the latter has proven reliability in normal subjects only. A consecutive sample of ankle fracture patients with permission to commence weight bearing, were recruited to the study. Three measurements of the Ankle Lunge Test were performed each by two raters, one senior and one junior physiotherapist. These occurred prior to therapy sessions in the second week after plaster removal. A standardised testing station was utilised and allowed for both knee to wall distance and toe to wall distance measurement. Data was collected from 10 individuals with ankle fracture, with an average age of 36 years (SD 14.8). Seventy seven percent of observations were negative. Intra and inter-rater reliability yielded intra class correlations at or above 0.97, p Ankle Lunge test is a practical and reliable tool for measuring weightbearing dorsiflexion post ankle fracture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Polzer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, a standardized examination and an evidence-based treatment are missing. Therefore, aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence and develop an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analysis, systematic reviews, or if applicable observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations are given. The Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures, Physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex. Classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance. The squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify such injuries. Stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis, while for unstable ankle sprains conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without carrying possible complications. Early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of re-injury. Supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we here present an applicable and evidence-based step by step decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor’s practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and confidence for the attending physician.

  1. Ankle Arthrodesis Following Trauma, a Useful Salvage Procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    progressive loss of ankle-joint motion, weight-bearing pain, and functional disability. ... of patients after the reconstructionof ankle malunions.[6] ... Three patients with severe open ankle ... diabetic nor was he known to be on any steroid medication. He was .... Charnley J. Compression arthrodesis of the ankle and shoulder.

  2. Predicted percentage dissatisfied with ankle draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Schiavon, S; Kabanshi, A; Nazaroff, W W

    2017-07-01

    Draft is unwanted local convective cooling. The draft risk model of Fanger et al. (Energy and Buildings 12, 21-39, 1988) estimates the percentage of people dissatisfied with air movement due to overcooling at the neck. There is no model for predicting draft at ankles, which is more relevant to stratified air distribution systems such as underfloor air distribution (UFAD) and displacement ventilation (DV). We developed a model for predicted percentage dissatisfied with ankle draft (PPD AD ) based on laboratory experiments with 110 college students. We assessed the effect on ankle draft of various combinations of air speed (nominal range: 0.1-0.6 m/s), temperature (nominal range: 16.5-22.5°C), turbulence intensity (at ankles), sex, and clothing insulation (thermal sensation and air speed at ankles are the dominant parameters affecting draft. The seated subjects accepted a vertical temperature difference of up to 8°C between ankles (0.1 m) and head (1.1 m) at neutral whole-body thermal sensation, 5°C more than the maximum difference recommended in existing standards. The developed ankle draft model can be implemented in thermal comfort and air diffuser testing standards. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Foot and ankle problems in Thai monks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Wattanarojanaporn, Thongaek; Intharasompan, Piyapong; Theeraamphon, Nipon; Auephanviriyakul, Sansanee; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-01-01

    Foot and ankle problems in Thai monks have not been explored. This is an unshod population, and its members have a unique lifestyle living among others in our modern era. Beginning at their ordainment, they follow strict rules about barefoot walking, the amount of daily walking, and their sitting position, practices that theoretically can increase their risk of developing foot and ankle problems. To evaluate the prevalence ofcommon foot and ankle problems in Thai monks. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in combination with foot and ankle examinations of monks living in northern Thailand Foot morphology was examined using a Harris mat footprint. Results of the interviews and the foot and ankle examinations were evaluated. Two hundred and nine monks from 28 temples were included in this study. Common foot and ankle problems found included callosity (70.8%), toe deformities (18.2%), plantar fasciitis (13.4%), metatarsalgia (3.8%), and numbness (2.9%). Callosity and toe deformities were associated with prolonged barefoot walking over extended periods since ordainment (p < 0.05). The callosity was found on the forefoot (47.3%), lateral malleolus (40.7%), and heel (12%). Arch types were considered normal in 66.4% of cases, high in 21.6%, and low in 12%. No association was found between arch type and foot and ankle problems. Callosity and toe deformity were the most common foot and ankle problems found in Thai monks, especially those with prolonged period of barefoot walking and long-term duration ofordainment. The unique pattern of walking and sitting of Thai monks may have contributed to the development of those feet and ankle problems.

  4. Realignment Surgery for Malunited Ankle Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Jun; Li, Xing-Cheng; Hu, Mu; Xu, Yang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics and the results of realignment surgery for the treatment of malunited ankle fracture. Thirty-three patients with malunited fractures of the ankle who underwent reconstructive surgery at our hospital from January 2010 to January 2014 were reviewed. The tibial anterior surface angle (TAS), the tibiotalar tilt angle (TTA), the malleolar angle (MA), and the tibial lateral surface angle (TLS) were measured. Clinical assessment was performed with use of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and the osteoarthritis stage was determined radiographically with the modified Takakura classification system. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs test was used to analyze the difference between the preoperative and the postoperative data. The mean follow-up was 36 months (range, 20-60 months). The mean age at the time of realignment surgery was 37.1 years (range, 18-62 years). Compared with preoperation, the TAS at the last follow-up showed a significant increase (88.50° ± 4.47° vs. 90.80° ± 3.49°, P = 0.0035); similar results were observed in TTA (1.62° ± 1.66° vs. 0.83° ± 0.90°, P ankle osteoarthritis, and was treated by ankle joint distraction. Realignment surgery for a malunited ankle fracture can reduce pain, improve function, and delay ankle arthrodesis or total ankle replacement. Postoperative large talar tilt and advanced stages of ankle arthritis are the risk factors for the surgery. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Compression therapy after ankle fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, R; Bayer, L; Gottlieb, H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The main purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of compression treatment on the perioperative course of ankle fractures and describe its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, length of stay (LOS) and time to surgery (TTS). The aim...... undergoing surgery, testing either intermittent pneumatic compression, compression bandage and/or compression stocking and reporting its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, LOS and TTS. To conclude on data a narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: The review included...

  6. All-inside, anatomical lateral ankle stabilization for revision and complex primary lateral ankle stabilization: a technique guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prissel, Mark A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-12-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common mechanical problem that often requires surgical management when conservative efforts fail. Historically, myriad open surgical approaches have been proposed. Recently, consideration for arthroscopic management of lateral ankle instability has become popular, with promising results. Unfortunately, recurrent inversion ankle injury following lateral ankle stabilization can occur and require revision surgery. To date, arthroscopic management for revision lateral ankle stabilization has not been described. We present a novel arthroscopic technique combining an arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization kit with a suture anchor ligament augmentation system for revision as well as complex primary lateral ankle stabilization. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. Differences in kinematic control of ankle joint motions in people with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kristof; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2013-06-01

    People with chronic ankle instability display different ankle joint motions compared to healthy people. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strategies used to control ankle joint motions between a group of people with chronic ankle instability and a group of healthy, matched controls. Kinematic data were collected from 11 people with chronic ankle instability and 11 matched control subjects as they performed a single-leg land-and-cut maneuver. Three-dimensional ankle joint angles were calculated from 100 ms before, to 200 ms after landing. Kinematic control of the three rotational ankle joint degrees of freedom was investigated by simultaneously examining the three-dimensional co-variation of plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, toe-in/toe-out rotation, and inversion/eversion motions with principal component analysis. Group differences in the variance proportions of the first two principal components indicated that the angular co-variation between ankle joint motions was more linear in the control group, but more planar in the chronic ankle instability group. Frontal and transverse plane motions, in particular, contributed to the group differences in the linearity and planarity of angular co-variation. People with chronic ankle instability use a different kinematic control strategy to coordinate ankle joint motions during a single-leg landing task. Compared to the healthy group, the chronic ankle instability group's control strategy appeared to be more complex and involved joint-specific contributions that would tend to predispose this group to recurring episodes of instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Elastic Bandage and Neoprene Ankle Support on Ankle Position Sense and Pain in Subjects with Ankle Sprain (Grade I & II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Majdoleslami

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate whether a neoprene ankle support and elastic bandage around the ankle joint of subjects with ankle sprain (grade I&II would , in short term (a reduce pain (b improve ankle joint position sense and comparison of their effect with each other if they have. Materials & Methods: In a semi-experimental study, 30 subjects (16men, 14 women, age between 16-52 with ankle sprain grade I&II. Subjects had to have at least 2cm from 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS of ankle pain for study entry. All patients were randomly assigned to either an elastic bandage or a neoprene ankle support. One week later they were assigned to the opposite selection. Joint position sense was assessed in the sitting position using an electrogoniometer and pain by VAS where 0cm equals no pain and 10 cm equals worst pain. ankle pain and JPS were assessed for each selection one week apart. During each visit assessment were performed at baseline and after 20 min of bandage/neoprene ankle support application. Results: the mean of scores for ankle variables JPS and VAS was taken and paired-t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test was employed to calculate the different between two trails. Neoprene ankle support had significant effect on ankle JPS (P=0.034. But elastic bandage had no effect (P=0.539. Both of them had significantly reduced ankle pain. (P=0.000  Conclusion: In subjects with both neoprene ankle support and elastic bandage reduced ankle pain with more effect of neoprene ankle support. Only the neoprene ankle support had effect on knee JPS.

  9. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomason, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described.

  10. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion - A short term retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Muthukumar Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years. The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100% progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3-6 months. All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34. The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42. We found that twenty patients (68.96% out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13% had good, and 2 (6.89% showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup.

  11. The adult ball-and-socket ankle joint: surgical management of late ankle and subtalar arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John S; DeOrio, James K

    2015-04-01

    We review the surgical management of 4 adult patients with ball-and-socket ankle deformity who developed end-stage subtalar and/or ankle joint arthritis. We retrospectively reviewed a series of 4 adult patients with ball-and-socket ankle configurations who underwent surgical treatment for either end-stage tibiotalar or subtalar arthritis, with either subtalar arthrodesis or total ankle replacement (TAR). Clinical outcome, including subjective pain assessment, limitation of activities, and difficulty with shoe wear, were assessed at follow-up. A total of 5 ankles in 4 patients were identified that met the inclusion criteria. There were 3 subtalar arthrodeses in 2 patients and 2 primary TARs in 2 patients. At an average follow-up of 30.5 (range = 17 to 59) months, there were no failures, although 1 patient who underwent TAR was considered an impending failure with aseptic component loosening. Of the 4 patients, 3 resumed normal activity with minimal pain and were very pleased with their overall outcome. Standard surgical interventions for ankle and subtalar arthritis, such as total ankle arthroplasty and subtalar arthrodesis, can be successfully performed in patients with ball-and-socket ankles; clinical outcome and survivorship, however, may be inferior to that in patients with normal ankle configurations. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case Series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  12. Spontaneous resolution of posterior ankle joint loose bodies after total ankle replacement: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond P; Cheng, Sally H S

    2017-06-01

    Late stage ankle osteoarthritis often presents with debilitating pain. It is common to find osteophytes and loose body formation around the joint. Total ankle arthroplasty can preserve joint mobility and pain relieve for such patient. However, when trying to remove the osteophytes and loose bodies at the posterior ankle joint, there is risk of damaging posterior structures such as the neurovascular bundle during the procedure. We are presenting a case where the posterior loose bodies remained untouched during the operation, and patient showed spontaneous resolution of the lesions with time. Patient enjoyed good function outcome after the surgery. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints and off-the-shelf ankle braces in preventing ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Winson C C; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Choy, Barton T S; Leung, Aaron K L

    2012-06-01

    A custom moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints potentially offers a better control over the subtalar joint and the ankle joint during lateral cutting movements, due to total contact design and increase in material strength. To test the above hypothesis by comparing it to three other available orthoses. Repeated measures. Eight subjects with a history of ankle sprains (Grade 2), and 11 subjects without such history performed lateral cutting movements in four test conditions: 1) non-orthotic, 2) custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges, 3) Sport-Stirrup, and 4) elastic ankle sleeve with plastic support. A VICON motion analysis system was used to study the motions at the ankle and subtalar joints. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis significantly lowered the inversion angle at initial contact (p = 0.006) and the peak inversion angle (p = 0.000) during lateral cutting movements in comparison to non-orthotic condition, while the other two orthoses did not. The three orthoses did not affect the plantarflexion motions, which had been suggested by previous studies to be important in shock wave attenuation. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges could better control inversion and thus expected to better prevent ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements. Custom-moulded ankle orthoses are not commonly used in preventing ankle sprains. This study raises the awareness of the use of custom-moulded ankle orthoses which are expected to better prevent ankle sprains.

  14. Water-rock interaction modelling and uncertainties of mixing modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    , hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on available primary data from the extended data freeze L2.3 at Laxemar (November 30 2007). The data interpretation was carried out during November 2007 to September 2008. Several groups within ChemNet were involved and the evaluation was conducted independently using different approaches ranging from expert knowledge to geochemical and mathematical modelling including transport modelling. During regular ChemNet meetings the results have been presented and discussed. The original works by the ChemNet modellers are presented in four level III reports containing complementary information for the bedrock hydrogeochemistry Laxemar Site Descriptive Model (SDM-Site Laxemar, R-08-93) level II report. There is also a fifth level III report: Fracture mineralogy of the Laxemar area (R-08-99). This report presents the modelling work performed by the UZ (Univ. of Zaragoza) group as part of the work plan for Laxemar-Simpevarp 2.2 and 2.3. The main processes determining the global geochemical evolution of the Laxemar-Simpevarp groundwaters system are mixing and reaction processes. Mixing has taken place between different types of waters (end members) over time, making the discrimination of the main influences not always straightforward. Several lines of evidence suggest the input of dilute waters (cold or warm), at different stages, into a bedrock with pre-existing very saline groundwaters. Subsequently, marine water entered the system over the Littorina period (when the topography and the distance to the coast allowed it) and mixed with pre-existent groundwaters of variable salinity. In the Laxemar subarea mainland, the Littorina input occurred only locally and it has mostly been flushed out by the subsequent input of warm meteoric waters with a distinctive modern isotopic signature. In addition to mixing processes and superimposed to their effects, different

  15. Water-rock interaction modelling and uncertainties of mixing modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia (Univ. of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain))

    2009-01-15

    , hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on available primary data from the extended data freeze L2.3 at Laxemar (November 30 2007). The data interpretation was carried out during November 2007 to September 2008. Several groups within ChemNet were involved and the evaluation was conducted independently using different approaches ranging from expert knowledge to geochemical and mathematical modelling including transport modelling. During regular ChemNet meetings the results have been presented and discussed. The original works by the ChemNet modellers are presented in four level III reports containing complementary information for the bedrock hydrogeochemistry Laxemar Site Descriptive Model (SDM-Site Laxemar, R-08-93) level II report. There is also a fifth level III report: Fracture mineralogy of the Laxemar area (R-08-99). This report presents the modelling work performed by the UZ (Univ. of Zaragoza) group as part of the work plan for Laxemar-Simpevarp 2.2 and 2.3. The main processes determining the global geochemical evolution of the Laxemar-Simpevarp groundwaters system are mixing and reaction processes. Mixing has taken place between different types of waters (end members) over time, making the discrimination of the main influences not always straightforward. Several lines of evidence suggest the input of dilute waters (cold or warm), at different stages, into a bedrock with pre-existing very saline groundwaters. Subsequently, marine water entered the system over the Littorina period (when the topography and the distance to the coast allowed it) and mixed with pre-existent groundwaters of variable salinity. In the Laxemar subarea mainland, the Littorina input occurred only locally and it has mostly been flushed out by the subsequent input of warm meteoric waters with a distinctive modern isotopic signature. In addition to mixing processes and superimposed to their

  16. New arthroscopic assisted technique for ankle instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner Garces, Juan Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    An assisted arthroscopic technique for chronic ankle instability is presented by the author, together with his results for 27 patients treated between January 2000 and February 2004, with a minimum follow-up of six months. Indications for his technique, according to the rehabilitation protocol of the Medical Centre, included patients with chronic subjective and objective ankle instability, anteroposterior instability, associated anteromedical impingement syndromes, non competitive athletes, patients not displaying defects in the alignment of the axis of foot and ankle, or systemic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, collagenisis or hyperelasticity. Patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS scale for the outcome of ankle procedures, and followed up for a minimum period of six months. Positive results confirm an efficient and effective technique, simple and easy to reproduce, that does not hinder future open anatomical or non-anatomical reconstruction, and in which complications are minimal

  17. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, Joseph J; Spiess, Anita; Darakjy, Salima; Grier, Tyson; Manning, Fred; Livingston, Elaine; Swedler, David; Amoroso, Paul; Jones, Bruce H

    2008-01-01

    ...) of the Defense Safety Oversight Council (DSOC) to evaluate the parachute ankle brace (PAB). Information provided by the questionnaire identified potential injury risk factors and comments on the PAB...

  18. Postoperative MR study of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Sander, B.; Schubeus, P.; Tepe, H.; Goudarzi, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    20 patients with acute traumatic rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament and ligamental suture were studied postoperatively by MRI. MR results were correlated with stress X-ray studies. We found a normal anterior talofibular ligament in eight cases. However, stress X-ray images showed normal stability of the ankle joint in eighteen cases. In six patients the anterior talofibular ligament was thickened, in another six cases it could not be separated from scar tissue. Therefore MR imaging of ankle ligaments did not allow a diagnosis of their function. Nevertheless, sequelae of the ankle trauma such as osteochondrosis, exsudation into the ankle joint and tendovaginitis of the flexor muscles were sensitively visualised by MR. (orig.) [de

  19. An order of magnitude improvement in optical fiber bandwidth using spatial domain multiplexing/space division multiplexing (SDM) in conjunction with orbital angular momentum (OAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Syed; Alanzi, Saud; Hridoy, Arnob; Lovell, Greg; Parhar, Gurinder; Chakravarty, Abhijit; Chowdhury, Bilas

    2014-09-01

    Spatial Domain Multiplexing/Space Division Multiplexing (SDM) can increase the bandwidth of existing and futuristic optical fibers by an order of magnitude or more. In the SDM technique, we launch multiple single mode pigtail laser sources of same wavelength into a carrier fiber at different angles. The launching angles decide the output of the carrier fiber by allocating separate spatial locations for each channel. Each channel follows a helical trajectory while traversing the length of the carrier fiber, thereby allowing spatial reuse of optical frequencies. In this endeavor we launch light from five different single mode pigtail laser sources at different angles (with respect to the axis of the carrier fiber) into the carrier fiber. Owing to helical propagation we get five distinct concentric donut shaped rings with negligible crosstalk at the output end of the fiber. These SDM channels also exhibit Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM), thereby adding an extra degree of photon freedom. We present the experimental data of five spatially multiplexed channels and compare them with simulated results to show that this technique can potentially improve the data capacity of optical fibers by an order of magnitude: A factor of five using SDM and another factor of two using OAM.

  20. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  1. Clinical examination results in individuals with functional ankle instability and ankle-sprain copers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L; Ross, Scott E; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Cross-sectional study. Sports medicine research laboratory. Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected immediately postinjury to prospectively identify potential copers is unknown.

  2. Using decision analysis to assess comparative clinical efficacy of surgical treatment of unstable ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, James D

    2013-11-01

    The development of a robust treatment algorithm for ankle fractures based on well-established stability criteria has been shown to be prognostic with respect to treatment and outcomes. In parallel with the development of improved understanding of the biomechanical rationale of ankle fracture treatment has been an increased emphasis on assessing the effectiveness of medical and surgical interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of using decision analysis in the assessment of the cost effectiveness of operative treatment of ankle fractures based on the existing clinical data in the literature. Using the data obtained from a previous structured review of the ankle fracture literature, decision analysis trees were constructed using standard software. The decision nodes for the trees were based on ankle fracture stability criteria previously published. The outcomes were assessed by calculated Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) assigned to achieving normal ankle function, developing posttraumatic arthritis, or sustaining a postoperative infection. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken by varying the patient's age, incidence of arthritis, and incidence or infection. Decision analysis trees captured the essential aspects of clinical decision making in ankle fracture treatment in a clinically useful manner. In general, stable fractures yielded better outcomes with nonoperative treatment, whereas unstable fractures had better outcomes with surgery. These were consistent results over a wide range of postoperative infection rates. Varying the age of the patient did not qualitatively change the results. Between the ages of 30 and 80 years, surgery yielded higher expected QALYs than nonoperative care for unstable fractures, and generated lower QALYs than nonoperative care for stable fractures. Using local cost estimates for operative and nonoperative treatment, the incremental cost of surgery for unstable fractures was less than $40,000 per QALY (the

  3. Unpredictably Stable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Failla, Virgilio; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    2014-01-01

    Is entrepreneurship a more stable career choice for high employment turnover individuals? We find that a transition to entrepreneurship induces a shift towards stayer behavior and identify job matching, job satisfaction and lock-in effects as main drivers. These findings have major implications...

  4. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  5. Measurement of blood pressure, ankle blood pressure and calculation of ankle brachial index in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Damsbo, Bent; Lund, Jens Otto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values......BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values...

  6. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  7. Foot and Ankle Kinematics During Descent From Varying Step Heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstle, Emily E; O'Connor, Kristian; Keenan, Kevin G; Cobb, Stephen C

    2017-12-01

    In the general population, one-third of incidences during step negotiation occur during the transition to level walking. Furthermore, falls during curb negotiation are a common cause of injury in older adults. Distal foot kinematics may be an important factor in determining injury risk associated with transition step negotiation. The purpose of this study was to identify foot and ankle kinematics of uninjured individuals during descent from varying step heights. A 7-segment foot model was used to quantify kinematics as participants walked on a level walkway, stepped down a single step (heights: 5 cm, 15 cm, 25 cm), and continued walking. As step height increased, landing strategy transitioned from the rearfoot to the forefoot, and the rearfoot, lateral and medial midfoot, and medial forefoot became more plantar flexed. During weight acceptance, sagittal plane range of motion of the rearfoot, lateral midfoot, and medial and lateral forefoot increased as step height increased. The changes in landing strategy and distal foot function suggest a less stable ankle position at initial contact and increased demand on the distal foot at initial contact and through the weight acceptance phase of transition step negotiation as step height increases.

  8. Effects of circumferential ankle pressure on ankle proprioception, stiffness, and postural stability: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sung H; Granata, Kevin P; Bunker, Linda K

    2004-08-01

    Cross-sectional repeated-measures design. Determine the effects of circumferential ankle pressure (CAP) intervention on proprioceptive acuity, ankle stiffness, and postural stability. The application of CAP using braces, taping, and adaptive shoes or military boots is widely used to address chronic ankle instability (CAI). An underlying assumption is that the CAP intervention might improve ankle stability through increased proprioceptive acuity and stiffness in the ankle. METHOD AND MEASURES: A convenience sample of 10 subjects was recruited from the local university community and categorized according to proprioceptive acuity (high, low) and ankle stability (normal, CAI). Proprioceptive acuity was measured when blindfolded subjects were asked to accurately reproduce a self-selected target ankle position before and after the application of CAP. Proprioceptive acuity was determined in 5 different ankle joint position sense tests: neutral, inversion, eversion, plantar flexion, and dorsiflexion. Joint position angles were recorded electromechanically using a potentiometer. Passive ankle stiffness was computed from the ratio of applied static moment versus angular displacement. Active ankle stiffness was determined from biomechanical analyses of ankle motion following a mediolateral perturbation. Postural stability was quantified from the center of pressure displacement in the mediolateral and the anteroposterior directions in unipedal stance. All measurements were recorded with and without CAP applied by a pediatric blood pressure cuff. Data were analyzed using a separate mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Post hoc comparison using Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test was performed if significant interactions were obtained. Significance level was set at P<.05 for all analyses. Significant group (high versus low proprioceptive acuity) x CAP interactions were identified for postural stability. Passive ankle stiffness was

  9. Intrinsic ankle stiffness during standing increases with ankle torque and passive stretch of the Achilles tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jaspret

    2018-01-01

    Individuals may stand with a range of ankle angles. Furthermore, shoes or floor surfaces may elevate or depress their heels. Here we ask how these situations impact ankle stiffness and balance. We performed two studies (each with 10 participants) in which the triceps surae, Achilles tendon and aponeurosis were stretched either passively, by rotating the support surface, or actively by leaning forward. Participants stood freely on footplates which could rotate around the ankle joint axis. Brief, small stiffness-measuring perturbations (torque or passive stretch. Sway was minimally affected by stretch or lean, suggesting that this did not underlie the alterations in stiffness. In quiet stance, maximum ankle stiffness is limited by the tendon. As tendon strain increases, it becomes stiffer, causing an increase in overall ankle stiffness, which would explain the effects of leaning. However, stiffness also increased considerably with passive stretch, despite a modest torque increase. We discuss possible explanations for this increase. PMID:29558469

  10. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open Weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Katherine; Ramesh, Ashwanth; McGoldrick, Niall; Cove, Richard; Walsh, James C; Stephens, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  12. Prospective Computed Tomographic Analysis of Osteochondral Lesions of the Ankle Joint Associated With Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosewicz, Tomasz L; Beerekamp, M Suzan H; De Muinck Keizer, Robert-Jan O; Schepers, Tim; Maas, Mario; Niek van Dijk, C; Goslings, J Carel

    2016-08-01

    Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) associated with ankle fracture correlate with unfavorable outcome. The goals of this study were to detect OCLs following ankle fracture, to associate fracture type to OCLs and to investigate whether OCLs affect clinical outcome. 100 ankle fractures requiring operative treatment were prospectively included (46 men, 54 women; mean age 44 ± 14 years, range 20-77). All ankle fractures (conventional radiography; 71 Weber B, 22 Weber C, 1 Weber A, 4 isolated medial malleolus and 2 isolated posterior malleolus fractures) were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) was performed postoperatively. For each OCL, the location, size, and Loomer OCL classification (CT modified Berndt and Harty classification) were determined. The subjective Foot and Ankle Outcome Scoring (FAOS) was used for clinical outcome at 1 year. OCLs were found in 10/100 ankle fractures (10.0%). All OCLs were solitary talar lesions. Four OCLs were located posteromedial, 4 posterolateral, 1 anterolateral, and 1 anteromedial. There were 2 type I OCLs (subchondral compression), 6 type II OCLs (partial, nondisplaced fracture) and 2 type IV OCLs (displaced fracture). Mean OCL size (largest diameter) was 4.4 ± 1.7 mm (range, 1.7 mm to 6.2 mm). Chi-square analysis showed no significant association between ankle fracture type and occurrence of OCLs. OCLs did occur only in Lauge-Hansen stage III/IV ankle fractures. There were no significant differences in FAOS outcome between patients with or without OCLs. Ten percent of investigated ankle fractures had associated OCLs on CT. Although no significant association between fracture type and OCL was found, OCLs only occurred in Lauge-Hansen stage III/IV ankle fractures. With the numbers available, OCLs did not significantly affect clinical outcome at 1 year according to FAOS. Level IV, observational study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Clinical value of the Ottawa ankle rules for diagnosis of fractures in acute ankle injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ottawa ankle rules (OAR are clinical decision guidelines used to identify whether patients with ankle injuries need to undergo radiography. The OAR have been proven that their application reduces unnecessary radiography. They have nearly perfect sensitivity for identifying clinically significant ankle fractures. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the applicability of the OAR in China, to examine their accuracy for the diagnosis of fractures in patients with acute ankle sprains, and to assess their clinical utility for the detection of occult fractures. METHODS: In this prospective study, patients with acute ankle injuries were enrolled during a 6-month period. The eligible patients were examined by emergency orthopedic specialists using the OAR, and then underwent ankle radiography. The results of examination using the OAR were compared with the radiographic results to assess the accuracy of the OAR for ankle fractures. Patients with OAR results highly suggestive of fracture, but no evidence of a fracture on radiographs, were advised to undergo 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT. RESULTS: 183 patients with ankle injuries were enrolled in the study and 63 of these injuries involved fractures. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the OAR for detection of fractures of the ankle were 96.8%, 45.8%, 48.4% and 96.5%, respectively. Our results suggest that clinical application of the OAR could decrease unnecessary radiographs by 31.1%. Of the 21 patients with positive OAR results and negative radiographic findings who underwent 3D-CT examination, five had occult fractures of the lateral malleolus. CONCLUSIONS: The OAR are applicable in the Chinese population, and have high sensitivity and modest specificity for the diagnosis of fractures associated with acute ankle injury. They may detect some occult fractures of the malleoli that are not visible on

  14. Dynamic ankle control in athletes with ankle instability during sports maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Chin-Yang; Lin, Chia-Wei

    2011-09-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury. While the effects of static constraints in stabilizing the ankle joint are relatively well understood, those of dynamic constraints are less clear and require further investigation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the dynamic stability of the ankle joint during the landing phase of running and stop-jump maneuvers in athletes with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Controlled laboratory study. Fifteen athletes with CAI and 15 age-matched athletes without CAI performed running and stop-jump landing tasks. The dynamic ankle joint stiffness, tibialis anterior (TA)/peroneus longus (PL) and TA/gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) co-contraction indices, ankle joint angle, and root-mean-square (RMS) of the TA, PL, and GL electromyographic signals were measured during each task. During running, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion angle than the control group in the pre-landing phase (P = .012-.042) and a lower dynamic ankle joint stiffness in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.109 ± 0.039 N·m/deg; control: 0.150 ± 0.068 N·m/deg; P = .048). In the stop-jump landing task, athletes with CAI had a significantly lower TA/PL co-contraction index during the pre-landing phase (CAI: 49.1 ± 19; control: 64.8 ± 16; P = .009). In addition, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion (P = .049), a lower peak eversion (P = .04), and a smaller RMS of the PL electromyographic signal in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.73 ± 0.32; control: 0.51 ± 0.22; P = .04). Athletes with CAI had a relatively inverted ankle, reduced muscle co-contraction, and a lower dynamic stiffness in the ankle joint during the landing phase of sports maneuvers and this may jeopardize the stability of the ankle. Sports training or rehabilitation programs should differentiate between the pre-landing and post-landing phases of sports maneuvers, and should educate athletes to land with an appropriate ankle position and muscle recruitment.

  15. Paratrooper's ankle fracture: posterior malleolar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ki Won; Kim, Jin-su; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were compound fractures, most cases had to

  16. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [de

  17. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  18. Arthroscopy and Endoscopy of the Ankle and Hindfoot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides the surgeon with a minimally invasive treatment option for a wide variety of indications such as impingement, osteochondral defects, loose bodies, ossicles, synovitis, adhesions, and instability. Posterior ankle pathology can be treated using endoscopic hindfoot portals.

  19. Common Types and Countermeasures of Ankle Ligament Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize ... players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to different .... Road Success 2010;8:70. 5.

  20. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  1. Stable Tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris [Fermilab

    2018-04-13

    For very heavy quarks, relations derived from heavy-quark symmetry imply novel narrow doubly heavy tetraquark states containing two heavy quarks and two light antiquarks. We predict that double-beauty states will be stable against strong decays, whereas the double-charm states and mixed beauty+charm states will dissociate into pairs of heavy-light mesons. Observing a new double-beauty state through its weak decays would establish the existence of tetraquarks and illuminate the role of heavy color-antitriplet diquarks as hadron constituents.

