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Sample records for stabilizes plasmids carrying

  1. Plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozwandowicz, M.; Brouwer, M.S.M.; Fischer, J.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Gonzalez-Zorn, B.; Guerra, B.; Mevius, D.J.; Hordijk, J.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is constantly evolving and horizontal gene transfer through plasmids plays a major role. The identification of plasmid characteristics and their association with different bacterial hosts provides crucial knowledge that is essential to understand the

  2. Investigation of diversity of plasmids carrying the blaTEM-52 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielak, Eliza Maria; Bergenholtz, Rikke D.; Jørgensen, Mikael Skaanning

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diversity of plasmids that carry blaTEM-52 genes among Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica originating from animals, meat products and humans. METHODS: A collection of 22 blaTEM-52-encoding plasmids was characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism...... of self-transfer to a plasmid-free E. coli recipient. CONCLUSIONS: The blaTEM-52 gene found in humans could have been transmitted on transferable plasmids originating from animal sources. Some of the blaTEM-52 plasmids carry replicons that differ from the classical ones. Two novel replicons were detected...... (RFLP), replicon typing (by PCR or replicon sequencing), susceptibility testing, assessment of plasmid ability to self-transfer by conjugation and typing of the genetic environment of the blaTEM-52 gene. Detected IncI1 plasmids underwent further plasmid multilocus sequence typing. RESULTS: RFLP profiles...

  3. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-01-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains

  4. Local Dynamic Stability Associated with Load Carrying

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    Jian Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Current study confirmed the sensitivity of local dynamic stability measure in load carrying situation. It was concluded that load carrying tasks were associated with declined local dynamic stability, which may result in increased risk of fall accident. This finding has implications in preventing fall accidents associated with occupational load carrying.

  5. Construction and Application of R Prime Plasmids, Carrying Different Segments of an Octopine Ti Plasmid from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, for Complementation of vir Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Klasen, Ina; Schilperoort, Rob

    1982-01-01

    Several R prime plasmids have been obtained with high efficiency, by enclosing the R plasmid replicator, in an R::Ti cointegrate plasmid, between two copies of the transposon Tn1831, in the same orientation. These R primes carry different segments of an octopine Ti plasmid, and are compatible with

  6. Cryptic Streptococcus mutans 5.6-kb plasmids encode a toxin–antitoxin system for plasmid stabilization

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    Anke Rheinberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In all Streptococcus mutans strains, 5–13% carry a 5.6-kb plasmid. Despite its frequency, little is known about its mediated functions with most of the information coming from a single study focussing on plasmid pUA140. Objective: Here, we describe the sequence and genetic organization of two S. mutans 5.6-kb plasmids, pDC09 and pNC101. Results: Based on PicoGreen dsDNA quantification and Real-Time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR, the plasmid copy number was found to range between 10 and 74, depending on the strain tested. In contrast to literature, we identified six instead of five open reading frames (ORFs. While the putative gene products of ORF1 (as a Rep-protein and ORF2 (as a Mob-protein could be confirmed as being identical to those from pUA140, the functions of ORF3 (unknown and ORF 4 (possibly AtpE homologue could not be further revealed. However, the product of ORF5 showed a fairly high identity (38–50% and structural similarity (58–74% to RelE of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus equi, and Streptococcus downei. In addition, we identified a functionally corresponding ORF6 encoding a protein with 61–68% identity (81–86% similarity to the S. equi and S. downei antitoxin of the RelB family. RelE and RelB together form a plasmid-encoded toxin-antitoxin (TA system, RelBEplas. Despite its rather limited sequence similarity with chromosomal TA systems in S. mutans (RelBEchro, MazEF, HicBA, we found similar tertiary structures applying I-Tasser protein prediction analysis. Conclusion: Type II-toxins, as the plasmid-encoded RelE, are RNA endonucleases. Depending on their mRNA cleavage activity, they might 1 kill every plasmid-free progeny, thereby stabilizing plasmid transfer at the expense of the host and/or 2 help S. mutans enter a dormant state and survive unfavourable environmental conditions. Whilst a function in plasmid stabilization has been confirmed, a function in persistence under nutritional stress, tested here

  7. Characterization of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Carrying Plasmids in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Yu; Lin, Heng-Jia; Chang, Lin-Li; Ma, Ling; Siu, L Kristopher; Tung, Yi-Ching; Lu, Po-Liang

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the replicon types, sizes, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing of plasmids carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Taiwan. Fifty-one Escherichia coli transconjugant strains with plasmids from ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance III Program in 2002 were included. All the 51 plasmids carried a bla CTX-M gene, the majority of which were bla CTX-M-3 (28/51 [54.9%]). Plasmids ranged in size from 126 to 241 kb by S1 nuclease digestion and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and the most common plasmid size (37.3%) was 161-170 kb. The most common replicon type of plasmids was incompatibility group (Inc)A/C (60.8%). The IncA/C plasmids all carried bla CTX-M (bla CTX-M-3, -14, -15 ), and some also carried bla SHV (bla SHV-5, -12 ) genes. All 51 plasmids could be typed with PstI, and 27 (52.9%) belonged to 10 clusters. Thirty-eight of the 51 plasmids were typable with BamHI, and 21 plasmids (55.3%) fell into 7 clusters. Plasmids in the same cluster belonged to the same incompatibility group, with the exception of cluster C6. In conclusion, IncA/C plasmids are the main plasmid type responsible for the dissemination of ESBL genes of K. pneumoniae from Taiwan. RFLP with PstI possessed better discriminatory power than that with BamHI and PCR-based replicon typing for ESBL-carrying plasmids in K. pneumoniae in this study. Greater than 50% of plasmids fell into clusters, and >60% of cluster-classified plasmids were present in clonally unrelated isolates, indicating that horizontal transfer of plasmids plays an important role in the spread of ESBL genes.

  8. Heterogeneity of vat(E)-carrying plasmids in Enterococcus faecium recovered from human and animal sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simjee, Shabbir; Zhang, Yifan; McDermott, Patrick F; Donabedian, Susan M; Zervos, Marcus J; Meng, Jianghong

    2006-09-01

    In this study, quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D)-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates (33 from poultry farms and 1 from a human outpatient) with Q/D minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 4 microg/mL to 32 microg/mL were analysed. Polymerase chain reaction detected the presence of vat(E) in all isolates. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 14 distinct PFGE patterns were identified. The human E. faecium isolate was distinguishable from the 33 farm isolates by PFGE. Southern hybridisation localised the vat(E) gene to an 11 kb plasmid and resulted in five plasmid hybridisation types. The vat(E)-carrying plasmid from the human isolate showed a nearly identical hybridisation pattern to a plasmid from a farm isolate. This study showed that the vat(E) gene, conferring resistance to Q/D, was carried on different plasmids in a heterogeneous group of E. faecium, some of which may be acquired by E. faecium capable of infecting humans.

  9. Photonic plasmid stability of transformed Salmonella Typhimurium: A comparison of three unique plasmids

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    Lay Donald

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella Typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella Typhimurium (S. typh-lux using three different plasmids and characterize their respective photonic properties. Results In presence of ampicillin (AMP, S. typh-lux with pCGLS-1, pAK1-lux and pXEN-1 plasmids exhibited 100% photon-emitting colonies over a 10-d study period. Photon emitters of S. typh-lux with pCGLS-1, pAK1-lux and pXEN-1 without AMP selection decreased over time (P 7 to 1 × 109 CFU, P 0.05; although photonic emissions across a range of bacterial concentrations were not different (1 × 104 to 1 × 106 CFU, P > 0.05. For very low density bacterial concentrations imaged in 96 well plates photonic emissions were positively correlated with bacterial concentration (P 3 to 1 × 105 CFU low to high were different in the 96-well plate format (P Conclusion These data characterize photon stability properties for S. typh-lux transformed with three different photon generating plasmids that may facilitate real-time Salmonella tracking using in vivo or in situ biophotonic paradigms.

  10. Salmonella Typhimurium ST213 is associated with two types of IncA/C plasmids carrying multiple resistance determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Magdalena; Calva, Edmundo; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Cevallos, Miguel A; Campos, Freddy; Zaidi, Mussaret B; Silva, Claudia

    2011-01-11

    Salmonella Typhimurium ST213 was first detected in the Mexican Typhimurium population in 2001. It is associated with a multi-drug resistance phenotype and a plasmid-borne blaCMY-2 gene conferring resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between the ST213 genotype and blaCMY-2 plasmids. The blaCMY-2 gene was carried by an IncA/C plasmid. ST213 strains lacking the blaCMY-2 gene carried a different IncA/C plasmid. PCR analysis of seven DNA regions distributed throughout the plasmids showed that these IncA/C plasmids were related, but the presence and absence of DNA stretches produced two divergent types I and II. A class 1 integron (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2) was detected in most of the type I plasmids. Type I contained all the plasmids carrying the blaCMY-2 gene and a subset of plasmids lacking blaCMY-2. Type II included all of the remaining blaCMY-2-negative plasmids. A sequence comparison of the seven DNA regions showed that both types were closely related to IncA/C plasmids found in Escherichia, Salmonella, Yersinia, Photobacterium, Vibrio and Aeromonas. Analysis of our Typhimurium strains showed that the region containing the blaCMY-2 gene is inserted between traA and traC as a single copy, like in the E. coli plasmid pAR060302. The floR allele was identical to that of Newport pSN254, suggesting a mosaic pattern of ancestry with plasmids from other Salmonella serovars and E. coli. Only one of the tested strains was able to conjugate the IncA/C plasmid at very low frequencies (10-7 to 10-9). The lack of conjugation ability of our IncA/C plasmids agrees with the clonal dissemination trend suggested by the chromosomal backgrounds and plasmid pattern associations. The ecological success of the newly emerging Typhimurium ST213 genotype in Mexico may be related to the carriage of IncA/C plasmids. We conclude that types I and II of IncA/C plasmids originated from a common ancestor and that the

  11. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuyu; Dalsgaard, Anders; Hammerum, Anette M; Porsbo, Lone J; Jensen, Lars B

    2010-07-30

    Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans) were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc) groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%), while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively). Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes. Sul genes were distributed widely in E. coli isolated

  12. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

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    Hammerum Anette M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3 in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. Results A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%, while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively. Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes

  13. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates harboring small erm(T)-carrying plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compain, Fabrice; Hays, Constantin; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Joubrel, Caroline; Poyart, Claire

    2014-11-01

    Among 1,827 group B Streptococcus (GBS) strains collected between 2006 and 2013 by the French National Reference Center for Streptococci, 490 (26.8%) strains were erythromycin resistant. The erm(T) resistance gene was found in six strains belonging to capsular polysaccharides Ia, III, and V and was carried by the same mobilizable plasmid, which could be efficiently transferred by mobilization to GBS and Enterococcus faecalis recipients, thus promoting a broad dissemination of erm(T). Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

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    Päivi Lahti

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.

  15. Detection of a Novel qnrB19-Carrying Plasmid Variant Mediating Decreased Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Hadar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegen, Ulrike; Klein, Günter; de Jong, Anno; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Thirty Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Hadar isolates of avian origin collected between 2007 and 2010 from chicken carcasses in five geographically spread abattoirs in Germany were investigated for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants. Four isolates were identified by PCR analysis and hybridization experiments to carry qnrB genes. The isolates were indistinguishable by their XbaI macrorestriction patterns and did not exhibit a mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. The qnrB genes were found to be located on small plasmids of ∼2.6 kb, which mediated decreased susceptibility only to quinolones. The plasmids were assigned to the same type, pHAD28, and transformation studies into an Escherichia coli recipient strain confirmed their transferability. Sequence analysis of the complete plasmid pHAD28 revealed the presence of a qnrB19 gene. The gene was found on a novel variant of qnrB19-harboring plasmids with high similarity to plasmids pPAB19-3 from E. coli and pPAB19-4 from Salmonella sp. M9397. A presumptive recombination side was detected, suggesting that interplasmid recombination events might have played a role in the development of this plasmid variant.

  16. Diversity and stability of plasmids from glycopeptide resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Villadsen, A. G.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    was seen at the end of the 7-year period, coinciding with the ban in 1998 of the macrolide tylosin as growth promoter for pig production. The stability of the plasmid in its original host was compared with stability of the same plasmid in BM4105RF, when both strains were maintained in liquid cultures...

  17. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shuyu, Wu; Dalsgaard, A.; Hammerum, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli......Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids...... carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. Results A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses...

  18. The novel Pseudomonas putida plasmid p12969-2 harbors an In127-carrying multidrug-resistant region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Niu, Yong; Sun, Fengjun; Yang, Ying; Luo, Wenbo; Wang, Zhe

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to characterize a multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmid p12969-2 coexistent with the previously reported one p12969-DIM in clinical Pseudomonas putida. The complete sequence of p12969-2 was determined using next-generation sequencing technology. p12969-2 contains a 29.2 kb MDR region, which carries In127 harboring three resistance genes aadA2, qacED1 and sul1. The MDR region is derived from the connection of Tn5041D and Tn5045, which is facilitated by two copies of miniature inverted-repeat transposable element. Conclusion & future perspective: p12969-2 represents a novel lineage with the highest but limited nucleotide sequence similarity with the plasmid pGRT1 that does not carry any of the resistance genes. This is the first report of coexistence of two MDR plasmids in P. putida.

  19. A large conjugative Acinetobacter baumannii plasmid carrying the sul2 sulphonamide and strAB streptomycin resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Mohammad; Ambrose, Stephanie J; Hall, Ruth M

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that often complicates treatment because of its high level of resistance to antibiotics. Though plasmids can potentially introduce various genes into bacterial strains, compared to other Gram-negative bacteria, information about the unique A. baumannii plasmid repertoire is limited. Here, whole genome sequence data was used to determine the plasmid content of strain A297 (RUH875), the reference strain for the globally disseminated multiply resistant A. baumannii clone, global clone 1(GC1). A297 contains three plasmids. Two known plasmids were present; one, pA297-1 (pRAY*), carries the aadB gentamicin, kanamycin and tobramycin resistance gene and another is an 8.7kb cryptic plasmid often found in GC1 isolates. The third plasmid, pA297-3, is 200kb and carries the sul2 sulphonamide resistance gene and strAB streptomycin resistance gene within Tn6172 and a mer mercuric ion resistance module elsewhere. pA297-3 transferred sulphonamide, streptomycin and mercuric ion resistance at high frequency to a susceptible A. baumannii recipient, and contains several genes potentially involved in conjugative transfer. However, a relaxase gene was not found. It also includes several genes encoding proteins involved in DNA metabolism such as partitioning. However, a gene encoding a replication initiation protein could not be found. pA297-3 includes two copies of a Miniature Inverted-Repeat Transposable Element (MITE), named MITE-297, bracketing a 77.5kb fragment, which contains several IS and the mer module. Several plasmids related to but smaller than pA297-3 were found in the GenBank nucleotide database. They were found in different A. baumannii clones and are wide spread. They all contain either Tn6172 or a variant in the same position in the backbone as Tn6172 in pA297-3. Some related plasmids have lost the segment between the MITE-297 copies and retain only one MITE-297. Others have segments of various lengths between

  20. A P7 Phage-Like Plasmid Carrying mcr-1 in an ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolate

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    Weilong Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strain, named SCKP83, was isolated and found to be resistant to colistin thanks to the presence plasmid-borne colistin resistant gene mcr-1. The strain was subjected to whole genome sequencing and conjugation experiments. The subsequent analysis indicated that the strain belongs to ST15 and the capsular type K41. In SCKP83, mcr-1 was carried by a 97.4-kb non-self-transmissible plasmid, a 90.9-kb region of which was predicted as an intact phage. This phage was 47.79% GC content, encoded 105 proteins and contained three tRNAs. mcr-1 was located downstream of two copies of the insertion sequence ISApl1 (one complete and one truncated and was inserted in the ant1 gene, which encodes a putative antirepressor for antagonizing C1 repression, in this phage. The phage is highly similar to phage P7 (77% coverage and 98% identity from Escherichia coli. Several similar mcr-1-carrying plasmids have been found in E. coli at various locations in China, suggesting that these phage-like plasmids have circulated in China. The findings in this study suggest that the P7 phage-like plasmids are not restricted to E. coli and may represent new vehicles to mediate the inter-species spread of mcr-1.

  1. Characterization of the Complete Nucleotide Sequences of IncA/C2 Plasmids Carrying In809-Like Integrons from Enterobacteriaceae Isolates of Wildlife Origin.

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    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Kutilova, Iva; Medvecky, Matej; Hrabak, Jaroslav; Dolejska, Monika

    2017-09-01

    A total of 18 Enterobacteriaceae (17 from gulls and 1 from a clinical sample) collected from Australia, carrying IncA/C plasmids with the IMP-encoding In809-like integrons, were studied. Seven plasmids, being representatives of different origins, plasmid sizes, replicon combinations, and resistance genes, were completely sequenced. Plasmid pEc158, identified in a clinical Escherichia coli ST752 isolate, showed extensive similarity to type 2 IncA/C 2 plasmids. pEc158 carried none of the bla CMY-2 -like region or ARI-B and ARI-A regions, while it contained a hybrid transposon structure. The six remaining plasmids, which were of wildlife origin, were highly similar to each other and probably were fusion derivatives of type 1 and type 2 A/C 2 plasmids. The latter plasmids contained an ARI-B region and hybrid transposon structures. In all plasmids, hybrid transposon structures containing In809-like integrons were inserted 3,434 bp downstream of the rhs2 start codon. In all cases, the one outermost 38-bp inverted repeat (IR) of the transposon was associated with the Tn 1696 tnp module, while the other outermost 38-bp IR of the transposon was associated with either a Tn 6317 -like module or a Tn 21 mer module. However, the internal structure of the transposon and the resistance genes were different in each plasmid. These findings indicated that, for the specific periods of time and settings, different IncA/C 2 plasmid types carrying In809-like elements circulated among isolates of wildlife and clinical origins. Additionally, they provided the basis for speculations regarding the reshuffling of IncA/C 2 plasmids with In809-like integrons and confirmed the rapid evolution of IncA/C 2 plasmid lineages. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Effect of Surfactants on Plasmid DNA Stability and Release from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of surfactants on plasmid DNA during preparation and release from polylactic glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. Methods: Various surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic (Span, Tween, Triton X100, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate), were added during the ...

  3. Nosocomial Outbreak of Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates ContainingblaOXA-237Carried on a Plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujer, Andrea M; Higgins, Paul G; Rudin, Susan D; Buser, Genevieve L; Marshall, Steven H; Xanthopoulou, Kyriaki; Seifert, Harald; Rojas, Laura J; Domitrovic, T Nicholas; Cassidy, P Maureen; Cunningham, Margaret C; Vega, Robert; Furuno, Jon P; Pfeiffer, Christopher D; Beldavs, Zintars G; Wright, Meredith S; Jacobs, Michael R; Adams, Mark D; Bonomo, Robert A

    2017-11-01

    Carbapenem antibiotics are among the mainstays for treating infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii , especially in the Northwest United States, where carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii remains relatively rare. However, between June 2012 and October 2014, an outbreak of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii occurred in 16 patients from five health care facilities in the state of Oregon. All isolates were defined as extensively drug resistant. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that the isolates belonged to sequence type 2 (international clone 2 [IC2]) and were >95% similar as determined by repetitive-sequence-based PCR analysis. Multiplex PCR revealed the presence of a bla OXA carbapenemase gene, later identified as bla OXA-237 Whole-genome sequencing of all isolates revealed a well-supported separate branch within a global A. baumannii phylogeny. Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) SMRT sequencing was also performed on one isolate to gain insight into the genetic location of the carbapenem resistance gene. We discovered that bla OXA-237 , flanked on either side by IS Aba1 elements in opposite orientations, was carried on a 15,198-bp plasmid designated pORAB01-3 and was present in all 16 isolates. The plasmid also contained genes encoding a TonB-dependent receptor, septicolysin, a type IV secretory pathway (VirD4 component, TraG/TraD family) ATPase, an integrase, a RepB family plasmid DNA replication initiator protein, an alpha/beta hydrolase, and a BrnT/BrnA type II toxin-antitoxin system. This is the first reported outbreak in the northwestern United States associated with this carbapenemase. Particularly worrisome is that bla OXA-237 was carried on a plasmid and found in the most prominent worldwide clonal group IC2, potentially giving pORAB01-3 great capacity for future widespread dissemination. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

    2012-03-14

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  5. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Luft, Benjamin J.; Schutzer, Steven E.; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Huang, Wai Mun; Vujadinovic, Marija; Aron, John K.; Vargas, Levy C.; Freeman, Sam; Radune, Diana; Weidman, Janice F.; Dimitrov, George I.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Sosa, Julia E.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Dunn, John J.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33–40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi ∼900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short ≤20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant. PMID:22432010

  6. Lactose carrier protein of Escherichia coli. Structure and expression of plasmids carrying the Y gene of the lac operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teather, R M; Bramhall, J; Riede, I; Wright, J K; Fürst, M; Aichele, G; Wilhelm, U; Overath, P

    1980-01-01

    The previously described hybrid plasmid pC7 which carries lacI+O+delta(Z)Y+A+ on a 12.3 X 10(6)-Mr DNA fragment [Teather et al. (1978) Mol. Gen. Genet. 159, 239-248] was partially digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI under conditions reducing the recognition sequence to d(A-A-T-T) and ligated to the vector pB322. lac Y-carrying inserts of various sized (Mr 1.5-4.7 X 10(6)) were obtained. Hybrid plasmid pTE18 (2300-base-pair insert) carries part of the I (repressor) gene, the promotor-operator region, part of the Z (beta-galactosidase) gene, the Y (lactose carrier) gene and part of the A (transacetylase) gene. Upon induction of pTE18-harbouring strains the Y-gene product is expressed at a nearly constant rate for several generations and accumulates to a level of 12-16% of the total cytoplasmic membrane protein. Integration into the membrane leads to active carrier as judged by binding and transport measurements.

  7. Diversity and stability of Plasmids from glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium (GRE) isolated from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Villadsen, A.G.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    was seen at the end of the 7-year period, coinciding with the ban in 1998 of the macrolide tylosin as growth promoter for pig production. The stability of the plasmid in its original host was compared with stability of the same plasmid in BM4105RF, when both strains were maintained in liquid cultures...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human-Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain of the Emerging Sequence Type 213 Harboring a Multidrug Resistance IncA/C Plasmid and a blaCMY-2-Carrying IncF Plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia; Calva, Edmundo; Calva, Juan J; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Puente, José L; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2015-11-12

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 33676 was isolated in Mexico City, Mexico, from a patient with a systemic infection, and its complete genome sequence was determined using PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Strain 33676 harbors an IncF plasmid carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporin gene blaCMY-2 and a multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid. Copyright © 2015 Silva et al.

  9. Cryptic plasmid pRK2 from Escherichia coli W: sequence analysis and segregational stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánek, Václav; Valešová, Renata; Kyslík, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, - (2005), s. 86-91 ISSN 0147-619X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : cryptic plasmid * escherichia coli * segregational stability Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.446, year: 2005

  10. STABILITY OF PLASMIDS IN 5 STRAINS OF SALMONELLA MAINTAINED IN STAB CULTURE AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. E.; Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    1994-01-01

    Four strains of Salmonella berta and one of Salm. enteritidis were stored as stab cultures in sugar-free agar at 5 degrees, 22 degrees and 30 degrees C and in 15% glycerol at -80 degrees C. The stability of the plasmid profiles in each of the strains was monitored over a period of 2.5 years. Plas...

  11. Complete Sequences and Characterization of Two Novel Plasmids Carrying aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS Gene in Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiao-Ying; Pan, Jing-Cao; Gu, Ya-Ming; Zheng, Wei; Li, Jun; Yu, Hua

    2016-03-01

    The complete sequences of two previously reported plasmids carrying plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes from Shigella flexneri in China have not been available. The present study using the p5-C3 assembly method revealed that (1) the plasmid pSF07201 with aac(6')-Ib-cr had 75,335 bp with antibiotic resistance genes CTX-M-3, TEM-1, and FosA3; (2) seven fragments of pSF07201 had more than 99% homology with the seven corresponding plasmids; (3) the other plasmid pSF07202 with qnrS had 47,669 bp with antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 and 99.95% homology with a segment of pKF362122, which has the qnrS gene from location 162,490 to 163,146. A conjugation and electrotransformation experiment suggested that these two plasmids might horizontally transfer between and coexist in Escherichia coli J53 and S. flexneri 2a 301. Either the aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrS gene contributed to, but only the coexistence of the two genes conferred to the resistance to ciprofloxacin in these two strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the complete sequences of the aac(6')-Ib-cr- and qnrS-positive plasmids in Shigella isolates. Our findings indicate that two genes probably evolve through horizontal plasmid transfer between the different bacterial types.

  12. Characterization of plasmids carrying oqxAB in bla(CTX-M)-negative Escherichia coli isolates from food-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Tao; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Qiu-E; Huang, Ting; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2014-12-01

    To study the characteristics of plasmids harboring oqxAB among bla(CTX-M)-negative Escherichia coli isolates and search for oqxAB-harboring plasmids similar to plasmids carrying oqxAB-bla(CTX-M) reported previously, conjugation experiment was performed for 115 randomly selected oqxAB-positive but bla(CTX-M)-negative E. coli isolates from diseased animals in Guangdong, China. S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and southern blotting experiments were performed to investigate the location of oqxAB and other resistance genes. The EcoRI digestion profiles of the plasmids with oqxAB were also analyzed. The clonal relatedness of donor isolates was investigated by PFGE. In this study, 32 oqxAB transconjugants were successfully obtained and most transconjugants showed multidrug resistances. Eleven replicon combination types were found in these transconjugants. floR and oqxAB were found on the same plasmids in all nine transconjugants resistant to florfenicol. The sequences between floR and oqxAB were identical in most transconjugants and the two genes were both linked with tnp in insertion sequences. Nine F18:A-:B1 plasmids with only oqxAB shared identical EcoRI digestion profiles and the profiles were also identical with that of a plasmid carrying oqxAB-bla(CTX-M) found previously. Co-transfer of plasmids carrying oqxAB and fosA3, respectively, was also observed in one isolate. This study demonstrates the dissemination of oqxAB among bla(CTX-M)-negative E. coli isolates was mainly mediated by identical F18:A-:B1 plasmids. A novel arrangement of regions between floR and oqxAB might play an important role in the dissemination of floR-oqxAB. This is the first description of the genetic environment of the relationship between oqxAB and floR in E. coli.

  13. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    that include global equities, global bonds, currencies, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and equity index options. This predictability underlies the strong returns to "carry trades" that go long high-carry and short low-carry securities, applied almost exclusively to currencies, but shown here...

  14. Characterization of blaTEM-52-carrying plasmids of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Salmonella enterica isolates from chicken meat with a common supplier in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuko; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    The acquisition of resistance to cephalosporins among Salmonella spp. is a major public health concern. This study identified clonal plasmids carrying bla(TEM-52) from 10 Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis and Manhattan isolates from retail chicken meats that originated from a common supplier in Japan. Whole-genome analyses of the representative plasmids, including pYM4, revealed that they are 38 kb in size and that pYM4 is identical to pDKX1 from beef in Denmark, suggesting a global dissemination of resistance mediated by the plasmids. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Complete sequences of IncHI1 plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 and qnrS1 in equine Escherichia coli provide new insights into plasmid evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolejska, Monika; Villa, Laura; Minoia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the structure of two multidrug-resistant IncHI1 plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 in Escherichia coli isolates disseminated in an equine clinic in the Czech Republic. METHODS: A complete nucleotide sequencing of 239 kb IncHI1 (pEQ1) and 287 kb IncHI1/X1 (pEQ2) plasmids...... was performed using the 454-Genome Sequencer FLX system. The sequences were compared using bioinformatic tools with other sequenced IncHI1 plasmids. RESULTS: A comparative analysis of pEQ1 and pEQ2 identified high nucleotide identity with the IncHI1 type 2 plasmids. A novel 24 kb module containing an operon......CTX-M-1 gene was formed by a truncated macrolide resistance cluster and flanked by IS26 as previously observed in IncI1 and IncN plasmids. The IncHI1 plasmid changed size and gained the quinolone resistance gene qnrS1 as a result of IS26-mediated fusion with an IncX1 plasmid. CONCLUSIONS: Our data...

  16. Prevalence and diversity of IncX plasmids carrying fluoroquinolone and β-lactam resistance genes in Escherichia coli originating from diverse sources and geographical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiasova, Hana; Dolejska, Monika

    2016-08-01

    To describe the prevalence and diversity of IncX plasmids with antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae and to identify the most disseminated lineages of the plasmid family. IncX plasmids were screened in 1894 Enterobacteriaceae isolates resistant to cefotaxime (2 mg/L) or with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg/L) obtained from various sources in five continents using PCR. IncX plasmid-harbouring isolates were identified using MALDI-TOF or biochemical tests, and screened for antibiotic resistance genes using PCR and sequencing; their clonality was determined by PFGE. Horizontal transfer of plasmids was tested using transformation and conjugation. IncX plasmids were characterized by S1-nuclease and PFGE, RFLP and hybridization. A total of 164 Escherichia coli isolates (8.7%, n = 1894) carried at least one IncX subgroup. Seven isolates harboured two distinct subgroups. IncX1 subgroup was found in 93 isolates, followed by IncX2 (35 isolates), IncX4 (28) and IncX3 (15). IncX4 plasmids were not transferred horizontally as single plasmids and therefore excluded from further analysis. The most disseminated lineages of IncX plasmids included IncX1 harbouring qnrS1 and blaTEM-1,-135 found in 36 E. coli from different sources in Europe and Australia and IncX2 carrying qnrS1 and tet(A) detected in nine E. coli from wildlife in Europe. IncX3 plasmids harboured predominantly blaSHV-12 and qnrS1 or qnrB7. IncX plasmids were widely distributed in E. coli from wildlife in Europe and were predominantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance genes. Plasmids showing indistinguishable restriction profiles were identified in E. coli from different sources and countries suggesting wide dissemination of certain plasmid lineages. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Characterization of IncN plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 and qnr genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella from animals, the environment and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolejska, Monika; Villa, Laura; Hasman, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    DNA purified from the respective E. coli transformants.Results Three types of IncN plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1, qnrS1 and qnrB19 genes were identified in strains isolated from the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Denmark, Italy and the Netherlands, corresponding to pMLST sequence type (ST) 1, ST3...... and ST8, respectively. Related plasmids circulating in human and animal isolates were identified. Complete nucleotide sequences of the ST1 pHHA45 plasmid carrying blaCTX-M-1, isolated from E. coli from pigs in Denmark, and the ST3 pKT58A plasmid harbouring qnrS1, identified in E. coli from a water bird......Objectives The aim of the study was to characterize a collection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella harbouring qnr and blaCTX-M-1 genes on IncN plasmids isolated from humans, food-producing, companion and wild animals, and the environment from six European countries.Methods Nineteen IncN plasmids...

  18. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    2018-01-01

    -sectionally and in time series for a host of different asset classes, including global equities, global bonds, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and options. Carry is not explained by known predictors of returns from these asset classes, and it captures many of these predictors, providing a unifying framework...... for return predictability. We reject a generalized version of Uncovered Interest Parity and the Expectations Hypothesis in favor of models with varying risk premia, in which carry strategies are commonly exposed to global recession, liquidity, and volatility risks, though none fully explains carry’s premium....

  19. A Transposable Partitioning Locus Used To Stabilize Plasmid-Borne Hydrogen Oxidation and Trifolitoxin Production Genes in a Sinorhizobium Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Angela D.; Wojtasiak, Michelle L.; Robleto, Eduardo A.; Triplett, Eric W.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nitrogen-fixing inoculum strains for leguminous crops must be able to effectively compete with indigenous strains for nodulation, enhance legume productivity compared to the productivity obtained with indigenous strains, and maintain stable expression of any added genes in the absence of selection pressure. We constructed a transposable element containing the tfx region for expression of increased nodulation competitiveness and the par locus for plasmid stability. The transposon was inserted into tetA of pHU52, a broad-host-range plasmid conferring the H2 uptake phenotype. The resulting plasmid, pHUTFXPAR, conferred the plasmid stability, trifolitoxin production, and H2 uptake phenotypes in the broad-host-range organism Sinorhizobium sp. strain ANU280. The broad applications of a transposon conferring plasmid stability are discussed. PMID:9572932

  20. Characterization of plasmids carrying the blaOXA-24/40 carbapenemase gene and the genes encoding the AbkA/AbkB proteins of a toxin/antitoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda, Noraida; Gato, Eva; Roca, Ignasi; López, María; de Alegría, Carlos Ruíz; Fernández Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Pachón, Jerónimo; Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Vila, Jordi; Bou, Germán; Tomás, María

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) is a major source of nosocomial infections in Spain associated with the production of OXA-58-like or OXA-24/40-like β-lactamase enzymes. We analysed the plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene in CRAb isolates obtained a decade apart. The presence of β-lactamases was screened for by PCR (metallo-β-lactamases, carbapenem-hydrolysing class D β-lactamases, GES and KPC) in 101 CRAb isolates obtained in two multicentre studies (GEIH/REIPI-Ab-2000 and GEIH/REIPI-Ab-2010; n = 493 Acinetobacter spp). We analysed the distribution and characterization of the plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene and sequenced two plasmids, AbATCC223p (2000) and AbATCC329p (2010) from A. baumannii ATCC 17978 transformants. Acquisition of the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene was the main mechanism underlying resistance to carbapenems (48.7% in 2000 compared with 51.6% in 2010). This gene was mainly isolated in ST2 A. baumannii strains in both studies, although some novel STs (ST79 and ST80) appeared in 2010. The gene was located in plasmids (8-12 kbp) associated with the repAci2 or repAci2/repGR12 types. The sequences of AbATCC223p (8840 bp) and AbATCC329p (8842 bp) plasmids were similar, particularly regarding the presence of the genes encoding the AbkA/AbkB proteins associated with the toxin/antitoxin system. Moreover, the abkA/abkB gene sequences (>96% identity) were also located in plasmids harbouring the bla(OXA-58)-like gene. The action of OXA-24/40 and OXA-58 β-lactamase-like enzymes represents the main mechanism underlying resistance to carbapenems in Spain in the last decade. AbkA/AbkB proteins in the toxin/antitoxin system may be involved in the successful dissemination of plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene, and probably also the bla(OXA-58)-like gene, thus contributing to the plasmid stability. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  1. Evolution of IncA/C blaCMY-₂-carrying plasmids by acquisition of the blaNDM-₁ carbapenemase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Villa, Laura; Poirel, Laurent; Bonnin, Rémy A; Nordmann, Patrice

    2012-02-01

    The bla(NDM-1) gene has been reported to be often located on broad-host-range plasmids of the IncA/C type in clinical but also environmental bacteria recovered from the New Delhi, India, area. IncA/C-type plasmids are the main vehicles for the spread of the cephalosporinase gene bla(CMY-2), frequently identified in the United States, Canada, and Europe. In this study, we completed the sequence of IncA/C plasmid pNDM-KN carrying the bla(NDM-1) gene, recovered from a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from Kenya. This sequence was compared with those of three IncA/C-type reference plasmids from Escherichia coli, Yersinia ruckeri, and Photobacterium damselae. Comparative analysis showed that the bla(NDM-1) gene was located on a widely diffused plasmid scaffold known to be responsible for the spread of bla(CMY-2)-like genes and consequently for resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Considering that IncA/C plasmids possess a broad host range, this scaffold might support a large-scale diffusion of the bla(NDM-1) gene among Gram-negative rods.

  2. Complete plasmid sequence carrying type IV-like and type VII secretion systems from an atypical mycobacteria strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mascarenhas Morgado

    Full Text Available The genus Mycobacterium is highly diverse and ubiquitous in nature, comprehending fast- and slow-growing species with distinct impact in public health. The plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer represents one of the major events in bacteria evolution. Here, we report the complete sequence of a 160,489 bp circular plasmid (pCBMA213_2 from an atypical and fast-growing environmental mycobacteria. This is a unique plasmid, in comparison with the characterised mycobacteria plasmids, harboring a type IV-like and ESX-P2 type VII secretion systems. pCBMA213_2 can be further explored for evolutionary and conjugation studies as well as a tool to manipulate DNA within this bacteria genus.

  3. β-Carotene production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae with regard to plasmid stability and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Nicole; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain was used for the production of β-carotene. The episomal plasmid YEplac195YB/I/E was extended by a gene coding for the mevalonate kinase (mvaK1) from Staphylococcus aureus. The adh1 promoter was chosen for constitutive expression of mvaK1. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae G175 (YEplac-CaroSA) synthesised β-carotene by expressing the carotenogenic genes of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous together with the mvaK1 gene. Cells of this strain were investigated for their carotenoid contents in YNB and YPD media. A corresponding mvaK1 transcript in the recombinant yeast host was verified. Growth experiments of a specific erg12 deletion mutant showed that the mevalonate kinase (MvaK1) was able to complement the function of the deleted native mevalonate kinase (Erg12) from S. cerevisiae in the MVA pathway under control of the constitutive adh1 promoter. Cells of S. cerevisiae G175 (YEplac-CaroSA) exhibited high plasmid stability under either selective or non-selective cultivation conditions. Time course experiments demonstrated high plasmid stability even over extended cultivation periods. Carotenoid production was therefore also stable in larger culture volumes. Due to the stability of the plasmid, cultivation of the cells in complex YPD medium was possible, and 14.3 mg β-carotene per litre and a cell density of 9 g cell dry matter (CDM) per litre were achieved. The highest amount of 3,897 μg β-carotene per gramme CDM at a cell density of 1 g CDM per litre was measured after cultivation of the cells in YNB medium with glucose as sole carbon source.

  4. Detection of the IncX3 plasmid carrying blaKPC-3 in a Serratia marcescens strain isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gona, Floriana; Caio, Carla; Iannolo, Gioacchin; Monaco, Francesco; Di Mento, Giuseppina; Cuscino, Nicola; Fontana, Ignazio; Panarello, Giovanna; Maugeri, Gaetano; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Stefani, Stefania; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2017-10-01

    Dissemination of resistance to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae through plasmids is an increasingly important concern in health care worldwide. Here we report the first description of an IncX3 plasmid carrying the blaKPC-3 gene in a strain of Serratia marcescens isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient at the transplantation centre ISMETT (Istituto Mediterraneo per i Trapianti e Terapie ad Alta Specializzazione, Palermo, Italy). To localize the transposable element containing the resistance-associated gene Next-Generation Sequencing of the bacterial DNA was performed. S. marcescens was positive for blaKPC-3 and blaSHV-11 genes. The molecular analysis demonstrated that the blaKPC-3 gene of this bacterial strain was located in one copy of the Tn-3-like element Tn4401-a carried in a plasmid that is 53 392 bp in size and showed the typical IncX3 scaffold. Our data demonstrated the presence of a new blaKPC-3 harbouring the IncX3 plasmid in S. marcescens. The possible dissemination among Enterobacteriaceae of this type of plasmid should be monitored and evaluated in terms of clinical risk.

  5. Complete Sequence of pSAM7, an IncX4 Plasmid Carrying a Novel blaCTX-M-14b Transposition Unit Isolated from Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae from Cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokes, M.O.; Abuoun, M.; Umur, S.; Wu, G.; Partridge, S.R.; Mevius, D.J.; Coldham, N.G.; Fielder, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    The same plasmid carrying blaCTX-M-14b was identified from an Escherichia coli isolate and an Enterobacter cloacae isolate collected from cattle in the United Kingdom by complete plasmid sequencing. This 35,341-bp plasmid, pSAM7, had an IncX4 backbone that is 99% identical to that of pJIE143 from a

  6. BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids, extrachromosomal DNA, were identified in bacteria pertaining to family of Enterobacteriacae for the very first time. After that, they were discovered in almost every single observed strain. The structure of plasmids is made of circular double chain DNA molecules which are replicated autonomously in a host cell. Their length may vary from few up to several hundred kilobase (kb. Among the bacteria, plasmids are mostly transferred horizontally by conjugation process. Plasmid replication process can be divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The process involves DNA helicase I, DNA gyrase, DNA polymerase III, endonuclease, and ligase.Plasmids contain genes essential for plasmid function and their preservation in a host cell (the beginning and the control of replication. Some of them possess genes whichcontrol plasmid stability. There is a common opinion that plasmids are unnecessary fora growth of bacterial population and their vital functions; thus, in many cases they can be taken up or kicked out with no lethal effects to a plasmid host cell. However,there are numerous biological functions of bacteria related to plasmids. Plasmids identification and classification are based upon their genetic features which are presented permanently in all of them, and these are: abilities to preserve themselves in a host cell and to control a replication process. In this way, plasmids classification among incompatibility groups is performed. The method of replicon typing, which is based on genotype and not on phenotype characteristics, has the same results as in compatibility grouping.

  7. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake.

  8. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake. PMID:26848973

  9. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Werbowy

    Full Text Available Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively. The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2 nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake.

  10. Conjugative IncFI plasmids carrying CTX-M-15 among Escherichia coli ESBL producing isolates at a University hospital in Germany

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    Hain Torsten

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, constitute an emerging public-health concern. Little data on the molecular epidemiology of ESBL producing Escherichia coli is available in Germany. Here we describe the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of ESBL producing-Escherichia coli isolates at a German University hospital. Methods We analysed 63 non-duplicate clinical ESBL isolates obtained over an 8-month period using PCR and sequence-based ESBL allele typing, plasmid replicon typing, phylogenetic group typing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE based genotyping and plasmid profiling was performed, as well as confirmatory DNA-based hybridization assays. Results Examination of the 63 Escherichia coli isolates revealed an almost equal distribution among the E. coli phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2 and D. High prevalence (36/63 of the CTX-M-15 gene was observed and an analysis of PFGE-based patterns revealed the presence of this CTX-M allele in multiple clones. Resistance to cefotaxime was a transferable trait and a commonly occurring 145.5 kb conjugative IncFI plasmid was detected in 65% of E. coli carrying the CTX-M-15 allele. The rate of transferable antibiotic resistances for GM, SXT, TET, GM-SXT-TET, SXT-TET and GM-TET was 33%, 61%, 61%, 27%, 44% and 11%, respectively. The remaining strains did not have a common IncFI plasmid but harboured transferable IncFI plasmids with sizes that ranged from 97 to 242.5 kb. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the presence of IncFI plasmids within the prevailing E. coli population in a hospital setting and suggest that the dissemination of CTX-M-15 allele is associated to lateral transfer of these well-adapted, conjugative IncFI plasmids among various E. coli genotypes.

  11. A GC1 Acinetobacter baumannii isolate carrying AbaR3 and the aminoglycoside resistance transposon TnaphA6 in a conjugative plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Mohammad; Holt, Kathryn E; Pickard, Derek; Dougan, Gordon; Hall, Ruth M

    2014-04-01

    To locate the acquired antibiotic resistance genes, including the amikacin resistance transposon TnaphA6, in the genome of an Australian isolate belonging to Acinetobacter baumannii global clone 1 (GC1). A multiply antibiotic-resistant GC1 isolate harbouring TnaphA6 was sequenced using Illumina HiSeq, and reads were used to generate a de novo assembly and determine multilocus sequence types (STs). PCR was used to assemble the AbaR chromosomal resistance island and a large plasmid carrying TnaphA6. Plasmid DNA sequences were compared with ones available in GenBank. Conjugation experiments were conducted. The A. baumannii GC1 isolate G7 was shown to include the AbaR3 antibiotic resistance island. It also contains an 8.7 kb cryptic plasmid, pAb-G7-1, and a 70,100 bp plasmid, pAb-G7-2, carrying TnaphA6. pAb-G7-2 belongs to the Aci6 Acinetobacter plasmid family. It encodes transfer functions and was shown to conjugate. Plasmids related to pAb-G7-2 were detected in further amikacin-resistant GC1 isolates using PCR. From the genome sequence, isolate G7 was ST1 (Institut Pasteur scheme) and ST231 (Oxford scheme). Using Oxford scheme PCR-based methods, the isolate was ST109 and this difference was traced to a single base difference resulting from the inclusion of the original primers in the gpi segment analysed. The multiply antibiotic-resistant GC1 isolate G7 carries most of its resistance genes in AbaR3 located in the chromosome. However, TnaphA6 is on a conjugative plasmid, pAb-G7-2. Primers developed to locate TnaphA6 in pAb-G7-2 will simplify the detection of plasmids related to pAb-G7-2 in A. baumannii isolates.

  12. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Tang, I-Ching [Bioprocessing Innovative Company, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at {proportional_to}6.0. (orig.)

  13. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. → Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. → Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  14. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, E.H., E-mail: md.ezharul.hoque@med.monash.edu.my [Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  15. Plasmid vectors for Xylella fastidiosa utilizing a toxin-antitoxin system for plasmid stability in the absence of antibiotic selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacte...

  16. Ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella Typhi carries an IncI1-ST31 plasmid encoding CTX-M-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghout, Bilal; Saha, Senjuti; Sajib, Mohammad Saiful Islam; Tanmoy, Arif Mohammad; Islam, Maksuda; Kay, Gemma L; Langridge, Gemma C; Endtz, Hubert P; Wain, John; Saha, Samir K

    2018-04-04

    Ceftriaxone is the drug of choice for typhoid fever and the emergence of resistant Salmonella Typhi raises major concerns for treatment. There are an increasing number of sporadic reports of ceftriaxone-resistant S. Typhi and limiting the risk of treatment failure in the patient and outbreaks in the community must be prioritized. This study describes the use of whole genome sequencing to guide outbreak identification and case management. An isolate of ceftriaxone-resistant S. Typhi from the blood of a child taken in 2000 at the Popular Diagnostic Center, Dhaka, Bangladesh was subjected to whole genome sequencing, using an Illumina NextSeq 500 and analysis using Geneious software.Results/Key findings. Comparison with other ceftriaxone-resistant S. Typhi revealed an isolate from the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2015 as the closest relative but no evidence of an outbreak. A plasmid belonging to incompatibility group I1 (IncI1-ST31) which included blaCTX-M-15 (ceftriaxone resistance) associated with ISEcp-1 was identified. High similarity (90 %) was seen with pS115, an IncI1 plasmid from S. Enteritidis, and with pESBL-EA11, an incI1 plasmid from E. coli (99 %) showing that S. Typhi has access to ceftriaxone resistance through the acquisition of common plasmids. The transmission of ceftriaxone resistance from E. coli to S. Typhi is of concern because of clinical resistance to ceftriaxone, the main stay of typhoid treatment. Whole genome sequencing, albeit several years after the isolation, demonstrated the success of containment but clinical trials with alternative agents are urgently required.

  17. Characterization of tet(Y)-carrying LowGC plasmids exogenously captured from cow manure at a conventional dairy farm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselková, Martina; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Husník, Filip; Chroňáková, Alica; Heuer, H.; Smalla, K.; Elhottová, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 6 (2016), č. článku fiw075. ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/2077; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13046 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cattle manure * LowGC plasmids * tetracycline resistance * tet(Y) * Acinetobacter * horizontal gene transfer Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2016

  18. Dissemination and characterization of plasmids carrying oqxAB-bla CTX-M genes in Escherichia coli isolates from food-producing animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Tao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of PMQR and ESBLs in negative-bacteria isolates has been of great concern. The present study was performed to investigate the prevalence of co-transferability of oqxAB and bla CTX-M genes among the 696 Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates from food-producing animals in South China, and to characterize these plasmids. METHODS: The ESBL-encoding genes (bla(CTX-M, bla(TEM and bla(SHV, and PMQR (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qnrD, aac(6'-Ib-cr, qepA, and oqxAB of these 696 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced directionally. Conjugation, S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and Southern blotting experiments were performed to investigate the co-transferability and location of oqxAB and bla(CTX-M. The EcoRI digestion profiles of the plasmids with oqxAB-bla(CTX-M were also analyzed. The clonal relatedness was investigated by PFGE. RESULTS: Of the 696 isolates, 429 harbored at least one PMQR gene, with oqxAB (328 being the most common type; 191 carried bla(CTX-M, with bla(CTX-M-14 the most common. We observed a significant higher prevalence of bla(CTX-M among the oqxAB-positive isolates (38.7% than that (17.4% in the oqxAB-negative isolates. Co-transferability of oqxAB and bla(CTX-M was found in 18 of the 127 isolates carrying oqxAB-bla(CTX-M. These two genes were located on the same plasmid in all the 18 isolates, with floR being on these plasmids in 13 isolates. The co-dissemination of these genes was mainly mediated by F33:A-: B- and HI2 plasmids with highly similar EcoRI digestion profiles. Diverse PFGE patterns indicated the high prevalence of oqxAB was not caused by clonal dissemination. CONCLUSION: bla(CTX-M was highly prevalent among the oqxAB-positive isolates. The co-dissemination of oqxAB-bla(CTX-M genes in E. coli isolates from food-producing animals is mediated mainly by similar F33:A-: B- and HI2 plasmids. This is the first report of the co-existence of oqxAB, bla(CTX-M, and floR on the same

  19. Functional characterization of replication and stability factors of an incompatibility group P-1 plasmid from Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Woo; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Stenger, Drake C

    2010-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa strain riv11 harbors a 25-kbp plasmid (pXF-RIV11) belonging to the IncP-1 incompatibility group. Replication and stability factors of pXF-RIV11 were identified and used to construct plasmids able to replicate in X. fastidiosa and Escherichia coli. Replication in X. fastidiosa required a 1.4-kbp region from pXF-RIV11 containing a replication initiation gene (trfA) and the adjacent origin of DNA replication (oriV). Constructs containing trfA and oriV from pVEIS01, a related IncP-1 plasmid of the earthworm symbiont Verminephrobacter eiseniae, also were competent for replication in X. fastidiosa. Constructs derived from pXF-RIV11 but not pVEIS01 replicated in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Xanthomonas campestris, and Pseudomonas syringae. Although plasmids bearing replication elements from pXF-RIV11 or pVEIS01 could be maintained in X. fastidiosa under antibiotic selection, removal of selection resulted in plasmid extinction after 3 weekly passages. Addition of a toxin-antitoxin addiction system (pemI/pemK) from pXF-RIV11 improved plasmid stability such that >80 to 90% of X. fastidiosa cells retained plasmid after 5 weekly passages in the absence of antibiotic selection. Expression of PemK in E. coli was toxic for cell growth, but toxicity was nullified by coexpression of PemI antitoxin. Deletion of N-terminal sequences of PemK containing the conserved motif RGD abolished toxicity. In vitro assays revealed a direct interaction of PemI with PemK, suggesting that antitoxin activity of PemI is mediated by toxin sequestration. IncP-1 plasmid replication and stability factors were added to an E. coli cloning vector to constitute a stable 6.0-kbp shuttle vector (pXF20-PEMIK) suitable for use in X. fastidiosa.

  20. Genomic characterization of a large plasmid containing a blaNDM-1gene carried on Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana C629 isolate from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Peng, Zixin; Hu, Yujie; Xu, Jin; Fanning, Séamus; Li, Fengqin

    2017-07-07

    The bla NDM-1 gene in Salmonella species is mostly reported in clinical cases, but is rarely isolated from red and white meat in China. A Salmonella Indiana (S. Indiana) isolate was cultured from a chicken carcass procured from a slaughterhouse in China. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested against a panel of agents. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolate was carried out and data was analyzed. A large plasmid, denoted as plasmid pC629 (210,106 bp), containing a composite cassette, consisting of IS26-bla NDM-1 -ble MBL -△trpF-tat-cutA-ISCR1-sul1-qacE△1-aadA2-dfrA12-intI1-IS26 was identified. The latter locus was physically linked with bla OXA-1 , bla CTX-M-65 , bla TEM-1 -encoding genes. A mercury resistance operon merACDEPTR was also identified; it was flanked on the proximal side, among IS26 element and the distally located on the bla NDM-1 gene. Plasmid pC629 also contained 21 other antimicrobial resistance-encoding genes, such as aac(6')-Ib-cr, aac(3)-VI, aadA5, aph(4)-Ia, arr-3, blmS, brp, catB3, dfrA17, floR, fosA, mph(A), mphR, mrx, nimC/nimA, oqxA, oqxB, oqxR, rmtB, sul1, sul2. Two virulence genes were also identified on plasmid pC629. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bla NDM-1 gene being identified from a plasmid in a S. Indiana isolate cultured from chicken carcass in China.

  1. A mutational analysis of the ColE1-encoded cell cycle regulator Rcd confirms its role in plasmid stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balding, Claire; Blaby, Ian; Summers, David

    2006-07-01

    Multimers of multicopy plasmids cause instability. They arise by homologous recombination and accumulate by over-replication in a process known as the dimer catastrophe. Dimers are resolved to monomers by site-specific recombination systems such as Xer-cer of plasmid ColE1. In addition, the Rcd checkpoint hypothesis proposes that a short transcript (Rcd) coded within ColE1 cer delays the division of multimer-containing cells. The crucial observation underpinning the checkpoint hypothesis is that when the Rcd promoter (P(cer)) is inactivated by mutation of its invariant T, the plasmid becomes unstable. Recently, we discovered that this mutation also alters a potential Fis binding site in cer. ColE1-like plasmids are less stable in fis mutant hosts and it is conceivable that instability caused by the mutation is due to altered Fis binding, rather than the loss of Rcd expression per se. We have therefore undertaken an independent test of the role of P(cer)-Rcd in multicopy plasmid stability. We have generated a series of loss-of-function mutants of Rcd and detailed analysis of two of these shows that they cause a level of instability indistinguishable from P(cer) inactivation. This result is consistent with the predictions of the checkpoint hypothesis and confirms the role of Rcd in plasmid stability.

  2. pCERC3 from a commensal ST95 Escherichia coli: A ColV virulence-multiresistance plasmid carrying a sul3-associated class 1 integron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert A; Holt, Kathryn E; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    The rare sulphonamide resistance gene sul3 was found in the commensal Escherichia coli ST95 strain 22.1-R1 that was isolated in 2010 from the faeces of a healthy Australian adult. The genome of 22.1-R1 was sequenced and a 144,344bp RepFII/FIB plasmid, pCERC3, carrying sul3 was assembled. The sul3 gene is part of a class 1 integron featuring a sul3-containing conserved segment (sul3-CS) that replaced the classic sul1-containing 3'-conserved segment (3'-CS) usually seen in class 1 integrons. The integron contained the cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH, conferring resistance to trimethoprim, streptomycin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol and quaternary ammonium compound. Two additional antibiotic resistance genes, blaTEM (ampicillin resistance) and tetA(B) (tetracycline) were adjacent to the integron, forming a single resistance region. In pCERC3, the sul3-type class 1 integron was flanked by sequence derived from the tnp and mer modules of Tn21 and was in the same location as In2, the sul1-containing In5-type class 1 integron of Tn21. At one end the sequence extends into Tn2670-derived sequence and then into sequence derived from the plasmid NR1 (R100). Examination of the sequences of eleven more complete sul3-containing plasmids in GenBank confirmed the relationship between sul3-associated integrons and Tn21/Tn2670/NR1. This suggests that the events that formed sul3-associated class 1 integrons occurred within the Tn21/Tn2670 context, most likely in NR1 or a related plasmid. The backbone of pCERC3 is most closely related to the backbones of ColV virulence plasmids and contains a complete ColV operon as well as several virulence associated genes and gene clusters. Hence, pCERC3 is both an antibiotic resistance and virulence plasmid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA plasmid vaccine carrying Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) major outer membrane and human papillomavirus 16L2 proteins for anti-Ct infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ledan; Cai, Yiqi; Xiong, Yirong; Du, Wangqi; Cen, Danwei; Zhang, Chanqiong; Song, Yiling; Zhu, Shanli; Xue, Xiangyang; Zhang, Lifang

    2017-05-16

    Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is one of the most frequently encountered sexual infection all over the world, yielding tremendous reproductive problems (e.g. infertility and ectopic pregnancy) in the women. This work described the design of a plasmid vaccine that protect mice from Ct infection, and reduce productive tract damage by generating effective antibody and cytotoxic T cell immunity. The vaccine, s was composed of MOMP multi-epitope and HPV16L2 genes carried in pcDNA plasmid (i.e. pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L). In transfection, the vaccine expressed the chimeric genes (i.e. MOMP and HPV16L2), as demonstrated via western blot, RT-PCR and fluorescence imaging. In vitro, the vaccine transfected COS-7 cells and expressed the proteins corresponding to the genes carried in the vaccine. Through intramuscular immunization in BALB/c mice, the vaccine induced higher levels of anti-Ct IgG titer, anti-HPV16L2 IgG titer in serum and IgA titer in local mucosal secretions, compared to plasmid vaccines that carry only Ct MOMP multi-epitope or HPV16L2 chimeric component only. In mice intravaginally challenged with Ct, the vaccines pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L2 generated a higher level of genital protection compared to other vaccine formulations. Additionally, histochemical staining indicated that pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L2 eliminated mouse genital tract tissue pathologies induced by Ct infection. This work demonstrated that pcDNA/MOMP/HPV16L2 vaccine can protect against Ct infection by regulating antibody production, cytotoxic T cell killing functions and reducing pathological damage in mice genital tract. This work can potentially offer us a new vaccine platform against Ct infection.

  4. High-level fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198 epidemic clone with IncA/C conjugative plasmid carrying bla(CTX-M-25) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Kern-Zdanowicz, Izabela; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna; Zając, Magdalena; Hoszowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-30

    Multidrug resistant Salmonella Kentucky strains have been isolated from turkeys in Poland since 2009. Multiple mutations within chromosomal genes gyrA and parC were responsible for high-level ciprofloxacin resistance. One of the isolates was extended spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL) positive: the strain 1643/2010 carried a conjugative 167,779 bps plasmid of IncA/C family. The sequence analysis revealed that it carried a blaCTX-M-25 gene and an integron with another β-lactamase encoding gene-blaOXA-21. This is the first known report of a CTX-M-25 encoding gene both in Poland and in Salmonella Kentucky world-wide, as well as in the IncA/C plasmid. Analysis of the integron showed a novel arrangement of gene cassettes-aacA4, aacC-A1 and blaOXA-21 where the latter might result from an intergeneric gene transfer. The study confirmed Salmonella Kentucky population isolated in Poland belongs to global epidemics of high level fluoroquinolone resistant clone ST198 that can carry rare β-lactamase genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Differences in the stability of the plasmids of Yersinia pestis cultures in vitro: impact on virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TC Leal-Balbino

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid and chromosomal genes encode determinants of virulence for Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. However, in vitro, Y. pestis genome is very plastic and several changes have been described. To evaluate the alterations in the plasmid content of the cultures in vitro and the impact of the alterations to their pathogenicity, three Y. pestis isolates were submitted to serial subculture, analysis of the plasmid content, and testing for the presence of characteristic genes in each plasmid of colonies selected after subculture. Different results were obtained with each strain. The plasmid content of one of them was shown to be stable; no apparent alteration was produced through 32 subcultures. In the other two strains, several alterations were observed. LD50 in mice of the parental strains and the derived cultures with different plasmid content were compared. No changes in the virulence plasmid content could be specifically correlated with changes in the LD50.

