WorldWideScience

Sample records for stabilized earth walls

  1. Evolution of the Stability Work from Classic Retaining Walls to Mechanically Stabilized Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghel Stanciu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For the consolidation of soil mass and the construction of the stability works for roads infrastructure it was studied the evolution of these kinds of works from classical retaining walls - common concrete retaining walls, to the utilization in our days of the modern and competitive methods - mechanically stabilized earth walls. Like type of execution the variety of the reinforced soil is given by the utilization of different types of reinforcing inclusions (steel strips, geosynthetics, geogrids or facing (precast concrete panels, dry cast modular blocks, metal sheets and plates, gabions, and wrapped sheets of geosynthetics.

  2. Inspector's manual for mechanically stabilized earth walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The scope of the project is to develop a condition rating system, creation of an inspector's manual to reference during : inspection or address any training for inspectors at the district level. The research project will develop a MSE wall : conditio...

  3. Tire Shred Backfill in Mechanically Stabilized Earth Wall Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Balunaini, Umashankar; Yoon, Sungmin; Prezzi, Monica; Salgado, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Tire shred-soil mixture backfill for use in mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) walls has several advantages over traditional backfill materials: 1) good drainage, 2) high shear strength, 3) low compacted unit weight and 4) low lateral pressure exerted on retaining structures. This work presents the results of laboratory tests performed on tire shred-sand mixtures focusing on determining the properties required for their use as backfill in MSE wall applications. Three sizes of tire shreds are...

  4. The stability of gabion walls for earth retaining structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyuddin Ramli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of earth retaining structures in flood prone areas has become a serious problem in many countries. The two most basic causes of failure arising from flooding are scouring and erosion of the foundation of the superstructure. Hence, a number of structures like bridges employ scour-arresting devices, e.g., gabions to acting on the piers and abutments during flooding. Research was therefore undertaken to improve gabion resistance against lateral movement by means of an interlocking configuration instead of the conventional stack-and-pair system. This involved simulating lateral thrusts against two dimensionally identical retaining wall systems configured according to the rectangular and hexagonal gabion type. The evolution of deformation observed suggested that the interlocking design exhibits better structural integrity than the conventional box gabion-based wall in resisting lateral movement and therefore warrants consideration for use as an appropriate scour-arresting device for earth retaining structures.

  5. Interaction between drilled shaft and mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) wall : project summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Drilled shafts are being constructed within the reinforced zone of mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) walls (Figure 1). The drilled shafts may be subjected to horizontal loads and push against the front of the wall. Distress of MSE wall panels has b...

  6. The stability of gabion walls for earth retaining structures

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyuddin Ramli; T.J.r. Karasu; Eethar Thanon Dawood

    2013-01-01

    The stability of earth retaining structures in flood prone areas has become a serious problem in many countries. The two most basic causes of failure arising from flooding are scouring and erosion of the foundation of the superstructure. Hence, a number of structures like bridges employ scour-arresting devices, e.g., gabions to acting on the piers and abutments during flooding. Research was therefore undertaken to improve gabion resistance against lateral movement by means of an interlocking ...

  7. Interaction analysis of back-to-back mechanically stabilized earth walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadok Benmebarek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Back-to-back mechanically stabilized earth walls (BBMSEWs are encountered in bridge approaches, ramp ways, rockfall protection systems, earth dams, levees and noise barriers. However, available design guidelines for BBMSEWs are limited and not applicable to numerical modeling when back-to-back walls interact with each other. The objective of this paper is to investigate, using PLAXIS code, the effects of the reduction in the distance between BBMSEW, the reinforcement length, the quality of backfill material and the connection of reinforcements in the middle, when the back-to-back walls are close. The results indicate that each of the BBMSEWs behaves independently if the width of the embankment between mechanically stabilized earth walls is greater than that of the active zone. This is in good agreement with the result of FHWA design guideline. However, the results show that the FHWA design guideline underestimates the lateral earth pressure when back-to-back walls interact with each other. Moreover, for closer BBMSEWs, FHWA design guideline strongly overestimates the maximum tensile force in the reinforcement. The investigation of the quality of backfill material shows that the minor increase in embankment cohesion can lead to significant reductions in both the lateral earth pressure and the maximum tensile force in geosynthetic. When the distance between the two earth walls is close to zero, the connection of reinforcement between back-to-back walls significantly improves the factor of safety.

  8. Characterizing material properties of cement-stabilized rammed earth to construct sustainable insulated walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of local materials can reduce the hauling of construction materials over long distances, thus reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with transporting such materials. Use of locally available soils (earth for construction of walls has been used in many parts of the world. Owing to the thermal mass of these walls and the potential to have insulation embedded in the wall section has brought this construction material/technology at the forefront in recent years. However, the mechanical properties of the rammed earth and the parameters required for design of steel reinforced walls are not fully understood. In this paper, the author presents a case study where full-scale walls were constructed using rammed earth to understand the effect of two different types of shear detailing on the structural performance of the walls. The mechanical properties of the material essential for design such as compressive strength of the material including effect of coring on the strength, pull out strength of different rebar diameters, flexural performance and out-of-plane bending on walls was studied. These results are presented in this case study.

  9. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  10. Electrical resisitivity of mechancially stablized earth wall backfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Michael; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey; Koehn, Weston

    2017-06-01

    Mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) retaining walls utilized in transportation projects are typically backfilled with coarse aggregate. One of the current testing procedures to select backfill material for construction of MSE walls is the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials standard T 288: ;Standard Method of Test for Determining Minimum Laboratory Soil Resistivity.; T 288 is designed to test a soil sample's electrical resistivity which correlates to its corrosive potential. The test is run on soil material passing the No. 10 sieve and believed to be inappropriate for coarse aggregate. Therefore, researchers have proposed new methods to measure the electrical resistivity of coarse aggregate samples in the laboratory. There is a need to verify that the proposed methods yield results representative of the in situ conditions; however, no in situ measurement of the electrical resistivity of MSE wall backfill is established. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) provides a two-dimensional (2D) profile of the bulk resistivity of backfill material in situ. The objective of this study was to characterize bulk resistivity of in-place MSE wall backfill aggregate using ERT. Five MSE walls were tested via ERT to determine the bulk resistivity of the backfill. Three of the walls were reinforced with polymeric geogrid, one wall was reinforced with metallic strips, and one wall was a gravity retaining wall with no reinforcement. Variability of the measured resistivity distribution within the backfill may be a result of non-uniform particle sizes, thoroughness of compaction, and the presence of water. A quantitative post processing algorithm was developed to calculate mean bulk resistivity of in-situ backfill. Recommendations of the study were that the ERT data be used to verify proposed testing methods for coarse aggregate that are designed to yield data representative of in situ conditions. A preliminary analysis suggests that ERT may be utilized

  11. Slope stability radar for monitoring mine walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Bryan; Noon, David A.; Stickley, Glen F.; Longstaff, Dennis

    2001-11-01

    Determining slope stability in a mining operation is an important task. This is especially true when the mine workings are close to a potentially unstable slope. A common technique to determine slope stability is to monitor the small precursory movements, which occur prior to collapse. The slope stability radar has been developed to remotely scan a rock slope to continuously monitor the spatial deformation of the face. Using differential radar interferometry, the system can detect deformation movements of a rough wall with sub-millimeter accuracy, and with high spatial and temporal resolution. The effects of atmospheric variations and spurious signals can be reduced via signal processing means. The advantage of radar over other monitoring techniques is that it provides full area coverage without the need for mounted reflectors or equipment on the wall. In addition, the radar waves adequately penetrate through rain, dust and smoke to give reliable measurements, twenty-four hours a day. The system has been trialed at three open-cut coal mines in Australia, which demonstrated the potential for real-time monitoring of slope stability during active mining operations.

  12. 30 CFR 56.3130 - Wall, bank, and slope stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wall, bank, and slope stability. 56.3130... Mining Methods § 56.3130 Wall, bank, and slope stability. Mining methods shall be used that will maintain wall, bank, and slope stability in places where persons work or travel in performing their assigned...

  13. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-01-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory. - Highlights: • A stepped nanowire is proposed to pin domain wall in desired position. • The new structure can be made by a simple off set of two single nanowires. • The critical current for moving domain wall from one state to the other could be tuned by adjusting the geometry of the device. • The device could be used for multi-bit per cell memory by extending the steps in the device.

  14. The Analysis Stability of Anchor Retaining Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamara, F. Z.; Belabed, L

    2011-01-01

    The construction of anchored retaining walls reach every day in the field of Civil Engineering especially in public works. Their dimensioning and stability are the axes of research for geotechnical. The rule is to reduce the active forces of the slide and increase the effective normal stress on the rupture surface. So that, we anchored tied-back (constituted by steel cables) in the stable ground located under the failure surface and we apply at the top a traction force. This effort can be distributed over the ground surface by means of small plates or massive reinforced concrete. The study of the stability of anchored retaining wall was also performed by using software GEO4. Many cases can be solved using analytical solutions available in the group GEO4 program, but for our standard model solution studied analytically proved unsatisfactory so we used a numerical analysis based on the method of finite element in this program. The results obtained by numerical study were interpreted to identify the precision numerical predictions. Moreover these methods were useful and economics in the realization of reinforced slopes by tied-buck. (author)

  15. Raising awareness for research on earth walls, and earth scientific aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Baas, Henk; Groenewoudt, Bert; Peen, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    A conference to raise awareness In the Netherlands, little research on earth walls has been done. To improve attention for earth walls, a number of organisations, including Geoheritage NL, organized a conference at the RCE, the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands. The conference* presented a state-of-the-art of research done. The book with the presentations, and extra case studies added, was published in December 2012. The book concludes with a research action list, including earth science research, and can be downloaded freely from the internet. It has English summaries. The earth science aspects Historical earth walls do not only add cultural value to a landscape, but also geodiversity value. Apart from geomorphological aspects, the walls contain information about past land- and climate conditions: - They cover up a former topography, a past landscape. A relevant source of scientific information where lands are levelled, as is the case in many parts of The Netherlands; - The soil formation under the earth wall is a reference soil. The soil formation in the top of the wall gives insight in the rate of soil formation in relationship with the age and parent material of the wall; - The soil profiles of different age have ecological significance. Older walls with a more pronounced soil formation often hold forest flora that has disappeared from the surrounding environment, such as historical bush or tree species, autogenetic DNA material or a specific soil fauna; - The materials in the earth walls tell about the process of wall-building. Paleosols and sedimentary structures in the earth walls, in the gullies and colluvial fans along the walls contain information about past land management and climate. - The eroded appearance of the earth walls is part of their history, and contain information about past management and land conditions, has ecological relevance, for example for insects, and is often visually more interesting. Insight in the rates of erosion are

  16. The effect of partial poloidal wall sections on the wall stabilization of external kink modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    An analysis of the effect on the wall stabilization of external kink modes due to toroidally continuous gaps in the resistive wall is performed. The effects with and without toroidal rotation are studied. For a high-β equilibrium, the mode structure is localized on the outboard side. Therefore, outboard gaps greatly increase the growth rate when there is no rotation. For resistive wall stabilization by toroidal rotation, the presence of gaps has the same effect as moving the wall farther away, i.e. destabilizing for the ideal plasma mode, and stabilizing for the resistive wall mode. The region of stability, in terms of wall position, is reduced in size and moved closer to the plasma. However, complete stabilization becomes possible at considerably reduced rotation frequencies. For a high-β, reverse-shear equilibrium both the resistive wall mode and the ideal plasma mode can be stabilized by close fitting discrete passive plates on the outboard side. The necessary toroidal rotation frequency to stabilize the resistive wall mode using these plates is reduced by a factor of three compared to that for a poloidally continuous and complete wall at the same plasma-wall separation. (author) 15 figs., 24 refs

  17. In situ stabilization wall for containment and hot spot retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a full scale field demonstration of a in situ stabilization technology applicable to buried transuranic waste. The technology involves creating a jet grouted wall around selected regions or hot spots within a buried waste site. The resulting wall provides a barrier against further horizontal migration of the contaminants and allows vertical digging of material inside the wall, thus minimizing waste during a hot spot removal action. The demonstration involved creating a open-quotes Uclose quotes shaped wall in the interior of a full sized, simulated waste pit. The wall simulated the main features of a four sided wall. The demonstration also involved a destructive examination and a stability test for a hot spot retrieval scenario

  18. Earth System Stability Through Geologic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, D.; Bowring, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Five times in the past 500 million years, mass extinctions haveresulted in the loss of greater than three-fourths of living species.Each of these events is associated with significant environmentalchange recorded in the carbon-isotopic composition of sedimentaryrocks. There are also many such environmental events in the geologicrecord that are not associated with mass extinctions. What makes themdifferent? Two factors appear important: the size of theenvironmental perturbation, and the time scale over which it occurs.We show that the natural perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle during thepast 500 million years exhibit a characteristic rate of change overtwo orders of magnitude in time scale. This characteristic rate isconsistent with the maximum rate that limits quasistatic (i.e., nearsteady-state) evolution of the carbon cycle. We identify this rate withmarginal stability, and show that mass extinctions occur on the fast,unstable side of the stability boundary. These results suggest thatthe great extinction events of the geologic past, and potentially a"sixth extinction" associated with modern environmental change, arecharacterized by common mechanisms of instability.

  19. Stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M S; Okabayashi, M

    2010-01-01

    The pursuit of steady-state economic production of thermonuclear fusion energy has led to research on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode. Advances in both experiment and theory, together with improvements in diagnostics, heating and feedback methods have led to substantial and steady progress in the understanding and stabilization of these instabilities. Many of the theory and experimental techniques and results that have been developed are useful not only for the stabilization of the resistive wall mode. They can also be used to improve the general performance of fusion confinement devices. The conceptual foundations and experimental results on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode are reviewed. (topical review)

  20. Entropy Stability and the No-Slip Wall Boundary Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Svä rd, Magnus; Carpenter, Mark H.; Parsani, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    We present an entropy stable numerical scheme subject to no-slip wall boundary conditions. To enforce entropy stability only the no-penetration boundary condition and a temperature condition are needed at a wall, and this leads to an L bound on the conservative variables. In this article, we take the next step and design a finite difference scheme that also bounds the velocity gradients. This necessitates the use of the full no-slip conditions.

  1. Entropy Stability and the No-Slip Wall Boundary Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Svärd, Magnus

    2018-01-18

    We present an entropy stable numerical scheme subject to no-slip wall boundary conditions. To enforce entropy stability only the no-penetration boundary condition and a temperature condition are needed at a wall, and this leads to an L bound on the conservative variables. In this article, we take the next step and design a finite difference scheme that also bounds the velocity gradients. This necessitates the use of the full no-slip conditions.

  2. The stability of cassette walls in compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutay, Pierre-Arnaud

    Much research into the behaviour of cold formed steel columns in the last decade has focused on channel sections undergoing local, distortional and overall buckling. Light gauge steel cassette sections are a particular form of channel section which offers an alternative form of load-bearing wall assembly for use in low-rise steel framed construction. Cassette wall sections possess wide and slender flanges so that, by including intermediate stiffeners in these wide flanges, a significant increase in the ultimate load capacity may be achieved. However, the introduction of intermediate stiffeners also increases the number of buckling modes (stiffener buckling) and, therefore complicates the behaviour and increases the risk of interactive buckling between these modes. The work undertaken in this thesis aims to clarify the behaviour of wide flanges in compression with and without intermediate stiffeners. In this research, the distortional mode of web and narrow flange buckling was inhibited by connecting the narrow flanges of the cassettes together at suitable intervals. "Generalised Beam Theory" (GBT), which allows the individual buckling modes to be considered individually and in predetermined combinations, provides a particularly good tool with which to analyse and understand the buckling behaviour of cassette sections with and without intermediate stiffeners. "Generalised Beam Theory" (GBT) is used throughout this work to determine the elastic buckling stress of the sections studied (simply supported stiffened plates, as well as cassette sections). Since the economic design of cold-formed steel sections requires the consideration of post- buckling behaviour, elastic buckling values are not directly comparable with design code values which are usually based on the concept of effective width. Therefore, finite element analysis with both material and geometric nonlinearity has also been carried out in order to obtain the ultimate strength in the critical mode or mode

  3. Stabilization of thin shell modes by a rotating secondary wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C.G.

    1989-01-01

    A simple model is developed to investigate if and under what circumstances the thin shell instabilities of a Reverse Field Pinch can be stabilized by a rotating secondary wall. The principles may be applicable to reactor designs that utilize a flowing liquid blanket (author)

  4. Temperature measurements in a wall stabilized steady flame using CARS

    KAUST Repository

    Sesha Giri, Krishna

    2017-01-05

    Flame quenching by heat loss to a surface continues to be an active area of combustion research. Close wall temperature measurements in an isothermal wall-stabilized flame are reported in this work. Conventional N-vibrational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) thermometry as close as 275 μm to a convex wall cooled with water has been carried out. The standard deviation of mean temperatures is observed to be ~6.5% for high temperatures (>2000K) and ~14% in the lower range (<500K). Methane/air and ethylene/air stoichiometric flames for various global strain rates based on exit bulk velocities are plotted and compared. CH* chemiluminescence is employed to determine the flame location relative to the wall. Flame locations are shown to move closer to the wall with increasing strain rates in addition to higher near-wall temperatures. Peak temperatures for ethylene are considerably higher (~250-300K) than peak temperatures for methane. Preheat zone profiles are similar for different strain rates across fuels. This work demonstrates close wall precise temperature measurments using CARS.

  5. Effect of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Longxi; Wu Bin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode (RWM) stability are studied. When considering the modes interaction effects, the linear growth rate of the most unstable (3, 1) mode decreases. After linear evolution, the RWM saturates at the nonlinear phase. The saturation can be attributed to flux piling up on the resistive wall. When some modes exist, the (3, 1) mode saturates at lower level compared with single mode evolution. Meanwhile, the magnetic energy of the (5, 2) mode increases correspondingly, but the magnetic energy saturation level of the (2, 1) mode changes weakly. (authors)

  6. Feedback and rotational stabilization of resistive wall modes in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueqiang; Bondeson, A.; Chu, M.S.; La Haye, R.J.; Favez, J.-Y.; Lister, J.B.; Gribov, Y.; Gryaznevich, M.; Hender, T.C.; Howell, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    Different models have been introduced in the stability code MARS-F in order to study the damping effect of resistive wall modes (RWM) in rotating plasmas. Benchmark of MARS-F calculations with RWM experiments on JET and D3D indicates that the semi-kinetic damping model is a good candidate for explaining the damping mechanisms. Based on these results, the critical rotation speeds required for RWM stabilization in an advanced ITER scenario are predicted. Active feedback control of the n = 1 RWM in ITER is also studied using the MARS-F code. (author)

  7. Wall stabilization of high beta plasmas in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.S.; Strait, E.J.; Lao, L.L.; Turnbull, A.D.; Burrell, K.H.; Chu, M.S.; Ferron, J.R.; Groebner, R.J.; La Haye, R.J.; Mauel, M.

    1995-02-01

    Detailed analysis of recent high beta discharges in the DIII-D tokamak demonstrates that the resistive vacuum vessel can provide stabilization of low n magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. The experimental beta values reaching up to β T = 12.6% are more than 30% larger than the maximum stable beta calculated with no wall stabilization. Plasma rotation is essential for stabilization. When the plasma rotation slows sufficiently, unstable modes with the characteristics of the predicted open-quotes resistive wallclose quotes mode are observed. Through slowing of the plasma rotation between the q = 2 and q = 3 surfaces with the application of a non-axisymmetric field, the authors have determined that the rotation at the outer rational surfaces is most important, and that the critical rotation frequency is of the order of Ω/2π = 1 kHz

  8. Hollow wall to stabilize and enhance ignition hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Grisollet, A.; Bonnefille, M.; Clérouin, J.; Arnault, P.; Desbiens, N.; Videau, L.

    2018-01-01

    In the context of the indirect-drive scheme of the inertial-confinement fusion, performance of the gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility appears to be reduced. Experiments ascertain a limited efficacy of the laser beam propagation and x-ray conversion. One identified issue is the growth of the gold plasma plume (or bubble) which is generated near the ends of the hohlraum by the impact of the laser beams. This bubble impedes the laser propagation towards the equator of the hohlraum. Furthermore, for high foot or low foot laser pulses, the gold-gas interface of the bubble can be unstable. If this instability should grow to mixing, the x-ray conversion could be degraded. A novel hollow-walled hohlraum is designed, which drastically reduces the growth of the gold bubble and stabilizes the gold-gas interface. The hollow walls are built from the combination of a thin gold foil and a gold domed-wall. We theoretically explain how the bubble expansion can be delayed and the gold-gas interface stabilized. This advanced design lets the laser beams reach the waist of the hohlraum. As a result, the x-ray drive on the capsule is enhanced, and more spherical implosions are obtained. Furthermore, this design only requires intermediate gas fill density to be efficient.

  9. The Effect of Displacement Mode of Rigid Retaining Walls on Shearing Bands by Active Earth Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sekkel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work treats the physical modeling of failure mechanisms by active earth pressure. This last is developed by retaining wall movement. A lot of research showed that wall displacement has a significant effect on active earth pressure. A good comprehension of active earth pressure phenomenon and its failure mechanisms help us to better conceive retaining walls. The conception of a small-scale model allowed the realization of active earth pressure tests, while displacing the mobile wall toward the outside of the massif. The studied material is that of Schneebeli; light two-dimensional material made of cylindrical plastic rollers, simulating granular non-cohesive soil. The evolution of shearing zones under continuous and discontinuous displacement modes of mobile walls by correlation pictures allows the investigation of the localization of deformations and failure mechanisms.

  10. Modification of Yellow River Sediment Based Stabilized Earth Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxia Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the microstructure and performance of stabilized earth bricks prepared from the Yellow River sediment. The sediment is modified by inorganic cementitious material, polymer bonding agent, and jute fibre. The results show that the sediment is preliminarily consolidated when the mixture ratio of activated sediment/cementitious binder/sand is 65/25/10. Compressive strength and softening coefficient of stabilized earth bricks is further improved by polymer bonding agent and jute fibre. SEM images and EDS spectral analysis indicate that there is indeed synergy among inorganic hydration products, polymer network and jute fibre to strengthen the sediment.

  11. Thermal stability of rare earth oxychlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunda, V.V.; Shtilikha, M.V.; Golovej, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal stability of oxichlorides of the lanthanum series is investigated to determine the possibility of preparing them in the form of crystals by the method of l chemical gas-transport reactions (CTR). The lanthanide oxichlorides were subjected to thermogravimetric studies in the 20-1500 deg C temperature range under normal conditions. The temperatures of initiation of incongruent decomposition reactions are found. It is found that the process of LnOCl decomposition is preceeded by the exothermal effect connected with the Ln 2 OCl 4 recrsytallization to LnOCl. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of decomposition reactions are determined, such as reaction heats ΔH, decomposition rate constants K, dissociation energies E, reaction orders n. The LnOCl specific heats (Csub(P))sub(T) are estimated. It is shown that the LnOCl compounds can be prepared in the form of monocrystals by the CTR method

  12. Physical and numerical modelling of earth pressure on anchored sheet pile walls in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Fuglsang, Leif D

    2006-01-01

    The influence of wall flexibility on earth pressure, bending moments and failure modes is studied. Numerical models are compared to results from model tests carried out in a geotechnical centrifuge. The back-fill is dry sand and failure is introduced by allowing the wall to rotate around the anchor...

  13. Resistive wall mode stabilization in slowly rotating high beta plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Garofalo, A M [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Okabayashi, M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Strait, E J [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Betti, R [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Chu, M S [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Hu, B [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); In, Y [FAR-TECH, Inc., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Jackson, G L [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); La Haye, R J [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Lanctot, M J [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Liu, Y Q [Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Navratil, G A [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Solomon, W M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Takahashi, H [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Groebner, R J [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    DIII-D experiments show that the resistive wall mode (RWM) can remain stable in high {beta} scenarios despite a low net torque from nearly balanced neutral beam injection heating. The minimization of magnetic field asymmetries is essential for operation at the resulting low plasma rotation of less than 20 krad s{sup -1} (measured with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy using C VI emission) corresponding to less than 1% of the Alfven velocity or less than 10% of the ion thermal velocity. In the presence of n = 1 field asymmetries the rotation required for stability is significantly higher and depends on the torque input and momentum confinement, which suggests that a loss of torque-balance can lead to an effective rotation threshold above the linear RWM stability threshold. Without an externally applied field the measured rotation can be too low to neglect the diamagnetic rotation. A comparison of the instability onset in plasmas rotating with and against the direction of the plasma current indicates the importance of the toroidal flow driven by the radial electric field in the stabilization process. Observed rotation thresholds are compared with predictions for the semi-kinetic damping model, which generally underestimates the rotation required for stability. A more detailed modeling of kinetic damping including diamagnetic and precession drift frequencies can lead to stability without plasma rotation. However, even with corrected error fields and fast plasma rotation, plasma generated perturbations, such as edge localized modes, can nonlinearly destabilize the RWM. In these cases feedback control can increase the damping of the magnetic perturbation and is effective in extending the duration of high {beta} discharges.

  14. Lateral Earth Pressure behind Walls Rotating about Base considering Arching Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In field, the earth pressure on a retaining wall is the common effect of kinds of factors. To figure out how key factors act, it has taken into account the arching effects together with the contribution from the mode of displacement of a wall to calculate earth pressure in the proposed method. Based on Mohr circle, a conversion factor is introduced to determine the shear stresses between artificial slices in soil mass. In the light of this basis, a modified differential slices solution is presented for calculation of active earth pressure on a retaining wall. Comparisons show that the result of proposed method is identical to observations from model tests in prediction of lateral pressures for walls rotating about the base.

  15. Chest wall stabilization in trauma patients: why, when, and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas W.

    2018-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest wall and rib fractures are remarkably frequent and are the basis of considerable morbidity and possible mortality. Surgical remedies for highly displaced rib fractures, especially in cases of flail chest, have been undertaken intermittently for more than 50 years. Rib-specific plating systems have started to be used in the last 10 years. These have ushered in the modern era of rib repair with chest wall stabilization (CWS) techniques that are safer, easier to perform, and more efficient. Recent consensus statements have sought to define the indications and contraindications, as well as the when, the how, and the technical details of CWS. Repair should be considered for patients who have three or more displaced rib fractures or a flail chest, whether or not mechanical ventilation is required. Additional candidates include patients who fail non-operative management irrespective of fracture pattern and those with rib fractures who need thoracic procedures for other reasons. Traditionally, unstable spine fracture and severe traumatic brain injury are definite contraindications. Pulmonary contusion’s role in the decision to perform CWS remains controversial. A range of rib-specific plating systems are now commercially available. PMID:29744222

  16. Oxygen stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.P.; Malekzadeh, M.; Pickus, M.R.

    1975-10-01

    A new, oxygen-stabilized intermetallic compound was identified in sintered, pre-alloyed rare-earth iron powder samples. Its composition corresponds to formula R 12 Fe 32 O 2 and its crystal structure belongs to space group Im3m. The presence of these compounds was observed, so far, in several R--Fe--O systems, with R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Y

  17. Redistribution Principle Approach for Evaluation of Seismic Active Earth Pressure Behind Retaining Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskar, A. D.; Madhekar, S. N.; Phatak, D. R.

    2017-11-01

    The knowledge of seismic active earth pressure behind the rigid retaining wall is very essential in the design of retaining wall in earthquake prone regions. Commonly used Mononobe-Okabe (MO) method considers pseudo-static approach. Recently there are many pseudo-dynamic methods used to evaluate the seismic earth pressure. However, available pseudo-static and pseudo-dynamic methods do not incorporate the effect of wall movement on the earth pressure distribution. Dubrova (Interaction between soils and structures, Rechnoi Transport, Moscow, 1963) was the first, who considered such effect and till date, it is used for cohesionless soil, without considering the effect of seismicity. In this paper, Dubrova's model based on redistribution principle, considering the seismic effect has been developed. It is further used to compute the distribution of seismic active earth pressure, in a more realistic manner, by considering the effect of wall movement on the earth pressure, as it is displacement based method. The effects of a wide range of parameters like soil friction angle (ϕ), wall friction angle (δ), horizontal and vertical seismic acceleration coefficients (kh and kv); on seismic active earth pressure (Kae) have been studied. Results are presented for comparison of pseudo-static and pseudo-dynamic methods, to highlight the realistic, non-linearity of seismic active earth pressure distribution. The current study results in the variation of Kae with kh in the same manner as that of MO method and Choudhury and Nimbalkar (Geotech Geol Eng 24(5):1103-1113, 2006) study. To increase in ϕ, there is a reduction in static as well as seismic earth pressure. Also, by keeping constant ϕ value, as kh increases from 0 to 0.3, earth pressure increases; whereas as δ increases, active earth pressure decreases. The seismic active earth pressure coefficient (Kae) obtained from the present study is approximately same as that obtained by previous researchers. Though seismic earth

  18. Stability of ideal and resistive modes in cylindrical plasmas with resistive walls and plasma rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondeson, A.; Xie, H.X.

    1996-01-01

    The stabilization of cylindrical plasmas by resistive walls combined with plasma rotation is analyzed. Perturbations with a single mode rational surface q=m/n in a finitely conducting plasma are treated by the resistive kink dispersion relation of Coppi. The possibilities for stabilization of ideal and resistive instabilities are explored systematically in different regions of parameter space. The study confirms that an ideal instability can be stabilized by a close-fitting wall and a rotation velocity of the order of resistive growth rate. However, the region in parameter space where such stabilization occurs is very small and appears to be difficult to exploit in experiments. The overall conclusion from the cylindrical plasma model is that resistive modes can readily be wall stabilized, whereas complete wall stabilization is hard to achieve for plasmas that are ideally unstable with the wall at infinity. 26 refs, 5 figs

  19. Stability of earth dam with a vertical core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Vyacheslav Valentinovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth dam with impervious element in the form of asphaltic concrete core is currently the most promising type of earth dams (due to simple construction technology and universal service properties of asphaltic concrete and is widely used in the world. However, experience in the construction and operation of high dams (above 160 m is not available, and their work is scarcely explored. In this regard, the paper discusses the results of computational prediction of the stress-strain state and stability of a high earth dam (256 m high with the core. The authors considered asphaltic concrete containing 7 % of bitumen as the material of the core. Gravel was considered as the material of resistant prisms. Design characteristics of the rolled asphaltic concrete and gravel were obtained from the processing of the results of triaxial tests. The calculations were performed using finite element method in elastoplastic formulation and basing on the phased construction of the dam and reservoir filling. The research shows, that the work of embankment dam with vertical core during filling of the reservoir is characterized by horizontal displacement of the lower resistant prism in the tailrace and the formation of a hard wedge prism descending along the core in the upper resistant prism. The key issue of the safety assessment is to determine the safety factor of the overall stability of the dam, for calculation of which the destruction of the earth dam is necessary, which can be done by reducing the strength properties of the dam materials. As a results of the calculations, the destruction of the dam occurs with a decrease in the strength characteristics of the materials of the dam by 2.5 times. The dam stability depends on the stability of the lower resistant prism. The destruction of its slope occurs on the classical circular-cylindrical surface. The presence of a potential collapse surface in the upper resistant prism (on the edges of the descending wedge does

  20. Measurement of Resistive Wall Mode stability in rotating high beta plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimerdes, H.; Bialek, J.; Garofalo, A.M.; Navratil, G.A.; Chance, M.S.; Menard, J.E.; Okabayashi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Chu, M.S.; Gohil, P.; Jackson, G.L.; Jensen, T.H.; La Haye, R.J.; Scoville, J.T.; Strait, E.J.; Jayakumar, R.J.; Liu, Y.Q.

    2005-01-01

    Toroidal plasma rotation in the order of a few percent of the Alfven velocity can stabilize the resistive wall mode and extend the operating regime of tokamaks from the conventional, ideal MHD no-wall limit up to the ideal MHD ideal wall limit. The stabilizing effect has been measured passively by measuring the critical plasma rotation required for stability and actively by probing the plasma with externally applied resonant magnetic fields. These measurements are compared to predictions of rotational stabilization of the sound wave damping and of the kinetic damping model using the MARS code. (author)

  1. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    as the rhabdophane structure is preserved. The bound hydrate water is accommodated in the rhabdophane structure and is stable at temperatures of up to 650 oC. The thermal stability of the hydrate water and the phosphate structure are of significance for the proton conductivity. The LaPO4·0.6H2O and NdPO4•0.5H2O......Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...... to the monazite structure upon dehydration. The thermal stability of the hydrate is studied and found to contain water of two types, physically adsorbed and structurally bound hydrate water. The adsorbed water is correlated to the specific surface area and can be reversibly recovered when dehydrated as long...

  2. Stability of spiral welded tubes in Quay Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, A.M.; van Es, S.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A European research project (RFCS) has started to provide economic and safe guidance for the design of spirally welded tubes in combined walls. The main motivation for this project called COMBITUBE is that the current Eurocode 3 regulations for tubes in quay walls lead to uneconomic designs, because

  3. Intraoperative CT in the assessment of posterior wall acetabular fracture stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian; Jackson, Kelly; Ortega, Gil

    2014-04-01

    Posterior wall acetabular fractures that involve 10% to 40% of the posterior wall may or may not require an open reduction and internal fixation. Dynamic stress examination of the acetabular fracture under fluoroscopy has been used as an intraoperative method to assess joint stability. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the value of intraoperative ISO computed tomography (CT) examination using the Siemens ISO-C imaging system (Siemens Corp, Malvern, Pennsylvania) in the assessment of posterior wall acetabular fracture stability during stress examination under anesthesia. In 5 posterior wall acetabular fractures, standard fluoroscopic images (including anteroposterior pelvis and Judet radiographs) with dynamic stress examinations were compared with the ISO-C CT imaging system to assess posterior wall fracture stability during stress examination. After review of standard intraoperative fluoroscopic images under dynamic stress examination, all 5 cases appeared to demonstrate posterior wall stability; however, when the intraoperative images from the ISO-C CT imaging system demonstrated that 1 case showed fracture instability of the posterior wall segment during stress examination, open reduction and internal fixation was performed. The use of intraoperative ISO CT imaging has shown an initial improvement in the surgeon's ability to assess the intraoperative stability of posterior wall acetabular fractures during stress examination when compared with standard fluoroscopic images. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. A Procedure to Measure the in-Situ Hygrothermal Behavior of Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Antoine Chabriac

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rammed earth is a sustainable material with low embodied energy. However, its development as a building material requires a better evaluation of its moisture-thermal buffering abilities and its mechanical behavior. Both of these properties are known to strongly depend on the amount of water contained in wall pores and its evolution. Thus the aim of this paper is to present a procedure to measure this key parameter in rammed earth or cob walls by using two types of probes operating on the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR principle. A calibration procedure for the probes requiring solely four parameters is described. This calibration procedure is then used to monitor the hygrothermal behavior of a rammed earth wall (1.5 m × 1 m × 0.5 m, instrumented by six probes during its manufacture, and submitted to insulated, natural convection and forced convection conditions. These measurements underline the robustness of the calibration procedure over a large range of water content, even if the wall is submitted to quite important temperature variations. They also emphasize the importance of gravity on water content heterogeneity when the saturation is high, as well as the role of liquid-to-vapor phase change on the thermal behavior.

  5. A Procedure to Measure the in-Situ Hygrothermal Behavior of Earth Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabriac, Pierre-Antoine; Fabbri, Antonin; Morel, Jean-Claude; Laurent, Jean-Paul; Blanc-Gonnet, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Rammed earth is a sustainable material with low embodied energy. However, its development as a building material requires a better evaluation of its moisture-thermal buffering abilities and its mechanical behavior. Both of these properties are known to strongly depend on the amount of water contained in wall pores and its evolution. Thus the aim of this paper is to present a procedure to measure this key parameter in rammed earth or cob walls by using two types of probes operating on the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) principle. A calibration procedure for the probes requiring solely four parameters is described. This calibration procedure is then used to monitor the hygrothermal behavior of a rammed earth wall (1.5 m × 1 m × 0.5 m), instrumented by six probes during its manufacture, and submitted to insulated, natural convection and forced convection conditions. These measurements underline the robustness of the calibration procedure over a large range of water content, even if the wall is submitted to quite important temperature variations. They also emphasize the importance of gravity on water content heterogeneity when the saturation is high, as well as the role of liquid-to-vapor phase change on the thermal behavior. PMID:28788603

  6. Characteristics of premixed flames stabilized in an axisymmetric curved-wall jet burner with tip modification

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daejoong; Gil, Y. S.; Chung, TaeWon; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2009-01-01

    The stabilization characteristics of premixed flames in an axisymmetric curved-wall jet burner have been experimentally investigated. This burner utilized the Coanda effect on top of a burner tip. The initially spherical burner tip was modified to a

  7. Best practices of using shotcrete for wall fascia and slope stabilization (phase 1 study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Shotcrete has become attractive and holds potential to replace cast-in-place (CIP) concrete for elements like retaining walls and slope stabilization. However, this practice is still limited due to concerns of drying shrinkage cracking, long-term dur...

  8. An approximate method for lateral stability analysis of wall-frame ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Initially the stability differential equation of this equivalent sandwich beam is ... buckling loads of coupled shear-wall structures using continuous medium ... In this study, an approximate method based on continuum system model and transfer.

  9. MHD stabilization of high β mirror plasma partially enclosed by conducting wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.Z.; Kesner, J.; Lane, B.

    1985-04-01

    An MHD formulation is used to study a wall stabilized high β mirror plasma with isotropic pressure. The stabilizing wall extends axially only a part of the distance between the mirror midplane and throat. We model this arrangement using a wall that approaches the plasma surface in the bad curvature region and is distant from the plasma in the good curvature region. A variational method is used to solve the equation in the distant wall region and an iterative method is used to solve the equation when the wall is close to the plasma. A jump condition is used to connect the regions of close and distant plasma-wall proximity. A simple trial function is used to perform the variational calculation (the choice of trial function is substantiated by an exact numerical solution). The results show that for a low mirror ratio case more conducting wall surface is needed for stability than in the high mirror ratio case. This agrees with the physical mechanism of the wall stabilization

  10. Analytic modeling of the feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, Vladimir D.

    2003-01-01

    Feedback suppression of resistive wall modes (RWM) is studied analytically using a model based on a standard cylindrical approximation. Optimal choice of the input signal for the feedback, effects related to the geometry of the feedback active coils, RWM suppression in a configuration with ITER-like double wall, are considered here. The widespread opinion that the feedback with poloidal sensors is better than that with radial sensors is discussed. It is shown that for an ideal feedback system the best input signal would be a combination of radial and poloidal perturbations measured inside the vessel. (author)

  11. Temperature measurements in a wall stabilized steady flame using CARS

    KAUST Repository

    Sesha Giri, Krishna; Lacoste, Deanna; Damazo, Jason; Kwon, Eddie; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    -Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) thermometry as close as 275 μm to a convex wall cooled with water has been carried out. The standard deviation of mean temperatures is observed to be ~6.5% for high temperatures (>2000K) and ~14% in the lower range (<500K

  12. Effects of inserted depth of wall penetration on basal stability of foundation pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aizhao; Shen, Hao; Sun, Jinguo

    2017-05-01

    Evaluation of basal heave stability is one of important design checks for excavations in soft clays. The commonly used classical calculation method based on limit equilibrium theory and the safety coefficient formula recommended by the current code, do not consider the influence of supporting structure of foundation pit depth heave stability, which results in conservative. Considering the wall stiffness and strength, the effective stress changes in different depth of soil, the frictional resistance between the retaining wall and the passive zone, the vertical shear resistance of the soil behind the wall and other factors. The modified safety factor calculation formula of foundation pit stability is presented, comparison analysis of calculation method combined with examples. The calculation results show that the safety factor of foundation pit stability is improved considering the influence of supporting structure depth, the calculation results are more reasonable.

  13. Aspect Ratio Scaling of Ideal No-wall Stability Limits in High Bootstrap Fraction Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Maingi, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] have achieved normalized beta values twice the conventional tokamak limit at low internal inductance and with significant bootstrap current. These experimental results have motivated a computational re-examination of the plasma aspect ratio dependence of ideal no-wall magnetohydrodynamic stability limits. These calculations find that the profile-optimized no-wall stability limit in high bootstrap fraction regimes is well described by a nearly aspect ratio invariant normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. However, the scaling of normalized beta with internal inductance is found to be strongly aspect ratio dependent at sufficiently low aspect ratio. These calculations and detailed stability analyses of experimental equilibria indicate that the nonrotating plasma no-wall stability limit has been exceeded by as much as 30% in NSTX in a high bootstrap fraction regime

  14. Experimental assessment of dry stone retaining wall stability on a rigid foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Villemus , B.; Morel , J.C.; Boutin , C.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Dry stone masonry retaining walls are present in the majority of mountainous areas all around the world, but the technique is marginal today in developed countries. The emergence of the concept of sustainable development calls for renewed use of this technique, both for the repair of existing retaining walls and the building of new ones. The objective of this research was to seek the knowledge necessary to ensure the stability of these structures, using experimental in...

  15. Stabilization of ideal plasma resistive wall modes in cylindrical geometry: The effect of resistive layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A cylindrical model with finite beta having an external resonant ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability has been constructed. This resonant mode has a mode rational surface, where the safety factor q equals m/n, within the plasma. In this model, the perturbed radial magnetic field for the ideal mode is nonzero between the mode rational surface and the wall, even though it must vanish at the mode rational surface. This property of the mode is in common with the toroidal external kink. Results are presented showing that in the parameter range for which this ideal mode is stable with a conducting wall but unstable with the wall at infinity, a resistive wall mode persists. However, in the presence of plasma resistivity in a resistive layer about the mode rational surface, this resistive wall mode can be stabilized by a plasma rotation frequency of order a nominal resistive instability growth rate. Furthermore, the stabilization occurs in a large gap in wall position or beta. It is also shown that for the ideal resonant mode, as well as resistive plasma modes and nonresonant ideal plasma modes, there is a maximum value of plasma rotation above which there is no stability gap. Discussions are presented suggesting that these properties may hold for the toroidal external kink. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. On fully three-dimensional resistive wall mode and feedback stabilization computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strumberger, E.; Merkel, P.; Sempf, M.; Guenter, S.

    2008-01-01

    Resistive walls, located close to the plasma boundary, reduce the growth rates of external kink modes to resistive time scales. For such slowly growing resistive wall modes, the stabilization by an active feedback system becomes feasible. The fully three-dimensional stability code STARWALL, and the feedback optimization code OPTIM have been developed [P. Merkel and M. Sempf, 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2006, Chengdu, China (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2006, paper TH/P3-8] to compute the growth rates of resistive wall modes in the presence of nonaxisymmetric, multiply connected wall structures and to model the active feedback stabilization of these modes. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the codes and to study the effect of the toroidal mode coupling caused by multiply connected wall structures, the codes are applied to test equilibria using the resistive wall structures currently under debate for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)] and ASDEX Upgrade [W. Koeppendoerfer et al., Proceedings of the 16th Symposium on Fusion Technology, London, 1990 (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1991), Vol. 1, p. 208

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stabilizing agents in red phosphorus Li-ion battery anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin

    2017-08-16

    Phosphorus boasts extremely high gravimetric and volumetric capacities but suffers from poor electrochemical stability with significant capacity loss immediately after the first cycle. We propose to circumvent this issue by mixing amorphous red phosphorus with single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing a non-destructive sublimation–deposition method, we have synthesized composites where the synergetic effect between red phosphorus and single-walled carbon nanotubes allows for a considerable improvement in the electrochemical stability of battery anodes. In contrast to the average 40% loss of capacity after 50 cycles for other phosphorus–carbon composites in the literature, our material shows losses of just 22% under analogous cycling conditions.