  2. Ankle and knee biomechanics during normal walking following ankle plantarflexor fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Hatfield, Gillian L

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of unilateral ankle plantarflexor fatigue on bilateral knee and ankle biomechanics during gait. Lower leg kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activation were assessed before and after an ankle plantarflexor fatiguing protocol in 31 healthy individuals. Fatigue (defined as >10% reduction in maximal isometric ankle plantarflexor torque production and a downward shift in the median power frequency of both heads of the gastrocnemius muscle of the fatigued limb) was achieved in 18 individuals, and only their data were used for analysis purposes. Compared to pre-fatigue walking trials, medial gastrocnemius activity was significantly reduced in the study (fatigued) limb. Other main changes following fatigue included significantly more knee flexion during loading, and an associated larger external knee flexion moment in the study limb. At the ankle joint, participants exhibited significantly less peak plantarflexion (occurring at toe-off) with fatigue. No significant differences were observed in the contralateral (non-fatigued) limb. Findings from this study indicate that fatigue of the ankle plantarflexor muscle does not produce widespread changes in gait biomechanics, suggesting that small to moderate changes in maximal ankle plantarflexor force production capacity (either an increase or decrease) will not have a substantial impact on normal lower limb functioning during gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindo; Bever, Christopher T.; Forrester, Larry W.; Macko, Richard F.; Hogan, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults. PMID:21346215

  4. Combined circular external fixation and open reduction internal fixation with pro-syndesmotic screws for repair of a diabetic ankle fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharia Facaros

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of ankle fractures among the diabetic population is associated with higher complication rates compared to the general population. Efforts toward development of better methods in prevention and treatment are continuously evolving for these injuries. The presence of peripheral neuropathy and the possible development of Charcot neuroarthropathy in this high risk patient population have stimulated much surgical interest to create more stable osseous constructs when open reduction of an ankle fracture/dislocation is required. The utilization of multiple syndesmotic screws (pro-syndesmotic screws to further stabilize the ankle mortise has been reported by many foot and ankle surgeons. In addition, transarticular Steinmann pins have been described as an adjunct to traditional open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF of the ankle to better stabilize the talus, thus minimizing risk of further displacement, malunion, and Charcot neuroarthropathy. The authors present a unique technique of ORIF with pro-syndesmotic screws and the application of a multi-plane circular external fixator for management of a neglected diabetic ankle fracture that prevented further deformity while allowing a weight-bearing status. This technique may be utilized for the management of complex diabetic ankle fractures that are prone to future complications and possible limb loss.

  5. Mechanical instability destabilises the ankle joint directly in the ankle-sprain mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Faschian, Katrin; Lauber, Benedikt; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    Despite massive research efforts, it remains unclear how mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and functional ankle instability (FAI) affect joint control in the situation of ankle sprain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether individuals with MAI have deficits in stabilising their ankle joint in a close-to-injury situation compared with those with FAI and healthy controls. Ankle-joint control was assessed by means of three-dimensional motion analysis and electromyography in participants with FAI and MAI (n=19), in participants with pure FAI (n=9) and in healthy controls (n=18). Close-to-injury situations were simulated during standing, walking and jumping by means of a custom-made tilt platform. Individuals with FAI and MAI displayed significantly greater maximum ankle inversion angles (+5°) and inversion velocities (+50°/s) in the walking and jumping conditions compared to those with pure FAI and controls. Furthermore, individuals in the FAI and MAI group showed a significantly decreased pre-activation of the peroneus longus muscle during jumping compared to those with FAI. No differences between groups were found for plantar flexion and internal rotation, or for muscle activities following tilting of the platform. The present study demonstrates that MAI is characterised by impairments of ankle-joint control in close-to-injury situations. This could make these individuals more prone to recurrent ankle sprains, and suggests the need for additional mechanical support such as braces or even surgery. In addition, the study highlights the fact that dynamic experimental test conditions in the acting participant are needed to further unravel the mystery of chronic ankle instability.

  6. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  7. Biomechanical Study about Lateral Ankle Laxity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Voicu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study the contribution of the anterior talofibular ligament to ankle laxity at 18 cadaver ankles. For this, there was made an original, bipolar transoseus system, in a monitorized test stand Mx-500N Schmidt with a digital force gauge Imada. It was measured the motion response for applied antero-posterior force, inversion-eversion moment and internal-external rotary torque, in three positions of flexion of the ankle, with an intact anterior talofibular ligament and after it’s sectioning. The results showed a significant increases in laxity in plantar flexion for the inversion and internal rotary torque, this mechanism coresponding with common modes of injury.

  8. Two ankle joint laxity testers: reliability and validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Corvelein, Ruby; Janssen, Guido H. W.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2005-01-01

    Two test devices were manufactured to objectively measure ankle joint laxity: the dynamic anterior ankle tester (DAAT) and the quasi-static anterior ankle tester (QAAT). The primary aim was to analyse the reliability of both testers; The secondary aim was to assess validity in correlation with TELOS

  9. Direct measurement of the intrinsic ankle stiffness during standing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlutters, Mark; Vlutters, M.; Boonstra, Tjitske; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Kooij, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Ankle stiffness contributes to standing balance, counteracting the destabilizing effect of gravity. The ankle stiffness together with the compliance between the foot and the support surface make up the ankle-foot stiffness, which is relevant to quiet standing. The contribution of the intrinsic

  10. Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R O'Connor

    Full Text Available Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain.A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85 with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks and medium term (4 months follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery.Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.34. Greater age, weight-bearing status at baseline and non-inversion injury mechanisms were associated with lower function at 4 months (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.20. Pain on medial palpation and pain on dorsiflexion at 4 weeks were the most valuable prognostic indicators of function at 4 months (p< 0.01; adjusted R square=0.49.The results of the present study provide further evidence that ankle sprains have a variable clinical course. Age, injury grade, mechanism and weight-bearing status at baseline provide some prognostic information for short and medium term recovery. Clinical assessment variables at 4 weeks were the strongest predictors of recovery, explaining 50% of the variance in ankle function at 4 months. Further prospective research is required to highlight the factors

  11. Simulations Results of an Ankle Rehabilitation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Doroftei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ankle structure is one of the most important structures of the human body. Due to its important role in human’s activities, this joint is the most injured part of the lower limb. For a complete recovery of the range of motion, recovery exercises are mandatory. The introduction of robotic physical recovery systems represents a modern alternative to traditional recovery. In this paper we present the development of a new ankle rehabilitation device, that aims to fully recover the range of motion required for daily activities.

  12. Knee and Ankle Arthroplasty in Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Piero Solimeno

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Today, major surgical procedures can be safely performed in hemophilic patients with chronic arthropathy, using available factor concentrates. In this setting, total knee replacement is considered the “gold standard”, while the use of total ankle replacement is still debated. Indeed, the unsatisfactory results obtained with the previous available design of implants did not raise enthusiasm as knee or hip replacement. Recently, the introduction of new implant designs and better reported outcomes have renewed the interest in total ankle replacement in people with hemophilia. In this review, the role of replacement surgery in the treatment of chronic hemophilic arthropathy will be described.

  13. Spring-like Ankle Foot Orthoses reduce the energy cost of walking by taking over ankle work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregman, D.J.J.; Harlaar, J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; de Groot, V.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with central neurological disorders, gait is often limited by a reduced ability to push off with the ankle. To overcome this reduced ankle push-off, energy-storing, spring-like carbon-composite Ankle Foot Orthoses (AFO) can be prescribed. It is expected that the energy returned by the

  14. Recalcitrant Lateral Premalleolar Bursitis of the Ankle Associated with Lateral Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Naito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle is a rarely reported disorder in the English literature although it is not uncommon in Asian countries where people commonly sit on their feet. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old woman with recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis associated with lateral ankle instability which was successfully treated with surgical resection of the bursa and repair of the anterior talofibular ligament. Operative findings revealed a communication between the bursa and articular cavity of the ankle joint via the sheath of the extensor digitorum longus tendon, which was considered to act as a check valve leading to a large and recalcitrant bursitis. This report provides a novel concept about the etiology of recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle.

  15. Therapeutic interventions for increasing ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Gribble, Phillip A

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The existing evidence suggests that clinicians need to consider what may be the limiting factor of

  16. [Arthroscopic therapy of ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhibin; Mi, Kun; Wei, Renzhi; Liu, Wu; Wang, Bin

    2011-07-01

    To study the operative procedure and the effectiveness of arthroscopic therapy for ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation. Between March 2008 and April 2010, 38 patients with ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation were treated. Among them, there were 28 males and 10 females with an average age of 28 years (range, 18 to 42 years). The time from internal fixation to admission was 12-16 months (mean, 13.8 months). There were pressing pain in anterolateral and anterior ankle. The dorsal extension ranged from -20 to -5 degrees (mean, -10.6 degrees), and the palmar flexion was 30-40 degrees (mean, 35.5 degrees). The total score was 48.32 +/- 9.24 and the pain score was 7.26 +/- 1.22 before operation according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score system. The X-ray films showed osteophyte formation in anterior tibia and talus; MRI showed cartilage injury in 22 cases. Arthroscopic intervention included removing osteophytes, debriding fabric scars and synovial membrane tissues, and removing osteochondral fragments. Arthroscopic microfracture technique was used in 22 patients with cartilage injury. All incisions healed primarily. Thirty-eight cases were followed up 10-26 months (mean, 16 months). At last follow-up, 26 patients had normal range of motion (ROM); the dorsal extension was 15-25 degrees (mean, 19.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 40.7 degrees). Eight patients had mild limited ROM; the dorsal extension was 5-15 degrees (mean, 7.2 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 39.5 degrees). Four patients had mild limited ROM and pain in posterior portion of the ankle after a long walking (3-4 hours); the dorsal extension was 0-5 degrees (mean, 2.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-40 degrees (mean, 37.5 degrees). The total score was 89.45 +/- 9.55 and the pain score was 1.42 +/- 1.26 after

  17. Directing clinical care using lower extremity biomechanics in patients with ankle osteoarthritis and ankle arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Robin

    2017-11-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating disease with approximately 50,000 new cases per year leading to skeletal deformity, severe and recurrent pain, cartilage breakdown, and gait dysfunction limiting patient mobility and well-being. Although many treatments (total ankle arthroplasty [TAA], ankle fusion [arthrodesis], and ankle distraction arthroplasty) relieve pain, it is not clear that these procedures significantly improve patient mobility. The goal of the research presented here is to summarize what is presently known about lower extremity gait mechanics and outcomes and to quantify the impact of ankle osteoarthritis and TAA have on these measures using an explicitly holistic and mechanistic approach. Our recent studies have explored physical performance and energy recovery and revealed unexpected patterns and sequelae to treatment including incomplete restoration of gait function. These studies demonstrated for the first time the extreme levels and range of gait and balance dysfunction present in ankle osteoarthritis patients as well as quantifying the ways in which the affected joint alters movement and loading patterns not just in the painful joint, but throughout both the ipsilateral and contralateral lower extremity. Through this work, we determined that relieving pain alone through TAA is not enough to restore normal walking mechanics and balance due to underlying causes including limited ankle range of motion and balance deficits leading to long-term disability despite treatment. The results indicate the need to consider additional therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring balance, ankle range of motion, and movement symmetry in order to improve long-term health and function. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2345-2355, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. An in Silico Analysis of Ankle Joint Loads in Secondary Ankle Osteoarthritis. Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Mrzygłód, Mirosław W; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Secondary, post-traumatic, degenerative lesions of the ankle joint remain a serious clinical challenge. This paper presents the case of a 66-year-old patient with secondary, post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis and subchondral cysts. The use of rapid computer modelling FEM 2D enabled optimization of surgical treatment. A FEM 2D model of biomechanical changes in bones may help in streamlining treatment as well as improve our understanding of the pathomechanism of osteoarthritis.

  19. Ankle fracture spur sign is pathognomonic for a variant ankle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Garner, Matthew R; Lazaro, Lionel E; Warner, Stephen J; Loftus, Michael L; Birnbaum, Jacqueline F; Burket, Jayme C; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-02-01

    The hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture is composed of a posterior tibial lip fracture with posterolateral and posteromedial fracture fragments separated by a vertical fracture line. This infrequently reported injury pattern often includes an associated "spur sign" or double cortical density at the inferomedial tibial metaphysis. The objective of this study was to quantitatively establish the association of the ankle fracture spur sign with the hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. Our clinical database of operative ankle fractures was retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of hyperplantarflexion variant and nonvariant ankle fractures as determined by assessment of injury radiographs, preoperative advanced imaging, and intraoperative observation. Injury radiographs were then evaluated for the presence of the spur sign, and association between the spur sign and variant fractures was analyzed. The incidence of the hyperplantarflexion variant fracture among all ankle fractures was 6.7% (43/640). The spur sign was present in 79% (34/43) of variant fractures and absent in all nonvariant fractures, conferring a specificity of 100% in identifying variant fractures. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 100% and 99%, respectively. The ankle fracture spur sign was pathognomonic for the hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. It is important to identify variant fractures preoperatively as patient positioning, operative approach, and fixation construct of variant fractures often differ from those employed for osteosynthesis of nonvariant fractures. Identification of the spur sign should prompt acquisition of advanced imaging to formulate an appropriate operative plan to address the variant fracture pattern. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Pre-impact lower extremity posture and brake pedal force predict foot and ankle forces during an automobile collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, E C; Su, A; van den Bogert, A J

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a driver's foot and ankle forces during a frontal vehicle collision depend on initial lower extremity posture and brake pedal force. A 2D musculoskeletal model with seven segments and six right-side muscle groups was used. A simulation of a three-second braking task found 3647 sets of muscle activation levels that resulted in stable braking postures with realistic pedal force. These activation patterns were then used in impact simulations where vehicle deceleration was applied and driver movements and foot and ankle forces were simulated. Peak rearfoot ground reaction force (F(RF)), peak Achilles tendon force (FAT), peak calcaneal force (F(CF)) and peak ankle joint force (F(AJ)) were calculated. Peak forces during the impact simulation were 476 +/- 687 N (F(RF)), 2934 +/- 944 N (F(CF)) and 2449 +/- 918 N (F(AJ)). Many simulations resulted in force levels that could cause fractures. Multivariate quadratic regression determined that the pre-impact brake pedal force (PF), knee angle (KA) and heel distance (HD) explained 72% of the variance in peak FRF, 62% in peak F(CF) and 73% in peak F(AJ). Foot and ankle forces during a collision depend on initial posture and pedal force. Braking postures with increased knee flexion, while keeping the seat position fixed, are associated with higher foot and ankle forces during a collision.

  1. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [de

  2. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Golanó, P.; Clavero, J.A.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly

  3. Ambulatory assessment of ankle and foot dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Ground reaction force (GRF) measurement is important in the analysis of human body movements. The main drawback of the existing measurement systems is the restriction to a laboratory environment. This paper proposes an ambulatory system for assessing the dynamics of ankle and foot, which integrates

  4. Bimalleolar ankle fracture with proximal fibular fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colenbrander, R. J.; Struijs, P. A. A.; Ultee, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 56-year-old female patient suffered a bimalleolar ankle fracture with an additional proximal fibular fracture. This is an unusual fracture type, seldom reported in literature. It was operatively treated by open reduction and internal fixation of the lateral malleolar fracture. The proximal fibular

  5. Arthroscopy for problems after ankle fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Verhagen, R. A.; Tol, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    From 1990 to 1994 we undertook arthroscopy of the ankle on 34 consecutive patients with residual complaints following fracture. Two groups were compared prospectively. Group I comprised 18 patients with complaints which could be attributed clinically to anterior bony or soft-tissue impingement. In

  6. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography delineates ankle symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Yukihiro; Tamura, Maasa; Kirino, Yohei; Sugiyama, Yumiko; Tsuchida, Naomi; Kunishita, Yosuke; Kishimoto, Daiga; Kamiyama, Reikou; Miura, Yasushi; Minegishi, Kaoru; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) of ankle joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Consecutive RA patients with or without ankle symptoms participated in the study. The US, clinical examination (CE), and patients' visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) for ankles were assessed. Prevalence of tibiotalar joint synovitis and tenosynovitis were assessed by grayscale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) US using a semi-quantitative grading (0-3). The positive US and CE findings were defined as GS score ≥2 and/or PD score ≥1, and joint swelling and/or tenderness, respectively. Multivariate analysis with the generalized linear mixed model was performed by assigning ankle pVAS as a dependent variable. Among a total of 120 ankles from 60 RA patients, positive ankle US findings were found in 21 (35.0%) patients. The concordance rate of CE and US was moderate (kappa 0.57). Of the 88 CE negative ankles, US detected positive findings in 9 (10.2%) joints. Multivariate analysis revealed that ankle US, clinical disease activity index, and foot Health Assessment Questionnaire, but not CE, was independently associated with ankle pVAS. US examination is useful to illustrate RA ankle involvement, especially for patients who complain ankle pain but lack CE findings.

  7. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, probotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A surgical ankle sprain pain model in the rat: Effects of morphine and indomethacin

    OpenAIRE

    Young Kim, Hee; Wang, Jigong; Chung, Kyungsoon; Mo Chung, Jin

    2008-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a frequent injury in humans that results in pain, swelling and difficulty in walking on the affected ankle. Currently a suitable animal model resembling human ankle sprain is lacking. Here, we describe an animal ankle sprain model induced by ankle ligament injury (ALI) in rats. Cutting combinations of the lateral ankle ligament complex produced pain, edema and difficulty of weight bearing, thereby mimicking severe (grade III) ankle sprain in humans. Analgesic compounds, morphi...

  9. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic Stress Testing Is Unnecessary for Unimalleolar Supination-External Rotation Ankle Fractures with Minimal Fracture Displacement on Lateral Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortunen, Simo; Leskelä, Hannu-Ville; Haapasalo, Heidi; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Pakarinen, Harri

    2017-03-15

    This study aimed to identify factors from standard radiographs that contributed to the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with isolated supination-external rotation fractures of the lateral malleolus (OTA/AO 44-B). Non-stress radiographs of the mortise and lateral views, without medial clear space widening or incongruity, were prospectively collected for 286 consecutive patients (mean age, 45 years [range, 16 to 85 years]), including 144 female patients (mean age, 50 years [range, 17 to 85 years]) and 142 male patients (mean age, 40 years [range, 16 to 84 years]) from 2 trauma centers. The radiographs were analyzed for fracture morphology by 2 orthopaedic surgeons, who were blinded to each other's measurements and to the results of external rotation stress radiographs (the reference for stability). Factors significantly associated with ankle mortise stability were tested in multiple logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed for continuous variables to determine optimal thresholds. A sensitivity of >90% was used as the criterion for an optimal threshold. According to external rotation stress radiographs, 217 patients (75.9%) had a stable injury, defined as that with a medial clear space of ankle mortise were female sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4 to 4.6]), a posterior diastasis of fracture fragments (OR, 7.3 [95% CI, 2.1 to 26.3]). When the posterior diastasis was fracture fragments were present, the probability of a stable ankle mortise was 0.98 for 48 female patients (16.8%) and 0.94 for 37 male patients (12.9%). Patients with noncomminuted lateral malleolar fractures (85 patients [29.7%]) could be diagnosed with a stable ankle mortise without further stress testing, when the fracture line widths were <2 mm on lateral radiographs. Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Minor or occult ankle instability as a cause of anterolateral pain after ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jordi; Peña, Fernando; Golanó, Pau

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which intra-articular injuries are associated with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. From 2008 to 2010, records of all patients who underwent ankle joint arthroscopy with anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain were reviewed. A systematic arthroscopic examination of the intra-articular structures of the ankle joint was performed. Location and characteristics of the injuries were identified and recorded. A total of 36 ankle arthroscopic procedures were reviewed. A soft-tissue occupying mass over the lateral recess was present in 18 patients (50%). A partial injury of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was observed in 24 patients (66.6%). Cartilage abrasion due to the distal fascicle of the anteroinferior tibiofibular ligament coming into contact with the talus was seen in 21 patients (58.3%), but no thickening of the ligament was observed. Injury to the intra-articular posterior structures, including the transverse ligament in 19 patients (52.7%) and the posterior surface of the distal tibia in 21 patients (58.3%), was observed. Intra-articular pathological findings have been observed in patients affected by anterolateral pain after an ankle sprain. Despite no demonstrable abnormal lateral laxity, morphologic ATFL abnormality has been observed on arthroscopic evaluation. An injury of the ATFL is present in patients with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. A degree of microinstability due to a deficiency of the ATFL could explain the intra-articular pathological findings and the patients' complaints. IV.

  12. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  13. Quantifying normal ankle joint volume: An anatomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draeger Reid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many therapeutic and diagnostic modalities such as intraarticular injections, arthrography and ankle arthroscopy require introduction of fluid into the ankle joint. Little data are currently available in the literature regarding the maximal volume of normal, nonpathologic, human ankle joints. The purpose of this study was to measure the volume of normal human ankle joints. Materials and Methods: A fluoroscopic guided needle was passed into nine cadaveric adult ankle joints. The needle was connected to an intracompartmental pressure measurement device. A radiopaque dye was introduced into the joint in 2 mL boluses, while pressure measurements were recorded. Fluid was injected into the joint until three consecutive pressure measurements were similar, signifying a maximal joint volume. Results: The mean maximum ankle joint volume was 20.9 ± 4.9 mL (range, 16-30 mL. The mean ankle joint pressure at maximum volume was 142.2 ± 13.8 mm Hg (range, 122-166 mm Hg. Two of the nine samples showed evidence of fluid tracking into the synovial sheath of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Conclusion: Maximal normal ankle joint volume was found to vary between 16-30 mL. This study ascertains the communication between the ankle joint and the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Exceeding maximal ankle joint volume suggested by this study during therapeutic injections, arthrography, or arthroscopy could potentially damage the joint.

  14. Active ankle motion may result in changes to the talofibular interval in individuals with chronic ankle instability and ankle sprain copers: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Theodore; Cosby, Nicole L; Hertel, Jay

    2013-08-01

    Alterations in talocrural joint arthrokinematics related to repositioning of the talus or fibula following ankle sprain have been reported in radiological and clinical studies. It is unclear if these changes can result from normal active ankle motion. The study objective was to determine if active movement created changes in the sagittal plane talofibular interval in ankles with a history of lateral ankle sprain and instability. Three subject groups [control (n = 17), ankle sprain copers (n = 20), and chronic ankle instability (n = 20)] underwent ultrasound imaging of the anterolateral ankle gutter to identify the lateral malleolus and talus over three trials. Between trials, subjects actively plantar and dorsiflexed the ankle three times. The sagittal plane talofibular interval was assessed by measuring the anteroposterior distance (mm) between the lateral malleolus and talus from an ultrasound image. Between group and trial differences were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance and post-hoc t-tests. Fifty-seven subjects participated. A significant group-by-trial interaction was observed (F4,108 = 3.5; P = 0.009). The talofibular interval was increased in both copers [2.4±3.6 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-4.1; P = 0.007] and chronic ankle instability (4.1±4.6 mm; 95% CI: 1.9-6.2; P = 0.001) at trial 3 while no changes were observed in control ankle talar position (0.06±2.8mm; 95% CI: -1.5-1.4; P = 0.93). The talofibular interval increased only in subjects with a history of lateral ankle sprain with large clinical effect sizes observed. These findings suggest that an alteration in the position of the talus or fibula occurred with non-weight bearing sagittal plane motion. These findings may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for manual therapists.

  15. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study protocol. An additional group of non-injured individuals were also recruited to act as a control group. All participants completed the anterior, posterior-lateral and posterior-medial reach directions of the star excursion balance test. Sagittal plane kinematics of the lower extremity and associated fractal dimension of the centre of pressure path were also acquired. Participants with chronic ankle instability displayed poorer performance in the anterior, posterior-medial and posterior-lateral reach directions compared with controls bilaterally, and in the posterior-lateral direction compared with lateral ankle sprain copers on their 'involved' limb only. These performance deficits in the posterior-lateral and posterior-medial directions were associated with reduced flexion and dorsiflexion displacements at the hip, knee and ankle at the point of maximum reach, and coincided with reduced complexity of the centre of pressure path. In comparison with lateral ankle sprain copers and controls, participants with chronic ankle instability were characterised by dynamic balance deficits as measured using the SEBT. This was attested to reduced sagittal plane motions at the hip, knee and ankle joints, and reduced capacity of the stance limb to avail of its supporting base. III.

  16. A Systematic Review on the Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain Brace versus Other Functional Treatment Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, Ingrid; Backx, Frank; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2011-01-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of

  17. Incidence of hockey ankle injuries in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ankle injuries amongst hockey players was 26.41%. The most frequent ankle injury sustained by male adolescent hockey players was an inversion ankle sprain (84.62% of the 26.41% injured subjects of the sample cohort). The mechanisms of ankle injuries were attributed to rapid rotational movements of the ankle joint ...

  18. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost.

  19. The Influence of Mulligan Ankle Taping on Dynamic Balance in the Athletes with and without Chronic Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourkhani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ankle joint is the most frequently injured anatomical site in athletes. Ankle instability is responsible for 25% of all time lost from sport. Clinical efficacy of the effect of taping in athletes with chronic ankle instability is unknown. So the purpose of this investigation is the study of the influence of Mulligan ankle taping on dynamic balance in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability. Materials & Methods: 32 athletes participated in this investigation: 16 subjects with chronic ankle instability, 6 women and 10 men (age 23.5±0.3 years, height 175.4±10.3 cm, weight 73.6±14.5 kg, Foot Ankle Disability Index 74.5±8.62% and Foot Ankle Disability Index Sport 63.5±7.86% and 16 healthy subjects, 6 women and 10 men (age 22.81±7.1 years, height 173.6±12.26 cm, weight 66.4±11.4 kg, Foot Ankle Disability Index and Foot Ankle Disability Index Sport 100%. Dynamic balance was assessed with Star Excursion Balance Test in 3 reaching directions (medial, antero-medial and postero-medial before and after Mulligan ankle taping. Independent and paired t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Dynamic balance in healthy group significantly was better than injured group (P&le0.05. Application of taping caused significantly improvement in dynamic balance in both groups (reaching in media, antero-medial and postero-medial directions (P&le0.05 (except reaching in antero-medial direction in healthy group (P>0.05. Conclusion: So it seems that Mulligan ankle taping can improve dynamic balance in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability.

  20. Ankle Plantarflexor Spasticity Does Not Restrict the Recovery of Ankle Plantarflexor Strength or Ankle Power Generation for Push-Off During Walking Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gavin; Banky, Megan; Olver, John

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to determine the impact of plantarflexor spasticity on muscle performance for ambulant people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A large metropolitan rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-two ambulant people with TBI who were attending physiotherapy for mobility limitations. Twenty-four participants returned for a 6-month follow-up reassessment. Cross-sectional cohort study. Self-selected walking speed, Tardieu scale, ankle plantarflexor strength, and ankle power generation (APG). Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity had significantly lower self-selected walking speed; however, there was no significant difference in ankle plantarflexor strength or APG. Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity were not restricted in the recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, or APG, indicating equivalent ability to improve their mobility over time despite the presence of spasticity. Following TBI, people with ankle plantarflexor spasticity have significantly greater mobility limitations than those without spasticity, yet retain the capacity for recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, and APG.

  1. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force...... of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle...... joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases....

  2. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welck, M J; Hayes, T; Pastides, P; Khan, W; Rudge, B

    2017-08-01

    Stress fractures occur as a result of microscopic injuries sustained when bone is subjected to repeated submaximal stresses. Overtime, with repeated cycles of loading, accumulation of such injuries can lead to macro-structural failure and frank fracture. There are numerous stress fractures about the foot and ankle of which a trauma and orthopaedic surgeon should be aware. These include: metatarsal, tibia, calcaneus, navicular, fibula, talus, medial malleolus, sesamoid, cuneiform and cuboid. Awareness of these fractures is important as the diagnosis is frequently missed and appropriate treatment delayed. Late identification can be associated with protracted pain and disability, and may predispose to non-union and therefore necessitate operative intervention. This article outlines the epidemiology and risk factors, aetiology, presentation and management of the range of stress fractures in the foot and ankle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MR arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Rand, T.; Breitenseher, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Schick, S.; Imhof, H.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  4. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  5. Modern cartilage imaging of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Wuennemann, Felix; Rehnitz, Christoph; Jungmann, Pia M.; Kuni, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions are an important risk factor for the development of talar osteoarthritis. Furthermore, osteochondral lesions might explain persistent ankle pain. Early diagnosis of accompanying chondral defects is important to establish the optimal therapy strategy and thereby delaying or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to explain modern cartilage imaging with emphasis of MR imaging as well as the discussion of more sophisticated imaging studies like CT-arthrography or functional MR imaging. Pubmed literature search concerning: osteochondral lesions, cartilage damage, ankle joint, talus, 2 D MR imaging, 3 D MR imaging, cartilage MR imaging, CT-arthrography, cartilage repair, microfracture, OATS, MACT. Dedicated MR imaging protocols to delineate talar cartilage and the appearance of acute and chronic osteochondral lesions were discussed. Recent developments of MR imaging, such as isotropic 3 D imaging that has a higher signal-to noise ratio when compared to 2 D imaging, and specialized imaging methods such as CT-arthrography as well as functional MR imaging were introduced. Several classifications schemes and imaging findings of osteochondral lesions that influence the conservative or surgical therapy strategy were discussed. MRI enables after surgery the non-invasive assessment of the repair tissue and the success of implantation. Key points: Modern MRI allows for highly resolved visualization of the articular cartilage of the ankle joint and of subchondral pathologies. Recent advances in MRI include 3 D isotropic ankle joint imaging, which deliver higher signal-to-noise ratios of the cartilage and less partial volume artifacts when compared with standard 2 D sequences. In case of osteochondral lesions MRI is beneficial for assessing the stability of the osteochondral fragment and for this discontinuity of the cartilage layer is an important factor. CT-arthrography can be used in case of contraindications of MRI and

  6. Ankle and foot tuberculosis: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswaranjan Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective: To know the biological behavior of ankle and foot tuberculosis (AFTB and to know the reasons for delay in diagnosis and treatment of AFTB in our population. Materials and Methods: Patients with non-healing ulcers/sinuses/swellings in the ankle and foot region are the subjects of present study. Detailed clinical history, physical examination and relevant investigations were done in all cases. Pus/wound discharge for acid fast bacillus (AFB study and biopsy from wound margin/sinus tract was taken in all the cases. Results: During the period from July 2007-June 2012, 20 cases of AFTB were treated. Out of them five cases were difficult to diagnose and a mean period of 6 month to 5year was elapsed before final diagnosis was established. Out of these five cases - three cases were diabetic with ulcers and sinuses in the heel and ankle region. One case was wrongly diagnosed as angiodysplasia with A-V malformation of foot and diagnosis was delayed for 5 year. In one case of rheumatoid arthritis with abscess in ankle joint, the diagnosis was delayed for 1year. Conclusion: AFTB is very rare condition. AFTB is suspected in cases with long standing pain/swelling/discharging sinus in the foot and thorough investigations is must to differentiate from other foot diseases. Diagnosis is delayed due to lack of clinical suspicion and non-confirmatory biopsy reports. Early diagnosis and ATT for 9-18 months is must in all cases of AFTB to prevent joint involvement and other complications.