  6. Dissemination of the Fosfomycin Resistance Gene fosA3 with CTX-M β-Lactamase Genes and rmtB Carried on IncFII Plasmids among Escherichia coli Isolates from Pets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianxia; Huang, Xianhui; Deng, Yuting; He, Liangying; Yang, Tong; Zeng, Zhenling; Chen, Zhangliu

    2012-01-01

    The presence and characterization of plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance determinants among Escherichia coli isolates collected from pets in China between 2006 and 2010 were investigated. Twenty-nine isolates (9.0%) were positive for fosA3, and all of them were CTX-M producers. The fosA3 genes were flanked by IS26 and were localized on F2:A−:B− plasmids or on very similar F33:A−:B− plasmids carrying both blaCTX-M-65 and rmtB. These findings indicate that the fosA3 gene may be coselected by antimicrobials other than fosfomycin. PMID:22232290

  7. Characterisation of IncA/C2 plasmids carrying an In416-like integron with the blaVIM-19 gene from Klebsiella pneumoniae ST383 of Greek origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radosław; Giakkoupi, Panagiota; Skálová, Anna; Chudějová, Kateřina; Dobiasova, Hana; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis C; Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M; Gniadkowski, Marek; Hrabák, Jaroslav

    2016-02-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of three multidrug resistance (MDR) IncA/C-like plasmids from Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying the VIM-type carbapenemase-encoding integrons In4863 (blaVIM-19-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2) or In4873 (blaVIM-1-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2) were determined, which are the first In416-like elements identified in Greece. Plasmids pKP-Gr642 and pKP-Gr8143 were from Klebsiella pneumoniae ST383 isolates, whereas plasmid pEcl-Gr4873 was from an Enterobacter cloacae ST88 isolate. Sequencing showed that pKP-Gr642 (162787bp) and pKP-Gr8143 (154395bp) consisted of the type 1 IncA/C2 conserved backbone, the blaCMY-2-like gene-containing region, and the ARI-B (with the sul2 gene) and ARI-A (with a class 1 integron) resistance islands, like the plasmid pUMNK88_161 from the USA. The third plasmid, pEcl-Gr4873 (153958bp), exhibited extensive similarity with the type 2 IncA/C2 plasmid pR55 from France. pEcl-Gr4873 carried only one resistance island of a hybrid transposon structure inserted in a different location to ARI-A in type 1 A/C2 plasmids. In all three plasmids, the In416-like integrons In4863 or In4873 were identified within non-identical class II transposon structures. All three In416-like-carrying regions presented significant similarities with the MDR region of the IncA/C2 plasmid pCC416 from Italy, carrying the prototype In416 integron (blaVIM-4-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2). These findings provided the basis for speculations regarding the evolution of IncA/C2 plasmids with In416-like integrons, and confirmed the rapid evolution of some IncA/C2 plasmid lineages. Considering the broad host range of IncA/C2 molecules, it seems that pKP-Gr642, pKP-Gr8143 and pEcl-Gr4873 plasmids might support the diffusion of In416-like integrons among Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Stability function in the Bacillus subtilis plasmid pTA 1060

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, S.; Bosma, P.; van Belkum, M.; Luxen, E.

    1987-01-01

    Plasmid pBB2 (11.3 kb) was constructed by genetically labeling the cryptic Bacillus subtilis plasmid pTA 1060 with the pC194-derived CmR and the pUB110-derived KmR markers. In nonselective media pBB2 was segregationally almost completely stable (loss rates less than or equal to 0.02% per cell

  9. Carrying shopping bags does not alter static postural stability and gait parameters in healthy older females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Food shopping is an important aspect of maintaining independence and social interaction in older age. Carriage of shopping bags alters the body's weight distribution which, depending on load distribution, could potentially increase instability during standing and walking. The study examined the effect of carrying UK style shopping bags on static postural stability and gait in healthy older and young females. Nine older (71.0±6.0 years) and 10 young (26.7±5.2 years) females were assessed in five conditions carrying no bags, one 1.5kg bag in each hand, one 3kg bag in each hand, one 1.5kg bag in preferred hand, one 3kg bag in preferred hand. Antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement, and 95% ellipse area from a 30s quiet standing were used for postural stability assessment. Stride length and its coefficient of variation, total double support time, step asymmetry and gait stability ratio were calculated from 1min treadmill walking at self-selected speed for gait assessment. Carrying shopping bags did not negatively affect postural stability or gait variables, in either group. Further, in older individuals, a decrease in sway velocity was found when holding bags during the postural stability assessment (pbags, irrespective of the load distribution, may have a stabilising effect during quiet standing. These results should help to alleviate concerns regarding safety of carrying shopping bags and help encourage shopping, both as a social and as a physical activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bicarbonate and amino acids are co-germinants for spores of Clostridium perfringens type A isolates carrying plasmid-borne enterotoxin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnoman, Maryam; Udompijitkul, Pathima; Banawas, Saeed; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2018-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A isolates carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (cpe) gene (C-cpe) are generally linked to food poisoning, while isolates carrying cpe on a plasmid (P-cpe) are associated with non-food-borne gastrointestinal diseases. Both C-cpe and P-cpe isolates can form metabolically dormant spores, which through germination process return to actively growing cells to cause diseases. In our previous study, we showed that only 3 out of 20 amino acids (aa) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) triggered germination of spores of P-cpe isolates (P-cpe spores). We now found that 14 out of 20 individual aa tested induced germination of P-cpe spores in the presence of bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.0). However, no significant spore germination was observed with bicarbonate (pH 7.0) alone, indicating that aa and bicarbonate are co-germinants for P-cpe spores. P-cpe strain F4969 gerKC spores did not germinate, and gerAA spores germinated extremely poorly as compared to wild-type and gerKA spores with aa-bicarbonate (pH 7.0) co-germinants. The germination defects in gerKC and gerAA spores were partially restored by complementing gerKC or gerAA spores with wild-type gerKC or gerAA, respectively. Collectively, this study identified aa-bicarbonate as a novel nutrient germinant for P-cpe spores and provided evidence that GerKC and GerAA play major roles in aa-bicarbonate induced germination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance and IncQ Plasmids Carrying qnrS2 Gene in Bacteria from Rivers near Hospitals and Aquaculture in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Wen

    Full Text Available Effluents from hospital and aquaculture are considered important sources of quinolone resistance. However, little information is available on the impact of this effluent on nearby rivers. In this study, 188 ciprofloxacin-resistant bacterial isolates obtained from rivers near hospitals and aquaculture were screened for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes. Species identification, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and PMQR gene transferability assessment were conducted for PMQR-positive bacteria. Representative qnrS2-encoding plasmids were subsequently sequenced using a primer-walking approach. In total, 44 isolates (23.4% were positive for qnr genes (16 qnrB2, 3 qnrS1, and 25 qnrS2 and 32 isolates (17.0% were positive for aac(6'-Ib-cr. Other PMQR genes were not detected. The qnrB2 and aac(6'-Ib-cr genes had a higher prevalence in aquaculture samples than in hospital samples, and were significantly associated with Enterobacteriaceae (p < 0.05. In contrast, the prevalence of qnrS2 was not site-related, but was significantly associated with Aeromonas spp. (p < 0.05. All PMQR isolates were resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics. Eleven qnrS2-harboring plasmids from Aeromonas spp., including a novel conjugative plasmid pHP18, were selected for sequencing. These plasmids were small in size (6,388-16,197 bp and belonged to the IncQ or IncU plasmid family, with qnrS2 being part of a mobile insertion cassette. Taken together, our findings suggest that aquaculture is a possible source for aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB2 dissemination, and demonstrate the ubiquity of qnrS2 in aquatic environments. Finally, Aeromonas spp. served as vectors for qnrS2 with the help of IncQ-type plasmids.

  12. Effect of habitat degradation on competition, carrying capacity, and species assemblage stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Careddu, Giulio; Rossi, Loreto

    2017-08-01

    Changes in species' trophic niches due to habitat degradation can affect intra- and interspecific competition, with implications for biodiversity persistence. Difficulties of measuring species' interactions in the field limit our comprehension of competition outcomes along disturbance gradients. Thus, information on how habitat degradation can destabilize food webs is scarce, hindering predictions regarding responses of multispecies systems to environmental changes. Seagrass ecosystems are undergoing degradation. We address effects of Posidonia oceanica coverage reduction on the trophic organization of a macroinvertebrate community in the Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy), hypothesizing increased trophic generalism, niche overlap among species and thus competition and decreased community stability due to degraded conditions. Census data, isotopic analysis, and Bayesian mixing models were used to quantify the trophic niches of three abundant invertebrate species, and intra- and interspecific isotopic and resource-use similarity across locations differing in seagrass coverage. This allowed the computation of (1) competition strength, with respect to each other and remaining less abundant species and (2) habitat carrying capacity. To explore effects of the spatial scale on the interactions, we considered both individual locations and the entire study area ("'meadow scale"). We observed that community stability and habitat carrying capacity decreased as P. oceanica coverage declined, whereas niche width, similarity of resource use and interspecific competition strength between species increased. Competition was stronger, and stability lower, at the meadow scale than at the location scale. Indirect effects of competition and the spatial compartmentalization of species interactions increased stability. Results emphasized the importance of trophic niche modifications for understanding effects of habitat loss on biodiversity persistence. Calculation of competition coefficients based

  13. A plasmid carrying mucA and mucB genes from pKM101 in Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spikes, D.; Setlow, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmid pMucAMucB, constructed from the Haemophilus influenzae vector pDM2, and a similar plasmid, constructed from pBR322, increased the survival after UV irradiation of Escherichia coli AB1157 with the umu-36 mutation and also caused UV-induced mutation in the E. coli strain. In H. influenzae, pMucAMucB caused a small but reproducible increase in survival after UV irradiation in wild-type cells and in a rec-1 mutant, but there was no increase in spontaneous mutation in the wild type or in the rec-1 mutant and no UV-induced mutation

  14. The IncI1 plasmid carrying the bla CTX-M-1 gene persists in in vitro culture of a Escherichia coli strain from broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, E.A.J.; Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Roermund, van H.J.W.; Mevius, D.J.; Stegeman, A.; Klinkenberg, D.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria are a reservoir for antimicrobial-resistance genes. In the Netherlands, bacteria producing Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) are found on chicken-meat and in the gut of broilers at a high prevalence and the predominant ESBL-gene is the blaCTX-M-1 located on IncI1 plasmids.

  15. pIMP-PH114 carrying bla IMP-4 in a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain is closely related to other multidrug-resistant IncA/C2 plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Lo, Wai-U; Chan, Jane; Cheung, Yuk-Yam; Chow, Kin-Hung; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Lin, Chi-Ho; Que, Tak-Lun

    2014-02-01

    The IncA/C plasmids are broad host-range vehicles which have been associated with wide dissemination of CMY-2 among Enterobacteriaceae of human and animal origins. Acquired metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) such as the IMP-type enzymes are increasingly reported in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria worldwide, particularly in Enterobacteriaceae. We described the complete sequence of the first IMP-4-encoding IncA/C2 plasmid, pIMP-PH114 (151,885 bp), from a sequence type 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae strain that was recovered from a patient who was hospitalized in the Philippines. pIMP-PH114 consists of a backbone from the IncA/C2 plasmids, with the insertion of a novel Tn21-like class 1 integron composite structure (containing the cassette array bla IMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3, followed by a class C β-lactamase bla DHA-1 and the mercury resistance operon, merRTPCADE) and a sul2-floR encoding region. Phylogenetic analysis of the IncA/C repA sequences showed that pIMP-PH114 formed a subgroup with other IncA/C plasmids involved in the international spread of CMY-2, TEM-24 and NDM-1. Identical bla IMP-4 arrays have been described among different Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter spp. in China, Singapore and Australia but the genetic context is different. The broad host range of IncA/C plasmids may have facilitated dissemination of the bla IMP-4 arrays among different diverse groups of bacteria.

  16. In Vivo Transfer and Microevolution of Avian Native IncA/C2blaNDM-1-Carrying Plasmid pRH-1238 during a Broiler Chicken Infection Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziabdic, Sead; Fischer, Jennie; Malorny, Burkhard; Borowiak, Maria; Guerra, Beatriz; Kaesbohrer, Annemarie; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno; Szabo, Istvan

    2018-04-01

    The emergence and spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in wildlife and livestock animals pose an important safety concern for public health. With our in vivo broiler chicken infection study, we investigated the transfer and experimental microevolution of the bla NDM-1 -carrying IncA/C 2 plasmid (pRH-1238) introduced by avian native Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Corvallis without inducing antibiotic selection pressure. We evaluated the dependency of the time point of inoculation on donor ( S Corvallis [12-SA01738]) and plasmid-free Salmonella recipient [d-tartrate-fermenting (d-Ta + ) S Paratyphi B (13-SA01617), referred to here as S Paratyphi B (d-Ta + )] excretion by quantifying their excretion dynamics. Using plasmid profiling by S1 nuclease-restricted pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we gained insight into the variability of the native plasmid content among S Corvallis reisolates as well as plasmid acquisition in S Paratyphi B (d-Ta + ) and the enterobacterial gut microflora. Whole-genome sequencing enabled us to gain an in-depth insight into the microevolution of plasmid pRH-1238 in S Corvallis and enterobacterial recipient isolates. Our study revealed that the fecal excretion of avian native carbapenemase-producing S Corvallis is significantly higher than that of S Paratyphi (d-Ta + ) and is not hampered by S Paratyphi (d-Ta + ). Acquisition of pRH-1238 in other Enterobacteriaceae and several events of plasmid pRH-1238 transfer to different Escherichia coli sequence types and Klebsiella pneumoniae demonstrated an interspecies broad host range. Regardless of the microevolutionary structural deletions in pRH-1238, the single carbapenem resistance marker bla NDM-1 was maintained on pRH-1238 throughout the trial. Furthermore, we showed the importance of the gut E. coli population as a vector of pRH-1238. In a potential scenario of the introduction of NDM-1-producing S Corvallis into a broiler flock, the pRH-1238 plasmid could

  17. Effect of salt and acidic pH on the stability of virulence plasmid (pYV) in Yersinia enterocolitica and expression of virulence-associated characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability of the Yersinia enterocolitica virulence plasmid (pYV) under different NaCl concentrations and under acidic pH conditions was investigated. Exposure of five strains representing five serotypes of pYV-bearing virulent Y. enterocolitica to 0.5, 2 and 5% NaCl and under conditions of pH 4...

  18. First Report of cfr-Carrying Plasmids in the Pandemic Sequence Type 22 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type IV Clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Anna C; Lazaris, Alexandros; Kinnevey, Peter M; Brennan, Orla M; Brennan, Gráinne I; O'Connell, Brian; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Coleman, David C

    2016-05-01

    Linezolid is often the drug of last resort for serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Linezolid resistance is mediated by mutations in 23S rRNA and genes for ribosomal proteins; cfr, encoding phenicol, lincosamide, oxazolidinone, pleuromutilin, and streptogramin A (PhLOPSA) resistance; its homologue cfr(B); or optrA, conferring oxazolidinone and phenicol resistance. Linezolid resistance is rare in S. aureus, and cfr is even rarer. This study investigated the clonality and linezolid resistance mechanisms of two MRSA isolates from patients in separate Irish hospitals. Isolates were subjected to cfr PCR, PhLOPSA susceptibility testing, 23S rRNA PCR and sequencing, DNA microarray profiling, spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid curing, and conjugative transfer. Whole-genome sequencing was used for single-nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis, multilocus sequence typing, L protein mutation identification, cfr plasmid sequence analysis, and optrA and cfr(B) detection. Isolates M12/0145 and M13/0401 exhibited linezolid MICs of 64 and 16 mg/liter, respectively, and harbored identical 23S rRNA and L22 mutations, but M12/0145 exhibited the mutation in 2/6 23S rRNA alleles, compared to 1/5 in M13/0401. Both isolates were sequence type 22 MRSA staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV (ST22-MRSA-IV)/spa type t032 isolates, harbored cfr, exhibited the PhLOPSA phenotype, and lacked optrA and cfr(B). They differed by five PFGE bands and 603 SNVs. Isolate M12/0145 harbored cfr and fexA on a 41-kb conjugative pSCFS3-type plasmid, whereas M13/0401 harbored cfr and lsa(B) on a novel 27-kb plasmid. This is the first report of cfr in the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. Different cfr plasmids and mutations associated with linezolid resistance in genotypically distinct ST22-MRSA-IV isolates highlight that prudent management of linezolid use is essential. Copyright © 2016 Shore et al.

  19. Characterization of Acinetobacter johnsonii isolate XBB1 carrying nine plasmids and encoding NDM-1, OXA-58 and PER-1 by genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Yang, Ping; Wang, Xiaohui; Zong, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    To obtain the complete genome sequence of an Acinetobacter johnsonii isolate, which encodes the NDM-1 and OXA-58 carbapenemases. Genome sequencing was performed using the 454 and HiSeq 2000 platforms. Reads were assembled into scaffolds and gaps between scaffolds were filled by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses of A. johnsonii isolates and their intrinsic blaOXA genes were performed using Harvest and MEGA. The context of blaOXA-58 was analysed in detail. Isolate XBB1 has one 3.5 Mb chromosome (38.5% GC content) and nine plasmids in the range 3.9-398.9 kb. Isolate XBB1 appears to be distinct from other A. johnsonii isolates. Five of the nine plasmids contained genes encoding for mobilization. The largest contains four XerC/XerD-like binding sites and five Re27 regions. Alignment revealed that Re27 regions are variants of XerC/XerD-like sites. Besides blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-58, isolate XBB1 has an ESBL gene blaPER-1 and a few other genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, sulphonamides and tetracycline. blaOXA-58 is located in a Russian doll-type structure, as it is flanked by ISAba3, then by two copies of a newly identified element ISAjo2 and bracketed by a pair of Re27 regions. The intrinsic blaOXA of XBB1 is a new variant, blaOXA-311, which is most closely related to blaOXA-333 in an Australian A. johnsonii isolate. We present the first completely assembled genome sequence of A. johnsonii. The ability of A. johnsonii to harbour nine plasmids suggests this species could generate various platforms to mediate the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Genetic analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system by use of plasmids carrying the bra genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, T; Kose, K

    1990-01-01

    About 30 mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO defective in the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I) were isolated by the selection for resistance to 4-aza-DL-leucine, a toxic leucine analog for LIV-I. All of the mutants were complemented by plasmid pKTH24, harboring the braC gene, which encodes the branched-chain amino acid-binding protein, and the four open reading frames named braD, braE, braF, and braG (T. Hoshino and K. Kose, J. Bacteriol. 172:5531-5539, 1990)...

  1. Complete sequence of the IncA/C1 plasmid pCf587 carrying blaPER-2 from Citrobacter freundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Melina; Girlich, Delphine; Dabos, Laura; Power, Pablo; Naas, Thierry; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2018-02-20

    The bla PER-2 harboring plasmid pCf587 (191,541 bp) belongs to lineage IncA/C 1 and is closely related to pRA1. It contains a large resistance island including the bla PER-2 gene between two copies of IS Kox2 -like elements, the toxin-antitoxin module pemK-pemI, several other resistance genes inserted within a Tn 2 transposon, a Tn 21 -like structure, and a class 1 integron. pCf587 belongs into ST 13, a new pMLST. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. IncA/C Plasmid Carrying bla(NDM-1), bla(CMY-16), and fosA3 in a Salmonella enterica Serovar Corvallis Strain Isolated from a Migratory Wild Bird in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, L; Guerra, B; Schmoger, S; Fischer, J; Helmuth, R; Zong, Z; García-Fernández, A; Carattoli, A

    2015-10-01

    A Salmonella enterica serovar Corvallis strain was isolated from a wild bird in Germany. This strain carried the IncA/C2 pRH-1238 plasmid. Complete sequencing of the plasmid was performed, identifying the blaNDM-1, blaCMY-16, fosA3, sul1, sul2, strA, strB, aac(6')-Ib, aadA5, aphA6, tetA(A), mphA, floR, dfrA7, and merA genes, which confer clinically relevant resistance to most of the antimicrobial classes, including β-lactams with carbapenems, fosfomycin, aminoglycosides, co-trimoxazole, tetracyclines, and macrolides. The strain likely originated from the Asiatic region and was transferred to Germany through the Milvus migrans migratory route. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Plasmid Vectors for Xylella fastidiosa Utilizing a Toxin-Antitoxin System for Stability in the Absence of Antibiotic Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-08-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacterial genetics but there are only a limited number of plasmid vectors available that replicate in X. fastidiosa, and even fewer that are retained without antibiotic selection. Two plasmids are described here that show stable replication in X. fastidiosa and are effective for gene complementation both in vitro and in planta. Plasmid maintenance is facilitated by incorporation of the PemI/PemK plasmid addiction system, consisting of PemK, an endoribonuclease toxin, and its cognate antitoxin, PemI. Vector pXf20pemIK utilizes a native X. fastidiosa replication origin as well as a high-copy-number pUC origin for propagation in Escherichia coli cloning strains. Broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK is a medium- to low-copy-number plasmid based on the pBBR1 backbone. Both plasmids are maintained for extended periods of time in the absence of antibiotic selection, as well as up to 14 weeks in grapevine, without affecting bacterial fitness. These plasmids present an alternative to traditional complementation and expression vectors which rely on antibiotic selection for plasmid retention.

  4. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located.

  5. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST Enterotoxins (STh and STp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Tobias

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants, and colonization factors (CFs among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10 or CS6+STp (n = 15 showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located.

  6. How load-carrying ants avoid falling over: mechanical stability during foraging in Atta vollenweideri grass-cutting ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Moll

    Full Text Available Foraging workers of grass-cutting ants (Atta vollenweideri regularly carry grass fragments larger than their own body. Fragment length has been shown to influence the ants' running speed and thereby the colony's food intake rate. We investigated whether and how grass-cutting ants maintain stability when carrying fragments of two different lengths but identical mass.Ants carried all fragments in an upright, backwards-tilted position, but held long fragments more vertically than short ones. All carrying ants used an alternating tripod gait, where mechanical stability was increased by overlapping stance phases of consecutive steps. The overlap was greatest for ants carrying long fragments, resulting in more legs contacting the ground simultaneously. For all ants, the projection of the total centre of mass (ant and fragment was often outside the supporting tripod, i.e. the three feet that would be in stance for a non-overlapping tripod gait. Stability was only achieved through additional legs in ground contact. Tripod stability (quantified as the minimum distance of the centre of mass to the edge of the supporting tripod was significantly smaller for ants with long fragments. Here, tripod stability was lowest at the beginning of each step, when the center of mass was near the posterior margin of the supporting tripod. By contrast, tripod stability was lowest at the end of each step for ants carrying short fragments. Consistently, ants with long fragments mainly fell backwards, whereas ants carrying short fragments mainly fell forwards or to the side. Assuming that transporting ants adjust neither the fragment angle nor the gait, they would be less stable and more likely to fall over.In grass-cutting ants, the need to maintain static stability when carrying long grass fragments has led to multiple kinematic adjustments at the expense of a reduced material transport rate.

  7. How load-carrying ants avoid falling over: mechanical stability during foraging in Atta vollenweideri grass-cutting ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Karin; Roces, Flavio; Federle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Foraging workers of grass-cutting ants (Atta vollenweideri) regularly carry grass fragments larger than their own body. Fragment length has been shown to influence the ants' running speed and thereby the colony's food intake rate. We investigated whether and how grass-cutting ants maintain stability when carrying fragments of two different lengths but identical mass. Ants carried all fragments in an upright, backwards-tilted position, but held long fragments more vertically than short ones. All carrying ants used an alternating tripod gait, where mechanical stability was increased by overlapping stance phases of consecutive steps. The overlap was greatest for ants carrying long fragments, resulting in more legs contacting the ground simultaneously. For all ants, the projection of the total centre of mass (ant and fragment) was often outside the supporting tripod, i.e. the three feet that would be in stance for a non-overlapping tripod gait. Stability was only achieved through additional legs in ground contact. Tripod stability (quantified as the minimum distance of the centre of mass to the edge of the supporting tripod) was significantly smaller for ants with long fragments. Here, tripod stability was lowest at the beginning of each step, when the center of mass was near the posterior margin of the supporting tripod. By contrast, tripod stability was lowest at the end of each step for ants carrying short fragments. Consistently, ants with long fragments mainly fell backwards, whereas ants carrying short fragments mainly fell forwards or to the side. Assuming that transporting ants adjust neither the fragment angle nor the gait, they would be less stable and more likely to fall over. In grass-cutting ants, the need to maintain static stability when carrying long grass fragments has led to multiple kinematic adjustments at the expense of a reduced material transport rate.

  8. Diversity and stability of Plasmids from glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium (GRE) isolated from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Villadsen, A.G.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the plasmid variation between a subset of unrelated GRE isolated from pigs in Denmark between 1995 and 2001 (five from each of the years). The isolates were tested with PFGE, plasmid RFLP, and subsequently Southern blotting with an IS1216V probe. Of the 35 isolates, 31 b...

  9. Stress responses in pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica with reference to the stability of the virulence plasmid in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersinia enterocolitica has been associated with food-borne illness, most often due the ingestion of pork products. The pathogenic effects induced by a Y. enterocolitica infection are caused by the interplay of chromosomal genes and a virulence plasmid, pYV. Generally, the plasmid is lost during g...

  10. Sequence of pNL194, a 79.3-Kilobase IncN Plasmid Carrying the blaVIM-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriagou, V.; Papagiannitsis, C. C.; Kotsakis, S. D.; Loli, A.; Tzelepi, E.; Legakis, N. J.; Tzouvelekis, L. S.

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of pNL194, a VIM-1-encoding plasmid, is described in this study. pNL194 (79,307 bp) comprised an IncN-characteristic segment (38,940 bp) and a mosaic structure (40,367 bp) including blaVIM-1, aacA7, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA12, aphA1, strA, strB, and sul1. Tn1000 or Tn5501 insertion within fipA probably facilitated recruitment of additional mobile elements carrying resistance genes. PMID:20660690

  11. Sequence of pNL194, a 79.3-kilobase IncN plasmid carrying the blaVIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriagou, V; Papagiannitsis, C C; Kotsakis, S D; Loli, A; Tzelepi, E; Legakis, N J; Tzouvelekis, L S

    2010-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of pNL194, a VIM-1-encoding plasmid, is described in this study. pNL194 (79,307 bp) comprised an IncN-characteristic segment (38,940 bp) and a mosaic structure (40,367 bp) including bla(VIM-1), aacA7, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA12, aphA1, strA, strB, and sul1. Tn1000 or Tn5501 insertion within fipA probably facilitated recruitment of additional mobile elements carrying resistance genes.

  12. Numerical Analysis on the Magneto-Elastic Stability of Current-Carrying Conductors: Aiming at Applications for the Tokamak System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weixin; Yuan Zhensheng; Wu Wenjing; Chen Zhenmao

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the magnetic stiffness matrix was proposed for the numerical analysis of the magneto-elastic stability of complicated current-carrying structures aiming for application in the magneto-elastic behavior of the tokamak system. A code based on the proposed method was developed and applied to the numerical analysis of two typical current-carrying structures. The good consistency of the numerical and analytical results validated the proposed method and the related numerical code. (fusion engineering)

  13. The effects of carrying extra weight on ankle stability in adolescent basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozunlu, Nihan; Basari, Gul Oznur; Baltaci, Gul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of weight on ankle stability in adolescent basketball players. 20 non-injured subjects (age=11.05+/-1.5 years) were included in this study. Each subject performed a 15min warm-up by running or riding a stationary bike. The Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), single-leg balance test (performed with eyes open and eyes closed) and vertical jump test were performed with dominant lower extremity. 1 week later, same tests were performed with a schoolbag. The schoolbag contained weight bars as 20% of the players own body weight. Only posteromedial component of SEBT had significant difference between non-weight measurement and weighted measurement (p=0.004). Single-leg stance test performed with eyes open (p=0.006) and closed (p=0.001) had significant difference between non-weight measurement and weighted measurement. Also the vertical jump test had significant difference between non-weight measurement and weighted measurement (p=0.001). These findings indicate that 20% weight of their own body weight does not affect dynamic ankle stability and postural limitations, which are magnified by advancing weight. We are confident in our conclusions because of the three-way interaction noted with posterior/medial with weight in SEBT. Furthermore, Star Excursion Balance test is more effective both weight and non-weight in measuring functional stability of the ankle. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of fat in ground beef on the growth and virulence plasmid (pYV) stability in Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of the behavior of Yersinia pestis in food may be useful in the event Y. pestis is used in a bioterrorism attack on the food supply. However, there are no reports on the growth of plasmid-bearing (pYV) virulent Y. pestis in food. The growth of a conditionally virulent pYV-bearing Yersini...

  15. RELATIVE EXPRESSION AND STABILITY OF A CHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED AND PLASMID-BORNE MARKER GENE FUSION IN ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPETENT BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A xyIE-iceC transcriptional fusion was created by ligating a DNA fragment harboring the cloned xyIE structural gene from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 into the cloned iceC gene of Pseudomonas syringae Cit7. This fusion construct was integrated into chromosome of Pseu...

  16. Structure and stability of online chat networks built on emotion-carrying links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligorijević, Vladimir; Skowron, Marcin; Tadić, Bosiljka

    2013-02-01

    High-resolution data of online chats are studied as a physical system in the laboratory in order to quantify collective behavior of users. Our analysis reveals strong regularities characteristic of natural systems with additional features. In particular, we find self-organized dynamics with long-range correlations in user actions and persistent associations among users that have the properties of a social network. Furthermore, the evolution of the graph and its architecture with specific k-core structure are shown to be related with the type and the emotion arousal of exchanged messages. Partitioning of the graph by deletion of the links which carry high arousal messages exhibits critical fluctuations at the percolation threshold.

  17. Persistence Mechanisms of Conjugative Plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2009-01-01

    maintenance in the host cell. These importantly include the ability to self-mobilize in a process termed conjugative transfer, which may occur across species barriers. Other plasmid stabilizing mechanisms include the multimer resolution system, active partitioning, and post-segregational-killing of plasmid......Are plasmids selfish parasitic DNA molecules or an integrated part of the bacterial genome? This chapter reviews the current understanding of the persistence mechanisms of conjugative plasmids harbored by bacterial cells and populations. The diversity and intricacy of mechanisms affecting...... the successful propagation and long-term continued existence of these extra-chromosomal elements is extensive. Apart from the accessory genetic elements that may provide plasmid-harboring cells a selective advantage, special focus is placed on the mechanisms conjugative plasmids employ to ensure their stable...

  18. Biofilm growth mode promotes maximum carrying capacity and community stability during product inhibition syntrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Annis Brileya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB can interact syntrophically with other community members in the absence of sulfate, and interactions with hydrogen-consuming methanogens are beneficial when these archaea consume potentially inhibitory H2 produced by the SRB. A dual continuous culture approach was used to characterize population structure within a syntrophic biofilm formed by the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and the methanogenic archaeum Methanococcus maripaludis. Under the tested conditions, monocultures of D. vulgaris formed thin, stable biofilms, but monoculture M. maripaludis did not. Microscopy of intact syntrophic biofilm confirmed that D. vulgaris formed a scaffold for the biofilm, while intermediate and steady-state images revealed that M. maripaludis joined the biofilm later, likely in response to H2 produced by the SRB. Close interactions in structured biofilm allowed efficient transfer of H2 to M. maripaludis, and H2 was only detected in cocultures with a mutant SRB that was deficient in biofilm formation ( delta pilA. M. maripaludis produced more carbohydrate (uronic acid, hexose, and pentose as a monoculture compared to total coculture biofilm, and this suggested an altered carbon flux during syntrophy. The syntrophic biofilm was structured into ridges (~300 x 50 um and models predicted lactate limitation at approximately 50 um biofilm depth. The biofilm had structure that likely facilitated mass transfer of H2 and lactate, yet maximized biomass with a more even population composition (number of each organism when compared to the bulk-phase community. Total biomass protein was equivalent in lactate-limited and lactate-excess conditions when a biofilm was present, but in the absence of biofilm, total biomass protein was significantly reduced. The results suggest that multispecies biofilms create an environment conducive to resource sharing, resulting in increased biomass retention, or carrying capacity, for cooperative

  19. Complete Sequence of a F33:A-:B- Conjugative Plasmid Carrying the oqxAB, fosA3 and blaCTX-M-55 Elements from a Foodborne Escherichia coli Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ho-yin Wong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the complete sequence of pE80, a conjugative IncFII plasmid recovered from an E. coli strain isolated from chicken meat. This plasmid harbors multiple resistance determinants including oqxAB, fosA3, blaCTX-M-55 and blaTEM-1, and is a close variant of the recently reported p42-2 element, which was recovered from E. coli of veterinary source. Recovery of pE80 constitutes evidence that evolution or genetic re-arrangement of IncFII type plasmids residing in animal-borne organisms is an active event, which involves acquisition and integration of foreign resistance elements into the plasmid backbone. Dissemination of these plasmids may further compromise the effectiveness of current antimicrobial strategies.

  20. Characterization of a Large Antibiotic Resistance Plasmid Found in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain B171 and Its Relatedness to Plasmids of Diverse E. coli and Shigella Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Michalski, Jane; Nagaraj, Sushma; Okeke, Iruka N; Rasko, David A

    2017-09-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a leading cause of severe infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Previous research has focused on the diversity of the EPEC virulence plasmid, whereas less is known regarding the genetic content and distribution of antibiotic resistance plasmids carried by EPEC. A previous study demonstrated that in addition to the virulence plasmid, reference EPEC strain B171 harbors a second, larger plasmid that confers antibiotic resistance. To further understand the genetic diversity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance plasmids among EPEC strains, we describe the complete sequence of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from EPEC strain B171. The resistance plasmid, pB171_90, has a completed sequence length of 90,229 bp, a GC content of 54.55%, and carries protein-encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer, resistance to tetracycline ( tetA ), sulfonamides ( sulI ), and mercury, as well as several virulence-associated genes, including the transcriptional regulator hha and the putative calcium sequestration inhibitor ( csi ). In silico detection of the pB171_90 genes among 4,798 publicly available E. coli genome assemblies indicates that the unique genes of pB171_90 ( csi and traI ) are primarily restricted to genomes identified as EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli However, conserved regions of the pB171_90 plasmid containing genes involved in replication, stability, and antibiotic resistance were identified among diverse E. coli pathotypes. Interestingly, pB171_90 also exhibited significant similarity with a sequenced plasmid from Shigella dysenteriae type I. Our findings demonstrate the mosaic nature of EPEC antibiotic resistance plasmids and highlight the need for additional sequence-based characterization of antibiotic resistance plasmids harbored by pathogenic E. coli . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. High instability of a nematicidal Cry toxin plasmid in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Anna E; Nakad, Rania; Saebelfeld, Manja; Masche, Anna C; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial pathogens, virulence factors are often carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, and as such, plasmid evolution is central in understanding pathogenicity. Bacillus thuringiensis is an invertebrate pathogen that uses plasmid-encoded crystal (Cry) toxins to establish infections inside the host. Our study aimed to quantify stability of two Cry toxin-encoding plasmids, BTI_23p and BTI_16p, under standard laboratory culturing conditions. These two plasmids are part of the genome of the B. thuringiensis strain MYBT18679, which is of particular interest because of its high pathogenicity towards nematodes. One of the plasmids, BTI_23p, was found to be highly unstable, with substantial loss occurring within a single growth cycle. Nevertheless, longer term experimental evolution in the absence of a host revealed maintenance of the plasmid at low levels in the bacterial populations. BTI_23p encodes two nematicidal Cry toxins, Cry21Aa2 and Cry14Aa1. Consistent with previous findings, loss of the plasmid abolished pathogenicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which could be rescued by addition of Cry21Aa2-expressing Escherichia coli. These results implicate BTI_23p as a plasmid that is required for successful infection, yet unstable when present at high frequency in the population, consistent with the role of Cry toxins as public goods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein causes structural plasmid instability in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, C.; Meima, R; Twiest, B; Kazemier, B; Venema, G; vanDijl, JM; Bron, S

    The rolling-circle plasmid pGP1 was used to study the effects of the expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein on structural plasmid stability in Bacillus subtilis. pGP1 contains a fusion between the Bacillus licheniformis penP gene, encoding a C-terminally truncated penicillinase, and the

  3. Role of the RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio in amplification of the segment of plasmid DNA carrying the gene of resistance to tetracycline and the genes of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fil' kova, S.L.; Il' ina, T.S.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Yanishevskii, N.V.; Smirnov, G.B.

    1988-11-01

    The hybrid plasmid pCO107, representing cointegrate 14(2)-5(2) of two plasmids, an F-derivative (pOX38) and a PBR322-derivative (pCT105) with an RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio cloned in its makeup, contains two copes of RS1 at the sites of union of the two plasmids. Using a tetracycline resistance marker (Tc/sup R/) of the plasmid pCT105, clones were isolated which have an elevated level of resistance to tetracycline (an increase of from 4- to 30-fold). Using restriction analysis and the Southern blot method of hybridization it was shown that the increase in the level of resistance of tetracycline is associated with the amplification of pCT105 portion of the cointegrate, and that the process of amplification is governed by the presence of direct repeats of the RS1 sequence at its ends. The increase in the number of copies of the pCT105 segment, which contains in its composition the genes of cholera toxin (vct), is accompanied by an increase in toxin production.

  4. Role of the RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio in amplification of the segment of plasmid DNA carrying the gene of resistance to tetracycline and the genes of cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fil'kova, S.L.; Il'ina, T.S.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Yanishevskii, N.V.; Smirnov, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    The hybrid plasmid pCO107, representing cointegrate 14(2)-5(2) of two plasmids, an F-derivative (pOX38) and a PBR322-derivative (pCT105) with an RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio cloned in its makeup, contains two copes of RS1 at the sites of union of the two plasmids. Using a tetracycline resistance marker (Tc R ) of the plasmid pCT105, clones were isolated which have an elevated level of resistance to tetracycline (an increase of from 4- to 30-fold). Using restriction analysis and the Southern blot method of hybridization it was shown that the increase in the level of resistance of tetracycline is associated with the amplification of pCT105 portion of the cointegrate, and that the process of amplification is governed by the presence of direct repeats of the RS1 sequence at its ends. The increase in the number of copies of the pCT105 segment, which contains in its composition the genes of cholera toxin (vct), is accompanied by an increase in toxin production

  5. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence-Resistance Plasmids Derived from the pSLT Carrying Nonconventional Class 1 Integrons with dfrA12 Gene in Their Variable Region and sul3 in the 3' Conserved Segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beutlich, J.; Rodicio, M.R.; Mendoza, M.C.; Garcia, P.; Kirchner, M.; Luzzi, I.; Mevius, D.J.; Threllfall, J.; Helmuth, R.; Guerra, B.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant derivatives of serovar-specific virulence plasmids, such as pSLT, in clinically-relevant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains, represent a threat for human health. We have analysed 14 S. Typhimurium isolates recovered in Italy and the United Kingdom from swine and from

  6. Simple method for identification of plasmid-coded proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancar, A.; Hack, A.M.; Rupp, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    Proteins encoded by plasmid DNA are specifically labeled in uv-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli carrying recA and uvrA mutations because extensive degradation of the chromosome DNA occurs concurrently with amplification of plasmid DNA

  7. Distribution of cfr in Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli Strains from Pig Farms in China and Characterization of a Novel cfr-Carrying F43:A-:B- Plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qin Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The multi-resistance gene cfr is widely distributed among various gram-positive and gram-negative species in livestock in China. To better understand the epidemiology of cfr among Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli isolates, 254 Staphylococcus spp. and 398 E. coli strains collected from six swine farms in China were subjected to prevalence and genetic analysis. Forty (15.7% Staphylococcus spp. isolates, including 38 Staphylococcus sciuri strains, one Staphylococcus chromogenes strain, and one Staphylococcus lentus strain, and two (0.5% E. coli isolates were found to contain the cfr gene. Most of the 38 S. sciuri strains were clonally unrelated; however, clonal dissemination of cfr-positive S. sciuri was detected at the same farm. In eight randomly selected cfr-positive staphylococci, a cfr-harboring module (IS21-558-cfr-ΔtnpB was detected in six S. sciuri isolates; cfr was bracketed by two copies of ISEnfa4 or IS256 in the remaining two S. sciuri isolates. In the two E. coli isolates, EP25 and EP28, cfr was flanked by two IS26 elements in the same or opposite orientation, respectively. Complete sequence analysis of the novel F43:A-:B- plasmid pHNEP28 revealed that it contains two multi-resistance regions: cfr together with floR, qnrS1 interspersed with IS26, ΔISCR2 and ISKpn19, and blaTEM-1 together with tet(M interspersed with IS26, ISApl1, ΔTn2, and ΔIS1B. The coexistence of cfr with other resistance genes on a conjugative plasmid may contribute to the dissemination of these genes by co-selection. Thus, rational drug use and continued surveillance of cfr in swine farms are warranted.

  8. Distribution of cfr in Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli Strains from Pig Farms in China and Characterization of a Novel cfr-Carrying F43:A-:B- Plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Jing; Li, Wei; Zhao, Li-Qing; Lu, Yan; Liu, Jian-Hua; Zeng, Zhen-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The multi-resistance gene cfr is widely distributed among various gram-positive and gram-negative species in livestock in China. To better understand the epidemiology of cfr among Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli isolates, 254 Staphylococcus spp. and 398 E. coli strains collected from six swine farms in China were subjected to prevalence and genetic analysis. Forty (15.7%) Staphylococcus spp. isolates, including 38 Staphylococcus sciuri strains, one Staphylococcus chromogenes strain, and one Staphylococcus lentus strain, and two (0.5%) E. coli isolates were found to contain the cfr gene. Most of the 38 S. sciuri strains were clonally unrelated; however, clonal dissemination of cfr -positive S. sciuri was detected at the same farm. In eight randomly selected cfr -positive staphylococci, a cfr -harboring module (IS 21-558-cfr- Δ tnpB ) was detected in six S. sciuri isolates; cfr was bracketed by two copies of IS Enfa4 or IS 256 in the remaining two S. sciuri isolates. In the two E. coli isolates, EP25 and EP28, cfr was flanked by two IS 26 elements in the same or opposite orientation, respectively. Complete sequence analysis of the novel F43:A-:B- plasmid pHNEP28 revealed that it contains two multi-resistance regions: cfr together with floR , qnrS1 interspersed with IS 26 , ΔIS CR2 and IS Kpn19 , and bla TEM-1 together with tet (M) interspersed with IS 26 , IS Apl1 , ΔTn 2 , and ΔIS 1B . The coexistence of cfr with other resistance genes on a conjugative plasmid may contribute to the dissemination of these genes by co-selection. Thus, rational drug use and continued surveillance of cfr in swine farms are warranted.

  9. Widespread plasmid resistance genes among Proteus species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    34% of the strains lost the antibiotic resistance plasmids marker after sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mediated curing. The rest of the plasmid markers were non transferable. The results indicated that plasmids carry varied dissemination of antibiotics resistance markers to distant recipient cells, indicating clonal transfer ...

  10. Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli Resistant to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins in the Norwegian Broiler Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Solveig Sølverød; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Berg, Einar Sverre; Norström, Madelaine; Sunde, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins have been detected in the Norwegian broiler production, despite the fact that antimicrobial agents are rarely used. The genetic mechanism responsible for cephalosporin resistance is mainly attributed to the presence of the blaCMY-2 gene encoding a plasmid-mediated AmpC-beta-lactamase (pAmpC). The aim of this study was to characterize and compare blaCMY-2 containing Escherichia coli isolated from the intestinal flora of broilers and retail chicken meat (fillets) to identify possible successful clones and/or resistance plasmids widespread in the Norwegian broiler production. Methods used included PCR based phylotyping, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis and whole genome sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of an IncK plasmid carrying blaCMY-2 was determined. Intestinal isolates displayed a higher degree of genetic diversity than meat isolates. A cluster of genetically related isolates belonging to ST38, phylogroup D, carrying blaCMY-2 containing IncK plasmids was identified. Furthermore, genes encoding plasmid stability systems (relBE/stbDE and pndAC) were identified on the IncK plasmid. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of a subset of isolates confirmed a close genetic relationship within the two most prevalent STs. The IncK plasmids within these two STs also shared a high degree of similarity. Cephalosporin-resistant E. coli with the same genetic characteristics have been identified in the broiler production in other European countries, and the IncK plasmid characterized in this study showed close homology to a plasmid isolated from retail chicken meat in the Netherlands. The results indicate that both clonal expansion and horizontal transfer of blaCMY-2 containing plasmids contribute to dissemination of cephalosporin resistant E. coli in the broiler production. The presence of plasmid

  11. Emergence of carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli isolates producing blaNDM and blaOXA-48-like carried on IncA/C and IncL/M plasmids at two Iranian university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solgi, Hamid; Giske, Christian G; Badmasti, Farzad; Aghamohammad, Shadi; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Sabeti, Shahram; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2017-11-01

    The emergence of carbapenem resistance among Escherichia coli is a serious threat to public health. The objective of this study was to investigate resistance genes and clonality of carbapenem resistant E. coli in Iran. Between February 2015 and July 2016, a total of 32 non-duplicate E. coli isolates that were ertapenem resistant or intermediate (R/I-ETP) were collected from patient clinical or surveillance cultures (rectal swabs) at two university hospitals. Resistance genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Conjugation experiments, PCR-based replicon typing, PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed. PCR assays showed, among the 32 isolates, twenty-nine strains produced carbapenemase genes. The predominant carbapenemase was bla OXA-48 (82.8%), followed by bla NDM-1 (31%), bla NDM-7 (6.9%) and bla OXA-181 (3.4%). Seven of the bla NDM positive isolates co-harbored bla OXA-48 carbapenemases. The bla NDM and bla OXA-48 were found in IncA/C and IncL/M conjugative plasmids, respectively. The bla CTX-M-15 , qnrA and intI1 genes were also present in most isolates. The PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 28 E. coli isolates, which belonged to six minor PFGE clusters and 14 isolates were singletons. The 26 isolates were distributed into 18 STs, of which two were dominant (ST648 and ST167). We identified one bla NDM-1 -positive ST131 E. coli isolates that harbor the bla CTX-M-15 and bla TEM genes. Horizontal transfer of IncA/C and IncL/M plasmids has likely facilitated the spread of the bla OXA-48 and bla NDM genes among E. coli. Their clonal diversity and the presence of faecal carriers in isolates suggest an endemic spread of OXA-48 and NDM. Therefore, it emphasizes the critical importance of monitoring and controlling the spread of carbapenem resistant E. coli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Horizontol dissemination of TEM- and SHV-typr beta-lactamase genes-carrying resistance plasmids amongst clonical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae Disseminação horizontal de plasmídios de resistência contendo genes de beta-lactamase dos tipos TEM e SHV entre isolados clínicos de Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Birol Ozgumus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing bacteria have been isolated at increasing frequency worldwide. Expression of ESBL is often associated with multidrug resistance and dissemination by resistance plasmids. During a two-month period in 2000, 133 clinical isolates of enterobacterial strains were randomly collected from outpatients and inpatients at a university hospital in Turkey. The ESBL producing strains were determined by double-disk synergy (DDS testing. Twenty ESBL producing strains (15% including Escherichia coli (n = 9, Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7, Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 2 and Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 2 were detected and further analyzed for their resistance transfer features, plasmid profile and nature of the resistance genes. Plasmid transfer assays were performed using broth mating techniques. TEM- and SHV- genes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and hybridization using specific probes. EcoRI restriction enzyme analyses of R plasmids were used in the detection of epidemic plasmids. Fourteen plasmid profiles (A, B1, B2, C1, and C2 to L were obtained with EcoRI restriction enzyme analysis. Most of these plasmids were detected to carry both TEM- and SHV-derived genes by PCR, and confirmed by localizing each gene by hybridization assay. Epidemiological evidence indicated that there was an apparent horizontal dissemination of conjugative R plasmids among multidrug-resistant enterobacterial genera and species in this hospitalO isolamento de bactérias produtoras de beta-lactamases de espectro expandido (ESBL está aumentando no mundo todo. Freqüentemente, a expressão de ESBL está associada com resistência a múltiplas drogas e disseminação por plasmídios de resistência. Durante um período de dois meses em 2000, 133 isolados clínicos de cepas de enterobactérias foram obtidos aleatoriamente de pacientes internos e externos de um hospital universitário na Turquia. As cepas produtoras de ESBL foram

  13. Correlation between transgen expression and plasmid DNA loss in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Ryohei; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Transgene expression from plasmid DNA is dependent on the expression efficiency per plasmid and the amount of intranuclear plasmid. In the present study, intranuclear dispositions of two types of plasmid DNAs (i.e. the pCpGfree and pLIVE plasmids) that maintain transgene expression in mouse liver were analyzed. In addition, the relationship between transgene expression and plasmid stability in the nucleus was examined. First, the pCpGfree and pLIVE plasmid DNAs, bearing the mouse secreted alkaline phosphatase (Seap) gene, were administered into mouse liver by the hydrodynamics-based method. Next, various Seap-plasmid DNAs containing different promoters, upstream and downstream sequences, and backbones were injected into mice, and both SEAP expression and plasmid DNA amounts were monitored for 28 days. At the 14- and 28-day time points, the amount of the pCpGfree plasmid DNA was one order of magnitude less than that of the pLIVE plasmid. Meanwhile, the expression efficiency per plasmid was one order of magnitude more efficient for the pCpGfree plasmid DNA. Moreover, the administration of various Seap-plasmid DNAs revealed that negative correlations exist between plasmid stability and SEAP expression level. The results obtained suggest that the pCpGfree plasmid is unstable from the viewpoint of quantity and maintains transgene expression by its high expression efficiency and also that transgene expression negatively affects the stability of plasmid DNA. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments ...

  15. Distribution of small native plasmids in Streptococcus pyogenes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, René; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2014-05-01

    Complete characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes population from a defined geographic region comprises information on the plasmids that circulate in these bacteria. Therefore, we determined the distribution of small plasmids (pyogenes isolates from India, where diversity of strains and incidence rates of S. pyogenes infections are high. The collection comprised 77 emm-types. For plasmid detection and discrimination, we developed PCRs for different plasmid replication initiation protein genes, the putative repressor gene copG and bacteriocin genes dysA and scnM57. Plasmid distribution was limited to 13 emm-types. Co-detection analysis using aforementioned PCRs revealed four distinct plasmid sub-types, two of which were previously unknown. Representative plasmids pA852 and pA996 of the two uncharacterized plasmid sub-types were sequenced. These two plasmids could be assigned to the pMV158 and the pC194/pUB110 family of rolling-circle plasmids, respectively. The majority of small plasmids found in India belonged to the two newly characterized sub-types, with pA852- and pA996-like plasmids amounting to 42% and 22% of all detected plasmids, respectively. None of the detected plasmids coded for a known antibiotic resistance gene. Instead, all of the four plasmid sub-types carried known or potential bacteriocin genes. These genes may have influence on the evolutionary success of certain S. pyogenes genotypes. Notably, pA852-like plasmids were found in all isolates of the most prevalent emm-type 11.0. Together, a priori fitness of this genotype and increased fitness due to the acquired plasmids may have rendered type emm11.0 successful and caused the prevalence of pA852-like plasmids in India. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction of Big Celandine Extract and Plasmid DNA, Excreted From the Clinical Strain Escherichia Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Chebotarjova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Search for compounds which possess antibacterial activity and have an effect on plasmid DNA, is one more of the important problems of applied medicine. Natural substances are the most desirable candidates for this role. Plasmid DNA excretion was carried out from the strain Echerihiacoli, derived from patient N., who suffered from chronic pyelonephritis, in the bacteriological laboratory of the Regional clinical hospital of Saratov according to the modified method Birnboim and Doli. The calculation of alkaloid concentration was made, e.g. Sanguinarin and Cheler-etrin contained in celandine extract. The devised method has been tested on five celandine tincture samples, stored for the research of the stability of the content of alkaloids and other quality factors of the given preparation. In so doing the content of the alkaloid sum in tincture changes within the limits of 1 %. Abatement of plasmid DNA concentration after the cell treatment by celandine extract is revealed.

  17. Occurrence of blaNDM-7within IncX3-type plasmid of Escherichia coli from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Deepjyoti; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha; Ingti, Birson; Choudhury, Nargis Alom; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Dhar, Debadatta; Chakravarty, Atanu

    2017-04-01

    New-Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-7 with higher hydrolytic activity than its ancestor NDM-1 is emerging across the globe including India. In this study, we have investigated the genetic context of bla NDM-7 and alteration in plasmid copy number under concentration gradient carbapenem stress. Six bla NDM-7 producing Escherichia coli isolates were obtained from Silchar Medical College and Hospital and the co-existence of other β-lactamases and transferability of this resistant determinant was determined by transformation and conjugation assay followed by typing of the plasmid by PBRT method. Genetic context and plasmid stability of bla NDM-7 was also determined. The change in copy number of transconjugable plasmid carrying bla NDM-7 under exposure of different carbapenem antibiotics was determined by quantitative Real Time PCR. All the six isolates carrying bla NDM-7 were conjugatively transferable through an IncX3-type plasmid and were also found to co-harbor bla CTX-M-15 . Genetic analysis of bla NDM-7 showed an association of ISAba125, IS5 and a truncated portion of ISAba125 in the upstream region and ble MBL gene in the downstream region of bla NDM-7 . Complete loss of the plasmids carrying bla NDM-7 was observed between 85th to 90th serial passages when antibiotic pressure was withdrawn. After analyzing the relative copy number it was observed that the copy number of the bla NDM-7 encoding plasmid was highly affected by the concentration of ertapenem. The present study has first demonstrated presence of IncX3-type plasmid encoding bla NDM-7 within nosocomial isolates of E. coli. Measures must be taken to prevent or atleast slowdown the emergence of this resistance determinant in this country. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments...... that segregate plasmids paired at mid-cell to daughter cells. Like microtubules, ParM filaments exhibit dynamic instability (i.e., catastrophic decay) whose regulation is an important component of the DNA segregation process. The Walker box ParA ATPases are related to MinD and form highly dynamic, oscillating...... filaments that are required for the subcellular movement and positioning of plasmids. The role of the observed ATPase oscillation is not yet understood. However, we propose a simple model that couples plasmid segregation to ParA oscillation. The model is consistent with the observed movement...

  19. Bacteriophages limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ellie; Wood, A Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-02

    Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. Conjugative plasmids are infectious loops of DNA capable of transmitting DNA between bacterial cells and between species. Because plasmids often carry extra genes that allow bacteria to live in otherwise-inhospitable environments, their dynamics are central to understanding bacterial adaptive evolution. The plasmid-bacterium interaction has typically been studied in isolation, but in natural bacterial communities, bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, are ubiquitous. Using experiments, mathematical models, and computer simulations we show that bacteriophages drive plasmid dynamics through their ecological and evolutionary effects on bacteria and ultimately

  20. Partition-associated incompatibility caused by random assortment of pure plasmid clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Sherratt, David J; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    Summary Bacterial plasmids and chromosomes encode centromere-like partition loci that actively segregate DNA before cell division. The molecular mechanism behind DNA segregation in bacteria is largely unknown. Here we analyse the mechanism of partition-associated incompatibility for plasmid pB171......, a phenotype associated with all known plasmid-encoded centromere loci. An R1 plasmid carrying par2 from plasmid pB171 was destabilized by the presence of an F plasmid carrying parC1, parC2 or the entire par2 locus of pB171. Strikingly, cytological double-labelling experiments revealed no evidence of long......-lived pairing of plasmids. Instead, pure R1 and F foci were positioned along the length of the cell, and in a random order. Thus, our results raise the possibility that partition-mediated plasmid incompatibility is not caused by pairing of heterologous plasmids but instead by random positioning of pure plasmid...

  1. Regulation of membrane peptides by the Pseudomonas plasmid alk regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, S; Oppici, M; Shapiro, J; Fennewald, M

    1979-12-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains carrying the plasmid alk genes will grow on n-alkanes. Induced alk+ strains contain membrane activities for alkane hydroxylation and dehydrogenation of aliphatic primary alcohols. P. putida cytoplasmic and outer membranes can be separated by sucrose gradient centrifugation after disruption of cells by either mild detergent lysis or passage through a French press. Both the membrane component of alkane hydroxylase and membrane alcohol dehydrogenase fractionated with the cytoplasmic membrane. Induction of the alk regulon resulted in the appearance of at least three new plasmid-determined cytoplasmic membrane peptides of about 59,000 (59K), 47,000 (47K), and 40,000 (40K) daltons as well as the disappearance of a pair of chromosomally encoded outer membrane peptides of about 43,000 daltons. The 40K peptide is the membrane component of alkane hydroxylase and the product of the plasmid alkB gene because the alkB1029 mutation altered the properties of alkane hydroxylase in whole cells, reduced its thermal stability in cell extracts, and led to increased electrophoretic mobility of the inducible 40K peptide. These results are consistent with a model for vectorial oxidation of n-alkanes in the cytoplasmic membrane of P. putida.