  18. Resistive instabilities in reversed shear discharges and wall stabilization on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeji, S.; Tokuda, S.; Fujita, T.; Suzuki, T.; Isayama, A.; Ide, S.; Ishii, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Koide, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Oikawa, T.; Ozeki, T.; Sakamoto, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Resistive instabilities and wall stabilization of ideal low toroidal mode number, n, kink modes are investigated in JT-60U reversed shear discharges. Resistive interchange modes with n=1 are found to appear in reversed shear discharges with large pressure gradient at the normalized beta, β N , of about unity or even lower. The resistive interchange modes appear as intermittent burst-like magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and higher n≤3 modes are observed occasionally in higher β N regime. No clear degradation of the plasma stored energy is observed by the resistive interchange modes themselves. It is also found that resistive interchange modes can lead to major collapse owing to a coupling with tearing modes at the outer mode rational surface over the minimum safety factor. Stability analysis revealed that stability parameter of tearing modes, Δ' , at the outer mode rational surface is affected by the free-boundary condition. The result is consistent with the experimental evidence that major collapse tends to occur when plasma edge safety factor, q*, is near integer values. Stabilization of ideal low n kink modes by the JT-60U wall is demonstrated. Magnetohydrodynamic perturbations that are attributed to resistive wall modes are observed followed by major collapse in wall-stabilized discharges. (author)

  19. Resistive Wall Mode Stability and Control in the Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadikin, Dmitriy

    2006-03-01

    Control of MHD instabilities using a conducting wall together with external magnetic fields is an important route to improved performance and reliability in fusion devices. Active control of MHD modes is of interest for both the Advanced Tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) configurations. A wide range of unstable, current driven MHD modes is present in the RFP. An ideally conducting wall facing the plasma can in principle provide stabilization to these modes. However, a real, resistive wall characterized by a wall field diffusion time, cannot stabilize the ideal MHD modes unless they rotate with Alfvenic velocity, which is usually not the case. With a resistive wall, the ideal modes are converted into resistive wall modes (RWM) with growth rates comparable to the inverse wall time. Resistive wall modes have been studied in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell RFP device. Growth rates have been measured and found in agreement with linear MHD stability calculations. An advanced system for active control has been developed and installed on the EXTRAP T2R device. The system includes an array of 128 active saddle coils, fully covering the torus surface. Experiments on EXTRAP T2R have for the first time demonstrated simultaneous active suppression of multiple independent RWMs. In experiments with a partial array, coupling of different modes due to the limited number of feedback coils has been observed, in agreement with theory. Different feedback strategies, such as the intelligent shell, the rotating shell, and mode control have been studied. Further, feedback operation with different types of magnetic field sensors, measuring either the radial or the toroidal field components have been compared

  20. Stability equation and two-component Eigenmode for domain walls in scalar potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, G.S.; Graca, E.L.; Rodrigues, R. de Lima

    2002-08-01

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics involving a two-component representation and two-component eigenfunctions is applied to obtain the stability equation associated to a potential model formulated in terms of two coupled real scalar fields. We investigate the question of stability by introducing an operator technique for the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) and non-BPS states on two domain walls in a scalar potential model with minimal N 1-supersymmetry. (author)

  1. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of E i I i , d, and γ, where E i I i and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates

  2. Collapse and stability of single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, J; Liu, B; Huang, Y; Zuo, J; Hwang, K-C; Yu, M-F

    2007-01-01

    The collapse and stability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important implications for their synthesis and applications. While nanotube collapse has been observed experimentally, the conditions for the collapse, especially its dependence on tube structures, are not clear. We have studied the energetics of the collapse of single- and multi-wall CNTs via atomistic simulations. The collapse is governed by the number of walls and the radius of the inner-most wall. The collapsed structure is energetically favored about a certain diameter, which is 4.12, 4.96 and 5.76 nm for single-, double- and triple-wall CNTs, respectively. The CNT chirality also has a strong influence on the collapsed structure, leading to flat, warped and twisted CNTs, depending on the chiral angle

  3. On the roles of direct feedback and error field correction in stabilizing resistive-wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Y.; Bogatu, I.N.; Kim, J.S.; Garofalo, A.M.; Jackson, G.L.; La Haye, R.J.; Schaffer, M.J.; Strait, E.J.; Lanctot, M.J.; Reimerdes, H.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Okabayashi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Active feedback control in the DIII-D tokamak has fully stabilized the current-driven ideal kink resistive-wall mode (RWM). While complete stabilization is known to require both low frequency error field correction (EFC) and high frequency feedback, unambiguous identification has been made about the distinctive role of each in a fully feedback-stabilized discharge. Specifically, the role of direct RWM feedback, which nullifies the RWM perturbation in a time scale faster than the mode growth time, cannot be replaced by low frequency EFC, which minimizes the lack of axisymmetry of external magnetic fields. (letter)

  4. Stability of tapered and parallel-walled dental implants: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieh, Momen A; Alsabeeha, Nabeel; Duncan, Warwick J

    2018-05-15

    Clinical trials have suggested that dental implants with a tapered configuration have improved stability at placement, allowing immediate placement and/or loading. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the implant stability of tapered dental implants compared to standard parallel-walled dental implants. Applying the guidelines of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched for in electronic databases and complemented by hand searching. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool and data were analyzed using statistical software. A total of 1199 studies were identified, of which, five trials were included with 336 dental implants in 303 participants. Overall meta-analysis showed that tapered dental implants had higher implant stability values than parallel-walled dental implants at insertion and 8 weeks but the difference was not statistically significant. Tapered dental implants had significantly less marginal bone loss compared to parallel-walled dental implants. No significant differences in implant failure rate were found between tapered and parallel-walled dental implants. There is limited evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of tapered dental implants in achieving greater implant stability compared to parallel-walled dental implants. Superior short-term results in maintaining peri-implant marginal bone with tapered dental implants are possible. Further properly designed RCTs are required to endorse the supposed advantages of tapered dental implants in immediate loading protocol and other complex clinical scenarios. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Stability of a pinned magnetic domain wall as a function of its internal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaigne, F.; Duluard, A.; Briones, J.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (France); Childress, J. R. [HGST San Jose Research Center, 3403 Yerba Buena Rd, San Jose, California 95135 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    It is shown that there are many stable configurations for a domain wall pinned by a notch along a magnetic stripe. The stability of several of these configurations is investigated numerically as a function of the thickness of the magnetic film. The depinning mechanism depends on the structure of the domain wall and on the thickness of the magnetic film. In the case of a spin-valve structure, it appears that the stray fields emerging from the hard layer at the notch location influence the stability of the micromagnetic configuration. Different depinning mechanisms are thus observed for the same film thickness depending on the magnetization orientation of the propagating domain. This conclusion qualitatively explains experimental magnetoresistance measurements.

  6. Reduced critical rotation for resistive-wall mode stabilization in a near-axisymmetric configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimerdes, H; Garofalo, A M; Jackson, G L; Okabayashi, M; Strait, E J; Chu, M S; In, Y; La Haye, R J; Lanctot, M J; Liu, Y Q; Navratil, G A; Solomon, W M; Takahashi, H; Groebner, R J

    2007-02-02

    Recent DIII-D experiments with reduced neutral beam torque and minimum nonaxisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field show a significant reduction of the toroidal plasma rotation required for the stabilization of the resistive-wall mode (RWM) below the threshold values observed in experiments that apply nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields to slow the plasma rotation. A toroidal rotation frequency of less than 10 krad/s at the q=2 surface (measured with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy using C VI) corresponding to 0.3% of the inverse of the toroidal Alfvén time is sufficient to sustain the plasma pressure above the ideal MHD no-wall stability limit. The low-rotation threshold is found to be consistent with predictions by a kinetic model of RWM damping.

  7. Spacecraft Line-of-Sight Stabilization Using LWIR Earth Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of using the bright and near-uniform Earth infrared (or wavelength infrared, LWIR) signature as a stable reference for accurate (micro-rad or less) inertial pointing and tracking on-board an space vehicle, including the determination of the fundamental limits of applicability of the proposed method for space missions. We demonstrate sub-micro radian level pointing accuracy under a representative set of disturbances experienced by the spacecraft in orbit.

  8. Strength Analysis of Coconut Fiber Stabilized Earth for Farm Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokela, O. S.; P. O, Alada

    2012-07-01

    Investigation of the strength characteristic of soil from alluvial deposit of River Benue in makurdi stabilized with coconut fiber as a stabilizer was carried as local building material for farm structure. Processed coconut fibers were mixed with the soil at four different mix ratios of 1% fiber, 2% fiber, 3% fiber and 4% fiber by percentage weight with 0% fiber as control. Compaction test and compressive strength were carried out on the various stabilizing ratio. From the compaction test, the correlation between the maximum dry density and optimum moisture content is a second order polynomial with a coefficient of 63% obtained at1.91kg/m3and 20.0% respectively while the compressive strength test shows an optimum failure load of 8.62N/mm2 at 2%fibre:100% soil mix ratio at 2.16 maximum dry density.

  9. Proton-beam propagation through wall-confined plasma channel stabilized against sausage instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahama, Masao; Nemoto, Masahiro; Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Michiaki; Matsui, Masao; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented of proton-beam (energy ∼ 650 keV) propagation through wall-confined plasma channel that is stabilized against sausage instability by an externally-applied longitudinal magnetic field. Significant improvement of beam-propagation efficiency has been obtained of ∼ 70 % compared with the previous experiment of ∼ 55 % without the magnetic field. The propagation can also be available up to ∼ 30 % even in a non-propagation region in a non-stabilized channel. (author)

  10. Analytical modelling of resistive wall mode stabilization by rotation in toroidal tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, C J; Gimblett, C G; Hastie, R J

    2011-01-01

    Stabilization of the resitive wall mode (RWM) may allow fusion power to be doubled for a given magnetic field in advanced tokamak operation. Experimental evidence from DIII-D and other machines suggests that plasma rotation can stabilize the RWM. Several authors (Finn 1995 Phys. Plasmas 2 3782, Bondeson and Xie 1997 Phys. Plasmas 4 2081) have constructed analytical cylindrical models for the RWM, but these do not deal with toroidal effects. The framework of Connor et al (1988 Phys. Fluids 31 577) is used to develop ideal plasma analytic models with toroidicity included. Stepped pressure profiles and careful ordering of terms are used to simplify the analysis. First, a current driven kink mode model is developed and a dispersion relation for arbitrary current profile is calculated. Second, the external pressure driven kink mode is similarly investigated as the most important RWM arises from this mode. Using this latter model it is found that the RWM is stabilized by Alfven continuum damping with rotation levels similar to those seen in experiments. An expression for the stability of the external kink mode for more general current profiles and a resistive wall is derived in the appendix.

  11. Numerical Study of Equilibrium, Stability, and Advanced Resistive Wall Mode Feedback Algorithms on KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; You, K.-I.; Glasser, A. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2007-11-01

    Stability to ideal MHD kink/ballooning modes and the resistive wall mode (RWM) is investigated for the KSTAR tokamak. Free-boundary equilibria that comply with magnetic field coil current constraints are computed for monotonic and reversed shear safety factor profiles and H-mode tokamak pressure profiles. Advanced tokamak operation at moderate to low plasma internal inductance shows that a factor of two improvement in the plasma beta limit over the no-wall beta limit is possible for toroidal mode number of unity. The KSTAR conducting structure, passive stabilizers, and in-vessel control coils are modeled by the VALEN-3D code and the active RWM stabilization performance of the device is evaluated using both standard and advanced feedback algorithms. Steady-state power and voltage requirements for the system are estimated based on the expected noise on the RWM sensor signals. Using NSTX experimental RWM sensors noise data as input, a reduced VALEN state-space LQG controller is designed to realistically assess KSTAR stabilization system performance.

  12. Coaxial stability of nano-bearings constructed by double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zaixing

    2008-01-01

    How to effectively control the coaxial stability of nano-bearings has an important influence on improving the quality of nano-bearings. Some relevant problems are studied in this paper. Firstly, we investigate basic non-coaxial modes in double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). On the basis of analysis for these non-coaxial modes, a planar continuum model is established according to the principle of homogenization. By means of this model, a dynamic parameter λ* characterizing the coaxial stability of nano-bearings is determined. λ* is the explicit function of the angular velocity and interlayer spacing of DWCNTs. In terms of λ*, a criterion used to judge the coaxial stability of nano-bearings is given. Through discussing the influence of the angular velocity and interlayer spacing on the dynamic parameter λ*, some important conclusions are drawn

  13. Normal mode approach to modelling of feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.S.; Chance, M.S.; Okabayashi, M.; Glasser, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) of a plasma in a general feedback configuration is formulated in terms of the normal modes of the plasma-resistive wall system. The growth/damping rates and the eigenfunctions of the normal modes are determined by an extended energy principle for the plasma during its open (feedback) loop operation. A set of equations are derived for the time evolution of these normal modes with currents in the feedback coils. The dynamics of the feedback system is completed by the prescription of the feedback logic. The feasibility of the feedback is evaluated by using the Nyquist diagram method or by solving the characteristic equations. The elements of the characteristic equations are formed from the growth and damping rates of the normal modes, the sensor matrix of the perturbation fluxes detected by the sensor loops, the excitation matrix of the energy input to the normal modes by the external feedback coils, and the feedback logic. (The RWM is also predicted to be excited by an external error field to a large amplitude when it is close to marginal stability.) This formulation has been implemented numerically and applied to the DIII-D tokamak. It is found that feedback with poloidal sensors is much more effective than feedback with radial sensors. Using radial sensors, increasing the number of feedback coils from a central band on the outboard side to include an upper and a lower band can substantially increase the effectiveness of the feedback system. The strength of the RWM that can be stabilized is increased from γτ w = 1 to 30 (γ is the growth rate of the RWM in the absence of feedback and τ w is the resistive wall time constant) Using poloidal sensors, just one central band of feedback coils is sufficient for the stabilization of the RWM with γτ w = 30. (author)

  14. Study of Local and Distortional Stability of Thin-Walled Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imene Mahi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin-walled structures have an increasingly large and growing field of application in the engineering sector, the goal behind using this type of structure is efficiency in terms of resistance and cost, however the stability of its components (the thin walls remains the first aspect of the behavior, and a primordial factor in the design process. The hot rolled sections are known by a consequent post-buckling reserve, cold-formed steel sections which are thin-walled elements also benefit, in this case, it seems essential to take into account the favorable effects of this reserve in to the verification procedure of the resistance with respect to the three modes of failures of this type of structure. The design method that takes into account this reserve of resistance is inevitably the effective width method. The direct strength method has been developed to improve the speed and efficiency of the design of thin-walled profiles. The latter mainly uses the buckling loads (for Local, Distortional and Global mode obtained from a numerical analysis and the resistance curves calibrated experimentally to predict the ultimate load of the profile. Among those, the behavior of a set of Cshaped profiles (highly industrialized is studied, this type of section is assumed to be very prone to modes of local and distortional instability. The outcome of this investigation revealed very relevant conclusions both scientifically and practically.

  15. Surfactive stabilization of multi-walled carbon nanotube dispersions with dissolved humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, Mark A. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineering Research and Development Center, US Army Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)], E-mail: mark.a.chappell@usace.army.mil; George, Aaron J.; Dontsova, Katerina M.; Porter, Beth E. [SpecPro, Inc., 4815 Bradford Drive, Suite 201, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Price, Cynthia L. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineering Research and Development Center, US Army Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Zhou Pingheng; Morikawa, Eizi [J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Kennedy, Alan J.; Steevens, Jeffery A. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineering Research and Development Center, US Army Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Soil humic substances (HS) stabilize carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersions, a mechanism we hypothesized arose from the surfactive nature of HS. Experiments dispersing multi-walled CNT in solutions of dissolved Aldrich humic acid (HA) or water-extractable Catlin soil HS demonstrated enhanced stability at 150 and 300 mg L{sup -1} added Aldrich HA and Catlin HS, respectively, corresponding with decreased CNT mean particle diameter (MPD) and polydispersivity (PD) of 250 nm and 0.3 for Aldrich HA and 450 nm and 0.35 for Catlin HS. Analogous trends in MPD and PD were observed with addition of the surfactants Brij 35, Triton X-405, and SDS, corresponding to surfactant sorption maximum. NEXAFS characterization showed that Aldrich HA contained highly surfactive domains while Catlin soil possessed a mostly carbohydrate-based structure. This work demonstrates that the chemical structure of humic materials in natural waters is directly linked to their surfactive ability to disperse CNT released into the environment. - Suspensions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes are stabilized by relatively low concentrations of dissolved humic substances in solution through surfactive mechanisms.

  16. Physicochemical Properties and Storage Stability of Microencapsulated DHA-Rich Oil with Different Wall Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wuxi; Wang, Haijun; Zhang, Ke; Gao, Feng; Chen, Shulin; Li, Demao

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the physicochemical properties and storage stability of microencapsulated DHA-rich oil spray dried with different wall materials: model 1 (modified starch, gum arabic, and maltodextrin), model 2 (soy protein isolate, gum arabic, and maltodextrin), and model 3 (casein, glucose, and lactose). The results indicated that model 3 exhibited the highest microencapsulation efficiency (98.66 %) and emulsion stability (>99 %), with a moisture content and mean particle size of 1.663 % and 14.173 μm, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis indicated that the Tm of DHA-rich oil microcapsules was high, suggesting that the entire structure of the microcapsules remained stable during thermal processing. A thermogravimetric analysis curve showed that the product lost 5 % of its weight at 172 °C and the wall material started to degrade at 236 °C. The peroxide value of microencapsulated DHA-rich oil remained at one ninth after accelerated oxidation at 45 °C for 8 weeks to that of the unencapsulated DHA-rich oil, thus revealing the promising oxidation stability of DHA-rich oil in microcapsules.

  17. Surfactive stabilization of multi-walled carbon nanotube dispersions with dissolved humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappell, Mark A.; George, Aaron J.; Dontsova, Katerina M.; Porter, Beth E.; Price, Cynthia L.; Zhou Pingheng; Morikawa, Eizi; Kennedy, Alan J.; Steevens, Jeffery A.

    2009-01-01

    Soil humic substances (HS) stabilize carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersions, a mechanism we hypothesized arose from the surfactive nature of HS. Experiments dispersing multi-walled CNT in solutions of dissolved Aldrich humic acid (HA) or water-extractable Catlin soil HS demonstrated enhanced stability at 150 and 300 mg L -1 added Aldrich HA and Catlin HS, respectively, corresponding with decreased CNT mean particle diameter (MPD) and polydispersivity (PD) of 250 nm and 0.3 for Aldrich HA and 450 nm and 0.35 for Catlin HS. Analogous trends in MPD and PD were observed with addition of the surfactants Brij 35, Triton X-405, and SDS, corresponding to surfactant sorption maximum. NEXAFS characterization showed that Aldrich HA contained highly surfactive domains while Catlin soil possessed a mostly carbohydrate-based structure. This work demonstrates that the chemical structure of humic materials in natural waters is directly linked to their surfactive ability to disperse CNT released into the environment. - Suspensions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes are stabilized by relatively low concentrations of dissolved humic substances in solution through surfactive mechanisms

  18. Effects of explosively venting aerosol-sized particles through earth-containment systems on the cloud-stabilization height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyckes, G.W.

    1980-07-01

    A method of approximating the cloud stabilization height for aerosol-sized particles vented explosively through earth containment systems is presented. The calculated values for stabilization heights are in fair agreement with those obtained experimentally

  19. Stability and Control of Burning Tokamak Plasmas with Resistive Walls: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, George [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States); Brennan, Dylan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Cole, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Finn, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-02

    This project is focused on theoretical and computational development for quantitative prediction of the stability and control of the equilibrium state evolution in toroidal burning plasmas, including its interaction with the surrounding resistive wall. The stability of long pulse burning plasmas is highly sensitive to the physics of resonant layers in the plasma, sources of momentum and flow, kinetic effects of energetic particles, and boundary conditions at the wall, including feedback control and error fields. In ITER in particular, the low toroidal flow equilibrium state, sustained primarily by energetic alpha particles from fusion reactions, will require the consideration of all of these key elements to predict quantitatively the stability and evolution. The principal investigators on this project have performed theoretical and computational analyses, guided by analytic modeling, to address this physics in realistic configurations. The overall goal has been to understand the key physics mechanisms that describe stable toroidal burning plasmas under active feedback control. Several relevant achievements have occurred during this project, leading to publications and invited conference presentations. In theoretical efforts, with the physics of the resonant layers, resistive wall, and toroidal momentum transport included, this study has extended from cylindrical resistive plasma - resistive wall models with feedback control to toroidal geometry with strong shaping to study mode coupling effects on the stability. These results have given insight into combined tearing and resistive wall mode behavior in simulations and experiment, while enabling a rapid exploration of plasma parameter space, to identify possible domains of interest for large plasma codes to investigate in more detail. Resonant field amplification and quasilinear torques in the presence of error fields and velocity shear have also been investigated. Here it was found, surprisingly, that the Maxwell

  20. Implementation of model predictive control for resistive wall mode stabilization on EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2015-10-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) method for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is presented. The system identification technique is used to obtain a linearized empirical model of EXTRAP T2R. MPC employs the model for prediction and computes optimal control inputs that satisfy performance criterion. The use of a linearized form of the model allows for compact formulation of MPC, implemented on a millisecond timescale, that can be used for real-time control. The design allows the user to arbitrarily suppress any selected Fourier mode. The experimental results from EXTRAP T2R show that the designed and implemented MPC successfully stabilizes the RWM.

  1. Implementation of model predictive control for resistive wall mode stabilization on EXTRAP T2R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiadi, A C; Brunsell, P R; Frassinetti, L

    2015-01-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) method for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is presented. The system identification technique is used to obtain a linearized empirical model of EXTRAP T2R. MPC employs the model for prediction and computes optimal control inputs that satisfy performance criterion. The use of a linearized form of the model allows for compact formulation of MPC, implemented on a millisecond timescale, that can be used for real-time control. The design allows the user to arbitrarily suppress any selected Fourier mode. The experimental results from EXTRAP T2R show that the designed and implemented MPC successfully stabilizes the RWM. (paper)

  2. In-plane cyclic behaviour of unfired clay and earth brick walls in both unstrengthened and strengthened conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hračov, Stanislav; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Garofano, A.; Urushadze, Shota

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2016), s. 3293-3308 ISSN 1359-5997 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP13-41574P EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 244123 - NIKER Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : seismic strengthening * retrofitting * earth brick walls * experimental tests * energy dissipation * earthquake engineering Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 2.607, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1617/s11527-015-0720-5

  3. High resolution detection and excitation of resonant magnetic perturbations in a wall-stabilized tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, David A. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Shiraki, Daisuke; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Bialek, James; Angelini, Sarah; Byrne, Patrick; DeBono, Bryan; Hughes, Paul; Mauel, Michael E.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Peng Qian; Rhodes, Dov; Rath, Nickolaus; Stoafer, Christopher [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We report high-resolution detection of the 3D plasma magnetic response of wall-stabilized tokamak discharges in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse [T. H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1926 (1996)] device. A new adjustable conducting wall has been installed on HBT-EP made up of 20 independent, movable, wall segments instrumented with three distinct sets of 40 modular coils that can be independently driven to generate a wide variety of magnetic perturbations. High-resolution detection of the plasma response is made with 216 poloidal and radial magnetic sensors that have been located and calibrated with high-accuracy. Static and dynamic plasma responses to resonant and non-resonant magnetic perturbations are observed through measurement of the step-response following a rapid change in the toroidal phase of the applied perturbations. Biorthogonal decomposition of the full set of magnetic sensors clearly defines the structures of naturally occurring external kinks as being composed of independent m/n = 3/1 and 6/2 modes. Resonant magnetic perturbations were applied to discharges with pre-existing, saturated m/n = 3/1 external kink mode activity. This m/n = 3/1 kink mode was observed to lock to the applied perturbation field. During this kink mode locked period, the plasma resonant response is characterized by a linear, a saturated, and a disruptive plasma regime dependent on the magnitude of the applied field and value of the edge safety factor and plasma rotation.

  4. ELM triggering by energetic particle driven mode in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Asakura, N.; Isayama, A.; Oyama, N.

    2013-01-01

    In the JT-60U high-β plasmas above the no-wall β limit, a triggering of an edge localized mode (ELM) by an energetic particle (EP)-driven mode has been observed. This EP-driven mode is thought to be driven by trapped EPs and it has been named EP-driven wall mode (EWM) on JT-60U (Matsunaga et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 045001). When the EWM appears in an ELMy H-mode phase, ELM crashes are reproducibly synchronized with the EWM bursts. The EWM-triggered ELM has a higher repetition frequency and less energy loss than those of the natural ELM. In order to trigger an ELM by the EP-driven mode, some conditions are thought to be needed, thus an EWM with large amplitude and growth rate, and marginal edge stability. In the scrape-off layer region, several measurements indicate an ion loss induced by the EWM. The ion transport is considered as the EP transport through the edge region. From these observations, the EP contributions to edge stability are discussed as one of the ELM triggering mechanisms. (paper)

  5. Effect of okra cell wall and polysaccharide on physical properties and stability of ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuennan, Pilapa; Sajjaanantakul, Tanaboon; Goff, H Douglas

    2014-08-01

    Stabilizers are used in ice cream to increase mix viscosity, promote smooth texture, and improve frozen stability. In this study, the effects of varying concentrations (0.00%, 0.15%, 0.30%, and 0.45%) of okra cell wall (OKW) and its corresponding water-soluble polysaccharide (OKP) on the physical characteristics of ice cream were determined. Ice cream mix viscosity was measured as well as overrun, meltdown, and consumer acceptability. Ice recrystallization was determined after ice cream was subjected to temperature cycling in the range of -10 to -20 °C for 10 cycles. Mix viscosity increased significantly as the concentrations of OKW and OKP increased. The addition of either OKW or OKP at 0.15% to 0.45% significantly improved the melting resistance of ice cream. OKW and OKP at 0.15% did not affect sensory perception score for flavor, texture, and overall liking of the ice cream. OKW and OKP (0.15%) reduced ice crystal growth to 107% and 87%, respectively, as compared to 132% for the control (0.00%). Thus, our results suggested the potential use of OKW and OKP at 0.15% as a stabilizer to control ice cream quality and retard ice recrystallization. OKP, however, at 0.15% exhibited greater effect on viscosity increase and on ice recrystallization inhibition than OKW. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Solar radiation pressure application for orbital motion stabilization near the Sun-Earth collinear libration point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakhova, Elena; Shmyrov, Alexander; Shmyrov, Vasily

    2018-05-01

    Orbital maneuvering in a neighborhood of the collinear libration point L1 of Sun-Earth system has specific properties, primarily associated with the instability L1. For a long stay in this area of space the stabilization problem of orbital motion requires a solution. Numerical experiments have shown that for stabilization of motion it is requires very small control influence in comparison with the gravitational forces. On the other hand, the stabilization time is quite long - months, and possibly years. This makes it highly desirable to use solar pressure forces. In this paper we illustrate the solar sail possibilities for solving of stabilization problem in a neighborhood L1 with use of the model example.

  7. Impact of Rain Water Infiltration on the Stability of Earth Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Slope failure occurs very often in natural and man-made slopes which are subjected to frequent changes in ground water level, rapid drawdown, rainfall and earthquakes. The current study discusses the significance of water infiltration, pore water pressure and degree of saturation that affect the stability of earth slopes. Rainwater infiltration not only mechanically reduces the shear strength of a slope material, but also chemically alters the mineral composition of the soil matrix. It results in the alteration of macro structures which in turn decreases the factor of safety. A few case studies are discussed in this paper to quantitatively observe the variation in factor of safety (FOS of various earth slopes by changing the degree of saturation. The results showed that most of the earth slopes get failed or become critical when the degree of saturation approaches to 50 % or more.

  8. Stability of the lithium waterfall first wall protection concept for inertial confinement fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esser, P.D.; Paul, D.D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainties regarding the feasibility of using an annular waterfall of liquid lithium to protect the first wall in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor cavities have prompted a theoretical investigation of annular jet stability. Infinitesimal perturbation techniques are applied to an idealized model of the jet with disturbances acting upon either or both of the free surfaces. Dispersion relations are derived which predict the range of disturbance frequencies leading to instability, as well as the perturbation growth rates and jet breakup length. The results are extended to turbulent annular jets and are evaluated for the lithium waterfall design. It is concluded that inherent instabilities due to turbulent fluctuations will not cause the jet to break up over distances comparable to the height of the reactor cavity

  9. Stability of the lithium ''WATERFALL'' first wall protection concept for inertial confinement fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esser, P.D.; Abel-Khalik, S.I.; Paul, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainties regarding the feasibility of using an annular ''waterfall'' of liquid lithium to protect the first wall in inertial confinement fusion reactor cavities have prompted a theoretical investigation of annular jet stability. Infinitesimal perturbation techniques are applied to an idealized model of the jet with disturbances acting upon either or both of the free surfaces. Dispersion relations are derived that predict the range of disturbance frequencies leading to instability, as well as the perturbation growth rates and jet breakup length. The results are extended to turbulent annular jets and are evaluated for the lithium waterfall design. It is concluded that inherent instabilities due to turbulent fluctuations will not cause the jet to break up over distances comparable to the height of the reactor cavity

  10. Stability of the lithium 'waterfall' first wall protection concept for inertial confinement fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esser, P.D.; Paul, D.D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainties regarding the feasibility of using an annular waterfall of liquid lithium to protect the first wall in inertial confinement fusion reactor cavities have prompted a theoretical investigation of annular jet stability. Infinitesimal perturbation techniques are applied to an idealized model of the jet with disturbances acting upon either or both of the free surfaces. Dispersion relations are derived that predict the range of disturbance frequencies leading to instability, as well as the perturbation growth rates and jet break-up length. The results are extended to turbulent annular jets and are evaluated for the lithium waterfall design. It is concluded that inherent instabilities due to turbulent fluctuations will not cause the jet to break up over distances comparable to the height of the reactor cavity

  11. A multimode analytic cylindrical model for the stabilization of the resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miron, I G

    2008-01-01

    A dispersion relation concerning the stability of the resistive wall modes within a multimode cylindrical analytical model is presented. This paper generalizes the Fitzpatrick-Aydemir model (Fitzpatrick R and Aydemir A Y 1996 Nucl. Fusion 1 11) in the presence of an unlimited number of neighboring modes for a tokamak plasma column surrounded by a resistive shell and a feedback system consisting of a number of detector and active feedback coils. The model is applied to the HBT-EP tokamak (Cates C et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3133) with its peculiar feedback system disposal. Finally, an analytical dispersion relation is obtained that can be solved by using a simple MATLAB code

  12. Characteristics of premixed flames stabilized in an axisymmetric curved-wall jet burner with tip modification

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daejoong

    2009-11-10

    The stabilization characteristics of premixed flames in an axisymmetric curved-wall jet burner have been experimentally investigated. This burner utilized the Coanda effect on top of a burner tip. The initially spherical burner tip was modified to a flat tip and a concave tip in order to improve flame stabilization by providing enough space for flow recirculation above the burner tip region. The flow characteristics have been visualized using a schlieren technique. Small-scale turbulence structure has been observed mainly in the interaction jet region (located downstream of the recirculation region) for large jet velocity (Reynolds number >11,500). An appreciable amount of air entrainment was exhibited from the half-angle of the jet spread, approximately 20. The averaged planar laser-induced fluorescence images of the flames for this large velocity demonstrated that the strong signal of OH radicals, representing reaction zones, existed in the recirculation zone, while it was weak in the interaction jet region due to intermittency and local extinction by the generation of small scale turbulence. The OH radical signals strengthened again in the merged jet region (downstream of the interaction jet region). In extreme cases of Reynolds number over 19,000, a unique flame exhibiting OH radicals only in the recirculation zone was observed for the concave tip. The flame stabilization has been mapped by varying jet velocity and equivalence ratio, and the result showed that the stabilization characteristics were improved appreciably from the initial spherical tip design, especially for rich mixtures. The flow fields measured by a laser Doppler velocimetry confirmed the existence of recirculation zone and the expansion of the recirculation zones for the modified tips. The temperature profile measured by a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy exhibited an intermittent nature, especially near the recirculation zone.

  13. Design and construction of earth retaining walls with anchors employed in excavation works at Oi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saino, Susumu; Aoshima, Ken-ichiro; Kamide, Atsushi.

    1990-01-01

    In Oi Nuclear Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., No.3 and No.4 plants of each 1180 MWe output are additionally installed, neighboring existing No.1 and No.2 plants of each 1175 MWe output in operation. The start of operation is expected in December, 1991 in No.3 plant, and in February, 1993 in No.4 plant. The total quantity of earth excavated for this additional installation works is about 3.3 million m 3 . The main works are, subsequently to the preparation of the site, the excavation for the foundations of reactor buildings and others, and the construction of the foundations for the seawater system facilities for cooling condensers and reactor auxiliary machines, and the works were begun in May, 1987. The excavation by using anchors was carried out in seven places. The vertical excavation on large scale was carried out by using the earth retaining walls of concrete-sprayed anchor structure in drain pits. In this report, the outline of the geological features, the outline of the excavation works, the design of the earth retaining walls, the execution of concrete spraying, the planning and result of measurement are described. (K.I.)

  14. Effects of centrifugal modification of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium on resistive wall mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, J.; Aiba, N.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Toroidal rotation effects are self-consistently taken into account not only in the linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis but also in the equilibrium calculation. The MHD equilibrium computation is affected by centrifugal force due to the toroidal rotation. To study the toroidal rotation effects on resistive wall modes (RWMs), a new code has been developed. The RWMaC modules, which solve the electromagnetic dynamics in vacuum and the resistive wall, have been implemented in the MINERVA code, which solves the Frieman–Rotenberg equation that describes the linear ideal MHD dynamics in a rotating plasma. It is shown that modification of MHD equilibrium by the centrifugal force significantly reduces growth rates of RWMs with fast rotation in the order of M 2  = 0.1 where M is the Mach number. Moreover, it can open a stable window which does not exist under the assumption that the rotation affects only the linear dynamics. The rotation modifies the equilibrium pressure gradient and current density profiles, which results in the change of potential energy including rotational effects. (paper)

  15. L-H Power Threshold, Pedestal Stability and Confinement in JET with a Metallic Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beurskens, M.; Alper, B.; Challis, C.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Kempenaars, M.; Lomas, P.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M. L.; Snyder, P. B.; Saarelma, S., E-mail: marc.beurskens@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM /CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Frassinetti, L. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-VR , Stockholm (Sweden); Maggi, C.; Angioni, C.; Hobirk, J.; Neu, R. [IPP Garching, Garching (Germany); Calabro, G.; Buratti, P.; Giovannozzi, E. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Bourdelle, C.; Joffrin, E. [Association Euratom-CEA, IRFM, St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Groth, M. [Association EURATOM/Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Leyland, M. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); De la Luna, E. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain); Mantica, P. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma ' P. Caldirola' , Milano (Italy); Nunes, I. [Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Associacao EURATOM-IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Osborne, T. [General Atomics, San Diego (United States); De Vries, P. [FOM DIFFER, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: After the change-over from the Carbon-Fibre Composite (CFC) wall to an ITER-like metallic wall (ILW) the baseline type I ELMy H-mode scenario has been re-established in JET with the new plasma-facing materials Be and W. A key finding for ITER is that the power required to enter H-mode has reduced with respect to that in JET with the CFC wall. In JET with the ILW the power threshold to enter H-mode (P{sub L-H}) is below the international L-H power threshold scaling P{sub Martin-08}. The minimum threshold is P{sub L-H} = 1.8 MW compared to P{sub Martin-08} = 4 MW with a pedestal density of n{sub ped} = 2 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in plasmas with I{sub p} = 2.0 MA, B{sub t} = 2.4 T. However the threshold depends strongly on density; using slow ion cyclotron heating (ICRH) power ramps P{sub L-H} varies from 1.8 to 4.5 MW in a range of lower and upper plasma triangularity ({delta}{sub L} = 0.32 - 0.4, {delta}{sub U} = 0.19 - 0.38). Stationary Type I ELMy H-mode operation has been re-established at both low and high triangularity with I{sub p} {<=} 2.5 MA, q{sub 95} = 2.8 - 3.6 and H{sub 98} {<=} 1. The achieved plasma collisionality is relatively high, in the range of 1 < v{sub eff} < 4 due to the required strong gas dosing. Stability analysis with the linear MHD stability code ELITE show that the pedestal is marginally unstable with respect to the Peeling Ballooning boundary. Due to the stabilising effect of the global pressure on the pedestal stability, a strong coupling between core and edge confinement is expected. Indeed in an H-mode profile database comparison with 119 CFC- (0.1 < v{sub eff} < 1) and 40 ILW-H-modes a strong coupling of the core versus edge confinement is found, independent of wall material. In addition, the pedestal predictions using the EPED predictive pedestal code coincide with the measured pedestal height over a wide range of normalised pressure 1.5 < {beta}{sub N} < 3.5. Due to the strong core-edge coupling, beneficial effects of core

  16. Stability Analysis Of Earth Dam Slopes Subjected To Earthquake Using ERT Results Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Andi Suryo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth Dam stability can be affected significantly by the existence of excessive leakage. This is due to decreasing of shear strength of the dam material and additional overturning moment. In such scenario, the non-destructive soil investigation method is needed to analyze the stability of earth dam in current condition. This paper examines the use of Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT to investigate soil layers and to measure parameters of soil shear strength indirectly. First survey was carried out at dam crest and downstream using Wenner Configuration along profile lines at electrode spacing of 5 m. There were 5 profile lines of 180m long each and 10m distance of spacing. Furthermore, two profiles lines at weak cross-section based on its resistivity soil values were undertaken. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine relationship between resistivity value, moisture content, cohesion and angle of friction for each type of dam materials. From the ERT results and lab testing, a model dam can be obtained using current material parameters to perform stability analysis of dam subjected to earthquake. The lowest FOS was found at the upstream side about 1.15 and at the downstream side about 1.14 after applying seismic load of 100 years return period. Keywords: Stability Analysis, ERT,resistivity, leakage, dam

  17. One-way spatial integration of Navier-Stokes equations: stability of wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Georgios; Colonius, Tim; Towne, Aaron; Beyar, Michael

    2016-11-01

    For three-dimensional flows, questions of stability, receptivity, secondary flows, and coherent structures require the solution of large partial-derivative eigenvalue problems. Reduced-order approximations are thus required for engineering prediction since these problems are often computationally intractable or prohibitively expensive. For spatially slowly evolving flows, such as jets and boundary layers, a regularization of the equations of motion sometimes permits a fast spatial marching procedure that results in a huge reduction in computational cost. Recently, a novel one-way spatial marching algorithm has been developed by Towne & Colonius. The new method overcomes the principle flaw observed in Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE), namely the ad hoc regularization that removes upstream propagating modes. The one-way method correctly parabolizes the flow equations based on estimating, in a computationally efficient way, the local spectrum in each cross-stream plane and an efficient spectral filter eliminates modes with upstream group velocity. Results from the application of the method to wall-bounded flows will be presented and compared with predictions from the full linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations and PSE.

  18. a Study on the Stability of Earth DAM Subjected to the Seismic Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jinghua; Che, Ailan; Ge, Xiurun

    For ensuring the earth dam's stability of Wangqingtuo reservoir when silt liquefaction happens during Tangshan earthquake, a large amount of laboratory soil tests and field measurements have been performed to obtain the mechanic properties of the soil and silt dynamic parameters. On the basis of the soil tests, the equivalent linear constitutive model is employed in the dynamic numerical simulation of the typical dam and the results indicate that the shear deformation is induced by the foundation liquefaction with the help of the geo-slope software. Moreover, the stability analysis is performed using the finite element elasto-plastic model that is considered the Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria to calculate the stability factor. The factors indicate the local instability would take place because of the shear action. At last, the measures are introduced to the designers for preventing the dam from the instability.

  19. Stability and control of resistive wall modes in high beta, low rotation DIII-D plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garofalo, A.M.; Jackson, G.L.; Haye, R.J. La; Okabayashi, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Strait, E.J.; Ferron, J.R.; Groebner, R.J.; In, Y.; Lanctot, M.J.; Matsunaga, G.; Navratil, G.A.; Solomon, W.M.; Takahashi, H.; Takechi, M.; Turnbull, A.D.

    2007-01-01

    Recent high-β DIII-D (Luxon J.L. 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 64) experiments with the new capability of balanced neutral beam injection show that the resistive wall mode (RWM) remains stable when the plasma rotation is lowered to a fraction of a per cent of the Alfven frequency by reducing the injection of angular momentum in discharges with minimized magnetic field errors. Previous DIII-D experiments yielded a high plasma rotation threshold (of order a few per cent of the Alfven frequency) for RWM stabilization when resonant magnetic braking was applied to lower the plasma rotation. We propose that the previously observed rotation threshold can be explained as the entrance into a forbidden band of rotation that results from torque balance including the resonant field amplification by the stable RWM. Resonant braking can also occur naturally in a plasma subject to magnetic instabilities with a zero frequency component, such as edge localized modes. In DIII-D, robust RWM stabilization can be achieved using simultaneous feedback control of the two sets of non-axisymmetric coils. Slow feedback control of the external coils is used for dynamic error field correction; fast feedback control of the internal non-axisymmetric coils provides RWM stabilization during transient periods of low rotation. This method of active control of the n = 1 RWM has opened access to new regimes of high performance in DIII-D. Very high plasma pressure combined with elevated q min for high bootstrap current fraction, and internal transport barriers for high energy confinement, are sustained for almost 2 s, or 10 energy confinement times, suggesting a possible path to high fusion performance, steady-state tokamak scenarios

  20. Plant metabolism and cell wall formation in space (microgravity) and on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.

    1994-01-01

    Variations in cell wall chemistry provide vascular plants with the ability to withstand gravitational forces, as well as providing facile mechanisms for correctional responses to various gravitational stimuli, e.g., in reaction wood formation. A principal focus of our current research is to precisely and systematically dissect the essentially unknown mechanism(s) of vascular plant cell wall assembly, particularly with respect to formation of its phenolic constituents, i.e., lignins and suberins, and how gravity impacts upon these processes. Formation of these phenolic polymers is of particular interest, since it appears that elaboration of their biochemical pathways was essential for successful land adaptation. By extrapolation, we are also greatly intrigued as to how the microgravity environment impacts upon 'normal' cell wall assembly mechanisms/metabolism.

  1. Study on passive earth pressure acting on the embedment of an earth retaining wall for braced excavation work in cohesive soil; Nenseido jiban ni okeru kussaku dodomeheki neirebu no judo doatsu ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H. [Pacific Consultants K.K., Tokyo (Japan); Hirashima, K. [Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-12-15

    Passive earth pressure exerts a great influence on the stress and deformation of earth retaining walls in braced excavation. To calculate this pressure, conventional ultimate earth pressure equation, or Rankine-Resals and Coulomb`s equation, are currently applied respectively to cohesive and sandy soil. However, these intentional equation to determine passive earth pressure do not adequately take into account the excavation width during work and the shearing resistance on the earth retaining wall surface. This paper deals with cohesive soil only, deriving a calculation equation for passive earth pressure, which takes into account excavation width and the shearing resistance of the earth retaining wall surface. Then, constants in this equation are determined using the calculation results obtained from the finite element method with blasts-plastic elements. The calculation results are also compared with measured values in the model test in order to check the applicability of the calculation equation for passive earth pressure thus obtained. Finally, this paper proposes a practicable calculation equation for passive earth pressure. 13 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Tabique walls composite earth-based material characterization in the Alto Douro wine region, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui CARDOSO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Alto Douro Wine Region, located in the northeast of Portugal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, presents a relevant tabique building stock, a traditional vernacular building technology. A technology based on a timber framed structure filled with a composite earth-based material. Meanwhile, previous research works have revealed that, principally in rural areas, this Portuguese heritage is highly deteriorated and damaged because of the rareness of conservation and strengthening works, which is partly related to the non-engineered character of this technology and to the growing phenomenon of rural to urban migration. Those aspects associated with the lack of scientific studies related to this technology motivated the writing of this paper, whose main purpose is the physical and chemical characterization of the earth-based material applied in the tabique buildings of that region. Consequently, an experimental work was conducted and the results obtained allowed, among others, the proposal of a particle size distribution envelope in respect to this material. This information will provide the means to assess the suitability of a given earth-based material in regard to this technology. The knowledge from this study could be very useful for the development of future normative documents and as a reference for architects and engineers that work with earth to guide and regulate future conservation, rehabilitation or construction processes helping to preserve this fabulous legacy.

  3. Influence of rare earths on shrinkage porosity in thin walled ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2009-01-01

    Ductile cast iron has been cast in test bars with thickness from 2 to 10 mm. The rare earth elements La and Ce have been added to some of the castings to evaluate their influence on microstructure and shrinkage tendency. Both La and Ce increased the graphite nodule count, especially for thickness...

  4. Negative feedback mechanism for the long-term stabilization of earth's surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.C.G.; Hays, P.B.; Kasting, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    We suggest that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is buffered, over geological time scales, by a negative feedback mechanism in which the rate of weathering of silicate minerals (followed by deposition of carbonate minerals) depends on surface temperature, and surface temperature, in turn, depends on carbon dioxide partial pressure through the green effect. Although the quantitative details of this mechanism are speculative, it appears able partially to stabilize earth's surface temperature against the steady increase of solar luminosity believed to have occured since the origin of the solar system

  5. The stability of through-wall circumferential cracks in cylindrical pipes subjected to bending loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1983-01-01

    Tada, Paris and Gamble have used the tearing modulus approach to show that when a circumferential through-wall crack exists in a 304 SS circular cylindrical pipe, and the pipe is subjected to an applied bending moment, then crack growth requires the rotation at the pipe-ends to be increased, (i.e. crack growth is stable), unless the pipe length is unduly large. On this basis it was concluded that unstable fracture is unlikely to occur in BWR SS piping, when the system is designed in accord with the ASME Code load levels for normal operation and anticipated transients. The Tada-Paris-Gamble analysis focuses on the inter-relation between instability and the onset of crack extension, and does not specifically consider the possibility that a crack might become unstable after some stable crack extension. The paper addresses this aspect of the crack stability problem using a crack tip opening angle criterion for crack extension, which has similarities with the tearing modulus approach. The results show that unstable fracture should not occur even after some stable crack extension, again provided that the pipe length is not unduly large. In other words, guillotine failure of a pipe in a BWR system is unlikely, even though the ASME Code limiting stress levels as might be exceeded, as may be the case with a very severe earthquake. (orig./HP)

  6. Encapsulation of vitamin E: effect of physicochemical properties of wall material on retention and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategekimana, Joseph; Masamba, Kingsley George; Ma, Jianguo; Zhong, Fang

    2015-06-25

    Spray drying technique was used to fabricate Vitamin E loaded nanocapsules using Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA) modified starches as emulsifiers and wall materials. Several physicochemical properties of modified starches that are expected to influence emulsification capacity, retention and storage stability of Vitamin E in nanocapsules were investigated. High Degree of Substitution (DS), low Molecular Weight (Mw) and low interfacial tension improved emulsification properties while Oxygen Permeability (OP) and Water Vapor Permeability (WVP) affected the film forming properties. The degradation profile of Vitamin E fitted well with the Weibull model. Nanocapsules from OSA modified starches MS-A and MS-B retained around 50% of Vitamin E after a period of 60 days at 4-35°C. Reduced retention and short half-life (35 days) in nanocapsules fabricated using MS-C at 35°C were attributed to autoxidation reaction occurred due to poor film forming capacity. These results indicated that low molecular weights OSA modified starches were effective at forming stable Vitamin E nanocapsules that could be used in drug and beverage applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling and analysis to quantify MSE wall behavior and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    To better understand potential sources of adverse performance of mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) walls, a suite of analytical models was studied using the computer program FLAC, a numerical modeling computer program widely used in geotechnical en...

  8. Rammed earth walls strengthened with polyester fabric strips: Experimental analysis under in-plane cyclic loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miccoli, L.; Müller, U.; Pospíšil, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 149, September (2017), s. 29-36 ISSN 0950-0618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : rammed earth * pseudo-dynamic loads * shear-compression tests * strengthening * polyester fabric strips Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering OBOR OECD: Construction engineering, Municipal and structural engineering Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950061817310000

  9. A simple toroidal shell model for the study of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhang, Hogun

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted on the feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in a tokamak plasma using a toroidal shell model. An analytically tractable form of the RWM dispersion relation is derived in the presence of a set of discrete feedback coil currents. A parametric study is carried out to optimize the feedback system configuration. It is shown that the total toroidal angle of a resistive wall spanned by the feedback coils and the poloidal angular extent of a feedback coil are crucial parameters to determine the efficacy of the feedback system

  10. Thermal response of integral abutment bridges with mechanically stabilized earth walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The advantages of integral abutment bridges (IABs) include reduced maintenance costs and increased useful life spans. : However, improved procedures are necessary to account for the impacts of cyclic thermal displacements on IAB components, : includi...