  7. Osteochondral injuries of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Andrew; Roach, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Osteochondral injuries commonly affect the ankle joint and involve the dome of the talus. This article describes the etiology and pathogenesis of these injuries. Their clinical presentation is described and advice is given on how to diagnose and investigate suspected osteochondral injuries. The various treatment options currently available are briefly reviewed. There is some attempt made to give consensus on optimal treatment of this condition at the present time.

  8. Osteoarthritis after osteosynthesis of ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Mechsner, K.; Langenscheidt, P.; Krankenhaus Spandau, Berlin

    1984-01-01

    98 patients were clinically and radiographically examined 2 to 9 years following the osteosynthesis of ankle fractures. The rate of secondary osteoarthritis was 70% including 40% of minor, 17% of medium and 13% of serious changes. Depending on the injured structures the frequency of posttraumatic osteoarthritis varies. Medium and serious radiology changes cause obvious dysfunction in 56% and 62% respectively. Joints free of Osteoarthritis one year after the injury will not develop secondary osteoarthritis later. (orig.) [de

  9. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required

  10. Pediatric Ankle Fractures: Concepts and Treatment Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Alvin W.; Larson, A. Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Current clinical concepts are reviewed regarding the epidemiology, anatomy, evaluation and treatment of pediatric ankle fractures. Correct diagnosis and management relies on appropriate exam, imaging, and knowledge of fracture patterns specific to children. Treatment is guided by patient history, physical examination, plain film radiographs and, in some instances, CT. Treatment goals are to restore acceptable limb alignment, physeal anatomy, and joint congruency. For high risk physeal fractures, patients should be monitored for growth disturbance as needed until skeletal maturity. PMID:26589088

  11. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  12. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V.

    1991-01-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.) [de

  13. Postural steadiness and ankle force variability in peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Roger J.; Feldman-Kothe, Caitlin; Trabert, Megan K.; Hitchcock, Leah N.; Reiser, Raoul F.; Tracy, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose was to determine the effect of peripheral neuropathy (PN) on motor output variability for ankle muscles of older adults, and the relation between ankle motor variability and postural stability in PN patients. Methods Older adults with (O-PN) and without PN (O), and young adults (Y) underwent assessment of standing postural stability and ankle muscle force steadiness. Results O-PN displayed impaired ankle muscle force control and postural stability compared with O and Y groups. For O-PN, the amplitude of plantarflexor force fluctuations was moderately correlated with postural stability under no-vision conditions (r = 0.54, P = 0.01). Discussion The correlation of variations in ankle force with postural stability in PN suggests a contribution of ankle muscle dyscontrol to the postural instability that impacts physical function for older adults with PN. PMID:26284897

  14. Plantar-flexion of the ankle joint complex in terminal stance is initiated by subtalar plantar-flexion: A bi-planar fluoroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Lee, Kyoung Min; Cha, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Gross motion of the ankle joint complex (AJC) is a summation of the ankle and subtalar joints. Although AJC kinematics have been widely used to evaluate the function of the AJC, the coordinated movements of the ankle and subtalar joints are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify the individual kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the intact foot during ground walking by using a bi-planar fluoroscopic system. Bi-planar fluoroscopic images of the foot and ankle during walking and standing were acquired from 10 healthy subjects. The three-dimensional movements of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus were calculated with a three-dimensional/two-dimensional registration method. The skeletal kinematics were quantified from 9% to 86% of the full stance phase because of the limited camera speed of the X-ray system. At the beginning of terminal stance, plantar-flexion of the AJC was initiated in the subtalar joint on average at 75% ranging from 62% to 76% of the stance phase, and plantar-flexion of the ankle joint did not start until 86% of the stance phase. The earlier change to plantar-flexion in the AJC than the ankle joint due to the early plantar-flexion in the subtalar joint was observed in 8 of the 10 subjects. This phenomenon could be explained by the absence of direct muscle insertion on the talus. Preceding subtalar plantar-flexion could contribute to efficient and stable ankle plantar-flexion by locking the midtarsal joint, but this explanation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Orthopedic rehabilitation using the "Rutgers ankle" interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girone, M; Burdea, G; Bouzit, M; Popescu, V; Deutsch, J E

    2000-01-01

    A novel ankle rehabilitation device is being developed for home use, allowing remote monitoring by therapists. The system will allow patients to perform a variety of exercises while interacting with a virtual environment (VE). These game-like VEs created with WorldToolKit run on a host PC that controls the movement and output forces of the device via an RS232 connection. Patients will develop strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance as they interact with the VEs. The device will also perform diagnostic functions, measuring the ankle's range of motion, force exertion capabilities and coordination. The host PC transparently records patient progress for remote evaluation by therapists via our existing telerehabilitation system. The "Rutgers Ankle" Orthopedic Rehabilitation Interface uses double-acting pneumatic cylinders, linear potentiometers, and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor. The controller contains a Pentium single-board computer and pneumatic control valves. Based on the Stewart platform, the device can move and supply forces and torques in 6 DOFs. A proof-of-concept trial conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) provided therapist and patient feedback. The system measured the range of motion and maximum force output of a group of four patients (male and female). Future medical trials are required to establish clinical efficacy in rehabilitation.

  16. MR imaging of the ankle: Normal variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noto, A.M.; Cheung, Y.; Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Leeds, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty asymptomatic ankles were studied with high-resolution surface coil MR imaging. The thirty ankles were reviewed for identification or normal structures. The MR appearance of the deltoid and posterior to talo-fibular ligaments, peroneous brevis and longus tendons, and posterior aspect of the tibial-talar joint demonstrated several normal variants not previously described. These should not be misinterpreted as pathologic processes. The specific findings included (1) cortical irregularity of the posterior tibial-talar joint in 27 of 30 cases which should not be mistaken for osteonecrois; (2) normal posterior talo-fibular ligament with irregular and frayed inhomogeneity, which represents a normal variant in seven of ten cases; and (3) fluid in the shared peroneal tendons sheath which may be confused for a longitudinal tendon tear in three of 30 cases. Ankle imaging with the use of MR is still a relatively new procedure. Further investigation is needed to better define normal anatomy as well as normal variants. The authors described several structures that normally present with variable MR imaging appearances. This is clinically significant in order to maintain a high sensitivity and specificity in MR imaging interpretation

  17. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  18. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  19. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  20. Description of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Per-Olof

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the modelling of the surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that was performed for the final site descriptive model of Forsmark produced in the site investigation stage, SDM-Site Forsmark. The comprehensive investigation and monitoring programme forms a strong basis for the developed conceptual and descriptive model of the hydrological and near-surface hydrological system of the site investigation area. However, there are some remaining uncertainties regarding the interaction of deep and near-surface groundwater and surface water of importance for the understanding of the system: The groundwaters in till below Lake Eckarfjaerden, Lake Gaellbotraesket, Lake Fiskarfjaerden and Lake Bolundsfjaerden have high salinities. The hydrological and hydrochemical interpretations indicate that these waters are relict waters of mainly marine origin. From the perspective of the overall water balance, the water below the central parts of the lakes can be considered as stagnant. However, according to the hydrochemical interpretation, these waters also contain weak signatures of deep saline water. Rough chloride budget calculations for the Gaellbotraesket depression also raise the question of a possible upward flow of deep groundwater. No absolute conclusion can be drawn from the existing data analyses regarding the key question of whether there is a small ongoing upward flow of deep saline water. However, Lake Bolundsfjaerden is an exception where the clear downward flow gradient from the till to the bedrock excludes the possibility of an active deep saline source. The available data indicate that there are no discharge areas for flow systems involving deep bedrock groundwater in the northern part of the tectonic lens, where the repository is planned to be located (the so-called 'target area'). However, it can not be excluded that such discharge areas exist. Data indicate that the prevailing downward vertical flow gradients from the QD to the bedrock

  1. Description of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes the modelling of the surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that was performed for the final site descriptive model of Forsmark produced in the site investigation stage, SDM-Site Forsmark. The comprehensive investigation and monitoring programme forms a strong basis for the developed conceptual and descriptive model of the hydrological and near-surface hydrological system of the site investigation area. However, there are some remaining uncertainties regarding the interaction of deep and near-surface groundwater and surface water of importance for the understanding of the system: The groundwaters in till below Lake Eckarfjaerden, Lake Gaellbotraesket, Lake Fiskarfjaerden and Lake Bolundsfjaerden have high salinities. The hydrological and hydrochemical interpretations indicate that these waters are relict waters of mainly marine origin. From the perspective of the overall water balance, the water below the central parts of the lakes can be considered as stagnant. However, according to the hydrochemical interpretation, these waters also contain weak signatures of deep saline water. Rough chloride budget calculations for the Gaellbotraesket depression also raise the question of a possible upward flow of deep groundwater. No absolute conclusion can be drawn from the existing data analyses regarding the key question of whether there is a small ongoing upward flow of deep saline water. However, Lake Bolundsfjaerden is an exception where the clear downward flow gradient from the till to the bedrock excludes the possibility of an active deep saline source. The available data indicate that there are no discharge areas for flow systems involving deep bedrock groundwater in the northern part of the tectonic lens, where the repository is planned to be located (the so-called 'target area'). However, it can not be excluded that such discharge areas exist. Data indicate that the prevailing downward vertical flow gradients from the QD to

  2. Lateral ankle injury. Literature review and report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-07-01

    Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with a review of relevant anatomy, assessment and treatment. Also included is a discussion of the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of ankle sprain. A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the ankle as well as the early recognition of factors that may delay the rate of healing are important considerations when developing a management plan for inversion sprains of the ankle. This area appears to be under-researched however it was found that movement therapy and its various forms appear to be the most efficient and most effective method of treating uncomplicated ankle injury. Future investigations should involve a study to determine the effect chiropractic treatment (manipulation) may have on the injured ankle.

  3. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  4. Ipsilateral wrist-ankle movements in the sagittal plane encoded in extrinsic reference frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Tetsuro; Ishida, Yuki; Obu, Takashi; Crawshaw, Larry; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2013-04-01

    When performing oscillatory movements of two joints in the sagittal plane, there is a directional constraint for performing such movements. Previous studies could not distinguish whether the directional constraint reflected movement direction encoded in the extrinsic (outside the body) reference frame or in the intrinsic (the participants' torso/head) reference frame since participants performed coordinated movements in a sitting position where the torso/head was stationary relative to the external world. In order to discern the reference frame in the present study, participants performed paced oscillatory movements of the ipsilateral wrist and ankle in the sagittal plane in a standing position so that the torso/head moved relative to the external world. The coordinated movements were performed in one of two modes of coordination, moving the hand upward concomitant with either ankle plantarflexion or ankle dorsiflexion. The same directional mode relative to extrinsic space was more stable and accurate as compared with the opposite directional mode. When forearm position was changed from the pronated position to the supinated position, similar results were obtained, indicating that the results were independent of a particular coupling of muscles. These findings suggest that the directional constraint on ipsilateral joints movements in the sagittal plane reflects movement direction encoded in the extrinsic reference frame. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher Beth E; Kulig Kornelia; Davenport Todd E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM) is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains...

  6. A three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatone, Stefania; Johnson, William Brett; Tucker, Kerice

    2016-04-01

    Misalignment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis joint axis with the anatomic joint axis may lead to discomfort, alterations in gait, and tissue damage. Theoretical, two-dimensional models describe the consequences of misalignments, but cannot capture the three-dimensional behavior of ankle-foot orthosis use. The purpose of this project was to develop a model to describe the effects of ankle-foot orthosis ankle joint misalignment in three dimensions. Computational simulation. Three-dimensional scans of a leg and ankle-foot orthosis were incorporated into a link segment model where the ankle-foot orthosis joint axis could be misaligned with the anatomic ankle joint axis. The leg/ankle-foot orthosis interface was modeled as a network of nodes connected by springs to estimate interface pressure. Motion between the leg and ankle-foot orthosis was calculated as the ankle joint moved through a gait cycle. While the three-dimensional model corroborated predictions of the previously published two-dimensional model that misalignments in the anterior -posterior direction would result in greater relative motion compared to misalignments in the proximal -distal direction, it provided greater insight showing that misalignments have asymmetrical effects. The three-dimensional model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist others in understanding the consequences of joint misalignments. Models and simulations can be used to gain insight into functioning of systems of interest. We have developed a three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses. The model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist understanding of trainees and others interested in orthotics. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  7. Effect of Ankle Taping and Fatigue on Dynamic Stability in Athletes With and Without Chronic Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourkhani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion In the athletes with chronic ankle instability, taping without fatigue improved dynamic balance in the vertical direction. Taping after fatigue could not improve dynamic stability in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability. Future researchers should examine injured and uninjured participants tested under these conditions to determine if these results are useful in selecting appropriate prophylactic method that can treat or prevent injury to the ankle during functional activities.

  8. Retrospective comparison of the Low Risk Ankle Rules and the Ottawa Ankle Rules in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbogen, Amy L; Rice, Amy L; Vyas, Pranav

    2017-09-01

    A recent multicenter prospective Canadian study presented prospective evidence supporting the Low Risk Ankle Rules (LRAR) as a means of reducing the number of ankle radiographs ordered for children presenting with an ankle injury while maintaining nearly 100% sensitivity. This is in contrast to a previous prospective study which showed that this rule yielded only 87% sensitivity. It is important to further investigate the LRAR and compare them with the already validated Ottawa Ankle Rules (OAR) to potentially curb healthcare costs and decrease unnecessary radiation exposure without compromising diagnostic accuracy. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 980 qualifying patients ages 12months to 18years presenting with ankle injury to a commonly staffed 310 bed children's hospital and auxiliary site pediatric emergency department. There were 28 high-risk fractures identified. The Ottawa Ankle Rules had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI 87.7-100), specificity of 33.1% (95% CI 30.1-36.2), and would have reduced the number of ankle radiographs ordered by 32.1%. The Low Risk Ankle Rules had a sensitivity of 85.7% (95% CI 85.7-96), specificity of 64.9% (95% CI 61.8-68), and would have reduced the number of ankle radiographs ordered by 63.1%. The latter rule missed 4 high-risk fractures. The Low Risk Ankle Rules may not be sensitive enough for use in Pediatric Emergency Departments, while the Ottawa Ankle Rules again demonstrated 100% sensitivity. Further research on ways to implement the Ottawa Ankle Rules and maximize its ability to decrease wait times, healthcare costs, and improve patient satisfaction are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Supination external rotation ankle fractures: A simpler pattern with better outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejwani, Nirmal C; Park, Ji Hae; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotational injuries are the most common and usually classified as per the Lauge Hansen classification; with the most common subgroup being the supination external rotation (SER) mechanism. Isolated fractures of the distal fibula (SE2) without associated ligamentous injury are usually treated with a splint or brace and the patient may be allowed to weight bear as tolerated. This study reports the functional outcomes following a stable, low energy, rotational ankle fracture supination external rotation (SER2) when compared to unstable SER4 fractures treated operatively. Materials and Methods: 64 patients who were diagnosed and treated nonoperatively for a stable SER2 ankle fracture were followed prospectively. In the comparison group, 93 operatively treated fibular fractures were extracted from a prospectively collected database and evaluated comparison. Baseline characteristics obtained by trained interviewers at the time of injury included: Patient demographics, short form-36, short musculoskeletal functional assessment (SMFA) and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) questionnaires. Patients were followed at 3, 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Additional information obtained at each followup point included any complications or evidence on fracture healing. Data were analyzed by the Student's t-test and theFisher's Exact Test to compare demographic and functional outcomes between the two cohorts. P fracture cohort was 43 versus 45 in the SER4 group. Nearly 64% of the patient population was female when compared with 37% in the operative group. In the SER2 by 6 months all patients had returned to baseline functional status. There were 18 delayed unions (all healed by 6 months). Based on the functional outcome scores all patients had returned to preoperative level. In comparison, SE4 patients had less functional recovery at 3 and 6 months (P delayed unions. Conclusions: An SER2 ankle fracture is a relatively benign injury with functional

  10. Influence of Passive Joint Stiffness on Proprioceptive Acuity in Individuals With Functional Instability of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Hellen Veloso Rocha; Amaral, Giovanna Mendes; de Souza Moreira, Bruno; Araújo, Vanessa Lara; Souza, Thales Rezende; Ocarino, Juliana Melo; da Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2017-12-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional. Background Deficits in ankle proprioceptive acuity have been reported in persons with functional instability of the ankle. Passive stiffness has been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying proprioceptive acuity. Objective To compare proprioceptive acuity and passive ankle stiffness in persons with and without functional ankle instability, and to assess the influence of passive joint stiffness on proprioceptive acuity in persons with functional ankle instability. Methods A sample of 18 subjects with and 18 without complaints of functional ankle instability following lateral ankle sprain participated. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to compare motion perception threshold, passive position sense, and passive ankle stiffness between groups. To evaluate the influence of passive stiffness on proprioceptive acuity, individuals in the lateral functional ankle instability group were divided into 2 subgroups: "high" and "low" passive ankle stiffness. Results The functional ankle instability group exhibited increased motion perception threshold when compared with the corresponding limb of the control group. Between-group differences were not found for passive position sense and passive ankle stiffness. Those in the functional ankle instability group with higher passive ankle stiffness had smaller motion perception thresholds than those with lower passive ankle stiffness. Conclusion Unlike motion perception threshold, passive position sense is not affected by the presence of functional ankle instability. Passive ankle stiffness appears to influence proprioceptive acuity in persons with functional ankle instability. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):899-905. Epub 7 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7030.

  11. Joint stability characteristics of the ankle complex in female athletes with histories of lateral ankle sprain, part II: clinical experience using arthrometric measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, John E; Heitman, Robert J; Gurchiek, Larry R; Hollis, J M; Liu, Wei; Pearsall, Albert W

    2014-01-01

    This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles.

  12. Ultra-high capacity WDM-SDM optical access network with self-homodyne detection downstream and 32QAM-FBMC upstream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhenhua; Xu, Liang; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Ming; Fu, Songnian; Tong, Weijun; Shum, Perry Ping; Liu, Deming

    2017-03-20

    Towards 100G beyond large-capacity optical access networks, wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) techniques incorporating with space division multiplexing (SDM) and affordable spectrally efficient advanced modulation formats are indispensable. In this paper, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a cost-efficient multicore fiber (MCF) based hybrid WDM-SDM optical access network with self-homodyne coherent detection (SHCD) based downstream (DS) and direct detection optical filter bank multi carrier (DDO-FBMC) based upstream (US). In the DS experiments, the inner core of the 7-core fiber is used as a dedicated channel to deliver the local oscillator (LO) lights while the other 6 outer cores are used to transmit 4 channels of wavelength multiplexed 200-Gb/s PDM-16QAM-OFDM signals. For US transmission, 4 wavelengths with channel spacing of 100 GHz are intensity modulated with 30 Gb/s 32-QAM-FBMC and directly detected by a ~7 GHz bandwidth receiver after transmission along one of the outer core. The results show that a 4 × 6 × 200-Gb/s DS transmission can be realized over 37 km 7-core fiber without carrier frequency offset (CFO) and phase noise (PN) compensation even using 10 MHz linewidth DFB lasers. The SHCD based on MCF provides a compromise and cost efficient scheme between conventional intradyne coherent detection and intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD) schemes. Both US and DS have acceptable BER performance and high spectral efficiency.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of the ankle joint complex in patients suffering from ankle sprain by the anterior drawer test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Shau, Yio-Wha; Wang, Chung-Li; Chai, Huei-Ming; Kang, Jiunn-Horng

    2013-06-01

    Biological tissues such as ligaments exhibit viscoelastic behaviours. Injury to the ligament may induce changes of these viscoelastic properties, and these changes could serve as biomarkers to detect the injury. In the present study, a novel instrument was developed to non-invasive quantify the viscoelastic properties of the ankle in vivo by the anterior drawer test. The purpose of the study was to investigate the reliability of the instrument and to compare the viscoelastic properties of the ankle between patients suffering from ankle sprain and controls. Eight patients and eight controls participated in the present study. The reliability test was performed on three randomly chosen subjects. In patient and control test, both ankles of each subject were tested to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the ankle. The viscosity index was defined for quantitatively evaluating the viscosity of the ankle. Greater viscosity index was associated with lower viscosity. Injured and uninjured ankles of patient and both ankles of controls were compared. The instrument exhibited excellent test-retest reliability (r > 0.9). Injured ankles exhibited significantly less viscosity than uninjured ankles, since injured ankles of patients had significantly higher viscosity index (8,148 ± 5,266) compared with uninjured ankles of patients (948 ± 617; p = 0.008) and controls (1,326 ± 613; p ankle can serve as sensitive and useful clinical biomarkers to differentiate between injured and uninjured ankles. The method may provide a clinical examination for objectively evaluating lateral ankle ligament injuries.

  14. A Medial Malleolar "Fleck Sign" May Predict Ankle Instability in Ligamentous Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Kenneth; Schneiderman, Brian Andrew; Shymon, Stephen Joseph; Harris, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Ankle joint stability dictates treatment in ligamentous supination external rotation ankle injuries (LSERAI). Investigation of the medial structures that support the ankle mortise is critical, and a small avulsion fracture, or "fleck", of the medial malleolus is occasionally encountered. This study aimed to assess the utility of this medial malleolus fleck sign (MMFS) in diagnosing instability requiring surgery in LSERAI. This retrospective observational study examined 166 LSERAI at a single level I trauma center. A standardized diagnostic and treatment protocol for ankle fractures was followed. LSERAI at presentation were reported as having a normal, dynamically wide, or statically wide medial clear space. Patient demographics, MMFS characteristics, and the use of operative management were recorded. MMFS incidence in the cohort was 16 (10%) of 166 and was present in 25% of patients with unstable LSERAI. Fifteen (94%) of 16 patients with a MMFS were deemed to have an unstable LSERAI (P < .005). MMFS had a 25% sensitivity and 99% specificity in diagnosing an unstable LSERAI. For the subgroup of patients without a statically wide medial clear space, MMFS had a 50% sensitivity and 99% specificity in determining instability. A MMFS may be indicative of an unstable LSERAI. With previous MRI studies demonstrating complete deltoid disruption in unstable LSERAI, we deduce the MMFS may be associated with extensive deltoid incompetence. The MMFS may help to diagnose a complete deltoid injury in LSERAI with a normal medial clear space, which could influence treatment and reduce patient morbidity, radiation exposure, and healthcare costs. Level III: Retrospective Cohort Study.

  15. 软组织贴扎技术预防及治疗踝关节扭伤的临床应用进展%Progress in Application of Soft Tissue Taping Techniques for Ankle Sprains (review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴松; 余波; 陈文华

    2015-01-01

    踝关节扭伤临床极为常见,如处理不当很容易再次扭伤,甚至发展成慢性踝关节不稳,影响人们的日常生活与运动。本文对以肌内效贴为代表的软组织贴扎技术预防及治疗踝关节扭伤的临床应用进展进行综述。作为一种非侵入性治疗手段,软组织贴扎技术可缓解踝关节扭伤症状,稳定关节,改善功能,预防踝关节扭伤反复发作,值得临床进一步研究与应用。%The ankle sprain is very common in clinic. It will be sprained again if it is not handled properly, and even develop into chron-ic ankle instability which will affect people's daily life and exercise. This paper discussed the soft tissue techniques, especially kinesio tap-ing, applied for ankle sprain in clinical. As a non-invasive therapy, soft tissue taping can relieve the symptoms of ankle sprains, stable ankle, improve ankle function and prevent recurrent ankle sprain, which is worthy of further research and application.

  16. [Influence of Ankle Braces on the Prevalence of Ankle Inversion Injuries in the Swiss Volleyball National League A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, J; Kneubühler, S; Rogan, S

    2016-06-01

    Ankle inversion is a common injury among volleyball players. The injury rate during a game is 2.1 times higher than during training. As a result, the preventive use of ankle braces is frequently observed in Swiss volleyball leagues. Studies have shown that ankle braces have a preventive effect on the prevalence of ankle inversion. In Switzerland there has been no investigation into the preventive use of braces and their influence on prevalence. For this reason, the goals of this study are 1) to determine when, why and by whom ankle braces are worn and 2) to evaluate the injury rate of users and non-users of ankle braces. A modified questionnaire was sent to 18 men's and women's teams of the Swiss National League A. The questionnaire included questions about injury rates and the circumstances of ankle inversion injuries. The data were statistically analysed with Microsoft Excel 2012 and SPSS Version 20. The overall response rate was 61 %, allowing data from 181 players to be analysed. 33 % (59 of 181) of the players used an ankle brace. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of ankle inversion between users (12 injured) and non-users (8 injured) (p = 0.006). Wearing an ankle brace during training or during a game made no difference in the prevention of injuries (p = 0.356). More athletes were injured during training (n = 13) than during a game (n = 7). The results of the present study indicate that volleyball players preferably wear ankle braces to prevent injury. More than one third of the players in the study wore an ankle brace, 60 % for primary prevention and 40 % for secondary prevention due to a previous injury. The study shows that significantly more users than non-users of ankle braces were injured. This is contrary to literature. Furthermore it was shown that more injuries occur during training than during a game. This finding results from the fact that ankle braces were rarely worn during training. It is

  17. Immobilisation for acute ankle sprain. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Rowe, B. H.; Assendelft, W. J.; Kelly, K. D.; Struijs, P. A.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2001-01-01

    The variation of practice with respect to the treatment of the acutely sprained ankle suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of the various methods of immobilisation for acute ankle sprain. An electronic

  18. Surgical procedures in patients with haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, A; Morris, S C; Schneider, S W; Phisitkul, P; Saltzman, C L

    2016-05-01

    In haemophilia, the ankle joint is one of the most common and earliest joints affected by recurrent bleeding, commonly resulting in end-stage ankle osteoarthritis during early adulthood. The surgical treatment of haemophilic ankle arthropathy is challenging. This review aims to highlight the literature addressing clinical outcomes following the most common approaches for different stages of haemophilia-induced ankle osteoarthritis: arthroscopic debridement, joint distraction arthroplasty, supramalleolar osteotomies, total ankle replacement, and ankle arthrodesis. A systematic literature review was performed using established medical literature databases. The following information was retrieved from the literature: patients' demographics, surgical technique, duration of follow-up, clinical outcome including pain relief and complication rate. A total of 42 clinical studies published between 1978 and 2015 were included in the systematic literature review. Eight and 34 studies had prospective and retrospective design, respectively. The most common studies were level IV studies (64.3%). The orthopaedic treatment of patients with haemophilic ankle osteoarthritis is often challenging and requires complete and careful preoperative assessment. In general, both joint-preserving and joint non-preserving procedure types can be performed. All specific relative and absolute contraindications should be considered to achieve appropriate postoperative outcomes. The current literature demonstrated that orthopaedic surgeries, with appropriate indication, in patients with haemophilic ankle arthropathy result in good postoperative results comparable to those observed in non-haemophiliacs. The surgical treatment should be performed in a setting with the ability to have multidisciplinary management, including expertise in haematology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in anterolateral impingement of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, L.K. III.; Cooperman, A.E.; Helms, C.A.; Speer, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MR imaging findings of anterolateral impingement (ALI) of the ankle.Design and patients. Nine patients with a history of ankle inversion injury and chronic lateral ankle pain were imaged with MR imaging, and the findings correlated with the results of arthroscopy. Three additional patients with clinically suspected ALI of the ankle were also included. Ankle MR imaging studies from 20 control patients in whom ALI was not suspected clinically were examined for similar findings to the patient group.Results. MR imaging findings in the patients with ALI included a soft tissue signal mass in the anterolateral gutter of the ankle in 12 of 12 (100%) cases, corresponding to the synovial hypertrophy and soft tissue mass found at arthroscopy in the nine patients who underwent arthroscopy. Disruption, attenuation, or marked thickening of the anterior talofibular ligament was seen in all cases. Additional findings included signs of synovial hypertrophy elsewhere in the tibiotalar joint in seven of 12 patients (58%) and bony and cartilaginous injuries to the tibiotalar joint in five of 12 (42%). None of the control patients demonstrated MR imaging evidence of a soft tissue mass in the anterolateral gutter.Conclusions. ALI of the ankle is a common cause for chronic lateral ankle pain. It has been well described in the orthopedic literature but its imaging findings have not been clearly elucidated. The MR imaging findings, along with the appropriate clinical history, can be used to direct arthroscopic examination and subsequent debridement. (orig.)

  20. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  1. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  2. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, S.H.; Kuo, A.D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is

  3. Recycling energy to restore impaired ankle function during human walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and "recycles" it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost.

  4. Gait analysis after successful mobile bearing total ankle replacement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doets, H.C.; van Middelkoop, M.; Houdijk, J.H.P.; Nelissen, R.G.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The effect of total ankle replacement on gait is not fully known in terms of joint kinematics, ground reaction force, and activity of the muscles of the lower leg. Methods: A comparative gait study was done in 10 patients after uneventful unilateral mobile-bearing total ankle replacement

  5. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  6. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  7. Blood pressure measurements in the ankle are not equivalent to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Blood pressure (BP) is often measured on the ankle in the emergency department (ED), but this has never been shown to be an acceptable alternative to measurements performed on the arm. Objective. To establish whether the differences between arm and ankle non-invasive BP measurements were clinically ...

  8. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. Methods: The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to ...

  9. approach to and management of acute ankle ligamentous injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Tibionavicular part. Medial (deltoid) ligament of ankle {. Table I. Differential diagnosis of acute ankle injury. ATFL sprain. CFL sprain. Syndesmosis sprain. Anterior process calcaneus fracture. Lateral process talus fracture. Fifth metatarsal base fracture. Subtalar injury. Peroneal tendon injury. Osteochondral injury of the talus.

  10. Ottawa ankle rules and subjective surgeon perception to evaluate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Foot and ankle injuries are frequent in emergency departments. Although only a few patients with foot and ankle sprain present fractures and the fracture patterns are almost always simple, lack of fracture diagnosis can lead to poor functional outcomes. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the reliability of ...

  11. Ottawa Ankle Rules and Subjective Surgeon Perception to Evaluate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Foot and ankle injuries are frequent in emergency departments. Although only a few patients with foot and ankle sprain present fractures and the fracture patterns are almost always simple, lack of fracture diagnosis can lead to poor functional outcomes. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the ...