  2. Deficient sumoylation of yeast 2-micron plasmid proteins Rep1 and Rep2 associated with their loss from the plasmid-partitioning locus and impaired plasmid inheritance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan B Pinder

    Full Text Available The 2-micron plasmid of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes copy-number amplification and partitioning systems that enable the plasmid to persist despite conferring no advantage to its host. Plasmid partitioning requires interaction of the plasmid Rep1 and Rep2 proteins with each other and with the plasmid-partitioning locus STB. Here we demonstrate that Rep1 stability is reduced in the absence of Rep2, and that both Rep proteins are sumoylated. Lysine-to-arginine substitutions in Rep1 and Rep2 that inhibited their sumoylation perturbed plasmid inheritance without affecting Rep protein stability or two-hybrid interaction between Rep1 and Rep2. One-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Rep1 was required for efficient retention of Rep2 at STB and that sumoylation-deficient mutants of Rep1 and Rep2 were impaired for association with STB. The normal co-localization of both Rep proteins with the punctate nuclear plasmid foci was also lost when Rep1 was sumoylation-deficient. The correlation of Rep protein sumoylation status with plasmid-partitioning locus association suggests a theme common to eukaryotic chromosome segregation proteins, sumoylated forms of which are found enriched at centromeres, and between the yeast 2-micron plasmid and viral episomes that depend on sumoylation of their maintenance proteins for persistence in their hosts.

  3. Plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria and their role in adaptation to cold environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz eDziewit

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Extremely cold environments are a challenge for all organisms. They are mostly inhabited by psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria, which employ various strategies to cope with the cold. Such harsh environments are often highly vulnerable to the influence of external factors and may undergo frequent dynamic changes. The rapid adjustment of bacteria to changing environmental conditions is crucial for their survival. Such short-term evolution is often enabled by plasmids – extrachromosomal replicons that represent major players in horizontal gene transfer.The genomic sequences of thousands of microorganisms, including those of many cold-active bacteria have been obtained over the last decade, but the collected data have yet to be thoroughly analyzed. This report describes the results of a meta-analysis of the NCBI sequence databases to identify and characterize plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria.We have performed in-depth analyses of 66 plasmids, almost half of which are cryptic replicons not exceeding 10 kb in size. Our analyses of the larger plasmids revealed the presence of numerous genes, which may increase the phenotypic flexibility of their host strains. These genes encode enzymes possibly involved in (i protection against cold and ultraviolet radiation, (ii scavenging of reactive oxygen species, (iii metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and lipids, (iv energy production and conversion, (v utilization of toxic organic compounds (e.g. naphthalene, and (vi resistance to heavy metals, metalloids and antibiotics. Some of the plasmids also contain type II restriction-modification systems, which are involved in both plasmid stabilization and protection against foreign DNA. Moreover, approx. 50% of the analyzed plasmids carry genetic modules responsible for conjugal transfer or mobilization for transfer, which may facilitate the spread of these replicons among various bacteria, including across species

  4. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    A spatial planning act was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive....../cities. Four different sectors (water, food production, waste, and forests) were selected as core areas for decentralised spatial planning. Indicators for SCC and ACC were identified and assessed with regard to relevance and quantifiability. For each of the indicators selected, a legal threshold or guiding...... was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative...

  5. Impact of co-carriage of IncA/C plasmids with additional plasmids on the transfer of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Pendleton, Sean J; Deck, Joanna; Singh, Ruby; Gilbert, Jeffrey; Johnson, Timothy J; Sanad, Yasser M; Nayak, Rajesh; Foley, Steven L

    2018-04-20

    Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica is often plasmid encoded. A key resistance plasmid group is the incompatibility group (Inc) A/C plasmids that often carry multiple resistance determinants. Previous studies showed that IncA/C plasmids were often co-located with other plasmids. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of plasmid co-carriage on antimicrobial resistance and plasmid transfer. A total of 1267 Salmonella isolates, representing multiple serotypes and sources were previously subjected to susceptibility testing and 251 isolates with resistance to at least 5 antimicrobial agents were identified for further study. Each isolate was subjected to PCR-based replicon typing, and those with IncA/C plasmids were selected for plasmid isolation, PCR-based mapping of IncA/C plasmid backbone genes, and conjugation assays to evaluate resistance plasmid transferability. Of the 87 identified IncA/C positive isolates, approximately 75% carried a plasmid with another identified replicon type, with the most common being I1 (39%), FIA, FIIA, FIB and HI2 (each 15%). PCR-based mapping indicated significant diversity in IncA/C backbone content, especially in regions encoding transfer-associated and hypothetical proteins. Conjugation experiments showed that nearly 68% of the isolates transferred resistance plasmids, with 90% containing additional identified plasmids or larger (>50 kb) non-typeable plasmids. The majority of IncA/C-positive strains were able to conjugally transfer antimicrobial resistance to the recipient, encoded by IncA/C and/or co-carried plasmids. These findings highlight the importance of co-located plasmids for resistance dissemination either by directly transferring resistance genes or by potentially providing the needed conjugation machinery for IncA/C plasmid transfer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Bifurcation Analysis of a Chemostat Model of Plasmid-Bearing and Plasmid-Free Competition with Pulsed Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zhao

    2014-01-01

    to the stability of the boundary periodic solution. By use of standard techniques of bifurcation theory, the periodic oscillations in substrate, plasmid-bearing, and plasmid-free organisms are shown when some conditions are satisfied. Our results can be applied to control bioreactor aimed at producing commercial producers through genetically altered organisms.

  7. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-29

    antibiotics sulfonamides and tetracycline, and produced in excess or synthetic drugs against which a given plasmid does of 10 000 reported cases [6] with an...antibiotic eliminated 8 out of 14 plasmids pense of ATP hydrolysis and is inhibited by the anti- biotic, novobiocin [52]. CHI Empirical tests of :be...of novobiocin (Fig. 3) offers no obvious clue and cephalosporins through hydrolysis , i.e., not by to the nature of the competition with ATP nor to

  8. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  9. Yoghurt fermentation at elevated temperatures by strains of Streptococcus thermophilus expressing a small heat-shock protein: application of a two-plasmid system for constructing food-grade strains of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Demerdash, Hassan A; Oxmann, Julian; Heller, Knut J; Geis, Arnold

    2006-04-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus S4 expressing a small heat-shock protein from the plasmid pSt04-encoded copy of shsp, is able to carry out fermentation at elevated temperature, i.e., at 50 degrees C. In yoghurt culture together with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, fermentation at elevated temperature results in a mild yoghurt with low post-acidification and improved stability of the starter bacteria during storage at 4 degrees C. To transfer pSt04 into commercial S. thermophilus yoghurt starter strains, a two-plasmid system was constructed. A helper plasmid providing a selectable antibiotic marker, but relying on the repA gene of pSt04, was transformed together with pSt04. After isolation of transformants, the helper plasmid was readily lost upon incubation of transformants in antibiotic-free medium, thus yielding food-grade strains carrying pSt04 only. Successful application of the system was demonstrated.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to various antimicrobial agents, and the relationship between antimicrobial resistance of the isolates and carriage of plasmids. Design: A random sampling of milk and meat samples was carried out. Setting: Milk was collected from various dairy ...

  11. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  12. Identification of pOENI-1 and Related Plasmids in Oenococcus oeni Strains Performing the Malolactic Fermentation in Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Marion; Bilhère, Eric; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Moine, Virginie; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids in lactic acid bacteria occasionally confer adaptive advantages improving the growth and behaviour of their host cells. They are often associated to starter cultures used in the food industry and could be a signature of their superiority. Oenococcus oeni is the main lactic acid bacteria species encountered in wine. It performs the malolactic fermentation that occurs in most wines after alcoholic fermentation and contributes to their quality and stability. Industrial O. oeni starters may be used to better control malolactic fermentation. Starters are selected empirically by virtue of their fermentation kinetics and capacity to survive in wine. This study was initiated with the aim to determine whether O. oeni contains plasmids of technological interest. Screening of 11 starters and 33 laboratory strains revealed two closely related plasmids, named pOENI-1 (18.3-kb) and pOENI-1v2 (21.9-kb). Sequence analyses indicate that they use the theta mode of replication, carry genes of maintenance and replication and two genes possibly involved in wine adaptation encoding a predicted sulphite exporter (tauE) and a NADH:flavin oxidoreductase of the old yellow enzyme family (oye). Interestingly, pOENI-1 and pOENI-1v2 were detected only in four strains, but this included three industrial starters. PCR screenings also revealed that tauE is present in six of the 11 starters, being probably inserted in the chromosome of some strains. Microvinification assays performed using strains with and without plasmids did not disclose significant differences of survival in wine or fermentation kinetics. However, analyses of 95 wines at different phases of winemaking showed that strains carrying the plasmids or the genes tauE and oye were predominant during spontaneous malolactic fermentation. Taken together, the results revealed a family of related plasmids associated with industrial starters and indigenous strains performing spontaneous malolactic fermentation that possibly

  13. Conjugative plasmids: Vessels of the communal gene pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2009-01-01

    available within that environment. Here we use the term supergenome to describe the set of all genes that a prokaryotic ‘individual' can draw on within a particular environmental setting. Conjugative plasmids can be considered particularly successful entities within the communal pool, which have enabled HGT...... over large taxonomic distances. These plasmids are collections of discrete regions of genes that function as ‘backbone modules' to undertake different aspects of overall plasmid maintenance and propagation. Conjugative plasmids often carry suites of ‘accessory elements' that contribute adaptive traits...... to the hosts and, potentially, other resident prokaryotes within specific environmental niches. Insight into the evolution of plasmid modules therefore contributes to our knowledge of gene dissemination and evolution within prokaryotic communities. This communal pool provides the prokaryotes with an important...

  14. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopin, M.C.; Rouault, A. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Rennes (France). Lab. de Recherches de Technologie Laitiere); Moillo-Batt, A. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital de Pontchaillon, 35 - Rennes (France))

    1985-02-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by co-transfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci.

  15. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, M.-C.; Rouault, A.

    1985-01-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by cotransfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci. (orig.)

  16. Identification of IncA/C Plasmid Replication and Maintenance Genes and Development of a Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Steven J; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M; Forde, Brian M; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    Plasmids of incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) are becoming increasingly prevalent within pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae They are associated with the dissemination of multiple clinically relevant resistance genes, including bla CMY and bla NDM Current typing methods for IncA/C plasmids offer limited resolution. In this study, we present the complete sequence of a bla NDM-1 -positive IncA/C plasmid, pMS6198A, isolated from a multidrug-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain. Hypersaturated transposon mutagenesis, coupled with transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), was employed to identify conserved genetic elements required for replication and maintenance of pMS6198A. Our analysis of TraDIS data identified roles for the replicon, including repA, a toxin-antitoxin system; two putative partitioning genes, parAB; and a putative gene, 053 Construction of mini-IncA/C plasmids and examination of their stability within E. coli confirmed that the region encompassing 053 contributes to the stable maintenance of IncA/C plasmids. Subsequently, the four major maintenance genes (repA, parAB, and 053) were used to construct a new plasmid multilocus sequence typing (PMLST) scheme for IncA/C plasmids. Application of this scheme to a database of 82 IncA/C plasmids identified 11 unique sequence types (STs), with two dominant STs. The majority of bla NDM -positive plasmids examined (15/17; 88%) fall into ST1, suggesting acquisition and subsequent expansion of this bla NDM -containing plasmid lineage. The IncA/C PMLST scheme represents a standardized tool to identify, track, and analyze the dissemination of important IncA/C plasmid lineages, particularly in the context of epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUHARTONO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Suhartono (2010 Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids. Biodiversitas 11: 59-64. Of major uropathogens, Escherichia coli has been widely known as a main pathogen of UTIs globally and has considerable medical and financial consequences. A strain of UPEC, namely E. coli ST131, confers a large plasmid encoding cephalosporinases (class C β-lactamase or AmpC that may be disseminated through horizontal transfer among bacterial populations. Therefore, it is worth examining such large plasmids by isolating, purifying, and digesting the plasmid with restriction enzymes. The examination of the large plasmids was conducted by isolating plasmid DNA visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis as well as by PFGE. The relationship of plasmids among isolates was carried out by HpaI restriction enzyme digestion. Of 36 isolates of E. coli ST 131, eight isolates possessed large plasmids, namely isolates 3, 9, 10, 12, 17, 18, 26 and 30 with the largest molecular size confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and PFGE was ~42kb and ~118kb respectively. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that isolates 9, 10, 12, 17 and 18 have the common restriction patterns and those isolates might be closely related.

  18. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna

    2003-01-01

    A plasmid-borne diacetyl (acetoin) reductase (butA) from Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides CHCC2114 was sequenced and cloned. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 257 amino acids which had high identity at the amino acid level to diacetyl (acetoin...... diacetyl (acetoin) reductase activity with NADH as coenzyme, but not with NADPH as coenzyme, suggesting the presence of another diacetyl (acetoin)-reducing activity in L. pseudomesenteroides. Plasmid-curing experiments demonstrated that the butA gene is carried on a 20-kb plasmid in L. pseudomesenteroides....

  19. Construction of Stable Fluorescent Reporter Plasmids for Use in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D. Rodriguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, the genes encoding three different fluorescent proteins were cloned into the stably maintained Staphylococcus aureus shuttle vector pKK30. The resulting plasmids were transformed into two S. aureus strains; SH1000 and RN4220. Stability assays illustrated that the three recombinant plasmids retained near 100% maintenance in vitro for 160 generations. S. aureus strain SH1000 expressing green fluorescent protein was then inoculated in an ovine model and in vivo stability for 6 days was demonstrated. In essence, these reporter plasmids represent a useful set of tools for dynamic imaging studies in S. aureus. These three reporter plasmids are available through BEI Resources.

  20. Survival and Evolution of a Large Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in New Clinical Bacterial Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten O A

    2016-11-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS26 mediated deletions of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities of plasmid adaptation. While insertion sequences are well known to supply plasmids with adaptive traits, our findings suggest that they also play an important role in plasmid evolution by maintaining the plasticity necessary to alleviate plasmid-host constrains. Further, the observed evolutionary strategy consistently followed by all evolved E. coli lineages exposes a trade-off between horizontal and vertical transmission that may ultimately limit the dissemination potential of clinical multidrug resistance plasmids in these hosts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Investigation of plasmid-induced growth defect in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia; Sydow, Anne; Schempp, Florence; Becher, Daniela; Schewe, Hendrik; Schrader, Jens; Buchhaupt, Markus

    2016-08-10

    Genetic engineering in bacteria mainly relies on the use of plasmids. But despite their pervasive use for physiological studies as well as for the design and optimization of industrially used production strains, only limited information about plasmid induced growth defects is available for different replicons and organisms. Here, we present the identification and characterization of such a phenomenon for Pseudomonas putida transformants carrying the pBBR1-derived plasmid pMiS1. We identified the kanamycin resistance gene and the transcription factor encoding rhaR gene to be causal for the growth defect in P. putida. In contrast, this effect was not observed in Escherichia coli. The plasmid-induced growth defect was eliminated after introduction of a mutation in the plasmid-encoded rep gene, thus enabling construction of the non-toxic variant pMiS4. GFP reporters construct analyses and qPCR experiments revealed a distinctly lowered plasmid copy number for pMiS4, which is probably the reason for alleviation of the growth defect by this mutation. Our work expands the knowledge about plasmid-induced growth defects and provides a useful low-copy pBBR1 replicon variant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasmid-mediated florfenicol resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Ken; Kohmoto, Mariko; Mikami, Osamu; Tamamura, Yukino; Uchida, Ikuo

    2012-03-23

    The aim of this study was to analyse a florfenicol-resistant Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from a calf to determine the genetic basis of its florfenicol-resistance. The antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmid content of the isolate were determined. A florfenicol resistant plasmid carrying the floR gene was identified by PCR and transformed into Escherichia coli JM109 and HB101 strains. The plasmid was then mapped and sequenced completely. The isolate was resistant to chloramphenicol, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, kanamycin, dihydrostreptomycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, and amoxicillin; it carried a floR plasmid of 7.7kb, designated pMH1405. The mobilisation and replication genes of pMH1405 showed extensive similarity to the 5.1-kb pDN1 plasmid from Dichelobacter nodosus and the 10.8-kb pCCK381 plasmid from Pasteurella multocida. An adjacent 2.4-kb segment was highly homologous to the TnfloR region of the E. coli BN10660 plasmid. A plasmid-mediated floR gene was responsible for florfenicol resistance in the bovine respiratory tract pathogen M. haemolytica. The pMH1405 plasmid is the smallest floR-carrying plasmid reported to date. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a florfenicol-resistant gene in M. haemolytica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibiotic Susceptibility and Plasmid Profiles of Shigella species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the antibiotic susceptibility, plasmid profile and conjugative abilities of Shigella species isolated from different towns in Sudan during 2005-2007. Methods: Stool specimens were collected in Carry Blair transport medium from patients presenting with diarrhea from different sites in ...

  4. Rhodococcus equi Infections in Goats: Characterization of Virulence Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranahan, Lauren W; Plumlee, Quinci D; Lawhon, Sara D; Cohen, Noah D; Bryan, Laura K

    2018-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an uncommon cause of systemic pyogranulomatous infections in goats with macroscopic similarities to caseous lymphadenitis caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. Caprine cases have previously been reported to be caused by avirulent R. equi strains. Six cases of R. equi infection in goats yielding 8 R. equi isolates were identified from 2000 to 2017. Lesions varied from bronchopneumonia, vertebral and humeral osteomyelitis, and subcutaneous abscesses, to disseminated infection involving the lungs, lymph nodes, and multiple visceral organs. Isolates of R. equi from infected goats were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for R. equi virulence-associated plasmid ( vap) genes. Seven of 8 isolates carried the VapN plasmid, originally characterized in bovine isolates, while 1 isolate lacked virulence plasmids and was classified as avirulent. The VapN plasmid has not been described in isolates cultured from goats.

  5. Development of plasmid and oligonucleotide nanometric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauty, E; Behr, J-P; Remy, J-S

    2002-06-01

    Nucleic acids delivery vectors have shown promising therapeutic potential in model systems. However, comparable clinical success is delayed essentially because of their poor biodistribution and of their ineffective intracellular trafficking. The size of condensed DNA particles is a key determinant for in vivo diffusion, as well as for gene delivery to the cell nucleus. Towards this goal, we have developed cationic thiol-detergents that individually compact plasmid DNA molecules into anionic particles. These particles are then 'stabilized' by air-induced dimerization of the detergent into a disulfide lipid on the template DNA. The particles all measure approximately 30 nm, which corresponds to the volume of a single molecule of plasmid DNA. The gel electrophoretic mobility of the anionic particles was found to be higher than that of the plasmid DNA itself. Similarly, particles formed with a 31-mer oligonucleotide measured 19 nm. Improved in vivo diffusion, as well as improved intracellular trafficking may be inferred from the faster migration of the complexes. Moreover, the size of the particles remains compatible with nuclear pore crossing. Finally, in an attempt to improve the biodistribution of these particles, we have coated the monomolecular particles with a poly(ethylene glycol) corona.

  6. A simian-human immunodeficiency virus carrying the rt gene from Chinese CRF01_AE strain of HIV is sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and has a highly genetic stability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Nan; Ju, Bin; Dong, Zhihui; Cong, Zhe; Jiang, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 subtype CRF01_AE is one of the major HIV-1 subtypes that dominate the global epidemic. However, its drug resistance, associated mutations, and viral fitness have not been systemically studied, because available chimeric simian-HIVs (SHIVs) usually express the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (rt) gene of subtype B HIV-1, which is different from subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, pRT-SHIV/AE, was constructed to generate a chimeric RT-SHIV/AE by replacing the rt gene of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) with the counterpart of Chinese HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE. The infectivity, replication capacity, co-receptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and genetic stability of RT-SHIV/AE were characterized. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE effectively infected and replicated in human T cell line and rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (rhPBMC). The rt gene of RT-SHIV/AE lacked the common mutation (T215I) associated with drug resistance. RT-SHIV-AE retained infectivity and immunogenicity, similar to that of its counterpart RT-SHIV/TC virus following intravenous inoculation in Chinese rhesus macaque. RT-SHIV-AE was more sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) than the RT-SHIV/TC. RT-SHIV/AE was genetically stable in Chinese rhesus macaque. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE may be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of the rt-based antiviral drugs against the subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Low biological cost of carbapenemase-encoding plasmids following transfer from Klebsiella pneumoniae to Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Sørum, Vidar; Starikova, Irina; Kloos, Julia; Hülter, Nils; Naseer, Umaer; Johnsen, Pål J; Samuelsen, Ørjan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the biological cost, stability and sequence of two carbapenemase-encoding plasmids containing bla KPC-2 (pG12-KPC-2) and bla VIM-1 (pG06-VIM-1) isolated from Klebsiella pneumoniae when newly acquired by uropathogenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates of different genetic backgrounds. The two plasmids were transferred into plasmid-free E. coli clinical isolates by transformation. The fitness effect of newly acquired plasmids on the host cell was assessed in head-to-head competitions with the corresponding isogenic strain. Plasmid stability was estimated by propagating monocultures for ∼312 generations. Plasmid nucleotide sequences were determined using next-generation sequencing technology. Assembly, gap closure, annotation and comparative analyses were performed. Both plasmids were stably maintained in three of four E. coli backgrounds and resulted in low to moderate reductions in host fitness ranging from 1.1% to 3.6%. A difference in fitness cost was observed for pG12-KPC-2 between two different genetic backgrounds, while no difference was detected for pG06-VIM-1 between three different genetic backgrounds. In addition, a difference was observed between pG12-KPC-2 and pG06-VIM-1 in the same genetic background. In general, the magnitude of biological cost of plasmid carriage was both host and plasmid dependent. The sequences of the two plasmids showed high backbone similarity to previously circulating plasmids in K. pneumoniae. The low to modest fitness cost of newly acquired and stably maintained carbapenemase-encoding plasmids in E. coli indicates a potential for establishment and further dissemination into other Enterobacteriaceae species. We also show that the fitness cost is both plasmid and host specific. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. High-throughput screening of cellulase F mutants from multiplexed plasmid sets using an automated plate assay on a functional proteomic robotic workcell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nasib

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The field of plasmid-based functional proteomics requires the rapid assay of proteins expressed from plasmid libraries. Automation is essential since large sets of mutant open reading frames are being cloned for evaluation. To date no integrated automated platform is available to carry out the entire process including production of plasmid libraries, expression of cloned genes, and functional testing of expressed proteins. Results We used a functional proteomic assay in a multiplexed setting on an integrated plasmid-based robotic workcell for high-throughput screening of mutants of cellulase F, an endoglucanase from the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces PC-2. This allowed us to identify plasmids containing optimized clones expressing mutants with improved activity at lower pH. A plasmid library of mutagenized clones of the celF gene with targeted variations in the last four codons was constructed by site-directed PCR mutagenesis and transformed into Escherichia coli. A robotic picker integrated into the workcell was used to inoculate medium in a 96-well deep well plate, combining the transformants into a multiplexed set in each well, and the plate was incubated on the workcell. Plasmids were prepared from the multiplexed culture on the liquid handler component of the workcell and used for in vitro transcription/translation. The multiplexed expressed recombinant proteins were screened for improved activity and stability in an azo-carboxymethylcellulose plate assay. The multiplexed wells containing mutants with improved activity were identified and linked back to the corresponding multiplexed cultures stored in glycerol. Spread plates were prepared from the glycerol stocks and the workcell was used to pick single colonies from the spread plates, prepare plasmid, produce recombinant protein, and assay for activity. The screening assay and subsequent deconvolution of the multiplexed wells resulted in identification of improved Cel

  9. Selective conditions for a multidrug resistance plasmid depend on the sociality of antibiotic resistance"

    OpenAIRE

    Bottery, Michael; Wood, A. Jamie; Brockhurst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes conferring qualitatively different mechanisms of resistance. We show here that the antibiotic concentrations selecting for the RK2 plasmid in Escherichia coli depend upon the sociality of the drug resistance: the selection for selfish drug resistance (efflux pump) occurred at very low drug concentrations, just 1.3% of the MIC of the plasmid-free antibiotic-sensitive strain, whereas selection for cooperative drug ...

  10. The characteristics of micrococcus (deinococcus) radiodurans sark plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjarief, Sri Hariani; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    The characterization of micrococcus (deinococcus) radiodurans sark plasmids. This bacterium has been classified as a new genus deinococcus radiodurans which is resistant to gamma-rays. It can repair itself completely almost all of DNA damages including double strand breaks induced by gamma-rays up to about 5 KGy. To reveal the repair mechanism, several investigations had been done to develop a cloning vector available for the genetic analysis. For this purpose D. radiodurans Sark are to be prepared as a vector by studying the characteristics of its plasmid. Plasmids were isolated by electrophoresis using 0.6% low-melting-temperature agarose in TAE and run for 5.5 hours, followed by the identification. An antibiotic marker was also carried out in this experiment to identify its location in the genetic materials of the cell, beside making a restriction map of the plasmid. Results have shown that D. radiodurans Sark has 4 plasmids (P1, P2, P3, and P4) and the refampicin resistant genes were not found in the plasmid. (authors). 14 refs; 4 figs

  11. Previously undescribed plasmids recovered from activated sludge confer tetracycline resistance and phenotypic changes to Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyerim; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2014-02-01

    We used culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to extract previously undescribed plasmids harboring tetracycline (TC) resistance genes from activated sludge. The extracted plasmids were transformed into naturally competent Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 to recover a non-Escherichia coli-based plasmid. The transformed cells showed 80-100-fold higher TC resistance than the wild-type strain. Restriction length polymorphism performed using 30 transformed cells showed four different types of plasmids. Illumina-based whole sequencing of the four plasmids identified three previously unreported plasmids and one previously reported plasmid. All plasmids carried TC resistance-related genes (tetL, tetH), tetracycline transcriptional regulators (tetR), and mobilization-related genes. As per expression analysis, TC resistance genes were functional in the presence of TC. The recovered plasmids showed mosaic gene acquisition through horizontal gene transfer. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, motility, growth rate, sensitivity to stresses, and quorum sensing signals of the transformed cells were different from those of the wild-type cells. Plasmid-bearing cells seemed to have an energy burden for maintaining and expressing plasmid genes. Our data showed that acquisition of TC resistance through plasmid uptake is related to loss of biological fitness. Thus, cells acquiring antibiotic resistance plasmids can survive in the presence of antibiotics, but must pay ecological costs.

  12. Multiple drug resistant carbapenemases producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harbours multiple R-plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan Saranathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The nosocomial human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has high propensity to develop resistance to antimicrobials and to become multidrug resistant (MDR, consequently complicating the treatment. This study was carried out to investigate the presence of resistant plasmids (R-plasmids among the clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, the study was performed to check the presence of common β-lactamases encoding genes on these plasmids. Methods: A total of 55 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were included in the study and all were subjected to plasmid DNA isolation, followed by PCR to check the presence of resistance gene determinants such as blaOXA-23 , blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58 and blaIMP-1 on these plasmids that encode for oxacillinase (OXA and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL type of carbapenemases. Plasmid curing experiments were carried out on selected isolates using ethidium bromide and acridine orange as curing agents and the antibiotic resistance profiles were evaluated before and after curing. Results: All the isolates were identified as A. baumannii by 16SrDNA amplification and sequencing. Plasmid DNA isolated from these isolates showed the occurrence of multiple plasmids with size ranging from 500bp to ≥ 25 kb. The percentage of blaOXA-51 and blaOXA-23 on plasmids were found to be 78 and 42 per cent, respectively and 20 isolates (36% carried blaIMP-1 gene on plasmids. Significant difference was observed in the antibiograms of plasmid cured isolates when compared to their parental ones. The clinical isolates became susceptible to more than two antibiotic classes after curing of plasmids indicating plasmid borne resistance. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study determined the plasmid mediated resistance mechanisms and occurrence of different resistance genes on various plasmids isolated from MDR A. baumannii. The present findings showed the evidence for antibiotic resistance mediated through multiple plasmids in

  13. Characterization of plasmids in extensively drug-resistant acinetobacter strains isolated in India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lim S; Carvalho, Maria J; Toleman, Mark A; White, P Lewis; Connor, Thomas R; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K; Raven, Katherine E; Török, M Estée; Peacock, Sharon J; Howe, Robin A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2015-02-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Translational control and differential RNA decay are key elements regulating postsegregational expression of the killer protein encoded by the parB locus of plasmid R1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, K; Helin, K; Christensen, O W

    1988-01-01

    The parB locus of plasmid R1, which mediates plasmid stability via postsegregational killing of plasmid-free cells, encodes two genes, hok and sok. The hok gene product is a potent cell-killing protein. The hok gene is regulated at the translational level by the sok gene-encoded repressor, a small...

  15. Plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in Escherichia coli from the Arabian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Sonnevend

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This is the first report on the presence of the plasmid-coded mcr-1 gene in a variety of multi-resistant clinical isolates from the Arabian Peninsula indicating that several commonly used antibiotics can potentially facilitate the spread of mcr-1 carrying strains, or directly, mcr-1 containing plasmids.

  16. Replicon typing of plasmids encoding resistance to newer beta-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems.

  17. Replicon Typing of Plasmids Encoding Resistance to Newer β-Lactams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction–based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  18. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  19. Multilocus sequence typing of IncN plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Fernández, Aurora; Villa, Laura; Moodley, Arshnee

    2011-01-01

    in different countries from both animals and humans belonged to ST1, suggesting dissemination of an epidemic plasmid through the food chain. Fifteen of 17 plasmids carrying blaVIM-1 from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, isolated during a 5year period in Greece were assigned to ST10, suggesting...... that spread and persistence of this particular IncN-carrying blaVIM-1 lineage in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: This study proposes the use of pMLST as a suitable and rapid method for identification of IncN epidemic plasmid lineages. The recent spread of blaCTX-M-1 among humans and animals seems to be associated......OBJECTIVES: Incompatibility group N (IncN) plasmids have been associated with the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance and are a major vehicle for the spread of blaVIM-1 in humans and blaCTX-M-1 in animals. A plasmid multilocus sequence typing (pMLST) scheme was developed for rapid...

  20. [Ecological behavior of plasmids and resistance to lead of Enterobacter agglomerans isolated from soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watarai, M; Takeda, K; Uesiba, H

    1991-03-01

    Soil samples taken monthly in 1990 from five parks outside Tokyo were examined for Enterobacter agglomerans. A total of 348 strains were isolated and 250 of them were tested for the presence of plasmids by DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. All the isolates carried at least two kinds of plasmids. Those isolated from July to September showed four or five kinds of plasmids (group I) and those isolated from January to June and from October to December showed two or three kinds of plasmids (group II). A majority of the plasmids detected were of 1,500 or fewer base pairs. The isolates were tested for the Pb2+ resistance; group I strains were more resistant to lead than group II strains. It is presumed that bacterial plasmids are related with the ecosystem of soil and the resistance to lead in E. agglomerans.

  1. Occurrence of Plasmids in the Aromatic Degrading Bacterioplankton of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ain Heinaru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids are mobile genetic elements that provide their hosts with many beneficial traits including in some cases the ability to degrade different aromatic compounds. To fulfill the knowledge gap regarding catabolic plasmids of the Baltic Sea water, a total of 209 biodegrading bacterial strains were isolated and screened for the presence of these mobile genetic elements. We found that both large and small plasmids are common in the cultivable Baltic Sea bacterioplankton and are particularly prevalent among bacterial genera Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. Out of 61 plasmid-containing strains (29% of all isolates, 34 strains were found to carry large plasmids, which could be associated with the biodegradative capabilities of the host bacterial strains. Focusing on the diversity of IncP-9 plasmids, self-transmissible m-toluate (TOL and salicylate (SAL plasmids were detected. Sequencing the repA gene of IncP-9 carrying isolates revealed a high diversity within IncP-9 plasmid family, as well as extended the assumed bacterial host species range of the IncP-9 representatives. This study is the first insight into the genetic pool of the IncP-9 catabolic plasmids in the Baltic Sea bacterioplankton.

  2. Transfer Potential of Plasmids Conferring Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin Resistance in Escherichia coli from Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Solveig Sølverød; Sunde, Marianne; Ilag, Hanna Karin; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even

    2017-06-15

    Escherichia coli strains resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) are widely distributed in Norwegian broiler production, and the majority harbor transferable IncK or IncI1 plasmids carrying bla CMY-2 Persistent occurrence in broiler farms may occur through the survival of ESC-resistant E. coli strains in the farm environment, or by transfer and maintenance of resistance plasmids within a population of environmental bacteria with high survival abilities. The aim of this study was to determine the transferability of two successful bla CMY-2 -carrying plasmids belonging to the incompatibility groups IncK and IncI1 into E. coli and Serratia species recipients. Initially, conjugative plasmid transfer from two E. coli donors to potential recipients was tested in an agar assay. Conjugation was further investigated for selected mating pairs in surface and planktonic assays at temperatures from 12°C to 37°C. Transfer of plasmids was observed on agar, in broth, and in biofilm at temperatures down to 25°C. The IncK plasmid was able to transfer into Serratia marcescens , and transconjugants were able to act as secondary plasmid donors to different E. coli and Serratia species recipients. All transconjugants displayed an AmpC phenotype corresponding to the acquisition of bla CMY-2 In summary, the results indicate that the IncK plasmid may transfer between E. coli and Serratia spp. under conditions relevant for broiler production. IMPORTANCE Certain bla CMY-2 -carrying plasmids are successful and disseminated in European broiler production. Traditionally, plasmid transferability has been studied under conditions that are optimal for bacterial growth. Plasmid transfer has previously been reported between E. coli bacteria in biofilms at 37°C and in broth at temperatures ranging from 8 to 37°C. However, intergenus transfer of bla CMY-2 -carrying plasmids from E. coli to environmental bacteria in the food-processing chain has not been previously studied. We

  3. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  4. A New Catabolic Plasmid in Xanthobacter and Starkeya spp. from a 1,2-Dichloroethane-Contaminated Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jacob E; Liew, Elissa F; Ly, Mai-Anh; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2016-09-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (DCA) is a problematic xenobiotic groundwater pollutant. Bacteria are capable of biodegrading DCA, but the evolution of such bacteria is not well understood. In particular, the mechanisms by which bacteria acquire the key dehalogenase genes dhlA and dhlB have not been well defined. In this study, the genomic context of dhlA and dhlB was determined in three aerobic DCA-degrading bacteria (Starkeya novella strain EL1, Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain EL4, and Xanthobacter flavus strain EL8) isolated from a groundwater treatment plant (GTP). A haloalkane dehalogenase gene (dhlA) identical to the canonical dhlA gene from Xanthobacter sp. strain GJ10 was present in all three isolates, and, in each case, the dhlA gene was carried on a variant of a 37-kb circular plasmid, which was named pDCA. Sequence analysis of the repA replication initiator gene indicated that pDCA was a member of the pTAR plasmid family, related to catabolic plasmids from the Alphaproteobacteria, which enable growth on aromatics, dimethylformamide, and tartrate. Genes for plasmid replication, mobilization, and stabilization were identified, along with two insertion sequences (ISXa1 and ISPme1) which were likely to have mobilized dhlA and dhlB and played a role in the evolution of aerobic DCA-degrading bacteria. Two haloacid dehalogenase genes (dhlB1 and dhlB2) were detected in the GTP isolates; dhlB1 was most likely chromosomal and was similar to the canonical dhlB gene from strain GJ10, while dhlB2 was carried on pDCA and was not closely related to dhlB1 Heterologous expression of the DhlB2 protein confirmed that this plasmid-borne dehalogenase was capable of chloroacetate dechlorination. Earlier studies on the DCA-degrading Xanthobacter sp. strain GJ10 indicated that the key dehalogenases dhlA and dhlB were carried on a 225-kb linear plasmid and on the chromosome, respectively. The present study has found a dramatically different gene organization in more recently isolated DCA

  5. Antibiogram and Plasmid Profiles of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective laboratory-based investigative study was carried out on clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoea to determine their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and plasmid profile using standard microbiological and molecular techniques. All the 32 isolates studied showed total resistance to penicillin, spectinomycin and ...

  6. Resistant plasmid profile analysis of multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli has become a major threat and cause of many urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the resistant plasmids of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from (Urinary tract infections)UTIs in Abeokuta.

  7. Plasmid Conjugation in E. coli and Drug Resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    more the copy number of resistance plasmid present in a bacterial cell, the higher the resistant ability of ... amoxicillin, as well as other semi synthetic penicillins, many cephalosporins, carbapenems, aztreonam, ... drugs resistant E. coli to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ceftriaxone were also carried out (Hadley, 2002;.

  8. PLASMID PROFILES OF KLEBSIELLA ISOLATES IN ILORIN, NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to identify factors responsible for poor clinical outcome in Klebsiella infections due to antibiotic resistance, and to detect the type of plasmids harbored by various strains of Klebsiella. Three hundred Klebsiella spp. were isolated from various clinical samples at the University of Ilorin Teaching ...

  9. Cefotaxime resistant Escherichia coli collected from a healthy volunteer; characterisation and the effect of plasmid loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Kirchner

    Full Text Available In this study 6 CTX-M positive E. coli isolates collected during a clinical study examining the effect of antibiotic use in a human trial were analysed. The aim of the study was to analyse these isolates and assess the effect of full or partial loss of plasmid genes on bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. A DNA array was utilised to assess resistance and virulence gene carriage. Plasmids were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and addiction system multiplex PCR. A phenotypic array and insect virulence model were utilised to assess the effect of plasmid-loss in E. coli of a large multi-resistance plasmid. All six E. coli carrying bla CTX-M-14 were detected from a single participant and were identical by pulse field gel electrophoresis and MLST. Plasmid profiling and arrays indicated absence of a large multi-drug resistance (MDR F-replicon plasmid carrying blaTEM, aadA4, strA, strB, dfrA17/19, sul1, and tetB from one isolate. Although this isolate partially retained the plasmid it showed altered fitness characteristics e.g. inability to respire in presence of antiseptics, similar to a plasmid-cured strain. However, unlike the plasmid-cured or plasmid harbouring strains, the survival rate for Galleria mellonella infected by the former strain was approximately 5-times lower, indicating other possible changes accompanying partial plasmid loss. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that an apparently healthy individual can harbour bla CTX-M-14 E. coli strains. In one such strain, isolated from the same individual, partial absence of a large MDR plasmid resulted in altered fitness and virulence characteristics, which may have implications in the ability of this strain to infect and any subsequent treatment.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology, Sequence Types, and Plasmid Analyses of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains in Israel▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Azita; Carmeli, Yehuda; Chmelnitsky, Inna; Goren, Moran G.; Ofek, Itzhak; Navon-Venezia, Shiri

    2010-01-01

    Sporadic isolates of carbapenem-resistant KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated in Tel Aviv Medical Center during 2005 and 2006, parallel to the emergence of the KPC-3-producing K. pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST 258). We aimed to study the molecular epidemiology of these isolates and to characterize their blaKPC-carrying plasmids and their origin. Ten isolates (8 KPC-2 and 2 KPC-3 producing) were studied. All isolates were extremely drug resistant. They possessed the blaKPC gene and varied in their additional beta-lactamase contents. The KPC-2-producing strains belonged to three different sequence types: ST 340 (n = 2), ST 277 (n = 2), and a novel sequence type, ST 376 (n = 4). Among KPC-3-producing strains, a single isolate (ST 327) different from ST 258 was identified, but both strains carried the same plasmid (pKpQIL). The KPC-2-encoding plasmids varied in size (45 to 95 kb) and differed among each of the STs. Two of the Klebsiella blaKPC-2-carrying plasmids were identical to plasmids from Escherichia coli, suggesting a common origin of these plasmids. These data indicate that KPC evolution in K. pneumoniae is related to rare events of interspecies spread of blaKPC-2-carrying plasmids from E. coli followed by limited clonal spread, whereas KPC-3 carriage in this species is related almost strictly to clonal expansion of ST 258 carrying pKpQIL. PMID:20350950

  11. Molecular epidemiology, sequence types, and plasmid analyses of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Azita; Carmeli, Yehuda; Chmelnitsky, Inna; Goren, Moran G; Ofek, Itzhak; Navon-Venezia, Shiri

    2010-07-01

    Sporadic isolates of carbapenem-resistant KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated in Tel Aviv Medical Center during 2005 and 2006, parallel to the emergence of the KPC-3-producing K. pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST 258). We aimed to study the molecular epidemiology of these isolates and to characterize their bla(KPC)-carrying plasmids and their origin. Ten isolates (8 KPC-2 and 2 KPC-3 producing) were studied. All isolates were extremely drug resistant. They possessed the bla(KPC) gene and varied in their additional beta-lactamase contents. The KPC-2-producing strains belonged to three different sequence types: ST 340 (n = 2), ST 277 (n = 2), and a novel sequence type, ST 376 (n = 4). Among KPC-3-producing strains, a single isolate (ST 327) different from ST 258 was identified, but both strains carried the same plasmid (pKpQIL). The KPC-2-encoding plasmids varied in size (45 to 95 kb) and differed among each of the STs. Two of the Klebsiella bla(KPC-2)-carrying plasmids were identical to plasmids from Escherichia coli, suggesting a common origin of these plasmids. These data indicate that KPC evolution in K. pneumoniae is related to rare events of interspecies spread of bla(KPC-2)-carrying plasmids from E. coli followed by limited clonal spread, whereas KPC-3 carriage in this species is related almost strictly to clonal expansion of ST 258 carrying pKpQIL.

  12. Plasmid profile in oral Fusobacterium nucleatum from humans and Cebus apella monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Marcia O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is a strict anaerobe and is indigenous of the human oral cavity. This organism is commonly recovered from different monomicrobial and mixed infections in humans and animals. In this study, the plasmid profile, the plasmid stability and the penicillin-resistance association in oral F. nucleatum isolated from periodontal patients, healthy subjects and Cebus apella monkeys were evaluated. Forty-five F. nucleatum strains from patients, 38 from healthy subjects and seven from C. apella were identified and analyzed. Plasmid extraction was performed in all the isolated strains. These elements were found in 26.7% strains from patients and one strain from C. apella. Strains from healthy subjects did not show any plasmid. Most of strains showed two plasmid bands ranging from 4 to 16 Kb, but digestions with endonucleases showed that they belonged to a single plasmid. The plasmid profile was similar and stable in human and monkey strains. Also, plasmids were classified into three groups according to size. Two strains were positive to beta-lactamase production and no plasmid DNA-hybridization with a beta-lactamase gene probe was observed, suggesting a chromosomal resistance.

  13. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Hoggard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS, and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1 present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM, which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may

  14. Molecular Organization of Small Plasmids Bearing blaTEM-1 and Conferring Resistance to β-Lactams in Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Søndergaard, Annette; San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Nielsen, Signe M.; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    TEM-1 is the dominant β-lactamase of Haemophilus influenzae and can be located on small plasmids. Three distinct plasmids with sizes from 4,304 to 5,646 nucleotides (nt) were characterized: pA1606, pA1209, and pPN223. In addition to TEM-1 and a replication enzyme of the Rep 3 superfamily, pA1606 carries a Tn3 resolvase gene and pA1606 and pA1209 carry an open reading frame (ORF) similar to a plasmid recombination enzyme gene described in Gram-positive bacteria. The plasmids transformed strain...

  15. Molecular organization of small plasmids bearing blaTEM-1 and conferring resistance to β-lactams in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Annette; San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Nielsen, Signe M; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-09-01

    TEM-1 is the dominant β-lactamase of Haemophilus influenzae and can be located on small plasmids. Three distinct plasmids with sizes from 4,304 to 5,646 nucleotides (nt) were characterized: pA1606, pA1209, and pPN223. In addition to TEM-1 and a replication enzyme of the Rep 3 superfamily, pA1606 carries a Tn3 resolvase gene and pA1606 and pA1209 carry an open reading frame (ORF) similar to a plasmid recombination enzyme gene described in Gram-positive bacteria. The plasmids transformed strain Rd to the ampicillin-resistant phenotype.

  16. Genetic characterization of blaNDM-harboring plasmids in carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli from Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Sugawara

    Full Text Available The bacterial enzyme New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase hydrolyzes almost all β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, which are drugs of last resort for severe bacterial infections. The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that carry the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaNDM, poses a serious threat to public health. In this study, we genetically characterized eight carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a tertiary care hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. The eight isolates belonged to five multilocus-sequence types and harbored multiple antimicrobial-resistance genes, resulting in resistance against nearly all of the antimicrobial agents tested, except colistin and fosfomycin. Nine plasmids harboring blaNDM genes were identified from these isolates. Multiple blaNDM genes were found in the distinct Inc-replicon types of the following plasmids: an IncA/C2 plasmid harboring blaNDM-1 (n = 1, IncX3 plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 2 or blaNDM-7 (n = 1, IncFII plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 1 or blaNDM-5 (n = 3, and a multireplicon F plasmid harboring blaNDM-5 (n = 1. Comparative analysis highlighted the diversity of the blaNDM-harboring plasmids and their distinct characteristics, which depended on plasmid replicon types. The results indicate circulation of phylogenetically distinct strains of carbapenem-resistant E. coli with various plasmids harboring blaNDM genes in the hospital.

  17. Genetic characterization of blaNDM-harboring plasmids in carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yo; Akeda, Yukihiro; Sakamoto, Noriko; Takeuchi, Dan; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiya, Hideharu; Yamamoto, Norihisa; Nishi, Isao; Yoshida, Hisao; Okada, Kazuhisa; Zin, Khwar Nyo; Aye, Mya Mya; Tomono, Kazunori; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial enzyme New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase hydrolyzes almost all β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, which are drugs of last resort for severe bacterial infections. The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that carry the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaNDM, poses a serious threat to public health. In this study, we genetically characterized eight carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a tertiary care hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. The eight isolates belonged to five multilocus-sequence types and harbored multiple antimicrobial-resistance genes, resulting in resistance against nearly all of the antimicrobial agents tested, except colistin and fosfomycin. Nine plasmids harboring blaNDM genes were identified from these isolates. Multiple blaNDM genes were found in the distinct Inc-replicon types of the following plasmids: an IncA/C2 plasmid harboring blaNDM-1 (n = 1), IncX3 plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 2) or blaNDM-7 (n = 1), IncFII plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 1) or blaNDM-5 (n = 3), and a multireplicon F plasmid harboring blaNDM-5 (n = 1). Comparative analysis highlighted the diversity of the blaNDM-harboring plasmids and their distinct characteristics, which depended on plasmid replicon types. The results indicate circulation of phylogenetically distinct strains of carbapenem-resistant E. coli with various plasmids harboring blaNDM genes in the hospital.

  18. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. Importance: Antibiotic resistance is in many pathogenic bacteria caused by genes that are carried on large conjugative plasmids. These plasmids typically contain multiple antibiotic resistance genes as well as genes that confer resistance to

  19. Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Austin, John W; Weedmark, Kelly A; Peck, Michael W

    2016-03-02

    Analysis of more than 150 Clostridium botulinum Group II type E genomes identified a small fraction (6%) where neurotoxin-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Seven closely related (134-144 kb) neurotoxigenic plasmids of subtypes E1, E3, and E10 were characterized; all carried genes associated with plasmid mobility via conjugation. Each plasmid contained the same 24-kb neurotoxin cluster cassette (six neurotoxin cluster and six flanking genes) that had split a helicase gene, rather than the more common chromosomal rarA. The neurotoxin cluster cassettes had evolved as separate genetic units which had either exited their chromosomal rarA locus in a series of parallel events, inserting into the plasmid-borne helicase gene, or vice versa. A single intact version of the helicase gene was discovered on a nonneurotoxigenic form of this plasmid. The observed low frequency for the plasmid location may reflect one or more of the following: 1) Less efficient recombination mechanism for the helicase gene target, 2) lack of suitable target plasmids, and 3) loss of neurotoxigenic plasmids. Type E1 and E10 plasmids possessed a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus with spacers that recognized C. botulinum Group II plasmids, but not C. botulinum Group I plasmids, demonstrating their long-term separation. Clostridium botulinum Group II type E strains also carry nonneurotoxigenic plasmids closely related to C. botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Characterization of plasmids in halobacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeifer, F; Weidinger, G; Goebel, W

    1981-01-01

    Extrachromosomal, covalently closed circular deoxyribonucleic acid has been isolated from different species of halobacteria. Three strains of Halobacterium halobium and one of Halobacterium cutirubrum, all of which synthesize purple membrane (Pum+) and bacterioruberin (Rub+), contain plasmids of different size which share extensive sequence homologies. One strain of Halobacterium salinarium, another one of Halobacterium capanicum, and two new Halobacterium isolates from Tunisia, which are als...

  1. PLASMIDS FROM ANAEROCELLUM THERMOPHILUM AND USES THEREOF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention concerns the isolation of plasmids from extremely thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms and their use in genetic transformation of thermophilic and mesophilic microorganisms. More particular the invention concerns the use of thermostable plasmid vectors as tools for creating...

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and plasmid-mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative Staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated from clinical samples and isolates subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing, plasmid curing and plasmid DNA isolation. Result: The highest percentages isolates were recovered from urine samples and ...

  3. PCR-based plasmid typing in Enterococcus faecium strains reveals widely distributed pRE25-, pRUM-, pIP501-and pHT beta-related replicons associated with glycopeptide resistance and stabilizing toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosvoll, T.C.S.; Pedersen, T.; Sletvold, H.

    2010-01-01

    for about 60% of the total number of plasmids detected by S1 nuclease analyses, which revealed zero to seven plasmids (10 kb to > 200 kb) per isolate. Interestingly, strains belonging to the clinically important clonal complex 17 (CC17) yielded a significantly higher number of plasmids (3.1) and p...

  4. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    wounds, facilitates the persistence of MDR plasmids in Acinetobacter baumannii , a problematic wound pathogen. Moreover, we have shown that plasmids...which plasmid persistence can improve in Acinetobacter baumannii and other wound pathogens when grown in biofilm environments. This project has the... Acinetobacter * baumannii ,!Klebsiella*pneumoniae,!Enterobacter*sp.,! and! Escherichia* coli! (Eardley! et! al.,! 2011;! Gaynes! &! Edwards,! 2005;! Murray

  5. Plasmids of carotenoid-producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - structure, diversity and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria.

  6. Plasmids of carotenoid-producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria - structure, diversity and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maj

    Full Text Available Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria: P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i plasmid replication, (ii stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families and (iii mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families. A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase. The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria.

  7. In Silico Detection and Typing of Plasmids using PlasmidFinder and Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Zankari, Ea; García-Fernández, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    In the work presented here, we designed and developed two easy-to-use Web tools for in silico detection and characterization of whole-genome sequence (WGS) and whole-plasmid sequence data from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. These tools will facilitate bacterial typing based on draft...

  8. Novel plasmids and resistance phenotypes in Yersinia pestis: unique plasmid inventory of strain Java 9 mediates high levels of arsenic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eppinger

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that the plasmid repertoire of Yersinia pestis is not restricted to the three classical virulence plasmids. The Java 9 strain of Y. pestis is a biovar Orientalis isolate obtained from a rat in Indonesia. Although it lacks the Y. pestis-specific plasmid pMT, which encodes the F1 capsule, it retains virulence in mouse and non-human primate animal models. While comparing diverse Y. pestis strains using subtractive hybridization, we identified sequences in Java 9 that were homologous to a Y. enterocolitica strain carrying the transposon Tn2502, which is known to encode arsenic resistance. Here we demonstrate that Java 9 exhibits high levels of arsenic and arsenite resistance mediated by a novel promiscuous class II transposon, named Tn2503. Arsenic resistance was self-transmissible from Java 9 to other Y. pestis strains via conjugation. Genomic analysis of the atypical plasmid inventory of Java 9 identified pCD and pPCP plasmids of atypical size and two previously uncharacterized cryptic plasmids. Unlike the Tn2502-mediated arsenic resistance encoded on the Y. enterocolitica virulence plasmid; the resistance loci in Java 9 are found on all four indigenous plasmids, including the two novel cryptic plasmids. This unique mobilome introduces more than 105 genes into the species gene pool. The majority of these are encoded by the two entirely novel self-transmissible plasmids, which show partial homology and synteny to other enterics. In contrast to the reductive evolution in Y. pestis, this study underlines the major impact of a dynamic mobilome and lateral acquisition in the genome evolution of the plague bacterium.

  9. Genetic transformation of a clinical (genital tract, plasmid-free isolate of Chlamydia trachomatis: engineering the plasmid as a cloning vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Wang

    Full Text Available Our study had three objectives: to extend the plasmid-based transformation protocol to a clinical isolate of C. trachomatis belonging to the trachoma biovar, to provide "proof of principle" that it is possible to "knock out" selected plasmid genes (retaining a replication competent plasmid and to investigate the plasticity of the plasmid. A recently developed, plasmid-based transformation protocol for LGV isolates of C. trachomatis was modified and a plasmid-free, genital tract C. trachomatis isolate from Sweden (SWFP- was genetically transformed. Transformation of this non-LGV C. trachomatis host required a centrifugation step, but the absence of the natural plasmid removed the need for plaque purification of transformants. Transformants expressed GFP, were penicillin resistant and iodine stain positive for accumulated glycogen. The transforming plasmid did not recombine with the host chromosome. A derivative of pGFP::SW2 carrying a deletion of the plasmid CDS5 gene was engineered. CDS5 encodes pgp3, a protein secreted from the inclusion into the cell cytoplasm. This plasmid (pCDS5KO was used to transform C. trachomatis SWFP-, and established that pgp3 is dispensable for plasmid function. The work shows it is possible to selectively delete segments of the chlamydial plasmid, and this is the first step towards a detailed molecular dissection of the role of the plasmid. The 3.6 kb β-galactosidase cassette was inserted into the deletion site of CDS5 to produce plasmid placZ-CDS5KO. Transformants were penicillin resistant, expressed GFP and stained for glycogen. In addition, they expressed β-galactosidase showing that the lacZ cassette was functional in C. trachomatis. An assay was developed that allowed the visualisation of individual inclusions by X-gal staining. The ability to express active β-galactosidase within chlamydial inclusions is an important advance as it allows simple, rapid assays to measure directly chlamydial infectivity without

  10. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via horizontal gene transfer as well as

  11. Molecular characterization of the pSinB plasmid of the arsenite oxidizing, metallotolerant Sinorhizobium sp. M14 - insight into the heavy metal resistome of sinorhizobial extrachromosomal replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Krzysztof; Dziewit, Lukasz; Decewicz, Przemyslaw; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Radlinska, Monika; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. M14 is an As(III)-oxidizing, psychrotolerant strain, capable of growth in the presence of extremely high concentrations of arsenic and many other heavy metals. Metallotolerant abilities of the M14 strain depend upon the presence of two extrachromosomal replicons: pSinA (∼ 109 kb) and pSinB (∼ 300 kb). The latter was subjected to complex analysis. The performed analysis demonstrated that the plasmid pSinB is a narrow-host-range repABC-type replicon, which is fully stabilized by the phd-vapC-like toxin-antitoxin stabilizing system. In silico analysis showed that among the phenotypic gene clusters of the plasmid pSinB, eight modules are potentially involved in heavy metals resistance (HMR). These modules carry genes encoding efflux pumps, permeases, transporters and copper oxidases, which provide resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc. The functional analysis revealed that the HMR modules are active and have an effect on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values observed for the heterological host cells. The phenotype was manifested by an increase or decrease of the MICs of heavy metals and it was strain specific. The analysis of distribution of the heavy metal resistance genes, i.e. resistome, in Sinorhizobium spp. plasmids, revealed that the HMR modules are common in these replicons. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Antibiotic resistance and plasmid carriage among Escherichia coli isolates from chicken meat in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin Tin Myaing; Saleha, A.A.; Arifah, A.K.; Raha, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates from 131 raw chicken meat samples were tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. Plasmids were isolated from many samples and their DNA molecular weight calculated. An 81.7% plasmid occurrence rate was observed among the isolates, ranging from 0 to 8 in number and with sizes from 1.2 to 118.6 MDa. Plasmids were detected in 93.8% of E. coIi isolates resistant to all 12 antibiotics, and in 90.5% of E. coli isolates resistant to 11. Three (2.8%) isolates harboured 8 plasmids and were resistant to all 12 antibiotics. Antibiotic resistant genes in bacteria are usually carried in extrachromosomal DNA and it is postulated that E. coli with a high number of plasmids possesses wider resistance to antibiotics. (author)

  13. Virulence-associated plasmids in Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, S; Watanabe, Y; Ikeda, T; Ozawa, T; Matsukura, S; Tamada, Y; Tsubaki, S; Sekizaki, T

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-three strains of Rhodococcus equi from independent clinical cases were analyzed for the presence of virulence plasmid DNA. Of the clinical isolates, 19 contained an 85-kb plasmid and the remaining 4 contained a 90-kb plasmid. All of the isolates expressed 15- to 17-kDa antigens and were virulent in mice. Restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses showed large regions of DNA homology between the 85- and 90-kb virulence plasmids. It was concluded tentatively that there are at least two virulence plasmids in R. equi and that they have a common origin. Images PMID:8349748

  14. An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Mohammad R; Antonic, Vlado; Ravizee, Adrien; Weina, Peter J; Izadjoo, Mina; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Genus Enterobacter includes important opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that could infect complex wounds. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in these microorganisms represents a challenging clinical problem in the treatment of these wounds. In the authors' screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from complex wounds, an Enterobacter species was isolated that harbors antibiotic-resistant plasmids conferring resistance to Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to identify the resistance genes carried by one of these plasmids. The plasmids from the Enterobacter isolate were propagated in E. coli and one of the plasmids, designated as pR23, was sequenced by the Sanger method using fluorescent dyeterminator chemistry on a genetic analyzer. The assembled sequence was annotated by search of the GenBank database. Plasmid pR23 is composed of the transposon Tn1331 and a backbone plasmid that is identical to the plasmid pPIGDM1 from Enterobacter agglomerans. The multidrug-resistance transposon Tn1331, which confers resistance to aminoglycoside and beta lactam antibiotics, has been previously isolated only from Klebsiella. The Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1, which carries a ColE1-like origin of replication and has no apparent selective marker, appears to provide a backbone for propagation of Tn1331 in Enterobacter. The recognition sequence of Tn1331 transposase for insertion into pPIGDM1 is the pentanucleotide TATTA, which occurs only once throughout the length of this plasmid. Transposition of Tn1331 into the Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1 enables this transposon to propagate in this Enterobacter. Since Tn1331 was previously isolated only from Klebsiella, this report suggests horizontal transfer of this transposon between the two bacterial genera.