  11. Effects of tube diameter and chirality on the stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes under ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zijian; Zhang Wei; Zhu Zhiyuan; Ren Cuilan; Li Yong; Huai Ping

    2009-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics method, we investigated the influence of tube diameter and chirality on the stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under ion irradiation. We found that in the energy range below 1 keV, the dependence of CNT stability on the tube diameter is no longer monotonic under C ion irradiation, and the thinner (5, 5) CNT may be more stable than the thicker (7, 7) CNT, while under Ar irradiation, the CNT stability increases still monotonically with the CNT diameter. This stability behavior was further verified by the calculations of the threshold ion energies to produce displacement damage in CNTs. The abnormal stability of thin CNTs is related to their resistance to the instantaneous deformation in the wall induced by ion pushing, the high self-healing capacity, as well as the different interaction properties of C and Ar ions with CNT atoms. We also found that under ion irradiation the stability of a zigzag CNT is better than that of an armchair CNT with the same diameter. This is because of the bonding structure difference between the armchair and the zigzag CNTs with respect to the orientations of graphitic networks as well as the self-healing capacity difference.

  12. Thermal conductivity of cement stabilized earth bricks reinforced with date palm fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrehail, Tahar; Zemmouri, Noureddine; Agoudjil, Boudjemaa

    2018-05-01

    Recently, some cheap materials are available and adaptable to climate seem to meet current requirements. This paper investigates the thermal and mechanical properties of cement stabilized earth bricks(CSEB) reinforced with date palm fibers (DPF). The main goal is to develop and expand the field of use of these materials in the construction sector, and investigate the possibility of new bio composite as renewable, insulating building material with low cost, made of earth and reinforced with palm wood waste. In this study, a particular interest is brought to the thermal and mechanical characteristics, which constitute a decisive character for the choice of a building material. A series of earthen samples stabilized at 5% and reinforced with DPF of various fiber weight fractions, (5%, 10%), were manufactured and compacted applying two levels compacting, (5MPa and 10MPa). Compressive strength and thermal conductivity were experimentally studied; heating capacity and diffusivity were indirectly calculated. It was found that the fibrous reinforcement proved thermal conductivity and compressive strength. it also enhanced thermal performances. Thus, the results found allow us to investigate hygrothermal behaviour and its impact on occupants comfort.

  13. Structures, stabilities, and electronic properties for rare-earth lanthanum doped gold clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Ya-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The structures, stabilities, and electronic properties of rare-earth lanthanum doped gold La 2 Au n (n = 1-9) and pure gold Au n (n ≤ 11) clusters have been investigated by using density functional theory. The optimized geometries show that the lowest energy structures of La 2 Au n clusters favour the 3D structure at n ≥ 3. The lanthanum atoms can strongly enhance the stabilities of gold clusters and tend to occupy the most highly coordinated position. By analysing the gap, vertical ionization potential, and chemical hardness, it is found that the La 2 Au 6 isomer possesses higher stability for small-sized La 2 Au n clusters (n = 1-9). The charges in the La 2 Au n clusters transfer from La atoms to the Au n host. In addition, Wiberg bond indices analysis reveals that the intensity of different bonds of La 2 Au n clusters exhibits a sequence of La-La bond > La-Au bond > Au-Au bond.

  14. Formation and stabilization of multiple ball-like flames at Earth gravity

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhen

    2018-03-20

    Near-limit low-Lewis-number premixed flame behavior is studied experimentally and numerically for flames of H–CH–air mixtures that are located in a 55 mm diameter tube and below a perforated plate in a downward mixture flow. A combustion regime diagram is experimentally identified in terms of equivalence ratio and ratio of H to CH (variation of fuel Lewis number). Planar flames, cell-like flames, distorted cap-like flames, and arrays of ball-like flames are progressively observed in the experiments as the equivalence ratio is decreased. The experimentally observed ball-like lean limit flames experience chaotic motion, which is accompanied by sporadic events of flame splitting and extinction, while the total number of simultaneously burning flamelets remains approximately the same. In separate experiments, the multiple ball-like lean limit flames are stabilized by creating a slightly non-uniform mixture flow field. The CH* chemiluminescence distributions of the lean limit flames are recorded, showing that the ball-like lean limit flame front becomes more uniform in intensity and its shape approaches a spherical one with the increase of H content in the fuel. Numerical simulations are performed for single representative flames of the array of stabilized flamelets observed in the experiments. The simulated ball-like lean limit flame is further contrasted with the single ball-like flame that forms in a narrow tube (13.5 mm inner diameter) with an iso-thermal wall. The numerical results show that the ball-like lean limit flames present in the array of ball-like flames are more affected by the buoyancy-induced recirculation zone, compared with that in the narrow tube, revealing why the shape of the ball-like flame in the array deviates more from a spherical one. All in all, the wall confinement is not crucial for the formation of ball-like flames at terrestrial gravity.

  15. Activity and stability studies of platinized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as fuel cell electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Borghei, Maryam; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2015-01-01

    A non-covalent functionalization for multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been used as an alternative to the damaging acid treatment. Platinum nanoparticles with similar particle size distribution have been deposited on the surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The interaction between...

  16. Positional stability of field-reversed-configurations in the presence of resistive walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, N., E-mail: nrath@trialphanenergy.com; Onofri, M.; Barnes, D. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688-7010 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    We show that in a field-reversed-configuration, the plasma is unstable to either transverse or axial rigid displacement, but never to both. Driving forces are found to be parallel to the direction of displacement with no orthogonal components. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the properties of a resistive wall (geometry and resistivity) in the vicinity of the plasma do not affect whether the plasma is stable or unstable, but in the case of an unstable system determine the instability growth rate. Depending on the properties of the wall, the instability growth is dominated by plasma inertia (and not affected by wall resistivity) or dominated by ohmic dissipation of wall eddy currents (and thus proportional to the wall resistivity).

  17. Dynamics and stability of a tethered centrifuge in low earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, B. M.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional attitude dynamics of a spaceborne tethered centrifuge for artificial gravity experiments in low earth orbit is analyzed using two different methods. First, the tethered centrifuge is modeled as a dumbbell with a straight viscoelastic tether, point tip-masses, and sophisticated environmental models such as nonspherical gravity, thermal perturbations, and a dynamic atmospheric model. The motion of the centrifuge during spin-up, de-spin, and steady-rotation is then simulated. Second, a continuum model of the tether is developed for analyzing the stability of lateral tether oscillations. Results indicate that the maximum fluctuation about the 1-g radial acceleration level is less than 0.001 g; the time required for spin-up and de-spin is less than one orbit; and lateral oscillations are stable for any practical values of the system parameters.

  18. Estimation of stability of polynuclear rare earth complexes with EDTA in the presence of stable monocomplexonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ba Tkhun; Kupriyanova, G.N.; Smirnova, N.S.; Martynenko, L.I.; Evseeva, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Complexing in rare-earth-EDTA system at the mole ratio making up (M 3+ ):(H 2 A 2- )=1:1, 2:1, 5:1, (M=Nd, Yb), C H 2 A 2- =0.010, 0.015 mol/l, μ=0.5 (KCl) is studied in pH 1.6-3.0 interval by pH-metric titration technique using mathematical modelling method. A model containing MA - , MHA, M 2 A 2+ complexes for which stability constants, equalling respectively (lgK) to 15.66, 2.11, 1.06 (for neodymium complexes) and 18.70, 1.78, 0.45 (for ytterbium complexes) are determined by non-linear LSF, appears to be adequate. It is shown that binuclear complex concentration in solution with M 3+ excess is comparable to stable monocomplexonate concentration

  19. Numerical study on lateral wall displacement of deep excavation supported by IPS earth retention system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugen Feng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the 3D behavior characteristics of an excavation supported by an innovative prestressed support (IPS earth retention system. A numerical simulation was conducted in order to provide insight into the IPS system behavior by using the FLAC3D package. Prior to the parametric study, validation work was conducted by means of a comparison of the deformation between the field test data and numerical analysis results, and strong agreement was obtained. The reasonable excavation location, layered excavation thickness, and blocked excavation sequence are presented according to variable parameter analysis. In view of the previous findings, certain measurements are proposed in order to control the foundation pit deformation. The results indicate that prestress compensation has a significant effect on the IPS system behavior, while an optimized excavation sequence slightly improves its behavior. With the conclusion proposed based on the numerical results, the aim is to provide reference data for optimization design and the construction sequence. Keywords: FLAC3D, IPS system, Prestress compensation, Layered excavation, Blocked excavation, Deformation control

  20. Multi-Mission Earth Vehicle Subsonic Dynamic Stability Testing and Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Fremaux, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes, retro-rockets, and reaction control systems and rely on the natural aerodynamic stability of the vehicle throughout the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of flight. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs for an array of missions and develop and visualize the trade space. Testing in NASA Langley?s Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) was conducted to significantly improve M-SAPE?s subsonic aerodynamic models. Vehicle size and shape can be driven by entry flight path angle and speed, thermal protection system performance, terminal velocity limitations, payload mass and density, among other design parameters. The objectives of the VST testing were to define usable subsonic center of gravity limits, and aerodynamic parameters for 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) simulations, for a range of MMEEV designs. The range of MMEEVs tested was from 1.8m down to 1.2m diameter. A backshell extender provided the ability to test a design with a much larger payload for the 1.2m MMEEV.

  1. Earth mortars and earth-lime renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface coatings play a decorative architectural role, apart from their function as wall protection. In Portuguese vernacular architecture, earth mortars were usually applied on stone masonry, while earth renders and plasters were used on indoors surface coatings. Limestone exists only in certain areas of the country and consequently lime was not easily available everywhere, especially on granite and schist regions where stone masonry was a current building technique. In the central west coast of Portugal, the lime slaking procedure entailed slaking the quicklime mixed with earth (sandy soil, in a pit; the resulting mixture would then be combined in a mortar or plaster. This was also the procedure for manufactured adobes stabilized with lime. Adobe buildings with earth-lime renderings and plasters were also traditional in the same region, using lime putty and lime wash for final coat and decoration. Classic decoration on earth architecture from the 18th-19th century was in many countries a consequence of the François Cointeraux (1740-1830 manuals - Les Cahiers d'Architecture Rurale" (1793 - a French guide for earth architecture and building construction. This manual arrived to Portugal in the beginning of XIX century, but was never translated to Portuguese. References about decoration for earth houses were explained on this manual, as well as procedures about earth-lime renders and ornamentation of earth walls; in fact, these procedures are exactly the same as the ones used in adobe buildings in this Portuguese region. The specific purpose of the present paper is to show some cases of earth mortars, renders and plasters on stone buildings in Portugal and to explain the methods of producing earth-lime renders, and also to show some examples of rendering and coating with earth-lime in Portuguese adobe vernacular architecture.

  2. Evaluation of geofabric in undercut on MSE wall stability : executive summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Compaction of granular base materials at sites with fine grained native soils often causes unwanted material loss due to penetration. In 2007, ODOT began placing geofabrics in the undercut of MSE walls at the soil/ granular material interface to faci...

  3. Natural Stabilized Earth Panels versus Conventional Façade Systems. Economic and Environmental Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Galán-Marín

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available More effective construction technologies are needed nowadays in order to reduce construction energy consumption during the life-cycle of buildings. Besides which, it is necessary to consider the economic feasibility and associated costs within the framework of these alternative technologies so as to favouring their practical implementation in the construction sector. In this sense, this paper presents an economic and environmental comparison of a new non-bearing façade construction solution based on the extruded unfired stabilized clay panels as opposed to three traditional solutions with similar physical, thermal, and aesthetic characteristics in terms of the exterior cladding. The proposed panels are a sandwich type configuration with an intermediate insulating material and two exterior pieces manufactured by extrusion with raw earth stabilized with alginate and animal wool fibers. In this paper, details of the constructive technology of the system are provided. From the results obtained, it is possible to conclude that the solution is a valid alternative from the environmental point of view, considerably reducing the Global Warming Potential and the Cumulative Energy Demand. And although the environmental improvement of the system can be considered the primary objective of this investigation, on the other hand, once executed, it will also be a competitive constructive technology from the perspective of the system’s final costs.

  4. Ultrasonic, Molecular and Mechanical Testing Diagnostics in Natural Fibre Reinforced, Polymer-Stabilized Earth Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Galán-Marín

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research study was to evaluate the influence of utilising natural polymers as a form of soil stabilization, in order to assess their potential for use in building applications. Mixtures were stabilized with a natural polymer (alginate and reinforced with wool fibres in order to improve the overall compressive and flexural strength of a series of composite materials. Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV and mechanical strength testing techniques were then used to measure the porous properties of the manufactured natural polymer-soil composites, which were formed into earth blocks. Mechanical tests were carried out for three different clays which showed that the polymer increased the mechanical resistance of the samples to varying degrees, depending on the plasticity index of each soil. Variation in soil grain size distributions and Atterberg limits were assessed and chemical compositions were studied and compared. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF, and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF techniques were all used in conjunction with qualitative identification of the aggregates. Ultrasonic wave propagation was found to be a useful technique for assisting in the determination of soil shrinkage characteristics and fibre-soil adherence capacity and UPV results correlated well with the measured mechanical properties.

  5. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  6. Scalable Fabrication of High-Performance Transparent Conductors Using Graphene Oxide-Stabilized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Inks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxiang He

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent development in liquid-phase processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs has revealed rod-coating as a promising approach for large-scale production of SWNT-based transparent conductors. Of great importance in the ink formulation is the stabilizer having excellent dispersion stability, environmental friendly and tunable rheology in the liquid state, and also can be readily removed to enhance electrical conductivity and mechanical stability. Herein we demonstrate the promise of graphene oxide (GO as a synergistic stabilizer for SWNTs in water. SWNTs dispersed in GO is formulated into inks with homogeneous nanotube distribution, good wetting and rheological properties, and compatible with industrial rod coating practice. Microwave treatment of rod-coated films can reduce GOs and enhance electro-optical performance. The resultant films offer a sheet resistance of ~80 Ω/sq at 86% transparency, along with good mechanical flexibility. Doping the films with nitric acid can further decrease the sheet resistance to ~25 Ω/sq. Comparing with the films fabricated from typical surfactant-based SWNT inks, our films offer superior adhesion as assessed by the Scotch tape test. This study provides new insight into the selection of suitable stabilizers for functional SWNT inks with strong potential for printed electronics.

  7. Stability of Monolithic Rubble Mound Breakwater Crown Walls Subjected to Impulsive Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the validity of a simple onedimensional dynamic analysis as well as a FEM model to determine the sliding of a rubble mound breakwater crown wall. The evaluation is based on a case example with real wave load time series and displacements measured from two-dimensional physical...... model tests. The outcome is a more reliable evaluation of the applicability of simple dynamic calculations for the estimation of sliding distances of rubble mound superstructures. This is of great practical importance since many existing rubble mound crown walls are subjected to increasing wave loads...

  8. High-temperature stability of the hydrate shell of a Na+ cation in a flat nanopore with hydrophobic walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The effect of elevated temperature has on the hydrate shell of a singly charged sodium cation inside a flat nanopore with smooth walls is studied using the Monte Carlo method. The free energy and the entropy of vapor molecule attachment are calculated by means of a bicanonical statistical ensemble using a detailed model of interactions. The nanopore has a stabilizing effect on the hydrate shell with respect to fluctuations and a destabilizing effect with respect to complete evaporation. At the boiling point of water, behavior is observed that is qualitatively similar to behavior at room temperature, but with a substantial shift in the vapor pressure and shell size.

  9. Stability of cell wall composition and saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus across diverse environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijde, van der Tim; Dolstra, Oene; Visser, Richard G.F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects of differences between growth locations on the cell wall composition and saccharification efficiency of the bioenergy crop miscanthus, a diverse set of 15 accessions were evaluated in six locations across Europe for the first 3 years following establishment.

  10. load-displacement and stability characteristics of tidn-walled beams

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    construction. Such structural ... The finite displacement formulation is used for load- displacement .... The other stress term, which is the incremental linear stress term a/ is .... formulation, only two out of the four general governing ..... 119, Paper. No. 2700 ... Deformations Spatial Buckling of Thin-Walled Beams and Frames ...

  11. STUDY OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THIN-WALLED BARS EXCITED BY PERIODICAL AXIAL EXTERNAL FORCES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASĂRE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In these paper, starting from the relations for the displacements and spinning the transversal section of a bar with thin walls of sections opened expressed by the corresponding influence functions and introducing the components of the exterior forces distributed and the moments of the exterior forces distributed due to the inertia forces, the exciting axial forces together with the following effect of these and of the reaction forces of the elastic environment for leaning it may reach to the system of the equations of parametric vibrations under the form of three integral equation These equations may serve for the study of vibrations of the bars, to study the static stability and to study the dynamic stability

  12. Stability characteristics of compressible boundary layers over thermo-mechanically compliant walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettenrieder, Fabian; Bodony, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Transition prediction at hypersonic flight conditions continues to be a challenge and results in conservative safety factors that increase vehicle weight. The weight and thus cost reduction of the outer skin panels promises significant impact; however, fluid-structure interaction due to unsteady perturbations in the laminar boundary layer regime has not been systematically studied at conditions relevant for reusable, hypersonic flight. In this talk, we develop and apply convective and global stability analyses for compressible boundary layers over thermo-mechanically compliant panels. This compliance is shown to change the convective stability of the boundary layer modes, with both stabilization and destabilization observed. Finite panel lengths are shown to affect the global stability properties of the boundary layer.

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stabilizing agents in red phosphorus Li-ion battery anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin; Alazmi, Amira; Patole, Shashikant P.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2017-01-01

    improvement in the electrochemical stability of battery anodes. In contrast to the average 40% loss of capacity after 50 cycles for other phosphorus–carbon composites in the literature, our material shows losses of just 22% under analogous cycling conditions.

  14. After the fall of the Berlin wall: Perceptions and consequences of stability and change among middle aged and older East- and West-Germans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, G.J.; Keyes, C.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study empirically tested the self-systems theory of subjective change in light of the rapid change after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The theory predicts that individuals have a tendency to perceive stability and that perceived stability exerts a strong positive effect on subjective

  15. Many-body forces and stability of the alkaline-earth tetramers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Torrejon, C.C.; Kaplan, Ilya G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Many-body forces effect. In a three-particle system, the two-body interaction energies depend upon coordinates of all three particles. The comparative study of the interaction energy and its many-body decomposition for alkaline-earths tetramers Be 4 , Mg 4 , and Ca 4 at the all-electron CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level is performed. For study of dependence of the binding energy and the orbital population on the cluster size the corresponding dimers and trimers were also calculated at the same level of theory. In comparison with weakly bound dimers, the binding energy in trimers and, especially, in tetramers drastically increases; e.g., E b /N in Be 3 is 7 times larger and in Be 4 is 18.4 times larger than in Be 2 . This sharp increase is explained as a manifestation of many-body forces. The trimers and tetramers are stabilized by the three-body forces, whereas the two- and four-body forces are repulsive. The attractive contribution to the three-body forces has a three-atom electron exchange origin. The natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis reveals a relatively large np-population in trimers and tetramers. The population of the valence np-orbitals leads to the sp-hybridization providing the covalent bonding. Research highlights: → The alkaline-earths trimers and tetramers are stabilized by the three-body forces. → Two- and four-body forces are repulsive for trimers and tetramers. → The attractive contribution to the three-body forces has a three-atom electron exchange origin. → The population of the np-orbitals leads to the sp-hybridization providing the covalent bonding. - Abstract: The comparative study of the interaction energy and its many-body decomposition for Be 4 , Mg 4 , and Ca 4 at the all-electron CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level is performed. For study of dependence of the binding energy and the orbital population on the cluster size the corresponding dimers and trimers were also calculated at the same level of theory. In

  16. Functional results after chest wall stabilization with a new screwless fixation device

    OpenAIRE

    Wiese, Mark Nikolaj; Kawel-Boehm, Nadine; Moreno de la Santa, Pablo; Al-Shahrabani, Feras; Toffel, Melanie; Rosenthal, Rachel; Schäfer, Juliane; Tamm, Michael; Bremerich, Jens; Lardinois, Didier

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This is the experience with the Stratos system in two surgical centres for the management of two types of rib fractures: flail chest and multiple dislocated rib fractures with significant chest wall deformity. METHODS From January 2009 to May 2012, 94 consecutive patients were included. Selected indications were extended anterolateral flail chest (n = 68) and dislocated painful rib fractures (n = 26). The open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) system consists of flexible titanium ...

  17. Flow induced vibration and stability analysis of multi wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kyung Jae [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Woon [Korean Intellectual Property Office, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Kyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Oh Seop [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The free vibration and flow induced flutter instability of cantilever multi wall carbon nanotubes conveying fluid are investigated and the nanotubes are modeled as thin-walled beams. The non-classical effects of the transverse shear, rotary inertia, warping inhibition, and van der Waals forces between two walls are incorporated into the structural model. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. A numerical analysis is carried out by using the extended Galerkin method, which enables us to obtain more accurate solutions compared to the conventional Galerkin method. Cantilevered carbon nanotubes are damped with decaying amplitude for a flow velocity below a certain critical value. However, beyond this critical flow velocity, flutter instability may occur. The variations in the critical flow velocity with respect to both the radius ratio and length of the carbon nanotubes are investigated and pertinent conclusions are outlined. The differences in the vibration and instability characteristics between the Timoshenko beam theory and Euler beam theory are revealed. A comparative analysis of the natural frequencies and flutter characteristics of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is also performed.

  18. Evaluation of respiratory functions in chest trauma patients treated with thoracic wall stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam E. Moslam

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgical stabilization of flail chest with metallic plates is a safe and effective therapy in properly selected patients. These patients had a significantly smoother course during the intensive care unit and hospital stays, had improved respiratory functions and decreased rate of complications.

  19. Sedative, membrane stability, cytotoxic and antioxidant properties of methanol extract of leaves of Protium serratum Wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rafikul Islam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the sedative, membrane stability, cytotoxic and antioxidant properties of the leaves of Protium serratum extracted using methanol. Methods: Sedative test was performed using hole cross and open field methods at 200 and 400 mg/kg. Membrane stability of red blood cell was used for anti-inflammatory test at different concentrations. Cytotoxic study was performed using brine shrimp lethality test. Total flavonoid contents, total phenol contents and reducing power were used to assess antioxidant properties of the extract. Results: Extract showed better sedative action at lower doses in both experiments. Maximum 73.33% locomotion reduction was found at 200 mg/kg at 1 20 min and that was 89.29% for diazepam in hole cross test. In membrane stability test, extract and standard drug diclofenac have 35.66% and 91.20% stability, respectively. LC50 value of the extract was 22.91 µg/mL. Total phenol and flavonoid contents were (55.53依14.63 mg gallic acid equivalent per gram of extract and (1 06.33依7.35 mg of quercetin equivalent per gram of extract, respectively per gram of extract. Significant reducing power was observed as compared to ascorbic acid. Conclusions: Extract possesses good pharmacological properties. Hence, further extensive study is essential to find out possible active constituents for the treatment of anxiety, inflammation or sickle cell disease, cancer and free radical mediated abnormalities.

  20. Robust flow stability: Theory, computations and experiments in near wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Kumar Manoj

    Helmholtz established the field of hydrodynamic stability with his pioneering work in 1868. From then on, hydrodynamic stability became an important tool in understanding various fundamental fluid flow phenomena in engineering (mechanical, aeronautics, chemical, materials, civil, etc.) and science (astrophysics, geophysics, biophysics, etc.), and turbulence in particular. However, there are many discrepancies between classical hydrodynamic stability theory and experiments. In this thesis, the limitations of traditional hydrodynamic stability theory are shown and a framework for robust flow stability theory is formulated. A host of new techniques like gramians, singular values, operator norms, etc. are introduced to understand the role of various kinds of uncertainty. An interesting feature of this framework is the close interplay between theory and computations. It is shown that a subset of Navier-Stokes equations are globally, non-nonlinearly stable for all Reynolds number. Yet, invoking this new theory, it is shown that these equations produce structures (vortices and streaks) as seen in the experiments. The experiments are done in zero pressure gradient transiting boundary layer on a flat plate in free surface tunnel. Digital particle image velocimetry, and MEMS based laser Doppler velocimeter and shear stress sensors have been used to make quantitative measurements of the flow. Various theoretical and computational predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. A closely related topic of modeling, simulation and complexity reduction of large mechanics problems with multiple spatial and temporal scales is also studied. A nice method that rigorously quantifies the important scales and automatically gives models of the problem to various levels of accuracy is introduced. Computations done using spectral methods are presented.

  1. Dispersive heterodyne probing method for laser frequency stabilization based on spectral hole burning in rare-earth doped crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobron, Olivier; Jung, K.; Galland, N.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-locking a laser to a spectral hole in rare-earth doped crystals at cryogenic temperature has been shown to be a promising alternative to the use of high finesse Fabry-Perot cavities when seeking a very high short term stability laser (M. J. Thorpe et al., Nature Photonics 5, 688 (2011......)). We demonstrate here a novel technique for achieving such stabilization, based on generating a heterodyne beat-note between a master laser and a slave laser whose dephasing caused by propagation near a spectral hole generate the error signal of the frequency lock. The master laser is far detuned from...

  2. A Generalized Stability Analysis of the AMOC in Earth System Models: Implication for Decadal Variability and Abrupt Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, Alexey V. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-01-14

    The central goal of this research project was to understand the mechanisms of decadal and multi-decadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) as related to climate variability and abrupt climate change within a hierarchy of climate models ranging from realistic ocean models to comprehensive Earth system models. Generalized Stability Analysis, a method that quantifies the transient and asymptotic growth of perturbations in the system, is one of the main approaches used throughout this project. The topics we have explored range from physical mechanisms that control AMOC variability to the factors that determine AMOC predictability in the Earth system models, to the stability and variability of the AMOC in past climates.

  3. Effect of the addition of Na2O on the thermal stability of alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassalle-Herraud, Olivier; Matecki, Marc; Glorieux, Benoit; Sadiki, Najim; Montoullout, Valerie; Dussossoy, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    Alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths have been prepared by concentrated solar way. Their recrystallization, the structural and microstructural properties as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of these glasses have been studied. The results show the effect of sodium addition on the thermal stability of the materials, the vitreous transition temperature and the recrystallization temperature. A heat treatment has allowed to reveal the formation of sodium apatite micro-crystallites and of lanthanum silicate in the glasses. (O.M.)

  4. Stark broadening of potassium ns-4p and nd-4p lines in a wall-stabilized arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Stark-width measurements are reported for lines in the ns-4p (n = 7--10) and nd-4p (n = 5--8) series in neutral potassium (K I). These measurements were made by observing the end-on emission from a low pressure (20 Torr) potassium-argon wall-stabilized arc source. The on-axis electron density and temperature in the 20-A arc were (2.0 +- 0.2) x 10 15 cm -3 and 2955 +- 100 K, respectively. The experimentally determined Stark widths were compared with the theoretical values calculated by Griem. The measured Stark widths agreed with theory to within 30% for lines in the ns-4p series; while the measured Stark widths of the nd-4p series lines were only one-third of the theoretical values

  5. An experimental study of flame stability in a directly-fueled wall cavity with a supersonic free stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Chadwick Clifford

    An extensive study of flame stability in a cavity-based fuel injector/flameholder has been performed. Flames were stabilized in cavities with two different aft wall configurations and length to depth ratios of 3 and 4. Fuel was injected directly into the cavity using two injector configurations. Fuel injected from the aft wall of the cavity entered directly into the recirculation zone and provided desirable performance near the lean blowout limit. At high fuel flowrates, the cavity became flooded with fuel and rich blowout occurred. When fuel was injected from the floor of the cavity, excess fuel was directed out of the cavity which allowed for flame stabilization at extremely high fuel flowrates; however, this phenomenon also resulted in suboptimal performance near the lean limit where the blowout point was less predictable. Images of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of CH, OH, and formaldehyde give insight into the flameholding mechanisms. CH layers in the cavity are thin and continuous and show structure that is comparable to lifted jet flames, while broad CH zones are sometimes observed in the shear layer. OH PLIF images show that hot recirculated products are always present at the location of flame stabilization, whereas images of formaldehyde indicate that partial premixing takes place in the shear layer portion of the flame. Nonreacting measurements of the boundary layer and the free stream velocity profiles were obtained to provide necessary boundary conditions for computational modeling. Mean and instantaneous velocity profiles were determined for the nonreacting flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). A correlation of the blowout points for a directly-fueled cavity in a supersonic flow was accomplished using a Damkohler number and an equivalence ratio based upon an effective air mass flowrate. The chemical time was formulated using a generic measure of the reaction rate, tauc ˜ alpha/ S2L , which was found to be adequate for correlating lean

  6. Absence of fks1p in lager brewing yeast results in aberrant cell wall composition and improved beer flavor stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-jing; Xu, Wei-na; Li, Xin'er; Li, Jia; Li, Qi

    2014-06-01

    The flavor stability during storage is very important to the freshness and shelf life of beer. However, beer fermented with a yeast strain which is prone to autolyze will significantly affect the flavor of product. In this study, the gene encoding β-1,3-glucan synthetase catalytic subunit (fks1) of the lager yeast was destroyed via self-clone strategy. β-1,3-glucan is the principle cell wall component, so fks1 disruption caused a decrease in β-1,3-glucan level and increase in chitin level in cell wall, resulting in the increased cell wall thickness. Comparing with wild-type strain, the mutant strain had 39.9 and 63.41 % less leakage of octanoic acid and decanoic acid which would significantly affect the flavor of beer during storage. Moreover, the results of European Brewery Convention tube fermentation test showed that the genetic manipulation to the industrial brewing yeast helped with the anti-staling ability, rather than affecting the fermentation ability. The thiobarbituric acid value reduced by 65.59 %, and the resistant staling value increased by 26.56 %. Moreover, the anti-staling index of the beer fermented with mutant strain increased by 2.64-fold than that from wild-type strain respectively. China has the most production and consumption of beer around the world, so the quality of beer has a significant impact on Chinese beer industry. The result of this study could help with the improvement of the quality of beer in China as well as around the world.

  7. Effects of lorentz force on flow fields of free burning arc and wall stabilized non-transferred arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yi; Huang Heji; Pan Wenxia

    2013-01-01

    The flow fields of two typical DC plasma arcs, namely the transferred free burning arc and the non-transferred arc were simulated by solving hydrodynamic equations and electromagnetic equations. The effects of the Lorentz force on the characteristics of the flow fields of these two typical DC plasma arcs were estimated. Results show that in the case of the free burning arc, the Lorentz force due to the current self-induced magnetic field has significant impact on the flow fields, as the self-induced magnetic compression is the main arc constraint mechanism. However, in the case of the non-transferred arc generated in a torch with long and narrow inter-electrode inserts and an abruptly expanded anode, the Lorentz force has limited impact on the flow fields of the plasma especially at the downstream of the inter-electrode inserts, compared with the strong wall constraints and relatively high aerodynamic force. This is because the ratio of the electromagnetic force to the aerodynamic force is only about 0.01 in this region. When the main consideration is outlet parameters of the wall stabilized non-transferred DC arc plasma generator, in order to improve the efficiency of the numerical simulation program, the Lorentz force could be neglected in the non-transferred arc in some cases. (authors)

  8. Structure and Stability of High-Pressure Dolomite with Implications for the Earth's Deep Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is subducted into the mantle primarily in the form of metasomatically calcium-enriched basaltic rock, calcified serpentinites and carbonaceous ooze. The fate of these carbonates in subduction zones is not well understood. End-member CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite typically breaks down into two carbonates at 2-7 GPa, which may further decompose to oxides and CO2-bearing fluid. However, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have recently shown that the presence of iron may be sufficient to stabilize dolomite I to high pressures, allowing the transformation to dolomite II at 17 GPa and subsequently to dolomite III at 35 GPa [1][2]. Such phases may be a principal host for deeply subducted carbon. The structure and equation of state of these high-pressure phases is debated and the effect of varying concentrations of iron is unknown, creating a need for theoretical calculations. Here we compare calculated dolomite structures to experimentally observed phases. Using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) interfaced with a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures (USPEX), a monoclinic phase with space group 5 ("dolomite sg5") was found for pure end-member dolomite. Dolomite sg5 has a lower energy than reported dolomite structures and an equation of state that resembles that of dolomite III. It is possible that dolomite sg5 is not achieved experimentally due to a large energy barrier and a correspondingly large required volume drop, resulting in the transformation to metastable dolomite II. Due to the complex energy landscape for candidate high-pressure dolomite structures, it is likely that several competing polymorphs exist. Determining the behavior of high-pressure Ca-Mg-Fe(-Mn) dolomite phases in subduction environments is critical for our understanding of the Earth's deep carbon cycle and supercell calculations with Fe substitution are in progress. [1] Mao, Z., Armentrout, M., Rainey, E., Manning, C. E., Dera, P., Prakapenka, V. B., and Kavner, A

  9. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.)

  10. A borehole stability study by newly designed laboratory tests on thick-walled hollow cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Hashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available At several mineral exploration drilling sites in Australia, weakly consolidated formations mainly consist of sand particles that are poorly bonded by cementing agents such as clay, iron oxide cement or calcite. These formations are being encountered when drilling boreholes to the depth of up to 200 m. To study the behaviour of these materials, thick-walled hollow cylinder (TWHC and solid cylindrical synthetic specimens were designed and prepared by adding Portland cement and water to sand grains. The effects of different parameters such as water and cement contents, grain size distribution and mixture curing time on the characteristics of the samples were studied to identify the mixture closely resembling the formation at the drilling site. The Hoek triaxial cell was modified to allow the visual monitoring of grain debonding and borehole breakout processes during the laboratory tests. The results showed the significance of real-time visual monitoring in determining the initiation of the borehole breakout. The size-scale effect study on TWHC specimens revealed that with the increasing borehole size, the ductility of the specimen decreases, however, the axial and lateral stiffnesses of the TWHC specimen remain unchanged. Under different confining pressures the lateral strain at the initiation point of borehole breakout is considerably lower in a larger size borehole (20 mm compared to that in a smaller one (10 mm. Also, it was observed that the level of peak strength increment in TWHC specimens decreases with the increasing confining pressure.

  11. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B. (NOVETECH Corp., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.).

  12. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS ON SEEPAGE AND STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF EARTH-ROCK DAM: A CASE STUDY OF XIQUANYAN DAM IN CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing GUO

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Earth-rock dam is commonly used in the high-dam engineering around the world. It has been widely accepted that the analysis on structural and seepage stability plays a very important role, and it is necessary to take into account while designing the earth-rock dam. In performing the analysis of structural and seepage stability, many remarkable methods are available at current stage. However, there are still some important issues remaining unsolved, including: (1 Finite element methods (FEMs is a means of solutions to analysis seepage process, but it is often a difficult task to determine the so-called seepage coefficient, because the common-used water injection test is limited in the practical work due to the high cost and complex procedure. (2 It has long been discussed that the key parameters for structural stability analysis show a significant spatial and temporal variations. It may be partly explained by the inhomogeneous dam-filling during construction work and the developing seepage process. The consequence is that one constant value of the parameter cannot represent the above variations. In this context, we solve the above issues and introduce the solution with a practical earth-rock dam project. For determining the seepage coefficient, the data from the piezo metric tube is used to calculate the potential value, based on which the seepage coefficient can be back-analysed. Then the seepage field, as well as the seepage stability are numerically analysed using the FEM-based SEEP/W program. As to the structural safety, we take into account the spatial and temporal variations of the key parameters, and incorporate the Monte-Carlo simulation method into the commonly used M-P method to calculate the frequency distribution of the obtained structural safety factor. In this way, the structural and seepage safety can be well analysed. This study is also beneficial to provide a mature method and a theoretical insight into the earth-rock dam design

  13. The stability of growth of a through-wall circumferential crack in a cylindrical pipe subjected to bending deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1987-01-01

    Tada, Paris and Gamble have used the tearing modulus approach to examine the stability of growth of a through-wall circumferential crack in a 304 stainless steel circular cylindrical pipe subject to bending deformation. They showed that crack growth is stable, in the sense that growth requires the rotation imposed at the pipe-ends to be increased, provided the pipe length is less than a critical length Lsub(c), which is given by their analysis. The Tada-Paris-Gamble analysis focuses on the question of the stability, or otherwise, of crack growth at the onset of crack extension. The analysis does not consider the possibilities that (a) instability might occur after some stable crack growth, and (b) arrest might occur after some unstable growth. A study of these aspects of the circumferential crack growth problem using the tearing modulus approach is precluded by the geometry dependence of the J-crack growth resistance curve. Consequently the present paper uses a crack tip opening angle criterion to describe crack growth, and thereby demonstrates that possibilities (a) and (b) should both occur, depending on the initial crack length and pipe length. In terms of relevance to the technologically important problem of cracking in Boiling Water Reactor piping, the important conclusion stemming from the paper's analysis is that stability of crack growth after the onset of crack extension is assured if the pipe length is less than a critical length L'sub(c). L'sub(c) is less than Lsub(c), the critical length relevant to the onset of crack extension, but it is still appreciably greater than the pipe run lengths in actual reactor piping systems, and safety against guillotine failure of a pipe is therefore generally assured. (author)

  14. Predictibility of the stability constant of a radium-cryptate by means of in vivo data from radioactive alkaline earthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W H

    1977-08-01

    By means of a formula, developed by J. Schubert[9] and A. Catsch, H.J. Heller[3] as well as a relation postulated by A. Catsch[1] the "thermodynamic" stability constant of the Radium (222)-cryptate (KRaRa(222) was calculated from measurements of the total body retention of the total body retention of the radioactive alkaline earthes 85SR, 140Ba and 224Ra and its (222)-cryptates in rats [5-7]. From the same in vivo data a direct lineary relationship between the log of the effectiveness quotient, log EQM(222), and the log of the "thermodynamic" stability log KMM(222) was found graphically. The values from the graph correspond with those of the calculation.

  15. A NEW DOUBLE-SLIT CURVED WALL-JET (CWJ) BURNER FOR STABILIZING TURBULENT PREMIXED AND NON-PREMIXED FLAMES

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-06-30

    A novel double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner was proposed and employed, which utilizes the Coanda effect by supplying fuel and air as annular-inward jets over a curved surface. We investigated the stabilization characteristics and structure of methane/air, and propane/air turbulent premixed and non-premixed flames with varying global equivalence ratio, , and Reynolds number, Re. Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH radicals were conducted. The burner showed potential for stable operation for methane flames with relatively large fuel loading and overall rich conditions. These have a non-sooting nature. However, propane flames exhibit stable mode for a wider range of equivalence ratio and Re. Mixing characteristics in the cold flow of non-premixed cases were first examined using acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions.PIV measurements revealed that velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annularjets generate the turbulence, enhanced with the collisions in the interaction jet, IJ,region. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced significantly by Re and high rms turbulent velocities are generated within the recirculation zone improving the flame stabilization in this burner.Premixed and non-premixed flames with high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Re. For flames with low equivalence ratio, the processes of local quenching at IJ region and of re-ignition within merged jet region maintained these flames further downstream particularly for non-premixed methane flame, revealing a strong intermittency.

  16. Extrapolated long-term stability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in artificial freshwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunelli, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Semenzin, Elena; Hristozov, Danail; Marcomini, Antonio, E-mail: marcom@unive.it [University Ca’ Foscari of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Long-term stability of two engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), i.e., the inorganic n-TiO{sub 2} and the organic Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs), dispersed in artificial freshwater (5–100 mg l{sup −1}), was investigated from short-term settling velocity, particle size distribution, and surface charge. Hydrodynamic diameter and ζ-pot, calculated by means of dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, respectively, qualitatively indicated a general ENMs dispersion instability over 1 h time. Sedimentation results, obtained by centrifugal separation analysis using the LUMiSizer over approx. 30 min analysis time, allowed to estimate the quantitative long-term (over 30 days) stability of ENMs. Settling data fitted satisfactorily with a first-order kinetic equation (R{sup 2} in the range of 0.918–0.989). The settling rate constant k values extrapolated at gravity spanned one order of magnitude, i.e., from 7.21 × 10{sup −5} to 4.12 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1}, and with the increasing of initial ENMs concentration. Sedimentation velocities were in good agreement with short- to long-term literature data (7.8 × 10{sup −2}–1.7 × 10{sup −}1 m day{sup −1} vs. 5 × 10{sup −4}–3 × 10{sup −1} m day{sup −1} for n-TiO{sub 2} and 5.9 × 10{sup −2}–3.4 × 10{sup −1} m day{sup −1} vs. 2 × 10{sup −1}–1.2 m day{sup −1} for MWCNTs). n-TiO{sub 2} showed a higher long-term stability with respect to MWCNTs (average: 1 × 10{sup −1} ± 3.4 × 10{sup −2} m day{sup −1} instead of 1.7 × 10{sup −1} ± 1.1 × 10{sup −1} m day{sup −1}, respectively).

  17. Determination of the stability constants for the complexes of rare-earth elements and tetracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiki, M.; Lima, F.W.

    1977-01-01

    Stability constants for the lanthanide elements complexes with tetracycline were determined by the methods of average number of ligands, the two parameters and by weighted least squares. The technique of solvent extraction was applied to obtain the values of the parameters required for the determination of the constants [pt

  18. The Stability of Hydrogen-Rich Atmospheres of Earth-Like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding hydrogen escape is essential to understanding the limits to habitability, both for liquid water where the Sun is bright, but also to assess the true potential of H2 as a greenhouse gas where the Sun is faint. Hydrogen-rich primary atmospheres of Earth-like planets can result either from gravitational capture of solar nebular gases (with helium), or from impact shock processing of a wide variety of volatile-rich planetesimals (typically accompanied by H2O, CO2, and under the right circumstances, CH4). Most studies of hydrogen escape from planets focus on determining how fast the hydrogen escapes. In general this requires solving hydro- dynamic equations that take into account the acceleration of hydrogen through a critical transonic point and an energy budget that should include radiative heating and cooling, thermal conduction, the work done in lifting the hydrogen against gravity, and the residual heat carried by the hydrogen as it leaves. But for planets from which hydrogen escape is modest or insignificant, the atmosphere can be approximated as hydrostatic, which is much simpler, and for which a relatively full-featured treatment of radiative cooling by embedded molecules, atoms, and ions such as CO2 and H3+ is straightforward. Previous work has overlooked the fact that the H2 molecule is extremely efficient at exciting non-LTE CO2 15 micron emission, and thus that radiative cooling can be markedly more efficient when H2 is abundant. We map out the region of phase space in which terrestrial planets keep hydrogen-rich atmospheres, which is what we actually want to know for habitability. We will use this framework to reassess Tian et al's hypothesis that H2-rich atmospheres may have been rather long-lived on Earth itself. Finally, we will address the empirical observation that rocky planets with thin or negligible atmospheres are rarely or never bigger than 1.6 Earth radii.

  19. Empirical model of subdaily variations in the Earth rotation from GPS and its stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panafidina, N.; Kurdubov, S.; Rothacher, M.

    2012-12-01

    The model recommended by the IERS for these variations at diurnal and semidiurnal periods has been computed from an ocean tide model and comprises 71 terms in polar motion and Universal Time. In the present study we compute an empirical model of variations in the Earth rotation on tidal frequencies from homogeneously re-processed GPS-observations over 1994-2007 available as free daily normal equations. We discuss the reliability of the obtained amplitudes of the ERP variations and compare results from GPS and VLBI data to identify technique-specific problems and instabilities of the empirical tidal models.

  20. Stability and lifetime testing of photomultiplier detectors for the Earth observing system SOLSTICE program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler, Joshua A.; van de Kop, Toni; Drake, Virginia A.; McClintock, William E.; Murphy, John; Rodgers, Paul

    1998-10-01

    The primary objective of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is to accurately measure the absolute value of the solar UV irradiance at the top of the earth's atmosphere for a minimum mission lifetime of 5 years. To meet this objective, SOLSTICE employs a unique design to determine changes in instrument performance by routinely observing a series of early-type stars and comparing the irradiances directly with the solar value. Although the comparison techniques allows us to track instrument performance, the success of the SOLSTICE experiment depends upon photomultiplier detectors which have graceful degradation properties. Therefore, we have established a laboratory program to evaluate the characteristics of photomultiplier tubes which are exposed to long term fluxes similar to those we expected to encounter in flight. Three types of Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes were tested as candidates for use in the EOS-SOLSTICE project. The results of these studies: pulse height distribution; quantum efficiency; surface maps,; and lifetime analysis are presented in this paper.

  1. Effect of whey protein isolate and β-cyclodextrin wall systems on stability of microencapsulated vanillin by spray-freeze drying method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundre, Swetank Y; Karthik, P; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2015-05-01

    Vanillin flavour is highly volatile in nature and due to that application in food incorporation is limited; hence microencapsulation of vanillin is an ideal technique to increase its stability and functionality. In this study, vanillin was microencapsulated for the first time by non-thermal spray-freeze-drying (SFD) technique and its stability was compared with other conventional techniques such as spray drying (SD) and freeze-drying (FD). Different wall materials like β-cyclodextrin (β-cyd), whey protein isolate (WPI) and combinations of these wall materials (β-cyd + WPI) were used to encapsulate vanillin. SFD microencapsulated vanillin with WPI showed spherical shape with numerous fine pores on the surface, which in turn exhibited good rehydration ability. On the other hand, SD powder depicted spherical shape without pores and FD encapsulated powder yielded larger particle sizes with flaky structure. FTIR analysis confirmed that there was no interaction between vanillin and wall materials. Moreover, spray-freeze-dried vanillin + WPI sample exhibited better thermal stability than spray dried and freeze-dried microencapsulated samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Observer enhanced control for spin-stabilized tethered formation in earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang, Zhai; Yuyang, Li; Liang, Bin

    2018-04-01

    This paper addresses the issues relevant to control of spin-stabilized tethered formation in circular orbit. Due to the dynamic complexities and nonlinear perturbations, it is challenging to promote the control precision for the formation deployment and maintenance. In this work, the formation dynamics are derived with considering the spinning rate of the central body, then major attention is dedicated to develop the nonlinear disturbance observer. To achieve better control performance, the observer-enhanced controller is designed by incorporating the disturbance observer into the control loop, benefits from the disturbance compensation are demonstrated, and also, the dependences of the disturbance observer performance on some important parameters are theoretically and numerically analyzed.