  12. Comparative ultrasound study of acute lateral ankle ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The return to competitive level of sport dates were also documented and compared. A single blind randomised control study comparing the JSFB rehabilitation programme with conventional ankle rehabilitation programmes was used. Ultrasound examinations were done on all first time lateral ankle ligament injuries 72 ...

  13. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  14. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  15. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  16. Kinematic analysis of a televised medial ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca E. Wade

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprains are one of the most prevalent athletic injuries. Prior work has investigated lateral ankle sprains, but research on generally more severe medial sprains is lacking. This case report performs a kinematic analysis using novel motion analysis methods on a non-contact medial ankle sprain. Peak eversion (50° occurred 0.2 seconds following ground contact, maximum velocity of 426°/s, while peak dorsiflexion (64° occurred with a greater maximum velocity (573°/s. The combination of dorsiflexion at ground contact and rapid eversion is associated with a non-contact eversion sprain. This study provides a quantitative analysis of the eversion ankle sprain injury mechanism. Keywords: Athletic injury, Biomechanics, Ankle injury, Kinematics

  17. MRI of injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent sport injury of the ankle is located in the lateral ankle ligaments. The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and stress radiography, allowing a fair diagnosis for the daily routine. For the direct visualization and precise diagnosis of the lateral ankle ligaments MRI provides the best answer. MRI is used with controlled positioning of the foot, correct angulation of sequenzes, and distinct analysis of MR findings. Sinus tarsi ligaments and ligaments of the distal syndesmosis should be included to the report. In selected patients MRI allows the best evaluation of the extent of the lateral ankle ligaments. MRI is the method of choice for combined osteochondral injuries and soft tissue lesions too. (orig.)

  18. The role of series ankle elasticity in bipedal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelik, Karl E; Huang, Tzu-Wei P; Adamczyk, Peter G; Kuo, Arthur D

    2014-04-07

    The elastic stretch-shortening cycle of the Achilles tendon during walking can reduce the active work demands on the plantarflexor muscles in series. However, this does not explain why or when this ankle work, whether by muscle or tendon, needs to be performed during gait. We therefore employ a simple bipedal walking model to investigate how ankle work and series elasticity impact economical locomotion. Our model shows that ankle elasticity can use passive dynamics to aid push-off late in single support, redirecting the body's center-of-mass (COM) motion upward. An appropriately timed, elastic push-off helps to reduce dissipative collision losses at contralateral heelstrike, and therefore the positive work needed to offset those losses and power steady walking. Thus, the model demonstrates how elastic ankle work can reduce the total energetic demands of walking, including work required from more proximal knee and hip muscles. We found that the key requirement for using ankle elasticity to achieve economical gait is the proper ratio of ankle stiffness to foot length. Optimal combination of these parameters ensures proper timing of elastic energy release prior to contralateral heelstrike, and sufficient energy storage to redirect the COM velocity. In fact, there exist parameter combinations that theoretically yield collision-free walking, thus requiring zero active work, albeit with relatively high ankle torques. Ankle elasticity also allows the hip to power economical walking by contributing indirectly to push-off. Whether walking is powered by the ankle or hip, ankle elasticity may aid walking economy by reducing collision losses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparing Arc-shaped Feet and Rigid Ankles with Flat Feet and Compliant Ankles for a Dynamic Walker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlemann, Ilyas; Matthias Braun, Jan; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we show that exchanging curved feet and rigid ankles by at feet and compliant ankles improves the range of gait parameters for a bipedal dynamic walker. The new lower legs were designed such that they t to the old set-up, allowing for a direct and quantitative comparison. The dynamic...

  20. Intra-articular fibrous band of the ankle: an uncommon cause of post-traumatic ankle pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavotinek, J.P.; Martin, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    A case of an intra-articular fibrous band of the ankle is presented with emphasis on the MR imaging appearances. This entity is an important but uncommon cause of post-traumatic ankle pain and is well recognized within the arthroscopy literature, but there is little if any documentation of this condition in the imaging literature

  1. Effects of visual feedback balance training on the balance and ankle instability in adult men with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seung-Min; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Do Youn

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of visual feedback balance training on the balance and ankle instability in adult men with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty eight adults with functional ankle instability, divided randomly into an experimental group, which performed visual feedback balance training for 20 minutes and ankle joint exercises for 10 minutes, and a control group, which performed ankle joint exercise for 30 minutes. Exercises were completed three times a week for 8 weeks. Bio rescue was used for balance ability. It measured limit of stability at one minute. For ankle instability was measured using Cumberland ankle instability tool (CAIT). This measure was performed before and after the experiments in each group. [Results] The experimental group had significant increase in the Limit of Stability and CAIT score. The control group had significant increase in CAIT score. While the Limit of Stability increased without significance. [Conclusion] In conclusion, visual feedback balance training can be recommended as a treatment method for patients with functional ankle instability.

  2. The course of the superficial peroneal nerve in relation to the ankle position: anatomical study with ankle arthroscopic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Golanó, Pau; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that the superficial peroneal nerve is the only nerve in the human body that can be made visible; iatrogenic damage to this nerve is the most frequently reported complication in anterior ankle arthroscopy. One of the methods to visualize the nerve is combined ankle plantar flexion

  3. Ankle tuberculosis. A case in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, F E; Gómez-Alessandri, J; Tintó, M; Sánchez-González, M; Vicent, V

    Articular tuberculosis of the ankle joint is a rare presentation of skeletal tuberculosis (10% of cases). This unusual location and the low index of clinical suspicion leads to delays in diagnosis and treatment. Radiographic and analytic studies are unspecific in the first stage. CAT and MRI are useful in diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment and surgery is often required to establish the diagnosis and in the treatment. We report a case of ankle tuberculosis in a 22 month-old child. The diagnosis was confirmed by synovial biopsy. There was no patient or family contact with tuberculosis patients. There was no risk factor. There was no lung disease. Diagnosis was made 1 year after onset of symptoms. The treatment was with chemotherapy and surgery was performed as preventive treatment of equinus deformity and osteoarthritis. Good clinical and functional outcome was achieved after 20 years of follow up. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. [Posttraumatic complications after pediatric ankle injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F J; Linhart, W E

    2013-08-01

    Ankle sprains are common injuries in childhood and are generally harmless. However, fractures of the ankle joint are rare, but complications (persistent rotational or axial deformity, alteration of growth of the distal tibia or fibula, or joint deformity) can lead to serious problems during growth. The clinical relevance of growth disturbances at the distal tibia or fibula depends on the age at the time of fracture more than on the fracture type, severity of dislocation, or interponated material in the fracture gap. Both stimulation and inhibition of growth are possible. Inhibition of growth at the distal tibial growth plate regularly leads to varus deformity and shortening. This is of clinical importance as this type of growth disturbance is the most common. Valgus deformity is rare, mostly due to persistent axial deviation of an insufficiently reduced fracture. Transitional fractures always occur at the time of growth plate closure; thus, growth disturbances do not play a role. Transitional fractures could be overlooked or treated insufficiently, leading to a step or gap of the joint surface.

  5. Rehabilitation for ankle fractures in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Donkers, Nicole A J; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Beckenkamp, Paula R; Khera, Kriti; Moseley, Anne M

    2012-11-14

    Rehabilitation after ankle fracture can begin soon after the fracture has been treated, either surgically or non-surgically, by the use of different types of immobilisation that allow early commencement of weight-bearing or exercise. Alternatively, rehabilitation, including the use of physical or manual therapies, may start following the period of immobilisation. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2008. To assess the effects of rehabilitation interventions following conservative or surgical treatment of ankle fractures in adults. We searched the Specialised Registers of the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group and the Cochrane Rehabilitation and Related Therapies Field, CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library (2011 Issue 7), MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, AMED, SPORTDiscus and clinical trials registers up to July 2011. In addition, we searched reference lists of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials with adults undergoing any interventions for rehabilitation after ankle fracture were considered. The primary outcome was activity limitation. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, patient satisfaction, impairments and adverse events. Two review authors independently screened search results, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for dichotomous variables, and mean differences or standardised mean differences and 95% CIs were calculated for continuous variables. End of treatment and end of follow-up data were presented separately. For end of follow-up data, short term follow-up was defined as up to three months after randomisation, and long-term follow-up as greater than six months after randomisation. Meta-analysis was performed where appropriate. Thirty-eight studies with a total of 1896 participants were included. Only one study was judged at low risk of bias. Eight studies were judged at high

  6. Arthroscopic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte-Real, Nuno M; Moreira, Rodrigo M

    2009-03-01

    The current "gold standard'' for treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability is the Broström-Gould procedure. Most authors recommend this type of operation even after an arthroscopic inspection of the joint. We review our results with an arthroscopic method of lateral ankle ligament repair. A method of arthroscopic lateral ligament repair with an anchor placed in the fibula is described. We used this technique on 31 consecutive patients (28 were available for followup). Twenty-one patients had work or traffic accidents, four suffered casual falls. and three had sport-related lesions. The patients were evaluated after 24.5 month average followup. The average postoperative AOFAS score was 85.3 (82.3 in the workers-compensation group and 94.4 in the others) and average satisfaction was 3.8 (3.5 to workers-compensation and 4.6 for the others). Complications occurred in nine patients (29%), but only three cases had ongoing problems. We had two recurrences (another sprain without instability on the stress radiograph). Three patients had some wound healing problems and three had injuries of the superficial peroneal nerve, one of which is persistent. One patient developed a deep venous thrombosis postoperatively. With this method, we achieved good clinical results. We had several complications but most of them were minor. It was a simple procedure with less morbidity to most patients. We believe it produced an anatomical repair of the lateral ligament with clinical and functional results similar to other techniques.

  7. Ankle and subtalar synovitis in a ball-and-socket ankle joint causing posterolateral painful coarse crepitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ka Yuk; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with bilateral ball-and-socket ankles reported left medial heel pain. Her left heel had gone into a varus position on tiptoeing, and a painful clunk had occurred when returning to normal standing. The clunk persisted after physiotherapy and treatment with an orthosis. Subtalar arthroscopy and peroneal tendoscopy showed mild diffuse synovitis of the ankle joint, especially over the posterior capsule, and a patch of inflamed and fibrotic synovium at the posterolateral corner of the subtalar joint. The clunk subsided immediately after arthroscopic synovectomy and had not recurred during 5 years of follow-up. We found no other reported cases of ankle and subtalar synovitis occurring in patients with a ball-and-socket ankle joint. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone in the classification of the ankle joint trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; Zhang Qiang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone in the classification of the ankle joint trauma. Methods: Measure fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint in 217 adult cases of fracture and dislocation of ankle joint. And the cases were classified by the results of the measurement. Results: Measurement was unavailable in 9 cases of tearing fracture. In 31 cases, the lesions could not be particularly classified. And in the rest 176 cases the trauma were precisely classified. The over all successful rate was 81.6%. Conclusion: Fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone are valuable in classification of the trauma of the angle joint. While the specificity of this method is low in differentiating the adducting and abducting fracture of the medial angle, in which a combined investigation is recommended

  9. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Different Arthroscopic Lateral Ankle Stabilization Techniques in 36 Cadaveric Ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S; Richardson, Phillip E; Maker, Jared M

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization has become an increasingly popular option among foot and ankle surgeons to address lateral ankle instability, because it combines a modified Broström-Gould procedure with the ability to address any intra-articular pathologic findings at the same session. The present study evaluated 3 different constructs in a cadaveric model. Thirty-six fresh frozen cadaver limbs were used, and the anterior talofibular ligament was identified and sectioned. The specimens were then placed into 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 received a repair with a single-row, 2-suture anchor construct; group 2 received repair with a novel, double-row, 4-anchor knotless construct; and group 3 received repair with a double-row, 3-anchor construct. Specimens were then tested for stiffness and load to ultimate failure using a customized jig. Stiffness was measured in each of the groups and was 12.10 ± 5.43 (range 5.50 to 22.24) N/mm for group 1, 13.40 ± 7.98 (range 6.71 to 36.28) N/mm for group 2, and 12.55 ± 4.00 (range 6.48 to 22.14) N/mm for group 3. No significant differences were found among the 3 groups in terms of stiffness (p = .939, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The groups were tested to failure, with observed force measurements of 156.43 ± 30.39 (range 83.69 to 192.00) N for group 1, 206.62 ± 55.62 (range 141.37 to 300.29) N for group 2, and 246.82 ± 82.37 (range 164.26 to 384.93) N for group 3. Statistically significant differences were noted between groups 1 and 3 (p = .006, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The results of the present study have shown that a previously reported arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedure, when modified with an additional proximal suture anchor into the fibula, results in a statistically significant increase in strength in terms of the maximum load to failure. Additionally, we have described a previously unreported, knotless technique for arthroscopic lateral ankle

  10. Spring-like Ankle Foot Orthoses reduce the energy cost of walking by taking over ankle work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, D J J; Harlaar, J; Meskers, C G M; de Groot, V

    2012-01-01

    In patients with central neurological disorders, gait is often limited by a reduced ability to push off with the ankle. To overcome this reduced ankle push-off, energy-storing, spring-like carbon-composite Ankle Foot Orthoses (AFO) can be prescribed. It is expected that the energy returned by the AFO in late stance will support ankle push-off, and reduce the energy cost of walking. In 10 patients with multiple sclerosis and stroke the energy cost of walking, 3D kinematics, joint power, and joint work were measured during gait, with and without the AFO. The mechanical characteristics of the AFO were measured separately, and used to calculate the contribution of the AFO to the ankle kinetics. We found a significant decrease of 9.8% in energy cost of walking when walking with the AFO. With the AFO, the range of motion of the ankle was reduced by 12.3°, and the net work around the ankle was reduced by 29%. The total net work in the affected leg remained unchanged. The AFO accounted for 60% of the positive ankle work, which reduced the total amount of work performed by the leg by 11.1% when walking with the AFO. The decrease in energy cost when walking with a spring-like energy-storing AFO in central neurological patients is not induced by an augmented net ankle push-off, but by the AFO partially taking over ankle work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of 2 ankle destabilization devices on electromyography measures during functional exercises in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Luke; Hart, Joseph M; Hertel, Jay

    2015-03-01

    Randomized crossover laboratory study. To determine the effects of ankle destabilization devices on surface electromyography (sEMG) measures of selected lower extremity muscles during functional exercises in participants with chronic ankle instability. Ankle destabilization devices are rehabilitation tools that can be worn as a boot or sandal to increase lower extremity muscle activation during walking in healthy individuals. However, they have not been tested in a population with pathology. Fifteen adults with chronic ankle instability participated. Surface electromyography electrodes were located over the anterior tibialis, fibularis longus, lateral gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gluteus medius. The activity level of these muscles was recorded in a single testing session during unipedal stance with eyes closed, the Star Excursion Balance Test, lateral hops, and treadmill walking. Each task was performed under 3 conditions: shod, ankle destabilization boot, and ankle destabilization sandal. Surface electromyography signal amplitudes were measured for each muscle during each exercise for all 3 conditions. Participants demonstrated a significant increase, with moderate to large effect sizes, in sEMG signal amplitude of the fibularis longus in the ankle destabilization boot and ankle destabilization sandal conditions during the unipedal eyes-closed balance test, the Star Excursion Balance Test in the anterior and posteromedial directions, lateral hops, and walking, when compared to the shod condition. Both devices also resulted in an increase in sEMG signal amplitudes, with large effect sizes of the lateral gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gluteus medius during the unipedal-stance-with-eyes-closed test, compared to the shod condition. Wearing ankle destabilization devices caused greater muscle activation during functional exercises in individuals with chronic ankle instability. Based on the magnitude of the effect, there were

  12. Modeling of the bony pelvis from MRI using a multi-atlas AE-SDM for registration and tracking in image-guided robotic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qinquan; Chang, Ping-Lin; Rueckert, Daniel; Ali, S Mohammed; Cohen, Daniel; Pratt, Philip; Mayer, Erik; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Edwards, Philip Eddie

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental challenge in the development of image-guided surgical systems is alignment of the preoperative model to the operative view of the patient. This is achieved by finding corresponding structures in the preoperative scans and on the live surgical scene. In robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), the most readily visible structure is the bone of the pelvic rim. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for prostate cancer detection and staging, but extraction of bone from MRI is difficult and very time consuming to achieve manually. We present a robust and fully automated multi-atlas pipeline for bony pelvis segmentation from MRI, using a MRI appearance embedding statistical deformation model (AE-SDM). The statistical deformation model is built using the node positions of deformations obtained from hierarchical registrations of full pelvis CT images. For datasets with corresponding CT and MRI images, we can transform the MRI into CT SDM space. MRI appearance can then be used to improve the combined MRI/CT atlas to MRI registration using SDM constraints. We can use this model to segment the bony pelvis in a new MRI image where there is no CT available. A multi-atlas segmentation algorithm is introduced which incorporates MRI AE-SDMs guidance. We evaluated the method on 19 subjects with corresponding MRI and manually segmented CT datasets by performing a leave-one-out study. Several metrics are used to quantify the overlap between the automatic and manual segmentations. Compared to the manual gold standard segmentations, our robust segmentation method produced an average surface distance 1.24±0.27mm, which outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for MRI bony pelvis segmentation. We also show that the resulting surface can be tracked in the endoscopic view in near real time using dense visual tracking methods. Results are presented on a simulation and a real clinical RALP case. Tracking is accurate to 0.13mm over 700 frames

  13. Mobile-bearing total ankle arthroplasty : a fundamental assessment of the clinical, radiographic and functional outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doets, Hendrik Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    Ankle arthritis often leads to significant impairments for the patient. As total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) with use of fixed-bearing (2-component) total ankle prostheses has a high rate of early failures, fusion of the ankle joint is, until today, considered to be the standard surgical treatment for

  14. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of its...

  16. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  17. Return to sports after ankle fractures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Buono, Angelo; Smith, Rebecca; Coco, Manuela; Woolley, Laurence; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to provide information on the time athletes will take to resume sports activity following ankle fractures. We systematically searched Medline (PubMED), EMBASE, CINHAL, Cochrane, Sports Discus and Google scholar databases using the combined keywords 'ankle fractures', 'ankle injuries', 'athletes', 'sports', 'return to sport', 'recovery', 'operative fixation', 'pinning', 'return to activity' to identify articles published in English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and Italian. Seven retrospective studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Of the 793 patients, 469 (59%) were males and 324 (41%) were females, and of the 356 ankle fractures we obtained information on, 338 were acute and 18 stress fractures. The general principles were to undertake open reduction and internal fixation of acute fractures, and manage stress fractures conservatively unless a thin fracture line was visible on radiographs. The best timing to return to sports after an acute ankle fracture is still undefined, given the heterogeneity of the outcome measures and results. The time to return to sports after an acute stress injury ranged from 3 to 51 weeks. When facing athletes with ankle fractures, associated injuries have to be assessed and addressed to improve current treatment lines and satisfy future expectancies. The best timing to return to sports after an ankle fracture has not been established yet. The ideas of the return to activity parameter and surgeon databases including sports-related information could induce research to progress.

  18. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  19. Ankle fractures have features of an osteoporotic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K M; Chung, C Y; Kwon, S S; Won, S H; Lee, S Y; Chung, M K; Park, M S

    2013-11-01

    We report the bone attenuation of ankle joint measured on computed tomography (CT) and the cause of injury in patients with ankle fractures. The results showed age- and gender-dependent low bone attenuation and low-energy trauma in elderly females, which suggest the osteoporotic features of ankle fractures. This study was performed to investigate the osteoporotic features of ankle fracture in terms of bone attenuation and cause of injury. One hundred ninety-four patients (mean age 51.0 years, standard deviation 15.8 years; 98 males and 96 females) with ankle fracture were included. All patients underwent CT examination, and causes of injury (high/low-energy trauma) were recorded. Mean bone attenuations of the talus, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, and distal tibial metaphysis were measured on CT images. Patients were divided into younger age (fractures than the younger age group. With increasing age, bone attenuations tended to decrease and the difference of bone attenuation between the genders tended to increase in the talus, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, and distal tibial metaphysis. Ankle fracture had features of osteoporotic fracture that is characterized by age- and gender-dependent low bone attenuation. Ankle fracture should not be excluded from the clinical and research interest as well as from the benefit of osteoporosis management.

  20. Pseudoaneurysm of the Anterior Tibial Artery following Ankle Arthroscopy in a Soccer Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Tonogai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankle arthroscopy carries a lower risk of vascular complications when standard anterolateral and anteromedial portals are used. However, the thickness of the fat pad at the anterior ankle affords little protection for the thin-walled anterior tibial artery, rendering it susceptible to indirect damage during procedures performed on the anterior ankle joint. To our knowledge, only 11 cases of pseudoaneurysm involving the anterior tibial artery after ankle arthroscopy have been described in the literature. Here we reported a rare case of a 19-year-old soccer player who presented with pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery following ankle arthroscopy using an ankle distraction method and underwent anastomosis for the anterior tibial artery injury. Excessive distraction of the ankle puts the neurovascular structures at greater risk for iatrogenic injury of the anterior tibial artery during ankle arthroscopy. Surgeons should look carefully for postoperative ankle swelling and pain after ankle arthroscopy.

  1. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  2. Pitfalls in the ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ato D

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dai Ato Gakujutsu Shien Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan Background: The ankle-brachial index (ABI and pulse wave velocity (PWV are indices of atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. The Japan-made measuring devices of those indices have spread widely because of their convenience and the significance of the parameters. However, studies that comprehensively discuss the various pitfalls in using these indices are not available.Methods: This study presents several representative pitfalls in using the ABI and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV by showing the result sheets of the device, “the Vascular Profiler”. Furthermore, some considerations when utilizing these indices in the future are also discussed.Results: Several diseases such as arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO, arterial calcification in the lower limb, arterial stenosis in the right upper-limb, aortic valve diseases, arterial stenosis in the upper-limb of the contralateral side of the hemodialysis access, are the representative pitfalls when evaluating ABI and baPWV. Moreover, a measurement error is found to actually exist. Furthermore, same phenomena are considered most likely to occur when using other similar indices and devices.Conclusion: The ABI and baPWV are the useful and significant biomarkers. Nevertheless, caution is sometimes necessary when interpreting them. Moreover, rigorous patient exclusion criteria should be considered when using those indices in the severely conditioned patient population. And the results of this study can be applied to enhance the literacy using other indices, such as the cardio-ankle vascular index and other similar devices. Keywords: ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, peripheral arterial disease, aortic valve disease, hemodialysis

  3. Dense SDM (12-Core × 3-Mode) Transmission Over 527 km With 33.2-ns Mode-Dispersion Employing Low-Complexity Parallel MIMO Frequency-Domain Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibahara, Kohki; Lee, Doohwan; Kobayashi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    We propose long-haul space-division-multiplexing (SDM) transmission systems employing parallel multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) frequency-domain equalization (FDE) and transmission fiber with low differential mode delay (DMD). We first discuss the advantages of parallel MIMO FDE technique in...

  4. Dense SDM (12-core × 3-mode) transmission over 527 km with 33.2-ns mode-dispersion employing low-complexity parallel MIMO frequency-domain equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibahara, K.; Mizuno, T.; Takara, H.

    We demonstrate 12-core × 3-mode dense SDM transmission over 527 km graded-index multi-core few-mode fiber without mode-dispersion management. Employing low baud rate multi-carrier signal and frequency-domain equalization enables 33.2-ns DMD compensation with low computational complexity. © 2015 OSA...

  5. [Ankle arthroscopy in clinical application: a preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J S

    1989-01-01

    The results of arthroscopy or arthroscopic synovectomy on 31 ankle joints in 24 cases were reported. All the patients were followed for 2 to 10 months with an average of 6 months. The results were as follows of the 26 rheumatoid arthritis: excellent in 5 ankles (19.2%), good in 8 (30.8%), fair in 7 (26.9%), and poor in 6 (23.6%), of the three traumatic arthritis: good in one and fair in two; of the remaining 2: good in 1 tuberculous synovitis and fair in 1 chronic pyogenic arthritis. The operative procedure, indications and value of ankle arthroscopy together with its advantages were discussed in detail.

  6. Proprioceptive exercises for ankle ligament injury: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Aguilera Eguía

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This CAT (Critically Appraised Topic answered the question: In recreational athletes suffering from chronic ankle sprain, can proprioceptive exercises reduce its recurrence?The clinical question was analyzed in three parts: patient, intervention and outcome. The purpose was to test the validity, results and effectiveness of proprioceptive exercises in recreational athletes suffering from chronic ankle sprain to reduce its recurrence from the article "Effectiveness of proprioceptive exercises for ankle ligament injury in adults: A systematic literature and meta-analisys "Postle”1 (2012.

  7. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Chui-Wai Ha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observations. Inversion velocity is another parameter that increased the reality of simulation. This review summarised the simulators, and aimed to compare and contrast their features and settings.

  8. Diabetic charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle with osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    One of the most devastating foot and/or ankle complications in the diabetic population with peripheral neuropathy is the presence of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN). In recent years, diabetic limb salvage has been attempted more frequently as opposed to major lower extremity amputation for CN of the foot and ankle with ulceration and/or deep infection. Treatment strategies for osteomyelitis in the diabetic population have evolved. This article reviews some of the most common surgical strategies recommended for the diabetic patient with CN of the foot and/or ankle and concomitant osteomyelitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [High complication rate after surgical treatment of ankle fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars; Lind, Marianne; Mersø, Camilla

    2014-08-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the quality and re-operation rate of the surgical treatment of ankle fractures at a large university hospital. X-rays and patient records of 137 patients surgically treated for ankle fractures were analyzed for: 1) correct classification according to Lauge-Hansen, 2) if congruity of the ankle joint was achieved, 3) selection and placement of the hardware, and 4) the surgeon's level of education. Totally 32 of 137 did not receive an optimal treatment, 11 were re-operated. There was no clear correlation between incorrect operation and the surgeon's level of education.

  10. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in res...

  11. Incidence and Cost of Ankle Sprains in United States Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shweta; Thomas, Abbey C.; Noone, Joshua M.; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Wikstrom, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ankle sprains represent a common injury in emergency departments, but little is known about common complications, procedures, and charges associated with ankle sprains in emergency departments. Hypothesis: There will be a higher incidence of ankle sprains among younger populations (≤25 years old) and in female patients. Complications and procedures will differ between ankle sprain types. Lateral ankle sprains will have lower health care charges relative to medial and high ankle sprains. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: A cross-sectional study of the 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was conducted. Outcomes such as charges, complications, and procedures were compared using propensity score matching between lateral and medial as well as lateral and high ankle sprains. Results: The sample contained 225,114 ankle sprains. Female patients sustained more lateral ankle sprains (57%). After propensity score adjustment, lateral sprains incurred greater charges than medial ankle sprains (median [interquartile range], $1008 [$702-$1408] vs $914 [$741-$1108]; P sprain of the foot (2.96% vs 0.70%, P ankle sprain events. Among procedures, medial ankle sprains were more likely to include diagnostic radiology (97.91% vs 83.62%, P ankle sprains (0.87% vs 2.79%, P ankle sprains than lateral ankle sprains (24 [6.06%] vs 1 [0.25%], P Ankle sprain emergency department visits account for significant health care charges in the United States. Age- and sex-related differences persist among the types of ankle sprains. Clinical Relevance: The health care charges associated with ankle sprains indicate the need for additional preventive measures. There are age- and sex-related differences in the prevalence of ankle sprains that suggest these demographics may be risk factors for ankle sprains. PMID:27474161

  12. Trends of Concurrent Ankle Arthroscopy at the Time of Operative Treatment of Ankle Fracture: A National Database Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Jakob; Fraser, Ethan J; Murawski, Christopher D; Desai, Payal; Vig, Khushdeep; Kennedy, John G

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to report trends associated with concurrent ankle arthroscopy at the time of operative treatment of ankle fracture. The current procedural terminology (CPT) billing codes were used to search the PearlDiver Patient Record Database and identify all patients who were treated for acute ankle fracture in the United States. The Medicare Standard Analytic Files were searchable between 2005 and 2011 and the United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from 2007 to 2011. Annual trends were expressed only between 2007 and 2011, as it was the common time period among both databases. Demographic factors were identified for all procedures as well as the cost aspect using the Medicare data set. In total, 32 307 patients underwent open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) of an ankle fracture, of whom 313 (1.0%) had an ankle arthroscopy performed simultaneously. Of those 313 cases, 70 (22.4%) patients received microfracture treatment. Between 2005 and 2011, 85 203 patients were treated for an ankle fracture whether via ORIF or closed treatment. Of these, a total of 566 patients underwent arthroscopic treatment within 7 years. The prevalence of arthroscopy after ankle fracture decreased significantly by 45% from 2007 to 2011 (Pankle fracture treatment, it appears that only a small proportion of surgeons in the United States perform these procedures concurrently. Therapeutic, Level IV: Retrospective. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Refining a brief decision aid in stable CAD: cognitive interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Blake, Karen; Clark, Stacie; Dontje, Katherine; Olomu, Adesuwa; Henry, Rebecca C; Rovner, David R; Rothert, Marilyn L; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret

    2014-02-13

    We describe the results of cognitive interviews to refine the "Making Choices©" Decision Aid (DA) for shared decision-making (SDM) about stress testing in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We conducted a systematic development process to design a DA consistent with International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) focused on Alpha testing criteria. Cognitive interviews were conducted with ten stable CAD patients using the "think aloud" interview technique to assess the clarity, usefulness, and design of each page of the DA. Participants identified three main messages: 1) patients have multiple options based on stress tests and they should be discussed with a physician, 2) take care of yourself, 3) the stress test is the gold standard for determining the severity of your heart disease. Revisions corrected the inaccurate assumption of item number three. Cognitive interviews proved critical for engaging patients in the development process and highlighted the necessity of clear message development and use of design principles that make decision materials easy to read and easy to use. Cognitive interviews appear to contribute critical information from the patient perspective to the overall systematic development process for designing decision aids.