  15. Mutation in ESBL Plasmid from Escherichia coli O104:H4 Leads Autoagglutination and Enhanced Plasmid Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickaël Poidevin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Conjugative plasmids are one of the main driving force of wide-spreading of multidrug resistance (MDR bacteria. They are self-transmittable via conjugation as carrying the required set of genes and cis-acting DNA locus for direct cell-to-cell transfer. IncI incompatibility plasmids are nowadays often associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producing Enterobacteria in clinic and environment. pESBL-EA11 was isolated from Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak strain in Germany in 2011. During the previous study identifying transfer genes of pESBL-EA11, it was shown that transposon insertion at certain DNA region of the plasmid, referred to as Hft, resulted in great enhancement of transfer ability. This suggested that genetic modifications can enhance dissemination of MDR plasmids. Such ‘superspreader’ mutations have attracted little attention so far despite their high potential to worsen MDR spreading. Present study aimed to gain our understanding on regulatory elements that involved pESBL transfer. While previous studies of IncI plasmids indicated that immediate downstream gene of Hft, traA, is not essential for conjugative transfer, here we showed that overexpression of TraA in host cell elevated transfer rate of pESBL-EA11. Transposon insertion or certain nucleotide substitutions in Hft led strong TraA overexpression which resulted in activation of essential regulator TraB and likely overexpression of conjugative pili. Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy observation suggested that IncI pili are distinct from other types of conjugative pili (such as long filamentous F-type pili and rather expressed throughout the cell surface. High transfer efficiency in the mutant pESBL-EA11 was involved with hyperpiliation which facilitates cell-to-cell adhesion, including autoagglutination. The capability of plasmids to evolve to highly transmissible mutant is alarming, particularly it might also have adverse effect on host pathogenicity.

  16. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  17. Transfer of the lambdadv plasmid to new bacterial hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellenberger-Gujer, G.; Boy de la Tour, E.; Berg, D.E.

    1974-01-01

    Lambda dv, which was derived from bacteriophage lambda, replicates autonomously as a plasmid in Escherichia coli and consists of only the immunity region (imm/sup lambda/) and DNA replication genes (O, P) of the ancestral phage. Addition phages (lambda imm 21 --lambda dv) carry the lambda dv fragment inserted as a tandem duplication in their genome (sequence A imm 21 O P imm/sup lambda/ O P R) are formed as recombinants after lambda imm 21 infection of strains carrying lambda dv. Addition phages were used to transfer lambda dv to new bacterial hosts. Lambda dv transfer by excision of the lambda dv segment from the addition phage genome requires a bacterial Rec or a phage Red recombination system. Successful transfer is stimulated by uv irradiation of the addition phage before infection. Some properties of the newly transferred lambda dv plasmids are described. (U.S.)

  18. Characterization of plasmids harbouring qnrS1, qnrB2 and qnrB19 genes in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Fernandez, A.; Fortini, D.; Veldman, K.T.; Mevius, D.J.; Carattoli, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize plasmids carrying qnrS1, qnrB2 and qnrB19 genes identified in Salmonella strains from The Netherlands. The identification of plasmids may help to follow the dissemination of these resistance genes in different countries and environments.

  19. Bacterial mitosis: partitioning protein ParA oscillates in spiral-shaped structures and positions plasmids at mid-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2004-01-01

    The par2 locus of Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 encodes oscillating ATPase ParA, DNA binding protein ParB and two cis-acting DNA regions to which ParB binds (parC1 and parC2). Three independent techniques were used to investigate the subcellular localization of plasmids carrying par2. In cells w...

  20. Source-sink plasmid transfer dynamics maintain gene mobility in soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James P J; Wood, A Jamie; Harrison, Ellie; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2016-07-19

    Horizontal gene transfer is a fundamental process in bacterial evolution that can accelerate adaptation via the sharing of genes between lineages. Conjugative plasmids are the principal genetic elements mediating the horizontal transfer of genes, both within and between bacterial species. In some species, plasmids are unstable and likely to be lost through purifying selection, but when alternative hosts are available, interspecific plasmid transfer could counteract this and maintain access to plasmid-borne genes. To investigate the evolutionary importance of alternative hosts to plasmid population dynamics in an ecologically relevant environment, we established simple soil microcosm communities comprising two species of common soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and a mercury resistance (Hg(R)) plasmid, pQBR57, both with and without positive selection [i.e., addition of Hg(II)]. In single-species populations, plasmid stability varied between species: although pQBR57 survived both with and without positive selection in P. fluorescens, it was lost or replaced by nontransferable Hg(R) captured to the chromosome in P. putida A simple mathematical model suggests these differences were likely due to pQBR57's lower intraspecific conjugation rate in P. putida By contrast, in two-species communities, both models and experiments show that interspecific conjugation from P. fluorescens allowed pQBR57 to persist in P. putida via source-sink transfer dynamics. Moreover, the replacement of pQBR57 by nontransferable chromosomal Hg(R) in P. putida was slowed in coculture. Interspecific transfer allows plasmid survival in host species unable to sustain the plasmid in monoculture, promoting community-wide access to the plasmid-borne accessory gene pool and thus potentiating future evolvability.

  1. Giant linear plasmids in Streptomyces: a treasure trove of antibiotic biosynthetic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinashi, Haruyasu

    2011-01-01

    Many giant linear plasmids have been isolated from Streptomyces by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and some of them were found to carry an antibiotic biosynthetic cluster(s); SCP1 carries biosynthetic genes for methylenomycin, pSLA2-L for lankacidin and lankamycin, and pKSL for lasalocid and echinomycin. Accumulated data suggest that giant linear plasmids have played critical roles in genome evolution and horizontal transfer of secondary metabolism. In this review, I summarize typical examples of giant linear plasmids whose involvement in antibiotic production has been studied in some detail, emphasizing their finding processes and interaction with the host chromosomes. A hypothesis on horizontal transfer of secondary metabolism involving giant linear plasmids is proposed at the end.

  2. Centromere pairing by a plasmid-encoded type I ParB protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringgaard, Simon; Löwe, Jan; Gerdes, Kenn

    2007-01-01

    The par2 locus of Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 encodes two trans-acting proteins, ParA and ParB, and two cis-acting sites, parC1 and parC2, to which ParB binds cooperatively. ParA is related to MinD and oscillates in helical structures and thereby positions ParB/parC-carrying plasmids regularly...

  3. Plasmid and chromosome partitioning: surprises from phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    Plasmids encode partitioning genes (par) that are required for faithful plasmid segregation at cell division. Initially, par loci were identified on plasmids, but more recently they were also found on bacterial chromosomes. We present here a phylogenetic analysis of par loci from plasmids...... and chromosomes from prokaryotic organisms. All known plasmid-encoded par loci specify three components: a cis-acting centromere-like site and two trans-acting proteins that form a nucleoprotein complex at the centromere (i.e. the partition complex). The proteins are encoded by two genes in an operon...... that is autoregulated by the par-encoded proteins. In all cases, the upstream gene encodes an ATPase that is essential for partitioning. Recent cytological analyses indicate that the ATPases function as adaptors between a host-encoded component and the partition complex and thereby tether plasmids and chromosomal...

  4. Partition locus-based classification of selected plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica spp.: an additional tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, A; Henquet, S; Compain, F; Genel, N; Arlet, G; Decré, D

    2015-03-01

    The dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae has been largely attributed to plasmids, circular DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication. Whereas high-copy-number plasmids primarily rely on passive diffusion for plasmid maintenance, low-copy-number plasmids utilize so-called partition (par) systems. Plasmid partition relies on three structures, i.e. a centromere like DNA site, a centromere-binding protein and an ATPase or a GTPase motor protein for plasmid positioning. Identification and classification of plasmids is essential for tracing plasmids conferring drug resistance. PCR-based replicon typing is currently the standard method for plasmid identification but there are new classification schemes, especially the relaxase gene typing (PRaseT). Here we developed a multiplex PCR set targeting par loci found on the plasmids most frequently encountered in Enterobacteriaceae. This method, called "plasmid partition gene typing" (PAR-T), was validated with 136 transconjugants or transformants harboring various replicon types. The method was tested with 30 multidrug-resistant clinical isolates including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica carrying 1-4 replicons; all replicons were tested in parallel with PRaseT for comparison. Six multiplex PCRs and one simplex PCR including 18 pairs of primers recognized plasmids of groups IncA/C, FIA, FIB, FIC, FIIk, FII, HI1, HI2, I1, L/M, N, X. Our set of multiplex PCRs showed high specificity for the classification of resistance plasmids except for IncX replicons. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Plasmid DNA Analysis of Pasteurella multocida Serotype B isolated from Haemorrhagic Septicaemia outbreaks in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 150 purified isolates of Pasteurella multocida serotype B were used (Salmah, 2004 for plasmid DNA curing experiment to determine hyaluronidase activity, antibiotic resistance pattern (ARP and mice lethality test (LD50 for their role of pathogenicity. A plasmid curing experiment was carried out by using the intercalating agent; ethidium bromide and rifampicin, where it was found all the plasmids had been cured (plasmidless from Pasteurella multocida. All of these plasmidless isolates maintained their phenotypic characteristics. They showed the same antibiotic resistancepattern as before curing, produced hyaluronidase and possessed lethality activity in mice when injected intraperitoneally(i.p. Based on this observation, the antibiotic resistance, hyaluronidase activity and mice virulence could probably be chromosomal-mediated. Plasmids were detected 100% in all P. multocida isolates with identical profile of 2 plasmids size 3.0 and 5.5 kb. No large plasmids could be detected in all isolates. Since all the isolates appeared to have identicalplasmid profiles, they were subjected to restriction enzyme(RE analysis. From RE analysis results obtained, it can be concluded that the plasmid DNA in serotype B isolates are identical. Only 4 of 32 REs were found to cleave these plasmids with identical restriction fingerprints; BglII, HaeIII, RsaI and SspI. From RE analysis results, it can be concluded that the plasmid DNA isolates are identical. This plasmid might not played any role in pathogenicity of Pasteurella multocida serotype B, however this information is important for the construction of shuttle vectors in genetic studies of the pathogenicity of haemorrhagic septicaemia(HS.

  6. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maayer Pieter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. Results and discussion The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1 of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS. A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS, conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. Conclusions LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse

  7. pLS010 plasmid vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Balganesh, Tanjore S.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb malM gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb T.sub.c r DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems.

  8. Sequences of two related multiple antibiotic resistance virulence plasmids sharing a unique IS26-related molecular signature isolated from different Escherichia coli pathotypes from different hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Venturini

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC are important zoonotic pathogens that increasingly are becoming resistant to multiple antibiotics. Here we describe two plasmids, pO26-CRL125 (125 kb from a human O26:H- EHEC, and pO111-CRL115 (115kb from a bovine O111 aEPEC, that impart resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, sulfathiazole, trimethoprim and tetracycline and both contain atypical class 1 integrons with an identical IS26-mediated deletion in their 3´-conserved segment. Complete sequence analysis showed that pO26-CRL125 and pO111-CRL115 are essentially identical except for a 9.7 kb fragment, present in the backbone of pO26-CRL125 but absent in pO111-CRL115, and several indels. The 9.7 kb fragment encodes IncI-associated genes involved in plasmid stability during conjugation, a putative transposase gene and three imperfect repeats. Contiguous sequence identical to regions within these pO26-CRL125 imperfect repeats was identified in pO111-CRL115 precisely where the 9.7 kb fragment is missing, suggesting it may be mobile. Sequences shared between the plasmids include a complete IncZ replicon, a unique toxin/antitoxin system, IncI stability and maintenance genes, a novel putative serine protease autotransporter, and an IncI1 transfer system including a unique shufflon. Both plasmids carry a derivate Tn21 transposon with an atypical class 1 integron comprising a dfrA5 gene cassette encoding resistance to trimethoprim, and 24 bp of the 3´-conserved segment followed by Tn6026, which encodes resistance to ampicillin, kanymycin, neomycin, streptomycin and sulfathiazole. The Tn21-derivative transposon is linked to a truncated Tn1721, encoding resistance to tetracycline, via a region containing the IncP-1α oriV. Absence of the 5 bp direct repeats flanking Tn3-family transposons, indicates that homologous recombination events played a key role in the formation of this complex

  9. Broad-Host-Range IncP-1 plasmids and their resistance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena ePopowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasmids of the incompatibility group IncP-1, also called IncP, as extrachromosomal genetic elements can transfer and replicate virtually in all Gram-negative bacteria. They are composed of backbone genes that encode a variety of essential functions and accessory genes that have implications for human health and environmental bioremediation. Broad-host-range IncP plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, heavy metals and quaternary ammonium compounds used as disinfectants. The backbone of these plasmids carries modules that enable them to effectively replicate, move to a new host via conjugative transfer and to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The adaptive, resistance and virulence genes are mainly located on mobile genetic elements integrated between the functional plasmid backbone modules. Environmental studies have demonstrated the wide distribution of IncP-like replicons in manure, soils and wastewater treatment plants. They also are present in strains of pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria, which can be a cause for concern, because they may encode multiresistance. Their broad distribution suggests that IncP plasmids play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation by utilizing horizontal gene transfer. This review summarizes the variety of genetic information and physiological functions carried by IncP plasmids, which can contribute to the spread of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance while also mediating the process of bioremediation of pollutants. Due to the location of the resistance genes on plasmids with a broad host range and the presence of transposons carrying these genes it seems that the spread of these genes would be possible and quite hazardous in infection control. Future studies are required to determine the level of risk of the spread of resistance genes located on these plasmids.

  10. Plasmid mediated antimicrobial resistance in Ontario isolates of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbride, K A; Rosendal, S; Brunton, J L

    1989-01-01

    The genetic basis of antimicrobial resistance in Ontario isolates of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae was studied. Two Ontario isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae were found to be resistant to sulfonamides (Su), streptomycin (Sm) and ampicillin (Amp). Resistance to Su and Sm was specified by a 2.3 megadalton (Mdal) plasmid which appeared to be identical to pVM104, which has been described in isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae from South Dakota. Southern hybridization showed that the 2.3 Mdal Su Sm plasmid was highly related to those Hinc II fragments of RSF1010 known to carry the Su Sm genes, but was unrelated to the remainder of this Salmonella resistance plasmid. Resistance to Su and Amp was specified by a 3.5 Mdal plasmid and appeared identical to pVM105 previously reported. The beta-lactamase enzyme had an isoelectric point of approximately 9.0. Southern hybridization showed no relationship to the TEM beta-lactamase. A third isolate of A. pleuropneumoniae was found to be resistant to chloramphenicol (Cm), Su and Sm by virtue of a 3.0 Mdal plasmid which specified a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase. We conclude that resistance to Su, Sm, Amp and Cm is mediated by small plasmids in A. pleuropneumoniae. Although the Su and Sm resistance determinants are highly related to those found in Enterobacteriaceae, the plasmids themselves and the beta-lactamase determinant are different. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2914226

  11. Development of inducer-free expression plasmids based on IPTG-inducible promoters for Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dinh Thi Minh; Phan, Trang Thi Phuong; Huynh, Thanh Kieu; Dang, Ngan Thi Kim; Huynh, Phuong Thi Kim; Nguyen, Tri Minh; Truong, Tuom Thi Tinh; Tran, Thuoc Linh; Schumann, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Hoang Duc

    2017-07-25

    Besides Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis is an important bacterial species for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant genes are inserted into shuttle expression vectors which replicate in both E. coli and in B. subtilis. The ligation products are first transformed into E. coli cells, analyzed for correct insertions, and the correct recombinant plasmids are then transformed into B. subtilis. A major problem using E. coli cells can be the strong basal level of expression of the recombinant protein which may interfere with the stability of the cells. To minimize this problem, we developed strong expression vectors being repressed in E. coli and inducer-free in B. subtilis. In general, induction of IPTG-inducible expression vectors is determined by the regulatory lacI gene encoding the LacI repressor in combination with the lacO operator on the promoter. To investigate the inducer-free properties of the vectors, we constructed inducer-free expression plasmids by removing the lacI gene and characterized their properties. First, we examined the ability to repress a reporter gene in E. coli, which is a prominent property facilitating the construction of the expression vectors carrying a target gene. The β-galactosidase (bgaB gene) basal levels expressed from Pgrac01-bgaB could be repressed at least twice in the E. coli cloning strain. Second, the inducer-free production of BgaB from four different plasmids with the Pgrac01 promoter in B. subtilis was investigated. As expected, BgaB expression levels of inducer-free constructs are at least 37 times higher than that of the inducible constructs in the absence of IPTG, and comparable to those in the presence of the inducer. Third, using efficient IPTG-inducible expression vectors containing the strong promoter Pgrac100, we could convert them into inducer-free expression plasmids. The BgaB production levels from the inducer-free plasmid in the absence of the inducer were at least 4.5 times higher than that of

  12. Repair promoted by plasmid pKM101 is different from SOS repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goze, A.; Devoret, R.

    1979-01-01

    In E. coli K12 bacteria carrying plasmid pKM101, prophage lambda was induced at UV doses higher than in plasmid-less parental bacteria. UV-induced reactivation per se was less effective. Bacteria with pKM101 showed no alteration in their division cycle. Plasmid PKM101 coded for a constitutive error-prone repair different from the inducible error-prone repair called SOS repair. Plasmid pKM101 protected E. coli bacteria from UV damage but slightly sensitized them to X-ray lesions. Protection against UV damage was effective in mutant bacteria deficient in DNA excision-repair provided that the recA, lexA and uvrE genes were functional. Survival of phages lambda and S13 after UV irradiation was enhanced in bacteria carrying plasmid pKM101; phage lambda mutagenesis was also increased. Plasmid pKM101 repaired potentially lethal DNA lesions, although Wild-type DNA sequences may not necessarily be restored; hence the mutations observed are the traces of the original DNA lesions. (Auth.)

  13. Comparative studies of Danish Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates: ribotypes, plasmid profiles, serotypes and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2000-01-01

    Ribotyping and plasmid profiling were carried out on 299 Danish Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates from farmed rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). The isolates had been characterized biochemically and serologically in another study. The isolates were very homogeneous, 254 isolates had...... the same ribotype A (restriction enzyme EcoRI) and 284 isolates harboured one 3.3 kb plasmid. Seventy-five per cent of the F. psychrophilum isolates had ribotype A, one 3.3 kb plasmid and belonged to either serotype Th or Fd. Virulence studies with representatives of the dominant groups classified...... such isolates as virulent, and an extra small or large plasmid did not change the virulence level. A relationship between the serotypes Fd and Th, certain ribotypes, and virulence was found. The isolates belonging to serotype Fp(T) and to ribotype B were less virulent. Only a few isolates with other ribotypes...

  14. Sequence Analysis of IncA/C and IncI1 Plasmids Isolated from Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Newport Using Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guojie; Allard, Marc; Hoffmann, Maria; Muruvanda, Tim; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Meng, Kevin; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick; Brown, Eric; Meng, Jianghong

    2018-04-05

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmids play an important role in disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes. To elucidate the antimicrobial resistance gene compositions in A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) plasmids carried by animal-derived MDR Salmonella Newport, and to investigate the spread mechanism of IncA/C plasmids, this study characterizes the complete nucleotide sequences of IncA/C plasmids by comparative analysis. Complete nucleotide sequencing of plasmids and chromosomes of six MDR Salmonella Newport strains was performed using PacBio RSII. Open reading frames were assigned using prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline (PGAP). To understand genomic diversity and evolutionary relationships among Salmonella Newport IncA/C plasmids, we included three complete IncA/C plasmid sequences with similar backbones from Salmonella Newport and Escherichia coli: pSN254, pAM04528, and peH4H, and additional 200 draft chromosomes. With the exception of canine isolate CVM22462, which contained an additional IncI1 plasmid, each of the six MDR Salmonella Newport strains contained only the IncA/C plasmid. These IncA/C plasmids (including references) ranged in size from 80.1 (pCVM21538) to 176.5 kb (pSN254) and carried various resistance genes. Resistance genes floR, tetA, tetR, strA, strB, sul, and mer were identified in all IncA/C plasmids. Additionally, bla CMY-2 and sugE were present in all IncA/C plasmids, excepting pCVM21538. Plasmid pCVM22462 was capable of being transferred by conjugation. The IncI1 plasmid pCVM22462b in CVM22462 carried bla CMY-2 and sugE. Our data showed that MDR Salmonella Newport strains carrying similar IncA/C plasmids clustered together in the phylogenetic tree using chromosome sequences and the IncA/C plasmids from animal-derived Salmonella Newport contained diverse resistance genes. In the current study, we analyzed genomic diversities and phylogenetic relationships among MDR Salmonella Newport using complete plasmids and chromosome

  15. Isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam; O’Dea, Mark; Trott, Darren J.; Abraham, Rebecca J.; Hughes, David; Pang, Stanley; McKew, Genevieve; Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Merlino, John; Saputra, Sugiyono; Malik, Richard; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a pressing public health issue due to limited therapeutic options to treat such infections. CREs have been predominantly isolated from humans and environmental samples and they are rarely reported among companion animals. In this study we report on the isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from a companion animal. Carbapenemase-producing S. enterica Typhimurium carrying blaIMP-4 was identified from a systemically unwell (index) cat and three additional cats at an animal shelter. All isolates were identical and belonged to ST19. Genome sequencing revealed the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant IncHI2 plasmid (pIMP4-SEM1) that encoded resistance to nine antimicrobial classes including carbapenems and carried the blaIMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3 cassette array. The plasmid also encoded resistance to arsenic (MIC-150 mM). Comparative analysis revealed that the plasmid pIMP4-SEM1 showed greatest similarity to two blaIMP-8 carrying IncHI2 plasmids from Enterobacter spp. isolated from humans in China. This is the first report of CRE carrying a blaIMP-4 gene causing a clinical infection in a companion animal, with presumed nosocomial spread. This study illustrates the broader community risk entailed in escalating CRE transmission within a zoonotic species such as Salmonella, and in a cycle that encompasses humans, animals and the environment. PMID:27767038

  16. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A Ali

    Full Text Available Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system.

  17. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed A.; Chew, Yik Wei; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Azman, Nizuwan

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system. PMID:26642325

  18. Natural plasmid transformation in a high-frequency-of transformation marine Vibrio strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischer, M.E.; Thurmond, J.M.; Paul, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The estuarine bacterium Vibrio strain DI-9 has been shown to be naturally transformable with both broad host range plasmid multimers and homologous chromosomal DNA at average frequencies of 3.5 x 10 -9 and 3.4 x 10 -7 transformants per recipient, respectively. Growth of plasmid transformants in nonselective medium resulted in cured strains that transformed 6 to 42,857 times more frequently than the parental strain, depending on the type of transforming DNA. These high-frequency-of-transformation (HfT) strains were transformed at frequencies ranging from 1.1 x 10 -8 to 1.3 x 10 -4 transformants per recipient with plasmid DNA and at an average frequency of 8.3 x 10 -5 transformants per recipient with homologous chromosomal DNA. The highest transformation frequencies were observed by using multimers of an R1162 derivative carrying the transposon Tn5 (pQSR50). Probing of total DNA preparations from one of the cured strains demonstrated that no plasmid DNA remained in the cured strains which may have provided homology to the transforming DNA. All transformants and cured strains could be differentiated from the parental strains by colony morphology. DNA binding studies indicated that late-log-phase HfT strains bound [ 3 H]bacteriophage lambda DNA 2.1 times more rapidly than the parental strain. These results suggest that the original plasmid transformation event of strain DI-9 was the result of uptake and expression of plasmid DNA by a competent mutant (HfT strain). Additionally, it was found that a strain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, USFS 3420, could be naturally transformed with plasmid DNA. Natural plasmid transformation by high-transforming mutants may be a means of plasmid acquisition by natural aquatic bacterial populations

  19. Horizontal Transfer of Carbapenemase-Encoding Plasmids and Comparison with Hospital Epidemiology Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, C. A.; Weingarten, R. A.; Khil, P.; Dekker, J. P.; Mathers, A. J.; Sheppard, A. E.; Segre, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing organisms have spread worldwide, and infections with these bacteria cause significant morbidity. Horizontal transfer of plasmids carrying genes that encode carbapenemases plays an important role in the spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Here we investigate parameters regulating conjugation using an Escherichia coli laboratory strain that lacks plasmids or restriction enzyme modification systems as a recipient and also using patient isolates as donors and recipients. Because conjugation is tightly regulated, we performed a systematic analysis of the transfer of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (blaKPC)-encoding plasmids into multiple strains under different environmental conditions to investigate critical variables. We used four blaKPC-carrying plasmids isolated from patient strains obtained from two hospitals: pKpQIL and pKPC-47e from the National Institutes of Health, and pKPC_UVA01 and pKPC_UVA02 from the University of Virginia. Plasmid transfer frequency differed substantially between different donor and recipient pairs, and the frequency was influenced by plasmid content, temperature, and substrate, in addition to donor and recipient strain. pKPC-47e was attenuated in conjugation efficiency across all conditions tested. Despite its presence in multiple clinical species, pKPC_UVA01 had lower conjugation efficiencies than pKpQIL into recipient strains. The conjugation frequency of these plasmids into K. pneumoniae and E. coli patient isolates ranged widely without a clear correlation with clinical epidemiological data. Our results highlight the importance of each variable examined in these controlled experiments. The in vitro models did not reliably predict plasmid mobilization observed in a patient population, indicating that further studies are needed to understand the most important variables affecting horizontal transfer in vivo. PMID:27270289

  20. Fitness Advantage of mcr-1–Bearing IncI2 and IncX4 Plasmids in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjie Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the impact of diverse plasmids bearing colistin resistance gene mcr-1 on host fitness. Forty-seven commensal E. coli isolates recovered from the pig farm where mcr-1 was first identified were screened for mcr-1. mcr-1-bearing plasmids were characterized by sequencing. The fitness impact of mcr-1-bearing plasmids was evaluated by in vitro competition assays. Twenty-seven (57.5% E. coli isolates were positive for mcr-1. The mcr-1 genes were mainly located on plasmids belonging to IncI2 (n = 5, IncX4 (n = 11, IncHI2/ST3 (n = 8, IncFII (n = 2, and IncY (n = 2. InHI2 plasmids also carried other resistance genes (floR, blaCTX−M, and fosA3 and were only detected in isolates from nursery pigs. Sequences of the representative mcr-1–bearing plasmids were almost identical to those of the corresponding plasmid types reported previously. An increase in the fitness of IncI2- and IncX4-carrying strains was observed, while the presence of IncHI2, IncFII and IncY plasmids showed a fitness cost although an insignificant fitness increase was initially observed in IncFII or IncY plasmids-containing strains. Acquisition of IncI2-type plasmid was more beneficial for host E. coli DH5α than either IncHI2 or IncX4 plasmid, while transformants with IncHI2-type plasmid presented a competitive disadvantage against IncI2 or IncX4 plasmid containing strains. In conclusion, IncI2, IncX4, and IncHI2 were the major plasmid types driving the dissemination of mcr-1 in this farm. Increased fitness or co-selection by other antimicrobials might contribute to the further dissemination of the three epidemic mcr-1–positive plasmids (IncI2, IncX4, and IncHI2 in this farm and worldwide.

  1. Influence of tra genes of IncP and F plasmids on the mobilization of small Kanamycin resistance ColE1-Like plasmids in bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Horizontal gene transfer is a mechanism for movement of antibiotic resistance genes among bacteria. Some small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids isolated from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica were shown to carry mobilization genes; although not self-transmissibl...

  2. Complete sequencing of IncI1 sequence type 2 plasmid pJIE512b indicates mobilization of blaCMY-2 from an IncA/C plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagg, Kaitlin A; Iredell, Jonathan R; Partridge, Sally R

    2014-08-01

    Sequencing of pJIE512b, a 92.3-kb IncI1 sequence type 2 (ST2) plasmid carrying bla(CMY-2), revealed a bla(CMY-2) context that appeared to have been mobilized from an IncA/C plasmid by the insertion sequence IS1294. A comparison with published plasmids suggests that bla(CMY-2) has been mobilized from IncA/C to IncI1 plasmids more than once by IS1294-like elements. Alignment of pJIE512b with the only other available IncI1 ST2 plasmid revealed differences across the backbones, indicating variability within this sequence type. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Genetic transformation of Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 by conjugative transfer of host-mimicking plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2012-09-01

    We established an efficient transformation method for thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 using conjugative transfer from Escherichia coli of host-mimicking plasmids that imitate DNA methylation of strain HTA426 to circumvent its DNA restriction barriers. Two conjugative plasmids, pSTE33T and pUCG18T, capable of shuttling between E. coli and Geobacillus spp., were constructed. The plasmids were first introduced into E. coli BR408, which expressed one inherent DNA methylase gene (dam) and two heterologous methylase genes from strain HTA426 (GK1380-GK1381 and GK0343-GK0344). The plasmids were then directly transferred from E. coli cells to strain HTA426 by conjugative transfer using pUB307 or pRK2013 as a helper plasmid. pUCG18T was introduced very efficiently (transfer efficiency, 10(-5)-10(-3) recipient(-1)). pSTE33T showed lower efficiency (10(-7)-10(-6) recipient(-1)) but had a high copy number and high segregational stability. Methylase genes in the donor substantially affected the transfer efficiency, demonstrating that the host-mimicking strategy contributes to efficient transformation. The transformation method, along with the two distinguishing plasmids, increases the potential of G. kaustophilus HTA426 as a thermophilic host to be used in various applications and as a model for biological studies of this genus. Our results also demonstrate that conjugative transfer is a promising approach for introducing exogenous DNA into thermophiles.

  4. Biodegradation of phenol using recombinant plasmid-carrying Rhodococcus erythropolis strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídková, L.; Szököl, Juraj; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav; Nešvera, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 84, OCT 2013 (2013), s. 179-184 ISSN 0964-8305 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * Phenol degradation * Wastewater Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2013

  5. Mechanisms Involved in Acquisition of blaNDM Genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailan, Alexander M; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Yam, Wan Keat; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Petty, Nicola K; Sartor, Anna L; Williamson, Deborah A; Forde, Brian M; Schembri, Mark A; Beatson, Scott A; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Partridge, Sally R

    2016-07-01

    blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1, and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A, and ISCR1 may have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-3 by pEC2-NDM-3. pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from Enterobacter cloacae and E. coli, respectively, have similar IncFIIY backbones, but different regions carrying blaNDM are found in different locations. Tn3-derived inverted-repeat transposable elements (TIME) appear to have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-6 by pEC4-NDM-6 and the rmtC 16S rRNA methylase gene by IncFIIY plasmids. Characterization of these plasmids further demonstrates that even very closely related plasmids may have acquired blaNDM genes by different mechanisms. These findings also illustrate the complex relationships between antimicrobial resistance genes, transposable elements, and plasmids and provide insights into the possible routes for transmission of blaNDM genes among species of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. PLASMID PROFILES AND PHAGE TYPES OF SALMONELLA-TYPHIMURIUM ISOLATED FROM SUCCESSIVE FLOCKS OF CHICKENS ON 3 PARENT STOCK FARMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Olsen, J. E.; Bisgaard, M.

    1992-01-01

    Three-hundred-and-eighty-seven strains of Salmonella typhimurium obtained from successive generations of parent stock originating from three different rearing farms were characterized by phage typing and plasmid profiling. Seventy-six strains representing dominant types were selected...... for restriction enzyme analysis and colony hybridization. The main phage type on each of the three farms was 110. Plasmid profiling, however, allowed further subtyping. All but three isolates carried the serotype-specific virulence-associated plasmid. Restriction enzyme analysis showed variations in this plasmid...... as well as the presence of co-migrating plasmids of the same size. At each locality one or more clonal lines of S. typhimurium were reisolated from successive generations, indicating that the infections were persistent. Although house construction, sanitation and disinfection procedures, in addition...

  7. Quorum-Dependent Mannopine-Inducible Conjugative Transfer of an Agrobacterium Opine-Catabolic Plasmid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Kim, Kun-Soo; Miller, Marilyn; Olsen, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    The Ti plasmid in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain 15955 carries two alleles of traR that regulate conjugative transfer. The first is a functional allele, called traR, that is transcriptionally induced by the opine octopine. The second, trlR, is a nonfunctional, dominant-negative mutant located in an operon that is inducible by the opine mannopine (MOP). Based on these findings, we predicted that there exist wild-type agrobacterial strains harboring plasmids in which MOP induces a functional traR and, hence, conjugation. We analyzed 11 MOP-utilizing field isolates and found five where MOP induced transfer of the MOP-catabolic element and increased production of the acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quormone. The transmissible elements in these five strains represent a set of highly related plasmids. Sequence analysis of one such plasmid, pAoF64/95, revealed that the 176-kb element is not a Ti plasmid but carries genes for catabolism of MOP, mannopinic acid (MOA), agropinic acid (AGA), and the agrocinopines. The plasmid additionally carries all of the genes required for conjugative transfer, including the regulatory genes traR, traI, and traM. The traR gene, however, is not located in the MOP catabolism region. The gene, instead, is monocistronic and located within the tra-trb-rep gene cluster. A traR mutant failed to transfer the plasmid and produced little to no quormone even when grown with MOP, indicating that TraRpAoF64/95 is the activator of the tra regulon. A traM mutant was constitutive for transfer and acyl-HSL production, indicating that the anti-activator function of TraM is conserved. PMID:24363349

  8. pHTβ-promoted mobilization of non-conjugative resistance plasmids from Enterococcus faecium to Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Laura; Morroni, Gianluca; Brenciani, Andrea; Vignaroli, Carla; Antonelli, Alberto; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Di Cesare, Andrea; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Varaldo, Pietro E; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Biavasco, Francesca

    2017-09-01

    To analyse the recombination events associated with conjugal mobilization of two multiresistance plasmids, pRUM17i48 and pLAG (formerly named pDO1-like), from Enterococcus faecium 17i48 to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2. The plasmids from two E. faecalis transconjugants (JH-4T, tetracycline resistant, and JH-8E, erythromycin resistant) and from the E. faecium donor (also carrying a pHTβ-like conjugative plasmid, named pHTβ17i48) were investigated by several methods, including PCR mapping and sequencing, S1-PFGE followed by Southern blotting and hybridization, and WGS. Two locations of repApHTβ were detected in both transconjugants, one on a ∼50 kb plasmid (as in the donor) and the other on plasmids of larger sizes. In JH-4T, WGS disclosed an 88.6 kb plasmid resulting from the recombination of pHTβ17i48 (∼50 kb) and a new plasmid, named pLAG (35.3 kb), carrying the tet(M), tet(L), lsa(E), lnu(B), spw and aadE resistance genes. In JH-8E, a 75 kb plasmid resulting from the recombination of pHTβ17i48 and pRUM17i48 was observed. In both cases, the cointegrates were apparently derived from replicative transposition of an IS1216 present in each of the multiresistance plasmids into pHTβ17i48. The cointegrates could resolve to yield the multiresistance plasmids and a pHTβ17i48 derivative carrying an IS1216 (unlike the pHTβ17i48 of the donor). Our results completed the characterization of the multiresistance plasmids carried by the E. faecium 17i48, confirming the role of pHT plasmids in the mobilization of non-conjugative antibiotic resistance elements among enterococci. Results also revealed that mobilization to E. faecalis was associated with the generation of cointegrate plasmids promoted by IS1216-mediated transposition. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effect of degradative plasmid CAM-OCT on responses of Pseudomonas bacteria to UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBeth, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of plasmid CAM-OCT on responses to UV irradiation was compared in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in Pseudomonas putida, and in Pseudomonas putida mutants carrying mutations in UV response genes. CAM-OCT substantially increased both survival and mutagenesis in the two species. P. aeruginosa strains without CAM-OCT exhibited much higher UV sensitivity than did P. putida strains. UV-induced mutagenesis of plasmid-free P. putida was easily detected in three different assays (two reversion assays and one forward mutation assay), whereas UV mutagenesis of P. aeruginosa without CAM-OCT was seen only in the forward mutation assay. These results suggest major differences in DNA repair between the two species and highlight the presence of error-prone repair functions on CAM-OCT. A number of P. putida mutants carrying chromosomal mutations affecting either survival or mutagenesis after UV irradiation were isolated, and the effect of CAM-OCT on these mutants was determined. All mutations producing a UV-sensitive phenotype in P. putida were fully suppressed by the plasmid, whereas the plasmid had a more variable effect on mutagenesis mutations, suppressing some and producing no suppression of others. On the basis of the results reported here and results obtained by others with plasmids carrying UV response genes, it appears that CAM-OCT may differ either in regulation or in the number and functions of UV response genes encoded

  10. Host range of enterococcal vanA plasmids among Gram-positive intestinal bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Guido; Freitas, Ana R.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The most prevalent type of acquired glycopeptide resistance is encoded by the vanA transposon Tn1546 located mainly on transferable plasmids in Enterococcus faecium. The limited occurrence in other species could be due to the lack of inter-species transferability and/or stability of T...

  11. Comparative Genomics of Rhodococcus equi Virulence Plasmids Indicates Host-Driven Evolution of the vap Pathogenicity Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Iain; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2017-05-01

    The conjugative virulence plasmid is a key component of the Rhodococcus equi accessory genome essential for pathogenesis. Three host-associated virulence plasmid types have been identified the equine pVAPA and porcine pVAPB circular variants, and the linear pVAPN found in bovine (ruminant) isolates. We recently characterized the R. equi pangenome (Anastasi E, et al. 2016. Pangenome and phylogenomic analysis of the pathogenic actinobacterium Rhodococcus equi. Genome Biol Evol. 8:3140-3148.) and we report here the comparative analysis of the virulence plasmid genomes. Plasmids within each host-associated type were highly similar despite their diverse origins. Variation was accounted for by scattered single nucleotide polymorphisms and short nucleotide indels, while larger indels-mostly in the plasticity region near the vap pathogencity island (PAI)-defined plasmid genomic subtypes. Only one of the plasmids analyzed, of pVAPN type, was exceptionally divergent due to accumulation of indels in the housekeeping backbone. Each host-associated plasmid type carried a unique PAI differing in vap gene complement, suggesting animal host-specific evolution of the vap multigene family. Complete conservation of the vap PAI was observed within each host-associated plasmid type. Both diversity of host-associated plasmid types and clonality of specific chromosomal-plasmid genomic type combinations were observed within the same R. equi phylogenomic subclade. Our data indicate that the overall strong conservation of the R. equi host-associated virulence plasmids is the combined result of host-driven selection, lateral transfer between strains, and geographical spread due to international livestock exchanges. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. RepA and RepB exert plasmid incompatibility repressing the transcription of the repABC operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Oseguera, Angeles; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 has a multipartite genome composed of one chromosome and six large plasmids with low copy numbers, all belonging to the repABC plasmid family. All elements essential for replication and segregation of these plasmids are encoded within the repABC operon. RepA and RepB direct plasmid segregation and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the operon, and RepC is the initiator protein of the plasmid. Here we show that in addition to RepA (repressor) and RepB (corepressor), full transcriptional repression of the operon located in the symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) of this strain requires parS, the centromere-like sequence, and the operator sequence. However, the co-expression of RepA and RepB is sufficient to induce the displacement of the parental plasmid. RepA is a Walker-type ATPase that self associates in vivo and in vitro and binds specifically to the operator region in its RepA-ADP form. In contrast, RepA-ATP is capable of binding to non-specific DNA. RepA and RepB form high molecular weight DNA-protein complexes in the presence of ATP and ADP. RepA carrying ATP-pocket motif mutations induce full repression of the repABC operon without the participation of RepB and parS. These mutants specifically bind the operator sequence in their ATP or ADP bound forms. In addition, their expression in trans exerts plasmid incompatibility against the parental plasmid. RepA and RepB expressed in trans induce plasmid incompatibility because of their ability to repress the repABC operon and not only by their capacity to distort the plasmid segregation process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence that plasmid-borne botulinum neurotoxin type B genes are widespread among Clostridium botulinum serotype B strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Franciosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmids that encode certain subtypes of the botulinum neurotoxin type B have recently been detected in some Clostridium botulinum strains. The objective of the present study was to investigate the frequency with which plasmid carriage of the botulinum neurotoxin type B gene (bont/B occurs in strains of C. botulinum type B, Ab, and A(B, and whether plasmid carriage is bont/B subtype-related. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism was employed to identify subtypes of the bont/B gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot hybridization with specific probes were performed to analyze the genomic location of the bont/B subtype genes. All five known bont/B subtype genes were detected among the strains; the most frequently detected subtype genes were bont/B1 and /B2. Surprisingly, the bont/B subtype gene was shown to be plasmid-borne in >50% of the total strains. The same bont/B subtype gene was associated with the chromosome in some strains, whereas it was associated with a plasmid in others. All five known bont/B subtype genes were in some cases found to reside on plasmids, though with varying frequency (e.g., most of the bont/B1 subtype genes were located on plasmids, whereas all but one of the bont/B2 subtypes were chromosomally-located. Three bivalent isolates carried both bont/A and /B genes on the same plasmid. The plasmids carrying the bont gene were five different sizes, ranging from approximately 55 kb to approximately 245 kb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The unexpected finding of the widespread distribution of plasmids harboring the bont/B gene among C. botulinum serotype B strains provides a chance to examine their contribution to the dissemination of the bont genes among heterogeneous clostridia, with potential implications on issues related to pathogenesis and food safety.

  14. The Salmonella genomic island 1 is specifically mobilized in trans by the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douard, Gregory; Praud, Karine; Cloeckaert, Axel; Doublet, Benoît

    2010-12-20

    The Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) is a Salmonella enterica-derived integrative mobilizable element (IME) containing various complex multiple resistance integrons identified in several S. enterica serovars and in Proteus mirabilis. Previous studies have shown that SGI1 transfers horizontally by in trans mobilization in the presence of the IncA/C conjugative helper plasmid pR55. Here, we report the ability of different prevalent multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) gene-carrying plasmids to mobilize the multidrug resistance genomic island SGI1. Through conjugation experiments, none of the 24 conjugative plasmids tested of the IncFI, FII, HI2, I1, L/M, N, P incompatibility groups were able to mobilize SGI1 at a detectable level (transfer frequency IncA/C incompatibility group. Several conjugative IncA/C MDR plasmids as well as the sequenced IncA/C reference plasmid pRA1 of 143,963 bp were shown to mobilize in trans SGI1 from a S. enterica donor to the Escherichia coli recipient strain. Depending on the IncA/C plasmid used, the conjugative transfer of SGI1 occurred at frequencies ranging from 10(-3) to 10(-6) transconjugants per donor. Of particular concern, some large IncA/C MDR plasmids carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporinase bla(CMY-2) gene were shown to mobilize in trans SGI1. The ability of the IncA/C MDR plasmid family to mobilize SGI1 could contribute to its spread by horizontal transfer among enteric pathogens. Moreover, the increasing prevalence of IncA/C plasmids in MDR S. enterica isolates worldwide has potential implications for the epidemic success of the antibiotic resistance genomic island SGI1 and its close derivatives.

  15. Sequencing of IncX-plasmids suggests ubiquity of mobile forms of a biofilm-promoting gene cassette recruited from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Burmølle

    Full Text Available Plasmids are a highly effective means with which genetic traits that influence human health, such as virulence and antibiotic resistance, are disseminated through bacterial populations. The IncX-family is a hitherto sparsely populated group of plasmids that are able to thrive within Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, a replicon-centric screening method was used to locate strains from wastewater sludge containing plasmids belonging to the IncX-family. A transposon aided plasmid capture method was then employed to transport IncX-plasmids from their original hosts (and co-hosted plasmids into a laboratory strain (Escherichia coli Genehogs® for further study. The nucleotide sequences of the three newly isolated IncX-plasmids (pLN126_33, pMO17_54, pMO440_54 and the hitherto un-sequenced type-plasmid R485 revealed a remarkable occurrence of whole or partial gene cassettes that promote biofilm-formation in Klebsiella pneumonia or E. coli, in all four instances. Two of the plasmids (R485 and pLN126_33 were shown to directly induce biofilm formation in a crystal violet retention assay in E. coli. Sequence comparison revealed that all plasmid-borne forms of the type 3 fimbriae encoding gene cassette mrkABCDF were variations of a composite transposon Tn6011 first described in the E. coli IncX plasmid pOLA52. In conclusion, IncX-plasmids isolated from Enterobacteriaceae over almost 40 years and on three different continents have all been shown to carry a type 3 fimbriae gene cassette mrkABCDF stemming from pathogenic K. pneumoniae. Apart from contributing general knowledge about IncX-plasmids, this study also suggests an apparent ubiquity of a mobile form of an important virulence factor and is an illuminating example of the recruitment, evolution and dissemination of genetic traits through plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  16. Sequencing of IncX-plasmids suggests ubiquity of mobile forms of a biofilm-promoting gene cassette recruited from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmølle, Mette; Norman, Anders; Sørensen, Søren J; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids are a highly effective means with which genetic traits that influence human health, such as virulence and antibiotic resistance, are disseminated through bacterial populations. The IncX-family is a hitherto sparsely populated group of plasmids that are able to thrive within Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, a replicon-centric screening method was used to locate strains from wastewater sludge containing plasmids belonging to the IncX-family. A transposon aided plasmid capture method was then employed to transport IncX-plasmids from their original hosts (and co-hosted plasmids) into a laboratory strain (Escherichia coli Genehogs®) for further study. The nucleotide sequences of the three newly isolated IncX-plasmids (pLN126_33, pMO17_54, pMO440_54) and the hitherto un-sequenced type-plasmid R485 revealed a remarkable occurrence of whole or partial gene cassettes that promote biofilm-formation in Klebsiella pneumonia or E. coli, in all four instances. Two of the plasmids (R485 and pLN126_33) were shown to directly induce biofilm formation in a crystal violet retention assay in E. coli. Sequence comparison revealed that all plasmid-borne forms of the type 3 fimbriae encoding gene cassette mrkABCDF were variations of a composite transposon Tn6011 first described in the E. coli IncX plasmid pOLA52. In conclusion, IncX-plasmids isolated from Enterobacteriaceae over almost 40 years and on three different continents have all been shown to carry a type 3 fimbriae gene cassette mrkABCDF stemming from pathogenic K. pneumoniae. Apart from contributing general knowledge about IncX-plasmids, this study also suggests an apparent ubiquity of a mobile form of an important virulence factor and is an illuminating example of the recruitment, evolution and dissemination of genetic traits through plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  17. Spontaneous mutability and light-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium: effects of an R-plasmid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia, L.

    1979-01-01

    The UV-protecting plasmid R46 was transferred by conjugation to a genetically marked mouse-virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain, not derived from LT2; in this host the plasmid conferred UV protection and enhanced UV mutagenesis just as it does in LT2 lines. Tra - derivatives of R46 encountered during transduction retained UV-protecting and mutagenesis-enhancing ability. Stored strains carrying the R46-derived plasmids with strong mutator effect but not UV-protecting had lost most of their original streptomycin resistance but were slightly resistant to spectinomycin; attempts to transfer such plasmids failed. R46 enhanced the weak mutagenic effect of visible light on several his and trp mutants of strain LT2, including some whose frequency of spontaneous reversion was not increased by the plasmid. A mutagenic effect was produced by visible-light irradiation of hisG46(R46), either growing cells or nonmultiplying (histidine-deprived cells at 10 0 C). Presence of catalase or cyanide during irradiation did not prevent mutagenesis, which excludes some hypothetical mechanisms. Visible-light irradiation of hisG46 or hisG46(R46) under strict anaerobiosis had little or no mutagenic effect (controls showed that revertants if produced would have been detected). This is as expected if visible-light irradiation in air causes photodynamic damage to DNA and mutations are produced during error-prone, plasmid-enhanced repair

  18. A mitochondrial mutator plasmid that causes senescence under dietary restricted conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoekstra Rolf F

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calorie or dietary restriction extends life span in a wide range of organisms including the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. Under dietary restricted conditions, P. anserina isolates are several-fold longer lived. This is however not the case in isolates that carry one of the pAL2-1 homologous mitochondrial plasmids. Results We show that the pAL2-1 homologues act as 'insertional mutators' of the mitochondrial genome, which may explain their negative effect on life span extension. Sequencing revealed at least fourteen unique plasmid integration sites, of which twelve were located within the mitochondrial genome and two within copies of the plasmid itself. The plasmids were able to integrate in their entirety, via a non-homologous mode of recombination. Some of the integrated plasmid copies were truncated, which probably resulted from secondary, post-integrative, recombination processes. Integration sites were predominantly located within and surrounding the region containing the mitochondrial rDNA loci. Conclusion We propose a model for the mechanism of integration, based on innate modes of mtDNA recombination, and discuss its possible link with the plasmid's negative effect on dietary restriction mediated life span extension.

  19. Hundreds of circular novel plasmids and DNA elements identified in a rat cecum metamobilome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Sparholt Jørgensen

    Full Text Available Metagenomic approaches are widespread in microbiological research, but so far, the knowledge on extrachromosomal DNA diversity and composition has largely remained dependant on cultivating host organisms. Even with the emergence of metagenomics, complete circular sequences are rarely identified, and have required manual curation. We propose a robust in silico procedure for identifying complete small plasmids in metagenomic datasets from whole genome shotgun sequencing. From one very pure and exhaustively sequenced metamobilome from rat cecum, we identified a total of 616 circular sequences, 160 of which were carrying a gene with plasmid replication domain. Further homology analyses indicated that the majority of these plasmid sequences are novel. We confirmed the circularity of the complete plasmid candidates using an inverse-type PCR approach on a subset of sequences with 95% success, confirming the existence and length of discrete sequences. The implication of these findings is a broadened understanding of the traits of circular elements in nature and the possibility of massive data mining in existing metagenomic datasets to discover novel pools of complete plasmids thus vastly expanding the current plasmid database.

  20. Two highly divergent lineages of exfoliative toxin B-encoding plasmids revealed in impetigo strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botka, Tibor; Růžičková, Vladislava; Svobodová, Karla; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Čejková, Darina; Doškař, Jiří

    2017-09-01

    Exfoliative toxin B (ETB) encoded by some large plasmids plays a crucial role in epidermolytic diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus. We have found as yet unknown types of etb gene-positive plasmids isolated from a set of impetigo strains implicated in outbreaks of pemphigus neonatorum in Czech maternity hospitals. Plasmids from the strains of clonal complex CC121 were related to archetypal plasmid pETB TY4 . Sharing a 33-kb core sequence including virulence genes for ETB, EDIN C, and lantibiotics, they were assigned to a stand-alone lineage, named pETB TY4 -based plasmids. Differing from each other in the content of variable DNA regions, they formed four sequence types. In addition to them, a novel unique plasmid pETB608 isolated from a strain of ST130 was described. Carrying conjugative cluster genes, as well as new variants of etb and edinA genes, pETB608 could be regarded as a source of a new lineage of ETB plasmids. We have designed a helpful detection assay, which facilitates the precise identification of the all described types of ETB plasmids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the structure and inheritance of a linear plasmid from the obligate biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, H; Lyngkjaer, M F; Stummann, B M; Grell, M N; Christiansen, S K

    2003-08-01

    A linear plasmid is widespread among isolates of the obligate biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (synonym Erysiphe graminis) (Bgh), the organism that causes the disease powdery mildew on barley. We cloned and sequenced the entire plasmid of 7965 bp. The plasmid contains two identical terminal inverted repeats (TIR) of 610 bp. Two ORFs are present on opposite strands, one encoding a phage-type DNA polymerase and the other a phage-type RNA polymerase. Two large transcripts of approximately 4.2 and 5.6 kb were identified in conidia, germinating conidia and Bgh -infected barley leaves, indicating that the polymerases are transcribed at most stages of the lifecycle. The transcription start sites were localised within the TIR regions, where a putative 11-bp ARS consensus sequence was also identified. To follow the sexual transmission of the plasmid we screened 27 Bgh isolates for mitochondrial polymorphisms. One polymorphism allowed us to carry out a cross between two isolates that differed in both mitochondrial genotype and presence/absence of the Bgh plasmid. The plasmid was transmitted independently of the origin of the mitochondria. No transfer of the plasmid was observed between two Bgh isolates that were co-cultivated for 1.5 years on a common susceptible barley variety. The plasmid appears to be an autonomous replicon with no phenotypic effect on Bgh.

  2. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  3. Behavior of IncQ Plasmids in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Schilperoort, Rob

    1981-01-01

    Inc-Q plasmids were introduced into Agrobacterium tumefuciens, by mobilization from Escherichia coli with an Inc-P plasmid, or by transformation with purified plasmid DNA. It was found that they were stably maintained. The presence of an Inc-Q plasmid did not influence tumorigenicity. These results

  4. Preclinical development of BCG.HIVA2auxo.int, harboring an integrative expression vector, for a HIV-TB Pediatric vaccine. Enhancement of stability and specific HIV-1 T-cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahant, Aakash; Saubi, Narcís; Eto, Yoshiki; Guitart, Núria; Gatell, Josep Ma; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2017-08-03

    One of the critical issues that should be addressed in the development of a BCG-based HIV vaccine is genetic plasmid stability. Therefore, to address this issue we have considered using integrative vectors and the auxotrophic mutant of BCG complemented with a plasmid carrying a wild-type complementing gene. In this study, we have constructed an integrative E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid, p2auxo.HIVA int , expressing the HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector uses an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism for plasmid selection and maintenance. It was first transformed into a glycine auxotrophic E. coli strain and subsequently transformed into a lysine auxotrophic Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain to generate the vaccine BCG.HIVA 2auxo.int . Presence of the HIVA gene sequence and protein expression was confirmed. We demonstrated that the in vitro stability of the integrative plasmid p2auxo.HIVA int was increased 4-fold, as compared with the BCG strain harboring the episomal plasmid, and was genetically and phenotypically characterized. The BCG.HIVA 2auxo.int vaccine in combination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA).HIVA was found to be safe and induced HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-γ-producing T-cell responses in adult BALB/c mice. We have engineered a more stable and immunogenic BCG-vectored vaccine using the prototype immunogen HIVA. Thus, the use of integrative expression vectors and the antibiotic-free plasmid selection system based on "double" auxotrophic complementation are likely to improve the mycobacterial vaccine stability in vivo and immunogenicity to develop not only recombinant BCG-based vaccines expressing second generation of HIV-1 immunogens but also other major pediatric pathogens to prime protective responses shortly following birth.

  5. An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi MR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad R Alavi1,2, Vlado Antonic2, Adrien Ravizee1, Peter J Weina3, Mina Izadjoo1,2, Alexander Stojadinovic21Division of Wound Biology and Translational Research, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and American Registry of Pathology, Washington DC, 2Combat Wound Initiative Program, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC, 3The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, USABackground: Genus Enterobacter includes important opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that could infect complex wounds. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in these microorganisms represents a challenging clinical problem in the treatment of these wounds. In the authors’ screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from complex wounds, an Enterobacter species was isolated that harbors antibiotic-resistant plasmids conferring resistance to Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to identify the resistance genes carried by one of these plasmids.Methods: The plasmids from the Enterobacter isolate were propagated in E. coli and one of the plasmids, designated as pR23, was sequenced by the Sanger method using fluorescent dye-terminator chemistry on a genetic analyzer. The assembled sequence was annotated by search of the GenBank database.Results: Plasmid pR23 is composed of the transposon Tn1331 and a backbone plasmid that is identical to the plasmid pPIGDM1 from Enterobacter agglomerans. The multidrug-resistance transposon Tn1331, which confers resistance to aminoglycoside and beta lactam antibiotics, has been previously isolated only from Klebsiella. The Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1, which carries a ColE1-like origin of replication and has no apparent selective marker, appears to provide a backbone for propagation of Tn1331 in Enterobacter. The recognition sequence of Tn1331 transposase for insertion into pPIGDM1 is the pentanucleotide TATTA, which occurs only once throughout the length of this plasmid.Conclusion: Transposition of Tn1331 into

  6. Isolation of a conjugative F-like plasmid from a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain CM6 using tandem shock wave-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Alonso, G; Cruz-Medina, J A; Caballero-Pérez, J; Arvizu-Hernández, I; Ávalos-Esparza, L M; Cruz-Hernández, A; Romero-Gómez, S; Rodríguez, A L; Pastrana-Martínez, X; Fernández, F; Loske, A M; Campos-Guillén, J

    2015-07-01

    Genetic characterization of plasmids from bacterial strains provides insight about multidrug resistance. Ten wild type Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains isolated from cow fecal samples were characterized by their antibiotic resistance profile, plasmid patterns and three different identification methods. From one of the strains, a fertility factor-like plasmid was replicated using tandem shock wave-mediated transformation. Underwater shock waves with a positive pressure peak of up to approximately 40 MPa, followed by a pressure trough of approximately -19 MPa were generated using an experimental piezoelectric shock wave source. Three different shock wave energies and a fixed delay of 750 μs were used to study the relationship between energy and transformation efficiency (TE), as well as the influence of shock wave energy on the integrity of the plasmid. Our results showed that the mean shock wave-mediated TE and the integrity of the large plasmid (~70 kb) were reduced significantly at the energy levels tested. The sequencing analysis of the plasmid revealed a high identity to the pHK17a plasmid, including the replication system, which was similar to the plasmid incompatibility group FII. It also showed that it carried an extended spectrum beta-lactamase gene, ctx-m-14. Furthermore, diverse genes for the conjugative mechanism were identified. Our results may be helpful in improving methodologies for conjugative plasmid transfer and directly selecting the most interesting plasmids from environmental samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasmid Segregation: Spatial Awareness at the Molecular Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Gerdes, Kenn

    2007-01-01

    In bacteria, low-copy number plasmids ensure their stable inheritance by partition loci (par), which actively distribute plasmid replicates to each side of the cell division plane. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopic tracking of segregating plasmid molecules, a new study provides novel...... insight into the workings of the par system from Escherichia coli plasmid R1. Despite its relative simplicity, the plasmid partition spindle shares characteristics with the mitotic machinery of eukaryotic cells....