  3. Thermal stability and temperature coefficients of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnets heated in dry air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnat, R. M. W.; Liu, S.; Strnat, K. J.

    1982-03-01

    Flux-loss characteristics during long-term air aging of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnet types were measured. Irreversible losses and reversible temperature coefficients on heating above room temperature are reported. Purely magnetic and permanent microstructure-related changes during aging were differentiated by measuring hysteresis curves before and after long-term exposure. Three commercial polymer-bonded magnets using different rare-earth-cobalt-transition metal alloys and a solder-matrix magnet with Sm(Co, Cu, Fe, Zr)7.4 were studied. They were cycled between 25 °C and maximum temperatures to 150 °C (25 ° intervals) as applicable. Aging data at 50 and 125 °C for an exposure time of 3300 h are reported. The 2-17 samples have a stability far superior to bonded 1-5. The soft metal binder imparts significantly better aging behavior on precipitation-hardened 2-17 magnet alloys above 100 °C than an epoxy resin matrix.

  4. Stability of iron-rich magnesiowüstite in Earth's lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, K.; Fujino, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Kondo, T.; Shimizu, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    At ambient conditions, MgO periclase and FeO wüstite form a solid solution (Mg1-xFex)O, named ferropericlase (x ≤ 0.5) and magnesiowüstite (x > 0.5). (Mg1-xFex)O ferropericlase is considered to be a major component of Earth's lower mantle, and may play an important role for its structure and dynamics. Iron-rich magnesiowüstite also needs to be considered because of possible iron enrichment at the core-mantle boundary region [e.g., Nomura et al., 2011]. Recent laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments on FeO revealed that NaCl-type (B1) structured FeO underwent an insulator-metal transition at about 70 GPa and 1800 K without any structural transformation [Fischer et al., 2011; Ohta et al., 2012]. These results imply that the metallic B1 FeO would require a two-phase field for the MgO-FeO binary system due to different chemical bonding between insulating MgO and metallic FeO. We performed simultaneous electrical conductivity and x-ray diffraction measurements on (Mg0.20Fe0.80)O and (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O magnesiowüstite up to 140 GPa and 2100 K, and then examined recovered samples by using analytical transmission electron microprobe. We obtained some evidences for the dissociation of (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O into lighter and heavier phases than starting material occurring above 70 GPa and 1900 K, which is most likely due to the metallization of FeO component. On the other hand, we did not observe such dissociation and metallization in (Mg0.20Fe0.80)O. Observed dissociation in (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O might contribute to the heterogeneity in seismic wave and electrical conductivity at the Earth's core-mantle boundary region.

  5. Boundary layer stability and Arctic climate change: a feedback study using EC-Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bintanja, R.; Linden, E.C. van der; Hazeleger, W. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Amplified Arctic warming is one of the key features of climate change. It is evident in observations as well as in climate model simulations. Usually referred to as Arctic amplification, it is generally recognized that the surface albedo feedback governs the response. However, a number of feedback mechanisms play a role in AA, of which those related to the prevalent near-surface inversion have received relatively little attention. Here we investigate the role of the near-surface thermal inversion, which is caused by radiative surface cooling in autumn and winter, on Arctic warming. We employ idealized climate change experiments using the climate model EC-Earth together with ERA-Interim reanalysis data to show that boundary-layer mixing governs the efficiency by which the surface warming signal is 'diluted' to higher levels. Reduced vertical mixing, as in the stably stratified inversion layer in Arctic winter, thus amplifies surface warming. Modelling results suggest that both shortwave - through the (seasonal) interaction with the sea ice feedback - and longwave feedbacks are affected by boundary-layer mixing, both in the Arctic and globally, with the effect on the shortwave feedback dominating. The amplifying effect will decrease, however, with climate warming because the surface inversion becomes progressively weaker. We estimate that the reduced Arctic inversion has slowed down global warming by about 5% over the past 2 decades, and we anticipate that it will continue to do so with ongoing Arctic warming. (orig.)

  6. After the fall of the Berlin Wall: perceptions and consequences of stability and change among middle-aged and older East and West Germans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, Gerben J; Keyes, Corey L M

    2006-09-01

    This study empirically tested the self-systems theory of subjective change in light of the rapid change after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The theory predicts that individuals have a tendency to perceive stability and that perceived stability exerts a strong positive effect on subjective well-being. We would expect perceptions of decline and, to a lesser extent, perceptions of improvement to be related to lower levels of subjective well-being. Data were from respondents aged 40-85 years who participated in the German Aging Survey. We used measures of well-being and temporal comparisons during the past 10 years (1986-1996). West Germans reported more stability than East Germans, in particular in the public domain and in older age groups. Compared with perceptions of stability, perceptions of decline were related to less life satisfaction and more negative affect, and perceptions of growth to more negative affect. Temporal comparisons were unrelated to positive affect. Our findings both confirm and reject the self-systems theory of subjective change as it relates to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Studying temporal comparisons is important in understanding the effects of historical events and their timing within an individual life course.

  7. Studying the effect of a variation in the main parameters on stability of homogeneous earth dams using design experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakehal Rida

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Deterministic approaches such as the limit equilibrium method (LEM especially Bishop modified method has been traditionally used to evaluate the stability of embankment dams. However, the uncertainty associated with the material properties necessitates the use of the probabilistic method to account the sensitivity of this uncertainty on the response of the deterministic approaches. In this study, the authors propose the application of design experiment, especially central composite design (CCD to determine the effects of independent uncertain parameters on the response of stability. A second-order polynomial model with cross terms is used to create an approximating function referred to as response surface for the implicit limit state surface, for which the input data were provided by stability analyses of different heights of homogeneous earth dams (10 m, 20 m, and 30 m with a depth ratio of DH = 1.5 and a circular slip surface using the Bishop modified limit equilibrium method. The proposed models obtained from this application represent higher prediction accuracy. The study of the effect of geotechnical parameters (material properties of embankment on safety factor show the importance of individual factors in level of linear effect with a positive effect of c’ or φ’ and a negative effect of H, γd, γsat and significant influence of two-factors interaction, the effect of c’ highly dependent on H, β, γd and φ’. Moreover, the effect of φ’ is dependent on the values of H and β. Lastly, the optimization of safety factor with respect to the range of values of material properties was made, and two failures modes are discussed which are (φ’, c’ reduction and γd increase.

  8. Synthesis and thermic behaviour (stability and sintering) of rare earth ortho-phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, S.

    2003-04-01

    Rare earth ortho-phosphates, LnPO 4 ,nH 2 O (Ln = La, Ce or Y), were synthesized by precipitation in aqueous media. The effect of pH, temperature, reagents stoichiometry and ripening time on the chemical composition and the morphology of the precipitates have been precised. The study of the thermal behaviour showed the presence of meta-phosphates as a secondary phase in the temperature range 1000 C - 1400 C that was very detrimental to the sintering. It is removed by calcining the powders at 1400 C. Thermogravimetry proved to be the best technique in order to insure the purity of the precipitates since it allows the detection of this phase down to a lower threshold than that associated with the other investigated characterization methods (IR or Raman spectrometry, chemical analysis, XRD, DTA). The monazites (La or Ce)PO 4 densify at 1400 C by natural sintering whereas the xenotime YPO 4 is not yet densified at 1500 C. Hot pressing at that temperature is required to its densification. The mechanical properties of the monazites remain low (sf about 120 MPa, K IC about 1.2 MPa.m 1/2 ). The xenotime ceramic is much more mechanically resistant (sf about 320 MPa, K IC about 1.5 MPa.m 1/2 ). An important acicular growth of the grains during the sintering of the xenotime (that occurs also during the synthesis process) is considered to be responsible for the behaviour and properties differences between this material and monazites. (author)

  9. Evaluation of Causes of Retaining Wall Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu'azu Mohammed ABDULLAHI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Retaining structures are vital geotechnical structure, because the topography of the earth surface is a combination of plain, sloppy and undulating terrain. The retaining wall resists thrust of a bank of earth as well as providing soil stability of a change of ground elevation. Earth pressures on retaining wall are designed from theories of Soil Mechanics, but unfortunately the engineers using them do not always realize the significance of the assumption in their development. This is usually accompanied by with failure and partial failures because of designed based on rules and formulae that fit only limited conditions. In addition there are also problems of using bad backfill materials without taking precautionary measures against built–up of hydrostatic pressure by provision of drainage and also poor workmanship.

  10. Examination of a climate stabilization pathway via zero-emissions using Earth system models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Daisuke; Tsutsui, J; Watanabe, S; Tachiiri, K; Hajima, T; Okajima, H; Matsuno, T

    2015-01-01

    Long-term climate experiments up to the year 2300 have been conducted using two full-scale complex Earth system models (ESMs), CESM1(BGC) and MIROC-ESM, for a CO 2 emissions reduction pathway, termed Z650, where annual CO 2 emissions peak at 11 PgC in 2020, decline by 50% every 30 years, and reach zero in 2160. The results have been examined by focusing on the approximate linear relationship between the temperature increase and cumulative CO 2 emissions. Although the temperature increase is nearly proportional to the cumulative CO 2 emissions in both models, this relationship does not necessarily provide a robust basis for the restriction of CO 2 emissions because it is substantially modulated by non-CO 2 forcing. CO 2 -induced warming, estimated from the atmospheric CO 2 concentrations in the models, indicates an approximate compensation of nonlinear changes between fast-mode responses to concentration changes at less than 10 years and slow-mode response at more than 100 years due to the thermal inertia of the ocean. In this estimate, CESM1(BGC) closely approximates a linear trend of 1.7 °C per 1000 PgC, whereas MIROC-ESM shows a deviation toward higher temperatures after the emissions peak, from 1.8 °C to 2.4 °C per 1000 PgC over the range of 400–850 PgC cumulative emissions corresponding to years 2000–2050. The evolution of temperature under zero emissions, 2160–2300, shows a slight decrease of about 0.1 °C per century in CESM1(BGC), but remains almost constant in MIROC-ESM. The fast-mode response toward the equilibrium state decreases with a decrease in the airborne fraction owing to continued CO 2 uptake (carbon cycle inertia), whereas the slow-mode response results in more warming owing to continued heat uptake (thermal inertia). Several specific differences are noted between the two models regarding the degree of this compensation and in some key regional aspects associated with sustained warming and long-term climate risks. Overall, elevated

  11. Characterization of the local layer structure of a broad wall in a surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi; Miyata, Hirokatsu.

    1996-01-01

    The local layer structure of the broad wall of a zig-zag defect in a thin-surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cell was characterized using a synchrotron X-ray microbeam of less than 5 μm spatial resolution. By using a rocking curve measurement at the broad wall, multiple or broad peaks were observed between a pair of peaks due to a chevron structure. These new peaks are clear evidence of a modified pseudo-bookshelf structure at the wall. For 1.5 μm thick cells, a bookshelf layer is relatively flat, but is accompanied by small areas of inclined layer connecting the bookshelf and the chevron structures. For 10 μm thick cells, the pseudo-bookshelf structure bends or undulates both perpendicular and parallel to the rubbing direction. No appreciable change in the layer spacing was observed in the modified pseudo-bookshelf structure. The temperature dependence of the broad wall layer structure was also measured. (author)

  12. Characterization of the local layer structure of a broad wall in a surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Atsuo [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Noma, Takashi; Miyata, Hirokatsu

    1996-01-01

    The local layer structure of the broad wall of a zig-zag defect in a thin-surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cell was characterized using a synchrotron X-ray microbeam of less than 5 {mu}m spatial resolution. By using a rocking curve measurement at the broad wall, multiple or broad peaks were observed between a pair of peaks due to a chevron structure. These new peaks are clear evidence of a modified pseudo-bookshelf structure at the wall. For 1.5 {mu}m thick cells, a bookshelf layer is relatively flat, but is accompanied by small areas of inclined layer connecting the bookshelf and the chevron structures. For 10 {mu}m thick cells, the pseudo-bookshelf structure bends or undulates both perpendicular and parallel to the rubbing direction. No appreciable change in the layer spacing was observed in the modified pseudo-bookshelf structure. The temperature dependence of the broad wall layer structure was also measured. (author)

  13. Effect of rare earth element on microstructure formation and mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.O.; Kim, J.Y.; Choi, C.O.; Kim, J.K.; Rohatgi, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile iron castings with 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 25 mm thickness and various amount of rare earth elements (RE) (from 0 to 0.04%), were cast in sand molds to identify the effects of sample thickness and the content of RE% on microstructural formation and selected mechanical properties. The effects of RE content and sample thickness on microstructural formation, including on graphite nodule count, graphite nodule shape, spherodization, and ferrite amount, were observed. The yield strength of the samples with RE within the range investigated were lower than those of the specimens without RE. The elongation was improved with the addition of RE up to 0.03% in ductile iron castings. The additions of 0.02% RE caused a smaller graphite nodule size and a higher number of graphite nodules than those in the specimen without RE at all levels of RE addition; the nodule count decreased with increase in section size. The chill zones were observed in the 2 mm thick samples, but were absent in the samples from castings which were thicker than 2 mm, irrespective of the addition of RE. The nodularity of graphite nodules improved due to the addition of 0.02-0.04% RE. The specimens with RE content up to 0.03% had a lower tensile strength and hardness, higher elongation than that of the specimens without RE. The ferrite content in all castings increased with additions of 0.02% RE. The tensile strengths of the 2 and 3 mm thick samples were also estimated using the relationship between strength and hardness, obtained from the data on the tensile strength and hardness of the 25 mm thick samples

  14. Long-term stability of superhydrophilic oxygen plasma-modified single-walled carbon nanotube network surfaces and the influence on ammonia gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Sungjoon [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonhyub [Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, 2511 Sejong-ro, Sejong City 339-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chanwon [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Joon-Hyung, E-mail: jj1023@chol.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyonggi University, 154-42 Gwanggyosan-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16227 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Nam Ki, E-mail: nkmin@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube obtained by O{sub 2} plasma treatment voluntarily and non-reversibly reverts to a metastable state. This aerobic aging is an essential process to develop a stable carbon nanotube-based sensor. - Highlights: • Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube network can be obtained by O{sub 2} plasma-based surface modification. • The modified carbon nanotube surface invariably reverts to a metastable state in a non-reversible manner. • Aerobic aging is essential to stabilize the modified carbon nanotube and the carbon nanotube-based sensing device due to minimized sensor-to-sensor variation. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks are subjected to a low-powered oxygen plasma for the surface modification. Changes in the surface chemical composition and the stability of the plasma-treated SWCNT (p-SWCNT) with aging in air for up to five weeks are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis. The contact angle decreases from 120° of the untreated hydrophobic SWCNT to 0° for the superhydrophilic p-SWCNT. Similarly, the ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C) based on the XPS spectra increases from 0.25 to 1.19, indicating an increase in surface energy of the p-SWCNT. The enhanced surface energy is gradually dissipated and the p-SWCNT network loses the superhydrophilic surface property. However, it never revert to the original hydrophobic surface state but to a metastable hydrophilic state. The aging effect on sensitivity of the p-SWCNT network-based ammonia sensor is investigated to show the importance of the aging process for the stabilization of the p-SWCNT. The best sensitivity for monitoring NH{sub 3} gas is observed with the as-prepared p-SWCNT, and the sensitivity decreases as similar as the p-SWCNT loses its hydrophilicity with time goes by. After a large performance degradation during the aging time for about two weeks, the response

  15. Strength and Absorption Rate of Compressed Stabilized Earth Bricks (CSEBs Due to Different Mixture Ratios and Degree of Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Abd Halid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed Stabilized Earth Brick (CSEB is produced by compressing a mixture of water with three main materials such as Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC, soil, and sand. It becomes popularfor its good strength, better insulation properties, and a sustainable product due to its easy production with low carbon emission and less skilled labour required. Different types of local soils usedwill produce CSEB of different physical properties in terms of its strength, durability, and water absorption rate. This study focuses on laterite soil taken from the surrounding local area in Parit Raja, Johor, and CSEB samples are produced based on prototype brick size 100×50×30 mm. The investigations are based on four different degree of compactions (i.e. 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 Psi and three different mix proportion ratios of cement:sand:laterite soil (i.e. 1:1:9, 1:2:8, 1:3:7. A total of 144 CSEB samples have been tested at 7 and 28 days curing periods to determine the compressive strength (BS 3921:1985 and water absorption rate (MS 76:1972. It was found that maximum compressive strength of CSEB was 14.68 N/mm2 for mixture ratio of 1:3:7 at 2500 Psi compaction. Whereas, the minimum strengthis 6.87 N/mm2 for 1:1:9mixture ratio at 1500 Psi. Meanwhile, the lowest water absorption was 12.35% for mixture ratio of 1:2:8 at 3000 Psi; while the 1:1:9 mixture ratio at 1500 Psi gave the highest rate of 16.81%. This study affirms that the sand content in the mixture and the degree of compaction would affect the value of compressive strength and water absorption of CSEB.

  16. A first attempt at few coils and low-coverage resistive wall mode stabilization of EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J.; Brunsell, Per R.; Drake, James R.; Frassinetti, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    The reversed-field pinch features resistive-shell-type instabilities at any (vanishing and finite) plasma pressure. An attempt to stabilize the full spectrum of these modes using both (i) incomplete coverage and (ii) few coils is presented. Two empirically derived model-based control algorithms are compared with a baseline guaranteed suboptimal intelligent-shell-type (IS) feedback. Experimental stabilization could not be achieved for the coil array subset sizes considered by this first study. But the model-based controllers appear to significantly outperform the decentralized IS method.

  17. Stability and anisotropy of (FexNi1-x)2O under high pressure and implications in Earth's and super-Earths' core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengxuan; Wu, Xiang; Qin, Shan

    2018-01-10

    Oxygen is thought to be an important light element in Earth's core but the amount of oxygen in Earth's core remains elusive. In addition, iron-rich iron oxides are of great interest and significance in the field of geoscience and condensed matter physics. Here, static calculations based on density functional theory demonstrate that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O is dynamically and mechanically stable and becomes energetically favorable with respect to the assemblage of hcp-Fe and [Formula: see text]-FeO above 270 GPa, which indicates that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O can be a strong candidate phase for stable iron-rich iron oxides at high pressure, perhaps even at high temperature. The elasticity and anisotropy of I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O at high pressures are also determined. Based on these results, we have derived the upper limit of oxygen to be 4.3 wt% in Earth's lower outer core. On the other hand, I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O with high AV S is likely to exist in a super-Earth's or an ocean planet's solid core causing the locally seismic heterogeneity. Our results not only give some clues to explore and synthesize novel iron-rich iron oxides but also shed light on the fundamental information of oxygen in the planetary core.

  18. Amino Acid Functionalization of Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Effects of Dopants and Side Chains as Well as Zwitterionic Stabilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lisha; Zhu, Chang; Fu, Yujie; Yang, Gang

    2017-04-06

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is necessitated in a number of conditions such as drug delivery, and here amino acid functionalization of SWCNTs is conducted within the framework of density functional theory. Functionalization efficiencies of Gly are largely determined by dopants, as a combined effect of atomic radius, electronic configuration, and distortion to SWCNTs. Different functionalization sites in Gly have divergent interaction strengths with M/SWCNTs that decline as O b > N > O a , and this trend seems almost independent of the identity of metallic dopants. B/SWCNT behaves distinctly and prefers to the N site. Dopants affect principally interaction strengths, while amino acids regulate significantly both functionalization configurations and interaction energies. Then focus is given to stabilization of zwitterionic amino acids due to enhanced interactions with the widely used zwitterionic drugs. All metallic dopants render zwitterionic Gly to be the most stable, and side chains in amino acids rather than dopants in M/SWCNTs cause more pronounced effects to zwitterionic stabilizations. Charge transfers between amino acids and M/SWCNTs are closely associated with zwitterionic stabilization effects, and different charge transfer mechanisms between M/SWCNTs and metal ions are interpreted. Thus, this work provides a comprehensive understanding of amino acid functionalization of M/SWCNTs.

  19. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  20. Spacer stability and prostate position variability during radiotherapy for prostate cancer applying a hydrogel to protect the rectal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Escobar-Corral, Nuria; Caffaro, Mariana; Djukic, Victoria; Klotz, Jens; Eble, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim was to evaluate the spacer dimensions and prostate position variability during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: CT scans were performed in a group of 15 patients (G1) after the 10 ml injection of a hydrogel spacer (SpaceOAR™) and 30 patients without a spacer (G2) before the beginning of treatment (CT1) and in the last treatment week, 10–12 weeks following spacer implantation (CT2). Spacer dimensions and displacements were determined and prostate displacements compared. Results: Mean volume of the hydrogel increased slightly (17%; p 2 cm 3 . The average displacement of the hydrogel center of mass was 0.6 mm (87% ⩽ 2.2 mm), −0.6 mm (100% ⩽ 2.2 mm) and 1.4 mm (87% ⩽ 4.3 mm) in the x-, y- and z-axes (not significant). The average distance between prostate and anterior rectal wall before/at the end of radiotherapy was 1.6 cm/1.5 cm, 1.2 cm/1.3 cm and 1.0 cm/1.1 cm at the level of the base, middle and apex (G1). Prostate position variations were similar comparing G1 and G2, but significant systematic posterior displacements were only found in G2. Conclusions: A stable distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall results during the radiotherapy course after injection of the spacer before treatment planning. Larger posterior prostate displacements could be reduced

  1. Local stabilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si(100)-2 x 1:H via nanoscale hydrogen desorption with an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Peter M; Lyding, Joseph W

    2007-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope (UHV-STM) was used to modify the interface between isolated ∼10 A-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the hydrogen-passivated Si(100) surface. Room-temperature UHV-STM desorption of hydrogen at the SWNT/H-Si(100) interface resulted in the local mechanical stabilization of tubes originally perturbed by the rastered STM tip under nominal imaging conditions. For the section of the SWNT contacted by depassivated Si, a topographic depression of 1.5 A (1 A) was measured in the case of parallel (nearly perpendicular) alignment between the tube axis and the Si dimer rows, in agreement with existing first-principles calculations. The compatibility of hydrogen-resist UHV-STM nanolithography with SWNTs adsorbed on H-Si(100) would enable the atomically precise placement of single molecules in proximity to the tube for the bottom-up fabrication of molecular electronic devices

  2. On local thermal equilibrium and potential gradient vs current characteristic in wall-stabilized argon plasma arc at 0.1 atm pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Haruo; Imazu, Shingo; Inaba, Tsuginori.

    1979-01-01

    In wall-stabilized arc which is a very useful means for determining the transport characteristics of high temperature gases, it is the premise that the inside of arc column is in complete local thermal equilibrium (LTE). In general, the higher the gas pressure, the easier the establishment of LTE, accordingly the experimental investigations on the characteristics of arc discharge as well as the transport characteristics so far were limited to the region of relatively high pressure. However, the authors have found that the theoretical potential vs. current characteristic obtained by the transport characteristic was greatly different from the actually measured one in low pressure region, as the fundamental characteristic of wall-stabilized argon plasma arc below atmospheric pressure. This time, they have clarified this discrepancy at 0.1 atm using the plasma parameters obtained through the spectroscopic measurements. The spectroscopic measurements have been performed through the side observation window at the position 5.5 cm away from the cathode, when arc was ignited vertically at the electrodes distant by 11 cm. Arc radius was 0.5 cm. Electron density and temperature, gas temperature and the excitation density of argon neutral atoms have been experimentally measured. The investigations showed that, in the region of low arc current, where the ratio of current to arc radius is less than 200 A/cm, the fall of gas temperature affected greatly on the decrease of axial electric field of arc column. The non-equilibrium between electron temperature and gas temperature decreased with the increase of arc current, and it was concluded that LTE has been formed at the center portion of arc column above I/R = 300 A/cm. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Chest wall stabilization and reconstruction: short and long-term results 5 years after the introduction of a new titanium plates system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Angela; Sollitto, Francesco; Loizzi, Domenico; Di Gennaro, Francesco; Scarascia, Daniele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Giudice, Giuseppe; Armenio, Andrea; Ludovico, Rossana; Loizzi, Michele

    2016-03-01

    We report short and long-term results with the dedicated Synthes(®) titanium plates system, introduced 5 years ago, for chest wall stabilization and reconstruction. We retrospectively analyzed (January 2010 to December 2014) 27 consecutive patients (22 males, 5 females; range 16-83 years, median age 60 years), treated with this system: primary [3] and secondary [8] chest wall tumor; flail chest [5]; multiple ribs fractures [5]; sternal dehiscence-diastasis [3]; sternal fracture [1]; sternoclavicular joint dislocation [1]; Poland syndrome [1]. Short-term results were evaluated as: operating time, post-operative morbidity, mortality, hospital stay; long-term results as: survival, plates-related morbidity, spirometric values, chest pain [measured with Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) and SF12 standard V1 questionnaire]. Each patient received from 1 to 10 (median 2) titanium plates/splints; median operating time was 150 min (range: 115-430 min). Post-operative course: 15 patients (55.6%) uneventful, 10 (37%) minor complications, 2 (7.4%) major complications; no post-operative mortality. Median post-operative hospital stay was 13 days (range: 5-129 days). At a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 1-59 months), 21 patients (78%) were alive, 6 (22%) died. Three patients presented long-term plates-related morbidity: plates rupture [2], pin plate dislodgment [1]; two required a second surgical look. One-year from surgery median spirometric values were: FVC 3.31 L (90%), FEV1 2.46 L (78%), DLCO 20.9 mL/mmHg/min (76%). On 21 alive patients, 7 (33.3%) reported no pain (VRS score 0), 10 (47.6%) mild (score 2), 4 (19.1%) moderate (score 4), no-one severe (score >4); 15 (71.5%) reported none or mild, 6 (28.5%) moderate pain influencing quality of life. An optimal chest wall stabilization and reconstruction was achieved with the Synthes(®) titanium plates system, with minimal morbidity, no post-operative mortality, acceptable operating time and post-operative hospital stay. Long

  4. A NEW DOUBLE-SLIT CURVED WALL-JET (CWJ) BURNER FOR STABILIZING TURBULENT PREMIXED AND NON-PREMIXED FLAMES

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mixing characteristics in the cold flow of non-premixed cases were first examined using acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions.PIV measurements revealed that velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annularjets generate the turbulence, enhanced with the collisions in the interaction jet, IJ,region. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced significantly by Re and high rms turbulent velocities are generated within the recirculation zone improving the flame stabilization in this burner.Premixed and non-premixed flames with high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Re. For flames with low equivalence ratio, the processes of local quenching at IJ region and of re-ignition within merged jet region maintained these flames further downstream particularly for non-premixed methane flame, revealing a strong intermittency.

  5. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang; Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs

  6. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2 NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver–silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium. Bacterial sensitivity...

  7. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium Bacterial sensitivity...

  8. Role of Hydrophobic/Aromatic Residues on the Stability of Double-Wall β-Sheet Structures Formed by a Triblock Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Beytullah; Sayar, Mehmet

    2017-04-27

    Bioinspired self-assembling peptides serve as powerful building blocks in the manufacturing of nanomaterials with tailored features. Because of their ease of synthesis, biocompatibility, and tunable activity, this emerging branch of biomolecules has become very popular. The triblock peptide architecture designed by the Hartgerink group is a versatile system that allows control over its assembly and has been shown to demonstrate tunable bioactivity. Three main forces, Coulomb repulsion, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity act together to guide the triblock peptides' assembly into one-dimensional objects and hydrogels. It was shown previously that both the nanofiber morphology (e.g., intersheet spacing, formation of antiparallel/parallel β-sheets) and hydrogel rheology strictly depend on the choice of the core residue where the triblock peptide fibers with aromatic cores in general form shorter fibers and yield poor hydrogels with respect to the ones with aliphatic cores. However, an elaborate understanding of the molecular reasons behind these changes remained unclear. In this study, by using carefully designed computer based free energy calculations, we analyzed the influence of the core residue on the formation of double-wall fibers and single-wall β-sheets. Our results demonstrate that the aromatic substitution impairs the fiber cores and this impairment is mainly associated with a reduced hydrophobic character of the aromatic side chains. Such weakening is most obvious in tryptophan containing peptides where the fiber core absorbs a significant amount of water. We also show that the ability of tyrosine to form side chain hydrogen bonds plays an indispensable role in the fiber stability. As opposed to the impairment of the fiber cores, single-wall β-sheets with aromatic faces become more stable compared to the ones with aliphatic faces suggesting that the choice of the core residue can also affect the underlying assembly mechanism. We also provide an in

  9. Improvement of the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of high-density polyethylene by free radical trapping of rare earth compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Shiya; Zhao, Li; Han, Ligang [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Guo, Zhenghong, E-mail: guozhenghong@nit.zju.edu.cn [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); Fang, Zhengping [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • Polyethylene filled with ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared. • A low Yb loading improved thermal stability of PE obviously by radical trapping. • Yb(OTf){sub 3} is expected to be an efficient thermal stabilizer for the polymer. - Abstract: A kind of rare earth compound, ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate (Yb(OTf){sub 3}), was introduced into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) by melt compounding to investigate the effect of Yb(OTf){sub 3} on the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE. The results of thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the addition of Yb(OTf){sub 3} made the thermal degradation temperatures dramatically increased, the oxidative induction time (OIT) extended, and the enthalpy (ΔH{sub d}) reduced. Very low Yb(OTf){sub 3} loading (0.5 wt%) in HDPE could increase the onset degradation temperature in air from 334 to 407 °C, delay the OIT from 11.0 to 24.3 min, and decrease the ΔH{sub d} from 61.0 to 13.0 J/g remarkably. Electron spin resonance spectra (ESR), thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), rheological investigation and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) indicated that the free radicals-trapping ability of Yb(OTf){sub 3} was responsible for the improved thermal and thermo-oxidative stability.

  10. Physicochemical characterization and oxidative stability of fish oil-loaded electrosprayed capsules: Combined use of whey protein and carbohydrates as wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Pelayo, Andres; Yu, Sen

    2018-01-01

    The encapsulation of fish oil in electrosprayed capsules using whey protein and carbohydrates (pullulan and dextran or glucose syrup) mixtures as glassy wall materials was studied. Capsules with fish oil emulsified by using only a rotor-stator emulsification exhibited higher oxidative stability...... than capsules where the oil was emulsified by high-pressure homogenization. Moreover, glucose syrup capsules (with a peroxide value, PV, of 19.7 ± 4.4 meq/kg oil and a content of 1-penten-3-ol of 751.0 ± 69.8 ng/g oil) were less oxidized than dextran capsules after 21 days of storage at 20 °C (PV of 24.......9 ± 0.4 meq/kg oil and 1-penten-3-ol of 1161.0 ± 222.0 ng/g oil). This finding may be attributed to differences in oxygen permeability between both types of capsules. These results indicated the potential of both combinations of whey protein, pullulan, and dextran or glucose syrup as shell materials...

  11. Influence of in-plane field on the stability of vertical Bloch lines in the walls of OHB at various bias fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, G.X.; Wang, L.N.; Zhen, C.M.; Nie, X.F.

    2006-01-01

    The stability of vertical Bloch line (VBL) chains subjected to in-plane field (H ip ) was statistically studied for the ordinary hard bubbles (OHB) in garnet bubble films at various bias fields (H b ). The dumbbell domains were also investigated. We found that (H ip (1) ) IID ip (1) ) ID ip (1) ) OHB and (H ip (2) ) IID =(H ip (2) ) ID =(H ip (2) ) OHB when keeping H b unchanged. With the increasing of H b , the in-plane field H ip (1) , H ip * and H ip (2) all decrease, while the in-plane field range [H ip (1) , H ip * ] and [H ip (1) , H ip (2) ] become narrower. Here, H ip (1) is the initial critical in-plane field where VBLs in the walls of three types of hard domains are annihilated, H ip * stands for the in-plane field where the retention rate of three types of hard domains R reduces to zero, and H ip (2) is the lowest in-plane field where VBLs in their corresponding hard domains are annihilated completely

  12. Metal–organic layers stabilize earth-abundant metal–terpyridine diradical complexes for catalytic C–H activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zekai; Thacker, Nathan C.; Sawano, Takahiro; Drake, Tasha; Ji, Pengfei; Lan, Guangxu; Cao, Lingyun; Liu, Shubin; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin (UNC); (UC); (Xiamen)

    2017-10-30

    Metal–organic layers stabilize FeIIor CoII-terpyridine diradical complexes to catalyze alkylazide Csp3–H amination and benzylic C–H borylation, respectively.

  13. Stability of Basalt plus Anhydrite plus Calcite at HP-HT: Implications for Venus, the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    "Canali" observed at Venus surface by Magellan are evidence for very long melt flows, but their composition and origin remain uncertain. The hypothesis of water-rich flow is not reasonable regarding the temperature at Venus surface. The length of these channels could not be explained by a silicate melt composition but more likely, by a carbonate-sulfate melt which has a much lower viscosity (Kargel et al 1994). One hypothesis is that calcite CaCO3 and anhydrite CaSO4 which are alteration products of basalts melted during meteorite impacts. A famous example recorded on the Earth (Chicxulub) produced melt and gas rich in carbon and sulfur. Calcite and sulfate evaporites are also present on Mars surface, associated with basalts. An impact on these materials might release C- and S-rich melt or fluid. Another type of planetary phenomenon (affecting only the Earth) might provoke a high pressure destabilization of basalt+anhydrite+calcite. Very high contents of C and S are measured in some Earth s magmas, either dissolved or in the form of crystals (Luhr 2008). As shown by the high H content and high fO2 of primary igneous anhydrite-bearing lavas, the high S content in their source may be explained by subduction of an anhydrite-bearing oceanic crust, either directly (by melting followed by eruption) or indirectly (by release of S-rich melt or fluid that metasomatize the mantle) . Calcite is a major product of oceanic sedimentation and alteration of the crust. Therefore, sulfate- and calcite-rich material may be subducted to high pressures and high temperatures (HP-HT) and release S- and C-rich melts or fluids which could influence the composition of subduction zone lavas or gases. Both phenomena - meteorite impact and subduction - imply HP-HT conditions - although the P-T-time paths are different. Some HP experimental/theoretical studies have been performed on basalt/eclogite, calcite and anhydrite separately or on a combination of two. In this study we performed piston

  14. Indications for surgical stabilization of rib fractures in patients without flail chest: surveyed opinions of members of the Chest Wall Injury Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieracci, Fredric M; Agarwal, Suresh; Doben, Andrew; Shiroff, Adam; Lottenberg, Larwence; Whitbeck, Sarah Ann; White, Thomas W

    2018-02-01

    There are currently no evidence-based indications for surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF) in patients without flail chest. The purpose of this survey was to identify patients for whom there is relative equipoise (operative vs. non-operative) in order to assist in designing a randomized clinical trial. Members of the Chest Wall Injury Society were sent an online survey, in which 18 patient scenarios were presented. The baseline patient had ≥ three displaced, contiguous fractures and had no other contraindications for surgery. This default scenario was then varied based upon patient age, degree of traumatic brain injury (TBI), fracture series location, and number of abnormal pulmonary physiologic variables (oxygen requirement, respiratory rate, incentive spirometry ability, cough, and numeric pain score). Thirty respondents provided a total of 540 answers. Overall, the majority of responses were in favor of SSRF (n = 413, 84.1%). Furthermore, the vast majority of responses indicated that some degree of pulmonary compromise was necessary to recommend SSRF (n = 44, 90.4%), with ≥ two abnormal parameters being the most common threshold (n = 156, 31.8%). Decision to recommend SSRF varied significantly by number of abnormal clinical variables, age, and degree of TBI, but not by fracture series location. Patients aged 85 years old and those with moderate TBI were the least likely to be recommended for SSRF, regardless of abnormal pulmonary physiologic variables. The most appropriate cutoff for equipoise appeared to be a patient aged 21-79 years old, with no or mild TBI, ≥ two abnormal pulmonary parameters, and regardless of fracture location (44.8% consensus for SSRF). SSRF was recommended for most patients with non-flail, displaced rib fractures. However, this recommendation was contingent upon patient age, degree of TBI, and pulmonary clinical status. Results of this survey may be used to inform inclusion criteria for a future randomized

  15. Synthesis and characterization of anionic rare-earth metal amides stabilized by phenoxy-amido ligands and their catalytic behavior for the polymerization of lactide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min; Yao, Yingming; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Qi

    2010-10-28

    A dianionic phenoxyamido ligand was the first to be used to stabilize organo-rare-earth metal amido complexes. Amine elimination reaction of Nd[N(TMS)(2)](3)(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) (TMS = SiMe(3)) with aminophenol [HNOH] {[HNOH] = N-p-methylphenyl(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butyl)benzylamine} in a 1 : 1 molar-ratio gave the anionic phenoxyamido neodymium amide [NO](2)Nd[N(TMS)(2)][Li(THF)](2) (2) in a low isolated yield. A further study revealed that the stoichiometric reactions of Ln[N(TMS)(2)](3)(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with the lithium aminophenoxy [HNOLi(THF)](2) (1) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) gave the anionic rare-earth metal amido complexes [NO](2)Ln[N(TMS)(2)][Li(THF)](2) [Ln = Nd (2), Sm (3), Yb (4), Y (5)] in high isolated yields. All of these complexes are fully characterized. X-Ray structure determination revealed that complex 1 has a solvated dimeric structure, and complexes 2-5 are isostructural, and have solvated monomeric structures. Each of the rare-earth metal ions is coordinated by two oxygen atoms and two nitrogen atoms from two phenoxyamido ligands and one nitrogen atom from the N(TMS)(2) group to form a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. Each of the lithium atoms in complexes 2-5 is coordinated with one oxygen atom and one nitrogen atom from two different phenoxyamido groups, and one oxygen atom from one THF molecule to form a trigonal planar geometry. Furthermore, the catalytic behavior of complexes 2-5 for the ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide was explored.

  16. Stability of the high pressure phase Fe3S2 up to Earth's core pressures in the Fe-S-O and the Fe-S-Si systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Davis, A.; Brauser, N.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's core is comprised of an iron-nickel alloy that contains 5-15% of a light element component. The abundance and alloying capability of sulfur, silicon and oxygen in the bulk Earth make them important core alloy candidates; therefore, the high-pressure phase equilibria of the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems are relevant for understanding the possible chemistry of Earth's core. Previously, a Fe3S2 phase was recognized as a low-pressure intermediate phase in the Fe-FeS system that is stable from 14-21 GPa, but the structure of this phase has not been resolved. We report in-situ XRD and chemical analysis of recovered samples to further examine the stability and structure of Fe3S2 as it coexists with other phases in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems. In situ high P-T synchrotron XRD experiments were conducted in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell to determine the equilibrium phases in Fe75S7O18 and Fe80S5Si15 compositions between 30 and 174 GPa and up to 3000 K. In the S,O-rich samples, an orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase coexists with hcp-Fe, Fe3S and FeO and undergoes two monoclinic distortions between 60 and 174 GPa. In the S,Si-rich samples, the orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase was observed up to 115 GPa. With increasing pressure, the Fe3S2 phase becomes stable to higher temperatures in both compositions, suggesting possible Fe3(S,O)2 or Fe3(S,Si)2 solid solutions. SEM analysis of a laser heated Fe75S7O18 sample recovered from 40 GPa and 1450 K confirms a Fe3(S,O)2 phase with O dissolved into the structure. Based on the current melting data in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems, the Fe3(S,O)2 stability field intersects the solidus in the outer core and could be a possible liquidus phase in Fe,S,O-rich planetary cores, whereas Fe3S is the stable sulfide at outer core pressures in Fe,S,Si-rich systems.

  17. Synthesis, structuring and characterization of rare earth oxide thin films: Modeling of the effects of stress and defects on the phase stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboriaud, R.J.; Paumier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the effects of the deposition parameters on the microstructure and the related residual stress in a rare earth oxide thin film. This study is focused on the yttrium sesquioxide (Y 2 O 3 ) thin films deposited on Si (100) substrates using the ion beam sputtering technique. This technique allows the control of the microstructure and the related residual stress in the thin films by monitoring the energy of the argon beam used in the deposition process. Measurements of the stresses within the oxide layer were performed by the X-ray diffraction-sin 2 Ψ method. The results show that the classic model of a pure biaxial in-plane model of stress, generally proposed in thin films, is not satisfying. A model that includes a hydrostatic stress due to the crystalline defects generated during the deposition process and a biaxial stress called a fixation stress, gives a good agreement with the experimental results. This modeling of the residual stress, based on nanometer-scale inclusions (point, extended defects) inducing a hydrostatic stress field, leads to a quantitative analysis of the nature and the concentration of the defects. This work shows results that establish a relationship between residual stress, defects and non-equilibrium phase stabilization during growth. - Highlights: • Microstructure of Y 2 O 3 thin films • Measurements of residual stresses in the thin films • Modeling of a triaxial residual stress state • Stress-induced stabilization of non-equilibrium phase

  18. Rare earth sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Shatskij, V.M.; Pokrovskij, A.N.; Chizhov, S.M.; Bal'kina, T.I.; Suponitskij, Yu.L.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental works on the study of synthesis conditions, structure and physico-chemical properties of rare earth, scandium and yttrium sulfates, have been generalized. Phase diagrams of solubility and fusibility, thermodynamic and crystallochemical characteristics, thermal stability of hydrates and anhydrous sulfates of rare earths, including normal, double (with cations of alkali and alkaline-earth metals), ternary and anion-mixed sulfates of rare earths, as well as their adducts, are considered. The state of ions of rare earths, scandium and yttrium in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions is discussed. Data on the use of rare earth sulfates are given

  19. Structure, thermal stability and resistance under external irradiation of rare earths and molybdenum-rich alumino-borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouard, N.

    2011-01-01

    In France, the highly radioactive nuclear liquid wastes arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing (fission products + minor actinides (FPA)) are currently immobilized in an alumino-borosilicate glass called 'R7T7'. In the future, the opportunity of using new alumino-borosilicate glass compositions (HTC glasses) is considered in order to increase the waste loading in glasses and thus significantly decrease the number of glass canisters. However, the increase of the concentration of FPA could lead to the crystallization of rare-earth-rich phases (Ca 2 RE 8 (SiO 4 ) 6 O 2 ) or molybdenum-rich phases (CaMoO 4 , Na 2 MoO 4 ) during melt cooling, which can modify the confinement properties of the glass (chemical durability, self-irradiation resistance..), particularly if they can incorporate radionuclides α or β in their structure. This thesis can be divided into two parts: The first part deals with studying the relationship that can occur between the composition, the structure and the crystallization tendency of simplified seven oxides glasses, belonging to the SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -Na 2 O-CaO-MoO 3 -Nd 2 O 3 system and derived from the composition of the HTC glass at 22,5 wt. % in FPA. The impact of the presence of platinoid elements (RuO 2 in our case) on the crystallization of the different phases is also studied. The second part deals with the effect of actinides α decays and more particularly of nuclear interactions essentially coming from recoil nuclei (simulated here by heavy ions external irradiations) on the behaviour under irradiation of an alumino-borosilicate glass containing apatite Ca 2 Nd 8 (SiO 4 ) 6 O 2 crystals, that can incorporate actinides in their structure. Two samples containing apatite crystals with different size are studied, in order to understand the impact of microstructure on the irradiation resistance of this kind of material. (author) [fr

  20. Linking craton stability and deep earth processes using thermochronology; a case study in the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, C. P.; Flowers, R. M.; Zhong, S.; Metcalf, J. R.; Kohn, B. P.

    2017-12-01

    Ancient, cratonic continental interiors are often presumed to be stable in the long term, neither accumulating nor shedding significant amounts of overlying sediment. However, recent low-temperature thermochronologic work suggests that such long term stability is an overly simplistic view and that forces besides plate tectonics, such as dynamic topography, may play a significant role. New apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and apatite fission track (AFT) data from Archean-Proterozoic basement rocks along a 1400km NW-SE transect in the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield record a spatially variable thermal history for the craton in Paleozoic through the end of Mesozoic time. Dates range from 600­­­­­­±60 Ma (AHe) and 529­±48 Ma (AFT) in the west to 184±14 Ma (AHe) and 174±9 Ma (AFT) in the east. Tectonic activity within the Superior Province ceased by 1.8 Ga, with the latest activity at the margins ending at 1 Ga. Widespread resetting of both AHe and AFT systems post 1 Ga is most likely due to regional scale burial at one or more times since the Cambrian. The temperature sensitivity of the AHe and AFT systems (30-90°C and 60-120°C, respectively) require at least a few km of burial across the craton that has since been stripped away. Preliminary inverse thermal history models, utilizing geologic constraints and radiation damage effects on He diffusion in apatite, indicate significant reheating in the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic (37 to >120°C) and a possible lesser reheating event since the mid Mesozoic (geothermal gradient and 0°C surface temperature, burial in some areas must have been at least 2-5km in the Paleozoic and was <4km in the Mesozoic. These burial and denudation patterns do not correlate with global sea level changes, making dynamic topography a good candidate for a driving mechanism. New AHe data from kimberlites emplaced in the early to mid-Jurassic will provide an important new constraint on the post-Jurassic thermal history of the Superior

  1. Observations on resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.A.; Finn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several results on resistive wall modes and their application to tokamaks are presented. First, it is observed that in the presence of collisional parallel dynamics there is an exact cancellation to lowest order of the dissipative and sound wave effects for an ideal Ohm's law. This is easily traced to the fact that the parallel dynamics occurs along the perturbed magnetic field lines for such electromagnetic modes. Such a cancellation does not occur in the resistive layer of a tearing-like mode. The relevance to models for resistive wall modes using an electrostatic Hammett-Perkins type operator to model Landau damping will be discussed. Second, we observe that with an ideal Ohm's law, resistive wall modes can be destabilized by rotation in that part of parameter space in which the ideal MHD modes are stable with the wall at infinity. This effect can easily be explained by interpreting the resistive wall instability in terms of mode coupling between the backward stable MHD mode and a stable mode locked into the wall. Such an effect can occur for very small rotation for tearing-resistive wall modes in which inertia dominates viscosity in the layer, but the mode is stabilized by further rotation. For modes for which viscosity dominates in the layer, rotation is purely stabilizing. For both tearing models, a somewhat higher rotation frequency gives stability essentially whenever the tearing mode is stable with a perfectly conducting wall. These tearing/resistive wall results axe also simply explained in terms of mode coupling. It has been shown that resonant external ideal modes can be stabilized in the presence of resistive wall and resistive plasma with rotation of order the nominal tearing mode growth rate. We show that these modes behave as resistive wall tearing modes in the sense above. This strengthens the suggestion that rotational stabilization of the external kink with a resistive wall is due to the presence of resistive layers, even for ideal modes

  2. Ternary rare earth sulfide CaCe2S4: Synthesis and characterization of stability, structure, and photoelectrochemical properties in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Paola; Orr, Melissa; Galante, Miguel Tayar; Hossain, Mohammad Kabir; Firouzan, Farinaz; Vali, Abbas; Li, Jun; Subramanian, Mas; Longo, Claudia; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Macaluso, Robin T.