  14. Trends in Ankle Arthroscopy and Its Use in the Management of Pathologic Conditions of the Lateral Ankle in the United States: A National Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Park, Joseph S; Perumal, Venkat; Gwathmey, F Winston

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate current trends in ankle arthroscopy across time, sex, age, and region of the United States as well as the use of ankle arthroscopy in the management of lateral ankle instability. Patients who underwent ankle arthroscopy and those who underwent ankle arthroscopy and lateral ankle ligament repair or peroneal retinacular repair from 2007 through 2011 were identified using the PearlDiver national database. These searches yielded volumes of unique patients, sex and age distribution, and regional volumes of patients. Χ-square linear-by-linear association analysis was used for comparisons, with P arthroscopy procedures in the database from 2007 to 2011. Over the 5-year study period, there was a significant increase in the overall number of ankle arthroscopies being performed, from 2,814 in 2007 to 3,314 in 2011 (P arthroscopy more frequently than did male patients (P = .027). The majority of patients who had ankle arthroscopy were between the ages of 30 and 49 years. The use of ankle arthroscopy during lateral ligament repair procedures increased from 37.2% in 2007 to 43.7% in 2011 (P arthroscopy and peroneal tendon retinacular repair increased 50%, from 2.8/100 ankle arthroscopies in 2007 to 4.2/100 ankle arthroscopies in 2011 (P arthroscopy increased significantly from 2007 to 2011, outpacing shoulder, knee, and elbow arthroscopy. Ankle arthroscopy was performed more frequently in female patients and most commonly in patients younger than 50 years. The use of ankle arthroscopy in the surgical management of lateral ankle instability also increased significantly. The incidence of concomitant ankle arthroscopy and lateral ligament repair increased significantly, as did the incidence of concomitant ankle arthroscopy and repair of peroneal tendon subluxation. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR IMPINGEMENT IN THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mikek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anterior soft tissue impingement is a common cause of chronic pain in the ankle. The preferred method of operative treatment is an arthroscopic excision of hypertrophic fibrous and synovial tissue in the anterior part of the ankle joint.Methods. We present the results of arthroscopic treatment of anterior ankle impingement in group of 14 patients.Results. Subjective improvement after the procedure was observed in all patients and 13 of them (93% were without any symptoms after the operation. One patient reported of intermittent pain, especially when walking on uneven grounds.Conclusions. We conclude that arthroscopic excision of hypertrophic synovial tissue in the anterior part of the ankle which causes the symptoms of impingement is a minimally invasive procedure that is both safe and reliable. When used for appropriate indications, an improvement can be expected in over 90% of patients.

  16. Comparison of Stretch Reflex Torques in Ankle Dorsiflexors and Plantarflexors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tung, J

    2001-01-01

    ...) ankle muscles, Pulse, step, and a combination of random perturbation and step inputs were used to identify the reflex and intrinsic contributions to the measured torque, TA reflex torques were very...

  17. Differential contributions of ankle plantarflexors during submaximal isometric muscle action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of superficial and deep ankle plantarflexors during repetitive submaximal isometric contractions using surface electromyography (SEMG) and positron emission tomography (PET). Myoelectric signals were obtained from twelve...

  18. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  19. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Aug 21,2017 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, ...

  20. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGovern RP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ryan P McGovern,1 RobRoy L Martin,1,2 1Department of Physical Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, 2Centers for Sports Medicine – University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI, interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. Keywords: reinjury, chronic ankle instability, rehabilitation techniques, diagnosis, intervention, athlete

  1. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments: what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witjes Suzanne

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180 with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales, number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2151

  2. MR imaging of the lateral collateral ligaments after ankle sprain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebe, P.; Kreitner, K.F.; Roeder, W.; Kersjes, W.; Hennes, R.; Runkel, M.

    1995-01-01

    35 patients with ankle sprain were examined by MRI and stress radiographs. 13 were operated afterwards, 22 patients underwent a functional conservative therapy and were examined by MRI and stress radiographs and second time after three months. MRI reports were correct in 12 of 13 operated cases. After conservative therapy we did not find any disrupted ankle ligament. MRI showed intact ligaments thickened by scar. (orig./MG) [de

  3. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments): what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180) with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales), number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2151 PMID:22340371

  4. Tibial shaft fracture and ankle injury - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Zamboni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The authors report on a case of tibial shaft fracture associated with ankle injury. The clinical, radiological and surgical characteristics are discussed. Assessment of associated injuries is often overlooked and these injuries are hard to diagnose. When torque occurs in the lower limb, the ankle becomes susceptible to simultaneous injury. It is essential to make careful assessment based on clinical, radiographic, intraoperative and postoperative characteristics in order to attain functional recovery.

  5. Talar anchor placement for modified Brostrom lateral ankle stabilization procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angirasa, Arush K; Barrett, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The modified Brostrom procedure has been a proven procedure with excellent utility in the treatment of lateral ankle instability within limitation. Multiple variations of the original technique have been described in the literature to date. Included in these variations are differences in anchor placement, suture technique, or both. In this research study, we propose placing a bone screw anchor into the lateral shoulder of the talus rather than the typical placement at the lateral malleolus for anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments.

  6. Foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kickboxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Intharasompan, Piyapong; Wattanarojanapom, Thongaek; Theeraamphon, Nipon; Auephanviriyakul, Sansanee; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-01-01

    Muay Thai kickboxing is a common sport that uses the foot and ankle in fighting. Muay Thai kickboxing trainees usually receive training in Thailand Foot and ankle problems in this group ofpeople who usually train barefoot remain unexplored To evaluate the prevalence of common foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kick boxers. The present study is a cross-sectional survey of Muay Thai kick boxers practicing in northern Thailand. Interviews were conducted and foot and ankle examinations were evaluated Foot morphology was examined using a Harris mat footprint. One hundred and twenty-three Muay Thai kickbox ersinnine training gyms were included in this study. Common foot and ankle problems found in the Muay Thai kick boxers were callosity (59%), gastrocnemius contracture (57%), toe deformities (49.3%), wounds (10%) and heel pain (9%). Callosity was most commonly found on the forefoot (77.5%), on the plantar first metatarsal (55.3%) and on the big toe (33.3%). An association was found between a tight heel cord and a history of foot injury with prolonged periods of weekly training. Toe deformities such as hallux rigidus (37.6%) were also associated with prolonged periods of training (p = 0.001). No correlation was found between type of foot arch and foot and ankle problems. Plantar forefoot callosities and wounds as well as toe deformities including tight heel cords are some of the foot and ankle problems commonly found in Muay Thai kick boxers. They are associated with prolonged periods of barefoot training. The unique pattern of training and of the kicks in Muay Thai might be a path mechanism, leading to the development of foot and ankle problems.

  7. Effect of kinesio-taping on ankle joint stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat A. Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ankle Instability is characterized by recurrent giving way and often develops after repeated lateral ankle sprains. Kinesiotape is more elastic than traditional athletic tape and is becoming increasingly popular. It is reported to decrease pain, improve muscle function, circulation and proprioception, however, research examining the effects of Kinesiotape in ankle instability is limited. The objective of this study was to determine if applying Kinesiotape to unstable ankle may improve performance in the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT, which has been shown to be a sensitive and reliable measure for quantifying dynamic balance. Thirty subjects with first degree ankle sprain were participated in this study. SEBT was used to test the subject dynamic balance under three conditions; without taping, with white athletic tape and with kinesiotape. One way repeated measure ANOVA using Greenhouse-Geisser corrections were conducted to evaluate differences in SEBT for the three conditions. Pairwise comparison of the outcome measures in the three occasions (without taping, with athletic taping, and with kinesio taping revealed statistically significant differences of all outcomes between occasion 1 (without taping and occasion 2 (with athletic taping favoring the athletic taping (p < 0.05. Also, a statistically significant difference between occasion 1 (without taping and occasion 3 (with kinesio taping were found (p < 0.05 favoring kinesio taping. Moreover, pairwise comparison of the ankle stability outcomes using athletic taping versus kinesio taping indicated a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 in favor of kinesio taping measures. Conclusion: kinesiotape has superior effect than athletic tape in patients with first degree ankle sprain and can be used safely for improving ankle joint stability.

  8. Direct measurement of the intrinsic ankle stiffness during standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlutters, M; Boonstra, T A; Schouten, A C; van der Kooij, H

    2015-05-01

    Ankle stiffness contributes to standing balance, counteracting the destabilizing effect of gravity. The ankle stiffness together with the compliance between the foot and the support surface make up the ankle-foot stiffness, which is relevant to quiet standing. The contribution of the intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness to balance, and the ankle-foot stiffness amplitude dependency remain a topic of debate in the literature. We therefore developed an experimental protocol to directly measure the bilateral intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness during standing balance, and determine its amplitude dependency. By applying fast (40 ms) ramp-and-hold support surface rotations (0.005-0.08 rad) during standing, reflexive contributions could be excluded, and the amplitude dependency of the intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness was investigated. Results showed that reflexive activity could not have biased the torque used for estimating the intrinsic stiffness. Furthermore, subjects required less recovery action to restore balance after bilateral rotations in opposite directions compared to rotations in the same direction. The intrinsic ankle-foot stiffness appears insufficient to ensure balance, ranging from 0.93±0.09 to 0.44±0.06 (normalized to critical stiffness 'mgh'). This implies that changes in muscle activation are required to maintain balance. The non-linear stiffness decrease with increasing rotation amplitude supports the previous published research. With the proposed method reflexive effects can be ruled out from the measured torque without any model assumptions, allowing direct estimation of intrinsic stiffness during standing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis with intra-articular distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyong Nyun; Jeon, June Young; Noh, Kyu Cheol; Kim, Hong Kyun; Dong, Quanyu; Park, Yong Wook

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis has shown high rates of union comparable to those with open arthrodesis but with substantially less postoperative morbidity, shorter operative times, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stays. To easily perform arthroscopic resection of the articular cartilage, sufficient distraction of the joint is necessary to insert the arthroscope and instruments. However, sometimes, standard noninvasive ankle distraction will not be sufficient in post-traumatic ankle arthritis, with the development of arthrofibrosis and joint contracture after severe ankle trauma. In the present report, we describe a technique to distract the ankle joint by inserting a 4.6-mm stainless steel cannula with a blunt trocar inside the joint. The cannula allowed sufficient intra-articular distraction, and, at the same time, a 4.0-mm arthroscope can be inserted through the cannula to view the joint. Screws can be inserted to fix the joint under fluoroscopic guidance without changing the patient's position or removing the noninvasive distraction device and leg holder, which are often necessary during standard arthroscopic arthrodesis with noninvasive distraction. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Value of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, C.N. van; Tol, J.L.; Marti, R.K. [Acad. Med. Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surg.; Molenaar, A.H.M. [Department of Radiology, Canisius Ziekenhuis, Weg door Jonkerbos 100, 6532 SZ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cohen, R.H. [Department of Radiology, Stichting Ziekenhuis Amstelveen, Laan van de Helende Meesters 8, 1186 AM Amstelveen (Netherlands); Bossuyt, P.M.M. [Department of Epidemiology, Academic Medical Centre, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    Objective. To investigate the merits of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle. Design and patients. In a group of 160 consecutive patients operative exploration was performed in cases where arthrography and/or a delayed physical examination showed positive findings. In all patients arthrography was performed within 48 h after trauma. To determine interobserver agreement, all arthrograms were independently evaluated by two radiologists, both ignorant of the first assessment. Results. The prevalence of an ankle ligament lesion was found to be 76%. Of the 122 patients with a rupture of one or more ankle ligaments, 52% had an isolated anterior talofibular ligament lesion, 3% had an isolated calcaneofibular ligament lesion, and 45% had combined lesions. The site of the lesion was predominantly intraligamentous. In the determination of the presence or absence of an ankle ligament lesion, the specificity and sensitivity of the ankle arthrogram were 71% and 96% respectively. Interobserver agreement on the arthrogram was very good ({kappa} 0.9). In 1% of patients a clear diagnosis was not possible by means of arthrography. Conclusion. Arthrography provides information of high diagnostic quality with excellent interobserver agreement and therefore remains the gold standard for early diagnosis (within 48 h) of a lateral ankle ligament rupture. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 tabs., 24 refs.

  11. Value of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, C.N. van; Tol, J.L.; Marti, R.K.; Cohen, R.H.; Bossuyt, P.M.M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the merits of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle. Design and patients. In a group of 160 consecutive patients operative exploration was performed in cases where arthrography and/or a delayed physical examination showed positive findings. In all patients arthrography was performed within 48 h after trauma. To determine interobserver agreement, all arthrograms were independently evaluated by two radiologists, both ignorant of the first assessment. Results. The prevalence of an ankle ligament lesion was found to be 76%. Of the 122 patients with a rupture of one or more ankle ligaments, 52% had an isolated anterior talofibular ligament lesion, 3% had an isolated calcaneofibular ligament lesion, and 45% had combined lesions. The site of the lesion was predominantly intraligamentous. In the determination of the presence or absence of an ankle ligament lesion, the specificity and sensitivity of the ankle arthrogram were 71% and 96% respectively. Interobserver agreement on the arthrogram was very good (κ 0.9). In 1% of patients a clear diagnosis was not possible by means of arthrography. Conclusion. Arthrography provides information of high diagnostic quality with excellent interobserver agreement and therefore remains the gold standard for early diagnosis (within 48 h) of a lateral ankle ligament rupture. (orig.)

  12. REVISION ANKLE SYNDESMOSIS FIXATION - FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AFTER TIGHTROPE ® FIXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendhilvelan Rajagopalan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Syndesmotic disruptions are often seen in ankle fractures. Malreduction of these fractures can result in arthritis and instability. A proportion of these patients with malreduction require revision fixation. This study presents the results of revision fixation in such patients, using the Ankle TightRope ® (Arthrex system. METHODS Between January 2000 to December 2009, 124 patients who underwent ankle fracture fixations with syndesmotic stabilisation were analysed. Out of 124 patients, 8 patients were diagnosed with failure of primary stabilisation (based on radiological and clinical criteria and subjected to revision fixation using the Ankle TightRope ® (Arthrex system. Followup was done at periodic time intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months. Both clinical and radiological assessment was performed. Complications and duration of hospital stay was recorded. Functional evaluation was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scoring system. RESULTS Five patients had good results, one satisfactory and two had poor outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Ankle TightRope ® fixation is an alternative method of stabilisation in patients who require revision syndesmosis fixation. Further studies are required to evaluate this method of revision stabilisation as compared to screws.

  13. Syndesmotic Malreduction after Ankle ORIF; Is Radiography Sufficient?

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    Alireza Manafi Rasi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Ankle fractures, especially those resulting from external rotation mechanisms are associated with injury to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. Some authors have recommended performing CT scanning after open ankle surgery to evaluate the reduction of syndesmosis. In this current study, we aimed to investigate the sensitivity of plain radiography in diagnosing syndesmosis malreduction after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF in patients with ankle fractures.   Methods: Thirty patients with ankle fractures participated in this prospective study. ORIFs were performed with respect to all of the technical guidelines shown in orthopedic literature for exact syndesmosis reduction, such as fibular length and proper settings. In the operating room, plain radiography was performed in anteroposterior, mortise and lateral views to assess whether syndesmosis was malreduced. If malreduction was detected, the patient was revised. As the gold standard, patients underwent postoperative bilateral CT scanning to investigate the syndesmosis reduction which was then compared to the healthy side. Finally, the sensitivity of plain radiography in the diagnosis of syndesmosis malreduction was determined by comparing this method to CT scanning. Results: In both of the methods we did not find any patient with syndesmosis malreduction. Hence, the sensitivity of plain radiography was determined 100%. Conclusion: Based on our findings, there is no need to perform CT scanning to evaluate syndesmosis reduction after ankle ORIF in patients with ankle fractures. Plain radiography is sufficient and has satisfactory sensitivity in these patients.

  14. Syndesmotic Malreduction after Ankle ORIF; Is Radiography Sufficient?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Manafi Rasi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle fractures, especially those resulting from external rotation mechanisms are associated with injury to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. Some authors have recommended performing CT scanning after open ankle surgery to evaluate the reduction of syndesmosis. In this current study, we aimed to investigate the sensitivity of plain radiography in diagnosing syndesmosis malreduction after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF in patients with ankle fractures.   Methods: Thirty patients with ankle fractures participated in this prospective study. ORIFs were performed with respect to all of the technical guidelines shown in orthopedic literature for exact syndesmosis reduction, such as fibular length and proper settings. In the operating room, plain radiography was performed in anteroposterior, mortise and lateral views to assess whether syndesmosis was malreduced. If malreduction was detected, the patient was revised. As the gold standard, patients underwent postoperative bilateral CT scanning to investigate the syndesmosis reduction which was then compared to the healthy side. Finally, the sensitivity of plain radiography in the diagnosis of syndesmosis malreduction was determined by comparing this method to CT scanning. Results: In both of the methods we did not find any patient with syndesmosis malreduction. Hence, the sensitivity of plain radiography was determined 100%. Conclusion: Based on our findings, there is no need to perform CT scanning to evaluate syndesmosis reduction after ankle ORIF in patients with ankle fractures. Plain radiography is sufficient and has satisfactory sensitivity in these patients.

  15. 2016 consensus statement of the International Ankle Consortium: prevalence, impact and long-term consequences of lateral ankle sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Phillip A; Bleakley, Chris M; Caulfield, Brian M; Docherty, Carrie L; Fourchet, François; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hertel, Jay; Hiller, Claire E; Kaminski, Thomas W; McKeon, Patrick O; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Verhagen, Evert A; Vicenzino, Bill T; Wikstrom, Erik A; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-12-01

    The Executive Committee of the International Ankle Consortium presents this 2016 position paper with recommendations for information implementation and continued research based on the paradigm that lateral ankle sprain (LAS), and the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI), serve as a conduit to a significant global healthcare burden. We intend our recommendations to serve as a mechanism to promote efforts to improve prevention and early management of LAS. We believe this will reduce the prevalence of CAI and associated sequelae that have led to the broader public health burdens of decreased physical activity and early onset ankle joint post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Ultimately, this can contribute to healthier lifestyles and promotion of physical activity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Clinical Outcomes of the Modified Broström Technique in the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability After Early, Intermediate, and Delayed Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sami; Thurston, Daniel; Sian, Tanvir; Shah, Rohi; Aziz, Abdul; Kothari, Paresh

    2018-04-11

    The modified Broström technique (MBT) is considered the reference standard for surgical management of ankle instability, with good short-term outcomes. However, limited evidence is available regarding outcomes for delayed presentations of instability. We report our outcomes for patients who underwent ligament repair using the MBT, from a single-surgeon retrospective study of consecutive patients. The minimum postoperative follow-up period was 6 months during a 5-year study period. The patients were retrospectively divided into 3 groups according to the delay in presentation: group 1, 6 months to 2 years; group 2, 2 to 4 years; and group 3, >4 years. We collected data on patient demographics, injury pattern, and intraoperative surgeon findings. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale (AHS) was used to evaluate patient outcomes and satisfaction with surgery. Twenty-six patients were treated with MBT. The mean follow-up period was 36.9 (range 6-42) months. Twenty-five (96.2%) patients had unilateral injuries, and 1 (3.85%) had bilateral repairs. Of the 26 patients, 21 (80.8%) completed the AOFAS-AHS, with a mean score of 87.4 (range 12 to 100). The mean interval from injury to surgery was 47.9 months. The results were excellent in 15 (71.4%), good in 3 (14.3%), fair in 1 (4.8%), and poor in 2 (9.5%) using the AOFAS-AHS. We found no significant difference in the overall AOFAS-AHS score or postoperative satisfaction among the groups (p > .05). All patients had a stable ankle joint at their final follow-up visit. In conclusion, patients with persistent or chronic ankle instability have good clinical outcomes and satisfaction after the MBT, irrespective of the time from injury to presentation. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of isokinetic and proprioception training on strength, movement and gait parameters after acute supination injury of the ankle ligaments

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    C. Mucha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a three-week isokinetic training compared to typical proprio -ceptive training on parameters of strength, movement and gait function after acute ankle ligament sprain were investigated. Thirty-nine patients were randomly allocated to two comparison groups. In group 1 (n=20a proprioceptive training and in group 2 (n=19 an isokinetic strength training (Cybex 6000® were administered. Thepatients of both groups underwent training five times a week for three weeks. Before and at the end of the treatmentcourse, in both groups isokinetic strength was tested, the range of motion in the ankle joint was recorded and gait wasanalyzed (multicomponent strength measurement platform, Henschel-System®. The maximum isokinetic torque(60°/s [Nm] and the contact time (monopedal support time of the injured leg during gait cycle were the basis for evaluation.The data obtained show that in group 2 a significantly greater increase of the maximum isokinetic torque wasattained in almost all range of motion of the ankle joint in the course of treatment. A t the same time, in group 2 theshortening of the contact time in the stance phase of the injured leg could be compensated. The active range of motionin the ankle joint was less at the end of treatment in group 2 than in group 1. The isokinetic training obviously did notonly lead to better strength regeneration, but also to a functionally more stable ankle joint with a rhythmically moreevenly balanced stance phase of the gait cycle.  These results suggest that the used isokinetic training had positive effects on functional stability after acute ankle sprain.

  18. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  19. Minimum distraction gap: how much ankle joint space is enough in ankle distraction arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomen, Austin T; McCoy, Thomas H; Meyers, Kathleen N; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2014-02-01

    The success of ankle distraction arthroplasty relies on the separation of the tibiotalar articular surfaces. The purpose of this study was to find the minimum distraction gap needed to ensure that the tibiotalar joint surfaces would not contact each other with full weight-bearing while under distraction. Circular external fixators were mounted to nine cadaver ankle specimens. Each specimen was then placed into a custom-designed load chamber. Loads of 0, 350, and 700N were applied to the specimen. Radiographic joint space was measured and joint contact pressure was monitored under each load. The external fixator was then sequentially distracted, and the radiographic joint space was measured under the three different loads. The experiment was stopped when there was no joint contact under 700N of load. The radiographic joint space was measured and the initial (undistracted) radiographic joint space was subtracted from it yielding the distraction gap. The minimum distraction gap (mDG) that would provide total unloading was calculated. The average mDG was 2.4 mm (range, 1.6 to 4.0 mm) at 700N of load, 4.4 mm (range, 3.7 to 5.8 mm) at 350N of load, and 4.9 mm (range, 3.7 to 7.0 mm) at 0N of load. These results suggest that if the radiographic joint space of on a standing X-ray of an ankle undergoing distraction arthroplasty shows a minimum of 5.8 mm of DG, then there will be no contact between joint surfaces during full weight-bearing. Therefore, 5 mm of radiographic joint space, as recommended historically, may not be adequate to prevent contact of the articular surfaces during weight-bearing.

  20. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale; translation and validation of the Dutch language version for ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A Siebe; Tjioe, Roderik J C; Van der Sijde, Fleur; Meuffels, Duncan E; den Hoed, Pieter T; Van der Vlies, Cornelis H; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2017-08-03

    The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale is among the most commonly used instruments for measuring outcome of treatment in patients who sustained a complex ankle or hindfoot injury. It consists of a patient-reported and a physician-reported part. A validated, Dutch version of this instrument is currently not available. The aim of this study was to translate the instrument into Dutch and to determine the measurement properties of the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale Dutch language version (DLV) in patients with a unilateral ankle fracture. Multicentre (two Dutch hospitals), prospective observational study. In total, 142 patients with a unilateral ankle fracture were included. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. Patients completed the subjective (patient-reported) part of the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale-DLV. A physician or trained physician-assistant completed the physician-reported part. For comparison and evaluation of the measuring characteristics, the Foot Function Index and the Short Form-36 were completed by the patient. Descriptive statistics (including floor and ceiling effects), reliability (ie, internal consistency), construct validity, reproducibility (ie, test-retest reliability, agreement and smallest detectable change) and responsiveness were determined. The AOFAS-DLV and its subscales showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's α >0.90). Construct validity and longitudinal validity were proven to be adequate (76.5% of predefined hypotheses were confirmed). Floor effects were not present. Ceiling effects were present from 6 months onwards, as expected. Responsiveness was adequate, with a smallest detectable change of 12.0 points. The AOFAS-DLV is a reliable, valid and responsive measurement instrument for evaluating functional outcome in patients with a unilateral ankle fracture. This implies that the questionnaire is suitable to compare different treatment modalities within this population or to compare outcome across

  1. Weightbearing vs Gravity Stress Radiographs for Stability Evaluation of Supination-External Rotation Fractures of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Angela; Krause, Fabian; Weber, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Isolated lateral malleolar fractures may result from a supination-external rotation (SER) injury of the ankle. Stable fractures maintain tibiotalar congruence due to competent medial restraints and can be treated nonoperatively with excellent functional results and long-term prognosis. Stability might be assessed with either stress radiographs or weightbearing radiographs. A consecutive series of patients with closed SER fractures (presumed AO 44-B1) were prospectively enrolled from 2008 to 2015. Patients with clearly unstable fractures (medial clear space more than 7 mm) on the initial nonweightbearing radiograph were excluded and operated on. All other patients were examined with a gravity stress and a weightbearing anteroposterior radiograph. Borderline instability of the fracture was assumed when the medial clear space was 4 to 7 mm. Those were treated nonoperatively. Of 104 patients with isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type, 14 patients were treated operatively because of clear instability (displacement) on the initial radiographs. Of the nonoperative patients, 44 patients demonstrated borderline instability on the gravity stress but stability on the weightbearing radiograph ("gravity borderline"); the remaining 46 were stable in both tests ("gravity stable"). At an average follow-up of 23 months, no significant differences were seen in the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot score (92 points gravity-borderline group vs 93 points gravity-unstable group), the Foot Functional Index score (11 vs 10 points), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical component (86 vs 85 points), and SF-36 mental component (84 vs 81 points). Radiographically, all fractures had healed with anatomic congruity of the ankle. Weightbearing radiographs provided a reliable basis to decide about stability and nonoperative treatment in isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type with excellent clinical and radiographic outcome at short-term follow-up. Gravity

  2. Preoperative Radiographic and CT Findings Predicting Syndesmotic Injuries in Supination-External Rotation-Type Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Seung Yeol; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2014-07-16

    The Lauge-Hansen classification system does not provide sufficient data related to syndesmotic injuries in supination-external rotation (SER)-type ankle fractures. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors helpful for the preoperative detection of syndesmotic injuries in SER-type ankle fractures using radiographs and computed tomography (CT). A cohort of 191 consecutive patients (104 male and eighty-seven female patients with a mean age [and standard deviation] of 50.7 ± 16.4 years) with SER-type ankle fractures who had undergone operative treatment were included. Preoperative ankle radiographs and CT imaging scans were made for all patients, and clinical data, including age, sex, and mechanism of injury (high or low-energy trauma), were collected. Patients were divided into two groups: the stable syndesmotic group and the unstable syndesmotic group, with a positive intraoperative lateral stress test leading to syndesmotic screw fixation. Fracture height, fracture length, medial joint space, extent of fracture, and bone attenuation were measured on radiographs and CT images and were compared between the groups. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the factors that significantly contributed to unstable syndesmotic injuries. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated, and cutoff values were suggested to predict unstable syndesmotic injuries on preoperative imaging measurements. Of the 191 patents with a SER-type ankle fracture, thirty-eight (19.9%) had a concurrent unstable syndesmotic injury. Age, sex, mechanism of injury, fracture height, medial joint space, and bone attenuation were significantly different between the two groups. In the binary logistic analysis, fracture height, medial joint space, and bone attenuation were found to be significant factors contributing to unstable syndesmotic injuries. The cutoff values for predicting unstable syndesmotic injuries were a fracture height of >3 mm and a medial

  3. Radiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Trattnig, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Imhof, H.; Wagesreither, S.

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemoplici patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging or

  4. EFFECT OF KINESIO TAPE VERSUS ATHLETIC TAPE ON MYOELECTRIC ACTIVITY OF ANKLE MUSCLES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ANKLE SPRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa F Abdelmonem

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sprained ankle a common orthopedic injury. The standard treatment for ankle sprains remains nonoperative. Ankle taping was used to protect and prevent ligaments excessive strain. So, the current study aimed at investigating the effect of spa-care Kinesio tape versus standard white athletic tape on myoelectric activities (EMG of ankle evertors (peroneus longus and invertors (tibialis anterior in a chronic ankle sprain. Methods: A convenient sample of 30 patients with a chronic ankle sprain (18 females and 12 males were included in this study. Their mean age ±SD was 24 ±1.2 years. Their height was 175±4.8 cm among men & 163±5.2 cm for females, and weight was 85±5.2 kg for males & 74±5.5 kg for women. It was a within-group design in which the same participant experienced the two types of taping compared to no taping condition. Root mean square (RMS was measured while participants were moving the isokinetic dynamometer at an angular velocity of 120°/sec using concentric contraction mode through full ankle range of motion. The EMG (RMS of evertors and invertors was measured immediately after the three taping ways (no tape, Kinesio tape, and athletic tape with a one-week interval between each taping. Results: Spa-care Kinesiotape significantly reduced evertors and invertors EMG (RMS compared with no tape or athletic tape in patients with chronic ankle sprain. Mean± SD of the evertors was 0.7 (±0.1 for no tape and 0.58 (±0.2 for Kinesio tape. The P value was 0.000 for kinesio tape in evertors compared with no tape. Also, mean± SD of the invertors was 0.87 (±0.23 for no tape, and 0.54 (±0.1 for Kinesio tape and the P value was 0.001 for Kinesio tape in invertors compared with no tape. Conclusion: Spa-care Kinesio tape may be useful for reducing EMG activity of ankle muscles in a chronic ankle sprain.

  5. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in response to plantarflexion and inversion of the foot or ankle compression were recorded from the medial part of the deep dorsal horn, laminae IV-VI, in normal and ankle-sprained rats. One day after ankle sprain, rats showed significantly reduced WBRs on the affected foot, and this reduction was partially restored by systemic morphine. The majority of deep dorsal horn neurons responded to a single ankle stimulus modality. After ankle sprain, the mean evoked response rates were significantly increased, and afterdischarges were developed in recorded dorsal horn neurons. The ankle sprain-induced enhanced evoked responses were significantly reduced by morphine, which was reversed by naltrexone. The data indicate that movement-specific dorsal horn neuron responses were enhanced after ankle sprain in a morphine-dependent manner, thus suggesting that hyperactivity of dorsal horn neurons is an underlying mechanism of pain after ankle sprain. PMID:21389306

  6. Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis of the Ankle: A Distinct Clinical Entity Requiring New Research Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delco, Michelle L.; Kennedy, John G.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is increasing as a result of advancements in non-invasive imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, improved arthroscopic surgical technology and heightened awareness among clinicians. Unlike OA of the knee, primary or age-related ankle OA is rare, with the majority of ankle OA classified as post-traumatic (PTOA). Ankle trauma, more specifically ankle sprain, is the single most common athletic injury, and no effective therapies are available to prevent or slow progression of PTOA. Despite the high incidence of ankle trauma and OA, ankle-related OA research is sparse, with the majority of clinical and basic studies pertaining to the knee joint. Fundamental differences exist between joints including their structure and molecular composition, response to trauma, susceptibility to OA, clinical manifestations of disease, and response to treatment. Considerable evidence suggests that research findings from knee should not be extrapolated to the ankle, however few ankle-specific preclinical models of PTOA are currently available. The objective of this article is to review the current state of ankle OA investigation, highlighting important differences between the ankle and knee that may limit the extent to which research findings from knee models are applicable to the ankle joint. Considerations for the development of new ankle-specific, clinically relevant animal models are discussed. PMID:27764893

  7. Range of Motion of the Ankle According to Pushing Force, Gender and Knee Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kang Hee; Jeon, Yumi; Lee, Hyunkeun

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the difference of range of motion (ROM) of ankle according to pushing force, gender and knee position. One hundred and twenty-eight healthy adults (55 men, 73 women) between the ages of 20 and 51, were included in the study. One examiner measured the passive range of motion (PROM) of ankle by Dualer IQ Inclinometers and Commander Muscle Testing. ROM of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and plantarflexion (PF) according to change of pushing force and knee position were measured at prone position. There was significant correlation between ROM and pushing force, the more pushing force leads the more ROM at ankle DF and ankle PF. Knee flexion of 90° position showed low PF angle and high ankle DF angle, as compared to the at neutral position of knee joint. ROM of ankle DF for female was greater than for male, with no significant difference. ROM of ankle PF for female was greater than male regardless of the pushing force. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the relationship between pushing force and ROM of ankle joint. There was significant correlation between ROM of ankle and pushing force. ROM of ankle PF for female estimated greater than male regardless of the pushing force and the number of measurement. The ROM of the ankle is measured differently according to the knee joint position. Pushing force, gender and knee joint position are required to be considered when measuring the ROM of ankle joint.