  8. Characterization of Tn904 insertions in octopine Ti plasmid mutants of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, G; Klapwijk, P M; Poulis, J A; Schilperoort, R A

    1980-01-01

    Seven Tn904 insertion mutants of pTi Ach5 affecting Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence were studied. The mutant character was shown to be plasmid borne. Four of these mutants were avirulent and carried an insertion in restriction endonuclease HpaI fragment 12, a 3.3-megadalton fragment, which therefore appears to be a Ti plasmid region essential for virulence. Two mutants were attenuated in virulence. The inserts mapped close to HpaI fragment 12. One mutant giving rise to small tumors with excessive adventitious root formation on Kalanchoe daigremontiana carried an insertion in the right side of the common sequence in the deoxyribonucleic acid of the Ti plasmid detected in crown gall tumors. The insertion behavior of Tn904 was studied by analyzing 11 independently isolated and randomly chosen mutants. The Tn904 inserts did not affect oncogenicity, tumor morphology, bacterial transfer functions, octopine catabolism functions, or vital parts of the Ti plasmid, such as the origin of replication. Most of the Tn904 inserts were concentrated in a small part of the map. The size of additional deoxyribonucleic acid as a result of Tn904 inserts varied between 5 and 15 megadaltons. In two cases a Ti plasmid was found with two Tn904 insertions at different positions. Images PMID:6252198

  9. Influence of endogenous plasmids on phenotypes of Pantoea vagans strain C9-1 associated with epiphytic fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea vagans strain C9-1 is an effective biological control agent for fire blight of pear and apple. C9-1 carries three circular plasmids: pPag1 (168 kb), pPag2 (166 kb), and pPag3 (530 kb). Of these, pPag3, a member of the large Pantoea plasmid family, was proposed to contribute to epiphytic fitn...

  10. IncP-1ε plasmids are important vectors of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural systems: diversification driven by class 1 integron gene cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger eHeuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of broad host range IncP-1ε plasmids in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems has not yet been investigated. These plasmids were detected in total DNA from all of 16 manure samples and in arable soil based on a novel 5’-nuclease assay for real time PCR. A correlation between IncP-1ε plasmid abundance and antibiotic usage was revealed. In a soil microcosm experiment the abundance of IncP-1ε plasmids was significantly increased even 127 days after application of manure containing the antibiotic compound sulfadiazine, compared to soil receiving only manure, only sulfadiazine, or water. Fifty IncP-1ε plasmids that were captured in E. coli CV601gfp from bacterial communities of manure and arable soil were characterized by PCR and hybridisation. All plasmids carried class 1 integrons with highly varying sizes of the gene cassette region and the sul1 gene. Three IncP-1ε plasmids captured from soil bacteria and one from manure were completely sequenced. The backbones were nearly identical to that of the previously described IncP-1ε plasmid pKJK5. The plasmids differed mainly in the composition of a Tn402-like transposon carrying a class 1 integron with varying gene cassettes, IS1326, and in three of the plasmids the tetracycline resistance transposon Tn1721 with various truncations. Diverse Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria were revealed as hosts of one of the IncP-1ε plasmids in soil microcosms. Our data suggest that IncP-1ε plasmids are important vectors for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems.

  11. First report on vertical transmission of a plasmid DNA in freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Labrechai Mog; Gireesh-Babu, P; Pavan-Kumar, A; Suresh Babu, P P; Chaudhari, Aparna

    2014-09-01

    Outbreak of WSSV disease is one of the major stumbling blocks in shrimp aquaculture. DNA vaccines have shown potential for mass scale vaccination owing to their stability, cost effectiveness and easy maintenance. Development of economically feasible delivery strategies remains to be a major challenge. This study demonstrates vertical transmission of a plasmid DNA in a decapod Macrobrachium rosenbergii for the first time. Females at three different maturation stages (immature, matured and berried) and mature males were injected with a plasmid DNA and allowed to spawn with untreated counterparts. Using specific primers the plasmid DNA could be amplified from the offspring of all groups except that of berried females. For this confirmation genomic DNA was isolated from 3 pools of 10 post larvae in each group. This presents an ideal strategy to protect young ones at zero stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasmid maintenance and physiology of a genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain during continuous L-carnitine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Vicente; González-Veracruz, María; Cánovas, Manuel; Iborra, José L

    2007-10-01

    The effect of immobilization on cell physiology and how this determines cell metabolic performance is an important concern for developing bioprocess. This is particularly true for genetically modified microorganisms and their genetic stability. For this reason the stability and physiological state of plasmid-bearing E. coli cells were ascertained by flow cytometry. Differences in the cellular DNA and protein content (15-20%) permit discrimination of control and plasmid-bearing cells, as well as adaptation to continuous cultivation conditions in both freely suspended and immobilized states to be monitored. Moreover, the observed metabolic burden due to maintenance and over-expression of plasmid-coded genetic material and slow cell growth in poorly-viable immobilized cells were found to be the main factors contributing to strain stabilization.

  13. Characterization of blaCTX-M IncFII plasmids and clones of Escherichia coli from pets in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Safia; Haenni, Marisa; Châtre, Pierre; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2013-12-01

    To characterize bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids and clones of Escherichia coli from cats and dogs and to compare them with bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids reported in humans. From December 2006 to April 2010, 518 E. coli isolates from clinical infections in cats and dogs were screened for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by disc diffusion and resistance genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Plasmids were characterized using PCR-based replicon typing and sub-typing schemes, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, S1-PFGE and Southern hybridization. Isolates were characterized by PFGE, phylogenetic grouping, O25b typing and multilocus sequence typing. Nineteen E. coli isolates (3.7%) produced ESBLs, of which 14 (74%) carried bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids. The bla(CTX-M) gene was predominant and located on F31:A4:B1, F36:A4:B1 or F36:A1:B20 plasmids, abundantly reported in humans. The bla(CTX-M) F22:A1:B20 or F2:A2:B20 plasmids were also found. Different sequence types (STs) were identified, such as ST10, ST410, ST359, ST617 and ST224. Only one E. coli isolate belonged to the ST131 E. coli clone and carried a bla(CTX-M) F2:A2:B20 plasmid. This is the first known extensive study on ESBL-producing E. coli isolates from pets in France. The ST131 clone was rare. However, the predominance of human-like bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids suggests exchanges of these plasmids with the human reservoir.

  14. Characteristics of plasmids in multi-drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolated during prospective surveillance of a newly opened hospital in Iraq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Zhe Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria are major causes of nosocomial infections, and antibiotic resistance in these organisms is often plasmid mediated. Data are scarce pertaining to molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in resource constrained areas such as Iraq. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, all MDR Enterobacteriaceae (n = 38 and randomly selected non-MDR counterparts (n = 41 isolated from patients, healthcare workers and environmental surfaces in a newly opened hospital in Iraq were investigated to characterize plasmids found in these isolates and determine their contribution to antibiotic resistance. Our results demonstrated that MDR E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates harbored significantly more (≥ 3 plasmids compared to their non-MDR counterparts, which carried ≤ 2 plasmids (p<0.01. Various large plasmids (~52 to 100 kb from representative isolates were confirmed to contain multiple resistance genes by DNA microarray analysis. Aminoglycoside (acc, aadA, aph, strA/B, and ksgA, β-lactam (bla(TEM1, bla(AMPC, bla(CTX-M-15, bla(OXA-1, bla(VIM-2 and bla(SHV, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (sul/dfr, tetracycline (tet and chloramphenicol (cat resistance genes were detected on these plasmids. Additionally, multiple plasmids carrying multiple antibiotic resistance genes were found in the same host strain. Genetic transfer-associated genes were identified on the plasmids from both MDR and non-MDR isolates. Seven plasmid replicon types (FII, FIA, FIB, B/O, K, I1 and N were detected in the isolates, while globally disseminated IncA/C and IncHI1 plasmids were not detected in these isolates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of the characteristics of the plasmids found in Enterobacteriaceae isolated following the opening of a new hospital in Iraq. The information provided here furthers our understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance in this specific region and their evolutionary

  15. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad, E-mail: amtamadon@gmail.com [Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (<50 µg/ml) depending on the dendrimer generation and cholesterol/amine mole ratio. Cholesterol conjugation resulted in higher resistance of the condensed plasmid DNA in a competition assay with heparin sulfate. Also, the transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol{sub 40 %}) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  16. Localization of Low Copy Number Plasmid pRC4 in Replicating Rod and Non-Replicating Cocci Cells of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Divya; Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus are gram-positive bacteria, which can exist in two different shapes rod and cocci. A number of studies have been done in the past on replication and stability of small plasmids in this bacterium; however, there are no reports on spatial localization and segregation of these plasmids. In the present study, a low copy number plasmid pDS3 containing pRC4 replicon was visualized in growing cells of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 (NBRC100887) using P1 parS-ParB-GFP system. Cells were initially cocci and then became rod shaped in exponential phase. Cocci cells were found to be non-replicating as evident by the presence of single fluorescence focus corresponding to the plasmid and diffuse fluorescence of DnaB-GFP. Rod shaped cells contained plasmid either present as one fluorescent focus observed at the cell center or two foci localized at quarter positions. The results suggest that the plasmid is replicated at the cell center and then it goes to quarter position. In order to observe the localization of plasmid with respect to nucleoid, plasmid segregation was also studied in filaments where it was found to be replicated at the cell center in a nucleoid free region. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on segregation of small plasmids in R. erythropolis.

  17. A conjugative 38 kB plasmid is present in multiple subspecies of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Rogers

    Full Text Available A ≈ 38kB plasmid (pXF-RIV5 was present in the Riv5 strain of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolated from ornamental plum in southern California. The complete nucleotide sequence of pXF-RIV5 is almost identical to that of pXFAS01 from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain M23; the two plasmids vary at only 6 nucleotide positions. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analyses indicate pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 share some similarity to chromosomal and plasmid (pXF51 sequences of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c and more distant similarity to plasmids from a wide variety of bacteria. Both pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 encode homologues of a complete Type IV secretion system involved in conjugation and DNA transfer among bacteria. Mating pair formation proteins (Trb from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP31758 are the mostly closely related non-X. fastidiosa proteins to most of the Trb proteins encoded by pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01. Unlike many bacterial conjugative plasmids, pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 do not carry homologues of known accessory modules that confer selective advantage on host bacteria. However, both plasmids encode seven hypothetical proteins of unknown function and possess a small transposon-associated region encoding a putative transposase and associated factor. Vegetative replication of pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 appears to be under control of RepA protein and both plasmids have an origin of DNA replication (oriV similar to that of pRP4 and pR751 from Escherichia coli. In contrast, conjugative plasmids commonly encode TrfA and have an oriV similar to those found in IncP-1 incompatibility group plasmids. The presence of nearly identical plasmids in single strains from two distinct subspecies of X. fastidiosa is indicative of recent horizontal transfer, probably subsequent to the introduction of subspecies fastidiosa to the United States in the late 19(th century.

  18. A conjugative 38 kB plasmid is present in multiple subspecies of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth E; Stenger, Drake C

    2012-01-01

    A ≈ 38kB plasmid (pXF-RIV5) was present in the Riv5 strain of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolated from ornamental plum in southern California. The complete nucleotide sequence of pXF-RIV5 is almost identical to that of pXFAS01 from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain M23; the two plasmids vary at only 6 nucleotide positions. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analyses indicate pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 share some similarity to chromosomal and plasmid (pXF51) sequences of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c and more distant similarity to plasmids from a wide variety of bacteria. Both pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 encode homologues of a complete Type IV secretion system involved in conjugation and DNA transfer among bacteria. Mating pair formation proteins (Trb) from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP31758 are the mostly closely related non-X. fastidiosa proteins to most of the Trb proteins encoded by pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01. Unlike many bacterial conjugative plasmids, pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 do not carry homologues of known accessory modules that confer selective advantage on host bacteria. However, both plasmids encode seven hypothetical proteins of unknown function and possess a small transposon-associated region encoding a putative transposase and associated factor. Vegetative replication of pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 appears to be under control of RepA protein and both plasmids have an origin of DNA replication (oriV) similar to that of pRP4 and pR751 from Escherichia coli. In contrast, conjugative plasmids commonly encode TrfA and have an oriV similar to those found in IncP-1 incompatibility group plasmids. The presence of nearly identical plasmids in single strains from two distinct subspecies of X. fastidiosa is indicative of recent horizontal transfer, probably subsequent to the introduction of subspecies fastidiosa to the United States in the late 19(th) century.

  19. Comparative genomics of multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C plasmids from commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli from multiple animal sources.

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    Claudia Fernández-Alarcón

    Full Text Available Incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C plasmids have received recent attention for their broad host range and ability to confer resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Due to the potential spread of multidrug resistance (MDR phenotypes from foodborne pathogens to human pathogens, the dissemination of these plasmids represents a public health risk. In this study, four animal-source IncA/C plasmids isolated from Escherichia coli were sequenced and analyzed, including isolates from commercial dairy cows, pigs and turkeys in the U.S. and Chile. These plasmids were initially selected because they either contained the floR and tetA genes encoding for florfenicol and tetracycline resistance, respectively, and/or the bla(CMY-2 gene encoding for extended spectrum β-lactamase resistance. Overall, sequence analysis revealed that each of the four plasmids retained a remarkably stable and conserved backbone sequence, with differences observed primarily within their accessory regions, which presumably have evolved via horizontal gene transfer events involving multiple modules. Comparison of these plasmids with other available IncA/C plasmid sequences further defined the core and accessory elements of these plasmids in E. coli and Salmonella. Our results suggest that the bla(CMY-2 plasmid lineage appears to have derived from an ancestral IncA/C plasmid type harboring floR-tetAR-strAB and Tn21-like accessory modules. Evidence is mounting that IncA/C plasmids are widespread among enteric bacteria of production animals and these emergent plasmids have flexibility in their acquisition of MDR-encoding modules, necessitating further study to understand the evolutionary mechanisms involved in their dissemination and stability in bacterial populations.

  20. Comparative genomics of multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C plasmids from commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli from multiple animal sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Singer, Randall S; Johnson, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) plasmids have received recent attention for their broad host range and ability to confer resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Due to the potential spread of multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes from foodborne pathogens to human pathogens, the dissemination of these plasmids represents a public health risk. In this study, four animal-source IncA/C plasmids isolated from Escherichia coli were sequenced and analyzed, including isolates from commercial dairy cows, pigs and turkeys in the U.S. and Chile. These plasmids were initially selected because they either contained the floR and tetA genes encoding for florfenicol and tetracycline resistance, respectively, and/or the bla(CMY-2) gene encoding for extended spectrum β-lactamase resistance. Overall, sequence analysis revealed that each of the four plasmids retained a remarkably stable and conserved backbone sequence, with differences observed primarily within their accessory regions, which presumably have evolved via horizontal gene transfer events involving multiple modules. Comparison of these plasmids with other available IncA/C plasmid sequences further defined the core and accessory elements of these plasmids in E. coli and Salmonella. Our results suggest that the bla(CMY-2) plasmid lineage appears to have derived from an ancestral IncA/C plasmid type harboring floR-tetAR-strAB and Tn21-like accessory modules. Evidence is mounting that IncA/C plasmids are widespread among enteric bacteria of production animals and these emergent plasmids have flexibility in their acquisition of MDR-encoding modules, necessitating further study to understand the evolutionary mechanisms involved in their dissemination and stability in bacterial populations.

  1. Destabilization of IncA and IncC plasmids by SGI1 and SGI2 type Salmonella genomic islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hamidian, Mohammad; Ambrose, Stephanie J; Hall, Ruth M

    Both the Salmonella genomic islands (SGI) and the conjugative IncC plasmids are known to contribute substantially to the acquisition of resistance to multiple antibiotics, and plasmids in the A/C group are known to mobilize the Salmonella genomic island SGI1, which also carries multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Plasmid pRMH760 (IncC; A/C 2 ) was shown to mobilize SGI1 variants SGI1-I, SGI1-F, SGI1-K and SGI2 from Salmonella enterica to Escherichia coli where it was integrated at the preferred location, at the end of the trmE (thdF) gene. The plasmid was transferred at a similar frequency. However, we observed that co-transfer of the SGI and the plasmid was rarer. In E. coli to E. coli transfer, the frequency of transfer of the IncC plasmid pRMH760 was at least 1000-fold lower when the donor carried SGI1-I or SGI1-K, indicating that the SGI suppresses transfer of the plasmid. In addition, pRMH760 was rapidly lost from both E. coli and S. enterica strains that also carried SGI1-I, SGI1-F or SGI2. However, plasmid loss was not seen when the SGI1 variant was SGI1-K, which lacks two segments of the SGI1 backbone. The complete sequence of the SGI1-I and SGI1-F were determined and SGI1-K also carries two single base substitutions relative to SGI1-I. The IncA (A/C 1 ) plasmid RA1 was also shown to mobilize SGI2-A and though there are significant differences between the backbones of IncA and IncC plasmids, RA1 was also rapidly lost when SGI2-A was present in the same cell. We conclude that there are multiple interactions, both cooperative and antagonistic, between an IncA or IncC plasmid and the SGI1 and SGI2 family genomic islands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lethal and mutagenic effects of 8-methoxypsoralen-induced lesions on plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramio, J M; Bauluz, C; de Vidania, R

    1987-01-01

    The genotoxic effect of 8-methoxypsoralen damages (monoadducts and crosslinks) on plasmid DNA was studied. pBR322 DNA was treated with several concentrations of 8-methoxypsoralen plus fixed UVA light irradiation. After transformation into E. coli cells with different repair capacities (uvrA, recA and wild-type), plasmid survival and mutagenesis in ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant genes were analysed. Results showed that crosslinks were extremely lethal in all 3 strains; indeed, it seemed that they were not repaired even in proficient bacteria. Monoadducts were also found to be lethal although they were removed to some extent by the excision-repair pathway (uvrA-dependent). Damaged plasmid DNA appeared to induce mutagenic repair, but only in the wild-type strain. In order to study the influence of the SOS response on plasmid recovery, preirradiation of the host cells was also performed. Preirradiation of the uvrA or wild-type strains significantly increased plasmid recovery. Consistent with the expectations of SOS repair, no effect was observed in preirradiated recA cells. Plasmid recovery in the excision-deficient strain was mainly achieved by the mutagenic repair of some fraction of the lesions, probably monoadducts. The greatest increase in plasmid recovery was found in the wild-type strain. This likely involved the repair of monoadducts and some fraction of the crosslinks. We conclude that repair in preirradiated repair-proficient cells is carried out mainly by an error-free pathway, suggesting enhancement of the excision repair promoted by the induction of SOS functions.

  3. Construction of an artificial recombinant bicistronic plasmid DNA vaccine against porcine rotavirus

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    Tingting Cui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The attenuated Salmonella typhimurium χ4550 strain was used to harbour a reconstructed bicistronic DNA vaccine against porcine rotavirus, which carried the rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4 and VP7 genes simultaneously. Using a balanced lethal system, the kanamycin resistance gene of expressing eukaryotic plasmids pVAX1 and pVAXD were replaced by the aspartate β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd gene. The NSP4 cleavage product (259–525 of rotavirus OSU strain and VP7 full-length genes were amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and then inserted into the eukaryotic single-expression plasmid, pVAX1-asd, and the eukaryotic dual-expression plasmid, pVAXD-asd, respectively. The recombinant plasmids pVAX1-asd-NSP4, pVAX1-asd-VP7 and pVAXD-asd-NSP4-VP7 were transformed into the attenuated S. typhimurium χ4550 strain by electrotransformation. An indirect immunofluorescence assay of the expressed COS-7 cell suggested that the recombinant S. typhimurium χ4550 strain was constructed successfully. The recombinant S. typhimurium χ4550 strain was orally administered to BALB/c mice. The group immunised with dual- expression plasmids produced a significantly higher level of serum Immunoglobulin G (IgG and intestinal Immunoglobulin A (IgA than the group immunised with single-expression plasmids. These results indicated that eukaryotic bicistronic plasmid DNA vaccines could be successfully constructed to enhance humoural, mucosal and cellular immune response against rotavirus infection.

  4. Design and synthesis of a quintessential self-transmissible IncX1 plasmid, pX1.0.

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    Lars H Hansen

    Full Text Available DNA exchange in bacteria via conjugative plasmids is believed to be among the most important contributing factors to the rapid evolution- and diversification rates observed in bacterial species. The IncX1 plasmids are particularly interesting in relation to enteric bacteria, and typically carry genetic loads like antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factors. So far, however, a "pure" version of these molecular parasites, without genetic loads, has yet to be isolated from the environment. Here we report the construction of pX1.0, a fully synthesized IncX1 plasmid capable of horizontal transfer between different enteric bacteria. The designed pX1.0 sequence was derived from the consensus gene content of five IncX1 plasmids and three other, more divergent, members of the same phylogenetic group. The pX1.0 plasmid was shown to replicate stably in E. coli with a plasmid DNA per total DNA ratio corresponding to approximately 3-9 plasmids per chromosome depending on the growth phase of the host. Through conjugation, pX1.0 was able to self-transfer horizontally into an isogenic strain of E. coli as well as into two additional species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Our results demonstrate the immediate applicability of recent advances made within the field of synthetic biology for designing and constructing DNA systems, previously existing only in silica.

  5. A putative multi-replicon plasmid co-harboring beta-lactamase genes blaKPC-2, blaCTX-M-14 and blaTEM-1 and trimethoprim resistance gene dfrA25 from a Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type (ST 11 strain in China.

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    Yu Tang

    Full Text Available The global emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae poses a major public health threat requiring immediate and aggressive action. Some older generation antibiotics, such as trimethoprim, serve as alternatives for treatment of infections. Here, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pHS091147, which co-harbored the carbapenemase (blaKPC-2 and trimethoprim resistance genes (dfrA25 from a Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type (ST 11 clone recovered in Shanghai, China. pHS091147 had three replication genes, several plasmid-stability genes and an intact type IV secretion system gene cluster. Besides blaKPC-2 and dfrA25, pHS091147 carried several other resistance genes, including β-lactamase genes blaTEM-1 and blaCTX-M-14, sulphonamide resistance gene sul1, a quinolone resistance gene remnant (ΔqnrB2, and virulence associated gene iroN. Notably, the multidrug-resistance region was a chimeric structure composed of three subregions, which shared strong sequence homology with several plasmids previously assigned in Genbank. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the co-localization of blaKPC-2 and dfrA25 on a novel putative multi-replicon plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST11 clone.

  6. Autonomous replication of plasmids bearing monkey DNA origin-enriched sequences

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    Frappier, L.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M.

    1987-10-01

    Twelve clones of origin-enriched sequences (ORS) isolated from early replicating monkey (CV-1) DNA were examined for transient episomal replication in transfected CV-1, COS-7, and HeLa cells. Plasmid DNA was isolated at time intervals after transfection and screened by the Dpn I resistance assay or by the bromodeoxyuridine substitution assay to differentiate between input and replicated DNA. The authors have identified four monkey ORS (ORS3, -8, -9, and -12) that can support plasmid replication in mammalian cells. This replication is carried out in a controlled and semiconservative manner characteristic of mammalian replicons. ORS replication was most efficient in HeLa cells. Electron microscopy showed ORS8 and ORS12 plasmids of the correct size with replication bubbles. Using a unique restriction site in ORS12, we have mapped the replication bubble within the monkey DNA sequence.

  7. Plasmid mediated tetracycline resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND in shrimps

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    Jee Eun Han

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most important problems in public health, veterinary medicine and aquaculture. Importantly, plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from shrimp can potentially be transferred through transposition, conjugation and plasmid uptake to different bacterial species in aquaculture systems. In this study, we evaluated the antibiotic resistance pattern in V. parahaemolyticus strains associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND from penaeid shrimp and identified AHPND strains from Mexico showed a high level of resistance to tetracycline (≥5 μg/mL and have the tetB gene coding tetracycline resistance. In particular, the tetB gene was carried in a single copy plasmid (named as pTetB-VA1 comprising 5162-bp with 40% G + C content from the strain (13-511/A1. The plasmid pTetB-VA1 consists of 9 ORFs encoding tetracycline resistant and repressor proteins, transcriptional regulatory proteins and transposases and showed a 99% sequence identity to other tet gene plasmids (pIS04_68 and pAQU2.

  8. Recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction allows rapid and seamless cloning of oligomeric genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jonathan R; Mackay, J Andrew; Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-04-12

    This paper reports a new strategy, recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction (PRe-RDL), to rapidly clone highly repetitive polypeptides of any sequence and specified length over a large range of molecular weights. In a single cycle of PRe-RDL, two halves of a parent plasmid, each containing a copy of an oligomer, are ligated together, thereby dimerizing the oligomer and reconstituting a functional plasmid. This process is carried out recursively to assemble an oligomeric gene with the desired number of repeats. PRe-RDL has several unique features that stem from the use of type IIs restriction endonucleases: first, PRe-RDL is a seamless cloning method that leaves no extraneous nucleotides at the ligation junction. Because it uses type IIs endonucleases to ligate the two halves of the plasmid, PRe-RDL also addresses the major limitation of RDL in that it abolishes any restriction on the gene sequence that can be oligomerized. The reconstitution of a functional plasmid only upon successful ligation in PRe-RDL also addresses two other limitations of RDL: the significant background from self-ligation of the vector observed in RDL, and the decreased efficiency of ligation due to nonproductive circularization of the insert. PRe-RDL can also be used to assemble genes that encode different sequences in a predetermined order to encode block copolymers or append leader and trailer peptide sequences to the oligomerized gene.

  9. [Gene cloning, selection of plasmids and application of Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Salih; Erensoy, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    Gene cloning refers to the process by which a fragment of DNA is transferred from one organism to a vector. A vector is an agent that can carry a DNA fragment into a host cell. Commonly used vectors include plasmids, lambda phage, cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC). Plasmid vectors that have been extensively used in genetic engineering are derived from natural plasmids. These contain a genetic marker conferring a phenotype that can be selected for or against and a polylinker or multiple cloning site (MCS), which is a short region containing several commonly used restriction sites allowing the insertion of DNA fragments at this location easily. There are several plasmids and gene cloning kits available nowadays commercially. These kits contain an advanced positive selection system for the highest efficiency cloning of PCR products generated with any DNA polymerase. The kits offer cloning efficiencies of up to 100% positive clones, eliminating the need for tedious colony screening. We consider that researchers should choose the most suitable plasmids and cloning kits for gene cloning in view of factors such as time consumption, cost and individual laboratory options.

  10. Plasmid Mediated Antibiotic and Heavy Metal Resistance in Bacillus Strains Isolated From Soils in Rize, Turkey

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    Elif SEVİM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen Bacillus strains which were isolated from soil samples were examined for resistance to 17 different antibiotics (ampicillin, methicillin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, cephalotine, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, vancomycin, oxacilin, neomycin, kanamycin and, novabiocin and to 10 different heavy metals (copper, lead, cobalt, chrome, iron, mercury, zinc, nickel, manganese and, cadmium and for the presence of plasmid DNA. A total of eleven strains (67% were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The most common resistance was observed against methicillin and oxacillin. The most resistance strains were found as Bacillus sp. B3 and Bacillus sp. B11. High heavy metal resistance against copper, chromium, zinc, iron and nickel was detected, but mercury and cobalt resistance was not detected, except for 3 strains (B3, B11, and B12 which showed mercury resistance. It has been determined that seven Bacillus strains have plasmids. The isolated plasmids were transformed into the Bacillus subtilis W168 and it was shown that heavy metal and antibiotic resistance determinants were carried on these plasmids. These results showed that there was a correlation between plasmid content and resistance for both antibiotic and heavy metal resistance

  11. Transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from biogas plant digestates often belong to the IncP-1ε subgroup

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    Birgit eWolters

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manure is known to contain residues of antibiotics administered to farm animals as well as bacteria carrying antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs. These genes are often located on mobile genetic elements. In biogas plants (BGPs, organic substrates such as manure and plant material are mixed and fermented in order to provide energy, and resulting digestates are used for soil fertilization. The fate of plasmid carrying bacteria from manure during the fermentation process is unknown. The present study focused on transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from digestates of seven BGPs, using manure as a co-substrate, and their phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Plasmids conferring resistance to either tetracycline or sulfadiazine were captured by means of exogenous plasmid isolation from digestates into Pseudomonas putida KT2442 and Escherichia coli CV601 recipients, at transfer frequencies ranging from 10-5 to 10-7. Transconjugants (n = 101 were screened by PCR-Southern blot hybridization and real-time PCR for the presence of IncP-1, IncP-1ε, IncW, IncN, IncP-7, IncP-9, LowGC and IncQ plasmids. While 61 plasmids remained unassigned, 40 plasmids belonged to the IncP-1ε subgroup. All these IncP-1ε plasmids were shown to harbor the genes tetA, sul1, qacE∆1, intI1 and integron gene cassette amplicons of different size. Further analysis of 16 representative IncP-1ε plasmids showed that they conferred six different multiple antibiotic resistance patterns and their diversity seemed to be driven by the gene cassette arrays. IncP-1ε plasmids displaying similar restriction and antibiotic resistance patterns were captured from different BGPs, suggesting that they may be typical for this environment. Our study showed that BGP digestates are a potential source of transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids and in particular the broad host range IncP-1ε plasmids might contribute to the spread of ARGs when digestates are used as fertilizer.

  12. Effects of administration of two growth hormone-releasing hormone plasmids to gilts on sow and litter performance for the subsequent three gestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patricia A; Khan, Amir S; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Pope, Melissa A; Bodles-Brakhop, Angela M; Kern, Douglas R

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether a novel optimized plasmid carrying the porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) wild-type cDNA administered at a lower dose was as effective at eliciting physiologic responses as a commercial GHRH plasmid approved for use in Australia. 134 gilts. Estrus was synchronized and gilts were bred. Pregnant gilts were assigned to 2 treatment groups (40 gilts/group) or 1 untreated control group (24 gilts). Gilts in one of the treatment groups received the commercial GHRH plasmid, whereas gilts in the other treatment group received a novel optimized GHRH plasmid; both plasmids were administered IM in the right hind limb, which was followed by electroporation. Sow and litter performance were monitored for the 3 gestations after treatment. A significant increase in insulin-like growth factor-I concentrations, decrease in perinatal mortality rate, increase in the number of pigs born alive, and increase in the weight and number of pigs weaned were detected for both groups receiving the GHRH-expressing plasmids, compared with values for the control group. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in sow attrition in GHRH-treated females, compared with attrition in the control group, during the 3 gestations after treatment. Both of the GHRH plasmids provided significant benefits for sow performance and baby pig survivability for pregnant and lactating sows and their offspring during the 3 gestations after treatment, compared with results for untreated control gilts. Use of a novel optimized plasmid reduced the effective plasmid dose in these large mammals.

  13. Changing plasmid types responsible for extended spectrum cephalosporin resistance inEscherichia coliO157:H7 in the United States, 1996-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, J P; Pecic, G; Stroika, S; Rickert, R; Whichard, J

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli O157 is a major cause of foodborne illness. Plasmids are genetic elements that mobilize antimicrobial resistance determinants including bla CMY β-lactamases that confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). ESCs are important for treating a variety of infections. IncA/C plasmids are found among diverse sources, including cattle, the principal source of E. coli O157 infections in humans. IncI1 plasmids are common among E. coli and Salmonella from poultry and other avian sources. To broaden our understanding of reservoirs of bla CMY , we determined the types of plasmids carrying bla CMY among E. coli O157. From 1996 to 2009, 3742 E. coli O157 isolates were tested. Eleven (0.29%) were ceftriaxone resistant and had a bla CMY-2 -containing plasmid. All four isolates submitted before 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY encoded on IncA/C plasmids, while all five isolates submitted after 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY carried on IncI1 plasmids. The IncI1 plasmids were ST2, ST20, and ST23. We conclude that cephalosporin resistance among E. coli O157:H7 is due to plasmid-encoded bla CMY genes and that plasmid types appear to have shifted from IncA/C to IncI1. This shift suggests either a change in plasmid type among animal reservoirs or that the organism has expanded into avian reservoirs. More analysis of human, retail meat, and food animal isolates is necessary to broaden our understanding of the antimicrobial resistance determinants of ESC resistance among E. coli O157.

  14. Changing plasmid types responsible for extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance in Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the USA, 1996-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, J P; Pecic, G; Stroika, S; Rickert, R; Whichard, J M

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli O157 is a major cause of food-borne illness. Plasmids are genetic elements that mobilise antimicrobial resistance determinants, including bla CMY β-lactamases that confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs). ESCs are important for treating a variety of infections. IncA/C plasmids are found among diverse sources, including cattle, the principal source of E. coli O157 infections in humans. IncI1 plasmids are common among E. coli and Salmonella from poultry and other avian sources. To broaden our understanding of the reservoirs of bla CMY , the types of plasmids carrying bla CMY among E. coli O157 were determined. From 1996 to 2009, 3742 E. coli O157 isolates were tested. Eleven isolates (0.29%) were ceftriaxone-resistant and had a bla CMY -2-containing plasmid. All four isolates submitted before 2001 as well as a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY encoded on IncA/C plasmids, whilst all five isolates submitted after 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY carried on IncI1 plasmids. The IncI1 plasmids were ST2, ST20 and ST23. We conclude that cephalosporin resistance among E. coli O157:H7 is due to plasmid-encoded bla CMY genes and that plasmid types appear to have shifted from IncA/C to IncI1. This shift suggests either a change in plasmid type among animal reservoirs or that the organism has expanded into avian reservoirs. More analysis of human, retail meat and food animal isolates is necessary to broaden our understanding of the antimicrobial resistance determinants of ESC resistance among E. coli O157. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Factors that affect transfer of the IncI1 β-lactam resistance plasmid pESBL-283 between E. coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Nadine; Otte, Sarah; Jonker, Martijs; Brul, Stanley; ter Kuile, Benno H

    2015-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide presents a major health threat to human health care that results in therapy failure and increasing costs. The transfer of resistance conferring plasmids by conjugation is a major route by which resistance genes disseminate at the intra- and interspecies level. High similarities between resistance genes identified in foodborne and hospital-acquired pathogens suggest transmission of resistance conferring and transferrable mobile elements through the food chain, either as part of intact strains, or through transfer of plasmids from foodborne to human strains. To study the factors that affect the rate of plasmid transfer, the transmission of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid from a foodborne Escherichia coli strain to the β-lactam sensitive E. coli MG1655 strain was documented as a function of simulated environmental factors. The foodborne E. coli isolate used as donor carried a CTX-M-1 harboring IncI1 plasmid that confers resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Cell density, energy availability and growth rate were identified as factors that affect plasmid transfer efficiency. Transfer rates were highest in the absence of the antibiotic, with almost every acceptor cell picking up the plasmid. Raising the antibiotic concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) resulted in reduced transfer rates, but also selected for the plasmid carrying donor and recombinant strains. Based on the mutational pattern of transconjugant cells, a common mechanism is proposed which compensates for fitness costs due to plasmid carriage by reducing other cell functions. Reducing potential fitness costs due to maintenance and expression of the plasmid could contribute to persistence of resistance genes in the environment even without antibiotic pressure. Taken together, the results identify factors that drive the spread and persistence of resistance conferring plasmids in natural isolates and shows how these

  16. Occurrence of Enterobacter hormaechei carrying blaNDM-1 and blaKPC-2 in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Biwei; Feng, Yu; McNally, Alan; Zong, Zhiyong

    2018-02-01

    Three carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of the Enterobacter cloacae complex (ECC) were recovered from different patients in a hospital. All 3 isolates carried 2 carbapenemase genes bla KPC-2 and bla NDM-1 . A study was performed to characterize their relatedness and to investigate possible links among the patients. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the isolates were Enterobacter hormaechei and belonged to ST177 of the ECC. There were 19-142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the isolates, suggesting that the isolates were likely from a central reservoir, which might have existed for some time. bla KPC-2 and bla NDM-1 were carried on 2 different IncF-type plasmids in the isolates. The 3 bla NDM-1 -carrying plasmids were almost identical and were self-transmissible, while the bla KPC-2 -carrying plasmids were only transmissible in the presence of the bla NDM-1 -carrying plasmid. The source of and direct links among them were not identified, suggesting a hospital transmission of a common multidrug resistant strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete Nucleotide Sequences of Two VIM-1-Encoding Plasmids from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Leclercia adecarboxylata Isolates of Czech Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papousek, Ivo; Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Medvecky, Matej; Hrabak, Jaroslav; Dolejska, Monika

    2017-05-01

    Two multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids, carrying the VIM-1-encoding integron In110, were characterized. Plasmid pLec-476cz (311,758 bp), from a Leclercia adecarboxylata isolate, consisted of an IncHI1 backbone, a MDR region, and two accessory elements. Plasmid pKpn-431cz (142,876 bp), from a sequence type 323 (ST323) Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate, comprised IncFII Y -derived and pKPN3-like sequences and a mosaic region. A 40,400-bp sequence of pKpn-431cz was identical to the MDR region of pLec-476cz, indicating the en bloc acquisition of the VIM-1-encoding region from one plasmid by the other. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Characterization of Resistance Genes and Plasmids from Outbreaks and Illness Clusters Caused by Salmonella Resistant to Ceftriaxone in the United States, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, Jason P; Grass, Julian E; Bicknese, Amelia; Taylor, Julia; Friedman, Cindy R; Whichard, Jean M

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella is an important cause of foodborne illness; however, quickly identifying the source of these infections can be difficult, and source identification is a crucial step in preventing additional illnesses. Although most infections are self-limited, invasive salmonellosis may require antimicrobial treatment. Ceftriaxone, an extended-spectrum cephalosporin, is commonly used for treatment of salmonellosis. Previous studies have identified a correlation between the food animal/retail meat source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella and the type of resistance gene and plasmid it carries. In this study, we examined seven outbreaks of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections, caused by serotypes Typhimurium, Newport, Heidelberg, and Infantis. All isolates were positive for a plasmid-encoded bla CMY gene. Plasmid incompatibility typing identified five IncI1 and two IncA/C plasmids. Both outbreaks containing bla CMY -IncA/C plasmids were linked to consumption of cattle products. Three of five outbreaks with bla CMY -IncI1 (ST12) plasmids were linked to a poultry source. The remaining IncI1 outbreaks were associated with ground beef (ST20) and tomatoes (ST12). In addition, we examined isolates from five unsolved clusters of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections and used our plasmid-encoded gene findings to predict the source. Overall, we identified a likely association between the source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella outbreaks and the type of resistance gene/plasmid it carries.

  19. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Plasmid- Encoded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the distribution of plasmid-encoded extended spectrum beta-lacatamases (ESBLs) in Lahore, Pakistan using different phenotypic and molecular methods. Methods: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp were obtained over a period of nineteen months (June 2007 to December 2008). Both were tested ...

  20. Persistence of plasmid DNA in different soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... Every 7 days 1 g of soil was taken, DNA purified from it and then that DNA was used for transformation with the E. coli DH5α competent cells and the results showed that DNA would persist till 35 days and it had transforming ability. Key words: Horizontal gene transfer, plasmid pUC18, persistence, abiotic.

  1. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic...

  2. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and

  3. Optimization of plasmid electrotransformation into Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve electroporation, optical density of bacteria, recovery time and electrical parameter (field strength and capacitance) were optimized using the Taguchi statistical method. ANOVA of obtained data indicated that the optimal conditions of electrotransformation of pET-28a (+) plasmid into Escherichia coli ...

  4. Antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profiles of Aeromonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of Aeromonas hydrophila at commonly used water collection points on the River Njoro and to determine the in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmid profiles of isolates. In total, 126 samples were collected and 36.5% of them were positive for A. hydrophila.

  5. Plasmid Diversity and Horizontal Transfer in Marine Sediment Microbial Communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sobecky, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    .... While plasmid exchange is an important mechanism by which bacterial populations can evolve and adapt, there remains a lack of information regarding the role of horizontal plasmid-mediated transfer...

  6. Reduced Immunogenicity of DNA Vaccine Plasmids in Mixtures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedegah, M; Charoenvit, Y; Minh, L; Belmonte, M; Majam, V. F; Abot, S; Ganeshan, H; Kumar, S; Bacon, D. J; Stowers, A; Narum, D. L; Carucci, D. J; Rogers, W. O

    2004-01-01

    We measured the ability of nine DNA vaccine plasmids encoding candidate malaria vaccine antigens to induce antibodies and interferon-gamma responses when delivered alone or in a mixture containing all nine plasmids...

  7. Plasmid mediated enhancement of uv resistance in Streptococcus faecalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehl, R.; Miller, M.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 38.5-Mdal plasmid of Streptococcus faecalis subdp. zymogenes has been shown to enhance survival following uv irradiation. In addition, the presence of this plasmid increases the mutation frequencies following uv irradiation and enhanced W-reactivation. The data presented indicate that S. faecalis has an inducible error-prone repair system and that the plasmid enhances these repair functions

  8. Characterization of Two Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from the 1960s by Using the MinION Sequencer Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Mónika; Nagy, Tibor; Wilk, Tímea; Farkas, Tibor; Hegyi, Anna; Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2016-11-01

    Two A/C incompatibility group (IncA/C family) plasmids from the 1960s have been sequenced and classified into the A/C 2 type 1 group. R16a and IP40a contain novel antibiotic resistance islands and a complete GIsul2 genomic island not previously found in the family. In the 173.1-kb R16a, the 29.9-kb antibiotic resistance island (ARI) is located in a unique backbone position not utilized by ARIs. ARI R16a consists of Tn1, Tn6020, and Tn6333, harboring the resistance genes bla TEM-1D and aphA1b and a mer module, respectively; a truncated Tn5393 copy; and a gene cluster with unknown function. Plasmid IP40a is 170.4 kb in size and contains a 5.6-kb ARI inserted into the kfrA gene. ARI IP40a carrying bla TEM-1D and aphA1b genes is composed of Tn1 with a Tn6023 insertion. Additionally, IP40a harbors single IS2, IS186, and Tn1000 insertions scattered in the backbone; an IS150 copy in GIsul2; and a complete Tn6333 carrying a mer module at the position of ARI R16a Loss of resistance markers in R16a, IP40a, and R55 was observed during stability tests. Every phenotypic change proved to be the result of recombination events involving mobile elements. Intramolecular transposition of IS copies that generated IP40a derivatives lacking large parts of the backbone could account for the formation of other family members, too. The MinION platform proved to be a valuable tool in bacterial genome sequencing since it generates long reads that span repetitive elements and facilitates full-length plasmid or chromosome assembly. Nanopore technology enables rapid characterization of large, low-copy-number plasmids and their rearrangement products. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Sequence analysis and characterization of rolling-circle replicating plasmid pVCM01 from Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penido, A. F. B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Characterization of cryptic plasmid pVCM01 (accession number JX133088 isolated from Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. Methodology and results: The complete sequence of pVCM01 was obtained. This plasmid possesses 1981 bp, with G+C content of 57% in agreement of the range of Salmonella genomic DNA. pVCM01 has a high degree of similarity to pB and pJ plasmids. It possesses six main open reading frames, only one have a very high degree of amino acid identity with protein involved in the rolling-circle-like replication (RCR. Based on the sequence similarities, pVCM01 plasmid belonged to the pC194/pUB110 rolling-circle replicating plasmid family. The Rep pVCM01 possesses the motifs: FLTLTVRN, HPHFHTL, SGDGYVKHERW, which were present in all Rep proteins. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The small size of pVCM01 plasmid and its stability in E. coli cells, make it an attractive candidate to develop new vectors, such as cloning and/or expression vector.

  10. Clostridium botulinum group III: a group with dual identity shaped by plasmids, phages and mobile elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håfström Therese

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium botulinum strains can be divided into four physiological groups that are sufficiently diverged to be considered as separate species. Here we present the first complete genome of a C. botulinum strain from physiological group III, causing animal botulism. We also compare the sequence to three new draft genomes from the same physiological group. Results The 2.77 Mb chromosome was highly conserved between the isolates and also closely related to that of C. novyi. However, the sequence was very different from the human C. botulinum group genomes. Replication-directed translocations were rare and conservation of synteny was high. The largest difference between C. botulinum group III isolates occurred within their surprisingly large plasmidomes and in the pattern of mobile elements insertions. Five plasmids, constituting 13.5% of the total genetic material, were present in the completed genome. Interestingly, the set of plasmids differed compared to other isolates. The largest plasmid, the botulinum-neurotoxin carrying prophage, was conserved at a level similar to that of the chromosome while the medium-sized plasmids seemed to be undergoing faster genetic drift. These plasmids also contained more mobile elements than other replicons. Several toxins and resistance genes were identified, many of which were located on the plasmids. Conclusions The completion of the genome of C. botulinum group III has revealed it to be a genome with dual identity. It belongs to the pathogenic species C. botulinum, but as a genotypic species it should also include C. novyi and C. haemolyticum. The genotypic species share a conserved chromosomal core that can be transformed into various pathogenic variants by modulation of the highly plastic plasmidome.

  11. Clostridium botulinum group III: a group with dual identity shaped by plasmids, phages and mobile elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, Hanna; Håfström, Therese; Westerberg, Josefina; Segerman, Bo

    2011-04-12

    Clostridium botulinum strains can be divided into four physiological groups that are sufficiently diverged to be considered as separate species. Here we present the first complete genome of a C. botulinum strain from physiological group III, causing animal botulism. We also compare the sequence to three new draft genomes from the same physiological group. The 2.77 Mb chromosome was highly conserved between the isolates and also closely related to that of C. novyi. However, the sequence was very different from the human C. botulinum group genomes. Replication-directed translocations were rare and conservation of synteny was high. The largest difference between C. botulinum group III isolates occurred within their surprisingly large plasmidomes and in the pattern of mobile elements insertions. Five plasmids, constituting 13.5% of the total genetic material, were present in the completed genome. Interestingly, the set of plasmids differed compared to other isolates. The largest plasmid, the botulinum-neurotoxin carrying prophage, was conserved at a level similar to that of the chromosome while the medium-sized plasmids seemed to be undergoing faster genetic drift. These plasmids also contained more mobile elements than other replicons. Several toxins and resistance genes were identified, many of which were located on the plasmids. The completion of the genome of C. botulinum group III has revealed it to be a genome with dual identity. It belongs to the pathogenic species C. botulinum, but as a genotypic species it should also include C. novyi and C. haemolyticum. The genotypic species share a conserved chromosomal core that can be transformed into various pathogenic variants by modulation of the highly plastic plasmidome.

  12. Plasmid Flux in Escherichia coli ST131 Sublineages, Analyzed by Plasmid Constellation Network (PLACNET), a New Method for Plasmid Reconstruction from Whole Genome Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ–proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages. PMID:25522143

  13. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET, a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val F Lanza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage, comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC, comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages.

  14. Deciphering conjugative plasmid permissiveness in wastewater microbiomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel; Milani, Stefan Morberg

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are designed to robustly treat polluted water. They are characterized by ceaseless flows of organic, chemical and microbial matter, followed by treatment steps before environmental release. WWTPs are hotspots of horizontal gene transfer between bacteria via...... conjugative plasmids, leading to dissemination of potentially hazardous genetic material such as antimicrobial resistance genes (AMRGs). While current focus is on the threat of AMRGs spreading and their environmental maintenance, conjugative plasmid transfer dynamics within and between bacterial communities...... still remains largely uncharted. Furthermore, current in vitro methods used to assess conjugation in complex microbiomes do not include in situ behaviours of recipient cells, resulting in partial understanding of transfers. We investigated the in vitro conjugation capacities of WWTP microbiomes from...

  15. Remarkable Diversity of Escherichia coli Carrying mcr-1 from Hospital Sewage with the Identification of Two New mcr-1 Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasmid-borne colistin-resistant gene mcr-1 has rapidly become a worldwide public health concern. This study aims to determine the host bacterial strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts of mcr-1 in hospital sewage. A 1-ml hospital sewage sample was cultured. Colistin-resistant bacterial colonies were selected on agar plates and were subjected to whole genome sequencing and subsequent analysis. The transfer of mcr-1 between bacterial strains was tested using conjugation. New variants of mcr-1 were cloned to test the impact of variations on the function of mcr-1. Plasmids carrying mcr-1 were retrieved from GenBank for comparison based on concatenated backbone genes. In the sewage sample, we observed that mcr-1 was located in various genetic contexts on the chromosome, or plasmids of four different replicon types (IncHI2, IncI2, IncP, and IncX4, in Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera spp. and seven Escherichia coli strains of six different sequence types (ST10, ST34, ST48, ST1196, ST7086, and ST7087. We also identified two new variants of mcr-1, mcr-1.4 and mcr-1.7, both of which encode an amino acid variation from mcr-1. mcr-1-carrying IncX4 plasmids, which have a global distribution across the Enterobacteriaceae, are the result of global dissemination of a single common plasmid, while IncI2 mcr-1 plasmids appear to acquire mcr-1 in multiple events. In conclusion, the unprecedented remarkable diversity of species, strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts carrying mcr-1 present in a single sewage sample from a single healthcare site highlights the continued evolution and dynamic transmission of mcr-1 in healthcare-associated environments.

  16. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol40 %) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  17. Direct identification of antibiotic resistance genes on single plasmid molecules using CRISPR/Cas9 in combination with optical DNA mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vilhelm; Rajer, Fredrika; Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Sandegren, Linus; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively involved in the rapid global spread of antibiotic resistance. We here present an assay, based on optical DNA mapping of single plasmids in nanofluidic channels, which provides detailed information about the plasmids present in a bacterial isolate. In a single experiment, we obtain the number of different plasmids in the sample, the size of each plasmid, an optical barcode that can be used to identify and trace the plasmid of interest and information about which plasmid that carries a specific resistance gene. Gene identification is done using CRISPR/Cas9 loaded with a guide-RNA (gRNA) complementary to the gene of interest that linearizes the circular plasmids at a specific location that is identified using the optical DNA maps. We demonstrate the principle on clinically relevant extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing isolates. We discuss how the gRNA sequence can be varied to obtain the desired information. The gRNA can either be very specific to identify a homogeneous group of genes or general to detect several groups of genes at the same time. Finally, we demonstrate an example where we use a combination of two gRNA sequences to identify carbapenemase-encoding genes in two previously not characterized clinical bacterial samples.

  18. The sudden dominance of blaCTX-M harbouring plasmids in Shigella spp. Circulating in Southern Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhu Thi Khanh Nguyen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid mediated antimicrobial resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae is a global problem. The rise of CTX-M class extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs has been well documented in industrialized countries. Vietnam is representative of a typical transitional middle income country where the spectrum of infectious diseases combined with the spread of drug resistance is shifting and bringing new healthcare challenges.We collected hospital admission data from the pediatric population attending the hospital for tropical diseases in Ho Chi Minh City with Shigella infections. Organisms were cultured from all enrolled patients and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Those that were ESBL positive were subjected to further investigation. These investigations included PCR amplification for common ESBL genes, plasmid investigation, conjugation, microarray hybridization and DNA sequencing of a bla(CTX-M encoding plasmid.We show that two different bla(CTX-M genes are circulating in this bacterial population in this location. Sequence of one of the ESBL plasmids shows that rather than the gene being integrated into a preexisting MDR plasmid, the bla(CTX-M gene is located on relatively simple conjugative plasmid. The sequenced plasmid (pEG356 carried the bla(CTX-M-24 gene on an ISEcp1 element and demonstrated considerable sequence homology with other IncFI plasmids.The rapid dissemination, spread of antimicrobial resistance and changing population of Shigella spp. concurrent with economic growth are pertinent to many other countries undergoing similar development. Third generation cephalosporins are commonly used empiric antibiotics in Ho Chi Minh City. We recommend that these agents should not be considered for therapy of dysentery in this setting.

  19. Proposed model for the high rate of rearrangement and rapid migration observed in some IncA/C plasmid lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinersmann, R J; Lindsey, R L; Bono, J L; Smith, T P; Oakley, B B

    2013-08-01

    IncA/C plasmids are a class of plasmids from the Enterobacteriaceae that are relatively large (49 to >180 kbp), that are readily transferred by conjugation, and that carry multiple antimicrobial resistance genes. Reconstruction of the phylogeny of these plasmids has been difficult because of the high rate of remodeling by recombination-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT). We hypothesized that evaluation of nucleotide polymorphisms relative to the rate of HGT would help to develop a clock to show whether anthropic practices have had significant influences on the lineages of the plasmid. A system was developed to rapidly sequence up to 191 known open reading frames from each of 39 recently isolated IncA/C plasmids from a diverse panel of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli strains. With these data plus sequences from GenBank, we were able to distinguish six distinct lineages that had extremely low numbers of polymorphisms within each lineage, especially among the largest group designated as group 1. Two regions, each about half the plasmid in size, could be distinguished with a separate lineal pattern. The distribution of group 1 showed that it has migrated extremely rapidly with fewer polymorphisms than can be expected in 2,000 years. Remodeling by frequent HGT was evident, with a pattern that appeared to have the highest rate just upstream of the putative conjugation origin of transfer (oriT). It seems likely that when an IncA/C plasmid is transferred by conjugation there is an opportunity for plasmid remodeling adjacent to the oriT, which was also adjacent to a multiple antimicrobial resistance gene cassette.

  20. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Xylella fastidiosa Is Dependent ontraandtrbOperon Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Van Horn, Christopher R

    2017-11-01

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa , but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb , putatively encoding a conjugative type IV secretion system, are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strain M23 ( X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa ) or Dixon ( X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex ) as the donor strain and Temecula ( X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa ) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa , possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts. IMPORTANCE Xylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen worldwide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. The emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa , or host switching of existing strains, is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time, compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT, adaptation, and disease emergence

  1. Microevolutionary Events Involving Narrow Host Plasmids Influences Local Fixation of Vancomycin-Resistance in Enterococcus Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ana R.; Novais, Carla; Tedim, Ana P.; Francia, María Victoria; Baquero, Fernando; Peixe, Luísa; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistance in enterococci (VRE) is associated with isolates within ST18, ST17, ST78 Enterococcus faecium (Efm) and ST6 Enterococcus faecalis (Efs) human adapted lineages. Despite of its global spread, vancomycin resistance rates in enterococcal populations greatly vary temporally and geographically. Portugal is one of the European countries where Tn1546 (vanA) is consistently found in a variety of environments. A comprehensive multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE isolates (75 Efm and 29 Efs) from Portuguese hospitals and aquatic surroundings (1996–2008) was performed to clarify the local dynamics of VRE. Clonal relatedness was established by PFGE and MLST while plasmid characterization comprised the analysis of known relaxases, rep initiator proteins and toxin-antitoxin systems (TA) by PCR-based typing schemes, RFLP comparison, hybridization and sequencing. Tn1546 variants were characterized by PCR overlapping/sequencing. Intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of Efm ST18, ST132 and ST280 and Efs ST6 clones, carrying rolling-circle (pEFNP1/pRI1) and theta-replicating (pCIZ2-like, Inc18, pHTβ-like, two pRUM-variants, pLG1-like, and pheromone-responsive) plasmids was documented. Tn1546 variants, mostly containing ISEf1 or IS1216, were located on plasmids (30–150 kb) with a high degree of mosaicism and heterogeneous RFLP patterns that seem to have resulted from the interplay between broad host Inc18 plasmids (pIP501, pRE25, pEF1), and narrow host RepA_N plasmids (pRUM, pAD1-like). TAs of Inc18 (ω-ε-ζ) and pRUM (Axe-Txe) plasmids were infrequently detected. Some plasmid chimeras were persistently recovered over years from different clonal lineages. This work represents the first multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE, revealing a frequent recombinatorial diversification of a limited number of interacting clonal backgrounds, plasmids and transposons at local scale. These interactions provide a continuous process of parapatric clonalization driving a full

  2. Construction and identification of helper plasmids of newcastle disease virus Italien strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen REN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Newcastle disease virus (NDV is a naturally oncolytic virus that has been shown to be safe and effective for cancer therapy. NDV virions possess a non-segmented negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome which contains six genes encoding the nucleocapsid protein (NP, phosphoprotein (P, large polymerase protein (L, matrix protein, fusion protein, and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase. The ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex consisting of the genomic RNA and the three proteins NP, P, and L are the active template for transcription and replication of the viral genome. The purpose of this study was to construct the expression plasmids of NP, P and L genes of NDV Italien strain in which phage T7 promoter was a transcription promoter for the aim of generation of recombinant NDV. Methods NP, P and L genes were cloned from the genome RNA of NDV Italien followed by introduction into the downstream of T7 promoter and internal ribosome entry sites to construct the expression plasmids of NP, P and L, respectively. Expression of exogenous gene in BSR-T7/5 cells which constitutively express phage T7 RNA polymerase and transfected with plasmids of NP and P was detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The function of NP, P and L proteins expressed by constructed plasmids to facilitate the genomic RNA to form RNP complex was tested using minigenome of NDV Italien carrying firefly luciferase as a reporter gene. Results The expression plasmids of NP, P and L genes were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Using the indirect immunofluorescence assay, we detected the expression of viral NP and P proteins in BSR-T7/5 cells. When the helper plasmids were co-transfected with NDV minigenome plasmid, the expression of firefly luciferase was more significant compared with the control group (P < 0.001. Conclusion The helper plasmids of NDV Italien strain using T7 promoter as a transcription promoter has been constructed successfully, and it provides a basis for the

  3. Plasmid Complement of Lactococcus lactis NCDO712 Reveals a Novel Pilus Gene Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazanova, Mariya; Beerthuyzen, Marke; Siezen, Roland; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Marcela M; de Jong, Anne; van der Meulen, Sjoerd; Kok, Jan; Bachmann, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis MG1363 is an important gram-positive model organism. It is a plasmid-free and phage-cured derivative of strain NCDO712. Plasmid-cured strains facilitate studies on molecular biological aspects, but many properties which make L. lactis an important organism in the dairy industry are plasmid encoded. We sequenced the total DNA of strain NCDO712 and, contrary to earlier reports, revealed that the strain carries 6 rather than 5 plasmids. A new 50-kb plasmid, designated pNZ712, encodes functional nisin immunity (nisCIP) and copper resistance (lcoRSABC). The copper resistance could be used as a marker for the conjugation of pNZ712 to L. lactis MG1614. A genome comparison with the plasmid cured daughter strain MG1363 showed that the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms that accumulated in the laboratory since the strains diverted more than 30 years ago is limited to 11 of which only 5 lead to amino acid changes. The 16-kb plasmid pSH74 was found to contain a novel 8-kb pilus gene cluster spaCB-spaA-srtC1-srtC2, which is predicted to encode a pilin tip protein SpaC, a pilus basal subunit SpaB, and a pilus backbone protein SpaA. The sortases SrtC1/SrtC2 are most likely involved in pilus polymerization while the chromosomally encoded SrtA could act to anchor the pilus to peptidoglycan in the cell wall. Overexpression of the pilus gene cluster from a multi-copy plasmid in L. lactis MG1363 resulted in cell chaining, aggregation, rapid sedimentation and increased conjugation efficiency of the cells. Electron microscopy showed that the over-expression of the pilus gene cluster leads to appendices on the cell surfaces. A deletion of the gene encoding the putative basal protein spaB, by truncating spaCB, led to more pilus-like structures on the cell surface, but cell aggregation and cell chaining were no longer observed. This is consistent with the prediction that spaB is involved in the anchoring of the pili to the cell.