    2018-06-01

    A red-orange rare earth ternary chalcogenide, CaCe2S4, was prepared in powder form by solid-state synthesis. The structural details of this compound were determined by powder X-ray diffraction. The optical band gap of CaCe2S4 was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) to be 2.1 eV, consistent with the observed red-orange color. Quantitative colorimetry measurements also support the observed color and band gap of CaCe2S4. Both direct and indirect optical transitions were gleaned from Tauc analyses of the DRS data. Photoelectrochemistry experiments on CaCe2S4 films showed n-type semiconductor behavior. Analyses of these data via the Butler-Gärtner model afforded a flat-band potential of - 0.33 V (vs. Ag/AgCl/KCl 4 M) in pH 9 aqueous sulfite electrolyte. The potential and limitations of this material for solar water splitting and photocatalytic environmental remediation (e.g., dye photodegradation) are finally presented against the backdrop of its photoelectrochemical stability and surface hole transfer kinetics in aqueous electrolytes.

  3. Stabilization of endangered part of structures by building dry brunt brick buttressing, critical case study of plane wall in DKG-North Area, Mohenjo daro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, J. M.; Park, J.

    2013-07-01

    'World Heritage Sites' are places or buildings of outstanding universal value recognized as constituting a world heritage 'for whose protection it is the duty of the international community as a whole to co-operate'. The concept of World Heritage is at the core of the World Heritage Convention, adopted by Heritage List as a means of identifying, protecting, conserving and presenting those parts of the world's natural and cultural heritage that are of sufficient 'outstanding universal value' to be the responsibility of the international community as a whole. By joining the Convention, nation states are pledged to safeguard the WH S by protecting their national heritage. UNESCO in 1972, to which 160 nations have now been adhered. The Convention came into force in 1975 and established a Site in their territory as part of a universally agreed policy for World. Moenjodaro site covering an area of 555 Acres out of which only 10 % of it has been excavated by exposing 50 Kilometer standing walls. The wall of the main street of DK G Area, Mohen jo Daro partially deformed, due to the torque effects this is studied here on a lateral cross wall in the chief house. Furthermore, the resulting behaviour of the bucking wall demonstrates the significant loadbearing capacity of the structure under service conditions and its high sensitivity to imposed changes of the geometry. Although the tensile stresses exceeded the flexural strength at the vertices and the length of the wall, hence both the geometry and condition of this area are critical for the safety of the wall. The results of this study can improve the assessment and thus help in the preservation of many important structures of the metropolitan city. Here the hydrous characteristic of the brick is studied as a general phenomenon, it is observed that the remains of the sites located in Sindh suffered a lot mostly due to age, human neglect variations of atmospheric condition, severe temperature and natural disasters. The main

  4. Stabilization of endangered part of structures by building dry brunt brick buttressing, critical case study of plane wall in DKG-North Area, Mohenjo daro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Shaikh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 'World Heritage Sites' are places or buildings of outstanding universal value recognized as constituting a world heritage 'for whose protection it is the duty of the international community as a whole to co-operate'. The concept of World Heritage is at the core of the World Heritage Convention, adopted by Heritage List as a means of identifying, protecting, conserving and presenting those parts of the world's natural and cultural heritage that are of sufficient 'outstanding universal value' to be the responsibility of the international community as a whole. By joining the Convention, nation states are pledged to safeguard the WH S by protecting their national heritage. UNESCO in 1972, to which 160 nations have now been adhered. The Convention came into force in 1975 and established a Site in their territory as part of a universally agreed policy for World. Moenjodaro site covering an area of 555 Acres out of which only 10 % of it has been excavated by exposing 50 Kilometer standing walls. The wall of the main street of DK G Area, Mohen jo Daro partially deformed, due to the torque effects this is studied here on a lateral cross wall in the chief house. Furthermore, the resulting behaviour of the bucking wall demonstrates the significant loadbearing capacity of the structure under service conditions and its high sensitivity to imposed changes of the geometry. Although the tensile stresses exceeded the flexural strength at the vertices and the length of the wall, hence both the geometry and condition of this area are critical for the safety of the wall. The results of this study can improve the assessment and thus help in the preservation of many important structures of the metropolitan city. Here the hydrous characteristic of the brick is studied as a general phenomenon, it is observed that the remains of the sites located in Sindh suffered a lot mostly due to age, human neglect variations of atmospheric condition, severe temperature and natural

  5. Reinforcement mechanism of multi-anchor wall with double wall facing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kouta; Kobayashi, Makoto; Miura, Kinya; Konami, Takeharu; Hayashi, Taketo

    2017-10-01

    The reinforced soil wall has high seismic performance as generally known. However, the seismic behavior has not been clarified accurately yet, especially on multi-anchor wall with double wall facing. Indefinite behavior of reinforced soil wall during earthquake make us complicated in case with adopting to the abutment, because of arrangement of anchor plate as reinforcement often different according to the width of roads. In this study, a series of centrifuge model tests were carried out to investigate the reinforcement mechanism of multi anchor wall with double wall facing from the perspective of the vertical earth pressure. Several types of reinforce arrangement and rigid wall were applied in order to verify the arch function in the reinforced regions. The test results show unique behavior of vertical earth pressure, which was affected by arch action. All the vertical earth pressure placed behind facing panel, are larger than that of middle part between facing panel despite of friction between backfill and facing panel. Similar results were obtained in case using rigid wall. On the other hands, the vertical earth pressure, which were measured at the 3cm high from bottom of model container, shows larger than that of bottom. This results show the existence of arch action between double walls. In addition, it implies that the wall facing of such soil structure confined the backfill as pseudo wall, which is very reason that the multi anchor wall with double wall facing has high seismic performance.

  6. Functional activity of plasmid DNA after entry into the atmosphere of earth investigated by a new biomarker stability assay for ballistic spaceflight experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora S Thiel

    Full Text Available Sounding rockets represent an excellent platform for testing the influence of space conditions during the passage of Earth's atmosphere and re-entry on biological, physical and chemical experiments for astrobiological purposes. We designed a robust functionality biomarker assay to analyze the biological effects of suborbital spaceflights prevailing during ballistic rocket flights. During the TEXUS-49 rocket mission in March 2011, artificial plasmid DNA carrying a fluorescent marker (enhanced green fluorescent protein: EGFP and an antibiotic resistance cassette (kanamycin/neomycin was attached on different positions of rocket exterior; (i circular every 90 degree on the outer surface concentrical of the payload, (ii in the grooves of screw heads located in between the surface application sites, and (iii on the surface of the bottom side of the payload. Temperature measurements showed two major peaks at 118 and 130 °C during the 780 seconds lasting flight on the inside of the recovery module, while outer gas temperatures of more than 1000 °C were estimated on the sample application locations. Directly after retrieval and return transport of the payload, the plasmid DNA samples were recovered. Subsequent analyses showed that DNA could be recovered from all application sites with a maximum of 53% in the grooves of the screw heads. We could further show that up to 35% of DNA retained its full biological function, i.e., mediating antibiotic resistance in bacteria and fluorescent marker expression in eukaryotic cells. These experiments show that our plasmid DNA biomarker assay is suitable to characterize the environmental conditions affecting DNA during an atmospheric transit and the re-entry and constitute the first report of the stability of DNA during hypervelocity atmospheric transit indicating that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of organics-laden artificial meteorites.

  7. Stability of rare earth complexes with 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole in aqueous-dioxane medium. Ustojchivost' kompleksnykh soedinenij RZEh s 2-(o-oksifenil)benzimidazolom v vodno-dioksanovoj srede

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhrimenko, Z M; Panyushkin, V T; Fedorova, M V [Kubanskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Krasnodar (USSR)

    1990-01-01

    Method of potentiometric titration was used to determine protonation constants of 2-(-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole (pK{sub 1}=4.5; pK{sub 2}=11.30) and stability constants of Pr,Nd,Sm,Eu,Tb,Dy complexes with this ligand. Nonmonotonous change of lgK{sub 1} with increase of ordinal number of rare earth element was revealed.

  8. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  9. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  10. Analytical and Numerical Evaluation of Limit States of MSE Wall Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drusa Marián

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Simplification of the design of Mechanically Stabilized Earth wall structures (MSE wall or MSEW is now an important factor that helps us not only to save a time and costs, but also to achieve the desired results more reliably. It is quite common way in practice, that the designer of a section of motorway or railway line gives order for design to a supplier of geosynthetics materials. However, supplier company has experience and skills, but a general designer does not review the safety level of design and its efficiency, and is simply incorporating into the overall design of the construction project. Actually, large number of analytical computational methods for analysis and design of MSE walls or similar structures are known. The problem of these analytical methods is the verification of deformations and global stability of structure. The article aims to clarify two methods of calculating the internal stability of MSE wall and their comparison with FEM numerical model. Comparison of design approaches allows us to draft an effective retaining wall and tells us about the appropriateness of using a reinforcing element.

  11. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  12. Seismic Stability of Reinforced Soil Slopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzavara, I.; Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades increased research interest has been observed on the dynamic response and stability issues of earth walls and reinforced soil structures. The current study aims to provide an insight into the dynamic response of reinforced soil structures and the potential of the geosynthetics...... to prevent the development of slope instability taking advantage of their reinforcing effect. For this purpose, a onedimensional (SDOF) model, based on Newmark’s sliding block model as well as a two-dimensional (plane-strain) dynamic finite-element analyses are conducted in order to investigate the impact...

  13. Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames Stabilized on Double-Slit Curved Wall-Jet Burner with Simultaneous OH-Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-04-29

    A double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner utilizing a Coanda effect by supplying fuel and air as annular-inward jets over a curved surface was employed to investigate the stabilization characteristics and structure of propane/air turbulent non-premixed flames with varying global equivalence ratio and Reynolds number. Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals were conducted. The burner showed a potential of stable and non-sooting operation for relatively large fuel loading and overall rich conditions. Mixing characteristics in cold flow were first examined using an acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions. PIV measurements revealed that the flow field consisted of a wall-jet region leading to a recirculation zone through flow separation, an interaction jet region resulting from the collision of annular-inward jets, followed by a merged-jet region. The flames were stabilized in the recirculation zone and, in extreme cases, only a small flame seed remained in the recirculation zone. Together with the collision of the slit jets in the interaction jet region, the velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annular jets generate the turbulence. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced by the presence of the flame, particularly in the recirculation zone. Flames with a high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Reynolds numbers. For flames with a low equivalence ratio, local quenching and re-ignition processes maintained flames in the merged jet region, revealing a strong intermittency, which was substantiated by the increased principal strain rates for these flames. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  14. Stability characteristics and structural properties of single- and double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous environment using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Ameri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Structural properties and stability characteristics of single- and double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes functionalized with Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous environment are investigated employing molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Structural and buckling analysis of boron-nitride nanotubes under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN). • Gyration radius increases linearly as the weight percentage of FMN increases. • Presence of water molecules results in more expansion of FMN around BNNTs. • Critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs is higher than that of pure BNNTs. • The critical strain of functionalized BNNTs is found to be lower than that of pure ones. - Abstract: The non-cytotoxic properties of Boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and the ability of stable interaction with biomolecules make them so promising for biological applications. In this research, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structural properties and stability characteristics of single- and double-walled BNNTs under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in vacuum and aqueous environments. According to the simulation results, gyration radius increases by rising the weight percentage of FMN. Also, the results demonstrate that critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs increases in vacuum. Moreover, it is observed that by increasing the weight percentage of FMN, critical force of functionalized BNNTs rises. By contrast, critical strain reduces by functionalization of BNNTs in vacuum. Considering the aqueous environment, it is observed that gyration radius and critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs increase more considerably than those of functionalized BNNTs in vacuum, whereas the critical strains approximately remain unchanged.

  15. Life raft stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnofsky, M. I.; Barnett, J. H., Jr.; Harrison, F. L.; Marak, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An improved life raft stabilizer for reducing rocking and substantially precluding capsizing is discussed. The stabilizer may be removably attached to the raft and is defined by flexible side walls which extend a considerable depth downwardly to one another in the water. The side walls, in conjunction with the floor of the raft, form a ballast enclosure. A weight is placed in the bottom of the enclosure and water port means are provided in the walls. Placement of the stabilizer in the water allows the weighted bottom to sink, producing submerged deployment thereof and permitting water to enter the enclosure through the port means, thus forming a ballast for the raft.

  16. Finite Element Optimised Back Analysis of In Situ Stress Field and Stability Analysis of Shaft Wall in the Underground Gas Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel optimised back analysis method is proposed in this paper. The in situ stress field of an underground gas storage (UGS reservoir in a Turkey salt cavern is analysed by the basic theory of elastic mechanics. A finite element method is implemented to optimise and approximate the objective function by systematically adjusting boundary loads. Optimising calculation is performed based on a novel method to reduce the error between measurement and calculation as much as possible. Compared with common back analysis methods such as regression method, the method proposed can further improve the calculation precision. By constructing a large circular geometric model, the effect of stress concentration is eliminated and a minimum difference between computed and measured stress can be guaranteed in the rectangular objective region. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated and confirmed by its capability on restoring in situ stress field, which agrees well with experimental results. The characteristics of stress distribution of chosen UGS wells are obtained based on the back analysis results and by applying the corresponding fracture criterion, the shaft walls are proven safe.

  17. Effects of rare-earth substitution on the stability and electronic structure of REZnOSb (RE = La-Nd, Sm-Gd) investigated via first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Kai; Man Zhenyong; Cao Qigao; Chen Haohong; Guo Xiangxin; Zhao Jingtai

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The structure stability of REZnOSb decreases with varying rare-earth from La to Gd because of the increased binding energy. Research highlights: → As increasing the atomic number of the RE, the structural stability of REZnOSb decreases. → Varying the rare-earth elements from La to Gd, the covalent interactions between [ZnSb] and [LaO] layer are enhanced by 4f-electrons. → The electrical transport properties of REZnOSb could be improved using the large atomic number of the RE. - Abstract: The structural stability, chemical bonding, Mulliken populations, and charge-density distribution of REZnOSb (RE = La-Nd, Sm-Gd) were investigated by first-principles calculations. Unit cell parameters calculated by the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) are in better agreement with experimental results than those derived from the local density approximation (LDA). Binding energy comparisons indicate that the structural stability of REZnOSb decreases with the increment of the atomic number of the RE, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) results. Semimetal or narrow band-gap semiconductor behaviors are found for selected REZnOSb. Moreover, chemical bonding analysis shows that there exist considerable polar covalent interactions between the participating atoms. It also reveals that the [ZnSb] layers receive some electrons from the [LaO] layers (donor) as an electrons acceptor and holes transport tunnel. The covalent interactions between the [ZnSb] and [LaO] layers, which are enhanced by 4f-electrons of the RE, are supposed to improve the electrical transport properties.

  18. Obtainment of zirconium oxide and partially stabilized zirconium oxide with yttrium and rare earth oxides, from Brazilian zirconite, for ceramic aim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, S.

    1991-05-01

    This work presents experimental results for processing of brazilian zirconite in order to obtain zirconium oxide with Yttrium and Rare Earth oxide by mutual coprecipitation for ceramics purposes. Due to analysis of experimental results was possible to obtain the optimum conditions for each one of technological route stage, such as: alkaline fusion; acid leaching; sulfactation and coprecipitation. (author)

  19. Earth bag dome workshop run by Paulina Wojciechowska – director of Earth Hands and Houses [lectures, research] Sussex, UK; 27 May 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Kolakowski, Marcin M.

    2010-01-01

    Construction of a small earth bag wall in south Sussex: constructing the formwork for entrance, preparing and filling earth bags, ramming layers of earth bags, plastering, artistic sculpturing of the exterior and interior.

  20. Design Analysis and Observed Performance of a Tieback Anchored Pile Wall in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yong Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the design process and service performance of a deep excavation supported by tieback anchored pile walls. The design procedure and design approaches for deep excavation in China are described. Based on the excavation case history for Shenyang, China, design results obtained using the elastic method and the finite element method (FEM are compared and analyzed. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of horizontal wall deformations, internal forces in the wall, earth pressures on the wall, ground surface settlements, and stabilities of the excavation. The similarities and differences between the Chinese code (JGJ 120-2012 and the European code (EN 1997-1 for the design of geotechnical structures are presented based on a design example. Through the comparison, it is indicated that the Chinese code focuses on the design result, while the European code focuses on the design process. The crucial construction methods for reducing construction risk based on the excavation case history are described. The mechanical behaviors of the excavation retained by an anchored pile wall were investigated by analyzing observed field cases. The results provide good, practical guidelines for the design and construction of a tieback anchored pile wall retained excavation in sandy soil.

  1. A unified wall function for compressible turbulence modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, K. C.; Chan, A.

    2018-05-01

    Turbulence modelling near the wall often requires a high mesh density clustered around the wall and the first cells adjacent to the wall to be placed in the viscous sublayer. As a result, the numerical stability is constrained by the smallest cell size and hence requires high computational overhead. In the present study, a unified wall function is developed which is valid for viscous sublayer, buffer sublayer and inertial sublayer, as well as including effects of compressibility, heat transfer and pressure gradient. The resulting wall function applies to compressible turbulence modelling for both isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions with the non-zero pressure gradient. Two simple wall function algorithms are implemented for practical computation of isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions. The numerical results show that the wall function evaluates the wall shear stress and turbulent quantities of wall adjacent cells at wide range of non-dimensional wall distance and alleviate the number and size of cells required.

  2. Effects of the presence of heavy rare earths on the stabilization of the zirconia ceramics - Yttria; Efeito da presenca de terras raras pesadas na estabilizacao das fases de ceramicas de zirconia - itria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazar, D.R.R.; Fancio, E.; Menezes, C.A.B.; Ussui, V.; Bressiani, A.H.A.; Lima, N.B.; Paschoal, J.O.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: drlazar@net.ipen.br

    2000-07-01

    The use of Yttria concentrates has been proposed to substitute the high purity Yttria in the zirconia stabilization. The elements terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium and ytterbium, classified as heavy rare earths, are the main impurities in these concentrates, due to their presence in yttrium ores. Besides that, the chemical similarities of these elements need the utilization of complex purification techniques. Considering the importance of the employed dopant on zirconia crystallization, this work shows the quantitative phases analysis of powders and ceramics of stabilized zirconia doped with 3 and 9 mol % of high purity Yttria and with a 85 wt % Yttria concentrate. This determination was performed using the Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction data. The powders were synthesized by the hydroxides coprecipitation route, which includes treatments with ethanol and butanol, drying, calcination at 800 deg C for 1 hour and milling in a ball mill and in an attrition mill. The ceramics pellets were pressed uniaxially and sintered at 1550 deg C for 1 hour. The powders and sintered pellets were also characterized by X-ray fluorescence analysis, laser diffraction, gas adsorption (B.E.T.), scanning electron microscopy and determination of apparent density by the Archimedes method. The results showed the same stabilization behavior when it was employed high purity Yttria and a concentrate of this oxide. It was also observed the predominating formation of tetragonal and cubic phases when the dopant concentration is 3 and 9 mol %, respectively. (author)

  3. Achieving excellent thermal stability and very high activation energy in an ultrafine-grained magnesium silver rare earth alloy prepared by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan MD, F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Panigrahi, S.K., E-mail: skpanigrahi@iitm.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2016-10-15

    Ultrafine-grained microstructure of a QE22 alloy prepared by Friction Stir processing (FSP) is isochronally annealed to study the thermal stability and grain growth kinetics. The FSPed microstructure of QE22 alloy is thermally stable under ultrafine-grained regime up to 300 °C and the activation energy required for grain growth is found to be exceptionally high as compared to conventional ultrafine-grained magnesium alloys. The high thermal stability and activation energy of the FSPed QE22 alloy is due to Zener pinning effect from thermally stable eutectic Mg{sub 12}Nd and fine precipitates Mg{sub 12}Nd{sub 2}Ag and solute drag effect from segregation of Neodymium (Nd) solute atoms at grain boundaries.

  4. Determination of strength behaviour of slope supported by vegetated crib walls using centrifuge model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu

    2010-05-01

    The crib retaining structures made of wooden/bamboo logs with live plants inside are called vegetative crib walls which are now becoming popular due to their advantages over conventional civil engineering walls. Conventionally, wooden crib walls were dimensioned based on past experiences. At present, there are several guidelines and design standards for machine finished wooden crib walls, but only few guidelines for the design and construction of vegetative log crib walls are available which are generally not sufficient for an economic engineering design of such walls. Analytical methods are generally used to determine the strength of vegetated crib retaining walls. The crib construction is analysed statically by satisfying the condition of static equilibrium with acceptable level of safety. The crib wall system is checked for internal and external stability using conventional monolithic and silo theories. Due to limitations of available theories, the exact calculation of the strength of vegetated wooden/bamboo crib wall cannot be made in static calculation. Therefore, experimental measurements are generally done to verify the static analysis. In this work, a model crib construction (1:20) made of bamboo elements is tested in the centrifuge machine to determine the strength behaviour of the slope supported by vegetated crib retaining wall. A geotechnical centrifuge is used to conduct model tests to study geotechnical problems such as the strength, stiffness and bearing capacity of different structures, settlement of embankments, stability of slopes, earth retaining structures etc. Centrifuge model testing is particularly well suited to modelling geotechnical events because the increase in gravitational force creates stresses in the model that are equivalent to the much larger prototype and hence ensures that the mechanisms of ground movements observed in the tests are realistic. Centrifuge model testing provides data to improve our understanding of basic mechanisms

  5. Plasmid stability in dried cells of the desert cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis and its potential for GFP imaging of survivors on Earth and in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Two GFP-based plasmids, namely pTTQ18-GFP-pDU1(mini) and pDUCA7-GFP, of about 7 kbp and 15 kbp respectively, able to replicate in Chroococcidiopsis sp. CCMEE 029 and CCMEE 123, were developed. Both plasmids were maintained in Chroococcidiopsis cells after 18 months of dry storage as demonstrated by colony PCR, plasmid restriction analysis, GFP imaging and colony-forming ability under selection of dried transformants; thus suggesting that strategies employed by this cyanobacterium to stabilize dried chromosomal DNA, must have protected plasmid DNA. The suitability of pDU1(mini)-plasmid for GFP tagging in Chroococcidiopsis was investigated by using the RecA homolog of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. After 2 months of dry storage, the presence of dried cells with a GFP-RecA(Syn) distribution resembling that of hydrated cells, supported its capability of preventing desiccation-induced genome damage, whereas the rewetted cells with filamentous GFP-RecA(Syn) structures revealed sub-lethal DNA damage. The long-term stability of plasmid DNA in dried Chroococcidiopsis has implication for space research, for example when investigating the recovery of dried cells after Martian and space simulations or when developing life support systems based on phototrophs with genetically enhanced stress tolerance and stored in the dry state for prolonged periods.

  6. Intrinsic Evaporative Cooling by Hygroscopic Earth Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra R. Rempel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The phase change of water from liquid to vapor is one of the most energy-intensive physical processes in nature, giving it immense potential for cooling. Diverse evaporative cooling strategies have resulted worldwide, including roof ponds and sprinklers, courtyard fountains, wind catchers with qanats, irrigated green roofs, and fan-assisted evaporative coolers. These methods all require water in bulk liquid form. The evaporation of moisture that has been sorbed from the atmosphere by hygroscopic materials is equally energy-intensive, however, yet has not been examined for its cooling potential. In arid and semi-arid climates, hygroscopic earth buildings occur widely and are known to maintain comfortable indoor temperatures, but evaporation of moisture from their walls and roofs has been regarded as unimportant since water scarcity limits irrigation and rainfall; instead, their cool interiors are attributed to well-established mass effects in delaying the transmission of sensible gains. Here, we investigate the cooling accomplished by daily cycles of moisture sorption and evaporation which, requiring only ambient humidity, we designate as “intrinsic” evaporative cooling. Connecting recent soil science to heat and moisture transport studies in building materials, we use soils, adobe, cob, unfired earth bricks, rammed earth, and limestone to reveal the effects of numerous parameters (temperature and relative humidity, material orientation, thickness, moisture retention properties, vapor diffusion resistance, and liquid transport properties on the magnitude of intrinsic evaporative cooling and the stabilization of indoor relative humidity. We further synthesize these effects into concrete design guidance. Together, these results show that earth buildings in diverse climates have significant potential to cool themselves evaporatively through sorption of moisture from humid night air and evaporation during the following day’s heat. This finding

  7. First wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite and C/C composite are used recently for the first wall of a thermonuclear device since materials with small atom number have great impurity allowable capacity for plasmas. Among them, those materials having high thermal conduction are generally anisotropic and have an upper limit for the thickness upon production. Then, anisotropic materials are used for a heat receiving plate, such that the surfaces of the heat receiving plate on the side of lower heat conductivity are brought into contact with each other, and the side of higher thermal conductivity is arranged in parallel with small radius direction and the toroidal direction of the thermonuclear device. As a result, the incident heat on an edge portion can be transferred rapidly to the heat receiving plate, which can suppress the temperature elevation at the surface to thereby reduce the amount of abrasion. Since the heat expansion coefficient of the anisotropic materials is great in the direction of the lower heat conductivity and small in the direction of the higher heat conductivity, the gradient of a thermal load distribution in the direction of the higher heat expansion coefficient is small, and occurrence of thermal stresses due to temperature difference is reduced, to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  8. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  9. Mechanical analysis of the dry stone walls built by the Incas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jaime; Vallejo, Luis E.; Estrada, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the retaining walls in the agricultural terraces built by the Incas are analyzed from a mechanical point of view. In order to do so, ten different walls from the Lower Agricultural Sector of Machu Picchu, Perú, were selected using images from Google Street View and Google Earth Pro. Then, these walls were digitalized and their mechanical stability was evaluated. Firstly, it was found that these retaining walls are characterized by two distinctive features: disorder and a block size distribution with a large size span, i.e., the particle size varies from blocks that can be carried by one person to large blocks weighing several tons. Secondly, it was found that, thanks to the large span of the block size distribution, the factor of safety of the Inca retaining walls is remarkably close to those that are recommended in modern geotechnical design standards. This suggests that these structures were not only functional but also highly optimized, probably as a result of a careful trial and error procedure.

  10. Rare earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranstone, D A

    1979-01-01

    Rare earth elements are commonly extracted from the minerals monazite, bastnaesite, and xenotine. New uses for these elements are constantly developing; they have found applications in glass polishing, television tube phosphors, high-strength low-alloy steels, magnets, catalysts, refractory ceramics, and hydrogen sponge alloys. In Canada, rare earths have been produced as byproducts of the uranium mining industry, but there was no production of rare earths in 1978 or 1979. The world sources of and markets for the rare earth elements are discussed.

  11. Synthesis and thermic behaviour (stability and sintering) of rare earth ortho-phosphates; Synthese et comportement thermique (stabilite et frittage) de phosphates de terres rares ceriques ou yttriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, S

    2003-04-01

    Rare earth ortho-phosphates, LnPO{sub 4},nH{sub 2}O (Ln = La, Ce or Y), were synthesized by precipitation in aqueous media. The effect of pH, temperature, reagents stoichiometry and ripening time on the chemical composition and the morphology of the precipitates have been precised. The study of the thermal behaviour showed the presence of meta-phosphates as a secondary phase in the temperature range 1000 C - 1400 C that was very detrimental to the sintering. It is removed by calcining the powders at 1400 C. Thermogravimetry proved to be the best technique in order to insure the purity of the precipitates since it allows the detection of this phase down to a lower threshold than that associated with the other investigated characterization methods (IR or Raman spectrometry, chemical analysis, XRD, DTA). The monazites (La or Ce)PO{sub 4} densify at 1400 C by natural sintering whereas the xenotime YPO{sub 4} is not yet densified at 1500 C. Hot pressing at that temperature is required to its densification. The mechanical properties of the monazites remain low (sf about 120 MPa, K{sub IC} about 1.2 MPa.m{sup 1/2}). The xenotime ceramic is much more mechanically resistant (sf about 320 MPa, K{sub IC} about 1.5 MPa.m{sup 1/2}). An important acicular growth of the grains during the sintering of the xenotime (that occurs also during the synthesis process) is considered to be responsible for the behaviour and properties differences between this material and monazites. (author)

  12. Theoretical survey on M@C_8_0 (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba): Behavior of different alkaline earth metal impacting the chemical stability and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Jin-Bo; Guo, Yi-Jun; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Zhao, Pei; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Structures of mono-metallofullerenes M@C_8_0 (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) that separated in early experiment are determined owning the C_2_v(31920)-C_8_0 cage. The change rule of properties for M@C_8_0 (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) influenced by different inner metal are discussed. As the trapped metal changes from calcium to barium, performance of thermodynamic stabilities for M@C_2_v(31920)-C_8_0, M@C_2_v(31922)-C_8_0, and M@D_5_h(31923)-C_8_0 are significantly different. Orbital analysis suggests that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of Ca@C_2_v(31920)-C_8_0 and Ca@D_5_h(31923)-C_8_0 are mostly located on the trapped metal, whereas reduction reactions of Ca@C_2_v(31920)-C_8_0 and Ca@D_5_h(31923)-C_8_0 occur on the fullerene cage. Natural electron configuration analyses demonstrates that the decentralized electron back-donation of Ba@C_2_v(31920)-C_8_0 would take responsible for the instability of itself. Electronic properties such as electron affinities and ionization potentials are significantly affected by encapsulated metal are also found. Computational UV–visible–NIR spectra for M@C_2_v(31920)-C_8_0 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) are in perfect accord with the spectra obtained experimentally.

  13. Alkaline earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The beryllium ion has a relatively small ionic radius. As a consequence of this small size, its hydrolysis reactions begin to occur at a relatively low pH. To determine the stability and solubility constants, however, the Gibbs energy of the beryllium ion is required. In aqueous solution calcium, like the other alkaline earth metals, only exists as a divalent cation. The size of the alkaline earth cations increases with increasing atomic number, and the calcium ion is bigger than the magnesium ion. The hydrolysis of barium(II) is weaker than that of strontium(II) and also occurs in quite alkaline pH solutions, and similarly, only the species barium hydroxide has been detected. There is only a single experimental study on the hydrolysis of radium. As with the stability constant trend, it would be expected that the enthalpy of radium would be lower than that of barium due to the larger ionic radius.

  14. Theoretical survey on M@C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba): Behavior of different alkaline earth metal impacting the chemical stability and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jin-Bo; Guo, Yi-Jun; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Zhao, Pei; Zhao, Xiang, E-mail: xzhao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2016-08-02

    Structures of mono-metallofullerenes M@C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) that separated in early experiment are determined owning the C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} cage. The change rule of properties for M@C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) influenced by different inner metal are discussed. As the trapped metal changes from calcium to barium, performance of thermodynamic stabilities for M@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80}, M@C{sub 2v}(31922)-C{sub 80}, and M@D{sub 5h}(31923)-C{sub 80} are significantly different. Orbital analysis suggests that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of Ca@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} and Ca@D{sub 5h}(31923)-C{sub 80} are mostly located on the trapped metal, whereas reduction reactions of Ca@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} and Ca@D{sub 5h}(31923)-C{sub 80} occur on the fullerene cage. Natural electron configuration analyses demonstrates that the decentralized electron back-donation of Ba@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} would take responsible for the instability of itself. Electronic properties such as electron affinities and ionization potentials are significantly affected by encapsulated metal are also found. Computational UV–visible–NIR spectra for M@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) are in perfect accord with the spectra obtained experimentally.

  15. Experimental validation of tape springs to be used as thin-walled space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, S.; Tuttle, S. L.; Griffin, D.; Lambert, A.; Boyce, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    With the advent of standardised launch geometries and off-the-shelf payloads, space programs utilising nano-satellite platforms are growing worldwide. Thin-walled, flexible and self-deployable structures are commonly used for antennae, instrument booms or solar panels owing to their lightweight, ideal packaging characteristics and near zero energy consumption. However their behaviour in space, in particular in Low Earth Orbits with continually changing environmental conditions, raises many questions. Accurate numerical models, which are often not available due to the difficulty of experimental testing under 1g-conditions, are needed to answer these questions. In this study, we present on-earth experimental validations, as a starting point to study the response of a tape spring as a representative of thin-walled flexible structures under static and vibrational loading. Material parameters of tape springs in a singly (straight, open cylinder) and a doubly curved design, are compared to each other by combining finite element calculations, with experimental laser vibrometry within a single and multi-stage model updating approach. While the determination of the Young's modulus is unproblematic, the damping is found to be inversely proportional to deployment length. With updated material properties the buckling instability margin is calculated using different slenderness ratios. Results indicate a high sensitivity of thin-walled structures to miniscule perturbations, which makes proper experimental testing a key requirement for stability prediction on thin-elastic space structures. The doubly curved tape spring provides closer agreement with experimental results than a straight tape spring design.

  16. Rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference was held from September 12 to 13, 1984 in Jetrichovice, Czechoslovakia. The participants heard 16 papers of which 4 were inputted in INIS. These papers dealt with industrial separation processes of rare earths, the use of chemical methods of separation from the concentrate of apatite and bastnesite, the effect of the relative permittivity of solvents in the elution of rare earth elements from a cation exchanger, and the determination of the content of different rare earth elements using X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. (E.S.)

  17. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia; Jia, Nana; Yang, Lijun; Su, Dong; Park, Jinseong; Choi, YongMan; Gong, Kuanping

    2014-01-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1

  18. Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  19. WALL-E’s world: animating Badiou’s philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, I.

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates the philosophy of Alain Badiou through Pixar’s 2008 animation ‘WALL-E’. The fictional story tells of a toxic planet Earth long abandoned following an ecological disaster. Humanity now exists in a floating brave new world; a spaceship whose passengers’ everyday existence is drowned by a consumptive slumber. That is, until a robot named WALL-E comes aboard and changes things forever. The purpose of making this connection between philosophy and film is not to trivialize ...

  20. A steep road to climate stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlingstein, P [CEA Saclay, Inst Pierre Simon Laplace, Lab Climate and Environm Sci, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The only way to stabilize Earth's climate is to stabilize the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, but future changes in the carbon cycle might make this more difficult than has been thought. (author)

  1. A steep road to climate stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlingstein, P.

    2008-01-01

    The only way to stabilize Earth's climate is to stabilize the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, but future changes in the carbon cycle might make this more difficult than has been thought. (author)

  2. COMPARISON OF SENSORS FOR RESISTIVE WALL MODE FEEDBACK CONTROL. MILESTONE No.145 ''CONTAINING PLASMA INSTABILITIES WITH METAL WALLS''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STRAIT, E.J.; CHU, M.S.; GAROFALO, A.M.; LAHAYE, R.J.; OKABAYASHI, M.; REIMERDES, H.; SCOVILLE, J.T.; TURNBULL, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 COMPARISON OF SENSORS FOR RESISTIVE WALL MODE FEEDBACK CONTROL MILESTONE No.145 CONTAINING PLASMA INSTABILITIES WITH METAL WALLS. The most serious instabilities in the tokamak are those described by ideal magneto-hydrodynamic theory. These modes limit the stable operating space of the tokamak. The ideal MHD calculations predict the stable operating space of the tokamak may be approximately doubled when a perfectly conducting metal wall is placed near the plasma boundary, compared to the case with no wall (free boundary). The unstable mode distortions of the plasma column cannot bulge out through a perfectly conducting wall. However, real walls have finite conductivity and when plasmas are operated in the regime between the free boundary stability limit and the perfectly conducting wall limit, the unstable mode encountered in that case the resistive wall mode, can leak out through the metal wall, allowing the mode to keep slowly growing. The slow growth affords the possibility of feedback stabilizing this mode with external coils. DIII-D is making good progress in such feedback stabilization research and in 2002 will use an improved set of mode sensors inside the vacuum vessel and closer to the plasma surface which are expected theoretically to improve the ability to stabilize the resistive wall mode

  3. Rotation of a Moonless Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Barnes, Jason W.; Chambers, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We numerically explore the obliquity (axial tilt) variations of a hypothetical moonless Earth. Previous work has shown that the Earth's Moon stabilizes Earth's obliquity such that it remains within a narrow range, between 22.1 deg and 24.5 deg. Without lunar influence, a frequency-map analysis by Laskar et al. showed that the obliquity could vary between 0 deg. and 85 deg. This has left an impression in the astrobiology community that a large moon is necessary to maintain a habitable climate on an Earth-like planet. Using a modified version of the orbital integrator mercury, we calculate the obliquity evolution for moonless Earths with various initial conditions for up to 4 Gyr. We find that while obliquity varies significantly more than that of the actual Earth over 100,000 year timescales, the obliquity remains within a constrained range, typically 20-25 deg. in extent, for timescales of hundreds of millions of years. None of our Solar System integrations in which planetary orbits behave in a typical manner show obliquity accessing more than 65% of the full range allowed by frequency-map analysis. The obliquities of moonless Earths that rotate in the retrograde direction are more stable than those of pro-grade rotators. The total obliquity range explored for moonless Earths with rotation periods shorter than 12 h is much less than that for slower-rotating moonless Earths. A large moon thus does not seem to be needed to stabilize the obliquity of an Earth-like planet on timescales relevant to the development of advanced life.

  4. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  5. Fundamental characteristics and simplified evaluation method of dynamic earth pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nukui, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Ohmiya, Y.

    1989-01-01

    In Japan, a method is commonly used in the evaluation of dynamic earth pressure acting on the underground walls of a deeply embedded nuclear reactor building. However, since this method was developed on the basis of the limit state of soil supported by retaining walls, the behavior of dynamic earth pressure acting on the embedded part of a nuclear reactor building may differ from the estimated by this method. This paper examines the fundamental characteristics of dynamic earth pressure through dynamic soil-structure interaction analysis. A simplified method to evaluate dynamic earth pressure for the design of underground walls of a nuclear reactor building is described. The dynamic earth pressure is fluctuating earth pressure during earthquake

  6. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  7. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Partin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, S.; Zanca, P.

    2005-01-01

    Active magnetic feedback suppression of resistive wall modes is of common interest for several fusion concepts relying on close conducting walls for stabilization of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. In the advanced tokamak without plasma rotation the kink mode is not completely stabilized, but rather converted into an unstable resistive wall mode (RWM) with a growth time comparable to the wall magnetic flux penetration time. The reversed field pinch (RFP) is similar to the advanced tokamak in the sense that it uses a conducting wall for kink mode stabilization. Also both configurations are susceptible to resonant field error amplification of marginally stable modes. However, the RFP has a different RWM spectrum and, in general, a range of modes is unstable. Hence, the requirement for simultaneous feedback stabilization of multiple independent RWMs arises for the RFP configuration. Recent experiments on RWM feedback stabilization, performed in the RFP device EXTRAP T2R [1], are presented. The experimental results obtained are the first demonstration of simultaneous feedback control of multiple independent RWMs [2]. Using an array of active magnetic coils, a reproducible suppression of several RWMs is achieved for the duration of the discharge, 3-5 wall times, through feedback action. An array with 64 active saddle coils at 4 poloidal times 16 toroidal positions is used. The important issues of side band generation by the active coil array and the accompanying coupling of different unstable modes through the feedback action are addressed in this study. Open loop control experiments have been carried out to quantitatively study resonant field error amplification. (Author)

  8. A Study of Aerodynamics in Kevlar-Wall Test Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kenneth Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study is undertaken to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of Kevlar-wall test sections and specifically those containing two-dimensional, lifting models. The performance of the Kevlar-wall test section can be evaluated against the standard of the hard-wall test section, which in the case of the Stability Wind Tunnel (SWT) at Virginia Tech can be alternately installed or replaced by the Kevlar-wall test section. As a first step towards the evaluation of the Kevlar-wall test section aer...

  9. Domain wall engineering through exchange bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.

    2016-01-01

    The control of the structure and position of magnetic domain walls is at the basis of the development of different magnetic devices and architectures. Several nanofabrication techniques have been proposed to geometrically confine and shape domain wall structures; however, a fine tuning of the position and micromagnetic configuration is hardly achieved, especially in continuous films. This work shows that, by controlling the unidirectional anisotropy of a continuous ferromagnetic film through exchange bias, domain walls whose spin arrangement is generally not favored by dipolar and exchange interactions can be created. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that the domain wall width, position and profile can be tuned by establishing an abrupt change in the direction and magnitude of the exchange bias field set in the system. - Highlights: • Micromagnetic simulations study domain walls in exchange biased thin films. • Novel domain wall configurations can be stabilized via exchange bias. • Domain walls nucleate at the boundary of regions with different exchange bias. • Domain wall width and spin profile are controlled by tuning the exchange bias.

  10. Physics of resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igochine, V.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced tokamak regime is a promising candidate for steady-state tokamak operation which is desirable for a fusion reactor. This regime is characterized by a high bootstrap current fraction and a flat or reversed safety factor profile, which leads to operation close to the pressure limit. At this limit, an external kink mode becomes unstable. This external kink is converted into the slowly growing resistive wall mode (RWM) by the presence of a conducting wall. Reduction of the growth rate allows one to act on the mode and to stabilize it. There are two main factors which determine the stability of the RWM. The first factor comes from external magnetic perturbations (error fields, resistive wall, feedback coils, etc). This part of RWM physics is the same for tokamaks and reversed field pinch configurations. The physics of this interaction is relatively well understood and based on classical electrodynamics. The second ingredient of RWM physics is the interaction of the mode with plasma flow and fast particles. These interactions are particularly important for tokamaks, which have higher plasma flow and stronger trapped particle effects. The influence of the fast particles will also be increasingly more important in ITER and DEMO which will have a large fraction of fusion born alpha particles. These interactions have kinetic origins which make the computations challenging since not only particles influence the mode, but also the mode acts on the particles. Correct prediction of the ‘plasma–RWM’ interaction is an important ingredient which has to be combined with external field's influence (resistive wall, error fields and feedback) to make reliable predictions for RWM behaviour in tokamaks. All these issues are reviewed in this paper. (special topic)

  11. Climate in Earth history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, W. H.; Crowell, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Complex atmosphere-ocean-land interactions govern the climate system and its variations. During the course of Earth history, nature has performed a large number of experiments involving climatic change; the geologic record contains much information regarding these experiments. This information should result in an increased understanding of the climate system, including climatic stability and factors that perturb climate. In addition, the paleoclimatic record has been demonstrated to be useful in interpreting the origin of important resources-petroleum, natural gas, coal, phosphate deposits, and many others.

  12. Semi top-down method combined with earth-bank, an effective method for basement construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, B. Q.; Tam, Ng M.

    2018-04-01

    Choosing an appropriate method of deep excavation not only plays a decisive role in technical success, but also in economics of the construction project. Presently, we mainly base on to key methods: “Bottom-up” and “Top-down” construction method. Right now, this paper presents an another method of construction that is “Semi Top-down method combining with earth-bank” in order to take the advantages and limit the weakness of the above methods. The Bottom-up method was improved by using the earth-bank to stabilize retaining walls instead of the bracing steel struts. The Top-down method was improved by using the open cut method for the half of the earthwork quantities.

  13. Physical Analysis Work for Slope Stability at Shah Alam, Selangor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, M. F.; Zaini, M. S. I.

    2018-04-01

    Slope stability analysis is performed to assess the equilibrium conditions and the safe design of a human-made or natural slope to find the endangered areas. Investigation of potential failure and determination of the slope sensitivity with regard to safety, reliability and economics were parts of this study. Ground anchor is designed to support a structure in this study. Ground anchor were implemented at the Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) wall along Anak Persiaran Jubli Perak to overcome the further cracking of pavement parking, concrete deck and building of the Apartments. A result from the laboratory testing of soil sample such as index test and shear strength test were applied to the Slope/W software with regard to the ground anchors that were implemented. The ground anchors were implemented to increase the value of the factor of safety (FOS) of the MSE Wall. The value of the factor of safety (FOS) before implementing the ground anchor was 0.800 and after the ground anchor was implemented the value increase to 1.555. The increase percentage of factor of safety by implementing on stability of slope was 94.38%.

  14. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinjoh, Hirohumi

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of inclusion of rare earth metals in automotive catalysts are discussed

  15. Earth thermics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, M

    1960-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the Earth are described, including terrestrial heat flow, internal temperatures and thermal history. The value of the geothermal gradient has been considered to be 3/sup 0/C/100 m but measured values are slightly different. The values of terrestrial heat flow are relatively constant and are calculated be about 2.3 x 10 to the minus 6 cal/cm/sup 2/ sec (2.3 HFU). The Earth's internal temperature can be calculated from the adiabatic temperature gradient of adiabatic expansion. Using Simon's equation No. 9, a value of 2100-2500/sup 0/C is obtained, this is much lower than it was previously thought to be. The value of 2.3 HFU can easily be obtained from this internal temperature figure.

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... belt typically occurs in elastico-frictional (EF) or quasi-plastic (QP) regimes at ... In contrast, the hanging wall schists and quartzites of the Ramgarh thrust exhibit quasi-plastic deformation structures. ... Journal of Earth System Science | News.

  17. An emerging role of pectic rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Reboul, Rebecca; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a complex network of different polysaccharides and glycoproteins, showing high diversity in nature. The essential components, tethering cell wall are under debate, as novel mutants challenge established models. The mutant ugd2,3 with a reduced supply of the important wall precursor UDP-glucuronic acid reveals the critical role of the pectic compound rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall stability. This polymer seems to be more important for cell wall integrity than the pre...