  8. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  9. Orthopaedic management of haemophilia arthropathy of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasta, G; Forsyth, A; Merchan, C R; Mortazavi, S M J; Silva, M; Mulder, K; Mancuso, E; Perfetto, O; Heim, M; Caviglia, H; Solimeno, L

    2008-07-01

    Joint bleeding, or haemarthrosis, is the most common type of bleeding episode experienced by individuals with haemophilia A and B. This leads to changes within the joints, including synovial proliferation, which results in further bleeding and chronic synovitis. Blood in the joint can also directly damage the cartilage, and with repeated bleeding, there is progressive destruction of both cartilage and bone. The end result is known as haemophilic arthropathy. The joints most commonly affected are the knees, elbows and ankles, although any synovial joint may be involved. In the ankle, both the tibiotalar and subtalar joints may be affected and joint bleeding and arthropathy can lead to a number of deformities. Haemophilic arthropathy can be prevented through regular factor replacement prophylaxis and implementing physiotherapy. However, when necessary, there are multiple surgical and non-surgical options available. In early ankle arthropathy with absent or minimal joint changes, both radioisotopic and chemical synoviorthesis can be used to reduce the hypertrophied synovium. These procedures can decrease the frequency of bleeding episodes, minimizing the risk of articular cartilage damage. Achilles tendon lengthening can be performed, in isolation or in combination with other surgical measures, to correct Achilles tendon contractures. Both arthroscopic and open synovectomies are available as a means to remove the friable villous layer of the synovium and are often indicated when bleeding episodes cannot be properly controlled by factor replacement therapy or synoviorthesis. In the later stages of ankle arthropathy, other surgical options may be considered. Debridement may be indicated when there are loose pieces of cartilage or anterior osteophytes, and can help to improve the joint function, even in the presence of articular cartilage damage. Supramalleolar tibial osteotomy may be indicated in patients with a valgus deformity of the hindfoot without degenerative

  10. Single-leg drop landing movement strategies in participants with chronic ankle instability compared with lateral ankle sprain 'copers'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To compare the movement patterns and underlying energetics of individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) to ankle sprain 'copers' during a landing task. Twenty-eight (age 23.2 ± 4.9 years; body mass 75.5 ± 13.9 kg; height 1.7 ± 0.1 m) participants with CAI and 42 (age 22.7 ± 1.7 years; body mass 73.4 ± 11.3 kg; height 1.7 ± 0.1 m) ankle sprain 'copers' were evaluated 1 year after incurring a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury. Kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle joints from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC, in addition to the vertical component of the landing ground reaction force, were acquired during performance of a drop land task. The CAI group adopted a position of increased hip flexion during the landing descent on their involved limb. This coincided with a reduced post-IC flexor pattern at the hip and increased overall hip joint stiffness compared to copers (-0.01 ± 0.05 vs. 0.02 ± 0.05°/Nm kg(-1), p = 0.03). Individuals with CAI display alterations in hip joint kinematics and energetics during a unipodal landing task compared to LAS 'copers'. These alterations may be responsible for the increased risk of injury experienced by individuals with CAI during landing manoeuvres. Thus, clinicians must recognise the potential for joints proximal to the affected ankle to contribute to impaired function following an acute lateral ankle sprain injury and to develop rehabilitation protocols accordingly. Level III.

  11. Application of the Superelastic NiTi Spring in Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO to Create Normal Ankle Joint Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhesam Amerinatanzi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hinge-based Ankle Foot Orthosis (HAFO is one of the most common non-surgical solutions for the foot drop. In conventional HAFOs, the ankle joint is almost locked, and plantar flexion is restricted due to the high stiffness of the hinge mechanism. This often leads to a rigid walking gate cycle, poor muscle activity, and muscle atrophy. Since the ankle torque-angle loop has a non-linear profile, the use of a superelastic NiTi spring within the hinge, due to its nonlinear behavior, could recreate a close-to-normal stiffness of the normal ankle joint, which, in turn, could create a more natural walk. The focus of this study is to evaluate the performance of a superelastic NiTi spring versus a conventional Stainless Steel spring in a hinge mechanism of a custom-fit HAFO. To this aim, a custom-fit HAFO was fabricated via the fast casting technique. Then, motion analysis was performed for two healthy subjects (Case I and Case II: (i subjects with bare foot; (ii subjects wearing a conventional HAFO with no spring; (iii subjects wearing a conventional Stainless Steel-based HAFO; and (iv subjects wearing a NiTi spring-based HAFO. The data related to the ankle angle and the amount of moment applied to the ankle during walking were recorded using Cortex software and used for the evaluations. Finally, Finite Element Analysis (FEA was performed to evaluate the safety of the designed HAFO. The NiTi spring offers a higher range of motion (7.9 versus 4.14 degree and an increased level of moment (0.55 versus 0.36 N·m/kg. Furthermore, a NiTi spring offers an ankle torque-angle loop closer to that of the healthy subjects.

  12. Application of the Superelastic NiTi Spring in Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO) to Create Normal Ankle Joint Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerinatanzi, Amirhesam; Zamanian, Hashem; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Jahadakbar, Ahmadreza; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2017-12-07

    Hinge-based Ankle Foot Orthosis (HAFO) is one of the most common non-surgical solutions for the foot drop. In conventional HAFOs, the ankle joint is almost locked, and plantar flexion is restricted due to the high stiffness of the hinge mechanism. This often leads to a rigid walking gate cycle, poor muscle activity, and muscle atrophy. Since the ankle torque-angle loop has a non-linear profile, the use of a superelastic NiTi spring within the hinge, due to its nonlinear behavior, could recreate a close-to-normal stiffness of the normal ankle joint, which, in turn, could create a more natural walk. The focus of this study is to evaluate the performance of a superelastic NiTi spring versus a conventional Stainless Steel spring in a hinge mechanism of a custom-fit HAFO. To this aim, a custom-fit HAFO was fabricated via the fast casting technique. Then, motion analysis was performed for two healthy subjects (Case I and Case II): (i) subjects with bare foot; (ii) subjects wearing a conventional HAFO with no spring; (iii) subjects wearing a conventional Stainless Steel-based HAFO; and (iv) subjects wearing a NiTi spring-based HAFO. The data related to the ankle angle and the amount of moment applied to the ankle during walking were recorded using Cortex software and used for the evaluations. Finally, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to evaluate the safety of the designed HAFO. The NiTi spring offers a higher range of motion (7.9 versus 4.14 degree) and an increased level of moment (0.55 versus 0.36 N·m/kg). Furthermore, a NiTi spring offers an ankle torque-angle loop closer to that of the healthy subjects.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of ankle ligaments and tendon injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Daebler, C.; Helbich, T.; Haller, J.; Imhof, H.

    1995-01-01

    Today MRI allows evaluation of the integrity of injured ankle ligaments. The major difficulty in MRI is inconsistency in visualization by inadequate appreciation of the three-dimensional orientation of each ankle ligament. Using this technique, 52 patients with sprained ankles underwent MRI. The integrity of rupture of the collateral lateral ligaments was obtained in all 52 ankles. Full-lenght visualization is essential for evaluation of the ankle ligaments with MRI. In these 52 patients the angle of tilt on the stress X-ray was compared with the rate of MRI findings showing an injury affecting two ligaments. We found that none of the patients in whom the angle of lateral tilt was less than 5 had rupture of two laterial ligaments, while 32% of patients with angles of tilt of 6-14 and 42% of those with angles of tilt over 15 on stress X-ray had two ruptured lateral ligaments. The advantages of MRI are that it offers the best visualization of the extent of the tendon lesion. MRI, however, seems to be superior to US in detecting and quantifying lesions of the Achilles tendon. Therefore, MRI may be indicated in particularly difficult cases of tendons injuries in the foot. (orig.) [de

  14. Myoelectric stimulation on peroneal muscles resists simulated ankle sprain motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chu, Vikki Wing-Shan; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2012-07-26

    The inadequate reaction time of the peroneal muscles in response to an incorrect foot contact event has been proposed as one of the etiological factors contributing to ankle joint inversion injury. Thus, the current study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a myoelectric stimulation applied to the peroneal muscles in the prevention of a simulated ankle inversion trauma. Ten healthy male subjects performed simulated inversion and supination tests on a pair of mechanical sprain simulators. An electrical signal was delivered to the peroneal muscles of the subjects through a pair of electrode pads. The start of the stimulus was synchronized with the drop of the sprain simulator's platform. In order to determine the maximum delay time which the stimulus could still resist the simulated ankle sprain motion, different delay time were test (0, 5, 10, and 15ms). Together with the control trial (no stimulus), there were 5 testing conditions for both simulated inversion and supination test. The effect was quantified by the drop in maximum ankle tilting angle and angular velocity, as determined by a motion analysis system with a standard laboratory procedure. Results showed that the myoelectric stimulation was effective in all conditions except the one with myoelectric stimulus delayed for 15ms in simulated supination test. It is concluded that myoelectric stimulation on peroneal muscles could resist an ankle spraining motion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of Ankle and Metatarsophalangeal Stiffness During Walking and Jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Fabian; Richards, Jim; Hennies, Malika; Dötzel, Eugen; Chohan, Ambreen; Mbuli, Alex; Capanni, Felix

    2018-05-29

    Forefoot stiffness has been shown to influence joint biomechanics. However, little or no data exists on metatarsophalangeal stiffness. Twenty-four healthy rearfoot strike runners were recruited from a staff and student population at the University of Central Lancashire. Five repetitions of shod, self-selected speed level walking and jogging were performed. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected using retro-reflective markers placed on the lower limb and foot, to create a three-segment foot model using the Calibrated Anatomical System Technique. Ankle and metatarsophalangeal moments and angles were calculated. Stiffness values were calculated using a linear best fit line of moment versus of angle plots. Paired t-tests were used to compare values between walking and jogging conditions. Significant differences were seen in ankle range of motion (ROM), but not in metatarsophalangeal ROM. Maximum moments were significantly greater in the ankle during jogging, but these were not significantly different at the metatarsophalangeal joint. Average ankle joint stiffness exhibited significantly lower stiffness when walking compared to jogging. However, the metatarsophalangeal joint exhibited significantly greater stiffness when walking compared to jogging. A greater understanding of forefoot stiffness may inform the development of footwear, prosthetic feet and orthotic devices, such as ankle-foot orthoses for walking and sporting activities.

  17. Early Intra-Articular Complement Activation in Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine regulation possibly influences long term outcome following ankle fractures, but little is known about synovial fracture biochemistry. Eight patients with an ankle dislocation fracture were included in a prospective case series and matched with patients suffering from grade 2 osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture and collection of effusion were only significantly associated with synovial aggrecan and C5b-9 levels (P<0.001. Furthermore, synovial expressions of both proteins correlated with each other (P<0.001. Although IL-1β expression was relatively low, intra-articular levels correlated with C5a (P<0.01 and serological C-reactive protein concentrations 2 days after surgery (P<0.05. Joint effusions were initially dominated by neutrophils, but the portion of monocytes constantly increased reaching 50% at day 6 after fracture (P<0.02. Whereas aggrecan and IL-1β concentrations were not different in fracture and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P<0.01. Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures.

  18. Is Hardware Removal Recommended after Ankle Fracture Repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Geun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The indications and clinical necessity for routine hardware removal after treating ankle or distal tibia fracture with open reduction and internal fixation are disputed even when hardware-related pain is insignificant. Thus, we determined the clinical effects of routine hardware removal irrespective of the degree of hardware-related pain, especially in the perspective of patients’ daily activities. This study was conducted on 80 consecutive cases (78 patients treated by surgery and hardware removal after bony union. There were 56 ankle and 24 distal tibia fractures. The hardware-related pain, ankle joint stiffness, discomfort on ambulation, and patient satisfaction were evaluated before and at least 6 months after hardware removal. Pain score before hardware removal was 3.4 (range 0 to 6 and decreased to 1.3 (range 0 to 6 after removal. 58 (72.5% patients experienced improved ankle stiffness and 65 (81.3% less discomfort while walking on uneven ground and 63 (80.8% patients were satisfied with hardware removal. These results suggest that routine hardware removal after ankle or distal tibia fracture could ameliorate hardware-related pain and improves daily activities and patient satisfaction even when the hardware-related pain is minimal.

  19. Differences in lateral ankle laxity measured via stress ultrasonography in individuals with chronic ankle instability, ankle sprain copers, and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Theodore; Saliba, Susan A; Saliba, Ethan; Anderson, Mark W; Hertel, Jay

    2012-07-01

    Cross-sectional. To use stress ultrasonography to measure the change in anterior talofibular ligament length during the simulated anterior drawer and ankle inversion stress tests. In approximately 30% of individuals, ankle sprains may eventually develop into chronic ankle instability (CAI) with recurrent symptoms. Individuals with CAI and those who have a history of ankle sprain (greater than 1 year prior) without chronic instability (copers) may or may not have mechanical laxity. Sixty subjects (n=60 ankles) were divided into 3 groups: 1) Control subjects without ankle injury history (n=20; mean ± SD age; 24.8 ± 4.8 years; height, 173.7 ± 9.4 cm; weight, 77.2 ± 19.5 kg), ankle sprain copers (n=20; 22.3 ± 2.9 years; 172.8 ± 11.3 cm; 72.4 ± 14.3 kg), and subjects with CAI (n=20; 23.5 ± 4.2 years; 174.6 ± 9.6 cm; 74.8 ± 17.3 kg). Ligament length change with the anterior drawer and end range ankle inversion was calculated from ultrasound images. The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) was used to quantify self-reported function on activities-of-daily living (ADL) and sports. The anterior drawer test resulted in length changes that were greater (F₂,₅₇=6.2, P=.004) in the CAI (mean ± SD length change, 15.6 ± 15.1%, P=.006) and the coper groups (14.0 ± 15.9%, P=.016) compared to the control group (1.3 ± 10.7%); however the length change for the CAI and coper groups were not different (P=.93). Ankle inversion similarly resulted in greater ligament length change (F₂,₅₇=6.5, P=.003) in the CAI (25.3 ± 15.5%, P=.003) and coper groups (20.2 ± 19.6%, P=.039) compared to the control group (7.4 ± 12.9%); with no difference in length change between the copers and CAI groups (P=.59). The CAI group had a lower score on the FAAM-ADL (87.4 ± 13.4%) and FAAM-Sports (74.2 ± 17.8%) when compared to the control (98.8 ± 2.9% and 98.9 ± 3.1%, P<.0001) and coper groups (99.4 ± 1.8% and 94.6 ± 8.8%, P<.0001). Stress ultrasonography identified greater

  20. Compilation of data used for the analysis of the geological and hydrogeological DFN models. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanson, Jan; Fox, Aaron; Oehman, Johan; Rhen, Ingvar

    2008-08-01

    This report provides an overview and compilation of the various data that constitutes the basis for construction of the geological and hydrogeological discrete feature network (DFN) models as part of model version SDM-Site Laxemar. This includes a review of fracture data in boreholes and in outcrop. Furthermore, the basis for the construction of lineament maps is given as well as a review of the hydraulic test data from cored and percussion-drilled boreholes. An emphasis is put on graphical representation of borehole logs in the form of composites of geological, hydrogeological and even hydrogeochemical data in the case of cored boreholes. One major contribution is a compilation of characteristics of minor local deformation zones (MDZs) identified in cored boreholes. Basic orientation data and fracture intensity data are presented as a function of depth for individual boreholes. The coupling between hydrogeological data and geological data is further refined in plots of Posiva flow log (PFL) data vs. geological single hole interpretation data

  1. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  2. 78 FR 68908 - Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ...: 2900--NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration...-- NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER...

  3. Original Paper Treatment and Outcome of Ankle Fractures at the Moi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KIGZ

    Key Words: Ankle fractures, Treatment outcome, Developing country ... protocols, surgeons still face unfavorable treatment outcomes. The injury .... and require special tests like Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ankle arthroscopy and nerve.

  4. What Causes Ankle Swelling During Pregnancy - And What Can I do About it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ankles or calves. Some research suggests that foot massage and reflexology, which involves applying pressure to certain areas of the feet, hands and ears, might help decrease foot and ankle swelling during pregnancy. Also, swelling doesn' ...

  5. A systematic review on the treatment of acute ankle sprain: brace versus other functional treatment types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, Ingrid; Backx, Frank; van Dijk, C Niek

    2011-03-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of taping the ankle. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of ankle braces as a treatment for acute ankle sprains compared with other types of functional treatments such as ankle tape and elastic bandages. A computerized literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Clinical Trial Register. This review includes randomized controlled trials in English, German and Dutch, published between 1990 and April 2009 that compared ankle braces as a treatment for lateral ankle sprains with other functional treatments. The inclusion criteria for this systematic review were (i) individuals (sports participants as well as non-sports participants) with an acute injury of the ankle (acute ankle sprains); (ii) use of an ankle brace as primary treatment for acute ankle sprains; (iii) control interventions including any other type of functional treatment (e.g. Tubigrip™, elastic wrap or ankle tape); and (iv) one of the following reported outcome measures: re-injuries, symptoms (pain, swelling, instability), functional outcomes and/or time to resumption of sports, daily activities and/or work. Eight studies met all inclusion criteria. Differences in outcome measures, intervention types and patient characteristics precluded pooling of the results, so best evidence syntheses were conducted. A few individual studies reported positive outcomes after treatment with an ankle brace compared with other functional methods, but our best evidence syntheses only demonstrated a better treatment result in terms of functional outcome. Other studies have suggested that ankle brace treatment is a more cost-effective method, so the use of braces after acute

  6. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  7. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General Article Volume 21 Issue 9 September 2016 pp 803- ... Keywords. Evolutionary game theory, evolutionary stable state, conflict, cooperation, biological games.

  8. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  9. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  10. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  11. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia; Fisher, Beth E

    2010-10-19

    Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM) is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains. Dosage of passive hands-on procedures involves a continuum of treatment speeds. Recent evidence suggests both slow- and fast-speed treatments may be effective to address disablement following ankle sprains. However, these interventions have yet to be longitudinally compared against a placebo study condition. We developed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to test the hypotheses that hands-on treatment procedures administered to individuals following ankle sprains during the post-acute injury period can improve short-, intermediate-, and long-term disablement, as well as reduce the risk for re-injury. This study is designed to measure the clinical effects of hands-on passive stretching treatment procedures directed to the talocrural joint that vary in treatment speed during the post-acute injury period, compared to hands-on placebo control intervention. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00888498.

  12. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Beth E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains. Dosage of passive hands-on procedures involves a continuum of treatment speeds. Recent evidence suggests both slow- and fast-speed treatments may be effective to address disablement following ankle sprains. However, these interventions have yet to be longitudinally compared against a placebo study condition. Methods/Design We developed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to test the hypotheses that hands-on treatment procedures administered to individuals following ankle sprains during the post-acute injury period can improve short-, intermediate-, and long-term disablement, as well as reduce the risk for re-injury. Discussion This study is designed to measure the clinical effects of hands-on passive stretching treatment procedures directed to the talocrural joint that vary in treatment speed during the post-acute injury period, compared to hands-on placebo control intervention. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00888498.

  13. Management of lawn mower injuries to the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, J; Zamboni, W A; Zook, E G

    1993-09-01

    Seventy consecutive patients treated for lawn mower injuries to the foot and ankle were reviewed to determine optimal treatment, functional results, and complications. Injuries were classified into 1 or more functional-anatomical zones (I, digits; II, dorsum; III, plantar nonweight-bearing surface; IV, heel; and V, ankle) for a total of 96 injuries. Thirty-one patients were available for follow-up. Mean age was 36.7 years and 84% were males. Most injuries (67%) involved patients > 16 years old using a push mower; however, 18% involved children Lawn mower injuries to the foot and ankle can be closed primarily after adequate irrigation and debridement without compromise of infection rate or function. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended. One-sixth of these injuries involve children < 5 years of age and can be prevented.

  14. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laehde, S.; Putkonen, M.; Puranen, J.; Raatikainen, T.

    1988-11-01

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis.

  15. Injured lateral ankle ligaments: technique and assessment of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Gaebler, C.; Kaider, A.; Haller, J.; Heinz-Peer, G.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    56 patients with the clinical diagnosis of sprained ankles were investigated. Evaluation of the anterior (AFTL) and posterior fibulotalar ligament (PFTL) was performed with the foot in dorsiflexion (20 ) and of the fibulo calcanear ligament (FCL) in plantarflexion (45 ). Axial T 1 w-SE and T 2 w-TSE images were obtained. Full-length visualisation of ligmaments in one slice and the extent of injury were evaluated. 12 ankle injuries were confirmed by operation. With MRI full-length visualisation of lateral ankle ligaments was possible in 86%. A partial/complete rupture of the AFTL was noticed in 33/64% and of the FCI in 29/39%, and of the PFTL in 27/5%. Sensitivity/specificity of MRI when compared to surgery was 100/100% for injuries of the AFTL, 64/100% for the FCL, and 33/78% for the PFTL. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laehde, S.; Putkonen, M.; Puranen, J.; Raatikainen, T.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis. (orig.)

  17. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability.

  18. Exercise and ankle sprain injuries: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Colado, Juan Carlos; Flandez, Jorge; Page, Phil; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-02-01

    Ankle sprains are common in team sports and sports played on courts, and often result in structural and functional alterations that lead to a greater reinjury risk. Specific exercises are often used to promote neuromuscular improvements in the prevention and rehabilitation of ankle injuries. This literature review summarizes the neuromuscular characteristics of common ankle sprains and the effectiveness of exercise as an intervention for improving neuromuscular function and preventing reinjury. Our review found that appropriate exercise prescription can increase static and dynamic balance and decrease injury recurrence. In particular, the addition of dynamic activities in the exercise program can be beneficial because of the anticipatory postural adjustments identified as a key factor in the injury mechanism.

  19. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability. (orig.)

  20. Ankle and pantalar arthrodeses using vascularized fibular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Kobata, Yasunori; Tomita, Yasuharu; Kawate, Kenji; Sugimoto, Kazuya; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2004-01-01

    From 1989 to 1998 ankle and pantalar arthrodeses using vascularized fibular grafts were performed for seven patients. The indications for surgery were chronic nonunion following fracture of the distal tibia in four patients, rheumatoid arthritis in two, and talus necrosis in one. The ankle joint was fused in the two patients with a pilon fracture, and in the other five patients, both the ankle and subtalar joints were fused. In one patient, additional bone grafting was required for delayed union. In the other six patients, the mean period required to obtain radiographic bone union was 6 months (range, 4-9 months). The time until the patients could walk without braces ranged from 6 to 20 months (mean, 12.3 months). Local infection was not encountered in any patients. This procedure represents a viable option for patients in whom a standard, less complicated arthrodesis cannot be performed.

  1. Dedicated extremity MR imaging of the foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hottya, G.A.; Peterfy, C.G.; Uffmann, M.; Haeckl, F.O.; LeHir, P.; Redei, J.; Gindele, A.U.; Dion, E.; Genant, H.K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide illustrative examples of diseases of the foot and ankle when imaged with a low-field MR imaging system. A retrospective review of 268 foot and ankle examinations, performed in our institution within the past 3 years with a 0.2-T (Artoscan Esaote, Genoa, Italy) dedicated extremity MR system was done. Additionally, illustrative comparison with conventional radiography and high-field MR imaging is presented in patients in whom these examinations were also performed. Although motion artifact limited the value of a few studies, in the majority of examinations low-field MR imaging provided diagnostic image quality for the full spectrum of disorders affecting the foot and ankle and seemed to be a feasible alternative to high-field MR imaging in establishing an accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Validity of an ankle joint motion and position sense measurement system and its application in healthy subjects and patients with ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chueh-Ho; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Lu, Liang-Hsuan; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Sung, Wen-Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Ankle motion and proprioception in multiple axis movements are crucial for daily activities. However, few studies have developed and used a multiple axis system for measuring ankle motion and proprioception. This study was designed to validate a novel ankle haptic interface system that measures the ankle range of motion (ROM) and joint position sense in multiple plane movements, investigating the proprioception deficits during joint position sense tasks for patients with ankle instability. Eleven healthy adults (mean ± standard deviation; age, 24.7 ± 1.9 years) and thirteen patients with ankle instability were recruited in this study. All subjects were asked to perform tests to evaluate the validity of the ankle ROM measurements and underwent tests for validating the joint position sense measurements conducted during multiple axis movements of the ankle joint. Pearson correlation was used for validating the angular position measurements obtained using the developed system; the independent t test was used to investigate the differences in joint position sense task performance for people with or without ankle instability. The ROM measurements of the device were linearly correlated with the criterion standards (r = 0.99). The ankle instability and healthy groups were significantly different in direction, absolute, and variable errors of plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion (p ankle joint motion and position sense measurement system is valid and can be used for measuring the ankle ROM and joint position sense in multiple planes and indicate proprioception deficits for people with ankle instability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of ankle foot orthosis stiffness on the energy cost of walking : A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregman, D.J.J.; Van der Krogt, M.M.; De Groot, V.; Harlaar, J.; Wisse, M.; Collins, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background In stroke and multiple sclerosis patients, gait is frequently hampered by a reduced ability to push-off with the ankle caused by weakness of the plantar-flexor muscles. To enhance ankle push-off and to decrease the high energy cost of walking, spring-like carbon-composite Ankle Foot

  4. The effect of ankle foot orthosis stiffness on the energy cost of walking: A simulation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregman, D.J.J.; van der Krogt, M.M.; de Groot, V.; Harlaar, J.; Wisse, M.; Collins, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In stroke and multiple sclerosis patients, gait is frequently hampered by a reduced ability to push-off with the ankle caused by weakness of the plantar-flexor muscles. To enhance ankle push-off and to decrease the high energy cost of walking, spring-like carbon-composite Ankle Foot

  5. Postural stability and ankle sprain history in athletes compared to uninjured controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, A.; Fransz, D.P.; Kingma, I.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diminished postural stability is a risk factor for ankle sprain occurrence and ankle sprains result in impaired postural stability. To date, ankle sprain history has not been taken into account as a determinant of postural stability, while it could possibly specify subgroups of interest.

  6. Unrecognised Acute Rupture of the Achilles Tendon in Severe Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inversion ankle sprain is a common sport injury. It commonly refers to the injury of lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. Failure to detect the concomitant injuries would lead to inappropriate treatment and suboptimal result. A case of unrecognised rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with severe inversion ankle sprain is reported.

  7. Ankle injuries in the Netherlands : Trends over 10-25 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, I.; Valkenberg, H.; Hoes, A. W.; Backx, F. J G

    2015-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a common health problem; data on ankle injury rates and time trends in the population at large are scarce. Our aim was to investigate the incidence of and time trends in population-based and emergency department-treated ankle injuries related to sports activities and other

  8. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3120 Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non...

  9. Results of Operative Fixation of Fractures of the Ankle at a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Operative fixation of ankle fractures is becoming popular in developing countries. The concern however is the outcome of care. The objective was to evaluate the results of open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of fractures of the ankle in our hospital. Methods: All cases ORIF of fractures of the ankle at the ...

  10. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  11. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  12. Acute paediatric ankle trauma: MRI versus plain radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, M. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Radiological Dept., Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Kallio, P.; Puntila, J. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Vehmas, T. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland)

    2001-09-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis of acute physeal ankle fractures on plain radiographs using MRI as the gold standard. Methods: Sixty consecutive children, 29 with a clinical diagnosis of lateral ligament injury and 31 with physeal ankle fractures, were examined using both radiographs and MRI in the acute period. The imaging data were reviewed by three ''masked'' radiologists. The fracture diagnosis and Slater-Harris classification of radiographs were compared with findings on MRI. Results: Plain radiography produced five of 28 (18%) false negative and 12 of 92 (13%) false positive fracture diagnoses compared with MRI. Six of the 12 false positive fractures were due to a misclassification of lateral ligament disruption as SH1 fractures. Altogether a difference was found in 21% of cases in either the diagnosis or the classification of the fractures according to Salter- Harris. All bone bruises in the distal tibia and fibula and 64% of bone bruises in the talus were seen in association with lateral ligament injuries. Talar bone bruises in association with fractures occurred on the same side as the malleolar fracture; talar bone bruises in association with lateral ligament disruption were seen in different locations. The errors identified on radiographs by MRI did not affect the management of the injury. Conclusions: The incidence of false negative ankle fractures in plain radiographs was small and no complex ankle fractures were missed on radiographs. The total extent of complex fractures was, however, not always obvious on radiographs. In an unselected series of relatively mild ankle injuries, we were unable to show a single case where the treatment or prognosis based on plain radiography should have been significantly altered after having done a routine MRI examination. Plain radiography is still the diagnostic cornerstone of paediatric ankle injuries. (orig.)