  4. Persistence of a pKPN3-like CTX-M-15-encoding IncFIIK plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumonia ST17 host during two years of intestinal colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iren Høyland Löhr

    Full Text Available To characterize the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST17 strain, responsible for an outbreak at a Norwegian neonatal intensive care unit and subsequent colonization of affected children for up to two years. To identify plasmid-mediated features relevant for the outbreak dynamics, and to investigate the plasmids capability of horizontal transfer, its segregational stability and plasmid-mediated fitness costs.Plasmid profiling was performed by S1-nuclease PFGE, PCR-based replicon typing and Southern blot-hybridization. The complete sequence of the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid was obtained by 454 sequencing. Plasmid self-transferability was investigated by broth- and filter mating, segregational stability was explored by serial passage, and plasmid-conferred fitness costs were examined in pairwise head-to-head competitions and by growth rate comparisons.CTX-M-15 was encoded by a ~180 kb IncFIIK plasmid in K. pneumoniae ST17. S1-nuclease PFGE profiles of the first and the last CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae isolates, recovered from the four children colonized the longest, suggested that the plasmid was stably maintained during intestinal carriage of up to two years. The DNA sequence of the pKPN3-like plasmid, pKp848CTX, uncovered a Tn3-like antibiotic resistance region and multiple heavy metal- and thermoresistance determinants. Plasmid pKp848CTX could not be transferred to Escherichia coli in vitro and we found no evidence to support horizontal plasmid transfer in vivo. Segregational plasmid loss ranging from 0.83% to 17.5% was demonstrated in evolved populations in vitro, but only minor fitness costs were associated with plasmid-carriage.Plasmid pKp848CTX encodes phenotypic traits, which may have had an impact on the fitness and survival of the K. pneumoniae ST17 strain in the outbreak setting. The antibiotic resistance plasmid pKp848CTX was stably maintained during two years of intestinal colonization, conferring negligible

  5. CARTOGRAPHIE DU PLASMIDE pSU100, PLASMIDE CRYPTIQUE DE LACTOBACILLUS CASEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F BENSALAH

    2003-06-01

    Ce plasmide appelé pSU100 a été cloné dans le vecteur de transformation pUC18 au site EcoRI chez E. coli JM103. Les profils électrophorétiques de restriction obtenus par des digestions simples, doubles et triples sous l’action de 33 endonucléases, ont contribué à l’élaboration d’une carte de restriction de ce plasmide. Cinq sites uniques ont été identifiés, ainsi que d’autres sites doubles et multiples. Une étude préliminaire du rôle physiologique de ce plasmide a permis de déceler une résistance à la kanamycine.

  6. Generation of Footprint-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Using Episomal Plasmid Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Sun, Jane; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have provided novel insights into the etiology of disease and are set to transform regenerative medicine and drug screening over the next decade. The generation of human iPSCs free of a genetic footprint of the reprogramming process is crucial for the realization of these potential uses. Here we describe in detail the generation of human iPSC from control and disease-carrying individuals' fibroblasts using episomal plasmids.

  7. Comparison of Gene Delivery Methods for Transformation of Robinia pseudoacacia L.by Ti-plasmid

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Chen; Koishiro, Gyokusen; Akira, Saito; Department of Forestry, Faculty of Agiculture, Kyushu University; Department of Forestry, Faculty of Agiculture, Kyushu University; Department of Forestry, Faculty of Agiculture, Kyushu University

    2000-01-01

    The bjnary vector plasmid plG121-Hm carrying the chimeric neomycin phosphotransferase (npt II),β-glucuronidase (gusA) andhygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) genes was delivered into Robinia pseudoacacia L. callus using the Agrobacterium tuntefaciens-mediated transformation method and particle gun transformation method. It was determined that adding 10 mg/L of acetosyringone to Agrobacterium infection medium and callus-Agrobacterium co-culture medium could increase Agrobacterium-mediated trans...

  8. Exponential Megapriming PCR (EMP) Cloning—Seamless DNA Insertion into Any Target Plasmid without Sequence Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts. PMID:23300917

  9. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  10. Construction of an artificial recombinant bicistronic plasmid DNA vaccine against porcine rotavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Tingting Cui; Jun Xiong; Yongzhi Wang; Xintian Wen; Xiaobo Huang; Yong Huang; Xiaoping Ma; Zhongkai Hu; Qin Zhao; Sanjie Cao

    2013-01-01

    The attenuated Salmonella typhimurium χ4550 strain was used to harbour a reconstructed bicistronic DNA vaccine against porcine rotavirus, which carried the rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) and VP7 genes simultaneously. Using a balanced lethal system, the kanamycin resistance gene of expressing eukaryotic plasmids pVAX1 and pVAXD were replaced by the aspartate β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene. The NSP4 cleavage product (259–525) of rotavirus OSU strain and VP7 full-lengt...

  11. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Xylella fastidiosa Is Dependent on tra and trb Operon Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Burbank, Lindsey P.; Van Horn, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative type IV secretion system, are foun...

  12. Production of plasmid-encoding NDM-1 in clinical Raoultella ornithinolytica and Leclercia adecarboxylata from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng eZhou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Raoultella ornithinolytica YNKP001 and Leclercia adecarboxylata P10164, harboring conjugative plasmids pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM with determination of complete nucleotide sequences, respectively, were isolated from two different Chinese patients. Production of NDM-1 enzyme by these plasmids accounts for carbapenem resistance of these two strains. This is the first report of blaNDM in L. adecarboxylata and the third report of this gene in R. ornithinolytica. pYNKP001-NDM is very similar to the IncN2 NDM-1-encoding plasmids pTR3, pNDM-ECS01 and p271A, while pP10164-NDM is similar to the IncFIIY blaNDM-1-carrying plasmid pKOX_NDM1. The blaNDM-1 genes of pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM are embedded in Tn125-like elements, which represent two distinct truncated versions of the prototype NDM-1-encoding Tn125 as observed in pNDM-BJ01. Flanking of these two Tn125-like elements by miniature inverted repeat element (MITE or its remnant denotes MITE felicitates transposition and mobilization of blaNDM-1 gene contexts.

  13. Production of plasmid-encoding NDM-1 in clinical Raoultella ornithinolytica and Leclercia adecarboxylata from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fengjun; Yin, Zhe; Feng, Jiao; Qiu, Yefeng; Zhang, Defu; Luo, Wenbo; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Xia, Peiyuan; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica YNKP001 and Leclercia adecarboxylata P10164, which harbor conjugative plasmids pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM, respectively, were isolated from two different Chinese patients, and their complete nucleotide sequences were determined. Production of NDM-1 enzyme by these plasmids accounts for the carbapenem resistance of these two strains. This is the first report of bla NDM in L. adecarboxylata and third report of this gene in R. ornithinolytica. pYNKP001-NDM is very similar to the IncN2 NDM-1-encoding plasmids pTR3, pNDM-ECS01, and p271A, whereas pP10164-NDM is similar to the IncFIIY bla NDM-1-carrying plasmid pKOX_NDM1. The bla NDM-1 genes of pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM are embedded in Tn125-like elements, which represent two distinct truncated versions of the NDM-1-encoding Tn125 prototype observed in pNDM-BJ01. Flanking of these two Tn125-like elements by miniature inverted repeat element (MITE) or its remnant indicates that MITE facilitates transposition and mobilization of bla NDM-1 gene contexts.

  14. The Plasmid Complement of Lactococcus lactis UC509.9 Encodes Multiple Bacteriophage Resistance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Mahony, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains are used globally for the production of fermented dairy products, particularly hard cheeses. Believed to be of plant origin, L. lactis strains that are used as starter cultures have undergone extensive adaptation to the dairy environment, partially through the acquisition of extrachromosomal DNA in the form of plasmids that specify technologically important phenotypic traits. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the eight plasmids of L. lactis UC509.9, an Irish dairy starter strain. Key industrial phenotypes were mapped, and genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids were identified. Four distinct, plasmid-borne bacteriophage resistance systems were identified, including two abortive infection systems, AbiB and AbiD1, thereby supporting the observed phage resistance of L. lactis UC509.9. AbiB escape mutants were generated for phage sk1, which were found to carry mutations in orf6, which encodes the major capsid protein of this phage. PMID:24814781

  15. A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Brent S.; Ly, Pek Man; Irwin, Joshua N.; Pukatzki, Stefan; Feldman, Mario F.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the most troublesome and least studied multidrug-resistant superbugs, are increasing at alarming rates. A. baumannii encodes a type VI secretion system (T6SS), an antibacterial apparatus of Gram-negative bacteria used to kill competitors. Expression of the T6SS varies among different strains of A. baumannii, for which the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that several multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii harbor a large, self-transmissible resistance plasmid that carries the negative regulators for T6SS. T6SS activity is silenced in plasmid-containing, antibiotic-resistant cells, while part of the population undergoes frequent plasmid loss and activation of the T6SS. This activation results in T6SS-mediated killing of competing bacteria but renders A. baumannii susceptible to antibiotics. Our data show that a plasmid that has evolved to harbor antibiotic resistance genes plays a role in the differentiation of cells specialized in the elimination of competing bacteria. PMID:26170289

  16. Yeast transformation mediated by Agrobacterium strains harboring an Ri plasmid: comparative study between GALLS of an Ri plasmid and virE of a Ti plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sato, Yukari; Momota, Naoto; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2012-07-01

    Agrobacterium strains containing a Ti plasmid can transfer T-DNA not only to plants but also to fungi, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no Agrobacterium strain harboring an Ri plasmid has been evaluated in fungal transformation. Some Ri plasmids have GALLS , instead of virE1 and virE2. GALLS protein can functionally substitute in plant transformation for a structurally different protein VirE2. In this study, we compared the yeast transformation ability among Agrobacterium donors: a strain containing a Ti plasmid, strains harboring either an agropine-type or a mikimopine-type Ri plasmid, and a strain having a modified Ri plasmid supplemented with a Ti plasmid type virE operon. Agrobacterium strains possessing GALLS transformed yeast cells far less efficiently than the strain containing virE operon. Production of GALLS in recipient yeast cells improved the yeast transformation mediated by an Agrobacterium strain lacking neither GALLS nor virE operon. A reporter assay to detect mobilization of the proteins fused with Cre recombinase revealed that VirE2 protein is much more abundant in yeast cells than GALLS. Based on these results, we concluded that the low yeast transformability mediated by Agrobacterium strains having the Ri plasmid is because of low amount of mobilized GALLS in yeast cells. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Deletion mutants of region E1 a of AD12 E1 plasmids: Effect on oncogenic transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.L.; Jochemsen, A.G.; Bernards, R.A.; Schrier, P.I.; Ormondt, H. van; Eb, A.J. van der

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids containing the El region of Ad12 DNA can transform certain rodent cells into oncogenic cells. To study the role of the Ela subregion in the process of oncogenic transformation, Ad12 region El mutants carrying deletions in the Ela region were constructed. Deletion mutants pR7 and pR8 affect

  18. Transformation of Haemophilus influenzae by plasmid RSF0885

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.; McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    Plasmid RSF0885, which conferred ampicillin resistance, transformed competent Haemophilus influenzae cells with low efficiency (maximun, less than 0.01%). As judged by competition experiments and uptake of radioactivity, plasmid RSF0885 deoxyribonucleic acid was taken up into competent H. influenzae cells several orders of magnitude less efficiently than H. influenzae chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid. Plasmid RSF0885 transformed cells with even lower efficiency than could be accounted for by the low uptake. Transformation was not affected by rec-1 and rec-2 mutations in the recipient, and strains cured of the plasmid did not show increased transformation. Plasmid molecules cut once with a restriction enzyme that made blunt ends did not transform. Transformation was favored by the closed circular form of the plasmid

  19. Construction of a eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ben-yan; Chen, Xiang-ming; Tang, Min; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    To construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin. The recombinant plasmid pGEMEX-1-Humanin was digested with restriction endonucleases BamH I and Hind III and the Humanin gene fragments, about 100 bp length, were obtained. Then the Humanin gene fragments were inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(-) and the recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin were identified by sequencing. Recombinant plasmid DNA successfully produced a band which had the same size as that of the Humanin positive control. The sequence of recombinant plasmids accorded with the Humnain gene sequence. A eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin was successfully constructed.

  20. Construction of a eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ben-yan; Chen, Xiang-ming; Tang, Min; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pGEMEX-1-Humanin was digested with restriction endonucleases BamH I and Hind III and the Humanin gene fragments, about 100 bp length, were obtained. Then the Humanin gene fragments were inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(-) and the recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin were identified by sequencing. Results: Recombinant plasmid DNA successfully produced a band which had the same size as that of the Humanin positive control. The sequence of recombinant plasmids accorded with the Humnain gene sequence. Conclusions: A eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin was successfully constructed. PMID:15593385

  1. Drug resistance plasmids in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus reuteri.

    OpenAIRE

    Vescovo, M; Morelli, L; Bottazzi, V

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen strains of Lactobacillus reuteri and 20 strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus were tested for resistance to 22 antibiotics by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Evidence suggesting linkage of these resistances to plasmids was obtained by "curing" experiments with acridine dyes and high growth temperatures. Examination of plasmid patterns of agarose gel electrophoresis provided further evidence of loss in plasmid DNA under curing conditions in some of the strains examined.

  2. Large linear plasmids of Borrelia species that cause relapsing fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shelley Campeau; Porcella, Stephen F; Raffel, Sandra J; Schwan, Tom G; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-08-01

    Borrelia species of relapsing fever (RF) and Lyme disease (LD) lineages have linear chromosomes and both linear and circular plasmids. Unique to RF species, and little characterized to date, are large linear plasmids of ∼160 kb, or ∼10% of the genome. By a combination of Sanger and next-generation methods, we determined the sequences of large linear plasmids of two New World species: Borrelia hermsii, to completion of its 174-kb length, and B. turicatae, partially to 114 kb of its 150 kb. These sequences were then compared to corresponding sequences of the Old World species B. duttonii and B. recurrentis and to plasmid sequences of LD Borrelia species. The large plasmids were largely colinear, except for their left ends, about 27 kb of which was inverted in New World species. Approximately 60% of the B. hermsii lp174 plasmid sequence was repetitive for 6 types of sequence, and half of its open reading frames encoded hypothetical proteins not discernibly similar to proteins in the database. The central ∼25 kb of all 4 linear plasmids was syntenic for orthologous genes for plasmid maintenance or partitioning in Borrelia species. Of all the sequenced linear and circular plasmids in Borrelia species, the large plasmid's putative partition/replication genes were most similar to those of the 54-kb linear plasmids of LD species. Further evidence for shared ancestry was the observation that two of the hypothetical proteins were predicted to be structurally similar to the LD species' CspA proteins, which are encoded on the 54-kb plasmids.

  3. Homologous plasmid recombination is elevated in immortally transformed cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Finn, G K; Kurz, B W; Cheng, R Z; Shmookler Reis, R J

    1989-01-01

    The levels of intramolecular plasmid recombination, following transfection of a plasmid substrate for homologous recombination into normal and immortally transformed cells, have been examined by two independent assays. In the first assay, recovered plasmid was tested for DNA rearrangements which regenerate a functional neomycin resistance gene from two overlapping fragments. Following transformation of bacteria, frequencies of recombinationlike events were determined from the ratio of neomyci...

  4. Genes from plasmid pKM101 in Haemophilus influenzae: separation of functions of mucA and mucB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae, normally not mutable by UV, became UV mutable with a recombinant plasmid insertion. A 7.8-kilobase-pair (kbp) fragment of the plasmid pKM101 containing the mucA and mucB genes was ligated to the shuttle vector pDM2, and a Rec- strain of H. influenzae was transformed with the ligated mixture. All of the transformants, unlike the parent Rec- strain, were resistant to UV, could carry out postreplication repair and Weigle reactivation, showed greatly increased spontaneous mutation, and contained a plasmid carrying an insert of only 1.2 rather than 7.8 kbp. This plasmid in a umuC mutant strain of Escherichia coli complemented a pKM101 derivative lacking mucA function but with an intact mucB gene, although there was no complementation with a mucA+ mucB- plasmid, suggesting that the newly constructed plasmid coded for the mucA protein; this is in accord with the restriction analysis and hybridization between the plasmid and a probe containing all of the mucA gene but only a small fraction of mucB. When one of the H. influenzae Rec- transformants lost the plasmid, the resistance to UV was retained but the high spontaneous mutation and UV mutability were not. The fact that there was hybridization between the chromosome of the cured strain and a probe containing both muc genes but none when almost no mucB was present suggested that at least part of the mucB gene had been integrated into the Rec- chromosome. Five different postreplication repair-proficient strains became UV mutable and had high spontaneous mutation rates caused by the putative mucA plasmid, indicating that these strains already possessed a chromosomal equivalent of the mucB gene

  5. Construction of a eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin*

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ben-yan; Chen, Xiang-ming; Tang, Min; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pGEMEX-1-Humanin was digested with restriction endonucleases BamH I and Hind III and the Humanin gene fragments, about 100 bp length, were obtained. Then the Humanin gene fragments were inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(-) and the recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin were identified by sequencing. Results: Recombinant plasmid DNA successfully produced a band whic...

  6. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  7. Dealing with the evolutionary downside of CRISPR immunity: bacteria and beneficial plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Jiang

    Full Text Available The immune systems that protect organisms from infectious agents invariably have a cost for the host. In bacteria and archaea CRISPR-Cas loci can serve as adaptive immune systems that protect these microbes from infectiously transmitted DNAs. When those DNAs are borne by lytic viruses (phages, this protection can provide a considerable advantage. CRISPR-Cas immunity can also prevent cells from acquiring plasmids and free DNA bearing genes that increase their fitness. Here, we use a combination of experiments and mathematical-computer simulation models to explore this downside of CRISPR-Cas immunity and its implications for the maintenance of CRISPR-Cas loci in microbial populations. We analyzed the conjugational transfer of the staphylococcal plasmid pG0400 into Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62a recipients that bear a CRISPR-Cas locus targeting this plasmid. Contrary to what is anticipated for lytic phages, which evade CRISPR by mutations in the target region, the evasion of CRISPR immunity by plasmids occurs at the level of the host through loss of functional CRISPR-Cas immunity. The results of our experiments and models indicate that more than 10(-4 of the cells in CRISPR-Cas positive populations are defective or deleted for the CRISPR-Cas region and thereby able to receive and carry the plasmid. Most intriguingly, the loss of CRISPR function even by large deletions can have little or no fitness cost in vitro. These theoretical and experimental results can account for the considerable variation in the existence, number and function of CRISPR-Cas loci within and between bacterial species. We postulate that as a consequence of the opposing positive and negative selection for immunity, CRISPR-Cas systems are in a continuous state of flux. They are lost when they bear immunity to laterally transferred beneficial genes, re-acquired by horizontal gene transfer, and ascend in environments where phage are a major source of mortality.

  8. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus from a fatal case of pneumonia harboring bla(NDM-1) on a widely distributed plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Yang, Chaojie; Xie, Jing; Liu, Nan; Wang, Houzhao; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yong; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2015-03-18

    We have recovered one bla(NDM-1)-harboring bacterial strain, designated as XM1570, from a sputum sample obtained from a fatal case of pneumonia in China. Biochemical profiling, 16S rRNA sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed. Conjugation experiments were conducted to determine transmissibility of resistance. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing were performed to identify strain-specific features. The isolate XM1570 was identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Whole genome sequencing identified two plasmids, pXM1 and pXM2. Comparative analysis showed >99% similarity between XM1570 and A. calcoaceticus PHEA-2. Plasmid pXM1 carried the carbapenemase gene bla(NDM-1) and displayed high homology with previously described plasmids isolated from different Acinetobacter spp., which were collected from human or livestock distributed in China and worldwide. The bla(NDM-1) gene was located on this conjugative plasmid in a transposon-like region flanked by two copies of the insertion sequence ISAba125; and resistance to all tested β-lactams was observed. Transferability of resistance from pXM1 to the transconjugants was identified. Plasmid pXM2 had an insertion sequence ISAba125 and a -35 region of the bla NDM-1 gene promoter but the bla NDM-1 gene was not present. A chromosomally located carbapenemase-encoding gene bla OXA-75 was detected; however, this gene was interrupted by an insertion sequence ISAba22 belonging to IS3 family. Location of bla(NDM-1) on different self-transmissible plasmids could facilitate geographically broad dissemination and host range expansion of the bla(NDM-1) gene via horizontal gene transfer. Our findings of this normally environmental species A. calcoaceticus XM1570 further underline the significant clinical challenge and the essential need for surveillance including molecular methods and plasmid analyses.

  9. Nasty Viruses, Costly Plasmids, Population Dynamics, and the Conditions for Establishing and Maintaining CRISPR-Mediated Adaptive Immunity in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) abound in the genomes of almost all archaebacteria and nearly half the eubacteria sequenced. Through a genetic interference mechanism, bacteria with CRISPR regions carrying copies of the DNA of previously encountered phage and plasmids abort the replication of phage and plasmids with these sequences. Thus it would seem that protection against infecting phage and plasmids is the selection pressure responsible for establishing and maintaining CRISPR in bacterial populations. But is it? To address this question and provide a framework and hypotheses for the experimental study of the ecology and evolution of CRISPR, I use mathematical models of the population dynamics of CRISPR-encoding bacteria with lytic phage and conjugative plasmids. The results of the numerical (computer simulation) analysis of the properties of these models with parameters in the ranges estimated for Escherichia coli and its phage and conjugative plasmids indicate: (1) In the presence of lytic phage there are broad conditions where bacteria with CRISPR-mediated immunity will have an advantage in competition with non-CRISPR bacteria with otherwise higher Malthusian fitness. (2) These conditions for the existence of CRISPR are narrower when there is envelope resistance to the phage. (3) While there are situations where CRISPR-mediated immunity can provide bacteria an advantage in competition with higher Malthusian fitness bacteria bearing deleterious conjugative plasmids, the conditions for this to obtain are relatively narrow and the intensity of selection favoring CRISPR weak. The parameters of these models can be independently estimated, the assumption behind their construction validated, and the hypotheses generated from the analysis of their properties tested in experimental populations of bacteria with lytic phage and conjugative plasmids. I suggest protocols for estimating these parameters and outline the design of

  10. Properties of Carry Value Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakanta Pal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carry Value Transformation (CVT is a model of discrete deterministic dynamical system. In the present study, it has been proved that (1 the sum of any two nonnegative integers is the same as the sum of their CVT and XOR values. (2 the number of iterations leading to either CVT=0 or XOR=0 does not exceed the maximum of the lengths of the two addenda expressed as binary strings. A similar process of addition of modified Carry Value Transformation (MCVT and XOR requires a maximum of two iterations for MCVT to be zero. (3 an equivalence relation is shown to exist on Z×Z which divides the CV table into disjoint equivalence classes.

  11. Acquisition of Carbapenem Resistance by Plasmid-Encoded-AmpC-Expressing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ria; Wattel, Agnes A; Arenas, Jesús; Goessens, Wil H F; Tommassen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Although AmpC β-lactamases can barely degrade carbapenems, if at all, they can sequester them and prevent them from reaching their targets. Thus, carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae can result from AmpC production and simultaneous reduction of antibiotic influx into the periplasm by mutations in the porin genes. Here we investigated the route and genetic mechanisms of acquisition of carbapenem resistance in a clinical E. coli isolate carrying bla CMY-2 on a plasmid by selecting for mutants that are resistant to increasing concentrations of meropenem. In the first step, the expression of OmpC, the only porin produced in the strain under laboratory conditions, was lost, leading to reduced susceptibility to meropenem. In the second step, the expression of the CMY-2 β-lactamase was upregulated, leading to resistance to meropenem. The loss of OmpC was due to the insertion of an IS1 element into the ompC gene or to frameshift mutations and premature stop codons in this gene. The bla CMY-2 gene was found to be located on an IncIγ plasmid, and overproduction of the CMY-2 enzyme resulted from an increased plasmid copy number due to a nucleotide substitution in the inc gene. The clinical relevance of these genetic mechanisms became evident from the analysis of previously isolated carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates, which appeared to carry similar mutations. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Mathematical Model of Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Ceftiofur in Commensal Enteric Escherichia coli of Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V.; Lanzas, Cristina; Lu, Zhao; Gröhn, Yrjö Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in food animals may contribute to antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animals and humans. Commensal bacteria of animal intestine may serve as a reservoir of resistance-genes. To understand the dynamics of plasmid-mediated resistance to cephalosporin ceftiofur in enteric commensals of cattle, we developed a deterministic mathematical model of the dynamics of ceftiofur-sensitive and resistant commensal enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) in the absence of and during parenteral therapy with ceftiofur. The most common treatment scenarios including those using a sustained-release drug formulation were simulated; the model outputs were in agreement with the available experimental data. The model indicated that a low but stable fraction of resistant enteric E. coli could persist in the absence of immediate ceftiofur pressure, being sustained by horizontal and vertical transfers of plasmids carrying resistance-genes, and ingestion of resistant E. coli. During parenteral therapy with ceftiofur, resistant enteric E. coli expanded in absolute number and relative frequency. This expansion was most influenced by parameters of antimicrobial action of ceftiofur against E. coli. After treatment (>5 weeks from start of therapy) the fraction of ceftiofur-resistant cells among enteric E. coli, similar to that in the absence of treatment, was most influenced by the parameters of ecology of enteric E. coli, such as the frequency of transfer of plasmids carrying resistance-genes, the rate of replacement of enteric E. coli by ingested E. coli, and the frequency of ceftiofur resistance in the latter. PMID:22615803

  13. [Construction of recombinant shuttle plasmid pIMP1-eHER2/neu and screening and identification of its stable Clostridium sporogenes transformants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-li; Zhang, Wen-qing; Wang, Qiu-bo; Ding, Shou-yi; Lv, Rui; Meng, Lin

    2011-11-01

    To construct recombinant clostridium sporogenes modified with the extracellular domain of human oncogene HER2/neu, to lay a foundation for further study of its antitumor effect. The extracellular domain (ECD) of HER2/neu gene was attached to the downstream of promoter and signal sequence of clostridia endo-1, 4-glucanase (eglAp) by SOE-PCR to construct fusion gene eglAp-HER2/neu, which was then inserted into E.coli-clostridia shuttle plasmid pIMP1 to construct recombinant plasmid pIMP1-eHER2/neu. The recombinant plasmid was firstly transformed into E.coli DH5α.Then the correct construct was identified and introduced into C. sporogenes by electroporation. Positive clones were selected by erythromycin resistance, bacteria PCR were used for verification. Restriction map and sequencing result showed that the sequence and ORF of fusion gene eglAp-HER2/neu in recombinant plasmid pIMP1-eHER2/neu was correct. Bacteria PCR results indicated that the recombinant plasmid pIMP1-eHER2/neu was successfully transformed into C.sporogenes. After more than 20 passages under antibiotic pressure, C.sporogenes transformants could stably carry the recombinant plasmid pIMP1-eHER2/neu. Stable C.sporogenes transformants with the recombinant plasmid pIMP1-eHER2/neu are successfully acquired, which laid a foundation for further anti-tumor study.

  14. Transposon characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) and dissemination of resistance associated with transferable plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migura, Lourdes Garcia; Liebana, Ernesto; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2007-01-01

    of the resistance. Methods and results: One hundred and one vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from 19 unrelated farms have been investigated. Tn 1546 characterization by long PCR and Clal-digestions of amplicons showed a very low diversity of Tn types (n = 4) in comparison to the high genotypic...... diversity demonstrated by PFGE (n = 62). Conjugation experiments were carried out to assess the transfer of vancomycin resistance. Co-transfer of vanA together with erm(B) positioned on the same conjugative plasmid containing a replicon similar to pRE25 was demonstrated and also the presence of different...... plasmid replicons, associated with antimicrobial resistance on several unrelated farms. Conclusions: Horizontal transfer of vancomycin resistance may play a more important role in the persistence of antimicrobial resistance than clonal spread. The presence of different plasmid replicons, associated...

  15. The minimal replicon of the Streptomyces ghanaensis plasmid pSG5 identified by subcloning and Tn5 mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, G; Wohlleben, W; Pühler, A

    1988-03-01

    The cryptic plasmid pSG5 of Streptomyces ghanaensis 5/1B (DSM 2932) was characterized to have a molecular size of 12.7 kb and approximate copy number of 20-50 per chromosome. A bifunctional derivative, designated pSW344E, consisting of pSG5 and an Escherichia coli vector plasmid was constructed. Following Tn5 mutagenesis in E. coli, the replication functions of the mutagenized pSW344E plasmids were analysed in S.lividans. A 2 kb DNA fragment of the pSG5 replicon was found to carry replication functions. Subcloning of pSG5 DNA into various replication probe vectors resulted in the identification of the pSG5 minimal replicon, identical to the above mentioned 2 kb DNA region. Several small bifunctional plasmids, able to replicate in E. coli as well as in Streptomyces, were generated during subcloning. Some of these plasmids were found to be useful shuttle vectors.

  16. Circulation of a multiresistant, conjugative, IncA/C plasmid within the nosocomial Providencia stuartii population in the Athens area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakkoupi, Panagiota; Tryfinopoulou, Kyriaki; Polemis, Michalis; Pappa, Olga; Miriagou, Vivi; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study is to report a multidrug-resistant outbreak of Providencia stuartii that occurred in inpatients in the Athens area in 2012 resulting from a very successful transmissible A/C multidrug-resistant plasmid. Thirteen multidrug-resistant P. stuartii clinical isolates from 5 hospitals were studied. Molecular typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Antibiotic resistance genes and their genetic surround were detected by PCR and sequencing. Plasmid analysis included conjugation experiments using liquid cultures, sizing by S1 digestion, and incompatibility replicon typing by PCR. Isolates were grouped into 2 distinct clonal types A and B, exhibiting similarity less than 70%. Isolates of type A were recovered from patients hospitalized in 4 different hospitals with no obvious epidemiological linkage, while isolates of type B were recovered from patients treated in a single hospital. Both clonal types harbored a conjugative plasmid of 130 bp and IncA/C replicon type carrying 5 β-lactamase genes bla(SHV-5), bla(VEB-1), bla(VIM-1), bla(OXA-10), and bla(TEM-1) and aminoglycosides resistant determinants. All β-lactamase genes were included in stable structures as IS26, IS1999, and In-e541. The current plasmid seemed to have many common determinants with previously reported plasmids derived from P. stuartii and Proteus mirabilis clinical isolates and exhibited the ability to circulate in nosocomial bacterial populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultraviolet light protection, enhancement of ultraviolet light mutagenesis, and mutator effect of plasmid R46 in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortelmans, K.E.; Stocker, B.A.D.

    1976-01-01

    Plasmid R46 partially protected Salmonella typhimurium, wild type or uvrB or polA, against the lethal effect of ultraviolet (uv) irradiation, but did not protect recA mutants. The plasmid also increased frequency of uv-induced reversion to His + in all tested his point mutants (wild type for uv sensitivity), including amber, ochre, UGA, missense, and frame-shift mutants. Plasmid R46 also increased uv-induced reversion to His + in uvrB and polA strains, but no uv mutagenic effect was detected in R - or R46-carrying recA derivatives of a his(amber) mutant. The spontaneous reversion frequency of his nonsense mutants of all classes, and of some his missense mutants, was increased about 10-fold when the strains carried R46, but the plasmid had no effect on the spontaneous reversion frequency of some other his missense mutations or of reversion rate of his frame-shift mutants (except for two uvrB derivatives of one single-base insertion mutant). The plasmid increased the ability of wild type, polA, and uvrB hosts to support plaque production by uv-irradiated phage, and made strain LT2 his G46 less sensitive to methyl methane sulfonate and to x rays and more responsive to the mutagenic effect of visible-light irradiation. R46 increased spontaneous reversion frequency of a his(amber) rec + strain, but had no such effect in its recA sublines. Since the plasmid in the absence of host recA function fails to produce its mutator effect, or to confer uv protection or to enhance uv mutagenesis, these three effects may be produced via some mechanism involved in recA-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid repair, perhaps by an increase in activity of the ''error-prone'' component of the inducible repair pathway

  18. Sorbitol-Fermenting Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H- Isolates from Czech Patients with Novel Plasmid Composition Not Previously Seen in German Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauwens, Andreas; Marejková, Monika; Middendorf-Bauchart, Barbara; Prager, Rita; Kossow, Annelene; Zhang, Wenlan; Karch, Helge; Mellmann, Alexander; Bielaszewska, Martina

    2017-12-01

    Sorbitol-fermenting (SF) enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H - strains, first identified in Germany, have emerged as important pathogens throughout Europe. Besides chromosomally encoded Shiga toxin 2a (the major virulence factor), several putative virulence loci, including the hly , etp , and sfp operons, encoding EHEC hemolysin, type II secretion system proteins, and Sfp fimbriae, respectively, are located on the 121-kb plasmid pSFO157 in German strains. Here we report novel SF EHEC O157:H - strains isolated from patients in the Czech Republic. These strains share the core genomes and chromosomal virulence loci encoding toxins ( stx 2a and the cdtV -ABC operon) and adhesins ( eae -γ, efa1 , lpfA O157OI-141 , and lpfA O157OI-154 ) with German strains but differ essentially in their plasmids. In contrast to all previously detected SF EHEC O157:H - strains, the Czech strains carry two plasmids, of 79 kb and 86 kb. The 79-kb plasmid harbors the sfp operon, but neither of the plasmids contains the hly and etp operons. Sequence analyses demonstrated that the 79-kb plasmid (pSFO157 258/98-1) evolved from pSFO157 of German strains by deletion of a 41,534-bp region via homologous recombination, resulting in loss of the hly and etp operons. The 86-kb plasmid (pSFO157 258/98-2) displays 98% sequence similarity to a 92.7-kb plasmid of an extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli bloodstream isolate. Our finding of this novel plasmid composition in SF EHEC O157:H - strains extends the evolutionary history of EHEC O157 plasmids. Moreover, the unique molecular plasmid characteristics permit the identification of such strains, thereby facilitating further investigations of their geographic distribution, clinical significance, and epidemiology. IMPORTANCE Since their first identification in Germany in 1989, sorbitol-fermenting enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H - (nonmotile) strains have emerged as important causes of the life-threatening disease hemolytic

  19. Complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of two conjugative broad host range plasmids from a marine microbial biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Norberg

    Full Text Available The complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 was determined and analyzed. pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 form a novel clade within the IncP-1 plasmid family designated IncP-1 ς. The plasmids were exogenously isolated earlier from a marine biofilm. pMCBF1 (62 689 base pairs; bp and pMCBF6 (66 729 bp have identical backbones, but differ in their mercury resistance transposons. pMCBF1 carries Tn5053 and pMCBF6 carries Tn5058. Both are flanked by 5 bp direct repeats, typical of replicative transposition. Both insertions are in the vicinity of a resolvase gene in the backbone, supporting the idea that both transposons are "res-site hunters" that preferably insert close to and use external resolvase functions. The similarity of the backbones indicates recent insertion of the two transposons and the ongoing dynamics of plasmid evolution in marine biofilms. Both plasmids also carry the insertion sequence ISPst1, albeit without flanking repeats. ISPs1is located in an unusual site within the control region of the plasmid. In contrast to most known IncP-1 plasmids the pMCBF1/pMCBF6 backbone has no insert between the replication initiation gene (trfA and the vegetative replication origin (oriV. One pMCBF1/pMCBF6 block of about 2.5 kilo bases (kb has no similarity with known sequences in the databases. Furthermore, insertion of three genes with similarity to the multidrug efflux pump operon mexEF and a gene from the NodT family of the tripartite multi-drug resistance-nodulation-division (RND system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. They do not seem to confer antibiotic resistance to the hosts of pMCBF1/pMCBF6, but the presence of RND on promiscuous plasmids may have serious implications for the spread of antibiotic multi-resistance.

  20. Construction of mammary gland specific expression plasmid pIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Then the neo gene was amplified from plasmid pCDNA3.1 and placed downstream of the β-casein 3' arm as a positive selection marker. In order to analyze the bioactivity of plasmid pIN, it was transfected into the Bcap-37 cell line and injected into goat mammary gland. Western-blotting and quantitative polymerase chain ...

  1. Developments and use of plasmid integration systems for lactococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, Cornelis Johannes

    1990-01-01

    Various traits of Lactococcus lactis important for dairying are encoded by unstable plasmids. The use of large scale dairy product fermentations necessitates the availability of genetically stable strains with defined properties. This thesis deals with efforts to develop plasmid integration systems

  2. Plasmid Borne Resistance in Klebsiella Isolates from Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty six Klebsiella isolates from Kenyatta National Hospital and the Centre for Microbiology, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi were screened for resistance to commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents and for their plasmid content. Plasmids were transferred into Esherichia coli K-12 and resulting transconjugants ...

  3. Persistence of plasmid DNA in different soils | Kandhavelu | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present evidence from studying the plasmid DNA retaining capability of different sterilized/abiotic soils (red, black, river, silt and loose sand soils). The study also explains how long DNA molecules are in the active transformable form in the above soils. Plasmid DNA after purification was quantified and 2 ƒÊg DNA was ...

  4. Functional analysis of three plasmids from Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, R. van; Golic, N.; Bongers, R.; Leer, R.J.; Vos, W.M. de; Siezen, R.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 harbors three plasmids, pWCFS101, pWCFS102, and pWCFS103, with sizes of 1,917, 2,365, and 36,069 bp, respectively. The two smaller plasmids are of unknown function and contain replication genes that are likely to function via the rolling-circle replication mechanism.

  5. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... mously Replicating Sequence (ARS) elements (reviewed in Campbell and Newlon 1991) function as replication origins in plasmids as well as in chromosomes. ARS elements can be identified by cloning and transformation analysis (also called ARS assay) as plasmids bearing them transform yeast cells.

  6. The technology of large-scale pharmaceutical plasmid purification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further test demonstrated that the pcDNAlacZ purified with CTAB and authoritative endotoxin-free plasmid Kit had the similar transfection efficiency in vivo and in vitro. CTAB can be used for plasmid purification; the main advantages of the DNAs purified with CTAB include the avoidance of animal-derived enzymes, toxic ...

  7. Plasmid Borne Resistance in Klebsiella Isolates from Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nx 6110

    Conjugation studies showed the presence of transmissible plasmids that conferred resistance to. Escherichia coli K-12. Transfer of resistance to amoxicillin by conjugation shows that besides chromosomal carriage of resistance determinants inherent in Klebsiella species there are additional determinants on plasmids.

  8. Plasmid profile and antimicrobial resistance ratings of enterococci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim was to isolate and investigate the resistance ratings of enterococci poultry and pig isolates to various antimicrobial agents as well as to determine their plasmid profiles. Antimicrobial resistance ratings and the plasmid profiles of Enterococci isolated from poultry birds and pigs were analyzed. Three hundred and ...

  9. Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I.

    2013-01-01

    Research leading to the thesis ‘Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines‘ can be divided into two parts. The first part describes the development of a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant plasmid DNA production process of pDNA vaccines for the treatment of Human

  10. Multi-antibiotics-resistance plasmid profile of enteric pathogens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr J. T. Ekanem

    from ≤0.55kbp to ≥1.14kbp. This indicates that plasmids allow the movement of genetic materials, including antimicrobial resistance genes between bacterial species and strains. Keywords: Diarrheagenic pathogens, antibiotics resistance plasmids profile. E-mail: yahclar@yahoo.com; Tel: 08053336108, 08063418265.

  11. Transfer of conjugative plasmids among bacteria under environmentally relevant conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musovic, Sanin

    det oprindelige bakteriesamfund der tager andel i plasmid overførsel blev udviklet. Dyrknings-minimal metode i kombination med reporter gen teknologi og moderne mikroskopi viste en meget høj forekomst af RP4:gfp plasmid overførsel til oprindelige jord bakterier af et bredt værtskab. Der blev også vist...

  12. How honey bees carry pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matherne, Marguerite E.; Anyanwu, Gabriel; Leavey, Jennifer K.; Hu, David L.

    2017-11-01

    Honey bees are the tanker of the skies, carrying thirty percent of their weight in pollen per foraging trip using specialized orifices on their body. How do they manage to hang onto those pesky pollen grains? In this experimental study, we investigate the adhesion force of pollen to the honeybee. To affix pollen to themselves, honey bees form a suspension of pollen in nectar, creating a putty-like pollen basket that is skewered by leg hairs. We use tensile tests to show that the viscous force of the pollen basket is more than ten times the honeybee's flight force. This work may provide inspiration for the design of robotic flying pollinators.

  13. Loren Shriver carries Olympic torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver proudly displays the Olympic torch that he carried to the top of Launch Pad 39A as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Nineteen other KSC runners also participated in the relay effort at the Center. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind Shriver, poised for the STS-79 mission, which will feature the fourth docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  14. Transmissible Plasmids and Integrons Shift Escherichia coli Population Toward Larger Multiple Drug Resistance Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono, Suhartono; Savin, Mary C; Gbur, Edward E

    2018-04-01

    Transmissible plasmids and integrons may play important roles in the persistence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria throughout aquatic environment by accumulating antibiotic resistance genes (ARG). Class 1 and class 2 integron (intI), mobilization (mob), sulfamethoxazole resistance (sul), and trimethoprim resistance (dfr) genes were PCR-amplified and confirmed through DNA sequencing following plasmid extraction from 139 antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli. E. coli had previously been recovered from wastewater treatment plant effluent and receiving stream water in Northwest Arkansas and isolates had expressed resistance to one to six antibiotics. Almost half of the total isolates (47%) carried putatively transmissible plasmids with mob F12 gene as the most frequently detected mobilization gene. When two or three mob genes were detected per isolate, there was a significant shift in the population toward larger multiple drug resistance (MDR) number. Class 1 and/or 2 integrons were prevalent (46%), and the presence of integron significantly shifted the isolate population toward larger MDR number. More isolates carried single or coexistence of two or three sul genes (99.3%), and single or a combination up to five dfr genes (89.3%) than had exhibited in vitro resistance to the respective antibiotics. These findings indicate not only the role of the wastewater treatment effluent and the stream environment in coaccumulation of ARG with transmissible plasmids and integrons in multiple antibiotic-resistant E. coli populations but also suggest that density of sul and dfr resistance genes within an isolate may serve as a biomarker for mobile MDR in general.

  15. Why do dolphins carry sponges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Sargeant, Brooke L; Watson-Capps, Jana J; Gibson, Quincy A; Heithaus, Michael R; Connor, Richard C; Patterson, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Tool use is rare in wild animals, but of widespread interest because of its relationship to animal cognition, social learning and culture. Despite such attention, quantifying the costs and benefits of tool use has been difficult, largely because if tool use occurs, all population members typically exhibit the behavior. In Shark Bay, Australia, only a subset of the bottlenose dolphin population uses marine sponges as tools, providing an opportunity to assess both proximate and ultimate costs and benefits and document patterns of transmission. We compared sponge-carrying (sponger) females to non-sponge-carrying (non-sponger) females and show that spongers were more solitary, spent more time in deep water channel habitats, dived for longer durations, and devoted more time to foraging than non-spongers; and, even with these potential proximate costs, calving success of sponger females was not significantly different from non-spongers. We also show a clear female-bias in the ontogeny of sponging. With a solitary lifestyle, specialization, and high foraging demands, spongers used tools more than any non-human animal. We suggest that the ecological, social, and developmental mechanisms involved likely (1) help explain the high intrapopulation variation in female behaviour, (2) indicate tradeoffs (e.g., time allocation) between ecological and social factors and, (3) constrain the spread of this innovation to primarily vertical transmission.

  16. Why do dolphins carry sponges?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Mann

    Full Text Available Tool use is rare in wild animals, but of widespread interest because of its relationship to animal cognition, social learning and culture. Despite such attention, quantifying the costs and benefits of tool use has been difficult, largely because if tool use occurs, all population members typically exhibit the behavior. In Shark Bay, Australia, only a subset of the bottlenose dolphin population uses marine sponges as tools, providing an opportunity to assess both proximate and ultimate costs and benefits and document patterns of transmission. We compared sponge-carrying (sponger females to non-sponge-carrying (non-sponger females and show that spongers were more solitary, spent more time in deep water channel habitats, dived for longer durations, and devoted more time to foraging than non-spongers; and, even with these potential proximate costs, calving success of sponger females was not significantly different from non-spongers. We also show a clear female-bias in the ontogeny of sponging. With a solitary lifestyle, specialization, and high foraging demands, spongers used tools more than any non-human animal. We suggest that the ecological, social, and developmental mechanisms involved likely (1 help explain the high intrapopulation variation in female behaviour, (2 indicate tradeoffs (e.g., time allocation between ecological and social factors and, (3 constrain the spread of this innovation to primarily vertical transmission.

  17. Molecular characterization of a 21.4 kilobase antibiotic resistance plasmid from an α-hemolytic Escherichia coli O108:H- human clinical isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fay E Dawes

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the 21.4 kilobase plasmid pECTm80 isolated from Escherichia coli strain 80, an α hemolytic human clinical diarrhoeal isolate (serotype O108:H-. DNA sequence analysis of pECTm80 revealed it belonged to incompatibility group X1, and contained plasmid partition and toxin-antitoxin systems, an R6K-like triple origin (ori replication system, genes required for replication regulation, insertion sequences IS1R, ISEc37 and a truncated transposase gene (Tn3-like ΔtnpA of the Tn3 family, and carried a class 2 integron. The class 2 integron of pECTm80 contains an intact cassette array dfrA1-sat2, encoding resistance to trimethoprim and streptothricin, and an aadA1 gene cassette truncated by the insertion of IS1R. The complex plasmid replication system includes α, β and γ origins of replication. Pairwise BLASTn comparison of pECTm80 with plasmid pE001 reveals a conserved plasmid backbone suggestive of a common ancestral lineage. Plasmid pECTm80 is of potential clinical importance, as it carries multiple genes to ensure its stable maintenance through successive bacterial cell divisions and multiple antibiotic resistance genes.

  18. Sources of diversity of carbapenem resistance levels in Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying blaVIM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Tzelepi, E; Carattoli, A; Vatopoulos, A C; Tassios, P T; Miriagou, V

    2006-09-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the diversity of beta-lactam resistance phenotypes among isolates of a VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) strain that is endemic in Greek hospitals. Five VPKP clinical isolates were studied. MICs of beta-lactams were determined by agar dilution. PFGE of XbaI-digested genomic DNA was used for typing. Profiles of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were determined by SDS-PAGE. Selected isolates were transformed with a plasmid encoding the Omp36K porin. beta-Lactamase activities were analysed by IEF and imipenem hydrolysis was assessed by spectrophotometry. VIM-1-encoding, self-transmissible plasmids were characterized by replicon typing, RFLP and hybridization with bla(VIM)- and IS26-specific probes. Characterization of integrons was performed by PCR, cloning and sequencing. Isolates exhibited highly similar PFGE patterns. Imipenem MICs were 2, 4, 16, 32 and 64 mg/L. The isolate with the highest imipenem MIC (Vipm-64) lacked a 36 kDa OMP. Expression of a cloned OmpK36 in this isolate reduced the imipenem MIC to susceptibility levels. Imipenem-hydrolysing activity was significantly higher in Vipm-16 as compared with the other isolates that expressed similar amounts of VIM-1. All isolates transferred beta-lactam resistance to Escherichia coli through conjugative, IncN plasmids that exhibited differences in the RFLP and hybridization patterns with bla(VIM)- and IS26-specific probes. The Vipm-16 plasmid, mediating the higher imipenem MICs among transconjugants, carried two copies of bla(VIM-1). Cloning and sequencing showed In-e541-like integrons truncated at the 5'CS by insertion of IS26 elements at two different positions. A VIM-1-producing strain of K. pneumoniae has evolved through OMP alterations and rearrangements in the bla(VIM-1)-carrying plasmid probably mediated by IS26, generating isolates with imipenem MICs ranging from susceptibility to resistance.

  19. [Combination of bla(VIM-1) and qnrS2 on the same plasmid in Klebsiella oxytoca and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Seville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José M; Conejo, M Carmen; Díaz de Alba, Paula; López-Cerero, Lorena; Fernandez-Echauri, Pedro; Pascual, Alvaro

    2012-05-01

    Combined resistance to quinolones and β-lactams is common in Enterobacteriaceae. The appearance in enterobacteria coding for metallo-β-lactamases and determinants of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance are an emerging problem in our country. The susceptibility was determined by E-test. The resistance genes were detected by PCR and the corresponding plasmids were characterised. This study describes 2 strains (1 Klebsiella oxytoca, 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae) carrying the genes qnrS2 and blaVIM-1 in a transferable plasmid of 70-Kb isolated in surveillance cultures at the University Hospital Virgen Macarena in Seville. This is the first combination of qnrS2 and bla(VIM-1) on the same non-typeable plasmid isolated in our centre. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Clonal spread of blaOXA-72-carrying Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 512 in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Hsu, Po-Jui; Chen, Jiann-Yuan; Liao, Po-Cheng; Lu, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chang-Hua; Liou, Ming-Li

    2016-07-01

    This is the first report to show an insidious outbreak of armA- and blaOXA-72-carrying Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 512 (ST512) at a study hospital in northern Taiwan. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that this was a ST512 clone. All of the isolates with ST512 carried a novel 12,056-bp repGR2 in combination with a repGR12-type plasmid. This plasmid, designated pAB-ML, had one copy of the blaOXA-72 gene that was flanked by XerC/XerD-like sites and conferred resistance to carbapenems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for the horizontal transfer of an integrase gene from a fusellovirus to a pRN-like plasmid within a single strain of Sulfolobus and the implications for plasmid survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu

    2008-01-01

    A fusellovirus SSV4 and a pRN-like plasmid pXZ1 were co-isolated from a single strain of Sulfolobus. In contrast to the previously characterized virus-plasmid hybrids pSSVx and pSSVi, which can coexist intracellulary with a fusellovirus, pXZ1 is not packaged into viral particles and shows no viral...... infectivity. The virus and plasmid carry genomes of 15 135 and 6970 bp, respectively. For SSV4, 33 predicted ORFs are compactly organized with a strong preference for UGA stop codons, three-quarters of which overlap with either the Shine-Dalgarno motif or the start codon of the following gene. pXZ1 carries...... seven ORFs, three of which encode an atypical RepA, a PlrA and a CopG protein. A fourth ORF exhibits a high nucleotide sequence identity to the SSV4 integrase gene, which suggests that it has been transferred to the plasmid from SSV4. A single point mutation within an otherwise identical 500 bp region...

  2. Antagonistic Donor Density Effect Conserved in Multiple Enterococcal Conjugative Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan; O'Brien, Sofie; Frank, Kristi L.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococcus faecalis, a common causative agent of hospital-acquired infections, is resistant to many known antibiotics. Its ability to acquire and transfer resistance genes and virulence determinants through conjugative plasmids poses a serious concern for public health. In some cases, induction of transfer of E. faecalis plasmids results from peptide pheromones produced by plasmid-free recipient cells, which are sensed by the plasmid-bearing donor cells. These plasmids generally encode an inhibitory peptide that competes with the pheromone and suppresses self-induction of donors. We recently demonstrated that the inhibitor peptide encoded on plasmid pCF10 is part of a unique quorum-sensing system in which it functions as a “self-sensing signal,” reducing the response to the pheromone in a density-dependent fashion. Based on the similarities between regulatory features controlling conjugation in pAD1 and pAM373 and those controlling conjugation in pCF10, we hypothesized that these plasmids are likely to exhibit similar quorum-sensing behaviors. Experimental findings indicate that for both pAD1 and pAM373, high donor densities indeed resulted in decreased induction of the conjugation operon and reduced conjugation frequencies. This effect was restored by the addition of exogenous inhibitor, confirming that the inhibitor serves as an indicator for donor density. Donor density also affects cross-species conjugative plasmid transfer. Based on our experimental results, we propose models for induction and shutdown of the conjugation operon in pAD1 and pAM373. IMPORTANCE Enterococcus faecalis is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Its ability to transfer antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants by sharing its genetic material with other bacteria through direct cell-cell contact via conjugation poses a serious threat. Two antagonistic signaling peptides control the transfer of plasmids pAD1 and pAM373: a peptide pheromone produced by

  3. Characterization of a novel plasmid type and various genetic contexts of bla OXA-58 in Acinetobacter spp. from multiple cities in China.

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    Yiqi Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Several studies have described the epidemiological distribution of blaOXA-58-harboring Acinetobacter baumannii in China. However, there is limited data concerning the replicon types of blaOXA-58-carrying plasmids and the genetic context surrounding blaOXA-58 in Acinetobacter spp. in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twelve non-duplicated blaOXA-58-harboring Acinetobacter spp. isolates were collected from six hospitals in five different cities between 2005 and 2010. The molecular epidemiology of the isolates was carried out using PFGE and multilocus sequence typing. Carbapenemase-encoding genes and plasmid replicase genes were identified by PCR. The genetic location of blaOXA-58 was analyzed using S1-nuclease method. Plasmid conjugation and electrotransformation were performed to evaluate the transferability of blaOXA-58-harboring plasmids. The genetic structure surrounding blaOXA-58 was determined by cloning experiments. The twelve isolates included two Acinetobacter pittii isolates (belong to one pulsotype, three Acinetobacter nosocomialis isolates (belong to two pulsotypes and seven Acinetobacter baumannii isolates (belong to two pulsotypes/sequence types. A. baumannii ST91 was found to be a potential multidrug resistant risk clone carrying both blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-23. blaOXA-58 located on plasmids varied from ca. 52 kb to ca. 143 kb. All plasmids can be electrotransformed to A. baumannii recipient, but were untypeable by the current replicon typing scheme. A novel plasmid replicase named repAci10 was identified in blaOXA-58-harboring plasmids of two A. pittii isolates, three A. nosocomialis isolates and two A. baumannii isolates. Four kinds of genetic contexts of blaOXA-58 were identified. The transformants of plasmids with structure of IS6 family insertion sequence (ISOur1, IS1008 or IS15-ΔISAba3-like element-blaOXA-58 displayed carbapenem nonsusceptible, while others with structure of intact ISAba3-like element

  4. Construction and Identification of a Recombinant Plasmid Encoding Echinococcus granulosus Oncosphere Antigen (EG95Abstract Background: Cystic echinococcosis (CE, as a zoonotic disease cause to health threat and economic losses. Despite implemented cont

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    Nahideh MAZAHERI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Cystic echinococcosis (CE, as a zoonotic disease cause to health threat and economic losses. Despite implemented control programs, few countries have been able to decrease or eliminate this infection. Vaccination of the intermediate host offers an additional strategy to control the parasite transmission and EG95 antigen is considered more than the others in the vaccine issue. According to the high protection induced by the EG95 recombinant vaccine, this study was designed to construct recombinant plasmid formulation of EG95 antigen.Methods: In 2015, the Echinococcus granulosus eggs were recovered from an infected dog in Parasitological laboratory of Tarbiat Modares University in Tehran, Iran. Following hatching, the oncospheres of E. granulosus were activated to increase the presence of the desired mRNA. The extracted mRNA was transcribed to the cDNA which used as template in RT-PCR. Then the EG95 gene cloned into pET28a vector and the recombinant plasmids expression was  investigated in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Results:  The recombinant plasmid encoding EG95 antigen was successfully constructed and identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. In vitro expression of the EG95 antigen was confirmed in prokary­otic and eukaryotic systems by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis.Conclusion: Because of potential advantages of DNA vaccines, including ability to induce long-term immune responses, low production cost and stability in different temperatures, this study carried out to construct the EG95 gene into a vector. This recombinant vector can be evaluated in further studies as a DNA vaccine may provide new prospects for the development of a vaccine against cystic hydatid disease.

  5. Identification of a globally distributed clinical streptomycin-resistance plasmid and other resistance determinants in a coastal bay of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Dang, H

    2011-01-01

    To study streptomycin-resistant bacteria isolated from Jiaozhou Bay and their molecular determinants of resistance. Twenty-seven tetracycline-resistant and 49 chloramphenicol-resistant bacterial isolates from surface seawater of Jiaozhou Bay were selected for investigation. More than 88% of these isolates were resistant to streptomycin. Half of the streptomycin-resistant bacteria harboured the strA-strB gene pair, and six isolates carried Tn5393-like transposons by PCR detection. The p9123-related plasmids containing the sul2-strA-strB gene cluster were characterized in two environmental Escherichia coli isolates. Transposon Tn5393 was first identified on a Klebsiella pneumoniae plasmid, which also carried Tn1721, estP and umu genes responsible for antimicrobial and insecticide resistance. Coresistance to streptomycin and tetracycline or chloramphenicol was found with high frequency. p9123-related plasmid and Tn5393 transposon may contribute to the wide distribution and spread of the strA-strB gene pair in Jiaozhou Bay. The detection of streptomycin-resistance plasmid pQ1-1 from Jiaozhou Bay seawater bacteria and human bacterial pathogens from USA indicates its global dissemination and transmission, across different components of the microbiota on earth. Streptomycin resistance can be recognized as an important bioindicator of environmental quality, owing to its association with anthropogenic pollution and the multidrug-resistant microbiota. © 2010 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Novelties that change carrying capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2012-09-01

    Comparative developmental studies have revealed a rich array of details about the patterns and processes of morphological change in animals and increasingly in plants. But, applying these insights to the study of major episodes of evolutionary innovation requires understanding how these novel morphologies become established and sufficiently abundant (either as individuals within a species or as a clade of species) to be preserved in the fossil record, and, in many cases, to influence ecological processes. Evolutionary novelties may: (1) disappear without changing the species; (2) be associated with the generation (through selection or drift) of a new species; and if the latter (3) may or may not become ecologically significant. Only the latter are commonly preserved in the fossil record. These alternatives mirror the distinction among historians of technology between innovation and invention. Here, I argue that specific sorts of evolutionary inventions drive ecological transformation, essentially constructing an environment for themselves and ancillary organisms through ecological spillover effects, increasing the "carrying capacity" of an ecosystem. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbolu, David Olusoga; Alli, Armstrong Oyebode; Anorue, Michael C; Daini, Oluwole Adebayo; Oluwadun, Afolabi

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, mechanisms of resistance to quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria were believed to be only chromosome encoded. However, emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) has been reported worldwide. This study investigated distribution of PMQR in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in eastern part of Nigeria. Seventy-one nonduplicate Gram-negative bacterial isolates of eight species were analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility, genotypic detection of various PMQRs, typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and analysis of plasmids present, including replicon typing. The minimum inhibitory concentrations showed MIC90values as high as 256 μg/ml for fluoroquinolones. Carriage of PMQR was found to be 35.2%. Twenty (28.2%) isolates carried various qnr genes, of which seven (9.9%) qnrA1; four (5.6%) qnrB1; eight (11.3%) qnrS1 while one (1.4%) encoded qnrD1. Eighteen (25.4%) isolates were positive for aac(6')-Ib-cr while carriage of multiple genes exists in some strains. Similarly, 13 isolates (18.7%) were found to carry PMQR efflux pump gene, qepA. Conjugation experiments revealed that the plasmids once transferred coded for fluoroquinolone resistance. The transconjugant strains carried a common plasmid estimated to be 65 kb. These plasmids were untypable for replicon/incompatibility. Typing revealed high diversity among all species tested with no identical RAPD pattern seen. This study further confirms high level resistance to many antimicrobials in different species of Gram-negative bacteria including fluoroquinolones and spread of PMQR genes in Southern Nigeria.