  18. A geometric derivation of the dyon wall-crossing group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, M.C.N.; Hollands, L.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, using supergravity analysis, a hyperbolic reflection group was found to underlie the structure of wall-crossing, or the discontinuous moduli dependence of the supersymmetric index due to the presence of walls of marginal stability, of the BPS dyons in the N = 4, d = 4 compactification. In

  19. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... is the most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  20. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Maple, T.G.; Sklensky, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    Advances in the use of stabilized rare earth phosphors and of conversion screens using these materials are examined. In particular the new phosphors discussed in this invention consist of oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium with a luminescent activator ion stabilized by an oxychloride or oxyfluoride surface layer and the conversion screens include trivalent cerium as the activator ion. (U.K.)

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. Magnetohydodynamics stability of compact stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, G.Y.; Ku, L.P.; Cooper, W.A.; Hirshman, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Recent stability results of external kink modes and vertical modes in compact stellarators are presented. The vertical mode is found to be stabilized by externally generated poloidal flux. A simple stability criterion is derived in the limit of large aspect ratio and constant current density. For a wall at infinite distance from the plasma, the amount of external flux needed for stabilization is given by Fi = (k2 minus k)=(k2 + 1), where k is the axisymmetric elongation and Fi is the fraction of the external rotational transform. A systematic parameter study shows that the external kink mode in QAS can be stabilized at high beta (approximately 5%) without a conducting wall by magnetic shear via 3D shaping. It is found that external kinks are driven by both parallel current and pressure gradient. The pressure contributes significantly to the overall drive through the curvature term and the Pfirsch-Schluter current

  3. Analysis of Flexible Anchored Hollow WPC Quay Walls of the New Berth in Tur, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ayman

    2017-10-01

    A seawall, also known as a bulkhead or retaining wall, is a structure built to reduce the effects of strong waves and to defend costal land from erosion. Traditionally, seawalls are made of steel, timber or concrete construction. Composite materials, however, have been recently introduced for their ease of installation/maintenance in dry processing, low cost, and environmentally friendly materials. A wood plastic composite (WPC) seawall system has been developed and patented for its unique hollow structure that can give greater stiffness and stability under various external stresses. This paper describes the development of design method used in the analysis of the WPC walls. The main challenge during the physical excavation works is to limit the deformations involved in order to minimize damage on adjacent structures. The deformations depend largely on the excavation and strutting procedures, but also on the properties of the structural elements like the soil, the sheet pile and strutting members. The detailed design procedure involves numerical analyses, national regulations and common practice considerations. The contribution of finite element method in this field was used herein to determine the lateral movements, the bending moments of the wall, the passive earth pressure of the soil and the tensile force exerted by the anchor rods. The overall objectives of this research can be divided into two categories, First calibration of the finite element model for the new Tur quay walls (the case study) and reviewing the results of the steel cross section that chosen and the suggested one. Second, analysis and comparing the results of WPC cross-sections with the designed Steel sheet pile wall (SPW).

  4. Model Tests on the Retaining Walls Constructed from Geobags Filled with Construction Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Hua; Wu, Jiu-jiang; Zou, Jiao-li; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Min; Gu, Chengzhuang

    2016-01-01

    Geobag retaining wall using construction waste is a new flexible supporting structure, and the usage of construction waste to fill geobags can facilitate the construction recycling. In this paper, model tests were performed on geobag retaining wall using construction waste. The investigation was concentrated on the slope top settlement, the distribution characteristics of the earth pressures on retaining walls and horizontal wall displacements, and slope failure modes. The results indicated t...

  5. Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames Stabilized on Double-Slit Curved Wall-Jet Burner with Simultaneous OH-Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    , followed by a merged-jet region. The flames were stabilized in the recirculation zone and, in extreme cases, only a small flame seed remained in the recirculation zone. Together with the collision of the slit jets in the interaction jet region, the velocity

  6. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  7. Performance assessment of MSE abutment walls in Indiana : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report presents a numerical investigation of the behavior of steel strip-reinforced mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) direct bridge abutments under static loading. Finite element simulations were performed using an advanced two-surface boundin...

  8. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia

    2014-04-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1-cyclohexyl-pyrrolidone (CHP) of the two components. The FePc/SWNT nanowires have a higher Fermi level compared to pure FePc (d-band center, DFT. =. -0.69. eV versus -0.87. eV, respectively). Consequently, an efficient channel for transferring electron to the FePc surface is readily created, facilitating the interaction between FePc and oxygen, so enhancing the ORR kinetics. This heterojunction-determined activity in ORR illustrates a new stratagem to preparing non-noble ORR electrocatalysts of significant importance in constructing real-world fuel cells. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  10. Wall Construction; Carpentry: 901892.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The curriculum guide outlines a course designed to provide instruction in floor and wall layout, and in the diverse methods and construction of walls. Upon completion of this course the students should have acquired a knowledge of construction plans and structural foundations in addition to a basic knowledge of mathematics. The course consists of…

  11. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, Lineke

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  12. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  13. Impacts on Explorer 46 from an Earth orbiting population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Explorer 46 was launched into Earth orbit in August 1972 to evaluate the effectiveness of using double-wall structures to protect against meteoroids. The data from the Meteoroid Bumper Experiment on Explorer 46 is reexamined and it is concluded that most of the impacts originated from an Earth orbiting population. The probable source of this orbiting population is solid rocket motors fired in Earth orbit.

  14. DEM Analysis of Backfilled Walls Subjected to Active Translation Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Khosravi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of a retaining wall under active translation mode is investigated numerically. To this end, a series of numerical models is conducted using the discrete element code, PFC2D. The backfill soil is simulated by an assembly of separate cohesionless circular particles. Backfill soil was prepared by pouring soil particles from a specific height under gravity force and giving them enough time for appropriate settlement. Different heights of retaining walls are simulated and the lateral earth pressure on the wall is observed under both at-rest and active conditions. Numerical results compared with predictions from some analytical methods and measurements from physical models. The active state of earth pressure is defined as the earth pressure distribution corresponding to the values of wall displacement where the failure zone in the backfill is fully developed. The numerical results showed that the fully active state of earth pressure occurred at a wall displacement corresponding to the strains required for reaching the critical state in biaxial compressive tests.

  15. Cell wall heterogeneity in root development of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Somssich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signalling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modelling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.

  16. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants.

  17. Halo current and resistive wall simulations of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, H.R.; Zheng Linjin; Kotschenreuther, M.; Park, W.; Jardin, S.; Breslau, J.; Pletzer, A.; Paccagnella, R.; Sugiyama, L.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2005-01-01

    A number of ITER relevant problems in resistive MHD concern the effects of a resistive wall: vertical displacement events (VDE), halo currents caused by disruptions, and resistive wall modes. Simulations of these events have been carried out using the M3D code. We have verified the growth rate scaling of VDEs, which is proportional to the wall resistivity. Simulations have been done of disruptions caused by large inversion radius internal kink modes, as well as by nonlinear growth of resistive wall modes. Halo current flowing during the disruption has asymmetries with toroidal peaking factor up to about 3. VDEs have larger growth rates during disruption simulations, which may account for the loss of vertical feedback control during disruptions in experiments. Further simulations have been made of disruptions caused by resistive wall modes in ITER equilibria. For these modes the toroidal peaking factor is close to 1. Resistive wall modes in ITER and reactors have also been investigated utilizing the newly developed AEGIS (Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution) linear full MHD code, for realistically shaped, fully toroidal equilibria. The AEGIS code uses an adaptive mesh in the radial direction which allows thin inertial layers to be accurately resolved, such as those responsible for the stabilization of resistive wall modes (RWM) by plasma rotation. Stabilization of resistive wall modes by rotation and wall thickness effects are examined. (author)

  18. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  19. Electromagnetic effects involving a tokamak reactor first wall and blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Evans, K. Jr.; Gelbard, E.; Prater, R.

    1980-01-01

    Four electromagnetic effects experienced by the first wall and blanket of a tokamak reactor are considered. First, the first wall provides reduction of the growth rate of vertical axisymmetric instability and stabilization of low mode number interval kink modes. Second, if a rapid plasma disruption occurs, a current will be induced on the first wall, tending to maintain the field formerly produced by the plasma. Third, correction of plasma movement can begin on a time scale much faster than the L/R time of the first wall and blanket. Fourth, field changes, especially those from plasma disruption or from rapid discharge of a toroidal field coil, can cause substantial eddy current forces on elements of the first wall and blanket. These effects are considered specifically for the first wall and blanket of the STARFIRE commercial reactor design study

  20. Wall locking and multiple nonlinear states of magnetic islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Mikael; Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT

    1994-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of magnetic islands is analysed in configurations with multiple resonant magnetic surfaces. The existence of multiple nonlinear steady states, is discussed. These are shown to be associated with states where the dynamics around the different rational surfaces are coupled or decoupled and in the presence of a wall of finite resistivity may correspond wall-locked or non-wall-locked magnetic islands. For the case of strong wall stabilization the locking is shown to consist of two different phases. During the first phase the locking of the plasma at the different rational surfaces occurs. Only when the outermost resonant magnetic surface has locked to the inner surfaces can the actual wall locking process take place. Consequently, wall locking, of a global mode, involving more than one rational surface, can be prevented by the decoupling of the resonant magnetic surfaces by plasma rotation. Possible implications on tokamak experiments are discussed. (author)

  1. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  2. Cable Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottura, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Superconductor stability is at the core of the design of any successful cable and magnet application. This chapter reviews the initial understanding of the stability mechanism, and reviews matters of importance for stability such as the nature and magnitude of the perturbation spectrum and the cooling mechanisms. Various stability strategies are studied, providing criteria that depend on the desired design and operating conditions.

  3. Multibunch resistive wall instability damping with feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhabitskij, V.M.; Korenev, I.L.; Yudin, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of multibunch transverse resistive wall instability damping with feedback is development. The system of coupling equations is obtained for description of bunched beam motion. The general solution and eigen frequencies are found. But for two bunches or multi bunches the tune splitting is found. The band of the tune splitting is calculated. The influence of the tune splitting on the damper system stability is discussed. 14 refs

  4. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  5. Fusion: first wall problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the relevant elementary atomic processes which are expected to be of significance to the first wall of a fusion reactor are reviewed. Up to the present, most investigations have been performed at relatively high ion energies, typically E greater than 5 keV, and even in this range the available data are very poor. If the plasma wall interaction takes place at energies of E greater than 1 keV the impurity introduction and first wall erosion which will take place predominantly by sputtering, will be large and may severely limit the burning time of the plasma. The wall bombardment and surface erosion will presumably not decrease substantially by introducing a divertor. The erosion can only be kept low if the energy of the bombarding ions and neutrals can be kept below the threshold for sputtering of 1 to 10 eV. 93 refs

  6. Plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER

  7. Dynamic wall demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsui, L.; Mayhew, W.

    1990-12-01

    The dynamic wall concept is a ventilation strategy that can be applied to a single family dwelling. With suitable construction, outside air can be admitted through the exterior walls of the house to the interior space to function as ventilation air. The construction and performance monitoring of a demonstration house built to test the dynamic wall concept in Sherwood Park, Alberta, is described. The project had the objectives of demonstrating and assessing the construction methods; determining the cost-effectiveness of the concept in Alberta; analyzing the operation of the dynamic wall system; and determining how other components and systems in the house interact with the dynamic wall. The exterior wall construction consisted of vinyl siding, spun-bonded polyolefin-backed (SBPO) rigid fiberglass sheathing, 38 mm by 89 mm framing, fiberglass batt insulation and 12.7 mm drywall. The mechanical system was designed to operate in the dynamic (negative pressure) mode, however flexibility was provided to allow operation in the static (balanced pressure) mode to permit monitoring of the walls as if they were in a conventional house. The house was monitored by an extensive computerized monitoring system. Dynamic wall operation was dependent on pressure and temperature differentials between indoor and outdoor as well as wind speed and direction. The degree of heat gain was found to be ca 74% of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Temperature of incoming dynamic air was significantly affected by solar radiation and measurement of indoor air pollutants found no significant levels. 4 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. The practicality of defensive ice walls: How would the great ice wall in Game of Thrones hold up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truffer, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Game of Thrones great ice wall is a colossal feature stretching several hundred miles and over 200 m high. Its purpose is to defend the realm from the wildlings. It is generally pictured as a near vertical wall. An ice wall of these proportions poses interesting challenges, mainly because ice acts as a non-linear shear-thinning fluid. A 200 m high vertical wall would create a large effective stress near its base of almost 1.8 MPa. Typical stresses responsible for ice flow in glaciers and ice sheets are more than a magnitude lower (0.1 MPa). Extrapolating a commonly used flow law for temperate ice to such high stresses would lead to strain rates at the bottom of the wall in excess of 1/day, meaning the wall would rapidly collapse and spread laterally under its own weight. To keep the wall stable, it would help to cool it significantly, as the flow of ice is also very temperature dependent. Cooling to a chilly -40 C would reduce strain rates by two orders of magnitude, but this still leads to significant slumping of the wall within just a few weeks. A time-dependent similarity solution for simplified ice flow equations that describe the evolving shape of the ice wall was provided by Halfar (1981), and demonstrates the rapid decay of the wall. A simple estimate can be derived by assuming that ice is a perfectly plastic fluid, able to maintain a basal shear stress of about 0.1 MPa. A stable ice wall would then spread laterally to about 4 km width. The resulting slope would only be steep at the very margin and the ice wall would loose much of its defensive capabilities. I conclude that the ice wall as proposed would not be a practicable defense under typical Earth conditions, and special magical powers would be necessary to maintain its shape, even for just a few days.

  9. Our sustainable Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbach, Raymond L

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that the Earth has been warming monotonically since 1980. Transient to equilibrium temperature changes take centuries to develop, as oceans are slow to respond to atmospheric temperature changes. Atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, from ice core and observatory measurements, display consistent increases from historical averages, beginning in about 1880, and can be associated with the industrial revolution. The climactic consequences of this human dominated increase in atmospheric CO 2 define a geologic epoch that has been termed the 'Anthropocene.' The issue is whether this is a short term, relatively minor change in global climate, or an extreme deviation that lasts for thousands of years. Eight 'myths' that posit the former are examined in light of known data. The analysis strongly suggests the latter. In order to stabilize global temperatures, sharp reductions in CO 2 emissions are required: an 80% reduction beginning in 2050. Two examples of economically sustainable CO 2 emission reduction demonstrate that technological innovation has the potential to maintain our standard of living while stabilizing global temperatures.

  10. Orbital wall fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Toshitaka; Ishio, Ken-ichirou; Yoshinami, Hiroyoshi; Kuriyama, Jun-ichi; Hirota, Yoshiharu.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 59 cases of mild facial fractures (simple orbital wall fractures, 34 cases, other facial fractures, 25 cases) with the clinical suspects of orbital wall fractures were evaluated both by conventional views (Waters' and Caldwell views) and coronal CT scans. Conventional views were obtained, as an average, after 4 days and CT after 7 days of injuries. Both the medial wall and the floor were evaluated at two sites, i.e., anterior and posterior. The ethmoid-maxillary plate was also included in the study. The degree of fractures was classified as, no fractures, fractures of discontinuity, dislocation and fragmentation. The coronal CT images in bone window condition was used as reference and the findings were compared between conventional views and CT. The correct diagnosis was obtained as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 78%, posterior, 73%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 72%, posterior, 72%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (64%). The false positive diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior only, 13%), medial orbital wall (anterior only, 7%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (11%). The false negative diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 9%, posterior, 10%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 21%, posterior, 28%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (21%). The results were compared with those of others in the past. (author)

  11. Stability of the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.N.

    1979-12-01

    The stability of a collisionless sheath joined to a plasma in the presence of secondary emission of electrons from the sheath boundary is examined in the fluid approximation. Instability is unlikely to occur under floating conditions but if significant currents flow corresponding to increased wall-plasma potentials the system can go unstable. (author)

  12. The thermal performance of earth buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heathcote, K.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the theoretical basis for the thermal performance of earth walls and links it to some test results on buildings constructed by the author, and to their predicted performance using a sophisticated computer modelling program. The analysis shows that for all earth walls the steady state thermal resistance is low but that for walls greater than about 450 mm thick the cyclic thermal resistance is high and increases exponentially. Whilst the steady state resistance of all thickness walls is low and results in higher than normal average temperatures in summer and lower than normal in winter the ability of thick earth walls to even out the swings in temperature is thought to be responsible for the materials reputation. The paper notes that good passive design principles (such as providing internal thermal mass and large areas of glazing for winter performance will greatly improve the performance of earth buildings with thin walls, but it is the author’s opinion that external earth walls should be at least 450 mm thick to gain the full benefit of thermal mass.

    Este artículo examina la base teórica del comportamiento térmico de las paredes de tierra y la relaciona con varios resultados de test realizados sobre edificios construidos por el autor, y con su comportamiento previsto utilizando un sofisticado programa de modelado por ordenador. El análisis muestra que la resistencia térmica constante es baja para todas las paredes de tierra, pero que para muros con un grosor mayor que 450 mm la resistencia térmica cíclica es alta y se incrementa exponencialmente. Mientras que la resistencia térmica constante de las paredes de cualquier grosor es baja y se traduce en temperaturas más altas que la media en verano y más bajas que la media en invierno, la capacidad de las paredes gruesas de tierra para amortiguar las variaciones de temperatura es la responsable de la reputación de los materiales. El artículo señala que los

  13. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  14. Effect of plastic soil on a retaining wall subjected to surcharge loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Juari Khawla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variation and climatic changes play a significant role that affects the stresses exerted on a retaining wall, and the state of stresses in the soil mass behind the wall especially for highly expansive soil. These stresses resulted in the wall moving either away or towards the soil. In this study, a laboratory physical model of the retaining wall formed of a box having (950×900×600 mm dimensions with one side representing the wall being developed. After the soil being laid out in the box in specified layers, specified conditions of saturation and normal stresses were applied. The wall is allowed to move horizontally in several distances (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 , 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 mm, and the stresses being measured, then the vertical loading was released. The main measured variables during the tests are; the active and passive earth pressures, vertical movement of the soil, total suction and time. Results showed that the lateral earth pressure along the depth of the wall largely decreased when wall moved away from the soil. Total suction was slightly affected during wall’s movement. At unloading stage, the lateral earth pressure decreased at the upper half of wall height, but increased at the other wall part. Total suction was increased at all depths during this stage.

  15. Seismic rehabilitation and analysis of Chaohe earth dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Zeng, Xiangwu

    2005-12-01

    Stability of earth dams during earthquakes has been a major concern for geotechnical engineers in seismic active regions. Liquefaction induced slope failure occurred at the upstream slope of a major earth dam in the suburb of Beijing, China, during the 1976 Tangshan Earthquake. The gravelly soil with loose initial condition liquefied under relatively small ground vibration. In recent years, a major seismic rehabilitation project was carried out on a similar earth dam nearby using dumped quarry stone. Seismic stability analysis was carried out using model test, finite element simulation, and pseudo-static slope stability program after taking into account the influence of excess pore pressure.

  16. Spheromak tilting and its stability control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Sato, T.

    1983-01-01

    Spheromak tilting instability was studied. A numerical technique to create a rather arbitrarily-shaped spheromak like the one with a flux hole was investigated. The dynamics governing the tilting instability, namely, the influence of the magnetic index, the toroidal current (q-profile) and the resistivity upon the tilting growth rate, and the roles of magnetc reconnection upon the nonlinear development were studied. The best way to control the tilting instability was invented. The stabilizing effects of the vertical wall, the isolated conducting cylindrical belt, and the horizontal wall were studied. Central pole stabilization was also investigated. The influence of the wall condition, namely, whether the wall acted as a flux conserver in the spheromak creation stage or not is discussed. The present study has shown that the three- dimensional simulation is indeed useful and practical in not only studying the underlying physics but also finding a stabilization technique of spheromaks. (Kato, T.)

  17. Initial Ferritic Wall Mode studies on HBT-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Navratil, G. A.

    2013-10-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective US component test facility and DEMO. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will provide crucial physics for these experiments. Although the ferritic wall mode (FWM) was seen in a linear machine, the FWM was not observed in JFT-2M, probably due to eddy current stabilization. Using its high-resolution magnetic diagnostics and positionable walls, HBT-EP has begun exploring the dynamics and stability of plasma interacting with high-permeability ferritic materials tiled to reduce eddy currents. We summarize a simple model for plasma-wall interaction in the presence of ferromagnetic material, describe the design of a recently-installed set of ferritic shell segments, and report initial results. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  18. Why Earth Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes Earth science. The study of Earth science provides the foundation for an understanding of the Earth, its processes, its resources, and its environment. Earth science is the study of the planet in its entirety, how its lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere work together as systems and how they affect…

  19. Kinetic wall from Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godolphin, D.

    1985-05-01

    An unusual solar mass wall is described. At the turn of a handle it can change from a solar energy collector to a heat-blocker. An appropriate name for it might be the rotating prism wall. An example of the moving wall is at work in an adobe test home in Sede Boqer. Behind a large south-facing window stand four large adobe columns that are triangular in plan. One face of each of them is painted black to absorb sunlight, a second is covered with panels of polystyrene insulation, and a third is painted to match the room decor. These columns can rotate. On winter nights, the insulated side faces the glass, keeping heat losses down. The same scheme works in summer to keep heat out of the house. Small windows provide ventilation.

  20. First Exploratory Study on the Ageing of Rammed Earth Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Quoc-Bao; Morel, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Rammed earth (RE) is attracting renewed interest throughout the world thanks to its “green” characteristics in the context of sustainable building. In this study, the ageing effects on RE material are studied on the walls which have been constructed and exposed for 22 years to natural weathering. First, mechanical characteristics of the “old” walls were determined by two approaches: in-situ dynamic measurements on the walls; laboratory tests on specimens which had been cut from the walls. Then, the walls’ soil was recycled and reused for manufacturing of new specimens which represented the initial state. Comparison between the compressive strength, the Young modulus of the walls after 22 years on site and that of the initial state enables to assess the ageing of the studied walls. PMID:28787920

  1. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  2. Meeting the challenge of constructing a uniquely difficult barrier wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamnes, R.L.; Orlean, H.M.; Thompson, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    A soil-bentonite vertical barrier wall with intersecting and round corners was constructed in complex geology and steep terrain to enclose and dewater a 1.4 hectare (3.5 acre) area once used for hazardous waste lagoons and landfills at the Queen City Farms (QCF) Superfund site in Maple Valley, Washington. The barrier system, including cap and barrier wall, was designed to contain light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL), in addition to subsurface soil and ground water contaminated with chromium, polychlorinated biphenyls, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, trichloroethylene, dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride in the dissolved-phase. These contaminants threaten a drinking water aquifer beneath the site. Constructing the vertical barrier was a challenge due to steep slopes of 20 percent along the alignment (19.2 meter elevation change in the top of the wall), a 22.5 meter (75 foot) design wall depth, heavily consolidated clays and silts, open works gravels (gravel without finer soils), and geologic discontinuity. The barrier wall is keyed into either a glacial till or thin clayey-silt aquitard. Extensive earth moving, stepped walls and many construction techniques were used to enable construction of this barrier wall. Commonly accepted constructability criteria would have discouraged the construction of this wall

  3. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  4. Vessel Wall Reaction after Vena Cava Filter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, Arend; Elstrodt, Jan M.; Nikkels, Peter G.J.; Tiebosch, Anton T.M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the interaction between the Cordis Keeper vena caval filter and vessel wall in aporcine model.Methods: Implantation of the filter was performed in five pigs. Radiologic data concerning inferior vena cava(IVC) diameter and filter patency, filter leg span, and stability were collected. At 2 or 6 months post-implantation, histopathologic analysis of the IVC wall was performed.Results: All filters remained patent with no evidence of migration. However, at 6 months follow-up, two legs of one filter penetrated the vessel wall and were adherent to the liver. These preliminary results suggest that with the observed gradual increase in the filter span, the risk of caval wall penetration increases with time, especially in a relatively small IVC(average diameter 16 mm).Conclusion: The Cordis Keeper filter was well tolerated, but seems to be prone to caval wall penetration in the long term

  5. Use of reinforced soil wall to support steam generator transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davie, J.R.; Wang, J.T.; Gladstone, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Consumers Power Company had the two steam generators at its Palisades Nuclear Plant in Michigan replaced in November 1990. This replacement was accomplished through a 26-foot wide by 28-foot high opening cut into the wall of the containment building, about 45 feet above the original ground surface. Because this ground surface was at an approximately 3-H:1-V slope, leveling was required before replacement in order to provide access for the steam generators and adequate support for the heavy-duty gantry crane system used to transfer the generators. A 25-foot high reinforced soil wall was constructed to achieve the level surface. This paper describes the design and construction of the heavily loaded reinforced soil wall, including ground improvement measures required to obtain adequate wall stability. The performance of the wall under test loading will also be presented and discussed

  6. eWALL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriazakos, Sofoklis; Mihaylov, Mihail; Anggorojati, Bayu

    2016-01-01

    challenge with impact in multiple sectors. In this paper we present an innovative ICT solution, named eWALL, that aims to address these challenges by means of an advanced ICT infrastructure and home sensing environment; thus differentiating from existing eHealth and eCare solutions. The system of e...

  7. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as liposuction , which is another way to remove fat. But, abdominal wall surgery is sometimes combined with liposuction. ... from the middle and lower sections of your abdomen to make it firmer ... removes excess fat and skin (love handles) from the sides of ...

  8. Occupy Wall Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael J.; Bang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional...

  9. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Carriquiry, L.

    2003-01-01

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  10. Our Sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Raymond L.

    2013-03-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that the Earth has been warming monotonically since 1980. Transient to equilibrium temperature changes take centuries to develop, as the upper levels of the ocean are slow to respond to atmospheric temperature changes. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations, from ice core and observatory measurements, display consistent increases from historical averages, beginning in about 1880. They can be associated with the use of coal ecause of the spread of the industrial revolution from Great Britain to the European continent and beyond. The climactic consequence of this human-dominated increase in atmospheric CO2 has been suggested to define a geologic epoch, termed the ``Anthropocene.'' This could be a short term, relatively minor change in global climate, or an extreme deviation that lasts for thousands of years. In order to stabilize global temperatures, sharp reductions in CO2 emissions are required: an 80% reduction beginning in 2050. U.S. emissions have declined sharply recently because of market conditions leading to the substitution of natural gas for coal for electricity generation. Whether this is the best use for this resource may be questioned, but it nevertheless reduces CO2 production by 67% from a coal-fired power plant, well on the way to the 80% reduction required for global temperature stabilization. Current methods for CO2 capture and storage are not cost effective, and have been slow (if not absent) to introduce at scale. This paper describes research into some potentially economically feasible approaches: cost-effective capture and storage of CO2 from injection of flue gas into subterranean methane-saturated aquifers at the surface; fuels from sunlight without CO2 production; and large-scale electrical energy storage for intermittent (and even constant) electricity generating sources.

  11. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  12. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  13. Rare earth germanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar', I.A.; Vinogradova, N.V.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth germanates attract close attention both as an independent class of compounds and analogues of a widely spread class of natural and synthetic minerals. The methods of rare earth germanate synthesis (solid-phase, hydrothermal) are considered. Systems on the basis of germanium and rare earth oxides, phase diagrams, phase transformations are studied. Using different chemical analysese the processes of rare earth germanate formation are investigated. IR spectra of alkali and rare earth metal germanates are presented, their comparative analysis being carried out. Crystal structures of the compounds, lattice parameters are studied. Fields of possible application of rare earth germanates are shown

  14. Resonant tunneling across a ferroelectric domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Tao, L. L.; Velev, J. P.; Tsymbal, E. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations, we explore electron transport properties of a ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) with an embedded head-to-head ferroelectric domain wall, using first-principles density-functional theory calculations. We consider a FTJ with L a0.5S r0.5Mn O3 electrodes separated by a BaTi O3 barrier layer and show that an in-plane charged domain wall in the ferroelectric BaTi O3 can be induced by polar interfaces. The resulting V -shaped electrostatic potential profile across the BaTi O3 layer creates a quantum well and leads to the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas, which stabilizes the domain wall. The confined electronic states in the barrier are responsible for resonant tunneling as is evident from our quantum-transport calculations. We find that the resonant tunneling is an orbital selective process, which leads to sharp spikes in the momentum- and energy-resolved transmission spectra. Our results indicate that domain walls embedded in FTJs can be used to control the electron transport.

  15. Evaluation of performance under fire of compressed earth blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Buson, M.; Lopes, N.; Varum, H.; Sposto, R. M.; Real, P. Vila

    2012-01-01

    In this paper are presented and discussed the main results of fire resistance tests on walls made of soil-cement and Kraftterra compressed earth blocks (CEB). Within this research it was intended to evaluate the fire resistance of walls made with CEB, with and without cellulose pulp incorporation deriving from recycling of cement sacks. Firstly, it is described the Kraftterra production processes and the fire resistance test campaign. Then, the performance of the blocks under anal...

  16. Slope Stability. CEGS Programs Publication Number 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestrong, Raymond

    Slope Stability is one in a series of single-topic problem modules intended for use in undergraduate and earth science courses. The module, also appropriate for use in undergraduate civil engineering and engineering geology courses, is a self-standing introduction to studies of slope stability. It has been designed to supplement standard…

  17. Space sickness on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooij, S. A. E.; Bos, J. E.; Groen, E. L.; Bles, W.; Ockels, W. J.

    2007-09-01

    During the first days in space, i.e., after a transition from 1G to 0G, more than 50% of the astro- (and cosmonauts) suffer from the Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS).The symptoms of SAS, like nausea and dizziness, are especially provoked by head movements. Astronauts have mentioned close similarities between the symptoms of SAS and the symptoms they experienced after a 1 hour centrifuge run on Earth, i.e., after a transition from 3G to 1G (denoted by Sickness Induced by Centrifugation, SIC). During several space missions, we related susceptibility to SAS and to SIC in 11 astronauts and found 4 of them being susceptible to both SIC and SAS, and 7 being not susceptible to SIC nor to SAS. This correspondence in susceptibility suggests that SIC and SAS share the same underlying mechanism. To further study this mechanism, several vestibular parameters have been investigated (e.g. postural stability, vestibularly driven eye movements, subjective vertical). We found some striking changes in individual cases that are possibly due to the centrifuge run. However, the variability between subjects generally is very large, making physiological links to SIC and SAS still hard to find.

  18. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  19. Rising damp in building walls: the wall base ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, A.S.; Delgado, J.M.P.Q.; Freitas, V.P. de [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Laboratorio de Fisica das Construcoes (LFC), Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Porto (Portugal)

    2012-12-15

    This work intends to validate a new system for treating rising damp in historic buildings walls. The results of laboratory experiments show that an efficient way of treating rising damp is by ventilating the wall base, using the HUMIVENT technique. The analytical model presented describes very well the observed features of rising damp in walls, verified by laboratory tests, who contributed for a simple sizing of the wall base ventilation system that will be implemented in historic buildings. (orig.)

  20. Stability of cosmological deflagration fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

    2014-05-01

    In a cosmological first-order phase transition, bubbles of the stable phase nucleate and expand in the supercooled metastable phase. In many cases, the growth of bubbles reaches a stationary state, with bubble walls propagating as detonations or deflagrations. However, these hydrodynamical solutions may be unstable under corrugation of the interface. Such instability may drastically alter some of the cosmological consequences of the phase transition. Here, we study the hydrodynamical stability of deflagration fronts. We improve upon previous studies by making a more careful and detailed analysis. In particular, we take into account the fact that the equation of motion for the phase interface depends separately on the temperature and fluid velocity on each side of the wall. Fluid variables on each side of the wall are similar for weakly first-order phase transitions, but differ significantly for stronger phase transitions. As a consequence, we find that, for large enough supercooling, any subsonic wall velocity becomes unstable. Moreover, as the velocity approaches the speed of sound, perturbations become unstable on all wavelengths. For smaller supercooling and small wall velocities, our results agree with those of previous works. Essentially, perturbations on large wavelengths are unstable, unless the wall velocity is higher than a critical value. We also find a previously unobserved range of marginally unstable wavelengths. We analyze the dynamical relevance of the instabilities, and we estimate the characteristic time and length scales associated with their growth. We discuss the implications for the electroweak phase transition and its cosmological consequences.

  1. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable β N close to the ideal with-wall limit, β N wall , with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at β N up to 86% of β N wall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of β N wall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade

  2. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  3. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  4. Early Earth(s) Across Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojzsis, S.

    2014-04-01

    The geochemical and cosmochemical record of our solar system is the baseline for exploring the question: "when could life appear on a world similar to our own?" Data arising from direct analysis of the oldest terrestrial rocks and minerals from the first 500 Myr of Earth history - termed the Hadean Eon - inform us about the timing for the establishment of a habitable silicate world. Liquid water is the key medium for life. The origin of water, and its interaction with the crust as revealed in the geologic record, guides our exploration for a cosmochemically Earth-like planets. From the time of primary planetary accretion to the start of the continuous rock record on Earth at ca. 3850 million years ago, our planet experienced a waning bolide flux that partially or entirely wiped out surface rocks, vaporized oceans, and created transient serpentinizing atmospheres. Arguably, "Early Earths" across the galaxy may start off as ice planets due to feeble insolation from their young stars, occasionally punctuated by steam atmospheres generated by cataclysmic impacts. Alternatively, early global environments conducive to life spanned from a benign surface zone to deep into crustal rocks and sediments. In some scenarios, nascent biospheres benefit from the exogenous delivery of essential bio-elements via leftovers of accretion, and the subsequent establishment of planetary-scale hydrothermal systems. If what is now known about the early dynamical regime of the Earth serves as any measure of the potential habitability of worlds across space and time, several key boundary conditions emerge. These are: (i) availability and long-term stability of liquid water; (ii) presence of energy resources; (iii) accessibility of organic raw materials; (iv) adequate inventory of radioisotopes to drive internal heating; (v) gross compositional parameters such as mantle/core mass ratio, and (vi) P-T conditions at or near the surface suitable for sustaining biological activity. Life could

  5. SUSY QM from three domain walls in a scalar potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima; Lima, A.F. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Unidade Academica de Fisica]. E-mail: aerlima@df.ufcg.edu.br; Bezerra de Mello, E.R.; Bezerra, V.B. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mails: emello@fisica.ufpb.br; valdir@fisica.ufpb.br

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the linear classical stability of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) on three domain wall solutions in a system of three coupled real scalar fields, for a general positive potential with a square form. From a field theoretic superpotential evaluated on the domain states, the connection between the supersymmetric quantum mechanics involving three-component eigenfunctions and the stability equation associated with three classical configurations is elaborated. (author)

  6. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing....

  7. Extended Multiscale Image Segmentation for Castellated Wall Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, M.; Tsuguchi, M.; Chhatkuli, S.; Satoh, T.

    2018-05-01

    Castellated walls are positioned as tangible cultural heritage, which require regular maintenance to preserve their original state. For the demolition and repair work of the castellated wall, it is necessary to identify the individual stones constituting the wall. However, conventional approaches using laser scanning or integrated circuits (IC) tags were very time-consuming and cumbersome. Therefore, we herein propose an efficient approach for castellated wall management based on an extended multiscale image segmentation technique. In this approach, individual stone polygons are extracted from the castellated wall image and are associated with a stone management database. First, to improve the performance of the extraction of individual stone polygons having a convex shape, we developed a new shape criterion named convex hull fitness in the image segmentation process and confirmed its effectiveness. Next, we discussed the stone management database and its beneficial utilization in the repair work of castellated walls. Subsequently, we proposed irregular-shape indexes that are helpful for evaluating the stone shape and the stability of the stone arrangement state in castellated walls. Finally, we demonstrated an application of the proposed method for a typical castellated wall in Japan. Consequently, we confirmed that the stone polygons can be extracted with an acceptable level. Further, the condition of the shapes and the layout of the stones could be visually judged with the proposed irregular-shape indexes.

  8. Cryostatic stability equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydoriak, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    Although criteria for cryostatic stability of superconducting magnets cooled by pool boiling of liquid helium have been widely discussed the same cannot be said for magnets cooled by natural convection or forced flow boiling in channels. Boiling in narrow channels is shown to be qualitatively superior to pool boiling because the recovery heat flux equals the breakaway flux for narrow channels, whereas the two are markedly different in pool boiling. A second advantage of channel boiling is that it is well understood and calculable; pool peak nucleate boiling heat flux has been adequately measured only for boiling from the top of an immersed heated body. Peak boiling from the bottom is much less and (probably) depends strongly on the extent of the bottom surface. Equations are presented by which one can calculate the critical boiling heat flux for parallel wall vertical channels subject to either natural convection or forced flow boiling, with one or both walls heated. The one-heated-wall forced flow equation is discussed with regard to design of a spiral wound solenoid (pancake magnet) having a slippery insulating tape between the windings

  9. Wall insulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostek, P.T.

    1987-08-11

    In a channel specially designed to fasten semi-rigid mineral fibre insulation to masonry walls, it is known to be constructed from 20 gauge galvanized steel or other suitable material. The channel is designed to have pre-punched holes along its length for fastening of the channel to the drywall screw. The unique feature of the channel is the teeth running along its length which are pressed into the surface of the butted together sections of the insulation providing a strong grip between the two adjacent pieces of insulation. Of prime importance to the success of this system is the recent technological advancements of the mineral fibre itself which allow the teeth of the channel to engage the insulation fully and hold without mechanical support, rather than be repelled or pushed back by the inherent nature of the insulation material. After the insulation is secured to the masonry wall by concrete nail fastening systems, the drywall is screwed to the channel.

  10. Shadows on the wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Diana.

    1984-01-01

    Canadian antinuclear groups, because of their shifting stances and fluid overlapping membership, are compared with shadows on a wall. They can be roughly classified as environmental, pacifist, concerned with energy, religious, or dedicated to nuclear responsibility. The author considers that such groups, despite their arguably unrealistic attitudes, have raised public awareness of the ethical, practical and financial aspects of power development in Canada and the world

  11. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason; Johnson, Andrew; Renambot, Luc; Peterka, Tom; Jeong, Byungil; Sandin, Daniel J.; Talandis, Jonas; Jagodic, Ratko; Nam, Sungwon; Hur, Hyejung; Sun, Yiwen

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  12. Light shining through walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  13. Light shining through walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  14. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  15. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  16. Build an Interactive Word Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Word walls visually display important vocabulary covered during class. Although teachers have often been encouraged to post word walls in their classrooms, little information is available to guide them. This article describes steps science teachers can follow to transform traditional word walls into interactive teaching tools. It also describes a…

  17. Stability of Pharmaceuticals in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Y-Uyen

    2009-01-01

    Stability testing is a tool used to access shelf life and effects of storage conditions for pharmaceutical formulations. Early research from the International Space Station (ISS) revealed that some medications may have degraded while in space. This potential loss of medication efficacy would be very dangerous to Crew health. The aim of this research project, Stability of Pharmacotherapeutic Compounds, is to study how the stability of pharmaceutical compounds is affected by environmental conditions in space. Four identical pharmaceutical payload kits containing medications in different dosage forms (liquid for injection, tablet, capsule, ointment and suppository) were transported to the ISS aboard a Space Shuttle. One of the four kits was stored on that Shuttle and the other three were stored on the ISS for return to Earth at various time intervals aboard a pre-designated Shuttle flight. The Pharmacotherapeutics laboratory used stability test as defined by the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), to access the degree of degradation to the Payload kit medications that may have occurred during space flight. Once these medications returned, the results of stability test performed on them were compared to those from the matching ground controls stored on Earth. Analyses of the results obtained from physical and chemical stability assessments on these payload medications will provide researchers additional tools to promote safe and efficacious medications for space exploration.

  18. Model Tests on the Retaining Walls Constructed from Geobags Filled with Construction Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geobag retaining wall using construction waste is a new flexible supporting structure, and the usage of construction waste to fill geobags can facilitate the construction recycling. In this paper, model tests were performed on geobag retaining wall using construction waste. The investigation was concentrated on the slope top settlement, the distribution characteristics of the earth pressures on retaining walls and horizontal wall displacements, and slope failure modes. The results indicated that the ultimate loads that the slope tops with retaining walls could bear were 87.5%~125% higher than that of the slope top without retaining walls. The ultimate loading of strengthened slopes with different slope ratios from 1 : 0.75 to 1 : 0.25 could be reduced by 11.8% to 29.4%. The horizontal displacements of the retaining walls constructed from geobags were distributed in a drum shape, with the greatest horizontal displacements occurring about 1/3~1/2 of the wall height away from the bottom of the wall. As the slope ratio increased, the failure of the slope soil supported by geobag retaining wall using construction waste changed from sliding to sliding-toppling (dominated by sliding and then to toppling-sliding (dominated by toppling. The range of 1/3~1/2 of wall height is the weak part of the retaining walls, which should be strengthened with certain measures during the process of design and construction.

  19. Mission to Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilford, Shelby G.; Asrar, Ghassem; Backlund, Peter W.

    1994-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the Earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic Earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the Earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the Earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment.

  20. Mission to Planet Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.S.; Backlund, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment. 8 refs

  1. Stabilization of the ferromagnetic metallic state in rare earth-doped La0.49X0.01Ca0.50MnO3+δ (X=Nd, Sm, Gd and Yb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, Affia; Hasanain, S.K.; Akhtar, M.J.; Nadeem, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report the effects of disorder induced by a small amount of substitution of the smaller cations (Nd, Sm, Gd and Yb) for La in the La 0.50 Ca 0.50 MnO 3+δ system. With decreasing size of the dopant, the ferromagnetic and metallic state is stabilized while the AFM and insulating behaviour is completely eliminating. The magnetic moment below T c increases in general, with decreasing dopant size. The behaviour is interpreted in terms of the destabilization of the charge ordering (CO) due to the disorder induced by the size mismatch of the cations. Our data support the view that close to the COI-FM phase boundary, the effect of disorder is to weaken the CO that is more sensitive to disorder, whereas it leaves the more robust double exchange relatively unaffected, thereby extending the region in phase space where the FM phase is stable

  2. Vessel wall reaction after vena cava filter placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A; Elstrodt, JM; Nikkels, PGJ; Tiebosch, ATMG

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the interaction between the Cordis Keeper vena caval filter and vessel wall in a porcine model. Methods: Implantation of the filter was performed in five pigs. Radiologic data concerning inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter and filter patency, filter leg span, and stability were

  3. Drilled Shaft Foundations for Noise Barrier Walls and Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    This research project is focused on two primary objectives. The first objective relates to the development of a methodology for using the SPT (Standard Penetration Test) results to design the laterally loaded drilled shafts. The second objective aims...

  4. Creep behavior of soil nail walls in high plasticity index (PI) soils : project summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Soil nailing is a convenient and economic : stabilization method for the reinforcement of existing : excavations by installing threaded steel bars into cuts : or slopes as wall construction progresses from top : down (Figure 1). An aspect of particul...

  5. Regulation of cell wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2007-12-01

    Plant cell walls differ in their amount and composition among various cell types and even in different microdomains of the wall of a given cell. Plants must have evolved regulatory mechanisms controlling biosynthesis, targeted secretion, and assembly of wall components to achieve the heterogeneity in cell walls. A number of factors, including hormones, the cytoskeleton, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, phosphoinositides, and sugar nucleotide supply, have been implicated in the regulation of cell wall biosynthesis or deposition. In the past two years, there have been important discoveries in transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis. Several transcription factors in the NAC and MYB families have been shown to be the key switches for activation of secondary wall biosynthesis. These studies suggest a transcriptional network comprised of a hierarchy of transcription factors is involved in regulating secondary wall biosynthesis. Further investigation and integration of the regulatory players participating in the making of cell walls will certainly lead to our understanding of how wall amounts and composition are controlled in a given cell type. This may eventually allow custom design of plant cell walls on the basis of our needs.

  6. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bödeker, Dietrich [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Moore, Guy D., E-mail: bodeker@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: guymoore@ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can 'run away,' that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ∼ 10{sup 14}. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ∼ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  7. A more general model for the analysis of the rock slope stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    slope stability analysis, the joint surfaces are assumed to be continuous along the potential ... of rock slope stability has many applications in the design of rock slopes, roofs and walls of .... cases the wedge failure analysis can be applied.

  8. Ternary rare-earth bismuthides RE5SiBi 2 and RE5GeBi 2 ( RE=La-Nd, Gd-Er): Stabilization of the β-Yb 5Sb 3-type structure through tetrel substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Stephen D.; Tkachuk, Andriy V.; Bie, Haiying; Blanchard, Peter E. R.; Mar, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Ternary bismuthides RE5TtBi 2 containing rare-earth ( RE=La-Nd, Gd-Er) and tetrel ( Tt=Si, Ge) atoms have been prepared by arc-melting of the elements followed by annealing at 800 °C. They adopt the β-Yb 5Sb 3-type structure (Pearson symbol o P32, space group Pnma, Z=4), as revealed through analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction on Ce 5Si 0.869(4)Bi 2.131(4) and powder X-ray diffraction on Ce 5GeBi 2. Cell parameters for the entire series lie in the ranges of a=12.8-11.8 Å, b=9.6-9.0 Å, and c=8.4-7.9 Å. Solid solubility in Ce 5Si xBi 3- x and Pr 5Si xBi 3- x (approximately 0.9≤ x≤1.2, depending on the RE member) is much more limited compared to the antimonides, consistent with a highly ordered structure in which the two possible anion sites are essentially segregated into a smaller one occupied by Tt atoms (CN7) and a larger one occupied by Bi atoms (CN9). Band structure calculations on La 5SiBi 2 confirm the importance of La-La bonding interactions near the Fermi level. X-ray photoelectron spectra support the presence of partially anionic Bi atoms, as indicated by a small negative binding energy shift relative to elemental Bi. The Ce and Pr members undergo magnetic transitions at low temperatures, possibly involving ferromagnetic interactions, that are strongly influenced by the nature of the Tt atom.