  13. Early Weightbearing After Operatively Treated Ankle Fractures: A Biomechanical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eric W; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Paez, Adrian G; Parks, Brent G; Schon, Lew C; Hasenboehler, Erik A

    2016-06-01

    No consensus exists regarding the timing of weightbearing after surgical fixation of unstable traumatic ankle fractures. We evaluated fracture displacement and timing of displacement with simulated early weightbearing in a cadaveric model. Twenty-four fresh-frozen lower extremities were assigned to Group 1, bimalleolar ankle fracture (n=6); Group 2, trimalleolar ankle fracture with unfixed small posterior malleolar fracture (n=9); or Group 3, trimalleolar ankle fracture with fixed large posterior malleolar fracture (n=9) and tested with axial compressive load at 3 Hz from 0 to 1000 N for 250 000 cycles to simulate 5 weeks of full weightbearing. Displacement was measured by differential variable reluctance transducer. The average motion at all fracture sites in all groups was significantly less than 1 mm (P fracture was 0.1±0.1 mm and 0.4±0.4 mm, respectively. Group 2 displacement of the lateral, medial, and posterior malleolar fracture was 0.6±0.4 mm, 0.5±0.4 mm, and 0.5±0.6 mm, respectively. Group 3 displacement of the lateral, medial, and posterior malleolar fracture was 0.1±0.1 mm, 0.5±0.7 mm, and 0.5±0.4 mm, respectively. The majority of displacement (64.0% to 92.3%) occurred in the first 50 000 cycles. There was no correlation between fracture displacement and bone mineral density. No significant fracture displacement, no hardware failure, and no new fractures occurred in a cadaveric model of early weightbearing in unstable ankle fracture after open reduction and internal fixation. This study supports further investigation of early weightbearing postoperative protocols after fixation of unstable ankle fractures. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Acute paediatric ankle trauma: MRI versus plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohman, M.; Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L.; Vehmas, T.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis of acute physeal ankle fractures on plain radiographs using MRI as the gold standard. Methods: Sixty consecutive children, 29 with a clinical diagnosis of lateral ligament injury and 31 with physeal ankle fractures, were examined using both radiographs and MRI in the acute period. The imaging data were reviewed by three ''masked'' radiologists. The fracture diagnosis and Slater-Harris classification of radiographs were compared with findings on MRI. Results: Plain radiography produced five of 28 (18%) false negative and 12 of 92 (13%) false positive fracture diagnoses compared with MRI. Six of the 12 false positive fractures were due to a misclassification of lateral ligament disruption as SH1 fractures. Altogether a difference was found in 21% of cases in either the diagnosis or the classification of the fractures according to Salter- Harris. All bone bruises in the distal tibia and fibula and 64% of bone bruises in the talus were seen in association with lateral ligament injuries. Talar bone bruises in association with fractures occurred on the same side as the malleolar fracture; talar bone bruises in association with lateral ligament disruption were seen in different locations. The errors identified on radiographs by MRI did not affect the management of the injury. Conclusions: The incidence of false negative ankle fractures in plain radiographs was small and no complex ankle fractures were missed on radiographs. The total extent of complex fractures was, however, not always obvious on radiographs. In an unselected series of relatively mild ankle injuries, we were unable to show a single case where the treatment or prognosis based on plain radiography should have been significantly altered after having done a routine MRI examination. Plain radiography is still the diagnostic cornerstone of paediatric ankle injuries. (orig.)

  15. Functional bandage for ankle sprains. Recommendations for nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Isabel Arcos Cirauqui

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Three quarters of ankle injuries are diagnosed as sprains. For the most part sprains are caused by a forced inversion movement with involvement of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL. One of the recommended guidelines is immobilization by taping. The aim of this article is to unify the recommendations for nursing, on taping in the treatment of ankle sprains. The methodology used was a literature review, analyzing the information found in books and journals in hospital libraries and nursing databases on the Internet. The main results are a set of guidelines for the most accurate and therapeutic taping.

  16. Motion Simulation of a New Ankle Rehabilitation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Racu (Cazacu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ankle structure holds one of the most important role in the human biomechanics. Due to complexity of everyday activities this joint is the most prone to be injured part of the lower limb. For a complete recovery of the locomotion function, recovery exercises are mandatory. The introduction of robotic physical recovery systems represents a modern alternative to traditional recovery. Based on the 3D virtual model and a previous dimensional synthesis of a new ankle rehabilitation device, its motion simulation is presented in this paper, to prove that it may fully recover the range of motion required for this joint.

  17. Modified tension band wiring of medial malleolar ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, G M; White, D B

    1995-02-01

    Twenty-two displaced medial malleolar ankle fractures that were treated surgically using the modified tension band method of Cleak and Dawson were retrospectively reviewed at an average follow-up of 25 months. The technique involves the use of a screw to anchor a figure-of-eight wire. There were no malreductions and all fractures healed. Problems with the technique included technical errors with hardware placement, medial ankle pain, and asymptomatic wire migration. Despite this, modified tension band wiring remains an acceptable method for fixation of selected displaced medial malleolar fractures. It is especially suited for small fracture fragments and osteoporotic bone.

  18. Posttraumatic severe infection of the ankle joint - long term results of the treatment with resection arthrodesis in 133 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienast B

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although there is a clear trend toward internal fixation for ankle arthrodesis, there is general consensus that external fixation is required for cases of posttraumatic infection. We retrospectively evaluated the technique and clinical long term results of external fixation in a triangular frame for cases of posttraumatic infection of the ankle. From 1993 to 2006 a consecutive series of 155 patients with an infection of the ankle was included in our study. 133 cases of the advanced "Gächter" stage III and IV were treated with arthrodesis. We treated the patients with a two step treatment plan. After radical debridement and sequestrectomy the malleoli and the joint surfaces were resected. An AO fixator was applied with two Steinmann-nails inserted in the tibia and in the calcaneus and the gap was temporary filled with gentamicin beads as the first step. In the second step we performed an autologous bone graft after a period of four weeks. The case notes were evaluated regarding trauma history, medical complaints, further injuries and illnesses, walking and pain status and occupational issues. Mean age at the index procedure was 49.7 years (18-82, 104 patients were male (67,1%. Follow up examination after mean 4.5 years included a standardised questionnaire and a clinical examination including the criteria of the AO-FAS-Score and radiographs. 92,7% of the cases lead to a stable arthrodesis. In 5 patients the arthrodesis was found partly-stable. In six patients (4,5% the infection was not controllable during the treatment process. These patients had to be treated with a below knee amputation. The mean AOFAS score at follow up was 63,7 (53-92. Overall there is a high degree of remaining disability. The complication rate and the reduced patient comfort reserve this method mainly for infection. Joint salvage is possible in the majority of cases with an earlier stage I and II infection.

  19. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process......This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...

  20. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  1. Effects of total knee arthroplasty on ankle alignment in patients with varus gonarthrosis: Do we sacrifice ankle to the knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursu, Sarper; Sofu, Hakan; Verdonk, Peter; Sahin, Vedat

    2016-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is one of the most commonly preferred surgical methods in the treatment of patients with varus gonarthrosis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the radiological changes observed in the ankles after total knee arthroplasty. Between May 2012 and June 2013, 80 knees of 78 patients with varus deformity over 10° underwent total knee arthroplasty. For each patient, full-leg standing radiographs were obtained pre- and post-operatively. Mechanical and anatomical axes (HKA and AA), lateral distal femoral angle, medial proximal tibial angle, lateral distal tibial angle (LDTA), ankle joint line orientation angle (AJOA), tibial plafond talus angle (PTA) and talar shift were measured for each patient both pre- and post-operatively. Pre-operatively, the mean HKA was 16.6° and the mean AA was 10.41°, both in favour of varus alignment. Post-operatively, the mean HKA decreased to 3.6° and the mean AA to -2.1. The mean LDTA was 87.3°. Before the operation, the mean AJOA was -7.6°, opening to the medial aspect of the ankle, and it was 0.04° after the operation and opening to the lateral aspect (p < 0.05). Our study reveals the changes occurring in the ankle after acute correction of long-standing varus deformity of the knee using total knee arthroplasty. In cases undergoing knee arthroplasty, effect of the acute change in the alignment of the knee on the ankle should be taken into consideration and the amount of correction should be calculated carefully in order not to damage the alignment of the ankle. IV.

  2. Effects of focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static balance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Application of cryotherapy over an injured joint has been shown to improve muscle function, yet it is unknown how ankle cryotherapy affects postural control. Our purpose was to determine the effects of a 20-min focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static stance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen young subjects with CAI (9 males, 6 females) and 15 healthy gender-matched controls participated. All subjects underwent two intervention sessions on different days in which they had a 1.5L plastic bag filled with either crushed ice (active treatment) or candy corn (sham) applied to the ankle. Unipedal stance with eyes closed for 10s were assessed with a forceplate before and after each intervention. Center of pressure (COP) data were used to compute 10 specific dependent measures including velocity, area, standard deviation (SD), and percent range of COP excursions, and mean and SD of time-to-boundary (TTB) minima in the anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral directions. For each measure a three-way (Group-Intervention-Time) repeated ANOVAs found no significant interactions and main effects involving intervention (all Ps > 0.05). There were group main effects found for mean velocity (F(1,28) = 6.46, P = .017), area (F(1,28) = 12.83, P = .001), and mean of TTB minima in the AP direction (F(1,28) = 5.19, P = .031) indicating that the CAI group demonstrated greater postural instability compared to the healthy group. Postural control of unipedal stance was not significantly altered following focal ankle joint cooling in groups both with and without CAI. Ankle joint cryotherapy was neither beneficial nor harmful to single leg balance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intrinsic risk factors of noncontact ankle sprains in soccer: a prospective study on 100 professional players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fousekis, Konstantinos; Tsepis, Elias; Vagenas, George

    2012-08-01

    Ankle sprain is an extremely common injury in soccer players. Despite extensive research, the intrinsic cause of this injury under noncontact conditions remains unclear. To identify intrinsic risk factors for noncontact ankle sprains in professional soccer players. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2 One hundred professional soccer players were assessed in the preseason for potential risk factors of noncontact ankle sprains. The assessment included (A) ankle joint asymmetries (right-left) in isokinetic muscle strength, flexibility, proprioception, and stability; (B) somatometric asymmetries; (C) previous injuries; and (D) lateral dominance traits. Noncontact ankle sprains were prospectively recorded and diagnosed for a full competition period (10 months). Seventeen of the players sustained at least 1 noncontact ankle sprain. Logistic regression revealed that players with (A) eccentric isokinetic ankle flexion strength asymmetries (odds ratio [OR] = 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.95-40.36, P = .005), (B) increased body mass index (OR = 8.16; 95% CI, 1.42-46.63, P = .018), and (C) increased body weight (OR = 5.72; 95% CI, 1.37-23.95, P = .017 ) each had a significantly higher risk of a noncontact ankle sprain. A trend for younger players (OR = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.061-1.24, P = .092) and for players with ankle laxity asymmetries (OR = 3.38; 95% CI, 0.82-14.00, P = .093) to be at greater risk for ankle sprain was also apparent to the limit of statistical significance (.05 ankle flexors and increased body mass index and body weight raise the propensity for ankle sprains in professional soccer players. Age and asymmetries in ankle laxity are potential factors worth revisiting, as there was an indication for younger players and players with ankle instability to be at higher risk for ankle injury. Proper preseason evaluation may improve prevention strategies for this type of injury in soccer.

  4. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  5. Kinematics of a Novel Ankle Rehabilitation Device with Two Degrees of Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Doroftei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The human ankle joint is the most common injured in sports and daily life in general. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy. However, the experiences suggest that without sufficient rehabilitation many people will have future problems. Furthermore, during a rehabilitation treatment, cooperative and intensive efforts of therapists and patients are required over prolonged sessions. Thus, robotic devices have been developed for human ankle rehabilitation. This paper discusses kinematic aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device, which can facilitate the recovery of the ankle joint

  6. Management of End-Stage Ankle Arthritis: Cost-Utility Analysis Using Direct and Indirect Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Simon, Matthew S; Hamid, Kamran S; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Deland, Jonathan T; Ellis, Scott J

    2015-07-15

    Total ankle replacement and ankle fusion are costly but clinically effective treatments for ankle arthritis. Prior cost-effectiveness analyses for the management of ankle arthritis have been limited by a lack of consideration of indirect costs and nonoperative management. The purpose of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of operative and nonoperative treatments for ankle arthritis with inclusion of direct and indirect costs in the analysis. Markov model analysis was conducted from a health-systems perspective with use of direct costs and from a societal perspective with use of direct and indirect costs. Costs were derived from the 2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and expressed in 2013 U.S. dollars; effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Model transition probabilities were derived from the available literature. The principal outcome measure was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). In the direct-cost analysis for the base case, total ankle replacement was associated with an ICER of $14,500/QALY compared with nonoperative management. When indirect costs were included, total ankle replacement was both more effective and resulted in $5900 and $800 in lifetime cost savings compared with the lifetime costs following nonoperative management and ankle fusion, respectively. At a $100,000/QALY threshold, surgical management of ankle arthritis was preferred for patients younger than ninety-six years and total ankle replacement was increasingly more cost-effective in younger patients. Total ankle replacement, ankle fusion, and nonoperative management were the preferred strategy in 83%, 12%, and 5% of the analyses, respectively; however, our model was sensitive to patient age, the direct costs of total ankle replacement, the failure rate of total ankle replacement, and the probability of arthritis after ankle fusion. Compared with nonoperative treatment for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis, total ankle

  7. The cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoye, Francis; Haigh, Carol

    2016-05-01

    To examine the cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains. Economic evaluation based on cost-utility analysis. Ankle sprains are a source of morbidity and absenteeism from work, accounting for 15-20% of all sports injuries. Semi-rigid ankle brace and taping are functional treatment interventions used by Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists and Nurses to facilitate return to work following acute ankle sprains. A decision model analysis, based on cost-utility analysis from the perspective of National Health Service was used. The primary outcomes measure was incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, based on quality-adjusted life years. Costs and quality of life data were derived from published literature, while model clinical probabilities were sourced from Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists. The cost and quality adjusted life years gained using semi-rigid ankle brace was £184 and 0.72 respectively. However, the cost and quality adjusted life years gained following taping was £155 and 0.61 respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the semi-rigid brace was £263 per quality adjusted life year. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that ankle brace provided the highest net-benefit, hence the preferred option. Taping is a cheaper intervention compared with ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time ankle sprains. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio observed for ankle brace was less than the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence threshold and the intervention had a higher net-benefit, suggesting that it is a cost-effective intervention. Decision-makers may be willing to pay £263 for an additional gain in quality adjusted life year. The findings of this economic evaluation provide justification for the use of semi-rigid ankle brace by Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists and Nurses to facilitate return to work in individuals with first-time ankle

  8. Potential savings of a program to prevent ankle sprain recurrence: Economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hupperets, M.D.W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; Tulder, M.W. van; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most common ankle injury is the lateral ankle sprain. Dutch annual sports-related ankle sprain costs can roughly be estimated at 187,200,000. Research has shown that proprioceptive training accounts for an approximated overall 50% reduction in ankle sprain recurrence rate.

  9. Lubrication of the Human Ankle Joint in Walking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 1 (2010), s. 1-8 ISSN 0742-4787 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/07/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : articular cartilage * human ankle joint * lubrication * walking Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 0.449, year: 2010

  10. Postoperative MRI of the ankle; Postoperative Magnetresonanztomographie des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharabianlou Korth, M.; Fritz, L.B. [Rheinlandaerzte, Willich (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Postoperative imaging of the ankle can be challenging, even for the experienced radiologist. Pathological and postoperative changes to the primarily complex anatomy of the ankle with its great variety of bone structures, tendons, ligaments, and soft tissue in a very limited space may cause great difficulty in differentiating underlying pathology from expected postoperative changes and artifacts, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Selecting the appropriate radiological modality is key to making the correct diagnosis. Therefore, knowledge of the initial and current symptoms is just as important as familiarity with the most frequently performed operations in the ankle. This article aims to give its reader a summary of the most important and frequently performed operation techniques of the ankle and discusses the expected appearance and possible complications in postoperative imaging. (orig.) [German] Die postoperative radiologische Bildgebung des Sprunggelenks kann auch fuer den erfahrenen Radiologen eine besondere Herausforderung darstellen. Die komplex aufgebaute Anatomie des Sprunggelenks, mit seinen multiplen Gelenkflaechen, Sehnen, Baendern und neurovaskulaeren Strukturen auf engstem Raum, kann durch Operationen signifikant veraendert und insbesondere in der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) verfaelscht dargestellt werden. Fuer eine fundierte Befundung und Beurteilung der Operationsergebnisse ist die Kenntnis der praeoperativen Diagnose, Zeitpunkt und Technik der durchgefuehrten Operation(en) sowie der aktuellen klinischen Symptomatik von grosser Bedeutung. Dieser Artikel konzentriert sich auf zu erwartende radiologische Veraenderungen und gibt Tipps zur Befundung der postoperativen MRT des Sprunggelenks bei einer Auswahl relevanter operativer Eingriffe. Zudem wird auf moegliche postoperative Komplikationen und ihre radiologische Darstellung hingewiesen. (orig.)

  11. Epidemiology, rehabilitation and prevention of ankle sprains in basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lewandowska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Basketball is a sports discipline in which the ankle sprain is the most common injury. It is considered to be an aggravated activity by its dimension of teamwork, contact and requiring a variety of motion dynamics. The aim of this paper is to identify basketball game elements that contribute to the development of traumatic torsion injuries, to present methods of injury prevention and to present possible methods for the rehabilitation of athletes in different stages of injury healing. A sprain and a torsion of the ankle is not a traumatic event defined at one time, but is often a cycle of repetitive trauma. It is also important to educate competitors not to underestimate these types of injuries and to treat them with serious medical and rehabilitation procedures. Rehabilitation of the ankle joint is dependent on the degree of injury, and above all on the extent of the damaged tissue. In order to avoid trauma, proprioception and global stabilization training play a very important role. Unstable ankle instability is associated with serious complications.

  12. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia J Hubbard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tricia J Hubbard, Erik A WikstromUNC Charlotte, Department of Kinesiology, CharlotteAbstract: With the high percentage (up to 75% of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75% after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction.Keywords: rehabilitation, recurrent sprains, chronic ankle instability (CAI

  13. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood.

  14. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE Treatment after Injuries of the Ankle Ligaments): what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain?: a Randomised Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, Suzanne; Gresnigt, Femke; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Olsman, Jan G.; van Dijk, Niek C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to

  15. Wear prediction on total ankle replacement effect of design parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Saad, Amir Putra Bin Md; Harun, Muhamad Noor; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    2016-01-01

    This book develops and analyses computational wear simulations of the total ankle replacement for the stance phase of gait cycle. The emphasis is put on the relevant design parameters. The book presents a model consisting of three components; tibial, bearing and talar representing their physiological functions.

  16. Physical examination is sufficient for the diagnosis of sprained ankles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Lim, L. S.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Marti, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the merits of physical examination after inversion injury of the ankle in 160 consecutive patients. They had an explanatory operation if they had a positive arthrogram and/or positive signs on a delayed physical examination. To determine the interobserver variation in delayed physical

  17. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheil Artul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013 at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel.

  18. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find a Foot & Ankle Orthopaedic Surgeon Page Content Who ... your prescribed treatment (surgical and/or non-surgical) ​ Find a Surgeon ​ Click here to find a foot ...

  19. Can an Ankle-Foot Orthosis Change Hearts and Minds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    the commercial brace in both comfort and function. He continued to progress in his therapy, returning to recre- ational softball with a local team of...this design, we have been able to return patients with fused ankles to running, basketball, softball , skydiving, and combat arms deployments. We have

  20. Use of and Satisfaction with Ankle Foot Orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; Eveline Wouters; Yvonne van Zaalen; F.C. Holtkamp; M.J. Verkerk

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to obtain insight in specific elements influencing the use, non-use, satisfaction, and dissatisfaction of ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) and the presence of underexposed problems with respect to AFOs. Methods: A questionnaire was composed to obtain information from

  1. Use of and satisfaction with ankle foot orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtkamp, F.C.; Wouters, E.J.M.; van Hoof, J.; van Zaalen, Y.; Verkerk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to obtain insight in specific elements influencing the use, non-use, satisfaction, and dissatisfaction of ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) and the presence of underexposed problems with respect to AFOs. Methods: A questionnaire was composed to obtain information from

  2. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pablo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion.

  3. Analysis of ankle alignment abnormalities as a risk factor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of paediatric flat feet are flexible and asymptomatic; less than 0.1% of all flat feet are rigid. If these can be diagnosed and managed early, then various complications can be prevented and they will remain asymptomatic. This study was conducted to analyse the ankle rotational malalignments in the natural course of ...

  4. Integrated effect of treadmill training combined with dynamic ankle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abd El Aziz Ali Sherief

    2015-01-13

    Jan 13, 2015 ... of this study was to determine the combined effects of treadmill and dynamic ankle foot ... electrical stimulation, constrained induced therapy and ortho- ... restricted plantar flexion. .... older). (2) The child performs the item according to the criteria ... applied and intended to control position and motion of the.

  5. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  6. Lubrication of the human ankle joint in running

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 5 (2009), s. 619-626 ISSN 1970-8734 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/07/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : human ankle joint * lubrication * running Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  7. Controlling rotational deformity in ankle fractures : the Bridgend ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management. Recognition of the forces is usually possible by observing the pattern of the fracture lines, especially in the fibula. Abduction and adduction forces cause transverse or short oblique fracture lines near the level of the ankle joint (Fig 1) whereas rotation forces produce spiral fractures of the fibula above the level ...

  8. An irreducible ankle fracture dislocation: the Bosworth injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; Hagenaars, Tjebbe; den Hartog, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Irreducible fracture dislocations of the ankle are rare and represent true orthopedic emergencies. We present a case of a fracture dislocation that was irreducible owing to a fixed dislocation of the proximal fibular fragment posterior to the lateral ridge of the tibia. This particular type of

  9. Operative management of ankle fractures during pregnancy: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma affects approximately 5% of pregnancies and is the leading non-obstetric cause of maternal death. Ankle fractures occurring in pregnancy although minor, can nonetheless create diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for the patient and the surgeon. There is limited information on the operative management of ...

  10. New ankle actuation mechanism for a humanoid robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, Gijs; Reinink, R.; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss the design of a new ankle actuation mechanism for the humanoid robot TUlip. The new mechanism consists of two coupled series-elastic systems. We discuss the choice of actuators according to calculations for maximum achievable walking speed. Some control issues, MIMO and

  11. Fleet of Foot: Adolescent Foot and Ankle Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legacy, Kelly Bromley

    2018-01-01

    In today's world of advanced technologies, accessible transportation, and fingertip talking, adolescents are spending too many hours each day sedentary. The purpose of this article is to underscore the importance of foot and ankle mobility in an adolescent population that spends very little time on their feet. Physical educators and athletic…

  12. A real-time computational model for estimating kinematics of ankle ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Zhang, Yanxin; Xie, Sheng Quan

    2016-01-01

    An accurate assessment of ankle ligament kinematics is crucial in understanding the injury mechanisms and can help to improve the treatment of an injured ankle, especially when used in conjunction with robot-assisted therapy. A number of computational models have been developed and validated for assessing the kinematics of ankle ligaments. However, few of them can do real-time assessment to allow for an input into robotic rehabilitation programs. An ankle computational model was proposed and validated to quantify the kinematics of ankle ligaments as the foot moves in real-time. This model consists of three bone segments with three rotational degrees of freedom (DOFs) and 12 ankle ligaments. This model uses inputs for three position variables that can be measured from sensors in many ankle robotic devices that detect postures within the foot-ankle environment and outputs the kinematics of ankle ligaments. Validation of this model in terms of ligament length and strain was conducted by comparing it with published data on cadaver anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging. The model based on ligament lengths and strains is in concurrence with those from the published studies but is sensitive to ligament attachment positions. This ankle computational model has the potential to be used in robot-assisted therapy for real-time assessment of ligament kinematics. The results provide information regarding the quantification of kinematics associated with ankle ligaments related to the disability level and can be used for optimizing the robotic training trajectory.

  13. Lower extremity joint coupling variability during gait in young adults with and without chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Thomas; Herb, Christopher C; Hart, Joseph; Hertel, Jay

    2018-06-01

    Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a condition resulting from a lateral ankle sprain. Shank-rearfoot joint-coupling variability differences have been found in CAI patients; however, joint-coupling variability (VCV) of the ankle and proximal joints has not been explored. Our purpose was to analyse VCV in adults with and without CAI during gait. Four joint-coupling pairs were analysed: knee sagittal-ankle sagittal, knee sagittal-ankle frontal, hip frontal-ankle sagittal and hip frontal-ankle frontal. Twenty-seven adults participated (CAI:n = 13, Control:n = 14). Lower extremity kinematics were collected during walking (4.83 km/h) and jogging (9.66 km/h). Vector-coding was used to assess the stride-to-stride variability of four coupling pairs. During walking, CAI patients exhibited higher VCV than healthy controls for knee sagittal-ankle frontal in latter parts of stance thru mid-swing. When jogging, CAI patients demonstrated lower VCV with specific differences occurring across various intervals of gait. The increased knee sagittal-ankle frontal VCV in CAI patients during walking may indicate an adaptation to deal with the previously identified decrease in variability in transverse plane shank and frontal plane rearfoot coupling during walking; while the decreased ankle-knee and ankle-hip VCV identified in CAI patients during jogging may represent a more rigid, less adaptable sensorimotor system ambulating at a faster speed.

  14. A study of semi-rigid support on ankle supination sprain kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y M; Wu, Z H; Liao, W H; Chan, K M

    2010-12-01

    Ankle sprain injury is very common in sports and the use of ankle support is crucial. This research investigated the effect of an ankle brace in reducing the ankle angular displacement and angular velocity during sudden supination. In the experiment, 11 healthy males were tested. The bracing condition, semi-rigid ankle braces were investigated. The angular displacement and angular velocity of the ankle were computed. The motion-capture system was adopted to capture the three-dimensional coordinates of the reflective markers. The coordinates of the reflective markers were used to compute the ankle kinematics during simulated ankle supination. A mechanical supination platform was used to simulate the sprain motions. Experimental results showed that the semi-rigid brace tested significantly reduced the ankle angular displacement and angular velocity compared with control conditions during sudden supination. In conclusion, the semi-rigid-type brace can provide significant restriction to reduce the magnitudes of the angular displacement and angular velocity of the ankle during sudden supination sprain. The semi-rigid-type brace is suggested as the prophylactic bracing for the ankle. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Delayed latency of peroneal reflex to sudden inversion with ankle taping or bracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, N; Maeda, A; Hirohashi, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of ankle taping and bracing based on the peroneal reflex in the hypermobile and normal ankle joints with and without history of ankle injury. Thirty-six ankle joints of 18 collegiate American football athletes with and without previous history of injury were studied. The angle of talar tilt (TT) was measured by stress radiograph for classifying normal (TT5 degrees ) ankles. They were tested with taping, bracing, and without any supports as a control. The latency of peroneus longus muscle was measured by a sudden inversion of 25 degrees using surface EMG signals. The results of the present study show no significant three-way Group (hypermobile or normal ankles) by History (previously injured or uninjured ankles) by Condition (control, taping, or bracing) interaction, while Condition main effect was significant (p0.05). In conclusion, ankle taping and bracing delayed the peroneal reflex latency not only for hypermobile ankles and/or injured ankle joints but also for intact ankle joints.

  16. Hypoalgesic effect of a passive accessory mobilisation technique in patients with lateral ankle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hwee Koon; Wright, Anthony

    2011-08-01

    A randomised, double blind, repeated measures study was conducted to investigate the initial effects of an accessory mobilisation technique applied to the ankle joint in 13 patients with a unilateral sub-acute ankle supination injury. Ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, pressure pain threshold, visual analogue scale rating of pain during functional activity and ankle functional scores were assessed before and after application of treatment, manual contact control and no contact control conditions. There were significant improvements in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (p = 0.000) and pressure pain threshold (p = 0.000) during the treatment condition. However no significant effects were observed for the other measures. These findings demonstrate that mobilisation of the ankle joint can produce an initial hypoalgesic effect and an improvement in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Treatment Comparing with Immobilization after Acute Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Mohammadi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle injuries are among the most prevalent injuries with which a physician may encounter. In this study, the efficiency of the functional treatment was compared with the immobilization treatment in healing the acute ankle sprain. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial study was carried out on 100 male patients whose ankle sprain had been diagnosed by Yasuj Shahid Beheshti Hospital. Using block allocation randomization method and regardless of damage degree, patients were divided into two groups, functional method (1st group or immobilization with plaster (2nd group, for treatment. Several variables such as range of motion, pain intensity, inflammation, joint tenderness and returning to work after 2, 6 and 12 weeks were examined. Results: After two weeks, the average pain intensity in the first group (33.2±3.2 has been decreased compared to the second group (55±1.2, which showed a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.05. The average ankle range of motion in the first and second groups was 29.08±1.2 degrees and 20.4±2.2 degrees, respectively which had been increased significantly in the first group compared to the second group (p<0.03. Similarly, a considerable difference was observed in decreased inflammation and tenderness in the first group compared to the second one. Conclusion: In acute ankle sprains, the functional treatment is better than the immobilization treatment in alleviating pain, inflammation and improving the range of joint motion.

  18. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  19. Uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    1998-01-01

    The most important fields of stable isotope use with examples are presented. These are: 1. Isotope dilution analysis: trace analysis, measurements of volumes and masses; 2. Stable isotopes as tracers: transport phenomena, environmental studies, agricultural research, authentication of products and objects, archaeometry, studies of reaction mechanisms, structure and function determination of complex biological entities, studies of metabolism, breath test for diagnostic; 3. Isotope equilibrium effects: measurement of equilibrium effects, investigation of equilibrium conditions, mechanism of drug action, study of natural processes, water cycle, temperature measurements; 4. Stable isotope for advanced nuclear reactors: uranium nitride with 15 N as nuclear fuel, 157 Gd for reactor control. In spite of some difficulties of stable isotope use, particularly related to the analytical techniques, which are slow and expensive, the number of papers reporting on this subject is steadily growing as well as the number of scientific meetings organized by International Isotope Section and IAEA, Gordon Conferences, and regional meeting in Germany, France, etc. Stable isotope application development on large scale is determined by improving their production technologies as well as those of labeled compound and the analytical techniques. (author)

  20. Selection criteria for patients with chronic ankle instability in controlled research: a position statement of the International Ankle Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribble, P.A.; Delahunt, E.; Bleakley, C.M.; Caulfield, B.; Docherty, C.L.; Fong, D.T.; Fourchet, F.; Hertel, J.; Hiller, C.E.; Kaminski, T.W.; McKeon, P.O.; Refshauge, K.M.; Wees, P.J. van der; Vicenzino, W.; Wikstrom, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    While research on chronic ankle instability (CAI) and awareness of its impact on society and health care systems has grown substantially in the last 2 decades, the inconsistency in participant or patient selection criteria across studies presents a potential obstacle to addressing the problem

  1. Selection criteria for patients with chronic ankle instability in controlled research: a position statement of the International Ankle Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribble, P.A.; Delahunt, E.; Bleakley, C.; Caulfield, B.; Docherty, C.; Fourchet, F.; Fong, D.T.; Hertel, J.; Hiller, C.; Kaminski, T.; McKeon, P.; Refshauge, K.; Wees, P.J. van der; Vincenzino, B.; Wikstrom, E.

    2014-01-01

    While research on chronic ankle instability (CAI) and awareness of its impact on society and health care systems has grown substantially in the last 2 decades, the inconsistency in participant/patient selection criteria across studies presents a potential obstacle to addressing the problem properly.