  8. Antibiotic resistance plasmids of Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    A variety of plasmids were isolated physically, and most antibiotic resistance is thought to be plasmid mediated. A number of characters (e.g., resistance to erythromycin or methicillin, and production of pigment) are determined by genes that do not give clear indications of either plasmid or chromosomal location. Although the formation of a particular plasmid is probably, even in bacterial terms, a very rare event, once formed such an element can spread rapidly among the bacterial population. The spectacular increase in the incidence of penicillinase-producing hospital strains in the late 1940's could have been due in part to this process. Evidence is stronger, however, for the intercell transfer of recently isolated plasmids coding for resistance to fusidic acid (and penicillinase production), or for neomycin, or for tetracycline resistance. Study of bacterial plasmids can resolve fundamental biochemical problems, and give some insight into the life of the cell at the molecular level. But the immediate application of the study of staphylococcal plasmids may be directed towards improving the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. The most important aspect of future anti-staphylococcal chemotherapy should thus be the limitation of the use of antibiotics, particularly for application to the skin and nose. (U.S.)

  9. Plasmid-associated sensitivity of Bacillus thuringiensis to UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, T.G.; Wilson, G.R.; Bull, D.L.; Aronson, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis were more sensitive to UV light than were spores or cells of plasmid-cured B. thuringiensis strains or of the closely related Bacillus cereus. Introduction of B. thuringiensis plasmids into B. cereus by cell mating increased the UV sensitivity of the cells and spores. Protoxins encoded by one or more B. thuringiensis plasmids were not involved in spore sensitivity, since a B. thuringiensis strain conditional for protoxin accumulation was equally sensitive at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. In addition, introduction of either a cloned protoxin gene, the cloning vector, or another plasmid not containing a protoxin gene into a plasmid-cured strain of B. thuringiensis all increased the UV sensitivity of the spores. Although the variety of small, acid-soluble proteins was the same in the spores of all strains examined, the quantity of dipicolinic acid was about twice as high in the plasmid-containing strains, and this may account for the differences in UV sensitivity of the spores. The cells of some strains harboring only B. thuringiensis plasmids were much more sensitive than cells of any of the other strains, and the differences were much greater than observed with spores

  10. Establishment of a replicating plasmid in Rickettsia prowazekii.

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    David O Wood

    Full Text Available Rickettsia prowazekii, the causative agent of epidemic typhus, grows only within the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells. This obligate intracellular lifestyle has restricted the genetic analysis of this pathogen and critical tools, such as replicating plasmid vectors, have not been developed for this species. Although replicating plasmids have not been reported in R. prowazekii, the existence of well-characterized plasmids in several less pathogenic rickettsial species provides an opportunity to expand the genetic systems available for the study of this human pathogen. Competent R. prowazekii were transformed with pRAM18dRGA, a 10.3 kb vector derived from pRAM18 of R. amblyommii. A plasmid-containing population of R. prowazekii was obtained following growth under antibiotic selection, and the rickettsial plasmid was maintained extrachromosomally throughout multiple passages. The transformant population exhibited a generation time comparable to that of the wild type strain with a copy number of approximately 1 plasmid per rickettsia. These results demonstrate for the first time that a plasmid can be maintained in R. prowazekii, providing an important genetic tool for the study of this obligate intracellular pathogen.

  11. Plasmid DNA Manufacturing for Indirect and Direct Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Marco; Buchholz, Tatjana; Schleef, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Plasmid DNA is currently gaining increasing importance for clinical research applications in gene therapy and genetic vaccination. For direct gene transfer into humans, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade plasmid DNA is mandatory. The same holds true if the drug substance contains a genetically modified cell, for example chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, where these cells as well as the contained plasmids are used. According to the responsible regulatory agencies, they have to be produced under full GMP. On the other hand, for GMP production of, for example, mRNA or viral vectors (lentiviral vectors, adeno-associated virus vectors, etc.), in many cases, High Quality Grade plasmid DNA is accepted as a starting material. The manufacturing process passes through different production steps. To ensure the right conditions are used for the plasmid, a pilot run must be conducted at the beginning. In this step, a followed upscaling with respect to reproducibility and influences on product quality is performed. Subsequently, a cell bank of the transformed productions strain is established and characterized. This cell bank is used for the cultivation process. After cell harvesting and lysis, several chromatography steps are conducted to receive a pure plasmid product. Depending on the respective required quality grade, the plasmid product is subject to several quality controls. The last step consists of formulation and filling of the product.

  12. Homologous plasmid recombination is elevated in immortally transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, G K; Kurz, B W; Cheng, R Z; Shmookler Reis, R J

    1989-09-01

    The levels of intramolecular plasmid recombination, following transfection of a plasmid substrate for homologous recombination into normal and immortally transformed cells, have been examined by two independent assays. In the first assay, recovered plasmid was tested for DNA rearrangements which regenerate a functional neomycin resistance gene from two overlapping fragments. Following transformation of bacteria, frequencies of recombinationlike events were determined from the ratio of neomycin-resistant (recombinant) colonies to ampicillin-resistant colonies (indicating total plasmid recovery). Such events, yielding predominantly deletions between the directly repeated sequences, were substantially more frequent in five immortal cell lines than in any of three normal diploid cell strains tested. Effects of plasmid replication or interaction with T antigen and of bacterially mediated rejoining of linear molecules generated in mammalian cells were excluded by appropriate controls. The second assay used limited coamplification of a control segment of plasmid DNA, and of the predicted recombinant DNA region, primed by two sets of flanking oligonucleotides. Each amplified band was quantitated by reference to a near-linear standard curve generated concurrently, and recombination frequencies were determined from the ratio of recombinant/control DNA regions. The results confirmed that recombinant DNA structures were generated within human cells at direct repeats in the transfected plasmid and were markedly more abundant in an immortal cell line than in the diploid normal cells from which that line was derived.

  13. Interspecific plasmid transfer between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis

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    Espinosa, M. (Inst. de Immunologia y Biologia Microbiana, Velazquez, Madrid, Spain); Lopez, P.; Perez-Urena, M.T.; Lacks, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The streptococcal plasmids pMV158 and pLS1, grown in Streptococcus pneumoniae, were transformed to Bacillus subtilis by DNA-mediated transformation.The plasmids were unchanged in the new host; no deletions were observed in 80 instances of transfer. Hybrid plasmids were produced by recombining the EcoRI fragment of pBD6 that confers Km/sup r/ with EcoRI-cut pLS1, which confers Tc/sup r/. The simple hybrid, pMP2, was transferable to both species and expressed Tc/sup r/ and Km/sup r/ in both. A derivative, pMP5, which contained an insertion in the pBD6 component, expressed a higher level of kanomycin resistance and was more easily selected in S. pneumoniae. Another derivative, pMP3, which contained an additional EcoRI fragment, presumably of pneumococcal chromosomal DNA, could not be transferred to B. subtilis. Previous findings that monomeric plasmid forms could transform S. pneumoniae but not B. subtilis were confirmed using single plasmid preparations. Although plasmids extracted from either species were readily transferred to S. pneumoniae, successive passage in B. subtilis increased the ability of plasmid extracts to transfer the plasmid to a B. subtilis recipient. This adaptation was tentatively ascribed to an enrichment of multimeric forms in extracts of B. subtilis as compared to S. pneumoniae. A review of host ranges exhibited by plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria suggested differences in their ability to use particular host replication functions. (JMT)

  14. Adsorption of bacterial plasmids in pure mineral mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Cochran, J. P.; Seaman, J. C.; Parrott, B.

    2017-12-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in controlling the fate and transport of subsurface contaminants through the direct degradation of organic contaminants to the control of chemical redox conditions that impact the speciation and partitioning of inorganic contaminants. Genes that control these processes, including the relative tolerance associated with direct exposure to toxic contaminants, are found within the bacteria's chromosomal DNA and also within distinct, circular DNA elements called plasmids. Plasmids are mobile genetic elements that can be exchanged with other bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The frequency of HGT in soil is influenced by several factors, with the physicochemical characteristics of soil possibly being a primary factor. Thus, the objective for our research was to determine the movement and persistence of bacterial plasmids within soil. Our current study focuses on batch sorption experiments designed to evaluate the partitioning of bacterial plasmids in idealized mineral mixtures that represent the clay mineralogy of highly weathered soils of the Southeastern US. Specifically, we compared plasmid adsorption among pure goethite, kaolinite, and a mixture of goethite and kaolinite. We also determined the adsorption of plasmids on the above minerals over increasing pH (3 to 10). Our results show that adsorption decreased in the following order: goethite > kaolinite > mixture of goethite and kaolinite. We also found that plasmids adsorption was higher at lower pH levels, with pH 3 having the adsorption maximum. However, at pH 3, DNA denaturing may have occurred, leading to aggregation or precipitation of plasmids on the mineral surfaces. Our study was the first steps in determining the influence of soil properties on plasmid adsorption. Our future goals are to determine the adsorption in other pure minerals and in natural soils.

  15. AAVS1-Targeted Plasmid Integration in AAV Producer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuxia; Frederick, Amy; Martin, John M; Scaria, Abraham; Cheng, Seng H; Armentano, Donna; Wadsworth, Samuel C; Vincent, Karen A

    2017-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) producer cell lines are created via transfection of HeLaS3 cells with a single plasmid containing three components (the vector sequence, the AAV rep and cap genes, and a selectable marker gene). As this plasmid contains both the cis (Rep binding sites) and trans (Rep protein encoded by the rep gene) elements required for site-specific integration, it was predicted that plasmid integration might occur within the AAVS1 locus on human chromosome 19 (chr19). The objective of this study was to investigate whether integration in AAVS1 might be correlated with vector yield. Plasmid integration sites within several independent cell lines were assessed via Southern, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR analyses. In the Southern analyses, the presence of fragments detected by both rep- and AAVS1-specific probes suggested that for several mid- and high-producing lines, plasmid DNA had integrated into the AAVS1 locus. Analysis with puroR and AAVS1-specific probes suggested that integration in AAVS1 was a more widespread phenomenon. High-producing AAV2-secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) lines (masterwell 82 [MW82] and MW278) were evaluated via FISH using probes specific for the plasmid, AAVS1, and a chr19 marker. FISH analysis detected two plasmid integration sites in MW278 (neither in AAVS1), while a total of three sites were identified in MW82 (two in AAVS1). An inverse PCR assay confirmed integration within AAVS1 for several mid- and high-producing lines. In summary, the FISH, Southern, and PCR data provide evidence of site-specific integration of the plasmid within AAVS1 in several AAV producer cell lines. The data also suggest that integration in AAVS1 is a general phenomenon that is not necessarily restricted to high producers. The results also suggest that plasmid integration within the AAVS1 locus is not an absolute requirement for a high vector yield.

  16. On Modeling Information Spreading in Bacterial Nano-Networks Based on Plasmid Conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorina, Gaetano; Galluccio, Laura; Palazzo, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    In the last years, nano-communications have attracted much attention as a newly promising research field. In particular, molecular communications, which exploit molecular nodes, are a powerful tool to implement communication functionalities in environments where the use of electromagnetic waves becomes critical, e.g., in the human body. In molecular communications, molecules such as proteins, DNA and RNA sequences are used to carry information. To this aim a novel approach relies on the use of genetically modified bacteria to transport enhanced DNA strands, called plasmids, where information can be encoded. Information transfer is thus based on bacteria motility, i.e., self-propelled motion, which under appropriate circumstances is exhibited by certain bacteria. It has been observed that bacteria motility presents many similarities with opportunistic forwarding. Currently the few studies on opportunistic communications among bacteria are based on simulations only. In this paper we propose an analytical model to characterize information spreading in bacterial nano-networks. To this purpose, an epidemic approach, similar to those used to model Delay Tolerant Networks (DTNs), is employed. We also derive two mathematical models which slightly differ. The first describes bacterial nano-networks where a single plasmid is disseminated according to an epidemic approach; the second, takes into account more complex mechanisms where multiple plasmids are disseminated as in realistic bacterial nano-networks. Numerical results being obtained are finally shown and discussed.

  17. Plasmid profilling and similarities in identities of probable microbes isolated from crude oil contaminated agricultural soil

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    Toochukwu Ekwutosi OGBULIE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid analysis of bacteria isolated from agricultural soil experimentally contaminated with crude oil was carried out and the resultant bands’ depicting the different molecular sizes of the plasmid DNA molecules per isolate was obtained. There was no visible band observed for Klebsiella indicating that the organism lack plasmid DNA that confers degradative ability to it, possibly the gene could be borne on the chromosomal DNA which enabled its persistence in the polluted soil. Molecular characterization was undertaken to confirm the identities of the possible microorganisms that may be present in crude oil-contaminated soil. The result of the DNA extracted and amplified in a PCR using EcoRI and EcoRV restriction enzymes for cutting the DNA of the bacterial cells indicated no visible band for cuts made with EcoRV restriction enzyme showing that the enzyme is not specific for bacterial DNA of isolates in the samples, hence there was no amplification. By contrast though, visible bands of amplicons were observed using EcoRI restriction enzymes. The resultant visible bands of microbial profile obtained using the universal RAPD primer with nucleotide sequence of 5’—CTC AAA GCA TCT AGG TCC A---3’ showed that only Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus mycoides had visible bands at identical position on the gel indicating that both species possibly had identical sequence or genes of negligible differences coding for degradation of hydrocarbons as shown by similar values in molecular weight and positions in the gel electrophoresis field.

  18. Bacterial clade with the ribosomal RNA operon on a small plasmid rather than the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Mizue; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Okubo, Takashi; Sugawara, Masayuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Mitsui, Hisayuki

    2015-11-17

    rRNA is essential for life because of its functional importance in protein synthesis. The rRNA (rrn) operon encoding 16S, 23S, and 5S rRNAs is located on the "main" chromosome in all bacteria documented to date and is frequently used as a marker of chromosomes. Here, our genome analysis of a plant-associated alphaproteobacterium, Aureimonas sp. AU20, indicates that this strain has its sole rrn operon on a small (9.4 kb), high-copy-number replicon. We designated this unusual replicon carrying the rrn operon on the background of an rrn-lacking chromosome (RLC) as the rrn-plasmid. Four of 12 strains close to AU20 also had this RLC/rrn-plasmid organization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that those strains having the RLC/rrn-plasmid organization represented one clade within the genus Aureimonas. Our finding introduces a previously unaddressed viewpoint into studies of genetics, genomics, and evolution in microbiology and biology in general.

  19. Strand breaks and lethal damage in plasmid DNA subjected to 60CO-γirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimczak, U.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments with calf thymus DNA subjected to extracellular irradiation yield information on the role of direct and indirect effects in single-strand breakage, if this is evaluated with reference to the scavenger activity in respect of OH radicals. The role of the two processes in the occurrence of double-stand breaks and further damage leading to cell decay has so far remained largely obscure. It was the aim of the study described here to contribute to research in this field by performing in vitro experiments on biologically active DNA. For this purpose, DNA from pBR322 plasmids was irradiated in the presence of OH-radical scavengers. The number of single-strand and double-strand breaks was determined on the basis of the system's ability to eliminate OH radicals. In order to asses the influence of irradiation processes on the biological activity of DNA, investigations were carried out in E. coli for transformations caused by irradiated plasmid DNA. The results were interpreted in the light of theories about inhomogenous reaction kinetics put forward by Mark et al. (1989). It was finally discussed, which of the gamma-irradiation injuries occurring in DNA was to be held responsible for the inactivation of plasmid DNA and which enzymatic processes were additionally at work here. (orig./MG) [de

  20. [Epidemiologic study of 2 S. typhimurium outbreaks using plasmid fingerprints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Breer, C; Schopfer, K

    1989-04-05

    An outbreak of salmonellosis in an old people's home is reported. The infectious agent, S. typhi-murium, was isolated not only from several inmates but also from sick cows of the farm belonging to the home, in animal feed, from employees of the local butcher's shop, and finally in sludge from the local sewage plant. Plasmid analysis provided evidence of a common origin for the isolated S. typhi-murium strains. The incriminated strains harboured, together with two low-molecular-weight plasmids, a plasmid of approximately 50 Mdal, which was also demonstrated in some other S. typhi-murium strains isolated from clinical cases in the area around St. Gallen.

  1. Large-pore mesoporous silica nanospheres as vehicles for delivering TRAF3-shRNA plasmids to Kupffer cells

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    Zhang, Junyong, E-mail: zhangmachine@hotmail.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Department of Urinary Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (China); Guo, Shipeng, E-mail: guoshipeng2008@126.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (China); Zhang, Wenfeng, E-mail: Sadengren8881@163.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (China); Niu, Dechao, E-mail: niudechao_2002@163.com [Low-Dimensional Materials Chemistry, Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology (China); Gong, Jianping, E-mail: gjp_cqmu@yeah.net [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (China)

    2016-01-08

    The currently available techniques for transferring exogenous genes into macrophages, especially the targeted import of exogenous genes into Kupffer cells (KCs) in vivo, are inefficient and achieve only low targeting. Novel Large-Pore Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (LPMSNs) may be a promising gene transfection agent for KCs because of their superior biodegradation and hypotoxic characteristics, as well as their ability to retain the biological function of KCs and the high loading-rate of exogenous plasmid. LPMSNs were able to completely adsorb shRNA-TRAF3 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-3) plasmid at a mass ratio as low as 30:1, and exhibited a low cytotoxicity for KCs. LPMSNs were detected in KC cytoplasm in vitro, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that they were present only in KCs in liver tissue in vivo. The max KC transfection efficiency with LPMSNs was 34.8± 0.07%, as evaluated using flow cytometry, and the protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by shRNA-TRAF3 plasmid transfection after 24 h in vitro and 48 h in vivo. In conclusion, KC targeted transfection was achieved successfully by LPMSNs carrying shRNA-TRAF3 plasmids in vitro and vivo. The protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were suppressed significantly. These results suggest that LPMSNs are a promising vehicle for delivering exogenous genes into KCs in vitro and vivo. - Highlights: • We constructed Large-Pore Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (LPMSNs). • LPMSNs adsorbed high quantity of plasmid. • Low cytotoxicity of LPMSNs to Kupffer cells. • LPMSNs delivered plasmid into Kupffer cells.

  2. Development of a transformation system for Chlamydia trachomatis: restoration of glycogen biosynthesis by acquisition of a plasmid shuttle vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibing; Kahane, Simona; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Lambden, Paul R; Clarke, Ian N

    2011-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis remains one of the few major human pathogens for which there is no transformation system. C. trachomatis has a unique obligate intracellular developmental cycle. The extracellular infectious elementary body (EB) is an infectious, electron-dense structure that, following host cell infection, differentiates into a non-infectious replicative form known as a reticulate body (RB). Host cells infected by C. trachomatis that are treated with penicillin are not lysed because this antibiotic prevents the maturation of RBs into EBs. Instead the RBs fail to divide although DNA replication continues. We have exploited these observations to develop a transformation protocol based on expression of β-lactamase that utilizes rescue from the penicillin-induced phenotype. We constructed a vector which carries both the chlamydial endogenous plasmid and an E.coli plasmid origin of replication so that it can shuttle between these two bacterial recipients. The vector, when introduced into C. trachomatis L2 under selection conditions, cures the endogenous chlamydial plasmid. We have shown that foreign promoters operate in vivo in C. trachomatis and that active β-lactamase and chloramphenicol acetyl transferase are expressed. To demonstrate the technology we have isolated chlamydial transformants that express the green fluorescent protein (GFP). As proof of principle, we have shown that manipulation of chlamydial biochemistry is possible by transformation of a plasmid-free C. trachomatis recipient strain. The acquisition of the plasmid restores the ability of the plasmid-free C. trachomatis to synthesise and accumulate glycogen within inclusions. These findings pave the way for a comprehensive genetic study on chlamydial gene function that has hitherto not been possible. Application of this technology avoids the use of therapeutic antibiotics and therefore the procedures do not require high level containment and will allow the analysis of genome function by

  3. Conjugation-Mediated Transfer of Antibiotic-Resistance Plasmids Between Enterobacteriaceae in the Digestive Tract of Blaberus craniifer (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacarso, I; Iseppi, R; Sabia, C; Messi, P; Condò, C; Bondi, M; de Niederhäusern, S

    2016-05-01

    Cockroaches, insects of the order Blattodea, seem to play a crucial role in the possible conjugation-mediated genetic exchanges that occur among bacteria that harbor in the cockroach intestinal tract. The gut of these insects can be thought of as an effective in vivo model for the natural transfer of antimicrobial resistance plasmids among bacteria. In our study, we evaluated the conjugation-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes between Escherichia coli and other microorganisms of the same Enterobacteriaceae family within the intestinal tract of Blaberus craniifer Burmeister, 1838 (Blattodea: Blaberidae). Different in vivo mating experiments were performed using E. coli RP4 harboring the RP4 plasmid carrying ampicillin, kanamycin, and tetracycline resistance genes as the donor and E. coli K12 resistant to nalidixic acid or Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis IMM39 resistant to streptomycin as the recipients. The RP4 plasmid was successfully transferred to both recipients, producing E. coli K12-RP4 and S. Enteritidis IMM39-RP4 transconjugants. Conjugation frequencies in vivo were similar to those previously observed in vitro. The transfer of the RP4 plasmid in all transconjugants was confirmed by small-scale plasmid isolation and agar gel electrophoresis, suggesting that the intestinal tract of cockroaches is an effective in vivo model for natural gene transfer. Our results confirm that cockroaches allow for the exchange of antimicrobial resistance plasmids among bacteria and may represent a potential reservoir for the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in different environments. These findings are particularly significant to human health in the context of health care settings such as hospitals. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Development of a transformation system for Chlamydia trachomatis: restoration of glycogen biosynthesis by acquisition of a plasmid shuttle vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Wang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis remains one of the few major human pathogens for which there is no transformation system. C. trachomatis has a unique obligate intracellular developmental cycle. The extracellular infectious elementary body (EB is an infectious, electron-dense structure that, following host cell infection, differentiates into a non-infectious replicative form known as a reticulate body (RB. Host cells infected by C. trachomatis that are treated with penicillin are not lysed because this antibiotic prevents the maturation of RBs into EBs. Instead the RBs fail to divide although DNA replication continues. We have exploited these observations to develop a transformation protocol based on expression of β-lactamase that utilizes rescue from the penicillin-induced phenotype. We constructed a vector which carries both the chlamydial endogenous plasmid and an E.coli plasmid origin of replication so that it can shuttle between these two bacterial recipients. The vector, when introduced into C. trachomatis L2 under selection conditions, cures the endogenous chlamydial plasmid. We have shown that foreign promoters operate in vivo in C. trachomatis and that active β-lactamase and chloramphenicol acetyl transferase are expressed. To demonstrate the technology we have isolated chlamydial transformants that express the green fluorescent protein (GFP. As proof of principle, we have shown that manipulation of chlamydial biochemistry is possible by transformation of a plasmid-free C. trachomatis recipient strain. The acquisition of the plasmid restores the ability of the plasmid-free C. trachomatis to synthesise and accumulate glycogen within inclusions. These findings pave the way for a comprehensive genetic study on chlamydial gene function that has hitherto not been possible. Application of this technology avoids the use of therapeutic antibiotics and therefore the procedures do not require high level containment and will allow the analysis of genome

  5. Adding to Yersinia enterocolitica Gene Pool Diversity: Two Cryptic Plasmids from a Biotype 1A Isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lepka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the nucleotide sequence of two novel cryptic plasmids (4357 and 14 662 base pairs carried by a Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strain isolated from pork. As distinguished from most biotype 1A strains, this isolate, designated 07-04449, exhibited adherence to eukaryotic cells. The smaller plasmid pYe4449-1 carries five attributable open reading frames (ORFs encoding the first CcdA/CcdB-like antitoxin/toxin system described for a Yersinia plasmid, a RepA-like replication initiation protein, and mobilizing factors MobA and MobC. The deduced amino acid sequences showed highest similarity to proteins described in Salmonella (CcdA/B, Klebsiella (RepA, and Plesiomonas (MobA/C indicating genomic fluidity among members of the Enterobacteriaceae. One additional ORF with unknown function, termed ORF5, was identified with an ancestry distinct from the rest of the plasmid. While the C+G content of ORF5 is 38.3%, the rest of pYe4449-1 shows a C+G content of 55.7%. The C+G content of the larger plasmid pYe4449-2 (54.9% was similar to that of pYe4449-1 (53.7% and differed from that of the Y. enterocolitica genome (47.3%. Of the 14 ORFs identified on pYe4449-2, only six ORFs showed significant similarity to database entries. For three of these ORFs likely functions could be ascribed: a TnpR-like resolvase and a phage replication protein, localized each on a low C+G island, and DNA primase TraC. Two ORFs of pYe4449-2, ORF3 and ORF7, seem to encode secretable proteins. Epitope-tagging of ORF3 revealed protein expression at 4°C but not at or above 27°C suggesting adaptation to a habitat outside swine. The hypothetical protein encoded by ORF7 is the member of a novel repeat protein family sharing the DxxGN(xnDxxGN motif. Our findings illustrate the exceptional gene pool diversity within the species Y. enterocolitica driven by horizontal gene transfer events.

  6. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  7. Optimization of ordered plasmid assembly by gap repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Pedersen, Mette Louise; Krogh, Berit Olsen

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial genetic libraries are powerful tools for diversifying and optimizing biomolecules. The process of library assembly is a major limiting factor for library complexity and quality. Gap repair by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can facilitate in vivo assembly of DNA...... in mutants carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase-encoding gene. Using our experimental conditions, a gap-repair efficiency of > 10(6) plasmid-harbouring colonies/µg gapped vector DNA is obtained in a single transformation, with a recombination fidelity > 90%....

  8. Properties of Lactose Plasmid pLY101 in Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko

    1987-01-01

    A starter strain, Lactobacillus casei C257, was found to carry a lactose plasmid, pLY101. Restriction mapping showed that pLY101 DNA was 68.2 kilobases long. Since a non-lactose-utilizing variant of C257, MSK248, lost phospho-β-galactosidase (P-β-gal) activity and pLY101 DNA had a sequence(s) homologous to the streptococcal fragment including a P-β-gal gene, pLY101 is likely to encode a P-β-gal gene required for lactose metabolism in C257. MSK248 grew in galactose medium at a rate identical t...

  9. Plasmid Involvement in Acyclic Isoprenoid Metabolism by Pseudomonas putida

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbergh, Peter A.; Wright, Ann M.

    1983-01-01

    An organism identified as Pseudomonas putida was found to utilize citronellol or geraniol as the sole carbon and energy source. The ability to degrade these acyclic isoprenols was associated with pSRQ50, a 50-megadalton transmissible plasmid.

  10. Antimicrobial, heavy metal resistance and plasmid profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial, heavy metal resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of Coliforms (Enterobacteriacea) isolated from nosocomial infections and healthy human faeces were compared. Fifteen of the 25 isolates from nosocomial infections were identified as Escherichia coli, and remaining as Kelebsiella pneumoniae.

  11. Neonatal intramuscular injection of plasmid encoding glucagon-like ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    -A) was significantly elevated in GP rats. These results suggest that neonatal intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA encoding GLP-1 affects anxiety behaviour in adolescent rats, probably through NGFI-A-activated upregulation of hippocampal ...

  12. Effective removal of a range of Ti/Ri plasmids using a pBBR1-type vector having a repABC operon and a lux reporter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinji; Sakai, Ayako; Agustina, Vita; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2018-02-01

    Ti and Ri plasmids of pathogenic Agrobacterium strains are stably maintained by the function of a repABC operon and have been classified into four incompatibility groups, namely, incRh1, incRh2, incRh3, and incRh4. Removal of these plasmids from their bacterial cells is an important step in determining strain-specific virulence characteristics and to construct strains useful for transformation. Here, we developed two powerful tools to improve this process. We first established a reporter system to detect the presence and absence of Ti/Ri plasmids in cells by using an acetosyringone (AS)-inducible promoter of the Ti2 small RNA and luxAB from Vibrio harveyi. This system distinguished a Ti/Ri plasmid-free cell colony among plasmid-harboring cell colonies by causing the latter colonies to emit light in response to AS. We then constructed new "Ti/Ri eviction plasmids," each of which carries a repABC from one of four Ti/Ri plasmids that belonged to incRh1, incRh2, incRh3, and incRh4 groups in the suicidal plasmid pK18mobsacB and in a broad-host-range pBBR1 vector. Introduction of the new eviction plasmids into Agrobacterium cells harboring the corresponding Ti/Ri plasmids led to Ti/Ri plasmid-free cells in every incRh group. The Ti/Ri eviction was more effective by plasmids with the pBBR1 backbone than by those with the pK18mobsacB backbone. Furthermore, the highly stable cryptic plasmid pAtC58 in A. tumefaciens C58 was effectively evicted by the introduction of a pBBR1 vector containing the repABC of pAtC58. These results indicate that the set of pBBR1-repABC plasmids is a powerful tool for the removal of stable rhizobial plasmids.

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of the multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid pR55 from Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated in 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublet, Benoît; Boyd, David; Douard, Gregory; Praud, Karine; Cloeckaert, Axel; Mulvey, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    To determine the complete nucleotide sequence of the multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid pR55 from a clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae strain that was isolated from a urinary tract infection in 1969 in a French hospital and compare it with those of contemporary emerging IncA/C plasmids. The plasmid was purified and sequenced using a 454 sequencing approach. After draft assembly, additional PCRs and walking reads were performed for gap closure. Sequence comparisons and multiple alignments with other IncA/C plasmids were done using the BLAST algorithm and CLUSTAL W, respectively. Plasmid pR55 (170 810 bp) revealed a shared plasmid backbone (>99% nucleotide identity) with current members of the IncA/C(2) multidrug resistance plasmid family that are widely disseminating antibiotic resistance genes. Nevertheless, two specific multidrug resistance gene arrays probably acquired from other genetic elements were identified inserted at conserved hotspot insertion sites in the IncA/C backbone. A novel transposon named Tn6187 showed an atypical mixed transposon configuration composed of two mercury resistance operons and two transposition modules that are related to Tn21 and Tn1696, respectively, and an In0-type integron. IncA/C(2) multidrug resistance plasmids have a broad host range and have been implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Enterobacteriaceae from humans and animals. This typical IncA/C(2) genetic scaffold appears to carry various multidrug resistance gene arrays and is now also a successful vehicle for spreading AmpC-like cephalosporinase and metallo-β-lactamase genes, such as bla(CMY) and bla(NDM), respectively.

  14. A home made kit for plasmid DNA mini-preparation | Kotchoni ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A home made kit for plasmid DNA mini-preparation. ... Here, we developed a rapid protocol for plasmid DNA extraction based on the alkaline lysis method of plasmid preparation (extraction at pH 8.0). Using this new method, a good plasmid preparation ... number of samples. (African Journal of Biotechnology: 2003 2(4): 87) ...

  15. The Addgene repository: an international nonprofit plasmid and data resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamens, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    The Addgene Repository (http://www.addgene.org) was founded to accelerate research and discovery by improving access to useful, high-quality research materials and information. The repository archives plasmids generated by scientists, conducts quality control, annotates the associated data and makes the plasmids and their data available to the scientific community. Plasmid associated data undergoes ongoing curation by members of the scientific community and by Addgene scientists. The growing database contains information on >31,000 unique plasmids spanning most experimental biological systems and organisms. The library includes a large number of plasmid tools for use in a wide variety of research areas, such as empty backbones, lentiviral resources, fluorescent protein vectors and genome engineering tools. The Addgene Repository database is always evolving with new plasmid deposits so it contains currently pertinent resources while ensuring the information on earlier deposits is still available. Custom search and browse features are available to access information on the diverse collection. Extensive educational materials and information are provided by the database curators to support the scientists that are accessing the repository's materials and data. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-plasmids does not reduce fitness but enhances virulence in some strains of pandemic E. coli lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina eSchaufler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic ESBL-producing E. coli lineages occur frequently worldwide, not only in a human health context but in animals and the environment, also in settings with low antimicrobial pressures. This study investigated the fitness costs of ESBL-plasmids and their influence on chromosomally encoded features associated with virulence, such as those involved in the planktonic and sessile behaviors of ST131 and ST648 E. coli. ESBL-plasmid-carrying wild-type E. coli strains, their corresponding ESBL-plasmid-cured variants (PCV, and complementary ESBL-carrying transformants were comparatively analyzed using growth curves, Omnilog® phenotype microarray (PM assays, macrocolony and biofilm formation, swimming motility, and RNA sequence analysis. Growth curves and PM results pointed towards similar growth and metabolic behaviors among the strains. Phenotypic differences in some strains were detected, including enhanced curli fimbriae and/or cellulose production as well as a reduced swimming capacity of some ESBL-carrying strains, as compared to their respective PCVs. RNA sequencing mostly confirmed the phenotypic results, suggesting that the chromosomally encoded csgD pathway is a key factor involved. These results contradict the hypothesis that ESBL-plasmid-carriage leads to a fitness loss in ESBL-carrying strains. Instead, the results indicate an influence of some ESBL-plasmids on chromosomally encoded features associated with virulence in some E. coli strains. In conclusion, apart from antibiotic resistance selective advantages, ESBL-plasmid-carriage may also lead to enhanced virulence or adaption to specific habitats in some strains of pandemic ESBL-producing E. coli lineages.

  17. Detection of plasmid-borne extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes in Escherichia coli isolates from bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christin; Michael, Geovana Brenner; Kadlec, Kristina; Hassel, Melanie; Schwarz, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates have been increasingly reported during recent years. The aims of this study were to characterize ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from bovine mastitis as well as their ESBL gene-carrying plasmids. A culture collection of E. coli isolated from bovine quarter milk samples (2009-2013), was screened for ESBL production using ESBL selective agar plates. Putative ESBL producers (n=16) were investigated by phenotypic confirmatory tests and were characterized by the detection/sequencing of ESBL genes, XbaI macrorestriction analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), phylotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. ESBL gene-carrying plasmids were investigated by transfer experiments, PCRs for the detection of co-located antimicrobial resistance genes, PCR-based replicon typing and S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Twelve ESBL-producing isolates were found. They showed eleven different XbaI patterns and were distributed among eight MLST types [ST10 (n=3), ST117 (n=2), ST361 (n=1), ST362 (n=1), ST540 (n=1), ST1431 (n=2), ST1508 (n=1), and the novel ST5447 (n=1)] and the phylogenetic groups A (n=6), B1 (n=2), B2 (n=1) and D (n=3). ESBL genes bla CTX-M-1 (n=5), bla CTX-M-2 (n=2), bla CTX-M-14 and bla CTX-M-15 (n=4) were found on conjugative plasmids (35-225kb) of diverse incompatibility groups (e.g. IncF, IncI1 or HI2+P). Co-located resistance to sulfonamides, tetracycline, trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol/florfenicol was detected on five ESBL gene-carrying plasmids, but seven plasmids conferred solely resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. The presence of additional resistance genes on the ESBL gene-carrying plasmids suggests that co-selection of ESBL genes may occur even in the absence of β-lactam antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Telomeres of the linear chromosomes of Lyme disease spirochaetes: nucleotide sequence and possible exchange with linear plasmid telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casjens, S; Murphy, M; DeLange, M; Sampson, L; van Vugt, R; Huang, W M

    1997-11-01

    Bacteria of the spirochaete genus Borrelia have linear chromosomes about 950 kbp in size. We report here that these linear chromosomes have covalently closed hairpin structures at their termini that are similar but not identical to those reported for linear plasmids carried by these organisms. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the chromosomal telomeric regions indicates that unique, apparently functional genes lie within a few hundred bp of each of the telomeres, and that there is an imperfect 26 bp inverted repeat at the two telomeres. In addition, we characterize a major chromosomal length polymorphism within the right telomeric regions of various Borrelia isolates, and show that sequences similar to those near the right telomere are often found on linear plasmids in B. burgdorferi (sensu stricto) isolates from nature. Sequences similar to a number of other regions of the chromosome, including those near the left telomere, were not found on B. burgdorferi plasmids. These observations suggest that there has been historical exchange of genetic information between the linear plasmids and the right end of the linear chromosome.

  19. Putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in Mitochondrial Plasmid of Paramecium caudatum Stock GT704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina Ekawati Tallei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria of Paramecium caudatum stock GT704 has a set of four kinds of linear plasmids with sizes of 8.2, 4.1, 2.8 and 1.4 kb. The plasmids of 8.2 and 2.8 kb exist as dimers consisting of 4.1- and 1.4-kb monomers, respectively. The plasmid 2.8 kb, designated as pGT704-2.8, contains an open reading frame encodes for putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP. This study reveals that this RNAP belongs to superfamily of DNA/RNA polymerase and family of T7/T3 single chain RNA polymerase and those of mitochondrial plasmid of fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. It is suggested that RNAP of pGT704-2.8 can perform transcription without transcription factor as promoter recognition. Given that only two motifs were found, it could not be ascertained whether this RNAP has a full function independently or integrated with mtDNA in carrying out its function.

  20. Cis activation of the c-myc gene in bovine papilloma virus type 1/human c-myc hybrid plasmids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modjtahedi, N.; Feunteun, J.; Brison, O. (Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France))

    1988-01-01

    The c-myc gene amplification observed in human tumors is likely to represent an activation mechanism aiming at an increased transcription level. In order to evaluate the biological significance of this amplification in the malignant transformation the authors designed an experimental model that could possibly mimic this situation in vitro. They have constructed a series of plasmids which physically link the human c-myc gene to the bovine papilloma virus type 1 genome (BPV1) and therefore should be maintained as amplified episomes upon transformation of rodent cells. Anticipating that the high copy number will bring about the immortalizing capacity of the c-myc gene, the constructions were introduced into primary rat embryo cells. Immortal cell lines were established by transfection of the hybrid plasmids carrying either the complete BPV1 genome or the transforming region of the viral genome. The BPV1 DNA alone or the c-myc gene alone has no activity in this assay. The analysis of the established cell lines demonstrates that the transfected plasmids are present not as free copies as anticipated but rather integrated as tandem repeats. They present data which strongly suggest that the immortalization capacity of the hybrid plasmids reflects the activation of the c-myc gene by the transactivable BPV1 enhancer. Although both the BPV1 early genes and the c-myc gene are actively transcribed, most of the cell lines do not display a transformed phenotype.

  1. Generation of influenza virus from avian cells infected by Salmonella carrying the viral genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangmin Zhang

    Full Text Available Domestic poultry serve as intermediates for transmission of influenza A virus from the wild aquatic bird reservoir to humans, resulting in influenza outbreaks in poultry and potential epidemics/pandemics among human beings. To combat emerging avian influenza virus, an inexpensive, heat-stable, and orally administered influenza vaccine would be useful to vaccinate large commercial poultry flocks and even migratory birds. Our hypothesized vaccine is a recombinant attenuated bacterial strain able to mediate production of attenuated influenza virus in vivo to induce protective immunity against influenza. Here we report the feasibility and technical limitations toward such an ideal vaccine based on our exploratory study. Five 8-unit plasmids carrying a chloramphenicol resistance gene or free of an antibiotic resistance marker were constructed. Influenza virus was successfully generated in avian cells transfected by each of the plasmids. The Salmonella carrier was engineered to allow stable maintenance and conditional release of the 8-unit plasmid into the avian cells for recovery of influenza virus. Influenza A virus up to 10⁷ 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50/ml were recovered from 11 out of 26 co-cultures of chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells upon infection by the recombinant Salmonella carrying the 8-unit plasmid. Our data prove that a bacterial carrier can mediate generation of influenza virus by delivering its DNA cargoes into permissive host cells. Although we have made progress in developing this Salmonella influenza virus vaccine delivery system, further improvements are necessary to achieve efficient virus production, especially in vivo.

  2. Novel Plasmid Transformation Method Mediated by Chrysotile, Sliding Friction, and Elastic Body Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Naoto; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Matsuki, Kaori; Shigeno, Toshiya

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli as a plasmid recipient cell was dispersed in a chrysotile colloidal solution, containing chrysotile adsorbed to plasmid DNA (chrysotile-plasmid cell mixture). Following this, the chrysotile-plasmid cell mixture was dropped onto the surface of an elastic body, such as agarose, and treated physically by sliding a polystyrene streak bar over the elastic body to create friction. Plasmid DNA was easily incorporated into E. coli, and antibiotic resistance was conferred by transform...

  3. Emergence of Plasmid-Borne dfrA14 Trimethoprim Resistance Gene in Shigella sonnei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALFONSO MIRANDA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The most common mechanism of trimethoprim (TMP-resistance is the acquisition of dihydrofolate reductase enzyme resistant to this drug. Previous molecular characterization of TMP-genes resistance in Chilean isolates of S. sonnei searching for dfrA1 and dfrA8, showed solely the presence of dfrA8 (formerly dhfrIIIc. However, these genetic markers were absent in S. sonnei strains further isolated during an outbreak in 2009. To identify the TMP-resistance gene in these strains, a genomic DNA library from a TMP-resistant (TMPR S. sonnei representative strain for the outbreak was used to clone, select and identify a TMP-resistance marker. The TMPR clone was sequenced by primer walking, identifying the presence of the dfrA14 gene in the sul2-strA’-dfrA14-‘strA-strB gene arrangement, harbored in a native 6,779-bp plasmid. The same plasmid was isolated by transforming with a ~4.2 MDa plasmid extracted from several TMPR S. sonnei strains into E. coli. This plasmid, named pABC-3, was present only in dfrA14-positive strains and was homologous to a previously described pCERC-1, but different due to the absence of an 11-bp repetitive unit. The distribution of dfrA1, dfrA8 and dfrA14 TMP-resistance genes was determined in 126 TMPR S. sonnei isolates. Most of the strains (96 % carried only one of the three TMP-resistance genes assessed. Thus, all strains obtained during the 2009-outbreak harbored only dfrA14, whereas, dfrA8 was the most abundant gene marker before outbreak and, after the outbreak dfrA1 seems have appeared in circulating strains. According to PFGE, dfrA14-positive strains were clustered in a genetically related group including some dfrA1- and dfrA8-positive strains; meanwhile other genetic group included most of the dfrA8-positive strains. This distribution also correlated with the isolation period, showing a dynamics of trimethoprim genetic markers prevalent in Chilean S. sonnei strains. To our knowledge, dfrA14 gene associated to a small

  4. Heat resistance mediated by a new plasmid encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a possible novel mechanism for nosocomial persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  5. Heat Resistance Mediated by a New Plasmid Encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a Possible Novel Mechanism for Nosocomial Persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  6. Diversity of STs, plasmids and ESBL genes among Escherichia coli from humans, animals and food in Germany, the Netherlands and the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Day, Michaela J.; Rodríguez, Irene; Essen-Zandbergen, van Alieda; Dierikx, Cindy; Kadlec, Kristina; Schink, Anne Kathrin; Wu, Guanghui; Chattaway, Marie A.; DoNascimento, Vivienne; Wain, John; Helmuth, Reiner; Guerra, Beatriz; Schwarz, Stefan; Threlfall, John; Woodward, Martin J.; Coldham, Nick; Mevius, Dik; Woodford, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare ESBL-producing Escherichia coli causing infections in humans with infecting or commensal isolates from animals and isolates from food of animal origin in terms of the strain types, the ESBL gene present and the plasmids that carry the respective ESBL genes.

  7. Characterization of a collection of plasmid-containing bacteria isolated from an on-farm biopurification system used for pesticide removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carla Martini, Maria; Javier Albicoro, Francisco; Nour, Eman; Schlueter, Andreas; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Springael, Dirk; Smalla, Kornelia; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Florencia Del Papa, Maria

    Biopurification systems (BPS) are complex soil-related and artificially-generated environments usually designed for the removal of toxic compounds from contaminated wastewaters. The present study has been conducted to isolate and characterize a collection of cultivable plasmid-carrying bacterial

  8. High Heterogeneity of Escherichia coli Sequence Types Harbouring ESBL/AmpC Genes on IncI1 Plasmids in the Colombian Poultry Chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos, Luis Ricardo; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; León, Maribel; Clavijo, Viviana; Arevalo, Alejandra; Bernal, Johan F; Timmerman, Arjen J; Mevius, Dik J; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Hordijk, Joost

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global spread.

  9. High heterogeneity of Escherichia coli sequence types harbouring ESBL/AmpC genes on IncI1 plasmids in the Colombian poultry chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos, Luis Ricardo; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; León, Maribel; Clavijo, Viviana; Arevalo, Alejandra; Bernal, Johan F.; Timmerman, Arjen J.; Mevius, Dik J.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Hordijk, Joost

    2017-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global

  10. Regular cellular distribution of plasmids by oscillating and filament-forming ParA ATPase of plasmid pB171

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Ringgaard, Simon; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    Centromere-like loci from bacteria segregate plasmids to progeny cells before cell division. The ParA ATPase (a MinD homologue) of the par2 locus from plasmid pB171 forms oscillating helical structures over the nucleoid. Here we show that par2 distributes plasmid foci regularly along the length o...

  11. Comparative Genomics of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella Isolates from Intensive Care Unit Patients and the Utility of Whole-Genome Sequencing in Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Zhao, LiCheng; Boutin, Mallory A.; Stancil, Angela; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D.; Rasko, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The IncA/C plasmids have been implicated for their role in the dissemination of β-lactamases, including gene variants that confer resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, which are often the treatment of last resort against multidrug-resistant, hospital-associated pathogens. A blaFOX-5 gene was detected in 14 Escherichia coli and 16 Klebsiella isolates that were cultured from perianal swabs of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) in Baltimore, MD, over a span of 3 years. Four of the FOX-encoding isolates were obtained from subsequent samples of patients that were initially negative for an AmpC β-lactamase upon admission to the ICU, suggesting that the AmpC β-lactamase-encoding plasmid was acquired while the patient was in the ICU. The genomes of five E. coli isolates and six Klebsiella isolates containing blaFOX-5 were selected for sequencing based on their plasmid profiles. An ∼167-kb IncA/C plasmid encoding the FOX-5 β-lactamase, a CARB-2 β-lactamase, additional antimicrobial resistance genes, and heavy metal resistance genes was identified. Another FOX-5-encoding IncA/C plasmid that was nearly identical except for a variable region associated with the resistance genes was also identified. To our knowledge, these plasmids represent the first FOX-5-encoding plasmids sequenced. We used comparative genomics to describe the genetic diversity of a plasmid encoding a FOX-5 β-lactamase relative to the whole-genome diversity of 11 E. coli and Klebsiella isolates that carry this plasmid. Our findings demonstrate the utility of whole-genome sequencing for tracking of plasmid and antibiotic resistance gene distribution in health care settings. PMID:24914121

  12. Comparative genomics of an IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella isolates from intensive care unit patients and the utility of whole-genome sequencing in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Zhao, LiCheng; Boutin, Mallory A; Stancil, Angela; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A; Johnson, J Kristie

    2014-08-01

    The IncA/C plasmids have been implicated for their role in the dissemination of β-lactamases, including gene variants that confer resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, which are often the treatment of last resort against multidrug-resistant, hospital-associated pathogens. A bla(FOX-5) gene was detected in 14 Escherichia coli and 16 Klebsiella isolates that were cultured from perianal swabs of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) in Baltimore, MD, over a span of 3 years. Four of the FOX-encoding isolates were obtained from subsequent samples of patients that were initially negative for an AmpC β-lactamase upon admission to the ICU, suggesting that the AmpC β-lactamase-encoding plasmid was acquired while the patient was in the ICU. The genomes of five E. coli isolates and six Klebsiella isolates containing bla(FOX-5) were selected for sequencing based on their plasmid profiles. An ∼ 167-kb IncA/C plasmid encoding the FOX-5 β-lactamase, a CARB-2 β-lactamase, additional antimicrobial resistance genes, and heavy metal resistance genes was identified. Another FOX-5-encoding IncA/C plasmid that was nearly identical except for a variable region associated with the resistance genes was also identified. To our knowledge, these plasmids represent the first FOX-5-encoding plasmids sequenced. We used comparative genomics to describe the genetic diversity of a plasmid encoding a FOX-5 β-lactamase relative to the whole-genome diversity of 11 E. coli and Klebsiella isolates that carry this plasmid. Our findings demonstrate the utility of whole-genome sequencing for tracking of plasmid and antibiotic resistance gene distribution in health care settings. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Isolation and characterization of naphthalene-catabolic genes and plasmids from oil-contaminated soil by using two cultivation-independent approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Akira; Miyazaki, Ryo; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Life Sciences; Sota, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Life Sciences; Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2007-02-15

    Two different cultivation-independent approaches were applied to isolate genes for naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from oil-contaminated soil in Japan. One approach was the construction of a broad-host-range cosmid-based metagenomic DNA library, and the other was the so-called exogenous plasmid isolation technique. Our screening of NDO genes in both approaches was based on the functional complementation of Pseudomonas putida strains which contained Tn4655K, a transposon carrying the entire set of naphthalene-catabolic (nah) genes but lacking the NDO-encoding gene. We obtained in the former approach a cosmid clone (pSLX928-6) that carried an nah upper pathway operon for conversion of naphthalene to salicylate, and this operon showed a significantly high level of similarity to the corresponding operon on an IncP-9 naphthalene-catabolic plasmid, pDTG1. In the latter approach, the microbial fraction from the soil was mated with a plasmid-free P. putida strain containing a chromosomal copy of Tn4655K, and transconjugants were obtained that received either a 200- or 80-kb plasmid containing all the nah genes for the complete degradation of naphthalene. Subsequent analysis revealed that (1) both plasmids belong to the IncP-9 incompatibility group; (2) their nah upper pathway operons are significantly similar, but not completely identical, to those of pDTG1 and pSLX928-6; and (3) these plasmids carried genes for the salicylate metabolism by the meta-cleavage pathway. (orig.)

  14. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss, Adam M; Olson, Daniel G; Caiazza, Nicky C; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-05-06

    Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+dcm+E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAMG205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  15. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Olson, Daniel G. [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Caiazza, Nicky [Mascoma Corporation; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. RESULTS: We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+ dcm+ E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAM205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. CONCLUSION: E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  16. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guss Adam M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. Results We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+dcm+E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAMG205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. Conclusions E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  17. Should women carry their antenatal records?

    OpenAIRE

    Draper, J; Field, S; Thomas, H; Hare, M J

    1986-01-01

    A study of women's views on carrying their medical records during their pregnancy was conducted in Cambridge in 1982. Eighty eight women who were given their full records were compared with a control group of 83 women who carried the traditional cooperation card, both groups answering postal questionnaires about the advantages and disadvantages of carrying their respective records. Most women found advantages in carrying the complete record, although it was too large to carry for practical pu...

  18. Construction of pRMES and pTMES plasmids to test their expression ability of Nanobodies via the efficient T7 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoud, H.; Quider, M.; Abbady, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanobody technology is considered as a promising molecular biology technique performed by means of the genetic engineering of special type of antibodies, existing exclusively in Camelidea. It enables the obtaining of small proteins, referred to as Nanobodies, which are characterized by high stability and solubility, are able to link to their specific antigens. After production, the Nanobody genes are cloned within plasmids of protein expression in bacteria, allowing their stable and continuous production for research and applied purposes. This work aimed to design new plasmids for Nanobody genes cloning in order to ensure a strong expression via the efficient T7 promoter, thus enhancing the quantity of the produced Nanobodies. These plasmids were called pRMES and pTMES and their ability to express Nanobodies, NbBruc02 and Nb16M, was tested. The plasmid pTMES showed an enhanced production condition of this Nanobody. These new plasmids, by their variable characteristics, could represent efficient tools for general production of recombinant proteins, including Nanobodies (author).

  19. Isolation of novel IncA/C and IncN fluoroquinolone resistance plasmids from an antibiotic-polluted lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Johnning, Anna; Nilsson, Ida; Smalla, Kornelia; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-polluted environments may function as reservoirs for novel resistance plasmids not yet encountered in pathogens. The aims of this study were to assess the potential of resistance transfer between bacteria from such environments and Escherichia coli, and to characterize the conjugative elements involved. Sediment samples from Kazipally lake and Asanikunta tank, two Indian lakes with a history of severe pollution with fluoroquinolones, were investigated. Proportions of resistant bacteria were determined by selective cultivation, while horizontal gene transfer was studied using a GFP-tagged E. coli as recipient. Retrieved transconjugants were tested for susceptibility by Etest(®) and captured conjugative resistance elements were characterized by WGS. The polluted lakes harboured considerably higher proportions of ciprofloxacin-resistant and sulfamethoxazole-resistant bacteria than did other Indian and Swedish lakes included for comparison (52% versus 2% and 60% versus 7%, respectively). Resistance plasmids were captured from Kazipally lake, but not from any of the other lakes; in the case of Asanikunta tank because of high sediment toxicity. Eight unique IncA/C and IncN resistance plasmids were identified among 11 sequenced transconjugants. Five plasmids were fully assembled, and four of these carried the quinolone resistance gene qnrVC1, which has previously only been found on chromosomes. Acquired resistance genes, in the majority of cases associated with class 1 integrons, could be linked to decreased susceptibility to several different classes of antibiotics. Our study shows that environments heavily polluted with antibiotics contain novel multiresistance plasmids transferrable to E. coli. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Movement and equipositioning of plasmids by ParA filament disassembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringgaard, Simon; van Zon, Jeroen; Howard, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that confer stable plasmid inheritance. We showed previously that, in the presence of ParB and parC encoded by the par2 locus of plasmid pB171, ParA formed cytoskeletal-like structures that dynamically relocated over the nucleoid. Simultaneously......, the par2 locus distributed plasmids regularly over the nucleoid. We show here that the dynamic ParA patterns are not simple oscillations. Rather, ParA nucleates and polymerizes in between plasmids. When a ParA assembly reaches a plasmid, the assembly reaction reverses into disassembly. Strikingly......, plasmids consistently migrate behind disassembling ParA cytoskeletal structures, suggesting that ParA filaments pull plasmids by depolymerization. The perpetual cycles of ParA assembly and disassembly result in continuous relocation of plasmids, which, on time averaging, results in equidistribution...

  1. Upregulated Transcription of Plasmid and Chromosomal Ribulose Monophosphate Pathway Genes Is Critical for Methanol Assimilation Rate and Methanol Tolerance in the Methylotrophic Bacterium Bacillus methanolicus

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsen, Øyvind M.; Benichou, Aline; Flickinger, Michael C.; Valla, Svein; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Brautaset, Trygve

    2006-01-01

    The natural plasmid pBM19 carries the key mdh gene needed for the oxidation of methanol into formaldehyde by Bacillus methanolicus. Five more genes, glpX, fba, tkt, pfk, and rpe, with deduced roles in the cell primary metabolism, are also located on this plasmid. By using real-time PCR, we show that they are transcriptionally upregulated (6- to 40-fold) in cells utilizing methanol; a similar induction was shown for two chromosomal genes, hps and phi. These seven genes are involved in the fruc...

  2. The conjugative plasmid of a bean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii strain is assembled from sequences of two Rhizobium plasmids and the chromosome of a Sinorhizobium strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Susana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bean-nodulating Rhizobium etli originated in Mesoamerica, while soybean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii evolved in East Asia. S. fredii strains, such as GR64, have been isolated from bean nodules in Spain, suggesting the occurrence of conjugative transfer events between introduced and native strains. In R. etli CFN42, transfer of the symbiotic plasmid (pRet42d requires cointegration with the endogenous self-transmissible plasmid pRet42a. Aiming at further understanding the generation of diversity among bean nodulating strains, we analyzed the plasmids of S. fredii GR64: pSfr64a and pSfr64b (symbiotic plasmid. Results The conjugative transfer of the plasmids of strain GR64 was analyzed. Plasmid pSfr64a was self-transmissible, and required for transfer of the symbiotic plasmid. We sequenced pSfr64a, finding 166 ORFs. pSfr64a showed three large segments of different evolutionary origins; the first one presented 38 ORFs that were highly similar to genes located on the chromosome of Sinorhizobium strain NGR234; the second one harbored 51 ORFs with highest similarity to genes from pRet42d, including the replication, but not the symbiosis genes. Accordingly, pSfr64a was incompatible with the R. etli CFN42 symbiotic plasmid, but did not contribute to symbiosis. The third segment contained 36 ORFs with highest similarity to genes localized on pRet42a, 20 of them involved in conjugative transfer. Plasmid pRet42a was unable to substitute pSfr64a for induction of pSym transfer, and its own transfer was significantly diminished in GR64 background. The symbiotic plasmid pSfr64b was found to differ from typical R. etli symbiotic plasmids. Conclusions S. fredii GR64 contains a chimeric transmissible plasmid, with segments from two R. etli plasmids and a S. fredii chromosome, and a symbiotic plasmid different from the one usually found in R. etli bv phaseoli. We infer that these plasmids originated through the transfer of a symbiotic-conjugative-plasmid

  3. Permissiveness of soil microbial communities towards broad host range plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli

    Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements facilitates adaptive and evolutionary processes in bacteria. Among the known mobile genetic elements, plasmids can confer their hosts with accessory adaptive traits, such as antibiotic or heavy metal resistances, or additional metabolic pathways...... and potentially cultivation biased image of the extent of plasmid transfer. In this thesis, I investigated the extent of plasmid transfer in microbial communities at an unprecedented level of resolution and not reliant on cultivation. I focused on soil microbial communities. Their potential role as a reservoir...... of the transconjugal pools remained similar. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Subsequently, I focused on the effect of metal cations - Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd – on community permissiveness. These cations are common environmental stressors associated with manure application to agricultural soils. I postulate...