  9. Ternary rare-earth bismuthides RE5SiBi2 and RE5GeBi2 (RE=La-Nd, Gd-Er): Stabilization of the β-Yb5Sb3-type structure through tetrel substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, Stephen D.; Tkachuk, Andriy V.; Bie, Haiying; Blanchard, Peter E.R.; Mar, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Ternary bismuthides RE 5 TtBi 2 containing rare-earth (RE=La-Nd, Gd-Er) and tetrel (Tt=Si, Ge) atoms have been prepared by arc-melting of the elements followed by annealing at 800 o C. They adopt the β-Yb 5 Sb 3 -type structure (Pearson symbol oP32, space group Pnma, Z=4), as revealed through analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction on Ce 5 Si 0.869(4) Bi 2.131(4) and powder X-ray diffraction on Ce 5 GeBi 2 . Cell parameters for the entire series lie in the ranges of a=12.8-11.8 A, b=9.6-9.0 A, and c=8.4-7.9 A. Solid solubility in Ce 5 Si x Bi 3-x and Pr 5 Si x Bi 3-x (approximately 0.9≤x≤1.2, depending on the RE member) is much more limited compared to the antimonides, consistent with a highly ordered structure in which the two possible anion sites are essentially segregated into a smaller one occupied by Tt atoms (CN7) and a larger one occupied by Bi atoms (CN9). Band structure calculations on La 5 SiBi 2 confirm the importance of La-La bonding interactions near the Fermi level. X-ray photoelectron spectra support the presence of partially anionic Bi atoms, as indicated by a small negative binding energy shift relative to elemental Bi. The Ce and Pr members undergo magnetic transitions at low temperatures, possibly involving ferromagnetic interactions, that are strongly influenced by the nature of the Tt atom. -- Graphical Abstract: Tetrel (Si or Ge) and Bi atoms are arranged in an ordered manner in the β-Yb 5 Sb 3 -type structure adopted by RE 5 TtBi 2 . Display Omitted

  10. Reactor advantages of the belt pinch and liquid metal walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J.; Rappaport, H.; Zheng Linjin; Dorland, B.; Miller, R.; Turnbull, A.

    2001-01-01

    MHD stability of highly elongated tokamaks (termed a belt pinch) are considered for high bootstrap fraction cases. By employing high triangularity or indentation, and invoking wall stabilization, and β can be increased by a factor of roughly 3 by increasing κ from 2 to 4. Axisymmetric stability up to κ=4 tolerable by employing a shell which conforms more closely to the boundary than in present experiments. Engineering difficulties with a close fitting shell in a reactor environment may be overcome by employing a liquid lithium alloy shell. Rapid metal flows can lead to potentially deleterious plasma shifts and damping of the flow. (author)

  11. Stabilizing Niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    international intervention in Niger. Their main objective is to secure their own strategic, economic and political interests by strengthening the Nigerien authorities through direct intervention and capacity building activities. For western states reinforcing state security institutions and stabilizing elite...

  12. Rare earths in iron and steelmaking and gaseous desulphurisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, D.A.R.; Subramanian, S.V.; Meng, V.; Kumar, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) additions, either as mischmetal or rare earth silicide, are used in many ladle treatment processes in modern ferrous metallurgy. In ironmaking they provide the basis for the control of graphite morphology in cast irons and in steelmaking additions are made to aluminum-killed steels for desulphurisation and the control of inclusion composition and morphology. Rare earth oxides may also be used in the desulphurisation of medium calorific value gaseous fuels and stack gases. In this paper, Ce-S-O and La-S-O phase stability diagrams are used to determine the role of the rare earths in the external processing of iron and steel, and gaseous desulphurisation

  13. Gravitational waves from domain walls and their implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nakayama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the impact of domain-wall annihilation on the currently ongoing and planned gravitational wave experiments, including a case in which domain walls experience a frictional force due to interactions with the ambient plasma. We show the sensitivity reach in terms of physical parameters, namely, the wall tension and the annihilation temperature. We find that a Higgs portal scalar, which stabilizes the Higgs potential at high energy scales, can form domain walls whose annihilation produces a large amount of gravitational waves within the reach of the advanced LIGO experiment (O5. Domain wall annihilation can also generate baryon asymmetry if the scalar is coupled to either SU(2L gauge fields or the (B−L current. This is a variant of spontaneous baryogenesis, but it naturally avoids the isocurvature constraint due to the scaling behavior of the domain-wall evolution. We delineate the parameter space where the domain-wall baryogenesis works successfully and discuss its implications for the gravitational wave experiments.

  14. Effects of opening in shear walls of 30- storey building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tall towers and multi-storey buildings have fascinated mankind from the beginning of civilization, their construction being initially for defense and subsequently for ecclesiastical purposes. These tall buildings because of its height, is affected by lateral forces due to wind or earthquake actions tends to snap the building in shear and push it over in bending. In general, the rigidity (i.e. Resistance to lateral deflection and stability (i.e. Resistance to overturning moments requirement become more important. Shear walls (Structural walls contribute significant lateral stiffness, strength, and overall ductility and energy dissipation capacity. In many structural walls a regular pattern of openings has to be provided due to various functional requirements such as to accommodate doors, windows and service ducts. Such type of openings reduces the stiffness of the shear wall to some extent depending on the shape and size of the opening. In the present parametric study, efforts are made to investigate and critically assess the effects of various size of openings in shear walls on the responses and behaviors of multi-storey buildings. The 30 storey Prototype buildings with different types of openings in shear wall with and without incorporating the volume of shear wall reduced in the boundary elements are analyzed using software E-TABS using Response spectrum method (1893(Part-1-2002 and Time history method.

  15. Digital Earth – A sustainable Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahavir

    2014-01-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth

  16. Enhanced wall pumping in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenberg, J.; Harbour, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The enhanced wall pumping phenomenon in JET is observed for hydrogen or deuterium plasmas which are moved from the outer (larger major radius) limiter position either to the inner wall or to the top/bottom wall of the vacuum vessel. This phenomenon is analysed by employing a particle recycling model which combines plasma particle transport with particle re-emission from and retention within material surfaces. The model calculates the important experimentally observable quantities, such as particle fluxes, global particle confinement time, plasma density and density profile. Good qualitative agreement is found and, within the uncertainties, the agreement is quantitative if the wall pumping is assumed to be caused by two simultaneously occurring effects: (1) Neutral particle screening at the inner wall and the top/bottom wall is larger than that at the outer limiter because of different magnetic topologies at different poloidal positions; and (2) although most of the particles (≥ 90%) impacting on the wall can be promptly re-emitted, a small fraction (≤ 10%) of them must be retained in the wall for a period of time which is similar to or larger than the global plasma particle confinement time. However, the wall particle retention time need not be different from that of the outer limiter, i.e. pumping can occur when there is no difference between the material properties of the limiter and those of the wall. (author). 45 refs, 18 figs

  17. Revisiting isoreticular MOFs of alkaline earth metals: a comprehensive study on phase stability, electronic structure, chemical bonding, and optical properties of A-IRMOF-1 (A = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ming; Vajeeston, Ponniah; Ravindran, Ponniah; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Tilset, Mats

    2011-06-07

    Formation energies, chemical bonding, electronic structure, and optical properties of metal-organic frameworks of alkaline earth metals, A-IRMOF-1 (where A = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, or Ba), have been systemically investigated with DFT methods. The unit cell volumes and atomic positions were fully optimized with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. By fitting the E-V data into the Murnaghan, Birch and Universal equation of states (UEOS), the bulk modulus and its pressure derivative were estimated and provided almost identical results. The data indicate that the A-IRMOF-1 series are soft materials. The estimated bandgap values are all ca. 3.5 eV, indicating a nonmetallic behavior which is essentially metal independent within this A-IRMOF-1 series. The calculated formation energies for the A-IRMOF-1 series are -61.69 (Be), -62.53 (Mg), -66.56 (Ca), -65.34 (Sr), and -64.12 (Ba) kJ mol(-1) and are substantially more negative than that of Zn-based IRMOF-1 (MOF-5) at -46.02 kJ mol(-1). From the thermodynamic point of view, the A-IRMOF-1 compounds are therefore even more stable than the well-known MOF-5. The linear optical properties of the A-IRMOF-1 series were systematically investigated. The detailed analysis of chemical bonding in the A-IRMOF-1 series reveals the nature of the A-O, O-C, H-C, and C-C bonds, i.e., A-O is a mainly ionic interaction with a metal dependent degree of covalency. The O-C, H-C, and C-C bonding interactions are as anticipated mainly covalent in character. Furthermore it is found that the geometry and electronic structures of the presently considered MOFs are not very sensitive to the k-point mesh involved in the calculations. Importantly, this suggests that sampling with Γ-point only will give reliable structural properties for MOFs. Thus, computational simulations should be readily extended to even more complicated MOF systems.

  18. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  19. Characteristics of wall pressure over wall with permeable coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Woo Seog; Shin, Seungyeol; Lee, Seungbae [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Fluctuating wall pressures were measured using an array of 16 piezoelectric transducers beneath a turbulent boundary layer. The coating used in this experiment was an open cell, urethane type foam with a porosity of approximately 50 ppi. The ultimate objective of the coating is to provide a mechanical filter to reduce the wall pressure fluctuations. The ultimate objective of the coating is to provide a mechanical filter to reduce the wall pressure fluctuations. The boundary layer on the flat plate was measured by using a hot wire probe, and the CPM method was used to determine the skin friction coefficient. The wall pressure autospectra and streamwise wavenumber frequency spectra were compared to assess the attenuation of the wall pressure field by the coating. The coating is shown to attenuate the convective wall pressure energy. However, the relatively rough surface of the coating in this investigation resulted in a higher mean wall shear stress, thicker boundary layer, and higher low frequency wall pressure spectral levels compared to a smooth wall.

  20. The earth's gravitational field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    . But to say that gravity acts downwards is not correct. Gravity acts down, no matter where you stand on the Earth. It is better to say that on Earth gravity pulls objects towards the centre of the Earth. So no matter where you are on Earth all objects fall... pull than objects at the poles. In combination, the equatorial bulge and the effects of centrifugal force mean that sea-level gravitational acceleration increases from about 9.780 m/s² at the equator to about 9.832 m/s² at the poles, so an object...

  1. Geomagnetic field of earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delipetrev, Marjan; Delipetrev, Blagoj; Panovska, Sanja

    2008-01-01

    In this paper is introduced the theory of geomagnetic field of the Earth. A homogenous and isotropic sphere is taken for a model of Earth with a bar magnet at its center as a magnetic potential. The understanding of the real origin of geomagnetic field produced from differential rotation of inner core with respect to the outer core of Earth is here presented. Special attention is given to the latest observed data of the established net of geomagnetic repeat stations in the Republic of Macedonia. Finally, the maps of elements of geomagnetic field and the equation for calculation of normal magnetic field of Earth are provided. (Author)

  2. Rare earth octacyanomolybdates(4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubritskaya, D.I.; Sergeeva, A.N.; Pisak, Yu.V.

    1980-01-01

    Optimal conditions for synthesis of rare-earth octacyanomolybdates(4) of the Ln 4 [Mo(CN) 8 ] 3 xnH 2 O composition (where Ln is a rare-earth element, other than Pr, Pm, Lu, Tb) have been worked out. The synthesis has been accomplished by neutralization with octacianomolybdic acid with rare-earth carbonates. The composition and structure of the compounds synthesized have been studied by infrared-spectroscopy. It has been established that rare-earth octacyanomolybdates(4) form three isostructural groups

  3. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Jens; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    been introduced with success. Future research should also investigate the effect of specific abdominal wall blocks on neuroendocrine and inflammatory stress response after surgery.  Summary USG abdominal wall blocks in adults are commonplace techniques today. Most abdominal wall blocks are assigned......Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.......  Recent findings Ultrasound guidance is now considered the golden standard for abdominal wall blocks in adults, even though some landmark-based blocks are still being investigated. The efficiency of USG transversus abdominis plane blocks in relation to many surgical procedures involving the abdominal wall...

  4. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Zaki; Lamb, Christopher A.; Ross, Shane D.

    2012-12-01

    The list of detected near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is constantly growing. NEAs are likely targets for resources to support space industrialization, as they may be the least expensive source of certain needed raw materials. The limited supply of precious metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating in the form of asteroids around the solar system. Precious metals make up a significant fraction NEAs by mass, and even one metallic asteroid of ˜1km size and fair enrichment in platinum-group metals would contain twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are ˜1000 NEAs with a diameter of greater than 1 km. Capturing these asteroids around the Earth would expand the mining industry into an entirely new dimension. Having such resources within easy reach in Earth's orbit could provide an off-world environmentally friendly remedy for impending terrestrial shortages, especially given the need for raw materials in developing nations. In this paper, we develop and implement a conceptually simple algorithm to determine trajectory characteristics necessary to move NEAs into capture orbits around the Earth. Altered trajectories of asteroids are calculated using an ephemeris model. Only asteroids of eccentricity less than 0.1 have been studied and the model is restricted to the ecliptic plane for simplicity. We constrain the time of retrieval to be 10 years or less, based on considerations of the time to return on investment. For the heliocentric phase, constant acceleration is assumed. The acceleration required for transporting these asteroids from their undisturbed orbits to the sphere of influence of the Earth is the primary output, along with the impulse or acceleration necessary to effect capture to a bound orbit once the Earth's sphere of influence is reached. The initial guess for the constant acceleration is provided by a new estimation method, similar in spirit to Edelbaum's. Based on the

  5. Optimal Design of Sheet Pile Wall Embedded in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manas Ranjan; Das, Sarat Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Sheet pile wall is a type of flexible earth retaining structure used in waterfront offshore structures, river protection work and temporary supports in foundations and excavations. Economy is an essential part of a good engineering design and needs to be considered explicitly in obtaining an optimum section. By considering appropriate embedment depth and sheet pile section it may be possible to achieve better economy. This paper describes optimum design of both cantilever and anchored sheet pile wall penetrating clay using a simple optimization tool Microsoft Excel ® Solver. The detail methodology and its application with examples are presented for cantilever and anchored sheet piles. The effects of soil properties, depth of penetration and variation of ground water table on the optimum design are also discussed. Such a study will help professional while designing the sheet pile wall penetrating clay.

  6. Radiation shielding wall structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yoshitaka; Oka, Shinji; Kan, Toshihiko; Misato, Takeshi.

    1990-01-01

    A space between a pair of vertical steel plates laterally disposed in parallel at an optional distance has a structure of a plurality of vertically extending tranks partitioned laterally by vertically placed steel plates. Then, cements are grouted to the tranks. Strip-like steel plates each having a thickness greater than the gap between the each of the vertically placed steel plates and the cement are bonded each at the surface for each of the vertically placed steel plates opposing to the cements. A protrusion of a strip width having radiation shielding performance substantially identical with that by the thickness of the cement is disposed in the strip-like steel plates. With such a constitution, a safety radiation shielding wall structure with no worry of radiation intrusion to gaps, if formed, between the steel plates and the grouted cements due to shrinkage of the cements. (I.N.)

  7. Compressible stability of growing boundary layers using parabolized stability equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The parabolized stability equation (PSE) approach is employed to study linear and nonlinear compressible stability with an eye to providing a capability for boundary-layer transition prediction in both 'quiet' and 'disturbed' environments. The governing compressible stability equations are solved by a rational parabolizing approximation in the streamwise direction. Nonparallel flow effects are studied for both the first- and second-mode disturbances. For oblique waves of the first-mode type, the departure from the parallel results is more pronounced as compared to that for the two-dimensional waves. Results for the Mach 4.5 case show that flow nonparallelism has more influence on the first mode than on the second. The disturbance growth rate is shown to be a strong function of the wall-normal distance due to either flow nonparallelism or nonlinear interactions. The subharmonic and fundamental types of breakdown are found to be similar to the ones in incompressible boundary layers.

  8. Domain wall networks on solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Domain wall networks on the surface of a soliton are studied in a simple theory. It consists of two complex scalar fields, in 3+1 dimensions, with a global U(1)xZ n symmetry, where n>2. Solutions are computed numerically in which one of the fields forms a Q ball and the other field forms a network of domain walls localized on the surface of the Q ball. Examples are presented in which the domain walls lie along the edges of a spherical polyhedron, forming junctions at its vertices. It is explained why only a small restricted class of polyhedra can arise as domain wall networks

  9. On thermal stability in incompressible slip flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestman, A.R.

    1990-12-01

    The paper considers the classical problem of the stability of a layer of fluid heated from below, but in the case when the density is low and there is slip flow at the bounding walls. The eigenvalue problem which ensures is tackled by taking cognisance of the orthogonality of Bessel function of the first kind. It is observed that the Rayleigh number for the onset of instability, for the case of marginal stability, is increased by gas rarefication. (author). 2 refs

  10. Transitional Flow in an Arteriovenous Fistula: Effect of Wall Distensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Transitional flow and the subsequent pressure and shear stress fluctuations are thought to be causative in the fistula failure. Since 50% of fistulae require surgical intervention before year one, understanding the altered hemodynamic stresses is an important step toward improving clinical outcomes. We perform numerical simulations of a patient-specific model of a functioning fistula reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans. Rigid wall simulations and fluid-structure interaction simulations using an in-house finite element solver for the wall deformations were performed and compared. In both the rigid and distensible wall cases, transitional flow is computed in fistula as evidenced by aperiodic high frequency velocity and pressure fluctuations. The spectrum of the fluctuations is much more narrow-banded in the distensible case, however, suggesting a partial stabilizing effect by the vessel elasticity. As a result, the distensible wall simulations predict shear stresses that are systematically 10-30% lower than the rigid cases. We propose a possible mechanism for stabilization involving the phase lag in the fluid work needed to deform the vessel wall. Support from an NIDDK R21 - DK08-1823.

  11. Slurry walls and slurry trenches - construction quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletto, R.J.; Good, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Slurry (panel) walls and slurry trenches have become conventional methods for construction of deep underground structures, interceptor trenches and hydraulic (cutoff) barriers. More recently polymers mixed with water are used to stabilize the excavation instead of bentonite slurry. Slurry walls are typically excavated in short panel segments, 2 to 7 m (7 to 23 ft) long, and backfilled with structural materials; whereas slurry trenches are fairly continuous excavations with concurrent backfilling of blended soils, or cement-bentonite mixtures. Slurry trench techniques have also been used to construct interceptor trenches. Currently no national standards exist for the design and/or construction of slurry walls/trenches. Government agencies, private consultants, contractors and trade groups have published specifications for construction of slurry walls/trenches. These specifications vary in complexity and quality of standards. Some place excessive emphasis on the preparation and control of bentonite or polymer slurry used for excavation, with insufficient emphasis placed on quality control of bottom cleaning, tremie concrete, backfill placement or requirements for the finished product. This has led to numerous quality problems, particularly with regard to identification of key depths, bottom sediments and proper backfill placement. This paper will discuss the inspection of slurry wall/trench construction process, identifying those areas which require special scrutiny. New approaches to inspection of slurry stabilized excavations are discussed

  12. Longevity in vivo of primary cell wall cellulose synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph Lee; Josephs, Cooper; Barnes, William J; Anderson, Charles T; Tien, Ming

    2018-02-01

    Our work focuses on understanding the lifetime and thus stability of the three main cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins involved in primary cell wall synthesis of Arabidopsis. It had long been thought that a major means of CESA regulation was via their rapid degradation. However, our studies here have uncovered that AtCESA proteins are not rapidly degraded. Rather, they persist for an extended time in the plant cell. Plant cellulose is synthesized by membrane-embedded cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). The CSC is composed of cellulose synthases (CESAs), of which three distinct isozymes form the primary cell wall CSC and another set of three isozymes form the secondary cell wall CSC. We determined the stability over time of primary cell wall (PCW) CESAs in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, using immunoblotting after inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide treatment. Our work reveals very slow turnover for the Arabidopsis PCW CESAs in vivo. Additionally, we show that the stability of all three CESAs within the PCW CSC is altered by mutations in individual CESAs, elevated temperature, and light conditions. Together, these results suggest that CESA proteins are very stable in vivo, but that their lifetimes can be modulated by intrinsic and environmental cues.

  13. Hard wall - soft wall - vorticity scattering in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, S.W.; Singh, D.K.

    2014-01-01

    An analytically exact solution, for the problem of lowMach number incident vorticity scattering at a hard-soft wall transition, is obtained in the form of Fourier integrals by using theWiener-Hopf method. Harmonic vortical perturbations of inviscid linear shear flow are scattered at the wall

  14. Hard wall - soft wall - vorticity scattering in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, S.W.; Singh, D.K.

    2014-01-01

    An analytically exact solution, for the problem of low Mach number incident vorticity scattering at a hard-soft wall transition, is obtained in the form of Fourier integrals by using the Wiener-Hopf method. Harmonic vortical perturbations of inviscid linear shear flow are scattered at the wall

  15. EARTH FROM SPACE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. EARTH FROM SPACE · Slide 2 · Earth System · Slide 4 · Global water cycle · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Direct Observations of Recent Climate Change · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Snow cover and Arctic sea ice are decreasing · Polar Melting & Global Heat Transport · Antarctica: Melting and Thickening · Slide 14 · Slide 15.

  16. Earth and Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosygin, Yu A

    1986-12-01

    Rocks, the age of which according to certain data exceeds considerably the recognized age of the Earth and approximates the age of the Universe, have been detected on the Earth. There is a necessity to coordinate the geological data with cosmological structures.

  17. Hands On Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  18. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  19. Earth System Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  20. Domain wall conductivity in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D J; Gruverman, A; Connell, J G; Seo, S S A

    2016-01-01

    Although enhanced conductivity of ferroelectric domain boundaries has been found in BiFeO 3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 films as well as hexagonal rare-earth manganite single crystals, the mechanism of the domain wall conductivity is still under debate. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe enhanced conductance at the electrically-neutral domain walls in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO 3 thin films where the structure and polarization direction are strongly constrained along the c-axis. This result indicates that domain wall conductivity in ferroelectric rare-earth manganites is not limited to charged domain walls. We show that the observed conductivity in the TbMnO 3 films is governed by a single conduction mechanism, namely, the back-to-back Schottky diodes tuned by the segregation of defects. (paper)

  1. Macroeconomic stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that full employment and sustainable development not necessarily are conflicting goals. On the other hand macroeconomic stability cannot be obtained without a deliberate labour sharing policy and a shift in the composition of private consumption away from traditional material...

  2. Stabilized superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.

    1975-01-01

    The stable, high field, high current composite wire comprises multiple filaments in a depleted bronze matrix, each filament comprising a type II superconducting, beta-tungsten structure, intermetallic compound layer jacketing and metallurgically bonded to a stabilizing copper core, directly or via an intermediate layer of refractory metal

  3. Biological Extinction in Earth History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, David M.

    1986-03-01

    Virtually all plant and animal species that have ever lived on the earth are extinct. For this reason alone, extinction must play an important role in the evolution of life. The five largest mass extinctions of the past 600 million years are of greatest interest, but there is also a spectrum of smaller events, many of which indicate biological systems in profound stress. Extinction may be episodic at all scales, with relatively long periods of stability alternating with short-lived extinction events. Most extinction episodes are biologically selective, and further analysis of the victims and survivors offers the greatest chance of deducing the proximal causes of extinction. A drop in sea level and climatic change are most frequently invoked to explain mass extinctions, but new theories of collisions with extraterrestrial bodies are gaining favor. Extinction may be constructive in a Darwinian sense or it may only perturb the system by eliminating those organisms that happen to be susceptible to geologically rare stresses.

  4. Biological extinction in earth history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all plant and animal species that have ever lived on the earth are extinct. For this reason alone, extinction must play an important role in the evolution of life. The five largest mass extinctions of the past 600 million years are of greatest interest, but there is also a spectrum of smaller events, many of which indicate biological systems in profound stress. Extinction may be episodic at all scales, with relatively long periods of stability alternating with short-lived extinction events. Most extinction episodes are biologically selective, and further analysis of the victims and survivors offers the greatest chance of deducing the proximal causes of extinction. A drop in sea level and climatic change are most frequently invoked to explain mass extinctions, but new theories of collisions with extraterrestrial bodies are gaining favor. Extinction may be constructive in a Darwinian sense or it may only perturb the system by eliminating those organisms that happen to be susceptible to geologically rare stresses.

  5. The "Brick Wall" Graphic Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2016-01-01

    A brick wall provides a fitting description of what happens when teachers try to teach a concept for which students are unprepared. When students are unsuccessful academically, their foundational knowledge may be missing, incomplete, or incorrect. As a result, students "hit a brick wall," and their academic progress stops because they do…

  6. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  7. Topological domain walls in helimagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, P.; Müller, J.; Köhler, L.; Rosch, A.; Kanazawa, N.; Tokura, Y.; Garst, M.; Meier, D.

    2018-05-01

    Domain walls naturally arise whenever a symmetry is spontaneously broken. They interconnect regions with different realizations of the broken symmetry, promoting structure formation from cosmological length scales to the atomic level1,2. In ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials, domain walls with unique functionalities emerge, holding great promise for nanoelectronics and spintronics applications3-5. These walls are usually of Ising, Bloch or Néel type and separate homogeneously ordered domains. Here we demonstrate that a wide variety of new domain walls occurs in the presence of spatially modulated domain states. Using magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we show three fundamental classes of domain walls to arise in the near-room-temperature helimagnet iron germanium. In contrast to conventional ferroics, the domain walls exhibit a well-defined inner structure, which—analogous to cholesteric liquid crystals—consists of topological disclination and dislocation defects. Similar to the magnetic skyrmions that form in the same material6,7, the domain walls can carry a finite topological charge, permitting an efficient coupling to spin currents and contributions to a topological Hall effect. Our study establishes a new family of magnetic nano-objects with non-trivial topology, opening the door to innovative device concepts based on helimagnetic domain walls.

  8. Gas from the wall socket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeer, B.

    1997-01-01

    A Dutch public utility (Obragas) introduces a new way to supply gas for their household clients in Helmond, Netherlands: the gas wall socket. The use of gas wall sockets must prevent the decrease of the market share for natural gas compared to the market share of electricity for households

  9. Diplopia and Orbital Wall Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  10. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  11. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  12. Anisotropy of domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viret; Samson; Warin; Marty; Ott; Sondergard; Klein; Fermon

    2000-10-30

    The resistive effect of domain walls in FePd films with perpendicular anisotropy was studied experimentally as a function of field and temperature. The films were grown directly on MgO substrates, which induces an unusual virgin magnetic configuration composed of 60 nm wide parallel stripe domains. This allowed us to carry out the first measurements of the anisotropy of domain wall resistivity in the two configurations of current perpendicular and parallel to the walls. At 18 K, we find 8.2% and 1.3% for the domain wall magnetoresistance normalized to the wall width (8 nm) in these two respective configurations. These values are consistent with the predictions of Levy and Zhang.

  13. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  14. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  15. Equations for studies of feedback stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    Important ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities grow slowly when a conducting wall surrounds a toroidal plasma. Feedback stabilization of these instabilities may be required for tokamaks and other magnetic confinement concepts to achieve adequate plasma pressure and self-driven current for practical fusion power. Equations are derived for simulating feedback stabilization, which require the minimum information about an ideal plasma for an exact analysis. The equations are solved in the approximation of one unstable mode, one wall circuit, one feedback circuit, and one sensor circuit. The analysis based on a single unstable mode is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the standard analysis of feedback of the axisymmetric vertical instability of tokamaks. Unlike that analysis, the method presented here applies to multiple modes that are coupled by the wall and to arbitrary toroidal mode numbers. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  16. WHERE TO FIND HABITABLE ''EARTHS'' IN CIRCUMBINARY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huigen; Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2013-01-01

    Six P-type planets have been found thus far around five binary systems, i.e., Kepler-16b, 34b, 35b, 38b, and 47b and c, which are all Neptune- or Jupiter-like planets. The stability of planets and the habitable zones are influenced by the gravitational and radiative perturbations of binary companions. In this Letter, we check the stability of an additional habitable Earth-mass planet in each system. Based on our simulations in 10 Myr, a habitable ''Earth'' is hardly stable in Kepler-16, while a stable ''Earth'' in Kepler-47 close to the boundaries of the habitable zone is possible. In contrast, Kepler-34, 35, and 38 seem to have high probabilities of being able to tolerante a stable ''Earth'' in their habitable zones. The affects of transit time variations are quite small due to the small mass of an undetected ''Earth,'' except that of Kepler-16b. With a time precision of 10 –3 day (∼88 s), an ''Earth'' in the corotational resonance with Kepler-16b can be detected in three years, while habitable ''Earths'' in the Kepler-34 and 38 systems can be detected in 10 yr. Habitable ''Earths'' in Kepler-35 and 47 are not likely to be detected in 10 yr under this precision.

  17. Dry wall Kras 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Zupančič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the modesty of hiska, they show a simple understanding of corbelling technique. One could say they are all examples of human landscape cultivation. Although there is no evident common line when comparing all types of hiska, the cunning eye may observe one shared feature: the positioning of the entrance. More or less all the documented shelters have south or south-western facing entrances. The burja is a cold northerly wind; from the south (Adriatic Sea the winds are warmer. When resting, the setting sun is taken as a sign of the ending of the working day and a reward for the whole day’s efforts. Entrances are the only openings to these structures, and they should serve as well as possible - to watch over the crops, to wait when hunting, to enjoy the calm of evening light, to breathe the sea wind.The syntax of the architectural language of layering stone and shaping the pattern of the landscape remain an inventive realisation of spatial ideas from the past until today. Not only ideas of shaping space - these ideas are basic interventions in the natural habitat which contribute to survival. Culture and an awareness of its values are the origins of local development and reasonable heritage preservation. The next step are tutorial days with workshops on how to build dry stone structures, walls and other stone architecture, as the DSWA organisation in the UK is doing.

  18. Plasma-Wall Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J; Chen, J L [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Guo, H Y [Tri Alpha Energy (United States); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); McCracken, G M [Culham Science Centre, UKAEA, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    The problem of impurities in fusion plasmas has been recognized since the beginning of the fusion programme. Early experiments in glass vacuum vessels released gas from the wall to such an extent that the radiation from the impurities prevented the plasma from being heated above about 50 eV. The radiative power loss is principally due to line radiation from partially stripped ions, which is particularly a problem during the plasma startup phase. Another problem is fuel dilution, which arises because impurity atoms produce many electrons and, for a given plasma pressure, these electrons take the place of fuel particles. Impurities can also lead to disruptions, as a result of edge cooling and consequent current profile modification. The fractional impurity level which radiates 10% of the total thermonuclear power for a 10 keV plasma is 50% for helium, 7% for carbon, and less than 0.1% for molybdenum. Clearly, impurities of low atomic number are a much less serious problem than those of high atomic number. (author)

  19. The profile of the domain walls in amorphous glass-covered microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, F.; Rigue, J.N. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Campus Cachoeira do Sul, RS (Brazil); Carara, M., E-mail: carara@smail.ufsm.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Glass-covered microwires with positive magnetostriction were studied. • The single domain wall dynamics was studied under different conditions. • We have evaluated the profile and shape of the moving domain walls. • The domain wall evolves from a bell shape to a parabolic one when a current is applied. - Abstract: We have studied the domain wall dynamics in Joule-annealed amorphous glass-covered microwires with positive magnetostriction in the presence of an electric current, in order to evaluate the profile and shape of the moving domain wall. Such microwires are known to present magnetic bi-stability when axially magnetized. The single domain wall dynamics was evaluated under different conditions, under an axially applied stress and an electric current. We have observed the well known increasing of the domain wall damping with the applied stress due to the increase in the magnetoelastic anisotropy and, when the current is applied, depending on the current intensity and direction, a modification on the axial domain wall damping. When the orthogonal motion of the domain wall is considered, we have observed that the associated velocity present a smaller dependence on the applied current intensity. It was observed a modification on both the domain wall shape and length. In a general way, the domain wall evolves from a bell shape to a parabolic shape as the current intensity is increased. The results were explained in terms of the change in the magnetic energy promoted by the additional Oersted field.

  20. Earth as art three

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  1. Estudo das características de adsorção de água e da estabilidade das microcápsulas de óleo essencial de laranja na seleção de material de parede Water adsorption characteristics and stability of orange essential oil microcapsules in the wall material selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. R. ASCHERI

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho consistiu no estudo e comparação das características de adsorção de água de três amostras de microcápsulas de óleo essencial de laranja, obtidas pela secagem por atomização de três diferentes emulsões preparadas pela adição de óleo essencial de laranja (oel, a uma solução aquosa de material de parede (mp constituída de capsul (5,0, 0,0 e 10,0%, goma arábica (5,0, 10,0 e 0,0% sendo constante para as três emulsões a maltodextrina (36,0%, água (44,0% e óleo essencial (10,0%. A microencapsulação foi realizada a 220 e 110° C de ar de entrada e saída do secador usando um atomizador rotativo a 20.000rpm. Com base à determinação das isotermas de adsorção de água a 30, 40 e 50° C e usando o modelo de GAB para ajustar os pontos experimentais foram avaliadas as características das isotermas, a estabilidade e área superficial de adsorção de água das diferentes amostras de microcápsulas obtidas. Os resultados indicaram ser importante o estudo das características de adsorção de água para estimar a estabilidade das microcápsulas de oel e a comparação destas mostrou que as microcápsulas obtidas pela secagem por atomização da emulsão preparada com 5,0% de capsul e 5,0% de goma arábica apresentaram o melhor resultado.This work consisted of the study and comparison of the water adsorption characteristics of three samples orange essential oil microcapsules obtained by spray drying of three different emulsions prepared by the addition of orange essential oil (oel to an aqueous solution of wall material (mp constituted of capsul (5.0, 0.0 and 10.0%, arabic gum (5.0, 10.0 and 0.0% being constant for the three emulsions the maltodextrin (36.0%, water (44.0% and essential oil (10.0%. The microencapsulation was accomplished to 220 and 110°C of entrance air and exit of the dryer using a wheel atomizer to 20,000rpm. With base to the determination of the water adsorption isotherms to 30, 40 and 50°C and

  2. HMD symbol stabilization concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Richard L.; Greeley, Kevin W.

    1995-05-01

    Helmet-mounted displays (HMDs) present flight, navigation, and weapon information in the pilot's line of sight. The HMD was developed to allow the pilot to retain aircraft and weapon information while looking off boresight. Symbol stabilization is a key issue for HMDs. In current equipment, the lack of compensation for pilot head motion creates excessive workload during hovering and nap-of-the-earth flight. This high workload translates into excessive training requirements. At the same time, misleading symbology makes interpretation of the height of obstructions impossible. A set of standardized coordinate transformations are necessary for the development of HMD symbology and the control laws. Part of the problem is there is no agreed upon set of definitions or descriptions for how HMD symbols are driven to compensate for pilot head motion. A candidate set of coordinate definitions is proposed to address this issue.

  3. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  4. Rare earth germanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar', I.A.; Vinogradova, N.V.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    From the viewpoint of structural chemistry and general regularities controlling formation reactions of compounds and phases in melts, solid and gaseous states, recent achievements in the chemistry of rare earth germanates are generalized. Methods of synthesizing germanates, systems on the base of germanium oxides and rare earths are considered. The data on crystallochemical characteristics are tabulated. Individual compounds of scandium germanate are also characterized. Processes of germanate formation using the data of IR-spectroscopy, X-ray phase analysis are studied. The structure and morphotropic series of rare earth germanates and silicates are determined. Fields of their present and possible future application are considered

  5. Project Earth Science

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Project Earth Science: Astronomy, Revised 2nd Edition, involves students in activities that focus on Earth's position in our solar system. How do we measure astronomical distances? How can we look back in time as we gaze across vast distances in space? How would our planet be different without its particular atmosphere and distance to our star? What are the geometries among Earth, the Moon, and the Sun that yield lunar phases and seasons? Students explore these concepts and others in 11 teacher-tested activities.

  6. Earth formation porosity log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining the porosity of earth formations in the vicinity of a cased well borehole is described, comprising the steps of: irradiating the earth formations in the vicinity of the cased well borehole with fast neutrons from a source of fast neutrons passed into the borehole; and generating a signal representative of the fast neutron population present in the well borehole at a location in the borehole, the signal is functionally related to the porosity of the earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole

  7. Earth before life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-09

    A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome includes the age of the Earth are consistent with observed data. The appearance of life after the formation of the Earth is consistent with the data set under examination.

  8. Glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This 35mm frame, photographed as the Space Shuttle Columbia was orbiting Earth during a 'night' pass, documents the glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods of the spacecraft.

  9. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  10. The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Hanafin, J. A.; Brindley, H.; Futyan, J.; Rufus, J.; Kellock, S.; Matthews, G.; Wrigley, R.; Last, A.; Mueller, J.; Mossavati, R.; Ashmall, J.; Sawyer, E.; Parker, D.; Caldwell, M.; Allan, P. M.; Smith, A.; Bates, M. J.; Coan, B.; Stewart, B. C.; Lepine, D. R.; Cornwall, L. A.; Corney, D. R.; Ricketts, M. J.; Drummond, D.; Smart, D.; Cutler, R.; Dewitte, S.; Clerbaux, N.; Gonzalez, L.; Ipe, A.; Bertrand, C.; Joukoff, A.; Crommelynck, D.; Nelms, N.; Llewellyn-Jones, D. T.; Butcher, G.; Smith, G. L.; Szewczyk, Z. P.; Mlynczak, P. E.; Slingo, A.; Allan, R. P.; Ringer, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports on a new satellite sensor, the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) experiment. GERB is designed to make the first measurements of the Earth's radiation budget from geostationary orbit. Measurements at high absolute accuracy of the reflected sunlight from the Earth, and the thermal radiation emitted by the Earth are made every 15 min, with a spatial resolution at the subsatellite point of 44.6 km (north south) by 39.3 km (east west). With knowledge of the incoming solar constant, this gives the primary forcing and response components of the top-of-atmosphere radiation. The first GERB instrument is an instrument of opportunity on Meteosat-8, a new spin-stabilized spacecraft platform also carrying the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared (SEVIRI) sensor, which is currently positioned over the equator at 3.5°W. This overview of the project includes a description of the instrument design and its preflight and in-flight calibration. An evaluation of the instrument performance after its first year in orbit, including comparisons with data from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite sensors and with output from numerical models, are also presented. After a brief summary of the data processing system and data products, some of the scientific studies that are being undertaken using these early data are described. This marks the beginning of a decade or more of observations from GERB, as subsequent models will fly on each of the four Meteosat Second Generation satellites.

  11. Rare earths production and marketing opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falconnet, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The rare earths (RE) market is relatively small. The total production during 1968 was only 10000 tons (REO) which rose to 27000 tons (REO) during 1985. The three major areas of application, which are volume market for ceric rare earths are catalysts, glass ceramics and metallurgy. Among the other uses of rare earths, the permanent magnets, lamp phosphors and fine ceramics have registered significant growth in RE consumption. Monazite and bastnasite are the main natural source for rare earths and processing of these for one of the rare earths in high demand leads to over production of some others not in demand, thus creating a balance problem. The growth in RE market has always been influenced by the technology shifts and product substitution. For example, the RE consumption during 1974/76 for desulfurization of steel had substantially decreased due to the usage of calcium. Similarly, 1985 had witnessed a drastic cut in the use of REs in fluid cracking due to the introduction of stabilized zeolites which contain less REO. Thus, the overall compound growth rate of demand was only 3.9 % per year during the period 1970-1985. At present, 37 % of the rare earths production goes to the glass/ceramics industry, 33 % for catalyst and 25 % to metallurgy. The price of REs constantly shows a downward trend. This trend coupled with the rapid changes taking place in the various technological fields, demands greater flexibility and high marketing skills from the RE producers. The key factor for future expansion of RE market will be the development of 'high volume' application of ceric rare earths. (author) 2 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26

    synthesis pathway genes are induced by removal of cell wall, some cell wall synthesis apparatus must be shared in both cases. The cell wall re-synthesis mechanism may have broad application because our preliminary assay indicates that the cell wall characteristics are highly different from those produced during cytokinesis. A thorough understanding on the regulation of cell wall re-synthesis may lead to improvement of cell wall characteristics. b) Removal of cell wall results in chromatin decondensation Another interesting observation was that removal of cell wall was associated with substantial chromatin change. Our DNA DAPI stain, chromatin MNase digestion, histone modification proteomics, protein differential expression analysis, and DNA oligo array studies all supported that substantial chromatin change was associated with removal of cell wall treatment. It is still under investigation if the chromatin change is associated with activation of cell wall synthesis genes, in which chromatin remodeling is required. Another possibility is that the cell wall is required for stabilizing the chromatin structure in plant cells. Given that spindle fiber is directly connected with both chromatin structure and cell wall synthesis, it is possible that there is an intrinsic connection between cell wall and chromatin.

  13. First wall of thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Makoto; Koizumi, Makoto; Nishihara, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The first wall of a thermonuclear device is constituted with inner wall tiles, e.g. made of graphite and metal substrates for fixing them. However, since the heat expansion coefficient is different between the metal substrates and intermediate metal members, thermal stresses are caused to deteriorate the endurance of the inner wall tiles. In view of the above, low melting metals are disposed at the portion of contact between the inner wall tiles and the metal substrates and, further, a heat pipe structure is incorporated into the metal substrates. Under the thermal load, for example, during operation of the thermonuclear device, the low melting metals at the portion of contact are melted into liquid metals to enhance the state of contact between the inner wall tiles and the metal substrate to reduce the heat resistance and improve the heat conductivity. Even if there is a difference in the heat expansion coefficient between the inner wall tiles and the metal substrates, neither sharing stresses not thermal stresses are caused. Further, since the heat pipe structure is incorporated into the metal substrates, the lateral unevenness of the temperature in the metal substrates can be eliminated. Thus, the durability of the inner wall tiles can be improved. (N.H.)

  14. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  15. Earth's variable rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond; Dickey, Jean O.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in geodetic data and practical meteorology have advanced research on fluctuations in the earth's rotation. The interpretation of these fluctuations is inextricably linked with studies of the dynamics of the earth-moon system and dynamical processes in the liquid metallic core of the earth (where the geomagnetic field originates), other parts of the earth's interior, and the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Fluctuations in the length of the day occurring on decadal time scales have implications for the topographay of the core-mantle boundary and the electrical, magnetic, ande other properties of the core and lower mantle. Investigations of more rapid fluctuations bear on meteorological studies of interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal variations in the general circulation of the atmosphere and the response of the oceans to such variations.

  16. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    , Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised...... and accepted. The European Space Agency mission Gaia is a proposed space observatory, designed to perform a highly accurate census of our galaxy, the Milky Way, and beyond. Through accurate measurement of star positions, Gaia is expected to discover thousands of extra-solar planets and follow the bending...... of starlight by the Sun, and therefore directly observe the structure of space-time. This thesis explores several aspects of the observation of NEOs with Gaia, emphasising detection of NEOs and the quality of orbits computed from Gaia observations. The main contribution is the work on motion detection...

  17. Earth study from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The significance that space studies are making to all Earth sciences in the areas of geography, geodesy, cartography, geology, meteorology, oceanology, agronomy, and ecology is discussed. It is predicted that cosmonautics will result in a revolution in science and technology.

  18. Earth's electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    The earth becomes charged during thunderstorm activity and discharges through the weak conducting atmosphere. Balloon and rocket studies infer that a high altitude electric field penetrates virtually unattenuated through the atmosphere, at least as far as balloon heights. The field has two primary sources. At low and mid latitudes, interaction between the earth's magnetic field and the neutral wind creates electric fields. At latitudes above 60 0 , the high altitude electrical structure is dominated by the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetic field. The auroral light is emitted by atmospheric atoms and molecules excited by electrons with potentials of many thousands volts. The potentials are induced by the solar wind. Recent satellite data shows that the electrons get this energy by passing through a localized electric field about 6000 km above the auroral zone. Several rocket and satellite experiments used to study the earth's electric field are discussed

  19. Near Earth Asteroid Scout

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Near-Earth Asteroid Scout, or NEA Scout, is a 6U CubeSat developed jointly between NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. NASA...

  20. Gambling with the earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Muir, H

    2000-01-01

    The probability that dangerous Earth-devouring particles will be born at a new accelerator in the US may be tiny, but scientists have played down the devastating potential costs in their risk assessments according to a physicist (1 page).

  1. Jupiter and planet Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of Jupiter and Earth are discussed along with their atmospheres, the radiation belts around both planets, natural satellites, the evolution of life, and the Pioneer 10. Educational study projects are also included

  2. Earth retaining structures manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-29

    The objectives of this policy are to obtain statewide uniformity, establish standard : procedures and delineate responsibility for the preparation and review of plans, : design and construction control of earth retaining structures. In addition, it i...

  3. Earliest life on earth

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Suzanne D

    2010-01-01

    This volume integrates the latest findings on earliest life forms, identified and characterized in some of the oldest rocks on Earth. It places emphasis on the integration of analytical methods with observational techniques and experimental simulations.

  4. Implementing Green Walls in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Michael B; Martin, Michael D; Sajady, Mollika A

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies in applied pedagogical design have shown that, at all educational levels, direct exposure to the natural environment can enhance learning by improving student attention and behaviors. Implementing green walls-a "vertical garden," or "living wall" interior wall that typically includes greenery, a growing medium (soil or substrate) and a water delivery system-provides environmental health benefits, but also provides a practical application within classrooms for minimizing directed attention fatigue in students by connecting them to "outdoor nature" within the indoor environment. Hands-on "project-based" learning is another pedagogical strategy that has proved to be effective across the spectrum of educational levels and across subject areas. Green walls have the potential to inspire critical thinking through a combination of project-based learning strategies and environmental education. The authors have outlined a curriculum involving the implementation of an indoor living wall system within a classroom-learning environment, incorporating project-based learning modules that interact with the wall. In conjunction with the passive health benefits of a green wall, project-based curriculum models can connect students interactively with indoor nature and have the potential to inspire real-world thinking related to science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics fields within the indoor learning environment. Through a combination of these passive and interactive modes, students are connected to nature in the indoor environment regardless of weather conditions outdoors. Future research direction could include post-construction studies of the effectiveness of project-based curricula related to living walls, and the long-term impacts of implementing green walls in classrooms on school achievement and student behaviors.

  5. Examination of wall functions for a Parabolized Navier-Stokes code for supersonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsbrooks, T.H. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-04-01

    Solutions from a Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code with an algebraic turbulence model are compared with wall functions. The wall functions represent the turbulent flow profiles in the viscous sublayer, thus removing many grid points from the solution procedure. The wall functions are intended to replace the computed profiles between the body surface and a match point in the logarithmic region. A supersonic adiabatic flow case was examined first. This adiabatic case indicates close agreement between computed velocity profiles near the wall and the wall function for a limited range of suitable match points in the logarithmic region. In an attempt to improve marching stability, a laminar to turbulent transition routine was implemented at the start of the PNS code. Implementing the wall function with the transitional routine in the PNS code is expected to reduce computational time while maintaining good accuracy in computed skin friction.