  2. Dynamic ankle stability and ankle sprain occurrence in elite ball team athletes : a one season prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chris Visscher; Anne Benjaminse; Koen A.P.M. Lemmink; Msc Henrike van der Does; Michel Brink; Joan Dallinga

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dynamic stability index (DSI) measured at baseline between elite ball team athletes with and without an ankle sprain during the season. Methods Forty-four elite male (age:22.5±3.6yr,height:193.7±8.0cm,mass:87.1±10.9kg) and eighteen female

  3. Three-dimensional computer graphics-based ankle morphometry with computerized tomography for total ankle replacement design and positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Chung; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Leardini, Alberto; Lu, Tung-Wu; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2014-05-01

    Morphometry of the bones of the ankle joint is important for the design of joint replacements and their surgical implantations. However, very little three-dimensional (3D) data are available and not a single study has addressed the Chinese population. Fifty-eight fresh frozen Chinese cadaveric ankle specimens, 26 females, and 32 males, were CT-scanned in the neutral position and their 3D computer graphics-based models were reconstructed. The 3D morphology of the distal tibia/fibula segment and the full talus was analyzed by measuring 31 parameters, defining the relevant dimensions, areas, and volumes from the models. The measurements were compared statistically between sexes and with previously reported data from Caucasian subjects. The results showed that, within a general similarity of ankle morphology between the current Chinese and previous Caucasian subjects groups, there were significant differences in 9 out of the 31 parameters analyzed. From a quantitative comparison with available prostheses designed for the Caucasian population, few of these designs have both tibial and talar components suitable in dimension for the Chinese population. The current data will be helpful for the sizing, design, and surgical positioning of ankle replacements and for surgical instruments, especially for the Chinese population. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  5. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree; Heuser, Alexander; Wombacher, Frank; Dietzel, Martin; Tipper, Edward; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  6. Recovery From a First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain and the Predictors of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Prospective Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    Impairments in motor control may predicate the paradigm of chronic ankle instability (CAI) that can develop in the year after an acute lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury. No prospective analysis is currently available identifying the mechanisms by which these impairments develop and contribute to long-term outcome after LAS. To identify the motor control deficits predicating CAI outcome after a first-time LAS injury. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Eighty-two individuals were recruited after sustaining a first-time LAS injury. Several biomechanical analyses were performed for these individuals, who completed 5 movement tasks at 3 time points: (1) 2 weeks, (2) 6 months, and (3) 12 months after LAS occurrence. A logistic regression analysis of several "salient" biomechanical parameters identified from the movement tasks, in addition to scores from the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool and the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) recorded at the 2-week and 6-month time points, were used as predictors of 12-month outcome. At the 2-week time point, an inability to complete 2 of the movement tasks (a single-leg drop landing and a drop vertical jump) was predictive of CAI outcome and correctly classified 67.6% of cases (sensitivity, 83%; specificity, 55%; P = .004). At the 6-month time point, several deficits exhibited by the CAI group during 1 of the movement tasks (reach distances and sagittal plane joint positions at the hip, knee and ankle during the posterior reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test) and their scores on the activities of daily living subscale of the FAAM were predictive of outcome and correctly classified 84.8% of cases (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 91%; P < .001). An inability to complete jumping and landing tasks within 2 weeks of a first-time LAS and poorer dynamic postural control and lower self-reported function 6 months after a first-time LAS were predictive of eventual CAI outcome. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale: A cross-cultural adaptation and validation study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughi, Amir Reza; Roustaei, Narges; Mahdaviazad, Hamideh

    2017-02-17

    The use of valid and reliable outcome rating scales is essential for evaluating the result of different treatments and interventions. The purposes of this study were to translate and culturally adapt the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale (AOFAS-AHFS) into Persian languages and evaluate its psychometric properties. Forward-backward translation and cultural adaptation method were used to develop Persian version of AOFAS-AHFS. From March to July 2016, one hundred consecutive patients with ankle and hindfoot injuries were included. Internal consistency and reproducibility were evaluated using Cronbach's alpha, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) respectively. Construct validity reported which compare the outcome rating scale measurements with Short Form-36 (SF-36), also convergent and discriminant validity evaluated using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Mean age (SD) of the patients was 41.95±13.45years. Cronbach's α coefficient, Spearman's rho and ICC values were 0.71, 0.89 and 0.90 respectively. Total score of AOFAS-AHFS and SF-36 domains has a correlation ranged between 0.17-0.55. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.4 was exceeded by all items with the exception of stability. The Spearman's rank correlation between each item in functional subscales with its own subscales was higher than the correlation between these items and other subscales. Persian version of AOFAS-AHFS provides additional reliable and valid instrument which can be used to assess broad range of patients with foot and ankle disorders that speaking in Persian. However, it seems that the original version of AOFAS-AHFS needs some revisions. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Does the centre of mass remain stable during complex human postural equilibrium tasks in weightlessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapley, Paul; Pozzo, Thierry

    In normal gravity conditions the execution of voluntary movement involves the displacement of body segments as well as the maintenance of a stable reference value for equilibrium control. It has been suggested that centre of mass (CM) projection within the supporting base (BS) is the stabilised reference for voluntary action, and is conserved in weightlessness. The purpose of this study was to determine if the CM is stabilised during whole body reaching movements executed in weightlessness. The reaching task was conducted by two cosmonauts aboard the Russian orbital station MIR, during the Franco-Russian mission ALTAIR, 1993. Movements of reflective markers were recorded using a videocamera, successive images being reconstructed by computer every 40ms. The position of the CM, ankle joint torques and shank and thigh angles were computed for each subject pre- in- and post-flight using a 7-link mathematical model. Results showed that both cosmonauts adopted a backward leaning posture prior to reaching movements. Inflight, the CM was displaced throughout values in the horizontal axis three times those of pre-flight measures. In addition, ankle dorsi flexor torques inflight increased to values double those of pre- and post-flight tests. This study concluded that CM displacements do not remain stable during complex postural equilibrium tasks executed in weightlessness. Furthermore, in the absence of gravity, subjects changed their strategy for producing ankle torque during spaceflight from a forward to a backward leaning posture.

  9. Predictors of chronic ankle instability: Analysis of peroneal reaction time, dynamic balance and isokinetic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Guzmán, Rafael; Jiménez, Fernando; Abián-Vicén, Javier

    2018-05-01

    Previous studies have reported the factors contributing to chronic ankle instability, which could lead to more effective treatments. However, factors such as the reflex response and ankle muscle strength have not been taken into account in previous investigations. Fifty recreational athletes with chronic ankle instability and 55 healthy controls were recruited. Peroneal reaction time in response to sudden inversion, isokinetic evertor muscle strength and dynamic balance with the Star Excursion Balance Test and the Biodex Stability System were measured. The relationship between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and performance on each test was assessed and a backward multiple linear regression analysis was conducted. Participants with chronic ankle instability showed prolonged peroneal reaction time, poor performance in the Biodex Stability System and decreased reach distance in the Star Excursion Balance Test. No significant differences were found in eversion and inversion peak torque. Moderate correlations were found between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and the peroneal reaction time and performance on the Star Excursion Balance Test. Peroneus brevis reaction time and the posteromedial and lateral directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test accounted for 36% of the variance in the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Dynamic balance deficits and delayed peroneal reaction time are present in participants with chronic ankle instability. Peroneus brevis reaction time and the posteromedial and lateral directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test were the main contributing factors to the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score. No clear strength impairments were reported in unstable ankles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compression were recorded from the lumbar spinal cord using an in vivo extracellular single unit recording setup 1 day after ankle sprain. EA was applied to the SI-6 acupoint on the right forelimb (contralateral to the sprained ankle) by trains of electrical pulses (10 Hz, 1-ms pulse width, 2-mA intensity) for 30 min. After EA, WBR of the sprained foot significantly recovered and dorsal horn neuron activities were significantly suppressed in ankle-sprained rats. However, EA produced no effect in normal rats. The inhibitory effect of EA on hyperactivities of dorsal horn neurons of ankle-sprained rats was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (5 mg/kg ip) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg ip). These data suggest that EA-induced analgesia in ankle sprain pain is mediated mainly by suppressing dorsal horn neuron activities through α-adrenergic descending inhibitory systems at the spinal level. PMID:21389301

  11. Gait Biomechanics in Participants, Six Months after First-time Lateral Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2016-06-01

    No research currently exists predicating a link between the injury-affiliated sensorimotor deficits of acute ankle sprain and those of chronic ankle instability during gait. This analysis evaluates participants with a 6-month history of ankle sprain injury to affirm this link. 69 participants with a 6-month history of acute first-time lateral ankle sprain were divided into subgroups ('chronic ankle instability' and 'coper') based on their self-reported disability and compared to 20 non-injured participants during a gait task. Lower extremity kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-heel strike (period 1) and from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-toe off (period 2). The 'chronic ankle instability' subgroup (who reported greater disability) displayed increased knee flexion during period 1. During period 2, this subgroup exhibited greater total displacement at their ankle joint and greater extensor dominance at their knee. That many of these features are present, both in individuals with acute ankle sprain and those with chronic ankle instability may advocate a link between acute deficits and long-term outcome. Clinicians must be aware that the sensorimotor deficits of ankle sprain may persevere beyond the acute stage of injury and be cognizant of the capacity for impairments to pervade proximally. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  13. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  14. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  15. Stable radiographic scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Stable compositions which are useful in the preparation of Technetium-99m-based scintigraphic agents are discussed. They are comprised of ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester thereof in combination with a pertechnetate reducing agent or dissolved in oxidized pertechnetate-99m (sup(99m)TcO 4 - ) solution

  16. Some stable hydromagnetic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J L; Oberman, C R; Kulsrud, R M; Frieman, E A [Project Matterhorn, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1958-07-01

    We have been able to find and investigate the properties of equilibria which are hydromagnetically stable. These equilibria can be obtained, for example, by wrapping conductors helically around the stellarator tube. Systems with I = 3 or 4 are indicated to be optimum for stability purposes. In some cases an admixture of I = 2 fields can be advantageous for achieving equilibrium. (author)

  17. The effect of ankle foot orthosis stiffness on the energy cost of walking: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, D J J; van der Krogt, M M; de Groot, V; Harlaar, J; Wisse, M; Collins, S H

    2011-11-01

    In stroke and multiple sclerosis patients, gait is frequently hampered by a reduced ability to push-off with the ankle caused by weakness of the plantar-flexor muscles. To enhance ankle push-off and to decrease the high energy cost of walking, spring-like carbon-composite Ankle Foot Orthoses are frequently prescribed. However, it is unknown what Ankle Foot Orthoses stiffness should be used to obtain the most efficient gait. The aim of this simulation study was to gain insights into the effect of variation in Ankle Foot Orthosis stiffness on the amount of energy stored in the Ankle Foot Orthosis and the energy cost of walking. We developed a two-dimensional forward-dynamic walking model with a passive spring at the ankle representing the Ankle Foot Orthosis and two constant torques at the hip for propulsion. We varied Ankle Foot Orthosis stiffness while keeping speed and step length constant. We found an optimal stiffness, at which the energy delivered at the hip joint was minimal. Energy cost decreased with increasing energy storage in the ankle foot orthosis, but the most efficient gait did not occur with maximal energy storage. With maximum storage, push-off occurred too late to reduce the impact of the contralateral leg with the floor. Maximum return prior to foot strike was also suboptimal, as push-off occurred too early and its effects were subsequently counteracted by gravity. The optimal Ankle Foot Orthosis stiffness resulted in significant push-off timed just prior to foot strike and led to greater ankle plantar-flexion velocity just before contralateral foot strike. Our results suggest that patient energy cost might be reduced by the proper choice of Ankle Foot Orthosis stiffness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll Jeremiah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  19. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah; Kerin, Fearghal; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2011-06-09

    Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  20. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah

    2011-06-09

    Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed\\/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  1. Merancang Manajemen SDM Berbasis Kompetensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarmanto Sudarmanto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Public servants human resource management, as the main driving force for the conduct of state task, recently has been viewed rigid, formalistic, unadaptive and late in anticipating global change. The national employee system is unable yet to push the rise of strong apparatus, competency, clean, responsible and professional. The performance accountability system of employee is neither clear yet. DP3—usually used as judgement for evaluating employee performance is unable yet to reflect the real profile of employee performance. Reward and punishment system can not also reflect justice and certainty yet, so that it is unable yet to motivate employee work more maximal. To be able to overcome such, it is necessary to develop the apparatus management system based competency. An alternative of approach based on behavior is determinant factor for superior performance. The concept of competency consists : motives, traits, self concept, knowledge and skill.

  2. A one year prospective study on ankle stability and landing technique : The occurrence of ankle and knee injuries in elite ball team athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Msc Henrike van der Does; M.S. Brink; Koen A.P.M. Lemmink

    2014-01-01

    Background: In team sports lower extremity injuries account for more than 50% of all injuries, indicating the importance of early detection of athletes at risk. Objective: To investigate the predictive value of ankle stability and landing technique at baseline for ankle and knee injury occurrence

  3. Posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis: How initial cartilage lesions, the deltoid ligament and hindfoot alignment affect the outcome of operatively treated ankle fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stufkens, S.A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority (70-78%) of ankle osteoarthritis is of posttraumatic origin. The quality of the reduction of intra-articular fractures is of paramount importance for a satisfactory outcome in all joints. Accordingly, the most important aspect of conservative or surgical treatment of ankle

  4. [Osteosynthesis of Weber B ankle fractures using the one-third tubular plate and refixation of the syndesmosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spering, C; Lesche, V; Dresing, K

    2015-08-01

    Anatomical reconstruction and recovery to complete range of function of the upper ankle joint. Therefore, the most stable but least invasive osteosynthesis is required to enable the patient early functional mobilization. Supination and pronation fracture with luxation mechanism of the upper ankle joint with or without rupture of the syndesmosis. Open fracture of the distal fibula including displaced and instable fractures. Severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease; contaminated open fractures (≥ 2nd degree); pediatric fractures with open epiphyseal plate. Supine position with ipsilateral slightly elevated hip and knee. Incision of about 8 cm length along the dorsal edge of the distal fibula. When reaching the lateral malleolus, a slight ventral angulation is necessary. Open reduction through this posterolateral approach. Secure the reposition using an interfragmentary lag screw and anatomically adjusted third tubular plate. Followed by a revision of the syndesmosis and transfixation using a tricortical position screw. Mobilization on day 1 after surgery with reduced weight-bearing when position screw is not applied; when position screw is implanted with ground contact for 6 weeks. Removal of position screw under local anesthesia after 6 weeks and pain-controlled full weight-bearing. Removal of metal after 1.5 years. Open reduction using the third tubular plate and an interfragmentary lag screw through a dorsolateral approach used in 90 % of all Weber B fractures in our clinic. Additional revision of a ruptured syndesmosis performed in 70 % and transfixation through a position screw in 40 %. Persisting instability in the upper ankle joint significantly reduced after surgical treatment compared to a conservative approach. Revisions necessary in 3.7 % of patients and pseudarthrosis diagnosed in 0.9 %. It has been shown that the preoperative x-ray and clinical examination is limited in detecting a ruptured syndesmosis.

  5. Translation, cross-cultural adaption and validation of the German version of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for patients with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauck, T; Lohrer, H

    2011-08-01

    The evaluation of health-related quality of life and physical function is important for determining therapeutic strategies following ankle injuries. The Anglo-American Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) is a valid and reliable self-reported measure to detect functional deficits in chronic lateral ankle instability. The purpose of this study was to translate, cross-culturally adapt and validate the FAAM questionnaire for use with German-speaking patients with chronic lateral ankle instability. Preoperative and conservatively treated patients with chronic lateral ankle instability. Sport students and volleyball athletes served as control groups. The FAAM was forward and back translated, cross-culturally adapted and validated. The study population completed the FAAM-G questionnaire twice within 3-5 days. Additionally, the patients were scored with the Good ankle laxity classification system. Test-Retest reliability, construct validity and internal consistency were calculated. Reliability and validity of the FAAM-G were examined in presurgical chronic ankle instability patients (n=24), conservatively treated chronic ankle instability patients (n=17), university sport students (n=31) and volleyballers (n=37). Test-retest reliability revealed fair, good, or excellent reliability (inter-class correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.590-0.998; ρ=0.528-1.000). Construct validity, tested between the FAAM-G subscores and the Good et al ankle laxity classification system demonstrated strong correlations (ρ = -0.819 to -0.861). The original FAAM questionnaire was successfully translated and cross-culturally adapted from English to German. Corresponding to the Anglo-American version, the FAAM-G is a reliable and valid questionnaire for self-reported assessment of pain and disability in German-speaking patients suffering from chronic ankle instability.

  6. Population based epidemiology of ankle sprains attending accident and emergency units in the West Midlands of England, and a survey of UK practice for severe ankle sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgman, S A; Clement, D; Downing, A; Walley, G; Phair, I; Maffulli, N

    2003-11-01

    To estimate the incidence of ankle sprains and severe ankle sprains attending accident and emergency (A&E) units; to describe current practice for severe ankle sprains in A&E units in the United Kingdom. Crude age and sex specific incidence rates were calculated for four health districts from cases ascertained from data on seven A&E clinical information systems. Case records of patients with ankle sprains at an A&E unit in another health district were audited and the proportion of severe ankle sprains calculated. UK A&E units were surveyed about their usual treatment of patients with severe ankle sprains. The estimate of the crude incidence rate of ankle sprains was a minimum of 52.7 per 10 000, rising to 60.9 (95% CI 59.4 to 62.4) when figures were adjusted for the proportion of patients without a diagnostic code (13.7%). There were important age-sex differences with unadjusted rates observed from 127.8 per 10 000 (CI 115.5 to 140.0) in girls aged 10-14 years to 8.2 (CI 4.2 to 12.3) in men aged 70-74 years. As 14% of ankle sprains attending A&E were classed as severe, this would equate to 42 000 severe ankle sprains per year in the UK. In the UK wide survey, there was a response rate of 79% (211 of 266). Among the responders, Tubigrip was used routinely in 55%, below knee casts in 3%, and braces in 2%. Boots were not used routinely in any unit. While there is considerable variation in severe ankle sprain management in UK A&E units, most are treated with the minimal mechanical support of Tubigrip.

  7. The correlation of the morphological changes of ankle point and ankle joint function after surgery on the Ruedi-Allgouer type III Pilon fracture: A case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifei; Cai, Leyi; Lu, Xiaolang; Yu, Yang; Hong, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between imaging findings and postoperative curative effect by measuring the morphology of the ankle mortise in patients with the Ruedi-Allgouer type III Pilon fractures. Forty-seven patients with Ruedi-Allgouer type III Pilon fractures who underwent surgical treatment from January 2011 to January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. At the last follow-up, x-rays of the affected ankle and the healthy side were measured. According to the Kitaoka score of ankle joint function at the last follow-up. All patients were followed up for 18-24 months (mean 21 months). This study demonstrated that compared with the healthy side, the index of the width, depth, and coronal/sagittal angles of the ankle mortise were significantly different (P  0.05). According to the Kitaoka score, the difference between the affected and the healthy sides of each index of the ankle mortise was compared between the 3 groups. That is, the intraoperative treatment of the width and depth of the ankle mortise as well as the coronal and sagittal angles of the ankle mortise were significantly correlated with the postoperative curative effect. The intraoperative treatment of ankle mortise width, depth, and ankle coronal/sagittal angle in patients with severe Pilon fractures has a significant impact on postoperative efficacy. In order to prevent the occurrence of traumatic arthritis, the anatomical morphology of the ankle should be restored as much as possible in the course of surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Developing A mobile App for the Rehabilitation of Ankle Sprains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne McDonough

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal injuries are common and costly. Ankle sprains are one of the most common such injuries, carrying significant risk of persistent disabling symptoms. Rehabilitation has been shown to be more effective than standard conservative approaches for musculoskeletal injuries. The use of a mobile app to present rehabilitation guidance may offer a more accessible, engaging and effective solution to ankle sprain rehabilitation. Several existing apps target the prevention and rehabilitation of ankle sprains, however evaluation details are limited. Aim: To develop a mobile phone app that provides interactive, personalised and tailored rehabilitation for people following ankle sprains. Method(s: In order to build requirements and produce content for the app (entitled ReApp 2, relevant literature was reviewed and behaviour change strategies identified from the Behaviour Change Taxonomy (BCT developed by Michie et al (2013. A flexible and team orientated methodology called Agile was used to refine the technical specification and implemented software using feedback from technical experts (n=5 and clinicians (n=6. Technical experts consisted of participants with at least five years of experience in ICT or a related discipline. These technical experts completed the System Usability Scale (SUS to rate the usability of the software. The SUS is a widely used usability survey, which provides a single overall score for each participant. These scores can be used to provide comparison between user groups and other software. The clinicians consisted of five physiotherapists and one sport and exercise consultant, all of whom had at least five years of experience in providing rehabilitation treatment for ankle injuries. These clinicians also completed a questionnaire and gave qualitative feedback on the clinical appropriateness of the app. Results: The identified BCTs were prioritised according to clinical importance, technical complexity and time

  9. Foot and Ankle Deformity in Young Acrobatic and Artistic Gymnasts

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    Sobera Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the paper was to determine the occurrence of feet and ankle deformities in trampoline and artistic gymnasts. Methods. Ten acrobatic gymnasts (trampolinists and 10 artistic gymnasts aged 6-14 years were recruited. The calcaneal-tibial (rearfoot angle was determined as the angle of the upper calcaneal tendon and the longitudinal heel axis while Clarke angles were determined by podoscopy. Results. The trampolinists showed significantly greater medial angulation (calcaneal valgus than the group of gymnasts. Right and left foot Clark’s angles in both the trampoline and artistic gymnasts were above 55°. Conclusions. Trampolinists exhibit significantly more pronounced calcaneal valgus than artistic gymnasts. The prevalence of foot and ankle deformities in both populations should be addressed by coaches in the gymnastics training of young children.

  10. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, one year on

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borthwick Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Journal of Foot and Ankle Research was launched one year ago, and a number of its key achievements are highlighted in this editorial. Although the journal is underpinned by professional bodies associated with the podiatry professions in the UK and Australasia, its content is aimed at the wider foot and ankle research community. Nevertheless, the journal's achievements over the past year reflect the development of research in the profession of podiatry. From this perspective, the journal may be viewed as contributing to the overall attainment of some of the profession's key goals and strategic aims over the last decade, across the UK and Australasia. The journal has also witnessed policy changes in the last year, and these are discussed - notably, the decision not to accept case reports for publication. We also report on a few of the key metrics, providing readers with a summary of the journal's performance over the last year.

  11. MR imaging of accessory muscles of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondello, Eduardo; Nazar, Miguel E.; Martin, Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to describe the normal anatomy and the characteristics in MRI of the accessory muscles of the posterior ankle: the accessory soleus, accessory flexor digitorum longus, peroneus quartus, tibiocalcaneus internus and peroneocalcaneus internus. Material and methods: There were evaluated 280 symptomatic patients between 18 and 40 years old (85 % males). MR was performed in High Field Magnetic Resonance Units (1.5 T y 1.0 T) and multiplanar sequences. Results: We found 2 peroneus quartus (0.7%), 2 accessory soleus muscles (0.7%), 3 accessory flexor digitorum longus (1.07%) and 1 peroneocalcaneus internus (0.35%). Conclusion: The knowledge of the accessory muscles of the posterior ankle allow to explain different painful pathologies with instability or tendinous tears, which are difficult to diagnose if the muscle are not adequately recognized. (author)

  12. Primary Ankle Arthrodesis for Severely Comminuted Tibial Pilon Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ashhab, Mohamed E

    2017-03-01

    Management of severely comminuted, complete articular tibial pilon fractures (Rüedi and Allgöwer type III) remains a challenge, with few treatment options providing good clinical outcomes. Twenty patients with severely comminuted tibial pilon fractures underwent primary ankle arthrodesis with a retrograde calcaneal nail and autogenous fibular bone graft. The fusion rate was 100% and the varus malunion rate was 10%. Fracture union occurred at a mean of 16 weeks (range, 13-18 weeks) postoperatively. Primary ankle arthrodesis is a successful method for treating highly comminuted tibial pilon fractures, having a low complication rate and a high satisfaction score. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e378-e381.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    McGovern RP; Martin RL

    2016-01-01

    Ryan P McGovern,1 RobRoy L Martin,1,2 1Department of Physical Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, 2Centers for Sports Medicine – University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected st...

  14. [Conservative therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolenski, U C; Best, N; Bocker, B

    2008-03-01

    Cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint reflect the problem that great force is transmitted and balanced out over a relatively small surface area. As a pathophysiological factor, cartilage-bone contusions play a significant role in the development of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint. Physiotherapeutic procedures belong to the standard procedures of conservative therapy. The use and selection of the type of therapy is based on empirical considerations and experience and investigations on effectiveness of particular therapies are relatively rare. At present a symptom-oriented therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint seems to be the most sensible approach. It can be assumed that it makes sense that the symptomatic treatment of cartilage defects or initial stages of arthritis also includes the subsequent symptoms of pain, irritated condition and limited function. This leads to starting points for physiotherapy with respect to pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, avoidance of pressure points, improvement of diffusion and pressure release. In addition to the differential physiotherapeutic findings, the determination of a curative, preventive or rehabilitative procedure is especially important. In physical therapy special importance is placed on a scheduled serial application corresponding to the findings, employing the necessary methods, such as physiotherapy, sport therapy, medical mechanics, manual therapy, massage, electrotherapy and warmth therapy. From this the findings-related therapy is proposed as a practical therapy concept: locomotive apparatus pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, improvement of diffusion and decongestion therapy. Therapy options have been selected base on the current literature and are summarised in tabular form. The art of symptomatic therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint does not lie in the multitude of sometimes speculative procedures, but in the targeted selection

  15. Conservative treatment of ankle sprain according to a recent literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Kaźmierczak

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to complicated structure of ankle, it is exceptionally susceptible to injuries, of which one of the most common is a sprain. The sprain involves soft-tissue injuries that, depending on their level of seriousness, are categorized as first-, second- or third-degree sprains. The main goals of rehabilitation in the acute phase after the injury include reduction of pain, swelling and hematoma, as well as prevention from secondary injuries. During the subacute phase the emphasis should be put on restoring the joint’s function and its range of motion, as well as on gentle loading of the joint. Proprioception training, strength and stretching exercises should also be introduced. The next stage, during which the reconstruction of the damaged tissues takes place, involves the implementation of gradual progressive loading and the variety of earlier introduced procedures. In the final phase of rehabilitation, it is vital to reassure that the patient is able to return to full activity, especially if he or she is an athlete. Therefore, functional testing such as the Dorsiflexion Lunge Test or The Star Excursion Balance Test may be of help. The main predisposing factor for an ankle sprain is a previous injury of the same type. It is due to the fact that such an injury leads to impaired proprioceptive function and impaired postural control. Improper rehabilitation or the lack of thereof may cause the development of chronic ankle instability, which substantially reduces the chances of physical activity and the patient’s quality of life. The implementation of adequate preventive measures based on employing external stabilisers and neuromuscular training appears to be essential. The objective is to regain a good sense of proprioception as well as muscle reaction time within the ankle joint.

  16. Computed tomography in complex fractures of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedburg, H.; Wimmer, B.; Hendrich, V.; Riede, U.N.

    1983-01-01

    Diagnostic value of conventional roentgen technique and computed tomography is proofed by examination of 50 patients with sprain fractures of the ankle joint. The dimension of destruction of the distal tibial joint surface is better documented by CT than by other radiological techniques. Additional informations like multifragmentation of the distal tibia or evaluation of reposition impedigment are found more frequently by CT. Therefore indication and planning of the traumatherapy can be assessed better by the traumatologist. (orig.)

  17. Computed tomography in complex fractures of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedburg, H.; Wimmer, B.; Hendrich, V.; Riede, U.N.

    1983-09-01

    Diagnostic value of conventional roentgen technique and computed tomography is proofed by examination of 50 patients with sprain fractures of the ankle joint. The dimension of destruction of the distal tibial joint surface is better documented by CT than by other radiological techniques. Additional informations like multiframentation of the distal tibia or evaluation of reposition impediment are found more frequently by CT. Therefore indication and planning of the traumatherapy can be assessed better by the traumatologist.

  18. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments; Bandverletzungen des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Institut fuer Radiologie, Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria); Karl Landsteiner Institut, St. Poelten (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung nach einem Sprunggelenktrauma basiert auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung hinsichtlich des Stellenwerts der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesondere fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird bei dieser Indikation zurzeit nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenkbaender erlaubt. Sie ist im besonderen Masse geeignet, akute und chronische Verletzungen des Sinus tarsi zu beurteilen. Bei chronischen Beschwerden nach Bandverletzung ist die MRT zur

  19. Prototyping of Individual Ankle Orthosis Using Additive Manufacturing Technologies

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    Natalia Wierzbicka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents design and manufacturing process of an individualized ankle orthosis using additive manufacturing technologies and reverse engineering. Conventional processes of manufacturing of orthosesareexpensive and time consuming -an alternative method was proposed. The patient’s leg was 3D scanned and the orthosis was designed using a CAD system. It was then manufactured using the Fused Deposition Modelling technology, assembled and fully tested. Positive results were obtained.

  20. Arthroscopic repair of lateral ankle ligament complex by suture anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yunxia

    2014-06-01

    Arthroscopic repair of the lateral ligament complex with suture anchors is increasingly used to treat chronic ankle instability (CAI). Our aims are (1) to analyze and evaluate the literature on arthroscopic suture anchor repair of the anterior talofibular ligament and (2) to conduct a systematic review of the clinical evidence on the reported outcomes and complications of treating CAI with this technique. We performed a systematic review of the literature using PubMed, Ovid, Elsevier ScienceDirect, Web of Science-Conference Proceedings Citation Index, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1987 to September 2013. Clinical studies using the arthroscopic suture anchor technique to treat CAI were included. Outcome measures consisted of clinical assessment of postoperative ligament stability and complications. In addition, the methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed by use of the modified Coleman Methodology Score. After reviewing 371 studies, we identified 6 studies (5 retrospective case series and 1 prospective case series, all Level IV) that met the inclusion criteria, with a mean Coleman Methodology Score of 71.8 ± 7.52 (range, 63 to 82). In these studies 178 patients (179 ankles) underwent arthroscopic suture anchor repair of the anterior talofibular ligament with a mean follow-up period of 38.9 months (range, 6 to 117.6 months). All patients were reported to have subjective improvement of their ankle instability, with complications in 31 cases. Studies of arthroscopic suture anchor technique to treat CAI are sparse, with moderate mean methodologic quality. The included studies suggest that the arthroscopic technique is a feasible procedure to restore ankle stability; however, on the basis of our review, this technique seems to be associated with a relatively high complication rate. Extensive cadaveric studies, clinical trials, and comparative studies comparing arthroscopic and open repair should be performed in the future. Level