  4. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Debets, Alfons J M; Slakhorst, S Marijke; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  5. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Slakhorst-Wandel, S.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  6. Molecular epidemiology of the endemic multiresistance plasmid pSI54/04 of Salmonella Infantis in broiler and human population in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmolka, Ama; Szabó, Móni; Kiss, János; Pászti, Judit; Adrián, Erzsébet; Olasz, Ferenc; Nagy, Béla

    2018-05-01

    Salmonella Infantis (SI) became endemic in Hungary where the PFGE cluster B, characterized by a large multiresistance (MDR) plasmid emerged among broilers leading to an increased occurrence in humans. We hypothesized that this plasmid (pSI54/04) assisted dissemination of SI. Indeed, Nal-Sul-Tet phenotypes carrying pSI54/04 occurred increasingly between 2011 and 2013 among SI isolates from broilers and humans. Characterization of pSI54/04 based on genome sequence data of the MDR strain SI54/04 indicated a size of ∼277 kb and a high sequence similarity with the megaplasmid pESI of SI predominant in Israel. Molecular characterization of 78 representative broiler and human isolates detected the prototype plasmid pSI54/04 and its variants together with novel plasmid associations within the emerging cluster B. To test in vitro and in vivo pathogenicity of pSI54/04 we produced plasmidic transconjugant of the plasmid-free pre-emergent strain SI69/94. This parental strain and its transconjugant have been tested on chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and in orally infected day old chicks. The uptake of pSI54/04 did not increase the pathogenicity of the strain SI69/94 in these systems. Thus, dissemination of SI in poultry could be assisted by antimicrobial resistance rather than by virulence modules of the endemic plasmid pSI54/04 in Hungary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi-locus sequence typing and plasmid profile characterization of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli associated with increased mortality in free-range layer flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R H; Stockholm, N M; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Christensen, H; Bisgaard, M

    2011-10-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains originating from 10 free-range layer flocks were characterized by multi-locus sequence typing and plasmid profile analysis to investigate their phylogenetic relationship and diversity, respectively. In addition to colibacillosis, all flocks tested positive for antibodies against avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) during production, and six of the flocks were concurrently affected by histomonosis. Accumulated average mortality for flocks concurrently affected by colibacillosis and histomonosis made up 17.4%, while the average mortality for E. coli-infected flocks was 16.5%. A total of eight different sequence types (STs) and 47 different plasmid profiles were demonstrated among the E. coli isolates. Within each flock between one and four different STs and between three and 13 different plasmid profiles were demonstrated. A statistical significant difference in STs and plasmid profile diversity of the population of E. coli was not demonstrated between flocks affected by histomonosis compared with histomonosis-free flocks. Only minor clonal diversity was demonstrated for each flock, and in all but one flock colibacillosis started before antibodies against aMPV were detected. All isolates, except two, carried plasmids greater than 100 kb, but only a single plasmid replicon type, IncFIB, was demonstrated, suggesting plasmids representing this type might represent a common pathogenicity factor for the different STs of E. coli. Within each flock a clonal tendency was observed, indicating that only certain clones of E. coli possess a significant pathogenic potential. These clones act as primary rather than secondary pathogens, resulting in colibacillosis without predisposing factors, including histomonosis and aMPV.

  8. Energetics of load carrying in Nepalese porters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Guillaume J; Schepens, Bénédicte; Willems, Patrick A; Heglund, Norman C

    2005-06-17

    Nepalese porters routinely carry head-supported loads equal to 100 to 200% of their body weight (Mb) for many days up and down steep mountain footpaths at high altitudes. Previous studies have shown that African women carry head-supported loads of up to 60% of their Mb far more economically than army recruits carrying equivalent loads in backpacks. Here we show that Nepalese porters carry heavier loads even more economically than African women. Female Nepalese porters, for example, carry on average loads that are 10% of their Mb heavier than the maximum loads carried by the African women, yet do so at a 25% smaller metabolic cost.

  9. PCR-Based Analysis of ColE1 Plasmids in Clinical Isolates and Metagenomic Samples Reveals Their Importance as Gene Capture Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ares-Arroyo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ColE1 plasmids are important vehicles for the spread of antibiotic resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae families of bacteria. Their monitoring is essential, as they harbor important resistant determinants in humans, animals and the environment. In this work, we have analyzed ColE1 replicons using bioinformatic and experimental approaches. First, we carried out a computational study examining the structure of different ColE1 plasmids deposited in databases. Bioinformatic analysis of these ColE1 replicons revealed a mosaic genetic structure consisting of a host-adapted conserved region responsible for the housekeeping functions of the plasmid, and a variable region encoding a wide variety of genes, including multiple antibiotic resistance determinants. From this exhaustive computational analysis we developed a new PCR-based technique, targeting a specific sequence in the conserved region, for the screening, capture and sequencing of these small plasmids, either specific for Enterobacteriaceae or specific for Pasteurellaceae. To validate this PCR-based system, we tested various collections of isolates from both bacterial families, finding that ColE1 replicons were not only highly prevalent in antibiotic-resistant isolates, but also present in susceptible bacteria. In Pasteurellaceae, ColE1 plasmids carried almost exclusively antibiotic resistance genes. In Enterobacteriaceae, these plasmids encoded a large range of traits, including not only antibiotic resistance determinants, but also a wide variety of genes, showing the huge genetic plasticity of these small replicons. Finally, we also used a metagenomic approach in order to validate this technique, performing this PCR system using total DNA extractions from fecal samples from poultry, turkeys, pigs and humans. Using Illumina sequencing of the PCR products we identified a great diversity of genes encoded by ColE1 replicons, including different antibiotic resistance

  10. Conjugative IncF and IncI1 plasmids with tet(A) and class 1 integron conferring multidrug resistance in F18(+) porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmolka, Ama; Lestár, Barbara; Pászti, Judit; Fekete, Péter; Nagy, Béla

    2015-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) bacteria frequently cause watery diarrhoea in newborn and weaned pigs. Plasmids carrying genes of different enterotoxins and fimbrial adhesins, as well as plasmids conferring antimicrobial resistance are of prime importance in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ETEC. Recent studies have revealed the significance of the porcine ETEC plasmid pTC, carrying tetracycline resistance gene tet(B) with enterotoxin genes. In contrast, the role of tet(A) plasmids in transferring resistance of porcine ETEC is less understood. The objective of the present study was to provide a comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles of porcine post-weaning ETEC strains representing pork-producing areas in Central Europe and in the USA, with special attention to plasmids carrying the tet(A) gene. Antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes of 87 porcine ETEC strains isolated from cases of post-weaning diarrhoea in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary and the Midwest USA was determined by disk diffusion and by PCR. Central European strains carrying tet(A) or tet(B) were further subjected to molecular characterisation of their tet plasmids. Results indicated that > 90% of the ETEC strains shared a common multidrug resistant (MDR) pattern of sulphamethoxazole (91%), tetracycline (84%) and streptomycin (80%) resistance. Tetracycline resistance was most frequently determined by the tet(B) gene (38%), while tet(A) was identified in 26% of all isolates with wide ranges for both tet gene types between some countries and with class 1 integrons and resistance genes co-transferred by conjugation. The virulence gene profiles included enterotoxin genes (lt, sta and/or stb), as well as adhesin genes (k88/f4, f18). Characterisation of two representative tet(A) plasmids of porcine F18(+) ETEC from Central Europe revealed that the IncF plasmid (pES11732) of the Czech strain (~120 kb) carried tet(A) in association with catA1 for

  11. Inducible plasmid-mediated copper resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, D; Camakaris, J; Lee, B T; Luke, R K

    1985-04-01

    The copper resistance in Escherichia coli determined by plasmid pRJ1004 is inducible. The level of resistance is proportional to the inducing dose of copper. The level of copper resistance in induced and uninduced cells changes with the growth phase of the culture. Induced resistant cells accumulate less copper than uninduced cells, so that reduced accumulation may be the mechanism of resistance. We propose that the inducible plasmid-coded copper resistance interacts with the normal metabolism of the cell to protect against toxic levels of copper while allowing continued operation of copper-dependent functions.

  12. Infectious alphavirus production from a simple plasmid transfection+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have developed a new method for producing infectious double subgenomic alphaviruses from plasmids transfected into mammalian cells. A double subgenomic Sindbis virus (TE3'2J was transcribed from a cytomegalovirus PolII promoter, which results in the production of infectious virus. Transfection of as little as 125 ng of plasmid is able to produce 1 × 108 plaque forming units/ml (PFU/ml of infectious virus 48 hours post-transfection. This system represents a more efficient method for producing recombinant Sindbis viruses.

  13. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microneedle delivery of plasmid DNA to living human skin: formulation coating, skin insertion and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearton, Marc; Saller, Verena; Coulman, Sion A; Gateley, Chris; Anstey, Alexander V; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Birchall, James C

    2012-01-01

    Microneedle delivery of nucleic acids, in particular plasmid DNA (pDNA), to the skin represents a potential new approach for the clinical management of genetic skin diseases and cutaneous cancers, and for intracutaneous genetic immunization. In this study excised human skin explants were used to investigate and optimize key parameters that will determine stable and effective microneedle-facilitated pDNA delivery. These include (i) high dose-loading of pDNA onto microneedle surfaces, (ii) stability and functionality of the coated pDNA, (iii) skin penetration capability of pDNA-coated microneedles, and (iv) efficient gene expression in human skin. Optimization of a dip-coating method enabled significant increases in the loading capacity, up to 100 micrograms of pDNA per 5-microneedle array. Coated microneedles were able to reproducibly perforate human skin at low (coated pDNA was partially compromised on storage, although this was improved through the addition of saccharide excipients without detriment to the biological functionality of pDNA. The pDNA-coated microneedles facilitated reporter gene expression in viable human skin. The efficiency of gene expression from coated microneedles will depend upon suitable DNA loading, efficient and reproducible skin puncture and rapid in situ dissolution of the plasmid at the site of delivery. PMID:22516089

  15. Elastic-plastic load-carrying capacity of steel members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhas Pavol

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The load-carrying capacity of steel structures and members subjected mostly to bending depends in large measure on local stability of their compressed flanges and bending webs in decided cross-sections and areas. Depending on local stability, the elastic or plastic, eventually the elastic-plastic analysis and design can be applied. The actual standards for design of steel structures contain relatively detailed rules for elastic analysis by the elastic theory and for plastic analysis by the plastic theory. The elastic-plastic analysis and design of steel members are meanwhile still problematic from theory, standard and application point of view. The real elastic-plastic behavior of the steel members is complicated strength and stability problem. Therefore, the representative experimental knowledge and results about the real elastic-plastic behavior and mechanisms of failure of the steel members have been very important from the scientific and applied aspects. The author of paper realized in previous time the wide experimental research within the range of this intention. The paper contains selected knowledge and results of the previous experimental-theoretical investigation of the elastic-plastic local stability of the steel members subjected mostly to bending. The adequate slenderness – strain relation and methodology for practical calculation of the elastic-plastic bending load-carrying capacity of the steel cross-sections and members are presented in the paper.

  16. First environmental sample containing plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli detected in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Silje Bakken; Søraas, Arne; Arnesen, Lotte Stenfors; Leegaard, Truls; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Jenum, Pål A

    2017-09-01

    We hereby report the detection of the plasmid borne mcr-1 gene conferring colistin resistance in an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli ST10 strain retrieved from seawater at a public beach in Norway. The sample was collected in September 2010 and was investigated by whole-genome sequencing in 2016. This report illustrates that E. coli strains carrying plasmid-mediated colistin resistance genes have also reached areas where this drug is hardly used at all. Surveillance of colistin resistance in environmental, veterinary, and human strains is warranted also in countries where colistin resistance is rare in clinical settings. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Transgenic lettuce seedlings carrying hepatitis B virus antigen HBsAg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Marcondes

    Full Text Available The obtainment of transgenic edible plants carrying recombinant antigens is a desired issue in search for economic alternatives viewing vaccine production. Here we report a strategy for genetic transformation of lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L. using the surface antigen HBsAg of hepatitis B virus. Transgenic lettuce seedlings were obtained through the application of a regulated balance of plant growth regulators. Genetic transformation process was acquired by cocultivation of cotyledons with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring the recombinant plasmid. It is the first description of a lettuce Brazilian variety "Vitória de Verão" genetically modified.

  18. Transgenic lettuce seedlings carrying hepatitis B virus antigen HBsAg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Jackson; Hansen, Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    The obtainment of transgenic edible plants carrying recombinant antigens is a desired issue in search for economic alternatives viewing vaccine production. Here we report a strategy for genetic transformation of lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) using the surface antigen HBsAg of hepatitis B virus. Transgenic lettuce seedlings were obtained through the application of a regulated balance of plant growth regulators. Genetic transformation process was acquired by cocultivation of cotyledons with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring the recombinant plasmid. It is the first description of a lettuce Brazilian variety 'Vitória de Verão' genetically modified.

  19. Further Spread of blaNDM-5 in Enterobacteriaceae via IncX3 Plasmids in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang eZhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and two carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE strains were isolated in a teaching hospital in Shanghai, China from 2012 to 2015. In a follow-up study, 4 New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-5 (NDM-5-producing strains were identified after screening these CRE strains, including 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae strain (RJ01, 1 Proteus mirabilis strain (RJ02, and 2 Escherichia coli strains (RJ03 and RJ04. All K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were resistant to carbapenems, third-generation cephalosporins, and piperacillin-tazobactam, but were susceptible to amikacin. No epidemiological links for either E. coli isolate were found by multilocus sequence typing (MLST and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. However, MLST revealed a novel sequence type, ST2250, of the K. pneumoniae RJ01 strain. Inc types and sizes of blaNDM-5-carrying plasmids differed among the 4 isolates, although in P. mirabilis RJ02 and E. coli RJ03, blaNDM-5 was carried by conjugative IncX3 plasmids of nearly the same size (~40 kb. Investigation of the genetic background of sequences flanking the blaNDM-5 gene showed that all 4 isolates shared the same genetic content (IS3000-ΔISAba125-IS5-blaNDM-5-ble-trpF-dsbC-IS26-ΔumuD, which was identical to that of the pNDM_MGR194 plasmid circulating in India. This is the first identification of blaNDM-5 in P. mirabilis, which suggests its further spread to Enterobacteriaceae, and indicates that IncX3 plasmids may play an important role in potentiating the spread of blaNDM.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, plasmid cleavage and cytotoxicity of cancer cells by a copper(II) complex of anthracenyl-terpyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Chinta, Jugun Prakash; Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar; Rao, Chebrolu P

    2011-11-07

    Metallo-organic compounds are interesting to study for their antitumor activity and related applications. This paper deals with the syntheses, characterization, structure determination of a copper complex of anthracenyl terpyridine (1) and its plasmid cleavage and cytotoxicity towards different cancer cell lines. The complex binds CT-DNA through partial intercalation mode. The plasmid cleavage studies carried out using pBR322 and pUC18 resulted in the formation of all the three forms of the plasmid DNA. Plasmid cleavage studies carried out with a non-redoxable Zn(2+) complex (2) supported the role of the redox activity of copper in 1. The complex 1 showed remarkable antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines, viz., cervical (HeLa, SiHa, CaSki), breast (MCF-7), liver (HepG2) and lung (H1299). A considerable lowering was observed in the IC(50) values of HPV-infected (viz., HeLa, SiHa, CaSki) vs. non-HPV-infected cell lines (MCF-7, HepG2, H1299). Antiproliferative activity of 1 was found to be much higher than the carboplatin when treated with the same cell lines. Incubation of the cells with 1 results in granular structures only with the HPV-infected cells and not with others as studied by phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy. The lower IC(50) value observed in case of 1 with HPV-infected cell lines may be correlated with the involvement of HPV oncoprotein. The role of HPV has been further augmented by transfecting the MCF-7 cells (originally not possessing HPV copy) with e6 oncoprotein cDNA. To our knowledge this is the first copper complex that causes cell death by interacting with HPV oncoprotein followed by exhibition of remarkable antiproliferative activity.

  1. Plasmid-mediated resistance to cephalosporins and quinolones in Escherichia coli from American crows in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamborova, Ivana; Dolejska, Monika; Zurek, Ludek; Townsend, Andrea K; Clark, Anne B; Ellis, Julie C; Papousek, Ivo; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) faeces were tested for Escherichia coli with plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and AmpC beta-lactamases. A total of 590 faecal samples were collected at four roosting sites in the USA and cultivated on selective media. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were performed to assess clonality. Transferability of resistance genes was studied using conjugation and transformation bioassays. In total, 78 (13%, n = 590) cefotaxime-resistant isolates were obtained, of which 66 and 12 displayed AmpC and ESBL phenotypes, respectively. Fifty-four AmpC-producing isolates carried bla CMY-2 . Isolates producing ESBLs contained genes bla CTX-M-27 (5 isolates), bla CTX-M-15 (4), bla CTX-M-14 (2) and bla CTX-M-1 (1). Ninety isolates (15%, n = 590) with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were obtained, among which 14 harboured PMQR genes aac(6')-Ib-cr (4 isolates), qnrB19 (3), qnrS1 (2), qnrA1 (2), qnrB2 (1), qnrB6 (1) and qnrD3 (1). High genetic diversity was revealed by PFGE and MLST. Epidemiologically important E. coli clones (e.g., ST131, ST405) were identified. Plasmids carrying bla CMY-2 were assigned predominantly to IncA/C (8 plasmids), IncI1/ST23 (5) and IncI1/ST12 (3). The study demonstrates a widespread occurrence of E. coli with ESBL, AmpC and PMQR genes associated with clinically important multidrug-resistant clones and epidemic plasmids, in American crows. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Complete Sequence of p07-406, a 24,179-base-pair plasmid harboring the blaVIM-7 metallo-beta-lactamase gene in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyang; Toleman, Mark A; Bennett, Peter M; Jones, Ronald N; Walsh, Timothy R

    2008-09-01

    An outbreak involving a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain that was resistant to all tested antimicrobials except polymyxin B occurred in a hospital in Houston, TX. Previous studies on this strain showed that it possesses a novel mobile metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) gene, designated bla(VIM-7), located on a plasmid (p07-406). Here, we report the complete sequence, annotation, and functional characterization of this plasmid. p07-406 is 24,179 bp in length, and 29 open reading frames were identified related to known or putatively recognized proteins. Analysis of this plasmid showed it to be comprised of four distinct regions: (i) a region of 5,200 bp having a Tn501-like mercuric resistance (mer) transposon upstream of the replication region; (ii) a Tn3-like transposon carrying a truncated integron with a bla(VIM-7) gene and an insertion sequence inserted at the other end of this transposon; (iii) a region of four genes, upstream of the Tn3-like transposon, possessing very high similarity to plasmid pXcB from Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri commonly associated with plants; (iv) a backbone sequence similar to the backbone structure of the IncP group plasmid Rms149, pB10, and R751. This is the first plasmid to be sequenced carrying an MBL gene and highlights the amelioration of DNA segments from disparate origins, most noticeably from plant pathogens.

  3. Biofouling control using microparticles carrying a biocide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C; Rosmaninho, R; Simoes, M; Pereira, M C; Bastos, M M S M; Nunes, O C; Coelho, M; Melo, L F

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a new technological approach to minimize the use of antimicrobial (AMB) agents and their deleterious effects, based on the principle of drug-delivery systems whereby the AMB chemicals are transported on microparticles. The efficacy of microparticles carrying the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), benzyldimethyldodecyl ammonium chloride (BDMDAC), was assessed against Pseudomonas fluorescens in both the planktonic and the biofilm state. The microparticles were prepared using a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique. Oppositely charged molecules of polyethyleneimine (PEI), sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), and BDMDAC were assembled on polystyrene (PS) cores. BDMDAC-coated particles were observed by CryoSEM and their composition analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. Zeta potential measurements indicated that changes in surface charge were compatible with a BDMDAC/particle interaction. This biocidal carrier structure had significant stability, verified by the release of only 15% of the BDMDAC when immersed in water for 18 months. Biocidal carrier activity was evaluated by determining the survival ratio of P. fluorescens planktonic and biofilm cells after different exposure periods to BDMDAC-coated particles. Tests with biofilm cells were also performed with the free QAC. An efficient AMB effect (minimum bactericidal concentration) against suspended cells was found for a concentration of 9.2 mg l(-1) of BDMDAC on coated particles after incubation for 30 min and 6.5 mg l(-1) of BDMDAC on coated particles after 60 min. Exposure of biofilms to PS-PEI/PSS/BDMDAC (0.87 mg l(-1)) resulted in a decrease in viability of 60.5% and 66.5% of the total biofilm population for 30 and 60 min exposure times, respectively. Exposure for 60 min to 6.33 mg l(-1) and 11.75 mg l(-1) of BDMDAC in PS-PEI/PSS/BDMDAC particles promoted inactivation of 80.6% and 87.2% of the total population, respectively. The AMB effects obtained with the application of free BDMDAC were

  4. Spontaneous deletion of a 20-kilobase DNA segment carrying genes specifying isopropylbenzene metabolism in Pseudomonas putida RE204.

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, R W; Timmis, K N

    1986-01-01

    The genes encoding isopropylbenzene metabolism in Pseudomonas putida RE204 are readily lost in two ways: by loss (curing) of plasmid pRE4 which specifies the catabolic pathway and by deletion from pRE4 of an approximately 20-kilobase segment of DNA carrying the catabolic genes. The presence of DNA sequences at the ends of the catabolic gene region sharing homology with one another suggests that the deletions result from recombination events between these homologous sequences.

  5. Multi-antibiotics-resistance plasmid profile of enteric pathogens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae 100% sensitive to peflacine and Enterococcus faecalis 100% sensitive to ciprofloxacin and augmentin. Most of the isolates were least sensitive to cotrimoxazole, ampicillin, erythromycin gentamicin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol. The resistance plasmids to the various isolates were very diverse ...

  6. Studying plasmid horizontal transfer in situ: a critical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Bailey, Mark; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2005-01-01

    This review deals with the prospective, experimental documentation of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and its role in real-time, local adaptation. We have focused on plasmids and their function as an accessory and/or adaptive gene pool. Studies of the extent of HGT in natural environments have...

  7. Use of plasmid DNA for induction of protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines based on plasmid DNA have been tested for a number of fish pathogens but so far it is only in case of the rhabdoviruses, where the technology has been a real break through in vaccine research. Aspects of dose, time-course and mechanisms of protection, as well as practical use are discussed....

  8. Plasmid-determined heavy metal resistances in Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.; Schottel, J.; Silver, S.

    1976-01-01

    Plasmid PI258 of S. aureus has separate genes determining resistance to cadmium and to mercury and the organomercurial phenylmercury acetate. Mercury(ial) resistance is due to the inducible synthesis of a mercury volatilization system. Hg/sup 2 +/ and mercury in phenylmercury acetate is enzymatically reduced to Hg/sup 0/, which is insoluble in water and highly volatile. PI258 differs from most enteric or pseudomonad plasmids which have been studied which determine resistance only to inorganic Hg/sup 2 +/. Cadmium resistance has been found only with staph plasmids. Cadmium resistance is constitutive and is associated with a lower accumulation of cadmium by the plasmid-bearing resistant cells. Cadmium accumulation by sensitive cells is energy-dependent and has those characteristics usually associated with a transmembrane active transport system. There is a specific interrelationship between cadmium accumulation and manganese accumulation and retention. Cd/sup 2 +/ competitively inhibits the uptake of Mn/sup 2 +/ and accelerates the loss of intracellular Mn/sup 2 +/ by the sensitive but has no effect on the resistant S. aureus. Under similar conditions there is no differential effect of Cd/sup 2 +/ on Mg/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Co/sup 2 +/ or Rb/sup +/ accumulation or exchange between the sensitive and the resistant strains.

  9. plasmid mediated resistance in multidrug resistant bacteria isolated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    PLASMID MEDIATED RESISTANCE IN MULTIDRUG RESISTANT BACTERIA. ISOLATED FROM CHILDREN WITH SUSPECTED SEPTICAEMIA IN ZARIA,. NIGERIA. AbdulAziz, Z. A.,1* Ehinmidu, J. O.,1 Adeshina, G. O.,1 Pala, Y. Y2., Yusuf, S. S2. and. Bugaje, M. A.3. 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical ...

  10. Plasmid containing a DNA ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Griffin, K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    A ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into the shuttle vector pDM2. Although the plasmid did not affect X-ray sensitivity, it caused an increase in UV sensitivity of the wild-type but not excision-defective H. influenzae and a decrease in UV sensitivity of the rec-1 mutant. 14 references, 2 figures

  11. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns and Plasmid Profile of Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: The antibiotic susceptibility patterns and plasmid profile were studied for 18(32.14%) samples of Vibrio cholerae isolates recovered from water samples from Elele Community. All isolates showed a multiple resistance patterns to 7 antibiotics namely amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin,.

  12. Pharmaceutical development of the plasmid DNA vaccine pDERMATT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, S.G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of tumor specific antigens and self tolerance mechanisms against these antigens led to the assumption that antigens circulating at sufficient concentration levels could break this self tolerance mechanism and evoke immunological antitumor effects. pDERMATT (plasmid DNA encoding

  13. Antibiotic resistance plasmids in wastewater treatment plants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance plasmids found in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may represent a threat to public health if they are readily disseminated into the environment and ultimately into pathogenic bacteria. The wastewater environments provide an ideal ecosystem for development and evolution of antibiotic resistance ...

  14. Plasmid Conjugation in E. coli and Drug Resistance | Igwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergence of multidrug resistance in clinical Escherichia coli has been associated significantly with plasmid mediated genes in carriers; which is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This study aimed at determining the antibiotics susceptibility pattern of E. coli isolates claimed to be ...

  15. Investigation of plasmid DNA and antibiotic resistance in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Helmuth R, Stephen R, Bungo C, Hoog B, Steinbeck A, Bulling E. (1985). Epidemiology of Vimlence-associated plasmids and outer membrane protein patterns within seven common Salmonella serotypes. Infection and community 48: 175-182. Karmaker S, Biswas D, Shaikh NM, Chatterjee SK, Kataria VK, ...

  16. Antibiogram and plasmid profiling of carbapenemase and extended ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The increased reports of ESBL dissemination from various centres in south western, Nigeria and the recent emergence of carbapenem resistant bacteria prompted the conception of this study. Objectives: To demonstrate the relationship between high molecular weight plasmids and the expression of antibiotic ...

  17. Construction of mammary gland specific expression plasmid pIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... First, the igf-1 gene was cloned from liver tissue harvested from a Saanen dairy goat and inserted downstream of the ... expression plasmids that can target expression of IGF-1 to mammary tissue, with the goal of increasing milk production. ... loss of mammary epithelial cells during the recession phase of ...

  18. Geminiviruses: a tale of a plasmid becoming a virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupovic Mart

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geminiviruses (family Geminiviridae are small single-stranded (ss DNA viruses infecting plants. Their virion morphology is unique in the known viral world – two incomplete T = 1 icosahedra are joined together to form twinned particles. Geminiviruses utilize a rolling-circle mode to replicate their genomes. A limited sequence similarity between the three conserved motifs of the rolling-circle replication initiation proteins (RCR Reps of geminiviruses and plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria allowed Koonin and Ilyina to propose that geminiviruses descend from bacterial replicons. Results Phylogenetic and clustering analyses of various RCR Reps suggest that Rep proteins of geminiviruses share a most recent common ancestor with Reps encoded on plasmids of phytoplasmas, parasitic wall-less bacteria replicating both in plant and insect cells and therefore occupying a common ecological niche with geminiviruses. Capsid protein of Satellite tobacco necrosis virus was found to be the best template for homology-based structural modeling of the geminiviral capsid protein. Good stereochemical quality of the generated models indicates that the geminiviral capsid protein shares the same structural fold, the viral jelly-roll, with the vast majority of icosahedral plant-infecting ssRNA viruses. Conclusion We propose a plasmid-to-virus transition scenario, where a phytoplasmal plasmid acquired a capsid-coding gene from a plant RNA virus to give rise to the ancestor of geminiviruses.

  19. Quinolones Resistance And R-Plasmids Of Clinical Isolates Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been reported incidence in the emergence of. Quinolones resistance in clinical isolates in Nigeria and the level in resistance has been on the increase. Objective: To determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmids profiles of 67 clinical Pseudomonas species from a teaching hospital ...

  20. a positive control plasmid for reporter gene assay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... qualification as a positive control for luciferase reporter gene assays. Key words: Reporter gene plasmid, luciferase assay, cytomegalovirus promoter/enhancer, human melanoma cell line. INTRODUCTION. Reporter genes, often called reporters, have become a precious tool in studies of gene expression ...

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Plasmid Profiles of Salmonella typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA bands were visualized using ultraviolet light transilluminator and molecular weights determined. Plasmid transfer by mating was also performed using Escherichia coli K-12 as recipient. In total, 36 (60.0%) isolates were confirmed to be Salmonella typhi, of which 6 (16.7%) were fully susceptible to all microbial agents ...

  2. Screening of degradative plasmids from Arthrobacter sp. HW08 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-08

    Jun 8, 2011 ... restriction digestion of genomic DNA and pUC19 vector, ligation and transformation into DH5α. Five plasmids of different sizes were ... endophytic fungi (Braun et al., 2003; Pryor et al., 2009;. Ralphs et al., 2008; Yu et al., ... soil, and six months later extracted and identified two strains of bacteria which were ...

  3. Comparative assessment of plasmid DNA delivery by encapsulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To compare the gene delivery effectiveness of plasmid DNA (pDNA) encapsulated within poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles with that adsorbed on PLGA nanoparticles. Methods: PLGA nanoparticles were prepared using solvent-evaporation method. To encapsulate pDNA within the particles, ...

  4. Comparative Analysis Of Antibiotic Resistance And R-Plasmids Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics constitutes a major cause of failure in the treatment of bacterial infections. The genetic exchange of plasmids containing antibiotic resistant determinants between bacteria is believed to play a critical role in the evolution of antibiotics resistant bacteria and this has been shown in S. aureus.

  5. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution...... of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population...... of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities...

  6. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells by simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lough John W

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of lentiviruses to reprogram human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells could limit their therapeutic usefulness due to the integration of viral DNA sequences into the genome of the recipient cell. Recent work has demonstrated that human iPS cells can be generated using episomal plasmids, excisable transposons, adeno or sendai viruses, mRNA, or recombinant proteins. While these approaches offer an advance, the protocols have some drawbacks. Commonly the procedures require either subcloning to identify human iPS cells that are free of exogenous DNA, a knowledge of virology and safe handling procedures, or a detailed understanding of protein biochemistry. Results Here we report a simple approach that facilitates the reprogramming of human somatic cells using standard techniques to transfect expression plasmids that encode OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, and LIN28 without the need for episomal stability or selection. The resulting human iPS cells are free of DNA integration, express pluripotent markers, and form teratomas in immunodeficient animals. These iPS cells were also able to undergo directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like and cardiac myocyte-like cells in culture. Conclusions Simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors is sufficient to generate human iPS cells from primary fibroblasts that are free of exogenous DNA integrations. This approach is highly accessible and could expand the use of iPS cells in the study of human disease and development.

  7. Self-Assembled Functional Nanostructure of Plasmid DNA with Ionic Liquid [Bmim][PF₆]: Enhanced Efficiency in Bacterial Gene Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sarvesh K; Sarkar, Sampa; Mirzadeh, Nedaossadat; Selvakannan, P R; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-04-28

    The electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged phosphate groups of plasmid DNA and the cationic part of hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim][PF6]), initiates spontaneous self-assembly to form the functional nanostructures made up of DNA and ionic liquid (IL). These functional nanostructures were demonstrated as promising synthetic nonviral vectors for the efficient bacterial pGFP gene transformation in cells. In particular, the functional nanostructures that were made up of 1 μL of IL ([Bmim][PF6]) and 1 μg of plasmid DNA can increase the transformation efficiency by 300-400% in microbial systems, without showing any toxicity for E. coli DH5α cells. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopic analysis revealed that the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged phosphate oxygen and cationic Bmim(+) tends to initiate the self-assembly process. Thermogravimetric analysis of the DNA-IL functional nanostructures showed that these nanostructures consist of ∼16 wt % ionic liquid, which is considered to provide the stability to the plasmid DNA that eventually enhanced the transformation efficiency.

  8. Optimum range of plasmid supercoiled DNA for preparation of ccompetent Top 10 E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tahir Majeed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In-house preparation of chemically competent andelectrocompetent Top 10 E. coli is not only economical butmeets the needs for most of the molecular cloning work. Forsuch transformations an optimum range of plasmidsupercoiled DNA is needed. Therefore, the present studydescribes the modification of two protocols for the preparationof such cells, and optimization of the amount of plasmidsupercoiled DNA required for better efficiency.Materials and methods: As most of the available protocols torender bacterial cells competent need special media orchemicals and are time consuming, the methods from HelenDonis-Keller Laboratory Manual of Washington University inSt. Louis and Goldberg Laboratory Standard Protocols of theUnited States Department of Agriculture have been used aftermeticulous selection and with few modifications for preparingchemically competent and electrocompetent Top 10 E. coli,respectively. The transformation was carried out using pUC19supercoiled plasmid DNA.Results: The transformation efficiencies of chemicallycompetent and electrocompetent Top 10 E. coli were found tobe 1.1 x 106 and 7.88 x 107 tranformants/μg of DNA,respectively. Such efficiencies are slightly higher than therequired (105-106 transformants/μg DNA for most of thecloning experimentation.Conclusion: The results of the present study indicatethat for sufficient transformation competence rates theoptimum range of plasmid supercoiled DNA is 10 ng forchemically competent and 0.1 ng for electrocompetentTop 10 E. coli.

  9. PLANT TRANSFORMATION VECTORS AND THEIR STABILITY IN AGROBACTERIUM TUMEFACIENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Polóniová,Pavol Dubnický

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The stability of the plant transformation vectors pTS2, pEV2 and pEV8 was tested in two Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains LBA 4404 and C58C1 that differed in chromosomal background. The T-DNAs of all binary vectors contained the β-glucuronidase reporter and the neomycin phosphotransferase selectable marker genes. In addition, the plasmids pEV2 and pEV8 contained the Cre/loxP recombination system. The binary vectors were transformed into A. tumefaciens strains and their stability was evaluated by restriction analyses after retransformation of plasmids from A. tumefaciens into E. coli. Our results showed that plasmids pTS2 and pEV2 were stable in both bacterial strains while the pEV8 exhibited instability in A. tunmefaciens LBA 4404.

  10. RpoS Regulates a Novel Type of Plasmid DNA Transfer in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanmei; Shi, Chunyu; Yu, Jiafei; Ren, Jingjing; Sun, Dongchang

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is independent of the DNA uptake machinery for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) entry. The one-hit kinetic pattern of plasmid transformation indicates that double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) enters E. coli cells on agar plates. However, DNA uptake and transformation regulation remain unclear in this new type of plasmid transformation. In this study, we developed our previous plasmid transformation system and induced competence at early stationary pha...

  11. Molecular heterogeneity of bla(VIM-2)-containing integrons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmids encoding the VIM-2 metallo-beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallecchi, L; Riccio, M L; Docquier, J D; Fontana, R; Rossolini, G M

    2001-02-20

    A bla(VIM-2) metallo-beta-lactamase determinant, identical to that previously identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa COL-1 isolate from a French hospital, was detected on a 28-kb plasmid carried by a nosocomial isolate of P. aeruginosa from Verona, Italy. In this plasmid the bla(VIM-2) determinant was inserted into a class 1 integron of original structure, named In72, that contains a partially deleted intI1 integrase gene and two gene cassettes. The first cassette carries an aacA4 aminoglycoside acetyl transferase determinant. The second cassette carries a bla(VIM-2) determinant followed by a partially deleted attC site. The structure of In72 was notably different from that of In56, the bla(VIM-2)-containing integron found in the COL-1 isolate, revealing the existence of molecular heterogeneity among bla(VIM-2)-containing integrons in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from Europe.

  12. Plasmid DNA is released from nanosized acicular material surface by low molecular weight oligonucleotides: exogenous plasmid acquisition mechanism for penetration intermediates based on the Yoshida effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Ide, K

    2008-10-01

    When a colloidal solution consisting of nanosized acicular material and bacterial cells is stimulated with sliding friction at the interface between the hydrogel and interface-forming material where the frictional coefficient increases rapidly, the nanosized acicular material accompanying the bacterial cells forms a penetration intermediate. This effect is known as the Yoshida effect in honor of its discoverer. Through the Yoshida effect, a novel property in which penetration intermediates incorporate exogenous plasmid DNA has been identified. This report proposes a possible mechanism for exogenous plasmid acquisition by penetration intermediates in the Yoshida effect. Escherichia coli cells, pUC18, and chrysotile were used as recipient cells, plasmid DNA, and nanosized acicular material, respectively. Even when repeatedly washing the mixture consisting of pUC18 and chrysotile, transformation efficiency by pUC18 was stable. Accordingly, pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was introduced into recipient E. coli cells. At saturation, the amount of pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was 0.8-1.2 microg/mg. To investigate whether pUC18 adsorbed on chrysotile is replicated by polymerase, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out with the chrysotile. Amplification of the beta-lactamase gene coded in pUC18, which was adsorbed onto chrysotile, was strongly inhibited. This suggests that DNA adsorbed onto chrysotile is not replicated in vivo. When we searched for substances to release pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile, we found that a 300-bp single- or double-stranded segment of DNA releases pUC18 from chrysotile. Competitive adsorption onto chrysotile between double-stranded DNA and pUC18 was then examined through the Yoshida effect. The 310- and 603-bp double-stranded nucleotides caused 50% competitive inhibition at the same molar ratio with pUC18. Hence, the adsorbed region of pUC18 is about 300 bp in length. As the culture period for recipient cells increases, transformation

  13. Measuring Social carrying Capacity: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    López-Bonilla, Jesús Manuel; López-Bonilla, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The tourist carrying capacity commands a growing interest given that it is closely linked with sustainable tourist development. The justification of the utility of this concept is given by means of a simple and efficient methodological proposal, by analysing the social carrying capacity. To this end, an empirical application is carried out in the Western Andalusia. In some of the cases analysed, the satisfaction of the tourist is found to decline when the levels of the tourist use are higher ...

  14. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated Arcobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three sma...

  15. Studies on the expression of plasmid-borne genes in the endosymbiotic state of Rhizobium leguminosarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, A.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The subject matter of the research reported in this thesis is the role of plasmid-borne genes of Rhizobium in symbiosis and nitrogen fixation. Plasmid DNA was isolated from Rhizobium leguminosarum strain PRE and the expression of plasmid DNA in nitrogen

  16. [Construction of plant expression plasmid of chimera SBR-CT delta A1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Sui; Ling, Junqi

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to construct plant expression plasmid containing the gene encoding chimera SBR-CT delta A1. The target gene fragment P2, including the gene-encoded chimera SBR-CT delta A1 (3,498-5,378 bp), was obtained by standard PCR amplification. The PCR products were ligated with pGEM-easy vector through TA clone to form plasmid pTSC. The plasmid pTSC and plasmid pPOKII were digested by restricted endonuclease BamHI and KpnI, and the digested products were extracted and purified for recombination. Then the purified P2 and plasmid pPOKII were recombined by T4 DNA ligase to form recombinant plasmid pROSC; inserting bar gene into the plasmid and form pROSB plasmid. The recombined plasmids were isolated and identified by restricted endonuclease cutting and Sanger dideoxy DNA sequencing. P2 gene was linked to pPOKII plasmid and formed recombinant plasmid pROSC. The DNA sequence and orientation were corrected. And bar gene was inserted into pPOSC and form recombinant plasmid pROSB. Plant expression vector pROSC and pROSB containing the gene encoding chimera SBR-CT delta A1, which may provide useful experiment foundation for further study on edible vaccine against caries have been successfully constructed.

  17. Initiation signals for complementary strand DNA synthesis on single-stranded plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, A.; Teertstra, R.; van der Avoort, H. G.; Weisbeek, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The bacteriophage 0X174 origin for (+) strand DNA synthesis, when inserted in a plasmid, is in vivo a substrate for the initiator A protein, that is produced by infecting phages. The result of this interaction is the packaging of single-stranded plasmid DNA into preformed phage coats. These plasmid

  18. A Bipolar Spindle of Antiparallel ParM Filaments Drives Bacterial Plasmid Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gayathri, P; Fujii, T; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    To ensure their stable inheritance by daughter cells during cell division, bacterial low copy-number plasmids make simple DNA segregating machines that use an elongating protein filament between sister plasmids. In the ParMRC system of Escherichia coli R1 plasmid, ParM, an actin-like protein, forms...

  19. Characterization of the pJB12 Plasmid from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Tn6352, a Novel Putative Transposon Associated with Mobilization of the blaVIM-2-Harboring In58 Integron

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, João; Grosso, Filipa; Peixe, Luísa

    2017-01-01

    The blaVIM-2-carrying In58 integron has been linked to a chromosomal location in different bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This work reports the first fully sequenced In58-harboring plasmid, which is significantly different from the two previously identified blaVIM-2-carrying plasmids in P. aeruginosa. blaVIM-2 might have been acquired by transposition of Tn6352, a novel transposon composed of the In58 and ISPa17 elements. The recognition of similar inverted repeat (IR) s...

  20. High Heterogeneity of Escherichia coli Sequence Types Harbouring ESBL/AmpC Genes on IncI1 Plasmids in the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ricardo Castellanos

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global spread.To investigate the diversity of genes, plasmids and strains in ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli from the Colombian poultry chain isolated within the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (Coipars.A total of 541 non-clinical E. coli strains from epidemiologically independent samples and randomly isolated between 2008 and 2013 within the Coipars program were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Poultry isolates resistant to cefotaxime (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L were screened for ESBL/AmpC genes including blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCMY and blaOXA. Plasmid and strain characterization was performed for a selection of the ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. Plasmids were purified and transformed into E. coli DH10B cells or transferred by conjugation to E. coli W3110. When applicable, PCR Based Replicon Typing (PBRT, plasmid Multi Locus Sequence Typing (pMLST, plasmid Double Locus Sequence Typing (pDLST and/or plasmid Replicon Sequence Typing (pRST was performed on resulting transformants and conjugants. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST was used for strain characterization.In total, 132 of 541 isolates were resistant to cefotaxime and 122 were found to carry ESBL/AmpC genes. Ninety-two harboured blaCMY-2 (75%, fourteen blaSHV-12 (11%, three blaSHV-5 (2%, five blaCTX-M-2 (4%, one blaCTX-M-15 (1%, one blaCTX-M-8 (1%, four a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-12 (4% and two a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-5 (2%. A selection of 39 ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates was characterized at the plasmid and strain level. ESBL/AmpC genes from 36 isolates were transferable by transformation or conjugation of which 22 were located on IncI1 plasmids. These IncI1

  1. High Heterogeneity of Escherichia coli Sequence Types Harbouring ESBL/AmpC Genes on IncI1 Plasmids in the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Luis Ricardo; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; León, Maribel; Clavijo, Viviana; Arevalo, Alejandra; Bernal, Johan F; Timmerman, Arjen J; Mevius, Dik J; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Hordijk, Joost

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global spread. To investigate the diversity of genes, plasmids and strains in ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli from the Colombian poultry chain isolated within the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (Coipars). A total of 541 non-clinical E. coli strains from epidemiologically independent samples and randomly isolated between 2008 and 2013 within the Coipars program were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Poultry isolates resistant to cefotaxime (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L) were screened for ESBL/AmpC genes including blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCMY and blaOXA. Plasmid and strain characterization was performed for a selection of the ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. Plasmids were purified and transformed into E. coli DH10B cells or transferred by conjugation to E. coli W3110. When applicable, PCR Based Replicon Typing (PBRT), plasmid Multi Locus Sequence Typing (pMLST), plasmid Double Locus Sequence Typing (pDLST) and/or plasmid Replicon Sequence Typing (pRST) was performed on resulting transformants and conjugants. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) was used for strain characterization. In total, 132 of 541 isolates were resistant to cefotaxime and 122 were found to carry ESBL/AmpC genes. Ninety-two harboured blaCMY-2 (75%), fourteen blaSHV-12 (11%), three blaSHV-5 (2%), five blaCTX-M-2 (4%), one blaCTX-M-15 (1%), one blaCTX-M-8 (1%), four a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-12 (4%) and two a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-5 (2%). A selection of 39 ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates was characterized at the plasmid and strain level. ESBL/AmpC genes from 36 isolates were transferable by transformation or conjugation of which 22 were located on IncI1 plasmids. These IncI1

  2. Bivalve carrying capacity in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.F.; Prins, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    carrying capacity of suspension feeding bivalves in 11 coastal and estuarine ecosystems is examined. Bivalve carrying capacity is defined in terms of water mass residence time, primary production time and bivalve clearance time. Turnover times for the 11 ecosystems are compared both two and three

  3. The Concept of Carrying Capacity in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Zelenka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carrying capacity is often pragmatically, theoretically as well as purely intuitively considered as a concept in the context of tourism sustainability. The carrying capacity application has the greatest potential in protected areas, in frequently visited cultural and natural attractions, and in relation to sustaining of the lifestyle of the local community and tourism destination potential in general. Despite its importance, partial applications, determination of basic theoretical principles, and specifying connection to the other theoretical concepts in tourism (particularly destination life cycle, LAC concept, visitors management, there still is a rightful opinion of some authors suggesting that there is no consistent theory of tourism carrying capacity. This theory would be the base for sophisticated practical carrying capacity applications. This paper is therefore focused on introduction of the theoretical concept of carrying capacity, which can be discussed and possibly further elaborated.

  4. PifC and Osa, Plasmid Weapons against Rival Conjugative Coupling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Getino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria display a variety of mechanisms to control plasmid conjugation. Among them, fertility inhibition (FI systems prevent conjugation of co-resident plasmids within donor cells. Analysis of the mechanisms of inhibition between conjugative plasmids could provide new alternatives to fight antibiotic resistance dissemination. In this work, inhibition of conjugation of broad host range IncW plasmids was analyzed in the presence of a set of co-resident plasmids. Strong FI systems against plasmid R388 conjugation were found in IncF/MOBF12 as well as in IncI/MOBP12 plasmids, represented by plasmids F and R64, respectively. In both cases, the responsible gene was pifC, known also to be involved in FI of IncP plasmids and Agrobacterium T-DNA transfer to plant cells. It was also discovered that the R388 gene osa, which affects T-DNA transfer, also prevented conjugation of IncP-1/MOBP11 plasmids represented by plasmids RP4 and R751. Conjugation experiments of different mobilizable plasmids, helped by either FI-susceptible or FI-resistant transfer systems, demonstrated that the conjugative component affected by both PifC and Osa was the type IV conjugative coupling protein. In addition, in silico analysis of FI proteins suggests that they represent recent acquisitions of conjugative plasmids, i.e., are not shared by members of the same plasmid species. This implies that FI are rapidly-moving accessory genes, possibly acting on evolutionary fights between plasmids for the colonization of specific hosts.

  5. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  6. pMH2, a small plasmid bearing the nif gene cluster of Enterobacter agglomerans 333 as an excisable cassette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, F; Halda, L; Klingmüller, W

    1993-10-01

    A small plasmid containing the entire nif gene cluster of Enterobacter agglomerans 333 as an excisable cassette has been constructed, using pACYC177 as a vector. Two cosmid clones taken from a gene library of E. agglomerans plasmid pEA3 were used as a source of nif genes. A SmaI fragment of peaMS2-2, containing the H,D,K,Y,E,N,X,U,S,V,W,Z,M,L,A and B genes and an ApaI fragment of peaMS2-16 containing nif A,B,Q,F and J were selected to construct pMH2. The resulting plasmid of 33 kb carries the complete nif gene cluster as a nif cassette on a single XbaI fragment. The nif construct pMH2 in Escherichia coli strains has significant nitrogenase activity compared to wild-type E. agglomerans 333. The nif gene cluster construct was found to be very stable.

  7. Specificity determinants of conjugative DNA processing in the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 and the Lactococcus lactis plasmid pRS01

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuqing; Staddon, Jack H.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    The DNA-processing region of the Enterococcus faecalis pheromone-responsive plasmid pCF10 is highly similar to that of the otherwise unrelated plasmid pRS01 from Lactococcus lactis. A transfer-proficient pRS01 derivative was unable to mobilize plasmids containing the pCF10 origin of transfer, oriT. In contrast, pRS01 oriT-containing plasmids could be mobilized by pCF10 at a low frequency. Relaxases PcfG and LtrB were both capable of binding to single-stranded oriT DNAs; LtrB was highly specif...

  8. Relative entropy differences in bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and genomic islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, Jon; van Passel, Mark W. J.; Snipen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    , and plasmids. Relative entropy was estimated using the Kullback-Leibler measure. Results: Relative entropy was highest in bacterial chromosomes and had the sequence chromosomes > GI > phage > plasmid. There was an association between relative entropy and AT content in chromosomes, phages, plasmids and GIs...... with the strongest association being in phages. Relative entropy was also found to be lower in the obligate intracellular Mycobacterium leprae than in the related M. tuberculosis when measured on a shared set of highly conserved genes. Conclusions: We argue that relative entropy differences reflect how plasmids...... chromosomes and stably incorporated GIs compared to the transient or independent replicons such as phages and plasmids....

  9. Effect of lipopolysaccharide mutations on recipient ability of Salmonella typhimurium for incompatibility group H plasmids.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherburne, C; Taylor, D E

    1997-01-01

    Previous investigations of the incompatibility group F, P, and I plasmid systems revealed the important role of the outer membrane components in the conjugal transfer of these plasmids. We have observed variability in transfer frequency of three incompatibility group H plasmids (IncHI1 plasmid R27, IncHI2 plasmid R478, and a Tn7 derivative of R27, pDT2454) upon transfer into various Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants derived from a common parental strain, SL1027. Recipien...

  10. Transcriptome Mapping of pAR060302, a blaCMY-2-Positive Broad-Host-Range IncA/C Plasmid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin S.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Xu, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-encoding plasmids belonging to the IncA/C incompatibility group have recently emerged among Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica strains in the United States. These plasmids have a unique genetic structure compared to other enterobacterial plasmid types, a broad host range, and a propensity to acquire large numbers of antimicrobial resistance genes via their accessory regions. Using E. coli strain DH5α harboring the prototype IncA/C plasmid pAR060302, we sought to define the baseline transcriptome of IncA/C plasmids under laboratory growth and in the face of selective pressure. The effects of ampicillin, florfenicol, or streptomycin exposure were compared to those on cells left untreated at logarithmic phase using Illumina platform-based RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Under growth in Luria-Bertani broth lacking antibiotics, much of the backbone of pAR060302 was transcriptionally inactive, including its putative transfer regions. A few plasmid backbone genes of interest were highly transcribed, including genes of a putative toxin-antitoxin system and an H-NS-like transcriptional regulator. In contrast, numerous genes within the accessory regions of pAR060302 were highly transcribed, including the resistance genes floR, blaCMY-2, aadA, and aacA. Treatment with ampicillin or streptomycin resulted in no genes being differentially expressed compared to controls lacking antibiotics, suggesting that many of the resistance-associated genes are not differentially expressed due to exposure to these antibiotics. In contrast, florfenicol treatment resulted in the upregulation of floR and numerous chromosomal genes. Overall, the transcriptome mapping of pAR060302 suggests that it mitigates the fitness costs of carrying resistance-associated genes through global regulation with its transcriptional regulators. PMID:22344651

  11. Transcriptome mapping of pAR060302, a blaCMY-2-positive broad-host-range IncA/C plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin S; Danzeisen, Jessica L; Xu, Wayne; Johnson, Timothy J

    2012-05-01

    The multidrug resistance-encoding plasmids belonging to the IncA/C incompatibility group have recently emerged among Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica strains in the United States. These plasmids have a unique genetic structure compared to other enterobacterial plasmid types, a broad host range, and a propensity to acquire large numbers of antimicrobial resistance genes via their accessory regions. Using E. coli strain DH5α harboring the prototype IncA/C plasmid pAR060302, we sought to define the baseline transcriptome of IncA/C plasmids under laboratory growth and in the face of selective pressure. The effects of ampicillin, florfenicol, or streptomycin exposure were compared to those on cells left untreated at logarithmic phase using Illumina platform-based RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Under growth in Luria-Bertani broth lacking antibiotics, much of the backbone of pAR060302 was transcriptionally inactive, including its putative transfer regions. A few plasmid backbone genes of interest were highly transcribed, including genes of a putative toxin-antitoxin system and an H-NS-like transcriptional regulator. In contrast, numerous genes within the accessory regions of pAR060302 were highly transcribed, including the resistance genes floR, bla(CMY-2), aadA, and aacA. Treatment with ampicillin or streptomycin resulted in no genes being differentially expressed compared to controls lacking antibiotics, suggesting that many of the resistance-associated genes are not differentially expressed due to exposure to these antibiotics. In contrast, florfenicol treatment resulted in the upregulation of floR and numerous chromosomal genes. Overall, the transcriptome mapping of pAR060302 suggests that it mitigates the fitness costs of carrying resistance-associated genes through global regulation with its transcriptional regulators.

  12. Dissemination of a bla(VIM-2)-carrying integron among Enterobacteriaceae species in Mexico: report from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Rodriguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Deshpande, Lalitagauri M; Sader, Helio S; Castanheira, Mariana

    2009-03-01

    Three VIM-2-producing Enterobacteriaceae (two Enterobacter cloacae and one Klebsiella oxytoca) isolates recovered from patients in a Mexican hospital were characterized during the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (2005-2007). These strains carried identical bla(VIM-2) integrons in a 450-kb plasmid. The interspecies dissemination of this bla(VIM-2)-harboring element emphasizes the potential for spread of genetic structures carrying metallo-beta-lactamases that could limit therapeutic options in this geographic region.

  13. A novel plasmid and SonoVue formulation plus ultrasound sonication for effective gene delivery in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Lu; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Li, Shuo; Jia, Chang-Jun; Jiang, Luo; Shi, Tei-Mei; Ren, Wei-Dong

    2013-10-11

    This study aimed to identify the effectiveness of gene therapy mediated by ultrasound-targeted SonoVue using the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TSV-TK) driven by the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) promoter (KDR-TK) for the treatment of ovarian carcinomas in nude mice. The optimized conditions for gene transfection were also explored. In this study, we developed a novel technique to deliver a plasmid vector-carried gene into tumor xenografts in sixty nude mice. We first mixed plasmid DNA with SonoVue to form microbubbles and then treated the mice with ultrasound sonication to enhance plasmid gene transfection and expression in tumor xenografts. The data showed that injection of pBluescript-KDR-TK cDNA mixed with SonoVue into nude mice plus ultrasound sonication significantly (Group E) increased the transfection efficiency and expression of KDR-TK mRNA in tumor xenografts. The growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice was significantly suppressed in Group E compared to the other four control groups (Groups A, B, C, and D, namely, treatment with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), KDR-TK+PBS, KDR-TK+SonoVue, KDR-TK+PBS+ultrasound sonication, respectively). TUNEL staining showed that SonoVue plus ultrasound sonication significantly induced apoptosis and reduced microvessel density (MVD). This study revealed that the formulation of plasmid with SonoVue plus ultrasound could provide efficient gene delivery into tumor xenografts. Increased gene expression was observed in vivo, which effectively reduced the tumor growth and MVD of tumor xenografts and induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Future clinical trials are necessary to further analyze the relevance of this technique. © 2013.

  14. [Taylorella equigenitalis: cell wall proteins, gene fingerprints, plasmids, adhesion and toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapan, G; Awad-Masalmeh, M; Hartig, A; Silber, R

    1991-10-01

    In this study 55 strains of Taylorella equigenitalis isolated from horses of four different studs in Austria, and a comparative strain from the Federal Republic of Germany were investigated by different methods. These investigations were carried out with the help of SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, the analyses of genomes and by proof of plasmids. Furthermore, pathogenic mechanisms such as adhesion or the formation of toxins were investigated in vitro. On the basis of the results carried out by means of SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting all tested strains of Taylorella equigenitalis were alike, whereas by DNA analyses the strains could be divided into five groups. The comparative strain from the FRG, which clearly differed from the Austrian strains, formed one group all by itself. From three studs, which are related to each other because of an intensive exchange of horses, representatives (n = 53) of three DNA fingerprint groups were isolated. These three fingerprint patterns were very similar to each other, while the hybridisation patterns from the other two Austrian strains were very different. One of these strains, isolated from a diseased mare, could not be distinguished from the other strain isolated from a clinical healthy stallion from the same study by this method. Only 47.3% from the investigated strains showed attachment to HeLa cells, while cell extracts of all of them caused morphological changes of a varying degree of both Y1 and Vero cells. There were no connexions between these adhesion-cytotoxicity-properties and the DNA fingerprint groups as well as the studs, respectively. No plasmids were found in the Taylorella equigenitalis strains used in this study.

  15. Properties of information carrying waves in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently we studied the effects of information carrying waves propagating through isotropic cosmologies. By information carrying we mean that the waves have an arbitrary dependence on a function. We found that the waves introduce shear and anisotropic stress into the universe. We then constructed explicit examples of pure gravity wave perturbations for which the presence of this anisotropic stress is essential and the null hypersurfaces playing the role of the histories of the wavefronts in the background space-time are shear free. Motivated by this result we now prove that these two properties are true for all information carrying waves in isotropic cosmologies

  16. Population growth and earth's human carrying capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J E

    1995-07-21

    Earth's capacity to support people is determined both by natural constraints and by human choices concerning economics, environment, culture (including values and politics), and demography. Human carrying capacity is therefore dynamic and uncertain. Human choice is not captured by ecological notions of carrying capacity that are appropriate for nonhuman populations. Simple mathematical models of the relation between human population growth and human carrying capacity can account for faster-than-exponential population growth followed by a slowing population growth rate, as observed in recent human history.

  17. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  18. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.