  6. Examination of wall functions for a Parabolized Navier-Stokes code for supersonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsbrooks, T.H. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Solutions from a Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code with an algebraic turbulence model are compared with wall functions. The wall functions represent the turbulent flow profiles in the viscous sublayer, thus removing many grid points from the solution procedure. The wall functions are intended to replace the computed profiles between the body surface and a match point in the logarithmic region. A supersonic adiabatic flow case was examined first. This adiabatic case indicates close agreement between computed velocity profiles near the wall and the wall function for a limited range of suitable match points in the logarithmic region. In an attempt to improve marching stability, a laminar to turbulent transition routine was implemented at the start of the PNS code. Implementing the wall function with the transitional routine in the PNS code is expected to reduce computational time while maintaining good accuracy in computed skin friction.

  7. Current management of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moed, Berton R; Kregor, Philip J; Reilly, Mark C; Stover, Michael D; Vrahas, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The general goals for treating an acetabular fracture are to restore congruity and stability of the hip joint. These goals are no different from those for the subset of fractures of the posterior wall. Nevertheless, posterior wall fractures present unique problems compared with other types of acetabular fractures. Successful treatment of these fractures depends on a multitude of factors. The physician must understand their distinctive radiologic features, in conjunction with patient factors, to determine the appropriate treatment. By knowing the important points of posterior surgical approaches to the hip, particularly the posterior wall, specific techniques can be used for fracture reduction and fixation in these often challenging fractures. In addition, it is important to develop a complete grasp of potential complications and their treatment. The evaluation and treatment protocols initially developed by Letournel and Judet continue to be important; however, the surgeon also should be aware of new information published and presented in the past decade.

  8. Design and installation of a ferromagnetic wall in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, P. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Rivera, N.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective component test facility and DEMO power reactor. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will provide crucial physics for these facilities. In order to study ferromagnetic effects in toroidal geometry, a ferritic wall upgrade was designed and installed in the High Beta Tokamak–Extended Pulse (HBT-EP). Several material options were investigated based on conductivity, magnetic permeability, vacuum compatibility, and other criteria, and the material of choice (high-cobalt steel) is characterized. Installation was accomplished quickly, with minimal impact on existing diagnostics and overall machine performance, and initial results demonstrate the effects of the ferritic wall on plasma stability

  9. Design and installation of a ferromagnetic wall in tokamak geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P. E., E-mail: peh2109@columbia.edu; Levesque, J. P.; Rivera, N.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A. [Columbia University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Columbia University, 102 S.W. Mudd, 500 W. 120th St., New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective component test facility and DEMO power reactor. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will provide crucial physics for these facilities. In order to study ferromagnetic effects in toroidal geometry, a ferritic wall upgrade was designed and installed in the High Beta Tokamak–Extended Pulse (HBT-EP). Several material options were investigated based on conductivity, magnetic permeability, vacuum compatibility, and other criteria, and the material of choice (high-cobalt steel) is characterized. Installation was accomplished quickly, with minimal impact on existing diagnostics and overall machine performance, and initial results demonstrate the effects of the ferritic wall on plasma stability.

  10. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Double wall steam generator tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padden, T.R.; Uber, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    Double-walled steam generator tubing for the steam generators of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor prevents sliding between the surfaces due to a mechanical interlock. Forces resulting from differential thermal expansion between the outer tube and the inner tube are insufficient in magnitude to cause shearing of base metal. The interlock is formed by jointly drawing the tubing, with the inside wall of the outer tube being already formed with grooves. The drawing causes the outer wall of the inner tube to form corrugations locking with the grooves. (author)

  12. Lifetime of Bentonites study: hydrothermal stability of saponites; Estudio de longevidad en bentonitas: estabilidad hidrotermal de saponitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguey, S; Cuevas, J; Garralon, A [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Geologia y Geoquimica, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The report studies the lifetime of bentonite and the hydrothermal stability of saponites. The testing comprised determination of physical and chemical properties of clays, the stability of the mineral porosity, lifetime and the wall of clay.

  13. Failure evolution in granular material retained by rigid wall in active mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Magdalena; Leśniewska, Danuta

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of a selected small scale model test, performed on a sample of surrogate granular material, retained by a rigid wall (typical geotechnical problem of earth thrust on a retaining wall). The experimental data presented in this paper show that the deformation of granular sample behind retaining wall can undergo some cyclic changes. The nature of these cycles is not clear - it is probably related to some micromechanical features of granular materials, which are recently extensively studied in many research centers in the world. Employing very precise DIC (PIV) method can help to relate micro and macro-scale behavior of granular materials.

  14. Investigation of Plant Cell Wall Properties: A Study of Contributions from the Nanoscale to the Macroscale Impacting Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jacob Dillon

    Biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol is one of a few challenging, yet opportune technologies that can reduce the consumption of petroleum-derived transportation fuels, while providing parallel reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass recalcitrance, or resistance to deconstruction, is a major technical challenge that limits effective conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars, often requiring a costly thermochemical pretreatment step to improve biomass deconstruction. Biomass recalcitrance is imparted largely by the secondary cell wall, a complex polymeric matrix of cell wall polysaccharides and aromatic heteropolymers, that provides structural stability to cells and enables plant upright growth. Polymers within the cell wall can vary both compositionally and structurally depending upon plant species and anatomical fraction, and have varied responses to thermochemical pretreatments. Cell wall properties impacting recalcitrance are still not well understood, and as a result, the goal of this dissertation is to investigate structural features of the cell wall contributing to recalcitrance (1) in diverse anatomical fractions of a single species, (2) in response to diverse pretreatments, and (3) resulting from genetic modification. In the first study, feedstock cell wall heterogeneity was investigated in anatomical (stem, leaf sheaths, and leaf blades) and internode fractions of switchgrass at varying tissue maturities. Lignin content was observed as the key contributor to recalcitrance in maturing stem tissues only, with non-cellulosic substituted glucuronoarabinoxylans and pectic polysaccharides contributing to cell wall recalcitrance in leaf sheath and leaf blades. Hydroxycinnamate (i.e., saponifiable p-coumarate and ferulate) content along with xylan and pectin extractability decreased with tissue maturity, suggesting lignification is only one component imparting maturity specific cell wall recalcitrance. In the second study

  15. Domain wall motion in magnetically frustrated nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarda, M. V.; Escobar, M. A.; Li, S.; Chang, R.; Fullerton, E. E.; Lomakin, V.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a magnetically frustrated nanoring (MFNR) configuration which is formed by introducing antiferromagnetic coupling across an interface orthogonal to the ring's circumferential direction. Such structures have the unique characteristic that only one itinerant domain wall (DW) can exist in the ring, which does not need to be nucleated or injected into the structure and can never escape making it analogous to a magnetic Möbius strip. Numerical simulations show that the DW in a MFNR can be driven consecutively around the ring with a prescribed cyclicity, and that the frequency of revolutions can be controlled by the applied field. The energy landscapes can be controlled to be flat allowing for low fields of operation or to have a barrier for thermal stability. Potential logic and memory applications of MFNRs are considered and discussed.

  16. Advanced high performance solid wall blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Malang, S.; Nishio, S.; Raffray, R.; Sagara, A.

    2002-01-01

    First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  17. Optimization of Steady Wall Temperature for Disturbance Control

    OpenAIRE

    Pralits, Jan; Ardeshir, Hanifi

    2003-01-01

    We present a theory for computing the optimal steady wall temperature distribution to suppress the growth of convectively unstable disturbances in compressible boundary layer flows on flat plates. A gradient based iterative procedure is used to minimize an objective function measuring the disturbance kinetic energy. The gradient of interest is obtained from the solution of the adjoint of the boundary layer and parabolized stability equations, which are derived using a Lagrange multiplier tech...

  18. Deformation Measurements of Gabion Walls Using Image Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Fraštia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The image based modeling finds use in applications where it is necessary to reconstructthe 3D surface of the observed object with a high level of detail. Previous experiments showrelatively high variability of the results depending on the camera type used, the processingsoftware, or the process evaluation. The authors tested the method of SFM (Structure fromMotion to determine the stability of gabion walls. The results of photogrammetricmeasurements were compared to precise geodetic point measurements.

  19. Analysis of ultra-narrow ferromagnetic domain walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Paul, David

    2012-01-10

    New materials with high magnetic anisotropy will have domains separated by ultra-narrow ferromagnetic walls with widths on the order of a few unit cells, approaching the limit where the elastic continuum approximation often used in micromagnetic simulations is accurate. The limits of this approximation are explored, and the static and dynamic interactions with intrinsic crystalline defects and external driving elds are modeled. The results developed here will be important when considering the stability of ultra-high-density storage media.

  20. Evaluating the Effect of Rainfall Infiltration on the Slope Stability of T16 tower of Taipei Mao-kong Gondola by Numerical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUNG, J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a series of rainfall-stability analyses were performed to simulate the failure mechanism and the function of remediation works of the down slope of T-16 tower pier, Mao-Kong gondola (or T-16 Slope) at the hillside of Taipei City using two-dimensional finite element method. The failure mechanism of T-16 Slope was simulated using the rainfall hyetograph of Jang-Mi typhoon in 2008 based on the field investigation data, monitoring data, soil/rock mechanical testing data and detail design plots of remediation works. Eventually, the numerical procedures and various input parameters in the analysis were verified by comparing the numerical results with the field observations. In addition, 48 hrs design rainfalls corresponding to 5, 10, 25 and 50 years return periods were prepared using the 20 years rainfall data of Mu-Zha rainfall observation station, Central Weather Bureau for the rainfall-stability analyses of T-16 Slope to inspect the effect of the compound stabilization works on the overall stability of the slope. At T-16 Slope, without considering the longitudinal and transverse drainages on the ground surface, there totally 4 types of stabilization works were installed to stabilize the slope. From the slope top to the slope toe, the stabilization works of T-16 Slope consists of RC-retaining wall with micro-pile foundation at the up-segment, earth anchor at the up-middle-segment, soil nailing at the middle-segment and retaining pile at the down-segment of the slope. The effect of each individual stabilization work on the slope stability under rainfall condition was examined and evaluated by raising field groundwater level.

  1. Optimal Safety EarthingEarth Electrode Sizing Using A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper a deterministic approach in the sizing of earth electrode using the permissible touch voltage criteria is presented. The deterministic approach is effectively applied in the sizing of the length of earth rod required for the safe earthing of residential and facility buildings. This approach ensures that the earthing ...

  2. Before Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Horst, Maja

    2013-01-01

    of the communication about innovations in information and communication technology (ICT), and to contribute to an understanding of how different visions promise particular future configurations of workflows, communication processes, politics, economic models and social relations. Hereby, the paper adds...... to the literature on the relationship between ICTs and organizing, but with a distinct focus on innovation communication and distributed innovation processes taking place before ICTs are stabilized, issues which cannot be captured by studies of diffusion and adaptation of new ICTs within single organizations....

  3. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  4. Restrained shrinkage of masonry walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Rots, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    State of the art computational rnechanics, in combination with experimental programmes have a lot to offer in providing insight, characterization of total behaviour and predictive ability of structural masonry. Here numerical research towards rationalizing masonry wall movement joint positioning and

  5. Gravity and domain wall problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, B.; Senjanovic, G.

    1992-11-01

    It is well known that the spontaneous breaking of discrete symmetries may lead to conflict with big-bang cosmology. This is due to formation of domain walls which give unacceptable contribution to the energy density of the universe. On the other hand, it is expected that gravity breaks global symmetries explicitly. In this work we propose that this could provide a natural solution to the domain-wall problem. (author). 17 refs

  6. Duct having oscillatory side wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2018-04-03

    A pump system includes a particulate consolidator pump that has a pump outlet. A duct is coupled to the pump outlet. The duct has a wall that is coupled with an oscillator. The oscillator is operable to oscillate the wall at a controlled frequency. The controlled frequency is selected with respect to breaking static bridging of particulate in the duct due, at least in part, to consolidation of the particulate from a downstream check valve.

  7. Aneurysmal wall enhancement and perianeurysmal edema after endovascular treatment of unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, I. Chang; Willinsky, Robert A.; Agid, Ronit; Fanning, Noel F.

    2014-01-01

    Perianeurysmal edema and aneurysm wall enhancement are previously described phenomenon after coil embolization attributed to inflammatory reaction. We aimed to demonstrate the prevalence and natural course of these phenomena in unruptured aneurysms after endovascular treatment and to identify factors that contributed to their development. We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutively treated unruptured aneurysms between January 2000 and December 2011. The presence and evolution of wall enhancement and perianeurysmal edema on MRI after endovascular treatment were analyzed. Variable factors were compared among aneurysms with and without edema. One hundred thirty-two unruptured aneurysms in 124 patients underwent endovascular treatment. Eighty-five (64.4 %) aneurysms had wall enhancement, and 9 (6.8 %) aneurysms had perianeurysmal brain edema. Wall enhancement tends to persist for years with two patterns identified. Larger aneurysms and brain-embedded aneurysms were significantly associated with wall enhancement. In all edema cases, the aneurysms were embedded within the brain and had wall enhancement. Progressive thickening of wall enhancement was significantly associated with edema. Edema can be symptomatic when in eloquent brain and stabilizes or resolves over the years. Our study demonstrates the prevalence and some appreciation of the natural history of aneurysmal wall enhancement and perianeurysmal brain edema following endovascular treatment of unruptured aneurysms. Aneurysmal wall enhancement is a common phenomenon while perianeurysmal edema is rare. These phenomena are likely related to the presence of inflammatory reaction near the aneurysmal wall. Both phenomena are usually asymptomatic and self-limited, and prophylactic treatment is not recommended. (orig.)

  8. Dressed Domain Walls and holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisa, Luca; Pujolas, Oriol

    2008-01-01

    The cutoff version of the AdS/CFT correspondence states that the Randall Sundrum scenario is dual to a Conformal Field Theory (CFT) coupled to gravity in four dimensions. The gravitational field produced by relativistic Domain Walls can be exactly solved in both sides of the correspondence, and thus provides one further check of it. We show in the two sides that for the most symmetric case, the wall motion does not lead to particle production of the CFT fields. Still, there are nontrivial effects. Due to the trace anomaly, the CFT effectively renormalizes the Domain Wall tension. On the five dimensional side, the wall is a codimension 2 brane localized on the Randall-Sundrum brane, which pulls the wall in a uniform acceleration. This is perceived from the brane as a Domain Wall with a tension slightly larger than its bare value. In both cases, the deviation from General Relativity appears at nonlinear level in the source, and the leading corrections match to the numerical factors.

  9. Numerical Analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) Shear Walls and Steel Strips under Cyclic Loads Using Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Askarizadeh, N.; Mohammadizadeh, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Reinforced concrete shear walls are the main elements of resistance against lateral loads in reinforced concrete structures. These walls should not only provide sufficient resistance but also provide sufficient ductility in order to avoid brittle fracture, particularly under strong seismic loads. However, many reinforced concrete shear walls need to be stabilized and reinforced due to various reasons such as changes in requirements of seismic regulations, weaknesses in design and execution, p...

  10. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 500 W. 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  11. Mechanical feedback coordinates cell wall expansion and assembly in yeast mating morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The shaping of individual cells requires a tight coordination of cell mechanics and growth. However, it is unclear how information about the mechanical state of the wall is relayed to the molecular processes building it, thereby enabling the coordination of cell wall expansion and assembly during morphogenesis. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches, we show that a mechanical feedback coordinating cell wall assembly and expansion is essential to sustain mating projection growth in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our theoretical results indicate that the mechanical feedback provided by the Cell Wall Integrity pathway, with cell wall stress sensors Wsc1 and Mid2 increasingly activating membrane-localized cell wall synthases Fks1/2 upon faster cell wall expansion, stabilizes mating projection growth without affecting cell shape. Experimental perturbation of the osmotic pressure and cell wall mechanics, as well as compromising the mechanical feedback through genetic deletion of the stress sensors, leads to cellular phenotypes that support the theoretical predictions. Our results indicate that while the existence of mechanical feedback is essential to stabilize mating projection growth, the shape and size of the cell are insensitive to the feedback. PMID:29346368

  12. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  13. Earth and planetary sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetherill, G.W.; Drake, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The earth is a dynamic body. The major surface manifestation of this dynamism has been fragmentation of the earth's outer shell and subsequent relative movement of the pieces on a large scale. Evidence for continental movement came from studies of geomagnetism. As the sea floor spreads and new crust is formed, it is magnetized with the polarity of the field at the time of its formation. The plate tectonics model explains the history, nature, and topography of the oceanic crust. When a lithospheric plate surmounted by continental crust collides with an oceanic lithosphere, it is the denser oceanic lithosphere that is subducted. Hence the ancient oceans have vanished and the knowledge of ancient earth will require deciphering the complex continental geological record. Geochemical investigation shows that the source region of continental rocks is not simply the depleted mantle that is characteristic of the source region of basalts produced at the oceanic ridges. The driving force of plate tectonics is convection within the earth, but much remains to be learned about the convection and interior of the earth. A brief discussion of planetary exploration is given

  14. The earth's hydrological cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, R-M; Calisto, M; Destouni, G; Gurney, R; Johannessen, J; Kerr, Y; Lahoz, WA; Rast, M

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive presentation of our present understanding of the Earth's Hydrological cycle and the problems, consequences and impacts that go with this topic. Water is a central component in the Earth's system. It is indispensable for life on Earth in its present form and influences virtually every aspect of our planet's life support system. On relatively short time scales, atmospheric water vapor interacts with the atmospheric circulation and is crucial in forming the Earth's climate zones. Water vapor is the most powerful of the greenhouse gases and serves to enhance the tropospheric temperature. The dominant part of available water on Earth resides in the oceans. Parts are locked up in the land ice on Greenland and Antarctica and a smaller part is estimated to exist as groundwater. If all the ice over the land and all the glaciers were to melt, the sea level would rise by some 80 m. In comparison, the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is small; it amounts to ~ 25 kg/m2, or the ...

  15. Modeling the earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  16. The Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Rood, Richard B.; Hildebrand, Peter; Raymond, Carol

    2003-01-01

    The Earth System Model is the natural evolution of current climate models and will be the ultimate embodiment of our geophysical understanding of the planet. These models are constructed from components - atmosphere, ocean, ice, land, chemistry, solid earth, etc. models and merged together through a coupling program which is responsible for the exchange of data from the components. Climate models and future earth system models will have standardized modules, and these standards are now being developed by the ESMF project funded by NASA. The Earth System Model will have a variety of uses beyond climate prediction. The model can be used to build climate data records making it the core of an assimilation system, and it can be used in OSSE experiments to evaluate. The computing and storage requirements for the ESM appear to be daunting. However, the Japanese ES theoretical computing capability is already within 20% of the minimum requirements needed for some 2010 climate model applications. Thus it seems very possible that a focused effort to build an Earth System Model will achieve succcss.

  17. Rare earths and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coqblin, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the different properties of rare-earths and actinides, either as pure metals or as in alloys or compounds. Three different cases are considered: (i) First, in the case of 'normal' rare-earths which are characterized by a valence of 3, we discuss essentially the magnetic ordering, the coexistence between superconductivity and magnetism and the properties of amorphous rare-earth systems. (ii) Second, in the case of 'anomalous' rare-earths, we distinguish between either 'intermediate-valence' systems or 'Kondo' systems. Special emphasis is given to the problems of the 'Kondo lattice' (for compounds such as CeAl 2 ,CeAl 3 or CeB 6 ) or the 'Anderson lattice' (for compounds such as TmSe). The problem of neutron diffraction in these systems is also discussed. (iii) Third, in the case of actinides, we can separate between the d-f hybridized and almost magnetic metals at the beginning of the series and the rare-earth like the metals after americium. (orig.)

  18. Seismic analysis for translational failure of landfills with retaining walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Gao, Li-Ya

    2010-11-01

    In the seismic impact zone, seismic force can be a major triggering mechanism for translational failures of landfills. The scope of this paper is to develop a three-part wedge method for seismic analysis of translational failures of landfills with retaining walls. The approximate solution of the factor of safety can be calculated. Unlike previous conventional limit equilibrium methods, the new method is capable of revealing the effects of both the solid waste shear strength and the retaining wall on the translational failures of landfills during earthquake. Parameter studies of the developed method show that the factor of safety decreases with the increase of the seismic coefficient, while it increases quickly with the increase of the minimum friction angle beneath waste mass for various horizontal seismic coefficients. Increasing the minimum friction angle beneath the waste mass appears to be more effective than any other parameters for increasing the factor of safety under the considered condition. Thus, selecting liner materials with higher friction angle will considerably reduce the potential for translational failures of landfills during earthquake. The factor of safety gradually increases with the increase of the height of retaining wall for various horizontal seismic coefficients. A higher retaining wall is beneficial to the seismic stability of the landfill. Simply ignoring the retaining wall will lead to serious underestimation of the factor of safety. Besides, the approximate solution of the yield acceleration coefficient of the landfill is also presented based on the calculated method. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complexing in aqueous solutions of rare earth n-aminobenzoates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremova, G.I.; Buchkova, R.T.; Lapitskaya, A.V.; Pirkes, S.B.

    1977-01-01

    Complexing in the system ''ion of a rare-earth metal - n-aminobenzoic acid'' has been investigated by the pH-metric method in the pH range of 3.5-5.5. In the La-Eu series, the stability of n-aminobenzoate complexes increases and attains the maximum value in the complex Eu (lg Ksub(st)=2.66). In the Gd-Lu series the stability of the complex particles decreases monotonically

  20. Rotation, Stability and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, J. W.

    2007-07-01

    Tokamak plasmas can frequently exhibit high levels of rotation and rotation shear. This can usually be attributed to various sources: injection of momentum, e.g. through neutral beams, flows driven by plasma gradients or torques resulting from non-ambipolar particle loss; however, the source sometimes remains a mystery, such as the spontaneous rotation observed in Ohmic plasmas. The equilibrium rotation profile is given by the balance of these sources with transport and other losses; the edge boundary conditions can play an important role in determining this profile . Such plasma rotation, particularly sheared rotation, is predicted theoretically to have a significant influence on plasma behaviour. In the first place, sonic flows can significantly affect tokamak equilibria and neoclassical transport losses. However, the influence of rotation on plasma stability and turbulence is more profound. At the macroscopic level it affects the behaviour of the gross MHD modes that influence plasma operational limits. This includes sawteeth, the seeding of neoclassical tearing modes, resistive wall modes and the onset of disruptions through error fields, mode locking and reconnection. At the microscopic level it has a major effect on the stability of ballooning modes, both ideal MHD and drift wave instabilities such as ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes. In the non-linear state, as unstable drift waves evolve into turbulent structures, sheared rotation also tears apart eddies, thereby reducing the resulting transport. There is considerable experimental evidence for these effects on both MHD stability and plasma confinement. In particular, the appearance of improved confinement modes with transport barriers, such as edge H-mode barriers and internal transport barriers (ITBs) appears to correlate well with the presence of sheared plasma rotation. This talk will describe the theory underlying some of these phenomena involving plasma rotation, on both macroscopic and microscopic

  1. Evolution of the cell wall components during terrestrialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Banasiak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of terrestrial ecosystems by the first land plants, and their subsequent expansion and diversification, were crucial for the life on the Earth. However, our understanding of these processes is still relatively poor. Recent intensification of studies on various plant organisms have identified the plant cell walls are those structures, which played a key role in adaptive processes during the evolution of land plants. Cell wall as a structure protecting protoplasts and showing a high structural plasticity was one of the primary subjects to changes, giving plants the new properties and capabilities, which undoubtedly contributed to the evolutionary success of land plants. In this paper, the current state of knowledge about some main components of the cell walls (cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins and lignins and their evolutionary alterations, as preadaptive features for the land colonization and the plant taxa diversification, is summarized. Some aspects related to the biosynthesis and modification of the cell wall components, with particular emphasis on the mechanism of transglycosylation, are also discussed. In addition, new surprising discoveries related to the composition of various cell walls, which change how we perceive their evolution, are presented, such as the presence of lignin in red algae or MLG (1→3,(1→4-β-D-glucan in horsetails. Currently, several new and promising projects, regarding the cell wall, have started, deciphering its structure, composition and metabolism in the evolutionary context. That additional information will allow us to better understand the processes leading to the terrestrialization and the evolution of extant land plants.

  2. Earth's Trojan asteroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Martin; Wiegert, Paul; Veillet, Christian

    2011-07-27

    It was realized in 1772 that small bodies can stably share the same orbit as a planet if they remain near 'triangular points' 60° ahead of or behind it in the orbit. Such 'Trojan asteroids' have been found co-orbiting with Jupiter, Mars and Neptune. They have not hitherto been found associated with Earth, where the viewing geometry poses difficulties for their detection, although other kinds of co-orbital asteroid (horseshoe orbiters and quasi-satellites) have been observed. Here we report an archival search of infrared data for possible Earth Trojans, producing the candidate 2010 TK(7). We subsequently made optical observations which established that 2010 TK(7) is a Trojan companion of Earth, librating around the leading Lagrange triangular point, L(4). Its orbit is stable over at least ten thousand years.

  3. Implementing Green Walls in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. McCullough

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies in applied pedagogical design have shown that, at all educational levels, direct exposure to the natural environment can enhance learning by improving student attention and behaviors. Implementing green walls—a “vertical garden,” or “living wall” interior wall that typically includes greenery, a growing medium (soil or substrate and a water delivery system—provides environmental health benefits, but also provides a practical application within classrooms for minimizing directed attention fatigue in students by connecting them to “outdoor nature” within the indoor environment. Hands-on “project-based” learning is another pedagogical strategy that has proved to be effective across the spectrum of educational levels and across subject areas. Green walls have the potential to inspire critical thinking through a combination of project-based learning strategies and environmental education. The authors have outlined a curriculum involving the implementation of an indoor living wall system within a classroom-learning environment, incorporating project-based learning modules that interact with the wall. In conjunction with the passive health benefits of a green wall, project-based curriculum models can connect students interactively with indoor nature and have the potential to inspire real-world thinking related to science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics fields within the indoor learning environment. Through a combination of these passive and interactive modes, students are connected to nature in the indoor environment regardless of weather conditions outdoors. Future research direction could include post-construction studies of the effectiveness of project-based curricula related to living walls, and the long-term impacts of implementing green walls in classrooms on school achievement and student behaviors.

  4. Probabilistic safety analysis of earth retaining structures during earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, D. A.; Souflis, C.

    1982-07-01

    A procedure is presented for determining the probability of failure of Earth retaining structures under static or seismic conditions. Four possible modes of failure (overturning, base sliding, bearing capacity, and overall sliding) are examined and their combined effect is evaluated with the aid of combinatorial analysis. The probability of failure is shown to be a more adequate measure of safety than the customary factor of safety. As Earth retaining structures may fail in four distinct modes, a system analysis can provide a single estimate for the possibility of failure. A Bayesian formulation of the safety retaining walls is found to provide an improved measure for the predicted probability of failure under seismic loading. The presented Bayesian analysis can account for the damage incurred to a retaining wall during an earthquake to provide an improved estimate for its probability of failure during future seismic events.

  5. How Big is Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  6. Teaching earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Diggles, Michael F.

    1998-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 17 teaching tools: 16 interactive HyperCard 'stacks' and a printable model. They are separated into the following categories: Geologic Processes, Earthquakes and Faulting, and Map Projections and Globes. A 'navigation' stack, Earth Science, is provided as a 'launching' place from which to access all of the other stacks. You can also open the HyperCard Stacks folder and launch any of the 16 stacks yourself. In addition, a 17th tool, Earth and Tectonic Globes, is provided as a printable document. Each of the tools can be copied onto a 1.4-MB floppy disk and distributed freely.

  7. Rare (Earth Elements [score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare (Earth Elements is a cycle of works for solo piano. The cycle was inspired by James Dillon’s Book of Elements (Vol. I-V. The complete cycle will consist of 14 pieces; one for each selected rare (earth element. The chosen elements are Neodymium, Erbium, Tellurium, Hafnium, Tantalum, Technetium, Indium, Dysprosium, Lanthanium, Cerium, Europium, Terbium, Yttrium and Darmstadtium. These elements were selected due to their special atomic properties that in many cases make them extremely valuable for the development of new technologies, and also because of their scarcity. To date, only 4 works have been completed Yttrium, Technetium, Indium and Tellurium.

  8. IR and the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf; Stevenson, Hayley

    2017-01-01

    , in the end, one finite interconnected space. Together these two starting points make for the basic conundrum of Inter- national Relations and the Earth: how does a divided world live on a single globe? This introduction first provides an overview of the recent rise of ‘the environment’ in international......, ‘what has the environment ever done for IR?’, before the plan for the rest of the book sketches the content and direction of the ensuing chapters that explore the problematique of International Relations and the Earth....

  9. A methodology to enlarge narrow stability windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Ewerton M.P.; Pastor, Jorge A.S.C.; Fontoura, Sergio A.B. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil. Grupo de Tecnologia e Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    The stability window in a wellbore design is defined by the difference between fracture pressure and collapse pressure. Deep water environments typically present narrow stability windows, because rocks have low strength due to under-compaction process. Often also, horizontal wells are drilled to obtain a better development of reservoirs placed in thin layers of sandstone. In this scenario, several challenges are faced when drilling in deep water. The traditional approach for predicting instabilities is to determine collapses and fractures at borehole wall. However, the initiation of rupture does not indicate that the borehole fails to perform its function as a wellbore. Thus, a methodology in which the stability window may be enlarged is desirable. This paper presents one practical analytical methodology that consists in allowing wellbore pressures smaller than the conventional collapse pressure, i.e., based upon failure on the borehole wall. This means that a collapse region (shear failure) will be developed around the borehole wall. This collapse region is pre-defined and to estimate its size is used a failure criterion. The aforementioned methodology is implemented in a user-friendly software, which can perform analyses of stress, pore pressure, formation failure, mud weight and mud salinity design for drilling in shale formations. Simulations of a wellbore drilling in a narrow stability window environment are performed to demonstrate the improvements of using the methodology. (author)

  10. Nonlinear Analyses of Adobe Masonry Walls Reinforced with Fiberglass Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giamundo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Adobe constructions were widespread in the ancient world, and earth was one of the most used construction materials in ancient times. Therefore, the preservation of adobe structures, especially against seismic events, is nowadays an important structural issue. Previous experimental tests have shown that the ratio between mortar and brick mechanical properties (i.e., strength, stiffness and elastic modulus influences the global response of the walls in terms of strength and ductility. Accurate analyses are presented in both the case of unreinforced and reinforced with fiberglass mesh when varying the mechanical properties of the materials composing the adobe masonry structure. The main issues and variability in the behavior of seismic resisting walls when varying the mechanical properties are herein highlighted. The aim of the overall research activity is to improve the knowledge about the structural behavior of adobe structural members unreinforced and reinforced with fiberglass mesh inside horizontal mortar joints.

  11. Dynamics of strings between walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Minoru; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke

    2009-01-01

    Configurations of vortex strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories in 3+1 dimensions. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string end points in the wall effective action. In the first method we explicitly obtain the effective Lagrangian in the strong coupling limit, which is written in terms of hypergeometric functions, and find the 90 deg. scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1) N gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well-separated strings.

  12. Isolation of the Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a method allowing the purification of the cell wall for studying both polysaccharides and proteins. The plant primary cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides (90-95 % in mass) and of proteins (5-10 %). At the end of growth, specialized cells may synthesize a lignified secondary wall composed of polysaccharides (about 65 %) and lignin (about 35 %). Due to its composition, the cell wall is the cellular compartment having the highest density and this property is used for its purification. It plays critical roles during plant development and in response to environmental constraints. It is largely used in the food and textile industries as well as for the production of bioenergy. All these characteristics and uses explain why its study as a true cell compartment is of high interest. The proposed method of purification can be used for large amount of material but can also be downscaled to 500 mg of fresh material. Tools for checking the quality of the cell wall preparation, such as protein analysis and microscopy observation, are also provided.

  13. Modeling of shear wall buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A K [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1984-05-01

    Many nuclear power plant buildings, for example, the auxiliary building, have reinforced concrete shear walls as the primary lateral load resisting system. Typically, these walls have low height to length ratio, often less than unity. Such walls exhibit marked shear lag phenomenon which would affect their bending stiffness and the overall stress distribution in the building. The deformation and the stress distribution in walls have been studied which is applicable to both the short and the tall buildings. The behavior of the wall is divided into two parts: the symmetric flange action and the antisymmetry web action. The latter has two parts: the web shear and the web bending. Appropriate stiffness equations have been derived for all the three actions. These actions can be synthesized to solve any nonlinear cross-section. Two specific problems, that of lateral and torsional loadings of a rectangular box, have been studied. It is found that in short buildings shear lag plays a very important role. Any beam type formulation which either ignores shear lag or includes it in an idealized form is likely to lead to erroneous results. On the other hand a rigidity type approach with some modifications to the standard procedures would yield nearly accurate answers.

  14. The Earth's Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's plasmasphere is an inner part of the magneteosphere. It is located just outside the upper ionosphere located in Earth's atmosphere. It is a region of dense, cold plasma that surrounds the Earth. Although plasma is found throughout the magnetosphere, the plasmasphere usually contains the coldest plasma. Here's how it works: The upper reaches of our planet's atmosphere are exposed to ultraviolet light from the Sun, and they are ionized with electrons that are freed from neutral atmospheric particles. The results are electrically charged negative and positive particles. The negative particles are electrons, and the positive particles are now called ions (formerly atoms and molecules). If the density of these particles is low enough, this electrically charged gas behaves differently than it would if it were neutral. Now this gas is called plasma. The atmospheric gas density becomes low enough to support the conditions for a plasma around earth at about 90 kilometers above Earth's surface. The electrons in plasma gain more energy, and they are very low in mass. They move along Earth's magnetic field lines and their increased energy is enough to escape Earth's gravity. Because electrons are very light, they don't have to gain too much kinetic energy from the Sun's ultraviolet light before gravity loses its grip on them. Gravity is not all that holds them back, however. As more and more electrons begin to escape outward, they leave behind a growing net positive electric charge in the ionosphere and create a growing net negative electric charge above the ionosphere; an electric field begins to develop (the Pannekoek-Rosseland E-field). Thus, these different interacting charges result in a positively charged ionosphere and negatively charged region of space above it. Very quickly this resulting electric field opposed upward movement of the electrons out of the ionosphere. The electrons still have this increased energy, however, so the electric field doesn't just

  15. Magnetization reversal of the transverse domain wall confined between two clusters of magnetic impurities in a ferromagnetic planar nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, D., E-mail: danilotoscano@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Leonel, S.A., E-mail: sidiney@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Coura, P.Z., E-mail: pablo@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Sato, F., E-mail: sjfsato@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação Computacional, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais 36036–330 (Brazil); Costa, B.V., E-mail: bvc@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Física, Laboratório de Simulação, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 30123–970 (Brazil); Vázquez, M., E-mail: mvazquez@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC. 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to investigate the polarity reversal of the transverse domain wall in rectangular magnetic nanowires and the stabilization of the domain wall position after occurring the polarity reversal. In order to control the wall position we have considered two clusters of magnetic impurities, identical and equidistant from the nanowire width axis. Traps of pinning and blocking for the transverse domain wall can be originated from magnetic impurities, consisting of a local variation of the exchange constant. Under suitable excitation amplitudes it is possible to switch the polarity of the transverse domain wall by applying a nanosecond axial magnetic field pulse in a fast and controllable way. - Highlights: • Traps for pinning and blocking transverse domain walls are proposed. • The traps consisting of localized modifications of the magnetic properties. • The wall polarity can be reversed in a fast and controllable way.

  16. Monitoring of Earth Rotation by VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma., Chopo; Macmillan, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring Earth rotation with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) has unique potential because of direct access to the Celestial Reference System (CRF and Terrestrial Reference System (TRF) and the feasibility of re-analyzing the entire data set. While formal precision of better than 0.045 mas for pole and 0.002 ms for UT 1 has been seen in the best 24-hr data, the accuracy of the Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) time series as a whole is subject to logistical, operational, analytical and conceptual constraints. The current issues related to the VLBI data set and the CORE program for greater time resolution such as analysis consistency, network jitter and reference frame stability will be discussed.

  17. International Conference and Advanced School Planet Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltsch, Rolf; Pinto, Alberto; Viana, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this volume is research carried out as part of the program Mathematics of Planet Earth, which provides a platform to showcase the essential role of mathematics in addressing planetary problems and creating a context for mathematicians and applied scientists to foster mathematical and interdisciplinary developments that will be necessary to tackle a myriad of issues and meet future global challenges. Earth is a planet with dynamic processes in its mantle, oceans and atmosphere creating climate, causing natural disasters, and influencing fundamental aspects of life and life-supporting systems. In addition to these natural processes, human activity has increased to the point where it influences the global climate, impacts the ability of the planet to feed itself and threatens the stability of these systems. Issues such as climate change, sustainability, man-made disasters, control of diseases and epidemics, management of resources, risk analysis, and global integration have come to the fore. Written...

  18. International Conference and Advanced School Planet Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltsch, Rolf; Pinto, Alberto; Viana, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this volume is research carried out as part of the program Mathematics of Planet Earth, which provides a platform to showcase the essential role of mathematics in addressing problems of an economic and social nature and creating a context for mathematicians and applied scientists to foster mathematical and interdisciplinary developments that will be necessary to tackle a myriad of issues and meet future global economic and social challenges. Earth is a planet with dynamic processes in its mantle, oceans and atmosphere creating climate, causing natural disasters, and influencing fundamental aspects of life and life-supporting systems. In addition to these natural processes, human activity has developed highly complex systems, including economic and financial systems; the World Wide Web; frameworks for resource management, transportation, energy production and utilization; health care delivery, and social organizations. This development has increased to the point where it impacts the stability and ...

  19. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  20. Control of the Resistive Wall Mode with Internal Coils in the DIII-D Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabayashi, M.; Bialek, J.; Bondeson, A.

    2005-01-01

    New coils were installed inside the vacuum vessel of the DIII-D device for producing nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields. These 'Internal-Coils' are predicted to stabilize the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) branch of the long-wavelength external kink mode with plasma beta close to the ideal wall limit. Feedback using these new Internal-Coils was found to be more effective when compared with using the External-Coils located outside the vacuum vessel, because the location inside the vessel allows faster response and their geometry also couples better to the helical mode structure. A proper choice of feedback gain increased the plasma beta above the no-wall limit to C β ≥ 0.9, where C β is a measure of achievable beta above no-wall limit defined as (β-β no-wall.limit )/(β ideal.wall.limit )-)/(β no.wall.limit ). The feedback system with Internal-Coils can suppress the RWM up to the normalized growth rate γτ w > or ∼ 10 (τ w is the resistive flux penetration time of the wall). The feedback-driven dynamic error field correction helps to stabilize the RWM by reducing the rotational drag for Ω rot > Ω crit , where Ω rot is the angular rotation frequency of plasma and Ω crit is the critical value for the rotational stabilization. When Ω rot crit /2, the feedback system must stabilize the RWM mainly through direct magnetic control of the mode. The estimated Ω crit /Ω A is ∼ 2.5% by the MARS-F code analysis with experimentally observed profiles, where /Ω A is the Alfven angular rotational frequency at q 2 surface. The MARS-F code also predicts that for successful RWM magnetic feedback control the power supply characteristic time should be a fraction of the growth time of the targeted RWM. (author)

  1. "Galileo Calling Earth..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This guide presents an activity for helping students understand how data from the Galileo spacecraft is sent to scientists on earth. Students are asked to learn about the concepts of bit-rate and resolution and apply them to the interpretation of images from the Galileo Orbiter. (WRM)

  2. Bones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  3. Our bubbling Earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    In several places on earth large volumes of gas are seen to escape. These gases are usually dominated by CO2. The emissions are associated with volcanic activity, and are attributed to magma degassing. It will be shown that in the case of Milos this explanation is unacceptable for quantitative

  4. Cosmic rays on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted. (GSCH)

  5. Earth as art 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2016-03-29

    Landsat 8 is the latest addition to the long-running series of Earth-observing satellites in the Landsat program that began in 1972. The images featured in this fourth installment of the Earth As Art collection were all acquired by Landsat 8. They show our planet’s diverse landscapes with remarkable clarity.Landsat satellites see the Earth as no human can. Not only do they acquire images from the vantage point of space, but their sensors record infrared as well as visible wavelengths of light. The resulting images often reveal “hidden” details of the Earth’s land surface, making them invaluable for scientific research.As with previous Earth As Art exhibits, these Landsat images were selected solely for their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation—only for your viewing pleasure. What do you see in these unique glimpses of the Earth’s continents, islands, and coastlines?

  6. Google Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get…

  7. How life shaped Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-05

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet.

  8. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  9. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  10. Earth Science Misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, William C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a list of over 50 commonly held misconceptions based on a literature review found in students and adults. The list covers earth science topics such as space, the lithosphere, the biosphere, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the cryosphere. (KR)

  11. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  12. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function......, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study...... was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery...

  13. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Giraffes - the tallest extant animals on Earth - are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. The pressure which may exceed 300 mmHg has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted...... by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It remains enigmatic, however, how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures.We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small...... intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic...

  14. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Bhaskar, N.

    1997-01-01

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  15. The radioactive earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant, J.A.; Saunders, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th and 40 K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 10 6 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases natural radioactivity can be of environmental concern. The most significant risk is posed by accumulations of radon, the gaseous daughter product of U. (author)

  16. The Earth's Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In the last five years, scientists have been able to monitor our changing planet in ways never before possible. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, has given researchers an unprecedented view of the biological engine that drives life on Earth-the countless forms of plants that cover the land and fill the oceans. 'There is no question the Earth is changing. SeaWiFS has enabled us, for the first time, to monitor the biological consequences of that change-to see how the things we do, as well as natural variability, affect the Earth's ability to support life,' said Gene Carl Feldman, SeaWiFS project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. SeaWiFS data, based on continuous daily global observations, have helped scientists make a more accurate assessment of the oceans' role in the global carbon cycle. The data provide a key parameter in a number of ecological and environmental studies as well as global climate-change modeling. The images of the Earth's changing land, ocean and atmosphere from SeaWiFS have documented many previously unrecognized phenomena. The image above shows the global biosphere from June 2002 measured by SeaWiFS. Data in the oceans is chlorophyll concentration, a measure of the amount of phytoplankton (microscopic plants) living in the ocean. On land SeaWiFS measures Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, an indication of the density of plant growth. For more information and images, read: SeaWiFS Sensor Marks Five Years Documenting Earth'S Dynamic Biosphere Image courtesy SeaWiFS project and copyright Orbimage.

  17. Structure reconstruction of TiO2-based multi-wall nanotubes: first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, A V; Evarestov, R A; Lukyanov, S I

    2014-07-28

    A new method of theoretical modelling of polyhedral single-walled nanotubes based on the consolidation of walls in the rolled-up multi-walled nanotubes is proposed. Molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum mechanics methods are applied to investigate the merging of walls in nanotubes constructed from the different phases of titania. The combination of two methods allows us to simulate the structures which are difficult to find only by ab initio calculations. For nanotube folding we have used (1) the 3-plane fluorite TiO2 layer; (2) the anatase (101) 6-plane layer; (3) the rutile (110) 6-plane layer; and (4) the 6-plane layer with lepidocrocite morphology. The symmetry of the resulting single-walled nanotubes is significantly lower than the symmetry of initial coaxial cylindrical double- or triple-walled nanotubes. These merged nanotubes acquire higher stability in comparison with the initial multi-walled nanotubes. The wall thickness of the merged nanotubes exceeds 1 nm and approaches the corresponding parameter of the experimental patterns. The present investigation demonstrates that the merged nanotubes can integrate the two different crystalline phases in one and the same wall structure.

  18. Seismic capacities of masonry walls at the big rock point nuclear generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.; Bunon, H.; Jenkins, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation to determine the ability of selected concrete block walls in the vicinity of essential equipment to withstand seismic excitation was conducted. The seismic input to the walls was developed in accordance with the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) site-specific response spectra for the site. Time-history inputs to the walls were determined from the response of the turbine building complex. Analyses were performed to determine the capacities of the walls to withstand both in-plane and transverse seismic loads. Transverse load capacities were determined from time-history analyses of nonlinear two-dimensional analytical models of the walls. Separate inputs were used at the tops and bottoms of the walls to reflect the amplification through the building. The walls were unreinforced vertically with one exception, and have unsupported heights as high as 20'-8''. Also, cantilever walls as high as 11'-2'' were included in the evaluation. Factors of safety based on stability of the walls were determined for the transverse response, and on code allowable stresses (Reference 1) for the in-plane response

  19. Shielding walls against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    Hot-cell shielding walls consist of building blocks made of lead according to DIN 25407 part 1, and of special elements according to DIN 25407 part 2. Alpha-gamma cells can be built using elements for protective contamination boxes according to DIN 25480 part 1. This standards document intends to provide planning engineers, manufacturers, future users and the competent authorities and experts with a basis for the design of hot cells with lead shielding walls and the design of hot-cell equipment. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Use of deep soil mixing as an alternate verticle barrier to slurry walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Slurry walls have become an accepted subsurface remediation technique to contain contaminated zones. However, situations develop where conventional slurry wall excavation techniques are not suitable. The use of conventional containment wall construction methods may involve removal and disposal of contaminated soils, stability concerns and the risk of open excavations. For these reasons, other installation techniques have received further consideration. Deep Soil Mixing (DSM) has emerged as a viable alternative to conventional slurry wall techniques. In situations dictating limited soil removal for contamination or stability concerns, or where space is a limitation, DSM can be used for installation of the barrier. Proper installation of a DSM wall requires sufficient monitoring and sampling to evaluate the continuity, mixing effectiveness, permeability and key into the confining layer. This paper describes a case study where DSM was used to cross major highways to avoid open excavation, and along slopes to reduce stability concerns. The DSM barrier was tied to an existing conventional slurry wall that had been installed in more stable areas without highway traffic